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Sample records for human colorectal carcinogenesis

  1. Colorectal carcinogenesis: Review of human and experimental animal studies

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    Tanaka Takuji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review gives a comprehensive overview of cancer development and links it to the current understanding of tumorigenesis and malignant progression in colorectal cancer. The focus is on human and murine colorectal carcinogenesis and the histogenesis of this malignant disorder. A summary of a model of colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis (an AOM/DSS model will also be presented. The earliest phases of colorectal oncogenesis occur in the normal mucosa, with a disorder of cell replication. The large majority of colorectal malignancies develop from an adenomatous polyp (adenoma. These can be defined as well-demarcated masses of epithelial dysplasia, with uncontrolled crypt cell proliferation. When neoplastic cells pass through the muscularis mucosa and infiltrate the submucosa, they are malignant. Carcinomas usually originate from pre-existing adenomas, but this does not imply that all polyps undergo malignant changes and does not exclude de novo oncogenesis. Besides adenomas, there are other types of pre-neoplasia, which include hyperplastic polyps, serrated adenomas, flat adenomas and dysplasia that occurs in the inflamed colon in associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Colorectal neoplasms cover a wide range of pre-malignant and malignant lesions, many of which can easily be removed during endoscopy if they are small. Colorectal neoplasms and/or pre-neoplasms can be prevented by interfering with the various steps of oncogenesis, which begins with uncontrolled epithelial cell replication, continues with the formation of adenomas and eventually evolves into malignancy. The knowledge described herein will help to reduce and prevent this malignancy, which is one of the most frequent neoplasms in some Western and developed countries.

  2. Role of colonic microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis: a systematic review

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    Marta Borges-Canha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: The human colonic mucosa is populated by a wide range of microorganisms, usually in a symbiotic relation with the host. Sometimes this balance is lost and a state of dysbiosis arises, exposing the colon to different metabolic and inflammatory stimuli (according to the microbiota's changing profile. Recent findings lead to hypothesize that this unbalance may create a subclinical pro-inflammatory state that increases DNA mutations and, therefore, colorectal carcinogenesis. In this article we aim to systematically review the scientific evidence regarding colonic microbiota and its role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: Systematic review of PubMed searching results for original articles studying microbiota and colorectal cancer until November 2014. Results: Thirty-one original articles studied the role of colon microbiota in colorectal carcinoma including both human and animal studies. Different and heterogeneous methods were used and different bacteria were considered. Nevertheless, some bacteria are consistently augmented (such as Fusobacteria, Alistipes, Porphyromonadaceae, Coriobacteridae, Staphylococcaceae, Akkermansia spp. and Methanobacteriales, while other are constantly diminished in colorectal cancer (such as Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus, Faecalibacterium spp., Roseburia, and Treponema. Moreover, bacteria metabolites amino acids are increased and butyrate is decreased throughout colonic carcinogenesis. Conclusion: Conclusive evidence shows that colorectal carcinogenesis is associated with microbial dysbiosis. This information may be used to create new prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for colorectal cancer.

  3. Genotoxicity of Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT on isogenic human colorectal cell lines: potential promoting effects for colorectal carcinogenesis

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    Vanessa eGraillot

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The composition of the human microbiota influences tumorigenesis, notably in colorectal cancer (CRC. Pathogenic Escherichia coli possesses a variety of virulent factors, among them the Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT. CDT displays dual DNase and phosphatase activities and induces DNA double strand breaks, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a broad range of mammalian cells. As CDT could promote malignant transformation, we investigated the cellular outcomes induced by acute and chronic exposures to E. coli CDT in normal human colon epithelial cells (HCECs. Moreover, we conducted a comparative study between isogenic derivatives cell lines of the normal HCECs in order to mimic the mutation of three major genes found in CRC genetic models: APC, KRAS and TP53. Our results demonstrate that APC and p53 deficient cells showed impaired DNA damage response after CDT exposure, whereas HCECs expressing oncogenic KRASV12 were more resistant to CDT. Compared to normal HCECs, the precancerous derivatives exhibit hallmarks of malignant transformation after a chronic exposure to CDT. HCECs defective in APC and p53 showed enhanced anchorage independent growth and genetic instability, assessed by the micronucleus formation assay. In contrast, the ability to grow independently of anchorage was not impacted by CDT chronic exposure in KRASV12 HCECs, but micronucleus formation is dramatically increased. Thus CDT does not initiate CRC by itself, but may have promoting effects in premalignant HCECs, involving different mechanisms in function of the genetic alterations associated to CRC.

  4. Colorectal Carcinogenesis: Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants.

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    Carini, Francesco; Mazzola, Margherita; Rappa, Francesca; Jurjus, Abdo; Geagea, Alice Gerges; Al Kattar, Sahar; Bou-Assi, Tarek; Jurjus, Rosalyn; Damiani, Provvidenza; Leone, Angelo; Tomasello, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    One of the contributory causes of colon cancer is the negative effect of reactive oxygen species on DNA repair mechanisms. Currently, there is a growing support for the concept that oxidative stress may be an important etiological factor for carcinogenesis. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the role of oxidative stress in promoting colorectal carcinogenesis and to highlight the potential protective role of antioxidants. Several studies have documented the importance of antioxidants in countering oxidative stress and preventing colorectal carcinogenesis. However, there are conflicting data in the literature concerning its proper use in humans, since these studies did not yield definitive results and were performed mostly in vitro on cell populations, or in vivo in experimental animal models. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  5. Mismatch repair defects in human carcinogenesis.

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    Eshleman, J R; Markowitz, S D

    1996-01-01

    Mismatch repair defects are carcinogenic. This conclusion comes some 80 years after the original description of a type of familial colorectal cancer in which mismatch repair defects are involved, and from decades of dedicated basic science research into fundamental mechanisms cells use to repair their DNA. Mismatch repair (MMR) was described first in bacteria, later in yeast and finally in higher eukaryotes. In bacteria, one of its roles is the rapid repair of replicative errors thereby providing the genome with a 100-1000-fold level of protection against mutation. It also guards the genome by preventing recombination between non-homologous regions of DNA. The information gained from bacteria suddenly became relevant to human neoplasia in 1993 when the RER phenotype of microsatellite instability was discovered in human cancers and was rapidly shown to be due to defects in mismatch repair. Evidence supporting the role of MMR defects in carcinogenesis comes from a variety of independent sources including: (i) theoretical considerations of the requirement for a mutator phenotype as a step in multistage carcinogenesis; (ii) discovering that MMR defects cause a 'mutator phenotype' destabilizing endogenous expressed genes including those integral to carcinogenesis; (iii) finding MMR defects in the germline of HNPCC kindred members; (iv) finding that such defects behave as classic tumor suppressor genes in both familial and sporadic colorectal cancers; (v) discovering that MMR 'knockout' mice have an increased incidence of tumors; and (vi) discovering that genetic complementation of MMR defective cells stabilizes the MMR deficiency-associated microsatellite instability. Models of carcinogenesis now must integrate the concepts of a MMR defect induced mutator phenotype (Loeb) with the concepts of multistep colon carcinogenesis (Fearon and Vogelstein) and clonal heterogeneity/selection (Nowell).

  6. Role of gastrin-peptides in Barrett's and colorectal carcinogenesis.

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    Chueca, Eduardo; Lanas, Angel; Piazuelo, Elena

    2012-12-07

    Gastrin is the main hormone responsible for the stimulation of gastric acid secretion; in addition, gastrin and its derivatives exert proliferative and antiapoptotic effects on several cell types. Gastrin synthesis and secretion are increased in certain situations, for example, when proton pump inhibitors are used. The impact of sustained hypergastrinemia is currently being investigated. In vitro experiments and animal models have shown that prolonged hypergastrinemia may be related with higher cancer rates; although, this relationship is less clear in human beings. Higher gastrin levels have been shown to cause hyperplasia of several cell types; yet, the risk for developing cancer seems to be the same in normo- and hypergastrinemic patients. Some tumors also produce their own gastrin, which can act in an autocrine manner promoting tumor growth. Certain cancers are extremely dependent on gastrin to proliferate. Initial research focused only on the effects of amidated gastrins, but there has been an interest in intermediates of gastrin in the last few decades. These intermediates aren't biologically inactive; in fact, they may exert greater effects on proliferation and apoptosis than the completely processed forms. In certain gastrin overproduction states, they are the most abundant gastrin peptides secreted. The purpose of this review is to examine the gastrin biosynthesis process and to summarize the results from different studies evaluating the production, levels, and effects of the main forms of gastrin in different overexpression states and their possible relationship with Barrett's and colorectal carcinogenesis.

  7. Beclin 1 Expression is Closely Linked to Colorectal Carcinogenesis and Distant Metastasis of Colorectal Carcinoma

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    Mei-Ying Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beclin 1 participates in development, autophagy, differentiation, anti- apoptosis, neurodegeneration, tumorigenesis and cancer progression. The roles of Beclin 1 in colorectal carcinogenesis and its subsequent progression are still unclear. Here, the mRNA and protein expression of Beclin 1 were determined in colorectal carcinoma and matched mucosa by Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization (ISH were performed on tissue microarryer with colorectal carcinoma, adenoma and mucosa. The expression of Beclin 1 mRNA and protein was found to be higher in colorectal carcinoma than matched mucosa by real-time PCR and Western blot (p < 0.05. According to the ISH data, Beclin 1 expression was lower in colorectal non-neoplastic mucosa (NNM than adenoma and carcinoma (p < 0.05. Immunohistochemically, primary carcinoma showed stronger Beclin 1 expression than NNM and metastatic carcinoma in the liver (p < 0.05. Beclin 1 protein expression was negatively related to liver and distant metastasis (p < 0.05, but not correlated with age, sex, depth of invasion, lymphatic or venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM staging, differentiation or serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA concentration (p > 0.05. Survival analysis indicated that Beclin 1 expression was not linked to favorable prognosis of the patients with colorectal carcinoma (p > 0.05. Cox’s model indicated that depth of invasion and distant metastasis were independent prognostic factors for colorectal carcinomas (p < 0.05. It was suggested that Beclin 1 expression is closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis and distant metastasis of colorectal carcinoma.

  8. Ghrelin administration suppresses inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis in mice.

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    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Kanemaru, Ai; Fukushima, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Haruyama, Yukihiro; Itoh, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Kataoka, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide that stimulates the release of pituitary growth hormone. Because of its orexigenic effects, ghrelin is being developed as a therapeutic option for postoperative support and treatment of anorexia-cachexia syndrome of cancer patients. However, ghrelin has a multiplicity of physiological functions, and it also affects cell proliferation. Therefore, the effects of ghrelin administration on carcinogenesis and cancer progression in patients susceptible to cancer should be clarified. In this study, we examined the effects of ghrelin on cancer promotion in vivo using murine intestinal carcinogenesis models. Intestinal tumorigenesis was examined to determine the effects of either exogenous ghrelin administration or ghrelin deficiency following deletion of the Ghrl gene. Two murine intestinal tumorigenesis models were used. The first was the azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis model and the second was the Apc(Min/+) genetic cancer susceptibility model. In AOM/DSS-treated mice, administration of ghrelin significantly suppressed tumor formation in the colon. In contrast, ghrelin administration did not affect the number of intestinal tumors formed in Apc(Min/+) mice. The absence of endogenous ghrelin did not affect the incidence of intestinal tumors in either AOM/DSS-treated mice or Apc(Min/+) mice, though tumor size tended to be larger in Ghrl(-/-) colons in the AOM/DSS model. No tumor-promoting effect was observed by ghrelin administration in either tumorigenesis model. In summary, this study provides in vivo experimental evidence for the usefulness of ghrelin administration in the chemoprevention of inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis and may suggest its safety in patients under colitis-associated cancer susceptibility conditions. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. Selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis

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    Overvad, Kim; Grøn, P.; Langhoff, Otto

    1991-01-01

    In a case-referent study on the possible role of selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis, serum selenium was found to be 79 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 66 cases and 81 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 93 referents. An internal trend in serum selenium was observed among cases (TNM stage I 81 +/- 11 micrograms....../l and TNM stage II 76 +/- 13 micrograms selenium/l), indicating disease-mediated changes. The evaluation of selenium as a risk indicator in human breast cancer was therefore restricted to TNM stage I patients (n = 36). Multiple logistic regression analyses including variables associated with selenium levels...... revealed no association between selenium levels and breast cancer risk....

  10. The role of B-vitamins - gene interactions in colorectal carcinogenesis: A molecular epidemiological approach

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    Donk, van den M.

    2005-01-01

    Folate deficiency can affect DNA methylation and DNA synthesis. Both factors may be operative in colorectal carcinogenesis. Many enzymes, like methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), thymidylate synthase (TS), methionine synthase (MTR), and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), are needed for

  11. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

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    Tanaka, Takuji [Cytopatholgy Division, Tohkai Cytopathology Institute, Cancer Research and Prevention (TCI-CaRP), 5-1-2 Minami-uzura, Gifu 500-8285 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)

    2012-07-16

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described.

  12. A critical overview on the biological and molecular features of red and processed meat in colorectal carcinogenesis.

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    Jeyakumar, Arunan; Dissabandara, Lakal; Gopalan, Vinod

    2017-04-01

    A recent investigation by the World Health Organisation (WHO) has found that the consumption of processed meat and potentially red meat promotes carcinogenesis and can increase the risk of colorectal cancer. This literature review aims to summarise both the red and processed meat molecules associated with colorectal carcinogenesis and investigate their relationship with the pathogenic process of colorectal cancer. Literature relating to the carcinogenic effect of red and processed meat molecules was critically reviewed. There are multiple molecules present in red and processed meat with a potential carcinogenic effect on colorectal tissues. Processed meat is more carcinogenic compared to red meat because of the abundance of potent nitrosyl-heme molecules that form N-nitroso compounds. Studies have also noted that other molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic amines have potential mechanisms for the initiation of colorectal cancer pathogenesis. The non-human sugar molecule N-glycolylneuraminic acid may account for the carcinogenic effects of pork despite its heme content being comparable to that of chicken. Red meat products, especially those that have been processed, have a wide variety of carcinogenic molecules known to increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Thus, the outcome of this review is consistent with the recent findings of WHO.

  13. Kimchi protects against azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in mice.

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    Kim, Hee-Young; Song, Jia-Le; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Soon-Ah; Park, Kun-Young

    2014-08-01

    The chemopreventive effects of different types and quantities of kimchi prepared with different subingredients, including commercial kimchi (CK), standardized kimchi (SK), cancer-preventive kimchi (CPK), and anticancer kimchi (ACK), on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice were evaluated. The development of colon cancer was induced in male BALB/c mice with a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg body weight) and subsequent treatment with 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days for two cycles. After exposure to AOM and DSS, treatment with the methanolic extracts from different kimchis, particularly 1.89 g/kg of ACK, significantly increased colon length, decreased the ratio of colon weight/length, and resulted in the lowest number of tumors compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Histological observation revealed that ACK was able to suppress AOM- and DSS-induced colonic mucosal damage and neoplasia. ACK also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and p21 was elevated in colon tissues from the ACK-treated mice compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Our results suggest that kimchi exerted a suppressive effect on AOM- and DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in the BALB/c mice. The anticancer effects of ACK were particularly potent. Thus, it is possible that the health-promoting subingredients added to ACK might be used to prevent colon carcinogenesis in humans.

  14. Kimchi Protects Against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Mice

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    Kim, Hee-Young; Song, Jia-Le; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Kang, Soon-Ah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The chemopreventive effects of different types and quantities of kimchi prepared with different subingredients, including commercial kimchi (CK), standardized kimchi (SK), cancer-preventive kimchi (CPK), and anticancer kimchi (ACK), on colorectal carcinogenesis in mice were evaluated. The development of colon cancer was induced in male BALB/c mice with a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg body weight) and subsequent treatment with 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days for two cycles. After exposure to AOM and DSS, treatment with the methanolic extracts from different kimchis, particularly 1.89 g/kg of ACK, significantly increased colon length, decreased the ratio of colon weight/length, and resulted in the lowest number of tumors compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Histological observation revealed that ACK was able to suppress AOM- and DSS-induced colonic mucosal damage and neoplasia. ACK also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and p21 was elevated in colon tissues from the ACK-treated mice compared with the other kimchi-treated groups. Our results suggest that kimchi exerted a suppressive effect on AOM- and DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in the BALB/c mice. The anticancer effects of ACK were particularly potent. Thus, it is possible that the health-promoting subingredients added to ACK might be used to prevent colon carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:25029638

  15. Development of an Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Cancer Model and Its Application for Research on Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention

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    Takuji Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a well-recognized risk factor for development of human cancer in several tissues, including large bowel. Inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer development. Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process may contribute to multistep carcinogenesis of human colorectal cancer in the inflamed colon. They include overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, overproduction and upregulation of productions and enzymes of arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway and cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this paper, I will describe several methods to induce colorectal neoplasm in the inflamed colon. First, I will introduce a protocol of a novel inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis in mice. In addition, powerful tumor-promotion/progression activity of dextran sodium sulfate in the large bowel of ApcMin/+ mice will be described. Finally, chemoprevention of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis will be mentioned.

  16. Cimetidine and Clobenpropit Attenuate Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Male ICR Mice

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    Takuji Tanaka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Histamine and histamine receptors (Hrhs have been identified as critical molecules during inflammation and carcinogenesis. This study was conducted to determine the effects of Hrh1-Hrh3 antagonists on inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis. Male ICR mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg bw, i.p. and 1.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, drinking water for 7 days to induce colorectal carcinogenesis. The mice were then fed diets containing test chemical (500 ppm terfenadine, 500 ppm cimetidine or 10 ppm clobenpropit for 15 weeks. At week 18, feeding with the diets containing cimetidine (Hrh2 antagonist and clobenpropit (Hrh3 antagonist/inverse agonist significantly lowered the multiplicity of colonic adenocarcinoma. Terfenadine (Hrh1 antagonist did not affect AOM-DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. Adenocarcinoma cells immunohistochemically expressed Hrh1, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 with varied intensities. Because clobenpropit is also known to be a Hrh4 receptor agonist, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 may be involved in inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis. Additional data, including the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible inflammatory enzymes in the colonic mucosa, are also presented.

  17. Tumor suppressor microRNA-27a in colorectal carcinogenesis and progression by targeting SGPP1 and Smad2.

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    Yonghua Bao

    Full Text Available The aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs is associated with colorectal carcinogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. This study showed that the miRNA-27a (miR-27a was significantly reduced in colorectal cancer tissues and colorectal cancer cell lines, and that the reduced miR-27a was associated with distant metastasis and colorectal cancer clinical pathological stages-miR-27a was lower at stages III/IV than that at stage II. Bioinformatic and systemic biological analysis predicted several targets of miR-27a, among them SGPP1 and Smad2 were significantly affected. SGPP1 and Smad2 at mRNA and protein levels were negatively correlated with miR-27a in human colorectal cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Increased miR-27a significantly repressed SGPP1 and Smad2 at transcriptional and translational levels. Functional studies showed that increasing miR-27a inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation, promoted apoptosis and attenuated cell migration, which were also linked to downregulation of p-STAT3 and upregulation of cleaved caspase 3. In vivo, miR-27a inhibited colon cancer cell growth in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, this study has revealed miR-27a as a tumor suppressor and has identified SGPP1 and Smad2 as novel targets of miR-27a, linking to STAT3 for regulating cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration in colorectal cancer. Therefore, miR-27a could be a useful biomarker for monitoring colorectal cancer development and progression, and also could have a therapeutic potential by targeting SGPP1, Smad2 and STAT3 for colorectal cancer therapy.

  18. Ghrelin administration suppresses inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis in mice

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    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Kanemaru, Ai; FUKUSHIMA, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Haruyama, Yukihiro; Itoh, Hiroshi; MATSUMOTO, Nobuhiro; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Kataoka, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide that stimulates the release of pituitary growth hormone. Because of its orexigenic effects, ghrelin is being developed as a therapeutic option for postoperative support and treatment of anorexia-cachexia syndrome of cancer patients. However, ghrelin has a multiplicity of physiological functions, and it also affects cell proliferation. Therefore, the effects of ghrelin administration on carcinogenesis and cancer progression in patients susceptible to cancer s...

  19. Collagen mRNA levels changes during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis

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    Skovbjerg, Hanne; Anthonsen, Dorit; Lothe, Inger M B

    2009-01-01

    . In addition, corresponding tissue was examined from healthy volunteers (n = 20). mRNA levels were normalized to beta-actin. Immunohistochemical analysis of the distributions of type IV and type VII collagens were performed on normal and affected tissues from colorectal cancer patients. RESULTS: The alpha1(IV......). The level of alpha 6(IV) was 5-fold lower in colorectal cancer tissue as compared to healthy individuals (p alpha 6(IV) mRNA coincides...... zone of stratified epithelia. Immunohistochemical studies have previously reported changes in steady-state levels of different alpha(IV) chains in several epithelial cancer types. In the present study we aimed to quantitatively determine the mRNA levels of type IV collagen (alpha1/alpha 4/alpha 6...

  20. Different Susceptibilities between Apoe- and Ldlr-Deficient Mice to Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

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    Takuji Tanaka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia resulting in atherosclerosis is associated with an increased risk of ischemic heart disease and colorectal cancer (CRC. However, the roles of apoliprotein (Apo E (Apoe and low-density lipoprotein (Ldl receptor (Ldlr in colorectal carcinogenesis have not yet been investigated. In this study, we examined the susceptibility of Apoe-deficient and Ldlr-deficient mice, which are genetic animal models of atherosclerosis to azoxymethane (AOM/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. In Experiment 1, male Apoe-deficient (n = 20 and wild type (WT mice (C57BL/6J, n = 21 were treated with a single intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight and then given 1.5% DSS in drinking water for seven days. They were maintained up to week 20 and sacrificed for the histopathological examination of colorectal tumors. The mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase (Cox-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos2, tumor necrosis factor (Tnf-α interleukin (Il-1β, and Il-6 was assayed in the colorectal mucosa. In Experiment 2, male Ldlr-deficient (n = 14 and WT mice (C57BL/6J, n = 10 were given a single i.p. injection of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight and then given 2% DSS in drinking water for seven days. They were sacrificed at week 20 to evaluate their colorectum histopathologically. In Experiment 1, the multiplicity of CRCs was significantly higher in the Apoe-deficient mice (2.75 ± 1.48 than in the WT mice (0.62 ± 0.67. The serum lipoprotein levels in the Apoe-deficient mice were also significantly higher than in the WT mice. In Experiment 2, the incidence (29% and multiplicity (0.50 ± 0.94 of CRCs in the Ldlr mice were significantly lower than in the WT mice (80% incidence and 3.10 ± 2.38 multiplicity. The mRNA expression of two inducible enzymes and certain pro-inflammatory cytokines in the colorectum of each genotype was greater than in the respective WT mice. The values in the Apoe-deficient mice were much greater

  1. Chemopreventive Effects of Eryngium foetidum L. Leaves on COX-2 Reduction in Mice Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis.

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    Promtes, Kamonwan; Kupradinun, Piengchai; Rungsipipat, Anudep; Tuntipopipat, Siriporn; Butryee, Chaniphun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the potential effects of Eryngium foetidum Linn. leaves (EF) in colitis-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in mice by azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS), 39 ICR male mice were studied and divided into 6 groups. The mice were received a modified AIN-76 diet in Group 1, whereas Group 2 was given an AOM, DSS, and AIN-76 diet. Groups 3 and 4 were fed with 0.8% and 3.2% freeze-dried EF with AIN-76 diets, for 5 wk. Groups 5 and 6 were fed with 0.8% and 3.2% EF diets for 5 wk during AOM/DSS administration. The mice were necropsied at Week 20 and their colons were collected. The results indicated that the incidences of tumors in Groups 2, 5, and 6 was 100%, 75%, and 88%, with multiplicities (mean ±SE) of 3.75 ±0.92, 2.38 ± 0.96 and 4.25 ± 0.79, respectively. Interestingly, there was a significant difference in COX-2 expression in mice received 3.2% EF in their diet, but the proliferative cell nuclear antigen index and iNOS protein expression were not significantly different. We concluded that EF at a dose level of 3.2% in their diet had a preventive effect on colorectal carcinogenesis via the proinflammatory cytokine, COX-2.

  2. Nutraceutical Approach for Preventing Obesity-Related Colorectal and Liver Carcinogenesis

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    Hisataka Moriwaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and its related metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, alterations in the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1/IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R axis, and the state of chronic inflammation, increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, these findings also indicate that the metabolic disorders caused by obesity might be effective targets to prevent the development of CRC and HCC in obese individuals. Green tea catechins (GTCs possess anticancer and chemopreventive properties against cancer in various organs, including the colorectum and liver. GTCs have also been known to exert anti-obesity, antidiabetic, and anti-inflammatory effects, indicating that GTCs might be useful for the prevention of obesity-associated colorectal and liver carcinogenesis. Further, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA, which improve protein malnutrition and prevent progressive hepatic failure in patients with chronic liver diseases, might be also effective for the suppression of obesity-related carcinogenesis because oral supplementation with BCAA reduces the risk of HCC in obese cirrhotic patients. BCAA shows these beneficial effects because they can improve insulin resistance. Here, we review the detailed relationship between metabolic abnormalities and the development of CRC and HCC. We also review evidence, especially that based on our basic and clinical research using GTCs and BCAA, which indicates that targeting metabolic abnormalities by either pharmaceutical or nutritional intervention may be an effective strategy to prevent the development of CRC and HCC in obese individuals.

  3. Dietary Crocin Inhibits Colitis and Colitis-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Male ICR Mice

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    Kunihiro Kawabata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A natural carotenoid crocin is contained in saffron and gardenia flowers (crocuses and gardenias and is used as a food colorant. This study reports the potential inhibitory effects of crocin against inflammation-associated mouse colon carcinogenesis and chemically induced colitis in male ICR mice. In the first experiment, dietary crocin significantly inhibited the development of colonic adenocarcinomas induced by azoxymethane (AOM and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS in mice by week 18. Crocin feeding also suppressed the proliferation and immunohistochemical expression of nuclear factor- (NF- κB but increased the NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 expression, in adenocarcinoma cells. In the second experiment, dietary feeding with crocin for 4 weeks was able to inhibit DSS-induced colitis and decrease the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin- (IL- 1β, IL-6, interferon γ, NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the colorectal mucosa and increased the Nrf2 mRNA expression. Our results suggest that dietary crocin suppresses chemically induced colitis and colitis-related colon carcinogenesis in mice, at least partly by inhibiting inflammation and the mRNA expression of certain proinflammatory cytokines and inducible inflammatory enzymes. Therefore, crocin is a candidate for the prevention of colitis and inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis.

  4. Genetic characteristics of mitochondrial DNA was associated with colorectal carcinogenesis and its prognosis.

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    Jae-Ho Lee

    Full Text Available Clinical value of mitochondrial DNA has been described in colorectal cancer (CRC. To clarify its role in colorectal carcinogenesis, mitochondrial microsatellite instability (mtMSI and other markers were investigated in CRCs and their precancerous lesions, as a multitier genetic study. DNA was isolated from paired normal and tumoral tissues in 78 tubular adenomas (TAs, 34 serrated polyps (SPs, and 100 CRCs. mtMSI, nucleus microsatellite instability (nMSI, KRAS mutation, and BRAF mutation were investigated in these tumors and their statistical analysis was performed. mtMSI was found in 30% of CRCs and 21.4% of precancerous lesions. Mitochondrial copy number was higher in SPs than TAs and it was associated with mtMSI in low grade TAs. KRAS and BRAF mutations were mutually exclusive in TAs and SPs. CRCs with mtMSI showed shorter overall survival times than the patients without mtMSI. In CRCs without nMSI or BRAF mutation, mtMSI was a more accurate marker for predicting prognosis. The genetic change of mitochondrial DNA is an early and independent event in colorectal precancerous lesions and mtMSI and mitochondrial contents are associated with the tubular adenoma-carcinoma sequence, resulting in poor prognosis. This result suggested that the genetic change in mitochondrial DNA appears to be a possible prognosis marker in CRC.

  5. Independent Induction of Caspase-8 and cFLIP Expression during Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Sporadic and HNPCC Adenomas and Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Heijink

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL is a promising agent for the induction of apoptosis in neoplastic tissues. Important determinants of TRAIL sensitivity are two intracellular proteins of the TRAIL pathway, caspase-8 and its anti-apoptotic competitor cellular Flice-Like Inhibitory Protein (cFLIP. Methods: The aim of this study was to investigate basic expression of caspase-8 and cFLIP in normal colorectal epithelium (n = 20, colorectal adenomas (n = 66 and colorectal carcinomas (n = 44 using immunohistochemistry performed on both sporadic and Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC or Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas and carcinomas. Results: Expression of both caspase-8 and cFLIP was similar in cases with sporadic and hereditary origin. Expression of caspase-8 in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas was increased when compared to normal colon tissue (P = 0.02. Nuclear, paranuclear as well as cytoplasmic localizations of caspase-8 were detected. Immunohistochemistry revealed an upregulation of cFLIP in colorectal carcinomas in comparison to normal epithelium and colorectal adenomas (P < 0.001. A large variation in the caspase-8/cFLIP ratio was observed between the individual adenomas and carcinomas. Conclusion: Caspase-8 and cFLIP are upregulated during colorectal carcinogenesis. Upregulation of caspase-8 and/or downregulation of cFLIP may be interesting approaches to maximize TRAIL sensitivity in colorectal neoplasms.

  6. Biomolecular and epidemiological aspects of human papillomavirus induced cervical carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Christine Frederike Wilhelmine

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer remains one of the leading causes of death from cancer among women worldwide. Organised screening programmes aim to trace precursor lesions in order to reduce cervical cancer incidence. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a necessary cause for cervical carcinogenesis. Most HPV infections

  7. Low ABCB1 gene expression is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis.

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    Vibeke Andersen

    Full Text Available The ABCB1/MDR1 gene product ABCB1/P-glycoprotein is implicated in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC. NFKB1 encodes transcription factors regulating expression of a number of genes including ABCB1. We have previously found association between the ABCB1 C-rs3789243-T polymorphism and CRC risk and interactions between the ABCB1 C-rs3789243-T and C3435T polymorphisms and meat intake in relation to CRC risk (Andersen, BMC Cancer, 2009, 9, 407. ABCB1 and NFKB1 mRNA levels were assessed in intestinal tissue from 122 CRC cases, 101 adenoma cases (12 with severe dysplasia, 89 with mild-moderate dysplasia and from 18 healthy individuals, together with gene polymorphisms in ABCB1 and NFKB1. ABCB1 mRNA levels were highest in the healthy individuals and significantly lower in mild/moderate and severe dysplasia tissue (P<0.05 for both, morphologically normal tissues close to the tumour (P<0.05, morphologically normal tissue at a distance from the tumour (P<0.05 and CRC tissue (P<0.001. Furthermore, ABCB1 mRNA levels were lower in adenomas and carcinomas compared to morphologically normal tissue from the same individuals (P<0.01. The ABCB1 C-rs3789243-T and NFKB1 -94ins/del homozygous variant genotypes were associated with low ABCB1 mRNA levels in morphologically normal sigmoid tissue from adenoma cases (P<0.05 for both. NFKB1 mRNA levels were lower in both tumour and normal tissue from cancer patients (P<0.001 as compared to healthy individuals but we were unable to show association between NFKB1 -94ins/del genotype and NFKB1 mRNA levels. This study suggests that low ABCB1 mRNA levels are an early event in CRC development and that the two polymorphisms affect ABCB1 mRNA levels whereas low NFKB1 mRNA levels occur later in carcinogenesis. Low ABCB1 protein levels may promote colorectal carcinogenesis through increasing intracellular exposure to carcinogenic ABCB1 substrates.

  8. Genomic lesions and colorectal carcinogenesis: the effects of protein-calorie restriction and inulin supplementation on deficiency statuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, W B; Takahachi, N A; Mauro, M O; Pesarini, J R; Rabacow, A P M; Antoniolli, A C M B; Oliveira, R J

    2015-03-27

    The present study investigated the effects of restricting protein and calories and supplementation of inulin, a fiber comprising a linear type of polydisperse carbohydrates composed primarily of fructil-fructose bonds (β-(2→1), on the deficiency statuses of animals in which genomic lesion development and colorectal carcinogenesis had been induced. This experiment involved adult male Swiss mice (N = 11/group). The experimental groups were as follows: Negative Control (vehicle), Positive Control, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), Inulin, and Associate. DMH, which promoted colorectal cancer, was administered intraperitoneally in 4 20-mg/kg body weight (bw) doses during a 2-week period; inulin was administered orally at a daily dose of 50 mg/kg bw. Each group was bifurcated; half of each group was fed a normal protein diet and the other half was fed a low-protein diet. The results indicated that a correlation existed between malnutrition and an increased frequency of genomic lesions but that malnutrition did not predispose animals to colorectal cancer development. Inulin exhibited genotoxic activity, which requires further investigation, and low anti-genotoxic activity. Moreover, inulin reduced the levels of intestinal carcinogenesis biomarkers in both malnourished and healthy animals. These data suggest that inulin holds therapeutic potential and is a strong candidate for inclusion among the functional foods used for cancer prevention in both properly nourished and malnourished individuals.

  9. Epithelial markers of colorectal carcinogenesis in ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Pavel; Hucl, Tomas; Drastich, Pavel; Kamenar, David; Spicak, Julius; Honsova, Eva; Sticova, Eva; Lodererova, Alena; Matous, Jan; Hill, Martin; Wohl, Petr; Kucera, Milos

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the expression of epithelial markers of colorectal carcinogenesis in patients with long-term ulcerative colitis (UC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) before and after transplantation. METHODS: Eight patients with UC and PSC prior to liver transplantation (PSC-UC), 22 patients with UC after liver transplantation for PSC (OLT), 9 patients with active ulcerative colitis without PSC (UCA), 7 patients with UC in remission (UCR) and 10 controls (N) underwent colonoscopy with multiple biopsies. Specimens were analysed histologically and semi-quantitatively immunohistochemically for p53, Bcl-2 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) markers. Statistical analysis was performed by Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher’s exact tests. RESULTS: PSC-UC had a statistically significantly higher expression of p53 in the nondysplastic mucosa as compared to OLT, UCA, UCR and N (P < 0.05). We also found a statistically significant positive correlation between the incidence of PSC and the expression of p53 (P < 0.001). UCA had a higher p53 expression as compared to UCR. OLT had a significantly lower expression of p53 as compared with PSC-UC (P < 0.001). Bcl-2 had a significant higher bcl-2 expression as compared with controls. No difference in COX-2 expression between PSC-UC, UCR and UCA was found. UCA had higher COX-2 expression as compared to UCR. We also found a statistically significant positive correlation between the expression of COX-2 and p53. Patients after liver transplantation for PSC had a statistically significantly lower expression of the p53 compared with PSC-UC (P < 0.001). PSC-UC had the same inflammatory endoscopic activity as OLT and UCR when evaluated with the Mayo score. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that the nondysplatic mucosa of UC patients with PSC is characterised by a higher expression of the tumour suppressor gene p53, suggesting a higher susceptibility of cancer. This p53 overexpression correlates with the presence of PSC whilst it is not present in

  10. Colorectal Cancer Carcinogenesis: a Multivariate Genetic Model in a Cohort of Romanian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopciuc, Lucia M; Osian, Gelu; Iancu, Mihaela

    2017-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) involves genes with roles in folate metabolism, genes involved in metabolization of carcinogenic compounds from diet and tobacco smoke, and genes related to the DNA repair process. The aim of the study was to examine whether the MTHFRC677T, MTHFR- A1298C, TS-2rpt/3rpt, TS-1494del6bp, NAT2*5C-C481T, NAT2*5A-T341C, NAT2*6B-G590A, NAT2*7B-G857A, NAT2*18-A845C, GSTM1-null, XRCC1-Arg399Gln, XRCC3-Thr241Met, XPD-Lys751Gln genetic variations are associated with CRC prognosis, in the presence of environmental and demographic factors. We genotyped 150 patients diagnosed with sporadic CRC using PCR-RFLP and sequencing methods. The performance of the final model was quantified using Nagelkerke's coefficient, the Hosmer-Lemeshow test, C statistics, and Somers' (D) index, capable of describing the model's goodness-of-fit and discrimination. Multiple logistic regression analysis established a significant independent association of NAT2*18-A845C, MTHFR-C677T, XRCC3-Thr241Met, NAT2*7B-G857A, XPD-Lys751Gln, XRCC1-Arg399Gln and NAT2*6BG590A with an increased prevalence of sporadic CRC, regardless of the presence/absence of colonic tumors. After an adjustment for other polymorphisms and environmental risk factors, the risk to develop sporadic CRC was 2.25 (p = 0.011) and 2.31 (p = 0.01) in association with the NAT2*18-A845C and MTHFR-C677T genetic variants, respectively. The risk increased to 3.22 (p = 0.0005) and 3.69 (p = 0.0009) in association with the XRCC3Thr241Met and NAT2*7B-G857A polymorphisms. Also, patients carrying the XPD-Lys751Gln, XRCC1Arg399Gln, and NAT2*6B-G590A polymorphisms had a 4.16 (p methylation and procarcinogen transformation into carcinogenic compounds in sporadic CRC risk and, also, the influence of environmental risk factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol consumption on this association.

  11. Combined genotoxic effects of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (B(aP and an heterocyclic amine (PhIP in relation to colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilien L Jamin

    Full Text Available Colorectal neoplasia is the third most common cancer worldwide. Environmental factors such as diet are known to be involved in the etiology of this cancer. Several epidemiological studies have suggested that specific neo-formed mutagenic compounds related to meat consumption are an underlying factor involved in the association between diet and colorectal cancer. Heterocyclic amines (HCAs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are known mutagens and possible human carcinogens formed at the same time in meat during cooking processes. We studied the genotoxicity of the model PAH benzo(apyrene (B(aP and HCA 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, alone or in mixture, using the mouse intestinal cell line Apc(Min/+, mimicking the early step of colorectal carcinogenesis, and control Apc(+/+ cells. The genotoxicity of B(aP and PhIP was investigated using both cell lines, through the quantification of B(aP and PhIP derived DNA adducts, as well as the use of a genotoxic assay based on histone H2AX phosphorylation quantification. Our results demonstrate that heterozygous Apc mutated cells are more effective to metabolize B(aP. We also established in different experiments that PhIP and B(aP were more genotoxic on Apc (Min/+ cells compared to Apc (+/+ . Moreover when tested in mixture, we observed a combined genotoxicity of B(aP and PhIP on the two cell lines, with an increase of PhIP derived DNA adducts in the presence of B(aP. Because of their genotoxic effects observed on heterozygous Apc mutated cells and their possible combined genotoxic effects, both B(aP and PhIP, taken together, could be implicated in the observed association between meat consumption and colorectal cancer.

  12. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study

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    Raul D. Bernabe-Dones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC. In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45 and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36 was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2% CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males and in 1 of 36 (2.8% controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49. HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted.

  13. Modulation of dietary fat-enhanced colorectal carcinogenesis in N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-treated rats by a vegetables-fruit mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnkels, J.M.; Hollanders, V.H.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Koeman, J.H.; Alink, G.M.

    1997-01-01

    The modulation of a vegetables-fruit mixture on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N- nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced colorectal carcinogenesis was studied in rats maintained on a low- or a high-fat diet. Far this purpose, 120 rats received a semisynthetic diet without (Groups A and C) or with a vegetables-fruit

  14. BRAF, KRAS and PIK3CA mutations in colorectal serrated polyps and cancer: Primary or secondary genetic events in colorectal carcinogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt Fernando

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BRAF, KRAS and PIK3CA mutations are frequently found in sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC. In contrast to KRAS and PIK3CA mutations, BRAF mutations are associated with tumours harbouring CpG Island methylation phenotype (CIMP, MLH1 methylation and microsatellite instability (MSI. We aimed at determine the frequency of KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations in the process of colorectal tumourigenesis using a series of colorectal polyps and carcinomas. In the series of polyps CIMP, MLH1 methylation and MSI were also studied. Methods Mutation analyses were performed by PCR/sequencing. Bisulfite treated DNA was used to study CIMP and MLH1 methylation. MSI was detected by pentaplex PCR and Genescan analysis of quasimonomorphic mononucleotide repeats. Chi Square test and Fisher's Exact test were used to perform association studies. Results KRAS, PIK3CA or BRAF occur in 71% of polyps and were mutually exclusive. KRAS mutations occur in 35% of polyps. PIK3CA was found in one of the polyps. V600E BRAF mutations occur in 29% of cases, all of them classified as serrated adenoma. CIMP phenotype occurred in 25% of the polyps and all were mutated for BRAF. MLH1 methylation was not detected and all the polyps were microsatellite stable. The comparison between the frequency of oncogenic mutations in polyps and CRC (MSI and MSS lead us to demonstrate that KRAS and PIK3CA are likely to precede both types of CRC. BRAF mutations are likely to precede MSI carcinomas since the frequency found in serrated polyps is similar to what is found in MSI CRC (P = 0.9112, but statistically different from what is found in microsatellite stable (MSS tumours (P = 0.0191. Conclusion Our results show that BRAF, KRAS and PIK3CA mutations occur prior to malignant transformation demonstrating that these oncogenic alterations are primary genetic events in colorectal carcinogenesis. Further, we show that BRAF mutations occur in association with CIMP phenotype in colorectal

  15. Interactive effects between dietary fat and a vegetables-fruit mixture on colorectal carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnkels, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Several dietary compounds are associated with colorectal cancer risk. These include the amount of dietary fat, which is positively associated with colorectal cancer, and a variety of vegetables and fruit, which are suggested to possess anticarcinogenic potential. Because diet is complex and

  16. Life style-related diseases of the digestive system: colorectal cancer as a life style-related disease: from carcinogenesis to medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yoneda, Kyoko; Tomimoto, Ayako; Endo, Hiroki; Fujisawa, Toshio; Iida, Hiroshi; Mawatari, Hironori; Nozaki, Yuichi; Ikeda, Tamon; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Yoneda, Masato; Inamori, Masahiko; Abe, Yasunobu; Saito, Satoru; Nakajima, Atsushi; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2007-10-01

    Life style-related diseases are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recently, an association has been demonstrated between obesity and CRC. CRC has been associated with markers of insulin or glucose control, and insulin resistance might be the unifying mechanism by which several risk factors affect colorectal carcinogenesis. We evaluated the association between the number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and other factors of life style-related disease. As a result, age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and visceral fat obesity were significantly associated with the number of ACF. These results suggest that visceral fat obesity is an important target for CRC prevention. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and is highly expressed in CRC. PPARgamma ligand administration for 1 to 8 months significantly reduced the number of ACF in human subjects. PPARgamma ligand is a promising candidate as a chemopreventive agent. Further investigation is needed to elucidate these mechanisms.

  17. Zinc finger protein 278, a potential oncogene in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqing Tian; Danfeng Sun; Yanjie Zhang; Shuliang Zhao; Hua Xiong; Jingyuan Fang

    2008-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 278 (ZNF278) is a novel Krueppel Cys2-His2-type zinc finger protein that is ubiquitously distributed in human tissues. Whether ZNF278 is related to the development of colorectal cancer is still unclear. The transcriptional level of ZNF278 was studied in colorectal cancer by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ZNF278 expression was increased in 53% of colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancerous tissues. The transcriptional down-regulation of ZNF278 was detected in only three (6%) human colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancer tissues. No significant difference was detected in 19 (41%) pairs of samples.However, we failed to find a significant association between the up-regulation of ZNF278 transcription and age, sex, the degree of infiltration, or the tumor size of colorectal cancer.To study the function of ZNF278 in colorectal carcinogenesis,the colon cancer cell line SW1116 was stably transfected with a wild-type ZNF278 plasmid to construct an overexpression system, and was transiently transfected with the small interfering RNA of ZNF278 to construct a ZNF278 knockdown system. Cell proliferation was assessed with 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide dye and a cell counter. The results show that ZNF278 promotes cell growth, and its knockdown suppresses cell proliferation. ZNF278 could be a potential proto-oncogene in colorectal cancer.

  18. MicroRNA-184 inhibits cell proliferation and metastasis in human colorectal cancer by directly targeting IGF-1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guannan; Liu, Jiayun; Wu, Zhenfeng; Wu, Xiaoyu; Yao, Xuequan

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third most common cancer in males and the second in females worldwide. In spite of marked progress having been achieved in surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the prognosis for patients with colorectal cancer remains poor. Previous studies have demonstrated that the abnormal expression of microRNAs contributed to human cancer carcinogenesis and progression, suggesting miRNAs as novel therapeutic targets in colorectal cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression, functions and underlying molecular mechanisms of microRNA-184 (miR-184) in colorectal cancer. The results identified that miR-184 was significantly downregulated in colorectal cancer tissues and cell lines. In vitro functional studies demonstrated that miR-184 significantly inhibited colorectal cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Notably, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) was identified as a direct target of miR-184 in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, the functions of IGF-1R small interfering RNA were similar to those induced by miR-184 in colorectal cancer, suggesting IGF-1R as a functional target of miR-184 in colorectal cancer. The results of the present study indicated that miR-184 may be a novel therapeutic strategy regimen of targeted therapy for colorectal cancer.

  19. Strawberry Phytochemicals Inhibit Azoxymethane/Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Crj: CD-1 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Shi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human and experimental colon carcinogenesis are enhanced by a pro-inflammatory microenvironment. Pharmacologically driven chemopreventive agents and dietary variables are hypothesized to have future roles in the prevention of colon cancer by targeting these processes. The current study was designed to determine the ability of dietary lyophilized strawberries to inhibit inflammation-promoted colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical animal model. Mice were given a single i.p. injection of azoxymethane (10 mg kg−1 body weight. One week after injection, mice were administered 2% (w/v dextran sodium sulfate in drinking water for seven days and then an experimental diet containing chemically characterized lyophilized strawberries for the duration of the bioassay. Mice fed control diet, or experimental diet containing 2.5%, 5.0% or 10.0% strawberries displayed tumor incidence of 100%, 64%, 75% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.05. The mechanistic studies demonstrate that strawberries reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators, suppressed nitrosative stress and decreased phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and nuclear factor kappa B. In conclusion, strawberries target proinflammatory mediators and oncogenic signaling for the preventive efficacies against colon carcinogenesis in mice. This works supports future development of fully characterized and precisely controlled functional foods for testing in human clinical trials for this disease.

  20. Intestinal PTGS2 mRNA Levels, PTGS2 Gene Polymorphisms, and Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Lotte K.; Saebo, Mona; Hoyer, Helle

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims: Inflammation is a major risk factor for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Prostaglandin synthase cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) encoded by the PTGS2 gene is the rate limiting enzyme in prostaglandin synthesis and therefore plays a distinct role as regulator of inflammation....... Methods: PTGS2 mRNA levels were determined in intestinal tissues from 85 intestinal adenoma cases, 115 CRC cases, and 17 healthy controls. The functional PTGS2 polymorphisms A-1195G (rs689466), G-765C (rs20417), T8473C (rs5275) were assessed in 200 CRC cases, 991 adenoma cases and 399 controls from...

  1. Low ABCB1 gene expression is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Godiksen, Sine

    2013-01-01

    risk and interactions between the ABCB1 C-rs3789243-T and C3435T polymorphisms and meat intake in relation to CRC risk (Andersen, BMC Cancer, 2009, 9, 407). ABCB1 and NFKB1 mRNA levels were assessed in intestinal tissue from 122 CRC cases, 101 adenoma cases (12 with severe dysplasia, 89 with mild......The ABCB1/MDR1 gene product ABCB1/P-glycoprotein is implicated in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). NFKB1 encodes transcription factors regulating expression of a number of genes including ABCB1. We have previously found association between the ABCB1 C-rs3789243-T polymorphism and CRC...

  2. Molecular evolution of colorectal cancer: from multistep carcinogenesis to the big bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Adriana; Chiara, Silvana; Pfeffer, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is characterized by exquisite genomic instability either in the form of microsatellite instability or chromosomal instability. Microsatellite instability is the result of mutation of mismatch repair genes or their silencing through promoter methylation as a consequence of the CpG island methylator phenotype. The molecular causes of chromosomal instability are less well characterized. Genomic instability and field cancerization lead to a high degree of intratumoral heterogeneity and determine the formation of cancer stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition mediated by the TGF-β and APC pathways. Recent analyses using integrated genomics reveal different phases of colorectal cancer evolution. An initial phase of genomic instability that yields many clones with different mutations (big bang) is followed by an important, previously not detected phase of cancer evolution that consists in the stabilization of several clones and a relatively flat outgrowth. The big bang model can best explain the coexistence of several stable clones and is compatible with the fact that the analysis of the bulk of the primary tumor yields prognostic information.

  3. Plant Foods versus Compounds in Carcinogenesis: Observational versus Experimental Human Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, E.; Arts, I.C.W.; Hollman, P.C.H.

    2003-01-01

    The protective role of plant foods and its constituents in cancer prevention is under renewed debate since the results of recent observational studies on colorectal cancer as well as large-scale human experimental studies on colorectal adenoma recurrence are disappointing. However, most short-term

  4. A transcriptome anatomy of human colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hao

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulating databases in human genome research have enabled integrated genome-wide study on complicated diseases such as cancers. A practical approach is to mine a global transcriptome profile of disease from public database. New concepts of these diseases might emerge by landscaping this profile. Methods In this study, we clustered human colorectal normal mucosa (N, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, adenoma (A and cancer (T related expression sequence tags (EST into UniGenes via an in-house GetUni software package and analyzed the transcriptome overview of these libraries by GOTree Machine (GOTM. Additionally, we downloaded UniGene based cDNA libraries of colon and analyzed them by Xprofiler to cross validate the efficiency of GetUni. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to validate the expression of β-catenin and. 7 novel genes in colorectal cancers. Results The efficiency of GetUni was successfully validated by Xprofiler and RT-PCR. Genes in library N, IBD and A were all found in library T. A total of 14,879 genes were identified with 2,355 of them having at least 2 transcripts. Differences in gene enrichment among these libraries were statistically significant in 50 signal transduction pathways and Pfam protein domains by GOTM analysis P Conclusion Colorectal cancers are genetically heterogeneous. Transcription variants are common in them. Aberrations of ribosome and glycolysis pathway might be early indicators of precursor lesions in colon cancers. The electronic gene expression profile could be used to highlight the integral molecular events in colorectal cancers.

  5. Cellular metabolism in colorectal carcinogenesis: Influence of lifestyle, gut microbiome and metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagland, Hanne R; Søreide, Kjetil

    2015-01-28

    The interconnectivity between diet, gut microbiota and cell molecular responses is well known; however, only recently has technology allowed the identification of strains of microorganisms harbored in the gastrointestinal tract that may increase susceptibility to cancer. The colonic environment appears to play a role in the development of colon cancer, which is influenced by the human metabolic lifestyle and changes in the gut microbiome. Studying metabolic changes at the cellular level in cancer be useful for developing novel improved preventative measures, such as screening through metabolic breath-tests or treatment options that directly affect the metabolic pathways responsible for the carcinogenicity. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Absence of an inhibitory effect of a vegetables-fruit mixture on the initiation and promotion phases of azoxymethane-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in rats fed low- or high-fat diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnkels, J.M.; Hollanders, V.M.H.; Woutersen, R.A.; Koeman, J.H.; Alink, G.M.

    1998-01-01

    The potential inhibitory effects of a vegetables-fruit mixture on the initiation and promotion phases of azoxymethane-induced colorectal carcinogenesis were examined in rats fed low- or high-fat diets. Rats were fed low-fat diets (20 energy percent, Diets A and B) or high-fat diets (40 energy

  7. SIX1 Oncoprotein as a Biomarker in a Model of Hormonal Carcinogenesis and in Human Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oncofetal protein sine oculis-related homeobox 1 (SIX1) is a developmental transcription factor associated with carcinogenesis in animal models and humans. In a model of hormonal carcinogenesis, mice neonatally exposed to the soy phytoestrogen, genistein (GEN), or the synthet...

  8. Towards the human colorectal cancer microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R Marchesi

    Full Text Available Multiple factors drive the progression from healthy mucosa towards sporadic colorectal carcinomas and accumulating evidence associates intestinal bacteria with disease initiation and progression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide a first high-resolution map of colonic dysbiosis that is associated with human colorectal cancer (CRC. To this purpose, the microbiomes colonizing colon tumor tissue and adjacent non-malignant mucosa were compared by deep rRNA sequencing. The results revealed striking differences in microbial colonization patterns between these two sites. Although inter-individual colonization in CRC patients was variable, tumors consistently formed a niche for Coriobacteria and other proposed probiotic bacterial species, while potentially pathogenic Enterobacteria were underrepresented in tumor tissue. As the intestinal microbiota is generally stable during adult life, these findings suggest that CRC-associated physiological and metabolic changes recruit tumor-foraging commensal-like bacteria. These microbes thus have an apparent competitive advantage in the tumor microenvironment and thereby seem to replace pathogenic bacteria that may be implicated in CRC etiology. This first glimpse of the CRC microbiome provides an important step towards full understanding of the dynamic interplay between intestinal microbial ecology and sporadic CRC, which may provide important leads towards novel microbiome-related diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions.

  9. The prevalence of human papillomavirus in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Louise; Thomsen, Louise T; Olesen, Tina Bech

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal cancer has been widely studied with conflicting results. We performed a systematic review and a meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in colorectal adenocarcinomas and adenomas, and test the potential association....

  10. Proteome analysis of human colorectal cancer tissue using 2-D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proteome analysis of human colorectal cancer tissue using 2-D DIGE and tandem mass spectrometry for identification of disease-related proteins. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... The cDNA of the differential protein was transfected into colorectal cancer cells, and the biological behavior of these cells was observed.

  11. Novel mouse model recapitulates genome and transcriptome alterations in human colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Nicole E; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Buishand, Floryne O; Hue, Yue; Ried, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Human colorectal carcinomas are defined by a nonrandom distribution of genomic imbalances that are characteristic for this disease. Often, these imbalances affect entire chromosomes. Understanding the role of these aneuploidies for carcinogenesis is of utmost importance. Currently, established transgenic mice do not recapitulate the pathognonomic genome aberration profile of human colorectal carcinomas. We have developed a novel model based on the spontaneous transformation of murine colon epithelial cells. During this process, cells progress through stages of pre-immortalization, immortalization and, finally, transformation, and result in tumors when injected into immunocompromised mice. We analyzed our model for genome and transcriptome alterations using ArrayCGH, spectral karyotyping (SKY), and array based gene expression profiling. ArrayCGH revealed a recurrent pattern of genomic imbalances. These results were confirmed by SKY. Comparing these imbalances with orthologous maps of human chromosomes revealed a remarkable overlap. We observed focal deletions of the tumor suppressor genes Trp53 and Cdkn2a/p16. High-level focal genomic amplification included the locus harboring the oncogene Mdm2, which was confirmed by FISH in the form of double minute chromosomes. Array-based global gene expression revealed distinct differences between the sequential steps of spontaneous transformation. Gene expression changes showed significant similarities with human colorectal carcinomas. Pathways most prominently affected included genes involved in chromosomal instability and in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Our novel mouse model therefore recapitulates the most prominent genome and transcriptome alterations in human colorectal cancer, and might serve as a valuable tool for understanding the dynamic process of tumorigenesis, and for preclinical drug testing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sood, Shilpa; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert, E-mail: hcrwang@utk.edu

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive

  13. Metallothioneins in human tumors and potential roles in carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherian, M. George; Jayasurya, A.; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2003-12-10

    Metallothioneins (MT) are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine rich intracellular proteins, which are encoded by a family of genes containing at least 10 functional isoforms in human. The expression and induction of these proteins have been associated with protection against DNA damage, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Moreover, MT may potentially activate certain transcriptional factors by donating zinc. Although MT is a cytosolic protein in resting cells, it can be translocated transiently to the cell nucleus during cell proliferation and differentiation. A number of studies have shown an increased expression of MT in various human tumors of the breast, colon, kidney, liver, lung, nasopharynx, ovary, prostate, salivary gland, testes, thyroid and urinary bladder. However, MT is down-regulated in certain tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver adenocarcinoma. Hence, the expression of MT is not universal to all human tumors, but may depend on the differentiation status and proliferative index of tumors, along with other tissue factors and gene mutations. In certain tumors such as germ cell carcinoma, the expression of MT is closely related to the tumor grade and proliferative activity. Increased expression of MT has also been observed in less differentiated tumors. Thus, expression of MT may be a potential prognostic marker for certain tumors. There are few reports on the expression of the different isoforms of MT which have been analyzed by specific gene probes. They reveal that certain isoforms are expressed in specific cell types. The factors which can influence MT induction in human tumors are not yet understood. Down-regulation of MT synthesis in hepatic tumors may be related to hypermethylation of the MT-promoter or mutation of other genes such as the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In vitro studies using human cancer cells suggest a possible role for p53 and the estrogen-receptor on the expression and induction of MT in epithelial neoplastic cells

  14. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Shen, Steven; Paena, Massimilano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten’s ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased ...

  15. Quercetin, but Not Its Glycosidated Conjugate Rutin, Inhibits Azoxymethane-Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in F344 Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dihal, A.A.; Boer, de V.C.J.; Woude, van der H.; Tilburgs, C.; Bruintjes, J.P.; Alink, G.M.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Stierum, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the flavonoid quercetin and its conjugate rutin was investigated on (biomarkers of) colorectal cancer (CRC). Male F344 rats (n = 42/group) were fed 0, 0.1, 1, or 10 g quercetin/kg diet or 40 g rutin/kg diet. Two wk after initial administration of experimental diets, rats were given 2

  16. Aquaporins in human breast cancer: identification and involvement in carcinogenesis of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhonghua; Zhang, Ting; Luo, Liang; Zhao, Hua; Cheng, Jing; Xiang, Jingying; Zhao, Chun

    2012-09-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) play important roles in water and glycerol transport. Recently, the role of AQPs in human carcinogenesis has become an area of great interest. However, little is known about the function of AQPs in human breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression profile of AQPs in human breast cancer and its significance. In this study, we screened the expression profile of AQP0-12 in breast cancer tissues and corresponding normal tissues by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. AQP1, 3-5, and 10-12 were expressed in human breast cancer and/or normal breast tissues, and AQP1 and 3-5 exhibited differential expression. AQP1 was expressed in cell membranes and its expression was higher in cancer than that in normal tissues. AQP4 was expressed in the cell membrane and cytoplasm and was detected markedly stronger in normal than in cancer tissues. AQP5 was expressed mainly in cell membranes in carcinoma tissues, but was almost absent in normal breast tissues. Expression of AQP5 was associated with cellular differentiation, lymph node invasion, and clinicopathological staging. These observations suggested that several subtypes of the AQP family play a role in human breast carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The RS4939827 polymorphism in the SMAD7 GENE and its association with Mediterranean diet in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Molero, Jéssica; González-Donquiles, Carmen; Palazuelos, Camilo; Fernández-Villa, Tania; Ramos, Elena; Pollán, Marina; Aragonés, Nuria; Llorca, Javier; Henar Alonso, M; Tardón, Adonina; Amiano, Pilar; Moleon, José Juan Jiménez; Pérez, Rosana Peiró; Capelo, Rocío; Molina, Antonio J; Acebo, Inés Gómez; Guevara, Marcela; Gómez, Beatriz Pérez; Lope, Virginia; Huerta, José María; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Kogevinas, Manolis; Moreno, Victor; Martín, Vicente

    2017-10-30

    The objective of our investigation is to study the relationship between the rs4939827 SNP in the SMAD7 gene, Mediterranean diet pattern and the risk of colorectal cancer. We examined 1087 cases of colorectal cancer and 2409 population controls with available DNA samples from the MCC-Spain study, 2008-2012. Descriptive statistical analyses, and multivariate logistic mixed models were performed. The potential synergistic effect of rs4939827 and the Mediterranean diet pattern was evaluated with logistic regression in different strata of of adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the genotype. High adherence to Mediterrenean diet was statistically significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. A decreased risk for CRC cancer was observed for the CC compared to the TT genotype (OR = 0.65 and 95% CI = 0.51-0.81) of the rs4939827 SNP Also, we could show an association between the Mediterranean diet pattern (protective factor) and rs4939827. Although the decreased risk for the CC genotype was slightly more pronounced in subjects with high adherence to Mediterrenean diet, there was no statistically significant synergistic effect between genotype CC and adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern factors. The SMAD7 gene and specifically the allele C could be protective for colorectal cancer. An independent protective association was also observed between high adherence Mediterranean diet pattern and CRC risk. Findings form this study indicate that high adherence to Mediterranean diet pattern has a protective role for CRC cancer probably involving the Tumor Growth Factor- β pathway in this cancer.

  18. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Mami, E-mail: mtakahas@ncc.go.jp; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Keiji [Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Yada 52-1, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-02-09

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  19. Towards the human colorectal cancer microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchesi, J.R.; Dutilh, B.E.; Hall, N.; Peters, W.H.M.; Roelofs, R.; Boleij, A.; Tjalsma, H.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors drive the progression from healthy mucosa towards sporadic colorectal carcinomas and accumulating evidence associates intestinal bacteria with disease initiation and progression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide a first high-resolution map of colonic dysbiosis that is

  20. Smad2/3 linker phosphorylation is a possible marker of cancer stem cells and correlates with carcinogenesis in a mouse model of colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Fukui, Toshiro; Kishimoto, Masanobu; Miyamoto, Sachi; Takahashi, Yu; Takeo, Masahiro; Mitsuyama, Toshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Yutaku; Uchida, Kazushige; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial cells affected by somatic mutations undergo transition from a tumour-suppressive to a carcinogenic Smad pathway during sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis, and the specific linker threonine phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in colon epithelial cells indicates stem-like cells. This study extends previous observations to a model of colitis-associated colorectal cancer. After Crl:CD-1 mice received an administration of azoxymethane [AOM], the mice were given dextran sodium sulfate [DSS] for 7 days. AOM/DSS-treated mice [AOM/DSS mice] were killed at 10 or 20 weeks. After macroscopic observations, a histopathological analysis was conducted. Immunohistochemical staining was performed using the avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method [pSmad3C-Ser, pSmad3L-Ser, c-Myc] and immunofluorescent methods [Ki67, β-catenin, CDK4, cyclin D1, Sox9, pSmad2/3L-Thr]. The colons from AOM/DSS mice were shorter than those from control mice. The number of colon tumours at Week 20 was higher than at Week 10. The inflammation scores for AOM/DSS mice were greater than those for control mice. Immunostaining-positive cells (staining by Ki67, β-catenin [nuclear and cytoplasmic], cyclin D1, and Sox9) were diffusely distributed in colon tumours. The percentage of pSmad3L-Ser-positive cells in colon tumours was higher than in sites of pre-neoplastic colitis, and that in sites of pre-neoplastic colitis was higher than in control mice. pSmad2/3L-Thr-positive cells were sparsely detected around crypt bases in non-neoplastic colon epithelia and at the tops of tumours, and immunohistochemical co-localisation of pSmad2/3L-Thr with Ki67 was not observed. Immunohistochemical co-localisation of pSmad2/3L-Thr with β-catenin and CDK4 was observed. pSmad3L-Ser signalling is an early event in colitis-associated colorectal cancer, and pSmad2/3L-Thr immunostaining-positive cells might be cancer stem cells. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University

  1. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Showing Altered Expression in Liver Metastases of Human Colorectal Cancers by cDNA Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempei Yanagawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of intensive and increasingly successful attempts to determine the multiple steps involved in colorectal carcinogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for metastasis of colorectal tumors to the liver remain to be clarified. To identify genes that are candidates for involvement in the metastatic process, we analyzed genome-wide expression profiles of 10 primary colorectal cancers and their corresponding metastatic lesions by means of a cDNA microarray consisting of 9121 human genes. This analysis identified 40 genes whose expression was commonly upregulated in metastatic lesions, and 7 that were commonly downregulated. The upregulated genes encoded proteins involved in cell adhesion, or remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Investigation of the functions of more of the altered genes should improve our understanding of metastasis and may identify diagnostic markers and/or novel molecular targets for prevention or therapy of metastatic lesions.

  2. Time-serial Assessment of Drug Combination Interventions in a Mouse Model of Colorectal Carcinogenesis Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan LeGendre-McGhee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT is a high-resolution, nondestructive imaging modality that enables time-serial assessment of adenoma development in the mouse model of colorectal cancer. In this study, OCT was utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions with the experimental antitumor agent α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac during early [chemoprevention (CP] and late stages [chemotherapy (CT] of colon tumorigenesis. Biological endpoints for drug interventions included OCT-generated tumor number and tumor burden. Immunochistochemistry was used to evaluate biochemical endpoints [Ki-67, cleaved caspase-3, cyclooxygenase (COX-2, β-catenin]. K-Ras codon 12 mutations were studied with polymerase chain reaction-based technique. We demonstrated that OCT imaging significantly correlated with histological analysis of both tumor number and tumor burden for all experimental groups ( P < 0.0001, but allows more accurate and full characterization of tumor number and burden growth rate because of its time-serial, nondestructive nature. DFMO alone or in combination with sulindac suppressed both the tumor number and tumor burden growth rate in the CP setting because of DFMO-mediated decrease in cell proliferation (Ki-67, P < 0.001 and K-RAS mutations frequency ( P = 0.04. In the CT setting, sulindac alone and DFMO/sulindac combination were effective in reducing tumor number, but not tumor burden growth rate. A decrease in COX-2 staining in DFMO/sulindac CT groups (COX-2, P < 0.01 confirmed the treatment effect. Use of nondestructive OCT enabled repeated, quantitative evaluation of tumor number and burden, allowing changes in these parameters to be measured during CP and as a result of CT. In conclusion, OCT is a robust minimally invasive method for monitoring colorectal cancer disease and effectiveness of therapies in mouse models.

  3. Analysis of DNA methylation status of the promoter of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenghui; Xu, Jinheng; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Weiming

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is expressed in normal somatic cells and reactivated in majority of tumor cells. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a catalytic subunit of telomerase, is a rate-limiting factor of telomerase activity. Evidence has shown that gastric cancer is the result of genetics and epignomics. DNA methylation is one of the most important research fields in epigenomics. It is one of the mechanisms resulting in gene silencing in carcinogenesis. Genomic DNAs were extracted from normal gastric mucosa, precancerous lesions and gastric cancer samples and were modified by sodium bisulfite. The modified genomic DNAs were amplified by PCR with primers that did not contain CpG sites. Each PCR product was sequenced. By matching the sequencing results and the original sequence, the status of each sample was obtained. PCR was carried out to identify hTERT expression. The promoter of hTERT in gastric cancer was more methylated than in the precancerous lesions and normal gastric mucosa (pmaker in early diagnosis of gastric cancer. During gastric carcinogenesis, expression of hTERT was increased. This may suggest that methylation of hTERT may influence expression of hTERT. 2010 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gavage of Fecal Samples From Patients With Colorectal Cancer Promotes Intestinal Carcinogenesis in Germ-Free and Conventional Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sunny H; Zhao, Liuyang; Zhang, Xiang; Nakatsu, Geicho; Han, Juqiang; Xu, Weiqi; Xiao, Xue; Kwong, Thomas N Y; Tsoi, Ho; Wu, William K K; Zeng, Benhua; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y; Wei, Hong; Yu, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Altered gut microbiota is implicated in development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Some intestinal bacteria have been reported to potentiate intestinal carcinogenesis by producing genotoxins, altering the immune response and intestinal microenvironment, and activating oncogenic signaling pathways. We investigated whether stool from patients with CRC could directly induce colorectal carcinogenesis in mice. We obtained stored stool samples from participants in a metagenome study performed in Hong Kong. Conventional (male C57BL/6) mice were given azoxymethane to induce colon neoplasia after receiving a course of antibiotics in drinking water. Mice were gavaged twice weekly with stool from 5 patients with CRC or 5 healthy individuals (controls) for 5 weeks. Germ-free C57BL/6 mice were gavaged once with stool from 5 patients with CRC or 5 controls. We collected intestinal tissues from mice and performed histology, immunohistochemistry, expression microarray, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, and flow cytometry analyses. We performed 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing analysis of feces from mice. Significantly higher proportions of conventional mice fed with stool from individuals with CRC than control stool developed high-grade dysplasia (P < .05) and macroscopic polyps (P < .01). We observed a higher proportion of proliferating (Ki-67-positive) cells in colons of germ-free mice fed with stool from patients with CRC vs those fed with stool from controls (P < .05). Feces from germ-free and conventional mice fed with stool from patients with CRC vs controls contained different microbial compositions, with lower richness in mice fed with stool from patients with CRC. Intestines collected from conventional and germ-free mice fed with stool from patients with CRC had increased expression of cytokines that modulate inflammation, including C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 1, C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 2, interleukin 17A (IL17A), IL22, and IL23A. Intestines

  5. Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 exopolysaccharides synergizes with low level ionizing radiation to modulate signaling molecular targets in colorectal carcinogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Walid E; Elsonbaty, Sawsan M; Moawed, Fatma S M

    2017-08-01

    Combination therapy that targets cellular signaling pathway represents an alternative therapy for the treatment of colon cancer (CRC). The present study was therefore aimed to investigate the probable interaction of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 exopolysaccharides (EPS) with low level ionizing γ radiation (γ-R) exposure against dimethylhydrazine (DMH)- induced colorectal carcinogenesis in rats. Colon cancer was induced with 20mg DMH/kg BW. Rats received daily by gastric gavage 100mg EPS/Kg BW concomitant with 1Gy γ-R over two months. Colonic oxidative and inflammatory stresses were assessed. The change in the expression of p-p38 MAPK, p-STAT3, β-catenin, NF-kB, COX-2 and iNOS was evaluated by western blotting and q-PCR. It was found that DMH treatment significantly induced colon oxidative injury accompanied by inflammatory disturbance along with increased protein expression of the targeted signaling factors p-p38 MAPK, p-STAT3 and β-catenin. The mRNA gene expression of NF-kB, COX-2 and iNOS was significantly higher in DMH-treated animals. It's worthy to note that colon tissues with DMH treatment showed significant dysplasia and anaplasia of the glandular mucosal lining epithelium with loses of goblet cells formation, pleomorphism in the cells and hyperchromachia in nuclei. Interestingly, EPS treatment with γ-R exposure showed statistically significant amelioration of the oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers with modulated signaling molecular factors accompanied by improved histological structure against DMH-induced CRC. In conclusion, our findings showed that Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 EPS with low level γ-R in synergistic interaction are efficacious control against CRC progression throughout the modulation of key signaling growth factors associated with inflammation via antioxidant mediated anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Impacts MSI-Driven Carcinogenesis and Anti-Tumor Immunity in Colorectal Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bchiri, Jamila; Guilloux, Agathe; Dartigues, Peggy; Loire, Etienne; Mercier, Dominique; Buhard, Olivier; Sobhani, Iradj; de la Grange, Pierre; Auboeuf, Didier; Praz, Françoise; Fléjou, Jean-François; Duval, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay (NMD) degrades mutant mRNAs containing premature termination codon (PTC-mRNAs). Here we evaluate the consequence of NMD activity in colorectal cancers (CRCs) showing microsatellite instability (MSI) whose progression is associated with the accumulation of PTC-mRNAs encoding immunogenic proteins due to frameshift mutations in coding repeat sequences. Inhibition of UPF1, one of the major NMD factors, was achieved by siRNA in the HCT116 MSI CRC cell line and the resulting changes in gene expression were studied using expression microarrays. The impact of NMD activity was also investigated in primary MSI CRCs by quantifying the expression of several mRNAs relative to their mutational status and to endogenous UPF1 and UPF2 expression. Host immunity developed against MSI cancer cells was appreciated by quantifying the number of CD3ε-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). UPF1 silencing led to the up-regulation of 1251 genes in HCT116, among which a proportion of them (i.e. 38%) significantly higher than expected by chance contained a coding microsatellite (P<2×10−16). In MSI primary CRCs, UPF1 was significantly over-expressed compared to normal adjacent mucosa (P<0.002). Our data provided evidence for differential decay of PTC-mRNAs compared to wild-type that was positively correlated to UPF1 endogenous expression level (P = 0.02). A negative effect of UPF1 and UPF2 expression on the host's anti-tumor response was observed (P<0.01). Overall, our results show that NMD deeply influences MSI-driven tumorigenesis at the molecular level and indicate a functional negative impact of this system on anti-tumor immunity whose intensity has been recurrently shown to be an independent factor of favorable outcome in CRCs. PMID:18612427

  7. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay impacts MSI-driven carcinogenesis and anti-tumor immunity in colorectal cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila El-Bchiri

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay (NMD degrades mutant mRNAs containing premature termination codon (PTC-mRNAs. Here we evaluate the consequence of NMD activity in colorectal cancers (CRCs showing microsatellite instability (MSI whose progression is associated with the accumulation of PTC-mRNAs encoding immunogenic proteins due to frameshift mutations in coding repeat sequences. Inhibition of UPF1, one of the major NMD factors, was achieved by siRNA in the HCT116 MSI CRC cell line and the resulting changes in gene expression were studied using expression microarrays. The impact of NMD activity was also investigated in primary MSI CRCs by quantifying the expression of several mRNAs relative to their mutational status and to endogenous UPF1 and UPF2 expression. Host immunity developed against MSI cancer cells was appreciated by quantifying the number of CD3epsilon-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs. UPF1 silencing led to the up-regulation of 1251 genes in HCT116, among which a proportion of them (i.e. 38% significantly higher than expected by chance contained a coding microsatellite (P<2x10(-16. In MSI primary CRCs, UPF1 was significantly over-expressed compared to normal adjacent mucosa (P<0.002. Our data provided evidence for differential decay of PTC-mRNAs compared to wild-type that was positively correlated to UPF1 endogenous expression level (P = 0.02. A negative effect of UPF1 and UPF2 expression on the host's anti-tumor response was observed (P<0.01. Overall, our results show that NMD deeply influences MSI-driven tumorigenesis at the molecular level and indicate a functional negative impact of this system on anti-tumor immunity whose intensity has been recurrently shown to be an independent factor of favorable outcome in CRCs.

  8. Viral carcinogenesis: revelation of molecular mechanisms and etiology of human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    The RNA and DNA tumor viruses have made fundamental contributions to two major areas of cancer research. Viruses were vital, first, to the discovery and analysis of cellular growth control pathways and the synthesis of current concepts of cancer biology and, second, to the recognition of the etiology of some human cancers. Transforming retroviruses carry oncogenes derived from cellular genes that are involved in mitogenic signalling and growth control. DNA tumor viruses encode oncogenes of viral origin that are essential for viral replication and cell transformation; viral oncoproteins complex with cellular proteins to stimulate cell cycle progression and led to the discovery of tumor suppressors. Viral systems support the concept that cancer development occurs by the accumulation of multiple cooperating events. Viruses are now accepted as bona fide etiologic factors of human cancer; these include hepatitis B virus, Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomaviruses, human T-cell leukemia virus type I and hepatitis C virus, plus several candidate human cancer viruses. It is estimated that 15% of all human tumors worldwide are caused by viruses. The infectious nature of viruses distinguishes them from all other cancer-causing factors; tumor viruses establish long-term persistent infections in humans, with cancer an accidental side effect of viral replication strategies. Viruses are usually not complete carcinogens, and the known human cancer viruses display different roles in transformation. Many years may pass between initial infection and tumor appearance and most infected individuals do not develop cancer, although immunocompromised individuals are at elevated risk of viral-associated cancers. Variable factors that influence viral carcinogenesis are reviewed, including possible synergy between viruses and environmental cofactors. The difficulties in establishing an etiologic role for a virus in human cancer are discussed, as well as the different approaches that proved

  9. Role of human papilloma virus in the oral carcinogenesis: An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chocolatewala Noureen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is one of the most common cancers in the Indian subcontinent. Although tobacco and alcohol are the main etiologic factors for nearly three-fourth of these cancers, no definite etiologic factor can be identified in one-fourth of the cases. There is growing evidence that human papilloma virus (HPV may act as a cocarcinogen, along with tobacco, in the causation of oral cancers. The role of HPV in the etiology of anogenital cancers has been firmly established, and infection with this virus has also been shown to have prognostic significance. However, there is no clear evidence to support its involvement in oral carcinogenesis. We searched the PubMed database for all literature published from 1985 to 2008 and performed a systemic review in order to understand the relationship of HPV with oral cancers and its prevalence in various sub-sites in the oral cavity. Association of HPV is strongest for oropharyngeal cancers, especially cancers of the tonsils, followed by those of the base of tongue. High-risk HPV-16 is the predominant type; it commonly affects the younger age-groups, with males appearing to have a predisposition for infection with this strain. Its prevalence increases from normal to dysplasia and finally to cancer. HPV prevalence has been reported to be twice as high in premalignant lesions as in normal mucosa and is nearly five times higher in OSCC. The overall prevalence of HPV in OSCC ranges between 20-50%. OSCCs associated with HPV have been found to have better outcomes, being more responsive to radiotherapy and showing higher survival rates. In view of the association of HPV with OSCC, it should be worthwhile to conduct further experimental studies to elucidate its role in oral carcinogenesis.

  10. Human AP Endonuclease 1: A Potential Marker for the Prediction of Environmental Carcinogenesis Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sung Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 functions mainly in DNA repair as an enzyme removing AP sites and in redox signaling as a coactivator of various transcription factors. Based on these multifunctions of APE1 within cells, numerous studies have reported that the alteration of APE1 could be a crucial factor in development of human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, the study on the combination of an individual’s genetic make-up with environmental factors (gene-environment interaction is of great importance to understand the development of diseases, especially lethal diseases including cancer. Recent reports have suggested that the human carcinogenic risk following exposure to environmental toxicants is affected by APE1 alterations in terms of gene-environment interactions. In this review, we initially outline the critical APE1 functions in the various intracellular mechanisms including DNA repair and redox regulation and its roles in human diseases. Several findings demonstrate that the change in expression and activity as well as genetic variability of APE1 caused by environmental chemical (e.g., heavy metals and cigarette smoke and physical carcinogens (ultraviolet and ionizing radiation is likely associated with various cancers. These enable us to ultimately suggest APE1 as a vital marker for the prediction of environmental carcinogenesis risk.

  11. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA-RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-05-19

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA-miRNA and miRNA-miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA-RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Isolation of a Novel Human Gene, MARKLI, Homologous to MARK3 and Its Involvement in Hepatocellular Carcinogenesis

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    Tatsushi Kato

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the Writ-signaling pathway is known to play a crucial role in carcinogenesis of various human organs including the colon, liver, prostate, and endometrium. To investigate the mechanisms underlying hepatocellular carcinogenesis, we attempted to identify genes regulated by β-catenin/Tcf complex in a human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, in which an activated form of β-catenin is expressed. By means of cDNA microarray, we isolated a novel human gene, termed MARKLI (MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase-like 1, whose expression was downregulated in response to decreased Tcf/LEF1 activity. The transcript expressed in liver consisted of 3529 nucleotides that contained an open reading frame of 2256 nucleotides, encoding 752 amino acids homologous to human MARK3 (MAP/ microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 3. Expression levels of MARKL1 were markedly elevated in eight of nine HCCs in which nuclear accumulation of β-catenin was observed, which may suggest that MARKL1 plays some role in hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

  13. The methylation status and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase is significantly high in oral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Kazuya; Yada, Naomi; Sato, Shinobu; Habu, Manabu; Hayakawa, Mana; Takahashi, Osamu; Sasaguri, Masaaki; Takenaka, Shigeori; Yoshioka, Izumi; Matsuo, Kou; Tominaga, Kazuhiro

    2017-09-01

    Telomerase activity is present in most cancers and is tightly regulated by the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Hypermethylation in the promoter region of hTERT contributes to the regulation of hTERT expression. In this study, we investigated the methylation and expression of hTERT in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), oral leukoplakia, and normal oral mucosa. Furthermore, we investigated the significance of hTERT to the clinicopathological findings of OSCC. 35 OSCC, 50 oral leukoplakia (epithelial dysplasia n = 25, squamous cell hyperplasia n = 25), and 10 normal oral mucosa samples were investigated through methylation-specific PCR. Immunohistochemistry was analyzed in 35 OSCC, 50 oral leukoplakia, and 4 normal oral mucosa samples. The methylation and expression of hTERT increased from normal oral mucosa to oral leukoplakia to OSCC. In OSCC, all samples were methylated. However, partial methylation (20%) or unmethylation (80%), but never complete methylation, was observed in normal oral mucosa. Additionally, hTERT expression correlated with cervical lymph node metastasis. These results suggested that the methylation and expression of hTERT is high in oral carcinogenesis and may play an important role in oral cancer. hTERT expression may also be predictive of cervical lymph node metastasis. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Relationship between Human Papilloma Virus and Colorectal Cancer in Northern Iran

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    Anahita Nosrati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with more than one million new cases. According to the Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in Iran. Many risk factors are known causes of this disease. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with colorectal cancer are still under investigation. Recent studies have shown that some viruses, particularly human papilloma virus, may be associated with the pathology of colorectal cancer. Methods: This case-control study examined 95 colorectal cancer and 95 normal colon tissue paraffin blocks (control to identify the relationship between human papilloma virus and colorectal cancer by polymerase chain reaction. Results: Clinicopathological data that included sex, age, tumor grade, stage and location were recorded. All tumor and control groups (totally: 190 samples were negative in terms of the human papilloma virus genome. No relationship between clinicopathological data and human papilloma virus genome was identified. Conclusions: Regardless of other risk factors for colorectal cancer, a number of studies in different parts of the world have shown that human papilloma virus may be an important factor in the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer. However, we have found no association between human papilloma virus and colorectal cancer in this study.

  15. Correlation between physical status of human papilloma virus and cervical carcinogenesis.

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    Li, Kezhen; Jin, Xin; Fang, Yong; Wang, Changyu; Gong, Mei; Chen, Pingbo; Liu, Jia; Deng, Dongrui; Ai, Jihui

    2012-02-01

    The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV)-16 in patients with cervical cancer, the physical status of HPV-16 in patients with cervical lesions, and the role of HPV-16 integration in cervical carcinogenesis were investigated. HPV genotyping was performed by using PCR approach with the primer GP5+/GP6+ and type-specific primer on biopsy specimens taken operatively from 198 women. Multiple PCR was done to detect physical status of HPV-16 in a series of cervical liquid-based cytology samples and biopsy specimens obtained from different cervical lesions with HPV-16 infection, including 112 specimens with cervical cancer, 151 specimens with CIN I, 246 specimens with CIN and 120 specimens with CINIII. The results showed that there were 112 cervical cancer samples (56.57% of total cervical cancer patients) with HPV-16 infection. The frequency of HPV-16 pure integration was 65.18% (73/112), 56.57% (47/120), 23.58% (58/246) and 7.95% (12/151) in cervical cancer, CINIII, CINII and CINI patients respectively. In situ hybridization was performed on some paraffin-embedded sections of CINII, CINIII and cervical cancer to verify the physical status of HPV-16 infection. Significant difference was observed between cervical cancer and CIN I, CINII, CINIII in the frequency of HPV-16 integration (PHPV-16 is the most prevalent type and is associated with cervical cancer. In the case of HPV-16 infection there are close associations between the severity of cervical lesions and the frequency of HPV-16 integration. The application of testing HPV genotyping and physical status based on detection of HC-II HPV DNA would be in favor of predicting the prognosis of cervical precancerosis and enhancing the screening accuracy of cervical cancer.

  16. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase as a marker in colon carcinogenesis: analysis of the prostaglandin pathway in human colonic tissue

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    Dong-Hoon Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH, and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGEs-1 regulate prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂ expression and are involved in colon carcinogenesis. We investigated the expression of PGE₂ and its regulating genes in sporadic human colon tumors and matched normal tissues.Methods: Twenty colonic adenomas and 27 colonic adenocarcinomas were evaluated. COX-2 and 15-PGDH expression was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of PGE₂ and mPGEs-1 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting, respectively.Results: The expression of COX-2, mPGEs-1, and PGE₂ did not differ between the adenomas and matched distant normal tissues. 15-PGDH expression was lower in adenomas than in the matched normal colonic tissues (P<0.001. In adenocarcinomas, mPGEs-1 and PGE₂ expression was significantly higher (P<0.001 and P=0.020, respectively, and COX-2 expression did not differ from that in normal tissues (P=0.207. 15-PGDH expression was significantly lower in the normal colonic mucosa from adenocarcinoma patients than in the normal mucosa from adenoma patients (P=0.018.Conclusions: Early inactivation of 15-PGDH, followed by activation of COX-2 and mPGEs-1, contributes to PGE₂ production, leading to colon carcinogenesis. 15-PGDH might be a novel candidate marker for early detection of field defects in colon carcinogenesis.

  17. Human RecQL4 helicase plays critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanrong; Meador, Jarah A; Calaf, Gloria M

    2010-01-01

    for prostate cancer promotion. Observation of a direct interaction of retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F1 proteins with RecQL4 promoter suggests that Rb-E2F1 pathway may regulate RecQL4 expression. Collectively, our study shows that RecQL4 is an essential factor for prostate carcinogenesis....

  18. Chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Paula A; Colaço, Aura; Chaves, Raquel; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; De-La-Cruz P, Luis F; Lopes, Carlos

    2007-12-01

    The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair--i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.

  19. Beta-catenin accelerates human papilloma virus type-16 mediated cervical carcinogenesis in transgenic mice.

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    Gülay Bulut

    Full Text Available Human papilloma virus (HPV is the principal etiological agent of cervical cancer in women, and its DNA is present in virtually all of these tumors. However, exposure to the high-risk HPV types alone is insufficient for tumor development. Identifying specific collaborating factors that will lead to cervical cancer remains an unanswered question, especially because millions of women are exposed to HPV. Our earlier work using an in vitro model indicated that activation of the canonical Wnt pathway in HPV-positive epithelial cells was sufficient to induce anchorage independent growth. We therefore hypothesized that constitutive activation of this pathway might function as the "second hit." To address this possibility, we developed two double-transgenic (DT mouse models, K14-E7/ΔN87βcat and K14-HPV16/ΔN87βcat that express either the proteins encoded by the E7 oncogene or the HPV16 early region along with constitutively active β-catenin, which was expressed by linking it to the keratin-14 (K14 promoter. We initiated tumor formation by treating all groups with estrogen for six months. Invasive cervical cancer was observed in 11% of the K14-ΔN87βcat mice, expressing activated β-catenin and in 50% of the animals expressing the HPV16 E7 oncogene. In double-transgenic mice, coexpression of β-catenin and HPV16 E7 induced invasive cervical cancer at about 7 months in 94% of the cases. We did not observe cervical cancer in any group unless the mice were treated with estrogen. In the second model, K14-HPV16 mice suffered cervical dysplasias, but this phenotype was not augmented in HPV16/ΔN87βcat mice. In summary, the phenotypes of the K14-E7/ΔN87βcat mice support the hypothesis that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in HPV-associated premalignant lesions plays a functional role in accelerating cervical carcinogenesis.

  20. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

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    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase gene expressions are significantly correlated in human colorectal cancer

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    Cavallini Aldo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ is a transcription factor that regulates adipogenic differentiation and glucose homeostasis. Spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC are key enzymes involved in the metabolism of polyamines, compounds that play an important role in cell proliferation. While the PPARγ role in tumour growth has not been clearly defined, the involvement of the altered polyamine metabolism in colorectal carcinogenesis has been established. In this direction, we have evaluated the PPARγ expression and its relationship with polyamine metabolism in tissue samples from 40 patients operated because of colorectal carcinoma. Since it is known that the functional role of K-ras mutation in colorectal tumorigenesis is associated with cell growth and differentiation, polyamine metabolism and the PPARγ expression were also investigated in terms of K-ras mutation. Methods PPARγ, ODC and SSAT mRNA levels were evaluated by reverse transcriptase and real-time PCR. Polyamines were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. ODC and SSAT activity were measured by a radiometric technique. Results PPARγ expression, as well as SSAT and ODC mRNA levels were significantly higher in cancer as compared to normal mucosa. Tumour samples also showed significantly higher polyamine levels and ODC and SSAT activities in comparison to normal samples. A significant and positive correlation between PPARγ and the SSAT gene expression was observed in both normal and neoplastic tissue (r = 0.73, p Conclusion In conclusion, our data demonstrated a close relationship between PPARγ and SSAT in human colorectal cancer and this could represent an attempt to decrease polyamine levels and to reduce cell growth and tumour development. Therefore, pharmacological activation of PPARγ and/or induction of SSAT may represent a therapeutic or preventive strategy for treating

  2. TRAP1 protein signature predicts outcome in human metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Francesca; Simeon, Vittorio; Vita, Giulia; Bochicchio, Annamaria; Possidente, Luciana; Sisinni, Lorenza; Lettini, Giacomo; Condelli, Valentina; Matassa, Danilo Swann; Li Bergolis, Valeria; Fersini, Alberto; Romito, Sante; Aieta, Michele; Ambrosi, Antonio; Esposito, Franca; Landriscina, Matteo

    2017-03-28

    TRAP1 is a HSP90 molecular chaperone upregulated in colorectal carcinomas and involved in control of intracellular signaling, cell cycle, apoptosis and drug resistance, stemness and bioenergetics through co-traslational regulation of a network of client proteins. Thus, the clinical significance of TRAP1 protein network was analyzed in human colorectal cancers. TRAP1 and/or its client proteins were quantified, by immunoblot analysis, in 60 surgical specimens of colorectal carcinomas at different stages and, by immunohistochemistry, in 9 colorectal adenomatous polyps, 11 in situ carcinomas and 55 metastatic colorectal tumors. TRAP1 is upregulated at the transition between low- and high-grade adenomas, in in situ carcinomas and in about 60% of human colorectal carcinomas, being downregulated only in a small cohort of tumors. The analysis of TCGA database showed that a subgroup of colorectal tumors is characterized by gain/loss of TRAP1 copy number, this correlating with its mRNA and protein expression. Interestingly, TRAP1 is co-expressed with the majority of its client proteins and hierarchical cluster analysis showed that the upregulation of TRAP1 and associated 6-protein signature (i.e., IF2α, eF1A, TBP7, MAD2, CDK1 and βCatenin) identifies a cohort of metastatic colorectal carcinomas with a significantly shorter overall survival (HR 5.4; 95% C.I. 1.1-26.6; p=0.037). Consistently, the prognostic relevance of TRAP1 was confirmed in a cohort of 55 metastatic colorectal tumors. Finally, TRAP1 positive expression and its prognostic value are more evident in left colon cancers. These data suggest that TRAP1 protein network may provide a prognostic signature in human metastatic colorectal carcinomas.

  3. Epigenetic modulation associated with carcinogenesis and prognosis of human gastric cancer.

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    Sonohara, Fuminori; Inokawa, Yoshikuni; Hayashi, Masamichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Nomoto, Shuji

    2017-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death, particularly in Asia. Epidemiological and other clinical studies have identified an association between a number of risk factors, including Helicobacter pylori, and GC. A number of studies have also examined genetic changes associated with the development and progression of GC. When considering the clinical significance of the expression of a specific gene, its epigenetic modulation should be considered. Epigenetic modulation appears to be a primary driver of changes in gastric tissue that promotes carcinogenesis and progression of GC and other neoplasms. The role of epigenetic modulation in GC carcinogenesis and progression has been widely studied in recent years. In the present review, recent results of epigenetic modulation associated with GC and their effects on clinical outcome are examined, with particular respect to DNA methylation, histone modulation and non-coding RNA. A number of studies indicate that epigenetic changes in the expression of specific genes critically affect their clinical significance and further study may reveal epigenetic changes as the basis for targeted molecular therapy or novel biomarkers that predict GC prognosis or extension of this often fatal disease.

  4. Downregulation of keratin 76 expression during oral carcinogenesis of human, hamster and mouse.

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    Srikant Ambatipudi

    Full Text Available Keratins are structural marker proteins with tissue specific expression; however, recent reports indicate their involvement in cancer progression. Previous study from our lab revealed deregulation of many genes related to structural molecular integrity including KRT76. Here we evaluate the role of KRT76 downregulation in oral precancer and cancer development.We evaluated KRT76 expression by qRT-PCR in normal and tumor tissues of the oral cavity. We also analyzed K76 expression by immunohistochemistry in normal, oral precancerous lesion (OPL, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and in hamster model of oral carcinogenesis. Further, functional implication of KRT76 loss was confirmed using KRT76-knockout (KO mice.We observed a strong association of reduced K76 expression with increased risk of OPL and OSCC development. The buccal epithelium of DMBA treated hamsters showed a similar trend. Oral cavity of KRT76-KO mice showed preneoplastic changes in the gingivobuccal epithelium while no pathological changes were observed in KRT76 negative tissues such as tongue.The present study demonstrates loss of KRT76 in oral carcinogenesis. The KRT76-KO mice data underlines the potential of KRT76 being an early event although this loss is not sufficient to drive the development of oral cancers. Thus, future studies to investigate the contributing role of KRT76 in light of other tumor driving events are warranted.

  5. Molecular detection, quantification, and isolation of Streptococcus gallolyticus bacteria colonizing colorectal tumors: inflammation-driven potential of carcinogenesis via IL-1, COX-2, and IL-8

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    Abdulamir Ahmed S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC has long been associated with bacteremia and/or endocarditis by Streptococcus gallolyticus member bacteria (SGMB but the direct colonization of SGMB along with its molecular carcinogenic role, if any, has not been investigated. We assessed the colonization of SGMB in CRC patients with history of bacteremia (CRC-w/bac and without history of bacteremia (CRC-wo/bac by isolating SGMB from feces, mucosal surfaces of colorectum, and colorectal tissues and detecting SGMB DNA, via PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH assays targeting SodA gene in colorectal tissues. Moreover, mRNA of IL1, IL-8, COX-2, IFN-γ, c-Myc, and Bcl-2 in colorectal tissues of studied groups was assessed via ISH and RT-PCR. Results SGMB were found to be remarkably isolated in tumorous (TU and non-tumorous (NTU tissues of CRC-w/bac, 20.5% and 17.3%, and CRC-wo/bac, 12.8% and 11.5%, respectively while only 2% of control tissues revealed SGMB (P 10 CN/g respectively, showed higher colonization in TU than in NTU and in CRC-w/bac than in CRC-wo/bac (P Conclusions The current study indicated that colorectal cancer is remarkably associated with SGMB; moreover, molecular detection of SGMB in CRC was superior to link SGMB with CRC tumors highlighting a possible direct and active role of SGMB in CRC development through most probably inflammation-based sequel of tumor development or propagation via, but not limited to, IL-1, COX-2, and IL-8.

  6. Na+,HCO3--cotransport is functionally upregulated during human breast carcinogenesis and required for the inverted pH gradient across the plasma membrane

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    Lee, Soojung; Mele, Marco; Vahl, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic and biochemical changes during breast carcinogenesis enhance cellular acid production. Extrusion of the acid load from the cancer cells raises intracellular pH, while it decreases extracellular pH creating an inverted pH gradient across the plasma membrane compared to normal cells...... and promoting cancer cell metabolism, proliferation, migration, and invasion. We investigated the effects of breast carcinogenesis on the mechanisms of cellular pH control using multicellular epithelial organoids freshly isolated from human primary breast carcinomas and matched normal breast tissue....... Intracellular pH was measured by fluorescence microscopy, while protein expression was investigated by immunofluorescence imaging and immunoblotting. We found that cellular net acid extrusion increased during human breast carcinogenesis due to enhanced Na(+),HCO3 (-)-cotransport, which created an alkaline shift...

  7. The significance of PITX2 overexpression in human colorectal cancer.

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    Hirose, Hajime; Ishii, Hideshi; Mimori, Koshi; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Ikeda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2011-10-01

    The paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) gene encodes a transcription factor controlled by the WNT/Dvl/CTNNB1 and Hedgehog/TGFB pathways in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Although PITX2 is reportedly involved in various functions, including tissue development by controlling cell growth, its significance in CRC remains unclear. We report our findings regarding abnormal PITX2 expression in human CRC. PITX2 expression was evaluated in 5 human CRC cell lines and 92 primary CRC samples. Cell growth was evaluated after inhibition of PITX2 expression or after exogenous introduction of PITX2. PITX2 expression was seen in all the five CRC cell lines. The study of tissue samples indicated that PITX2 expression was significantly higher in cancerous tissue than in paired control tissue (P = 0.0471). Patients with lower PITX2 expression showed a poorer overall survival rate than those with higher PITX2 expression (P = 0.0481). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that PITX2 expression was an independent prognostic factor. Experimental knockdown and introduction of PITX2 also demonstrated that the level of PITX2 expression is inversely associated with cell growth and invasion in vitro. PITX2 expression is significantly related to the biological behavior of CRC cells and appears to be correlated with clinical survival. Thus, this study revealed a previously uncharacterized unique role and significance of PITX2 expression in CRC.

  8. Genome-wide transcriptional reorganization associated with senescence-to-immortality switch during human hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Gokhan; Arslan-Ergul, Ayca; Bagislar, Sevgi; Konu, Ozlen; Yuzugullu, Haluk; Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ozturk, Nuri; Ozen, Cigdem; Ozdag, Hilal; Erdal, Esra; Karademir, Sedat; Sagol, Ozgul; Mizrak, Dilsa; Bozkaya, Hakan; Ilk, Hakki Gokhan; Ilk, Ozlem; Bilen, Biter; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Akar, Nejat; Ozturk, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a permanent proliferation arrest in response to cell stress such as DNA damage. It contributes strongly to tissue aging and serves as a major barrier against tumor development. Most tumor cells are believed to bypass the senescence barrier (become "immortal") by inactivating growth control genes such as TP53 and CDKN2A. They also reactivate telomerase reverse transcriptase. Senescence-to-immortality transition is accompanied by major phenotypic and biochemical changes mediated by genome-wide transcriptional modifications. This appears to happen during hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in patients with liver cirrhosis, however, the accompanying transcriptional changes are virtually unknown. We investigated genome-wide transcriptional changes related to the senescence-to-immortality switch during hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Initially, we performed transcriptome analysis of senescent and immortal clones of Huh7 HCC cell line, and identified genes with significant differential expression to establish a senescence-related gene list. Through the analysis of senescence-related gene expression in different liver tissues we showed that cirrhosis and HCC display expression patterns compatible with senescent and immortal phenotypes, respectively; dysplasia being a transitional state. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that cirrhosis/senescence-associated genes were preferentially expressed in non-tumor tissues, less malignant tumors, and differentiated or senescent cells. In contrast, HCC/immortality genes were up-regulated in tumor tissues, or more malignant tumors and progenitor cells. In HCC tumors and immortal cells genes involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, telomere extension and branched chain amino acid metabolism were up-regulated, whereas genes involved in cell signaling, as well as in drug, lipid, retinoid and glycolytic metabolism were down-regulated. Based on these distinctive gene expression features we developed a 15-gene

  9. Human intestinal microbiota: cross-talk with the host and its potential role in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Guidotti, Marco; Fabbri, Alessia; Brigidi, Patrizia; Franceschi, Claudio; Fiorentini, Carla

    2011-02-01

    In this review, we discuss the multifactorial role of intestinal microbiota in colorectal cancer. The peculiar metabolism of dietary compounds of the individual microbiota complement, its overall immunostimulation and immunomodulatory activity, and eventually the production of toxins that perturb the regulation of cell growth, define the balance of positive and negative risk factors for colorectal cancer development. Moreover, shaping the composition of the human intestinal microbiota, diet has an indirect impact in determining the balance between health and disease. The integration of diet, microbial, and host factors in a system approach is mandatory to determine the overall balance of risk and protective factors for colorectal cancer onset.

  10. Gut microbiota modulate T cell trafficking into human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Eleonora; Governa, Valeria; Garzon, Jesus Francisco Glaus; Mele, Valentina; Amicarella, Francesca; Muraro, Manuele Giuseppe; Trella, Emanuele; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Oertli, Daniel; Däster, Silvio Raffael; Droeser, Raoul A; Weixler, Benjamin; Bolli, Martin; Rosso, Raffaele; Nitsche, Ulrich; Khanna, Nina; Egli, Adrian; Keck, Simone; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Terracciano, Luigi M; Zajac, Paul; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Borsig, Lubor; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2018-02-06

    Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) favour survival in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Chemotactic factors underlying their recruitment remain undefined. We investigated chemokines attracting T cells into human CRCs, their cellular sources and microenvironmental triggers. Expression of genes encoding immune cell markers, chemokines and bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (16SrRNA) was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR in fresh CRC samples and corresponding tumour-free tissues. Chemokine receptor expression on TILs was evaluated by flow cytometry on cell suspensions from digested tissues. Chemokine production by CRC cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo, on generation of intraperitoneal or intracecal tumour xenografts in immune-deficient mice. T cell trafficking was assessed on adoptive transfer of human TILs into tumour-bearing mice. Gut flora composition was analysed by 16SrRNA sequencing. CRC infiltration by distinct T cell subsets was associated with defined chemokine gene signatures, including CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 for cytotoxic T lymphocytes and T-helper (Th)1 cells; CCL17, CCL22 and CXCL12 for Th1 and regulatory T cells; CXCL13 for follicular Th cells; and CCL20 and CCL17 for interleukin (IL)-17-producing Th cells. These chemokines were expressed by tumour cells on exposure to gut bacteria in vitro and in vivo. Their expression was significantly higher in intracecal than in intraperitoneal xenografts and was dramatically reduced by antibiotic treatment of tumour-bearing mice. In clinical samples, abundance of defined bacteria correlated with high chemokine expression, enhanced T cell infiltration and improved survival. Gut microbiota stimulate chemokine production by CRC cells, thus favouring recruitment of beneficial T cells into tumour tissues. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Inhibition of fried meat-induced colorectal DNA damage and altered systemic genotoxicity in humans by crucifera, chlorophyllin, and yogurt.

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    Daniel T Shaughnessy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary exposures implicated as reducing or causing risk for colorectal cancer may reduce or cause DNA damage in colon tissue; however, no one has assessed this hypothesis directly in humans. Thus, we enrolled 16 healthy volunteers in a 4-week controlled feeding study where 8 subjects were randomly assigned to dietary regimens containing meat cooked at either low (100°C or high temperature (250°C, each for 2 weeks in a crossover design. The other 8 subjects were randomly assigned to dietary regimens containing the high-temperature meat diet alone or in combination with 3 putative mutagen inhibitors: cruciferous vegetables, yogurt, and chlorophyllin tablets, also in a crossover design. Subjects were nonsmokers, at least 18 years old, and not currently taking prescription drugs or antibiotics. We used the Salmonella assay to analyze the meat, urine, and feces for mutagenicity, and the comet assay to analyze rectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes for DNA damage. Low-temperature meat had undetectable levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs and was not mutagenic, whereas high-temperature meat had high HCA levels and was highly mutagenic. The high-temperature meat diet increased the mutagenicity of hydrolyzed urine and feces compared to the low-temperature meat diet. The mutagenicity of hydrolyzed urine was increased nearly twofold by the inhibitor diet, indicating that the inhibitors enhanced conjugation. Inhibitors decreased significantly the mutagenicity of un-hydrolyzed and hydrolyzed feces. The diets did not alter the levels of DNA damage in non-target white blood cells, but the inhibitor diet decreased nearly twofold the DNA damage in target colorectal cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that dietary factors can reduce DNA damage in the target tissue of fried-meat associated carcinogenesis.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00340743.

  12. Effect of New Water-Soluble Dendritic Phthalocyanines on Human Colorectal and Liver Cancer Cell Lines

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    Ebru YABAŞ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells and colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1 cells were treated with the synthesized water soluble phthalocyanine derivatives to understand the effect of the compounds both on colorectal and liver cancer cells. The compounds inhibited cell proliferation and displayed cytotoxic effect on these cancer cell lines however; the effect of the compounds on healthy control fibroblast cell line was comparatively lower. The compounds can be employed for cancer treatment as anticancer agents.

  13. Chemical carcinogenesis

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    Paula A. Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair - i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.A sociedade obtém numerosos benefícios da utilização de compostos químicos. A aplicação dos pesticidas, por exemplo, permitiu obter alimento em quantidade suficiente para satisfazer as necessidades alimentares de milhões de pessoas, condição relacionada com o aumento da esperança de vida. Os benefícios estão, por

  14. In vivo measurement of the shape of the tissue-refractive-index correlation function and its application to detection of colorectal field carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Andrew J; Ruderman, Sarah; DelaCruz, Mart; Wali, Ramesh K; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2012-04-01

    Polarization-gated spectroscopy is an established method to depth-selectively interrogate the structural properties of biological tissue. We employ this method in vivo in the azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat model to monitor the morphological changes that occur in the field of a tumor during early carcinogenesis. The results demonstrate a statistically significant change in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function for AOM-treated rats versus saline-treated controls. Since refractive index is linearly proportional to mass density, these refractive-index changes can be directly linked to alterations in the spatial distribution patterns of macromolecular density. Furthermore, we found that alterations in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function shape were an indicator of both present and future risk of tumor development. These results suggest that noninvasive measurement of the shape of the refractive-index correlation function could be a promising marker of early cancer development.

  15. Oral concentrated grape juice suppresses expression of NF-kappa B, TNF-α and iNOS in experimentally induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanholo, Vanessa Maria de Lima Pazine; Silva, Roseane Mendes; Silva, Tiago Donizetti; Neto, Ricardo Artigiani; Paiotti, Ana Paula Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Forones, Nora Manoukian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of grape juice on colon carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane (AOM) and expression of NF-kB, iNOS and TNF- α. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into 7 groups: G1, control; G2, 15 mg/kg AOM; G3, 1% grape juice 2 weeks before AOM; G4, 2% grape juice 2 weeks before AOM; G5, 1% grape juice 4 weeks after AOM; G6, 2% grape juice 4 weeks after AOM; G7, 2% grape juice without AOM. Histological changes and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were studied, while RNA expression of NF- kB, TNF- and iNOS was evaluated by qPCR. The number of ACF was higher in G2, and G4 presented a smaller number of crypts per focus than G5 (p=0.009) and G6. Small ACF (1-3) were more frequent in G4 compared to G2, G5 and G6 (p=0.009, p=0.009 and p=0.041, respectively). RNA expression of NF-kB was lower in G3 and G4 compared to G2 (p=0.004 and p=0.002, respectively). A positive correlation was observed between TNF- α and NF-kB gene expression (p=0.002). In conclusion, the administration of 2% grape juice before AOM reduced the crypt multiplicity, attenuating carcinogenesis. Lower expression of NF-kB was observed in animals exposed to grape juice for a longer period of time, regardless of concentration.

  16. Cuminaldehyde from Cinnamomum verum Induces Cell Death through Targeting Topoisomerase 1 and 2 in Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma COLO 205 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-daw Tsai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamomum verum, also called true cinnamon tree, is employed to make the seasoning cinnamon. Furthermore, the plant has been used as a traditional Chinese herbal medication. We explored the anticancer effect of cuminaldehyde, an ingredient of the cortex of the plant, as well as the molecular biomarkers associated with carcinogenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 cells. The results show that cuminaldehyde suppressed growth and induced apoptosis, as proved by depletion of the mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of both caspase-3 and -9, and morphological features of apoptosis. Moreover, cuminaldehyde also led to lysosomal vacuolation with an upregulated volume of acidic compartment and cytotoxicity, together with inhibitions of both topoisomerase I and II activities. Additional study shows that the anticancer activity of cuminaldehyde was observed in the model of nude mice. Our results suggest that the anticancer activity of cuminaldehyde in vitro involved the suppression of cell proliferative markers, topoisomerase I as well as II, together with increase of pro-apoptotic molecules, associated with upregulated lysosomal vacuolation. On the other hand, in vivo, cuminaldehyde diminished the tumor burden that would have a significant clinical impact. Furthermore, similar effects were observed in other tested cell lines. In short, our data suggest that cuminaldehyde could be a drug for chemopreventive or anticancer therapy.

  17. Dietary folate and APC mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Engeland, M. van; Lüchtenborg, M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with colorectal cancer risk and may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis through increased chromosome instability, gene mutations, and aberrant DNA methylation. Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated the associations between

  18. Toxicogenomic outcomes predictive of forestomach carcinogenesis following exposure to benzo(a)pyrene: Relevance to human cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labib, Sarah, E-mail: Sarah.Labib@hc-sc.gc.ca; Guo, Charles H., E-mail: Charles.Guo@hc-sc.gc.ca; Williams, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Williams@hc-sc.gc.ca; Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: Carole.Yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca; White, Paul A., E-mail: Paul.White@hc-sc.gc.ca; Halappanavar, Sabina, E-mail: Sabina.Halappanavar@hc-sc.gc.ca

    2013-12-01

    Forestomach tumors are observed in mice exposed to environmental carcinogens. However, the relevance of this data to humans is controversial because humans lack a forestomach. We hypothesize that an understanding of early molecular changes after exposure to a carcinogen in the forestomach will provide mode-of-action information to evaluate the applicability of forestomach cancers to human cancer risk assessment. In the present study we exposed mice to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), an environmental carcinogen commonly associated with tumors of the rodent forestomach. Toxicogenomic tools were used to profile gene expression response in the forestomach. Adult Muta™Mouse males were orally exposed to 25, 50, and 75 mg BaP/kg-body-weight/day for 28 consecutive days. The forestomach was collected three days post-exposure. DNA microarrays, real-time RT-qPCR arrays, and protein analyses were employed to characterize responses in the forestomach. Microarray results showed altered expression of 414 genes across all treatment groups (± 1.5 fold; false discovery rate adjusted P ≤ 0.05). Significant downregulation of genes associated with phase II xenobiotic metabolism and increased expression of genes implicated in antigen processing and presentation, immune response, chemotaxis, and keratinocyte differentiation were observed in treated groups in a dose-dependent manner. A systematic comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the forestomach from the present study to differentially expressed genes identified in human diseases including human gastrointestinal tract cancers using the NextBio Human Disease Atlas showed significant commonalities between the two models. Our results provide molecular evidence supporting the use of the mouse forestomach model to evaluate chemically-induced gastrointestinal carcinogenesis in humans. - Highlights: • Benzo(a)pyrene-mediated transcriptomic response in the forestomach was examined. • The immunoproteosome subunits and MHC class I

  19. Molecular evidence of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in colorectal tumours from Cuban patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudira Soto

    Full Text Available The association between colorectal cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV infection is still unproven. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV DNA in colorectal tissues from Cuban patients. A total of 63 colorectal formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues were studied (24 adenocarcinoma, 18 adenoma, and 21 colorectal tissues classified as benign colitis. DNA from colorectal samples was analysed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect the most clinically relevant high HR-HPV types (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45, -52, and -58. Associations between histologic findings and other risk factors were also analysed. Overall, HPV DNA was detected in 23.8% (15/63 of the samples studied. Viral infections were detected in 41.7% of adenocarcinoma (10/24 and 27.7% of adenoma cases (5/18. HPV DNA was not found in any of the negative cases. An association between histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma and HPV infection was observed (odd ratio = 4.85, 95% confidence interval = 1.40-16.80, p = 0.009. The only genotypes identified were HPV 16 and 33. Viral loads were higher in adenocarcinoma, and these cases were associated with HPV 16. This study provides molecular evidence of HR-HPV infection in colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues from Cuban patients.

  20. Human Sgo1 downregulation leads to chromosomal instability in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaizumi, M; Shinmura, K; Mori, H; Yamada, H; Suzuki, M; Kitayama, Y; Igarashi, H; Nakamura, T; Suzuki, H; Watanabe, Y; Hishida, A; Ikuma, M; Sugimura, H

    2009-02-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is recognised as a hallmark of cancer and is caused by a spindle assembly checkpoint disorder or chromosome mis-segregation during mitosis. Although the recent identification of human shugoshin (hSgo1), an important player in proper chromosome segregation, has suggested the involvement of hSgo1 in colorectal tumourigenesis, little is known about how it is involved. The aim of this study was to obtain information about the status of hSgo1 in human colorectal cancer. Among the 46 colorectal cancer cases, hSgo1 mRNA expression was decreased in the tumour tissue in comparison with the corresponding normal tissue (p = 0.032). Human Sgo1-downregulated tumours (tumour to normal mucosa ratiocatastrophes were also noted in hSgo1 knockdown cells. These findings suggest that hSgo1-downregulated colorectal cancers have a clinicopathological character of CIN, and hSgo1 downregulation leads to CIN in colorectal cancer cells.

  1. Genes Involved in Human Ribosome Biogenesis areTranscriptionally Upregulated in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Lamy, Philippe; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p<10-3) when compared to normal mucosa. Overexpression was independent of microsate......Microarray gene expression profiling comprising 168 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 10 normal mucosas showed that over 79% of the genes involved in human ribosome biogenesis are significantly upregulated (log2>0.5, p... of rRNA processing genes points towards a coordinated process enabling the overproduction of matured ribosomal structures....

  2. Adamts18 deficiency promotes colon carcinogenesis by enhancing β-catenin and p38MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling in the mouse model of AOM/DSS-induced colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tiantian; Dang, Suying; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Ying; Nie, Zongying; Hong, Tao; Zhang, Wei

    2017-03-21

    ADAMTS18 is a novel tumor suppressor and is critical to the pathology of human colorectal cancer. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. Here we generated an Adamts18-deficient mouse strain as an in vivo model to investigate the role of ADAMTS18 in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. In AOM/DSS-induced colitis-associated colorectal cancer, the deficiency of Adamts18 in mice resulted in enhanced tumorigenesis and colon inflammation that could be attributed in part to enhanced nuclear translocation of β-catenin and elevated expression of its downstream target genes, cyclin D1 and c-myc. Moreover, increased p38MAPK and ERK1/2 activities were detected in colon cancer cells from Adamts18-deficient mice. Further studies revealed that ADAMTS18 deficiency reduced intestinal E-cadherin levels in mice, which ultimately led to intestinal barrier dysfunction. These data indicate that Adamts18 deficiency enhances tumorigenesis and intestinal inflammation through elevated Wnt/β-catenin and p38MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling and promotes colon cancer in this mouse model.

  3. Nuclear expression of claudin-3 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuhara, Yasunori; Morinishi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Toru; Sakai, Manabu; Sakai, Takayoshi; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Kadota, Kyuichi; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji; Hirakawa, Eiichiro

    2018-01-01

    Claudins are members of a large family of transmembrane proteins, which are essential for the formation of tight junctions and have a significant effect on the biological behavior of tumor progression. Previous studies have demonstrated that several claudins show aberrant expression patterns in numerous types of cancer. The present study investigated the expression and localization of claudin-3 and claudin-7 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines and tissues. The protein expression levels of claudin-3 and claudin-7 were determined using immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical staining. Claudin-3, but not claudin-7, exhibited nuclear localization in the human colorectal adenocarcinoma Caco-2 and SW620 cell lines. Surgically resected colorectal adenocarcinoma tissue specimens were obtained, and the associations between the expression of claudin-3 or claudin-7 and various clinicopathological parameters were analyzed. The membranous expression rates of claudin-3 and claudin-7 were 58.0 and 50.0%, while their nuclear expression rates were 22.0 and 2.0%, respectively. The membranous expression of claudin-3 and claudin-7 was not associated with any clinicopathological factors, whereas the nuclear expression of claudin-3 was associated with histological type and was significantly increased in colorectal mucinous adenocarcinomas compared with that in well- to moderately-differentiated colorectal adenocarcinomas (P<0.01). However, no associations were observed between the nuclear expression of claudin-7 and any clinicopathological parameter. In conclusion, the nuclear expression of claudin-3 in colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma may be involved in the biological transformation of tumors. The results from the present study indicated that claudin-3 is an important protein associated with histological type and has potential as a prognostic marker. Although the mechanisms underlying the nuclear localization of claudin-3 in tumorigenesis have not yet been elucidated in

  4. Naringin accelerates the regression of pre-neoplastic lesions and the colorectal structural reorganization in a murine model of chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequetto, Priscila L; Oliveira, Tânia T; Maldonado, Izabel R S C; Augusto, Luís Eugênio F; Mello, Vanessa J; Pizziolo, Virginia R; Almeida, Márcia R; Silva, Marcelo E; Novaes, Rômulo D

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Naringin on pre-neoplastic colorectal lesions induced by chemical carcinogen in rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 130.8±27.1 g received weekly one subcutaneous injection of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH, 20 mg/kg) for 10 weeks. The animals were divided into 5 groups with 6 animals in each group. Group 1: 0.9% saline; Group 2: DMH+0.9% saline; Group 3: DMH+Naringin (10 mg/kg); Group 4: DMH+Naringin (100 mg/kg); Group 5: DMH+Naringin (200 mg/kg). G2 and G3 showed a significant increase in ACF number, AgNOR/nucleus and mitosis compared to G1. G4 and G5 presented a significant reduction in these parameters compared to G2. The number of cells producing acidic and neutral mucins, red blood cells and the level of antioxidant minerals, such as copper, magnesium, selenium and zinc, were significantly reduced in G2 and G3, but similar in G4 and G5 compared to G1. Naringin, especially at 200 mg/kg, was effective in reducing the number of pre-neoplastic lesions in rats exposed to DMH. Some of these effects may be due to reduction in cellular proliferation and tissue levels of iron together with the recovery of antioxidant mineral levels induced by this flavonoid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Progressive increase of matrix metalloprotease-9 and interleukin-8 serum levels during carcinogenic process in human colorectal tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorella Biasi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory reactions, known to promote tumor growth and invasion, have been found associated with colorectal carcinoma (CRC. Macrophages are the chief component of the inflammatory infiltration that occurs early in the progression from non-invasive to malignant tumor, with a switch from the pro-inflammatory phenotype to the tumor-promoting phenotype. Tumor and stroma are additional sources of inflammation-related molecules. The study aimed to evaluate, during colorectal carcinogenesis from benign to malignant phases: i the trend of serum levels of IL-8, IL-6, TGFβ1, VEGF and MMPs; ii the parallel trend of CRP serum levels; iii derangement of the principal TGFβ1 receptors (TGFβ1RI/RII in tumor tissues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 96 patients with colon adenomas or CRC at different stages of progression, and 17 controls, were recruited. Serum IL-8, IL-6, TGFβ1, VEGF, MMPs and CRP levels were analyzed before endoscopy or surgery. TGFβ1 receptors were evaluated in adenoma biopsies and surgically-removed colorectal adenocarcinomas. Serum levels of IL-8 in adenocarcinoma patients were increased from stage II, when also the enzymatic activity of MMP-9 increased. Of note, the increasing trend of the two serum markers was found significantly correlated. Trend of serum CRP was also very similar to that of IL-8 and MMP-9, but just below statistical significance. TGFβ1 levels were lower at stage III CRC, while IL-6 and VEGF levels had no significant variations. In tissue specimens, TGFβ1 receptors were already absent in about 50% of adenomas, and this percentage of missing receptors markedly increased in CRC stages III and IV. CONCLUSIONS: Combined quantification of serum IL-8, MMP-9 and CRP, appears a reliable and advanced index of inflammation-related processes during malignant phase of colorectal carcinogenesis, since these molecules remain within normal range in colorectal adenoma bearing patients, while consistently increase in

  6. The Relationship between TP53 Gene Status and Carboxylesterase 2 Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Ishimine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Irinotecan (CPT-11 is an anticancer prodrug that is activated by the carboxylesterase CES2 and has been approved for the treatment of many types of solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Recent studies with cell lines show that CES2 expression is regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53. However, clinical evidence for this regulatory mechanism in cancer is lacking. In this study, we examined the relationship between TP53 gene status and CES2 expression in human colorectal cancer. Most colorectal cancer specimens (70%; 26 of 37 showed lower CES2 mRNA levels (≥1.5-fold lower than the adjacent normal tissue, and only 30% (12 of 37 showed similar (<1.5-fold lower or higher CES2 mRNA levels. However, TP53 gene sequencing revealed no relationship between CES2 downregulation and TP53 mutational status. Moreover, while colorectal cancer cells expressing wild-type p53 exhibited p53-dependent upregulation of CES2, PRIMA-1MET, a drug that restores the transcriptional activity of mutant p53, failed to upregulate CES2 expression in cells with TP53 missense mutations. These results, taken together, suggest that CES2 mRNA expression is decreased in human colorectal cancer independently of p53.

  7. The role of selected matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in colorectal cancer developme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Groblewska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The development of this tumor is a complex, long-term, and multi-step process, from small dysplastic lesions of normal colorectal mucosa, through adenomatous polyps, to carcinoma in situ. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. MMP-9 is able to degrade collagen IV from basement membranes and extracellular matrix, which is associated with tumor progression, including invasion, metastasis, growth, migration, and angiogenesis. It was demonstrated that increased expression of MMP-9 plays a crucial role in the development of several human malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Increased expression of MMP-9 correlated with tumor stage, invasiveness, and poor survival of colorectal cancer patients.

  8. Human Neutrophil Peptides 1-3 – Early Markers in Development of Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Mothes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of Human Neutrophil Peptides (HNP 1–3 was recently found to be associated with development of colorectal cancer. Raised defensin-expression in tumours is believed to stem from increased infiltration of neutrophils into tumour environment.

  9. A comparison of flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in human colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Hansen, T P; Nielsen, O

    1998-01-01

    In human colorectal cancer it has been reported that some tumours lack the HLA-ABC antigens. This has been interpreted as reflecting tumour escape from the immune system. Earlier data have been obtained by immunohistochemistry. In this study, we compared the expression of HLA-ABC, HLA-DR, CD80 (B7......-1) and CD54 (ICAM-1) in 20 tumours using both a conventional immunohistochemistry two-layer technique and multiparameter flow cytometry, gating on an epithelial cell marker. Colorectal cancer tissue used in flow cytometry was dissociated with collagenase, deoxyribonuclease and hyaluronidase. The intensity...

  10. Human papillomavirus genome integration in squamous carcinogenesis: what have next generation sequencing studies taught us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Ian J; Coleman, Nicholas

    2018-02-14

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with ~5% of all human cancers, including a range of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Persistent infection by high-risk HPVs (HRHPVs) is associated with the integration of virus genomes (which are usually stably maintained as extrachromosomal episomes) into host chromosomes. Although HRHPV integration rates differ across human sites of infection, this process appears to be an integral event in HPV-associated neoplastic progression, leading to deregulation of virus oncogene expression, host gene expression modulation and further genomic instability. However, the mechanisms by which HRHPV integration occur and by which the subsequent gene expression changes take place are incompletely understood. The advent of 'next generation' sequencing (NGS) of both RNA and DNA has allowed powerful interrogation of the association of HRHPVs with human disease, including precise determination of the sites of integration and the genomic rearrangements at integration loci. In turn, these data have indicated that integration occurs through two main mechanisms: looping integration or direct insertion. Improved understanding of integration sites is allowing further investigation of the factors that provide a competitive advantage to some integrants during disease progression. Furthermore, advanced approaches to the generation of genome-wide samples have given novel insight into the three-dimensional interactions within the nucleus, that could act as another layer of epigenetic control of both virus and host transcription. It is hoped that further advances with NGS techniques and analysis will not only allow the examination of further unanswered questions regarding HPV infection but also direct new approaches to treating HPV-associated human disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of Lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule in human bladder carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hong-Yi; Chang, Hsin-Mei; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Chaing, Chang-Yao; Tzai, Tzong-Shin; Cheng, Hong-Lin; Raghavaraju, Giri; Chow, Nan-Haw; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2017-08-26

    Lutheran/basal cell adhesion molecule (Lu/BCAM) is a membrane bound glycoprotein. This study was performed to investigate the role and downstream signaling pathway of Lu/BCAM in human bladder tumorigenesis. Five human bladder cancer (E6, RT4, TSGH8301, TCCSUP and J82), one stable mouse fibroblast cell line (NIH-Lu) expressing Lu/BCAM transgene and sixty human uroepithelial carcinoma specimens were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IFA) staining, Western blotting and promoter luciferase assay for Lu/BCAM, respectively. The tumorigenicity of Lu/BCAM was demonstrated by focus formation, colony-forming ability, tumour formation, cell adhesion and migration. H-ras V12 was revealed to up-regulate Lu/BCAM at both transcriptional and translation levels. Lu/BCAM expression was detected on the membrane of primary human bladder cancer cells. Over-expression of Lu/BCAM in NIH-Lu stable cells increased focus number, colony formation and cell adhesion accompanied with F-actin rearrangement and decreased cell migration compared with parental NIH3T3 fibroblasts. In the presence of laminin ligand, Lu/BCAM overexpression further suppressed cell migration accompanied with increased cell adhesion. We further revealed that laminin-Lu/BCAM-induced cell adhesion and F-actin rearrangement were through increased Erk phosphorylation with an increase of RhoA and a decrease of Rac1 activity. Similarly, high Lu/BCAM expression was detected in the tumors of human renal pelvis, ureter and bladder, and was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage (p = 0.02). Patients with high Lu/BCAM expression showed a trend toward larger tumor size (p = 0.07) and lower disease-specific survival (p = 0.08), although not reaching statistical significance. This is the first report showing that Lu/BCAM, in the presence of its ligand laminin, is oncogenic in human urothelial cancers and may have potential as a novel therapeutic target.

  12. Occurrence of BK Virus and Human Papilloma Virus in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzyński, Adrian; Zając, Przemysław; Żebrowski, Remigiusz; Boguszewska, Anastazja; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2017-09-21

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. In Poland, it is the second most common cancer, regardless of gender. The aim of study was to analyze the incidence of HPV and BKV in the tissue of colorectal cancer and to determine the relationship between the presence of these viruses and the development of this cancer. The experiments were conducted using 50 colorectal cancer tissues collected from histological sections. The clinical material was embedded in paraffin blocks. Next, DNA extraction was performed. Isolates of colorectal cancer tissue were tested for the presence of HPV DNA. BKV DNA was detected by PCR using specific primers and then differentiated from JCV by digestion with BamHI enzyme. In clinical specimens taken from patients with colorectal cancer, HPV DNA was detected in 20% of cases. In 10% of cases the presence of HPV type 18 was confirmed, in the other 90% of the samples HPV type 16 was detected, while the presence of BKV was confirmed in 30% of cases. Coinfection with HPV and BKV was shown in 12% of patients. In one case, BK virus coexisted with HPV type 18, in the remaining 5 cases with HPV type 16. Developing colorectal cancer can show no symptoms, even for many years. This is why it is so important to become familiar with as many etiological factors as possible. The development of many human neoplasms is often initiated by exposure to infectious agents - such as bacterial or viral infections. Similar to the human papillomavirus, the BK virus was detected in clinical specimens. It seems that HPV and BKV infections can contribute to the neoplastic process, which requires detailed studies on a larger group of patients.

  13. Animal and human responses to UVA and UVB[UV; Skin; Eye; Carcinogenesis; Immune response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, R.; Cridland, N.; Kowalczuk, C

    1997-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) comprises the most energetic region of the optical radiation spectrum and is able to induce photochemical changes in the superficial tissues of animals and people which can lead to various acute or chronic adverse health effects. The evidence concerning experimental studies of animals and, where available, volunteers of the effects of occupationally relevant wavelengths (principally UVB, 280-315 rim, and UVA, 315-400 nm) has been reviewed. Experimental studies on animals indicate that exposure to UVR elicits transient (acute) and long-lasting (chronic) effects in the skin and the eye, the severity of which increases in proportion to the exposure. Transient responses have also been investigated in human volunteers and these include adaptive changes such as immediate pigment darkening, melanogenesis and epidermal hyperplasia, and inflammatory responses such as erythema in the skin and keratitis and conjunctivitis in the eye. Irreversible, long-lasting changes also occur following exposure; these include photoageing of the skin, and the development of cataracts in the lens of the eye. Animal studies show that UVR can act either as a complete carcinogen, capable of inducing tumours when applied by itself, or as a co-carcinogen acting in combination with tumour initiators and promoters. The interaction of UVR with the immune system is complex. Exposure to UVR affects the immune system, depressing certain types of cell-mediated antigen-specific responses. Variable immunosuppressive effects have also been reported in humans. In addition, exogenous chemical sensitisers can initiate phototoxic or photoallergic responses in humans and animals; these can precede the development of more persistent idiopathic photodermatoses in which the sensitiser may be an endogenous chemical or antigen. Recommendations for further research are made. (author)

  14. Human colorectal mucosal microbiota correlates with its host niche physiology revealed by endomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-Hua; Li, Ming; Li, Chang-Qing; Kou, Guan-Jun; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-02-26

    The human gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of health, but how the microbiota interacts with the host at the colorectal mucosa is poorly understood. We proposed that confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) might help to untangle this relationship by providing in vivo physiological information of the mucosa. We used CLE to evaluate the in vivo physiology of human colorectal mucosa, and the mucosal microbiota was quantified using 16 s rDNA pyrosequencing. The human mucosal microbiota agglomerated to three major clusters dominated by Prevotella, Bacteroides and Lactococcus. The mucosal microbiota clusters did not significantly correlate with the disease status or biopsy sites but closely correlated with the mucosal niche physiology, which was non-invasively revealed by CLE. Inflammation tilted two subnetworks within the mucosal microbiota. Infiltration of inflammatory cells significantly correlated with multiple components in the predicted metagenome, such as the VirD2 component of the type IV secretory pathway. Our data suggest that a close correlation exists between the mucosal microbiota and the colorectal mucosal physiology, and CLE is a clinically available tool that can be used to facilitate the study of the in vivo correlation between colorectal mucosal physiology and the mucosal microbiota.

  15. Human Papilloma Virus-Dependent HMGA1 Expression Is a Relevant Step in Cervical Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Mellone

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available HMGA1 is a member of a small family of architectural transcription factors involved in the coordinate assembly of multiprotein complexes referred to as enhanceosomes. In addition to their role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and development, high-mobility group proteins of the A type (HMGA family members behave as transforming protoncogenes either in vitro or in animal models. Recent reports indicated that HMGA1 might counteract p53 pathway and provided an interesting hint on the mechanisms determining HMGA's transforming potential. HMGA1 expression is deregulated in a very large array of human tumors, including cervical cancer, but very limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms leading to HMGA1 deregulation in cancer cells. Here, we report that HMGA1 expression is sustained by human papilloma virus (HPV E6/E7 proteins in cervical cancer, as demonstrated by either E6/E7 overexpression or by repression through RNA interference. Knocking down HMGA1 expression by means of RNA interference, we also showed that it is involved in cell proliferation and contributes to p53 inactivation in this type of neoplasia. Finally, we show that HMGA1 is necessary for the full expression of HPV18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins thus establishing a positive autoregulatory loop between HPV E6/E7 and HMGA1 expression.

  16. Haemostatic aspects of recombinant human erythropoietin in colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, K A; Qvist, N; Winther, K

    1998-01-01

    patients undergoing elective colorectal resection, 13 of whom were given r-HuEPO (Eprex) and 11 placebo. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Concentrations of haemoglobin, tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1; activated partial thromboplastin time; prothrombin time; platelet...... and reticulocyte counts; blood loss; and transfusions. RESULTS: There was no significant change in fibrinolytic activity, prothrombin time, or activated prothrombin time in the treatment group. Platelet counts differed slightly but not significantly, being higher in the r-HuEPO group. There was a significant...

  17. Dietary mycotoxins, co-exposure, and carcinogenesis in humans: Short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruyck, Karl; De Boevre, Marthe; Huybrechts, Inge; De Saeger, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins, toxic secondary metabolites of fungi, affect global agriculture so prolifically that they are virtually ubiquitous at some concentration in the average human diet. Studies of in vitro and in vivo toxicity are discussed, leading to investigations of co-exposed mycotoxins, as well as carcinogenic effects. Some of the most common and toxicologically significant mycotoxins, such as the aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, patulin, zearalenone, and some ergot alkaloids are outlined. The wide variety of pathogenic mechanisms these compounds employ are shown capable of inducing a complex set of interactions. Of particular note are potential synergisms between mycotoxins with regard to carcinogenic attributable risk, indicating an important field for future study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cryopreservation of human colorectal carcinomas prior to xenografting

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    Krohn Mathias

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular heterogeneity of colorectal carcinoma (CRC is well recognized, forming the rationale for molecular tests required before administration of some of the novel targeted therapies that now are rapidly entering the clinics. For clinical research at least, but possibly even for future individualized tumor treatment on a routine basis, propagation of patients' CRC tissue may be highly desirable for detailed molecular, biochemical or functional analyses. However, complex logistics requiring close liaison between surgery, pathology, laboratory researchers and animal care facilities are a major drawback in this. We here describe and evaluate a very simple cryopreservation procedure for colorectal carcinoma tissue prior to xenografting that will considerably reduce this logistic complexity. Methods Fourty-eight CRC collected ad hoc were xenografted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice either fresh from surgery (N = 23 or after cryopreservation (N = 31; up to 643 days. Results Take rates after cryopreservation were satisfactory (71% though somewhat lower than with tumor tissues fresh from surgery (74%, but this difference was not statistically significant. Re-transplantation of cryopreserved established xenografts (N = 11 was always successful. Of note, in this series, all of the major molecular types of CRC were xenografted successfully, even after cryopreservation. Conclusions Our procedure facilitates collection, long-time storage and propagation of clinical CRC specimens (even from different centres for (preclinical studies of novel therapies or for basic research.

  19. Human papillomavirus infection correlates with inflammatory Stat3 signaling activity and IL-17 level in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xin Li

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major burden of public health and healthcare worldwide. Microbiota has been suggested in promoting chronic inflammation in the intestine which, in turn, promotes tumor development. This study focuses on possible correlations of human papillomavirus (HPV infection with proinflammatory Stat3 signaling activities and the resulting levels of its downstream proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 in CRC patients.HPV was examined using HPV Genotyping Chip technology and constitutively active Stat3 (p-Stat3 and IL-17 levels were tested using immunohistochemistry (IHC in paraffin-embedded cancerous and adjacent normal tissues (ANT from a cohort of 95 CRC patients. Correlation analyses were performed between HPV infection and clinicopathological characteristics, Stat3 activities and IL-17 levels among these CRC patients.Three major findings were observed: (1 HPV infection existed in a high rate of CRC cases (48.4%, 46/95, of which 45 cases (45/46, 97.8% were high-risk HPV16-positive and only one case was HPV53-positive. (2 HPV infection correlated with poorer clinical stages (III+IV of CRC. (3 HPV infection strongly correlated with both constitutively higher Stat3 activities (P<0.01 and higher IL-17 levels (P<0.01 only in CRC tissues but not in ANT tissues.HPV infection is common in CRC patients suggesting potentially preventive effectiveness of HPV vaccination among high-risk young individuals. We have for the first time revealed a tri-lateral relationship among HPV infection, constitutive Stat3 activity and IL-17 level, whose collaborative act may orchestrate a proinflammatory microenvironment in the colorectum that, in turn, may promote carcinogenesis and possibly facilitate progression of CRC.

  20. Autofluoresence spectroscopy for in-vivo diagnosis of human oral carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Yu; Tsai, Tsuimin; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Kuo, Ying-Shiung; Chen, Chin-Tin; Chiang, Chung-Ping

    2002-09-01

    An in vivo study of human oral cancer diagnosis by using autofluorescence spectroscopy is presented. A Xenon-lamp with a motor-controlled monochromator was adopted as the excitation light source. We chose the excitation wavelength of 330 nm, and the spectral measurement range was from 340 nm to 601 nm. A Y-type fiber bundle was used to guide the excitation light, and collect the autofluorescence of samples. The emitted light was detected by a motor-controlled monochromator and a PMT. After measurement, the measured sites were sectioned and sent for histological examination. In total 15 normal sites, 30 OSF (oral submucosa fibrosis) sites, 26 EH (epithelial hyperkratosis) sites, 13 ED (epithelial dysplasia) sites, and 13 SCC (squamous cell carcinoma) sites were measured. The discriminant algorithm was established by partial-least squares (PLS) method with cross-validation technique. By extracting the first two t-scores of each sample and make scattering plot, we found that the samples of different cancerous stages were in grouped distinct locations, except that samples of ED and EH were mixed together. It means that this algorithm can be used to classify normal, premalignant, and malignant tissues. We conclude that autofluorescence spectroscopy may be useful for in vivo detection of early stage oral cancer.

  1. Co-carcinogenesis: Human Papillomaviruses, Coal Tar Derivatives, and Squamous Cell Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry W. Haverkos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer (CC is the fourth most common cancers among women worldwide. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs play a major role in the etiology of CC, with several lines of epidemiologic and experimental evidence supporting a role for non-viral (co-carcinogens and host genetic factors in controlling the risk for progression to neoplasia among HPV-infected individuals. The role of co-carcinogens in the development of CC is significant in the developing world where poor sanitation and other socio-economic conditions increase the infectious cancer burden. Here, we discuss how exposure to environmental factors such as coal tar derivatives from cigarette smoking, tar-based sanitary products, and inhaled smoke from biomass-burning stoves, could activate host pathways involved in development of HPV-associated squamous cell cancers in resource-limited settings. Understanding interactions between these pathways with certain oncogenic HPV genotypes may guide implementation of strategies for control and treatment of HPV-associated cancers that develop in populations at high risk of exposure to various co-carcinogens.

  2. Incidence and Mortality of Colorectal Cancer and Relationships with the Human Development Index across the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Sepehri, Zahra; Shamlou, Reza; Salehiniya, Hamid; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the standardized incidence and mortality rate of colorectal cancer and its relationship with the human development index (HDI) across the world in 2012. This ecologic study was conducted for assessment of the correlation between age-specific incidence rate (ASIR) and age-specific mortality rate (ASMR) with HDI and its components. Data for SIR and SMR for every country for the year 2012 were obtained from the global cancer project. We used a bivariate method for assessment of the correlation between SIR and SMR and HDI. Statistical significance was assumed at <0.05. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS (Version 22.0, SPSS Inc.). Countries with the highest SIR of colorectal cancer in the world in 2012, were Republic of Korea, Slovakia, Hungary and countries with the highest SMR were Hungary, Croatia and Slovakia. The correlation between SIR of colorectal cancer and the HDI was 0.712 (P≤0.001), with life expectancy at birth 0.513 (P≤0.001), with mean years of schooling 0.641 (P≤0.001) and with level of income per each person of the population 0.514 (P=0.013). In addition, the correlation between SMR of colorectal cancer and the HDI was 0.628 (P≤0.001), with life expectancy at birth 0.469 (P≤0.001), with mean years of schooling 0.592 (P≤0.001) and with level of income per each person of the population 0.378 (P=0.013). The highest SIR and SMR of colorectal cancer was in the WHO Europe region. There was a positive correlation between HDI and SIR and SMR of colorectal cancer.

  3. Identification of a characteristic vascular belt zone in human colorectal cancer.

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    Jakob Nikolas Kather

    Full Text Available Intra-tumoral blood vessels are of supreme importance for tumor growth, metastasis and therapy. Yet, little is known about spatial distribution patterns of these vessels. Most experimental or theoretical tumor models implicitly assume that blood vessels are equally abundant in different parts of the tumor, which has far-reaching implications for chemotherapy and tumor metabolism. In contrast, based on histological observations, we hypothesized that blood vessels follow specific spatial distribution patterns in colorectal cancer tissue. We developed and applied a novel computational approach to identify spatial patterns of angiogenesis in histological whole-slide images of human colorectal cancer.In 33 of 34 (97% colorectal cancer primary tumors blood vessels were significantly aggregated in a sharply limited belt-like zone at the interface of tumor tissue to the intestinal lumen. In contrast, in 11 of 11 (100% colorectal cancer liver metastases, a similar hypervascularized zone could be found at the boundary to surrounding liver tissue. Also, in an independent validation cohort, we found this vascular belt zone: 22 of 23 (96% samples of primary tumors and 15 of 16 (94% samples of liver metastases exhibited the above-mentioned spatial distribution.We report consistent spatial patterns of tumor vascularization that may have far-reaching implications for models of drug distribution, tumor metabolism and tumor growth: luminal hypervascularization in colorectal cancer primary tumors is a previously overlooked feature of cancer tissue. In colorectal cancer liver metastases, we describe a corresponding pattern at the invasive margin. These findings add another puzzle piece to the complex concept of tumor heterogeneity.

  4. Regulatory feedback loops bridge the human gene regulatory network and regulate carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Ru; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Lin, Chen-Ching

    2017-11-29

    The development of disease involves a systematic disturbance inside cells and is associated with changes in the interactions or regulations among genes forming biological networks. The bridges inside a network are critical in shortening the distances between nodes. We observed that, inside the human gene regulatory network, one strongly connected core bridged the whole network. Other regulations outside the core formed a weakly connected component surrounding the core like a peripheral structure. Furthermore, the regulatory feedback loops (FBLs) inside the core compose an interface-like structure between the core and periphery. We then denoted the regulatory FBLs as the interface core. Notably, both the cancer-associated and essential biomolecules and regulations were significantly overrepresented in the interface core. These results implied that the interface core is not only critical for the network structure but central in cellular systems. Furthermore, the enrichment of the cancer-associated and essential regulations in the interface core might be attributed to its bridgeness in the network. More importantly, we identified one regulatory FBL between HNF4A and NR2F2 that possesses the highest bridgeness in the interface core. Further investigation suggested that the disturbance of the HNF4A-NR2F2 FBL might protect tumor cells from apoptotic processes. Our results emphasize the relevance of the regulatory network properties to cellular systems and might reveal a critical role of the interface core in cancer. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Review of colorectal cancer and its metastases in rodent models: comparative aspects with those in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobaek-Larsen, M; Thorup, I; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2000-01-01

    . To study these phenomena in detail, a number of animal models of human CRC have been developed. The hypothetical ideal animal model should mimic the human disease in terms of morphology, biochemical alterations, and biological behavior. No existing model replicates the disease as an entity, but available...... models approximate many of the characteristics of human colonic carcinogenesis and metastasis. So far few comparative evaluations of the various animal models of CRC have been made. CONCLUSION: Animal studies cannot replace human clinical trials, but they can be used as a pre-screening tool, so...... that human trials become more directed, with greater chances of success. The orthotopic transplantation of colon cancer cells into the cecum of syngeneic animals or intraportal inoculation appears to resemble the human metastatic disease most closely, providing a model for study of the treatment...

  6. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, an appropriate in vitro model to study heavy metals induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Youn-hee; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu

    2015-09-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to arsenic (III) and chromium VI (Cr(VI)) have been confirmed to cause lung cancer. Mechanisms of these metals carcinogenesis are still under investigation. Selection of cell lines to be used is essential for the studies. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells are the cells to be utilized by most of scientists. However, due to p53 missense mutation (CCG → TCG) at codon 47 and the codon 72 polymorphism (CGC → CCC) in BEAS-2B cells, its usage has frequently been questioned. The present study has examined activity and expression of 53 and its downstream target protein p21 upon acute or chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic and Cr(VI). The results show that short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) was able to activate both p53 and p21. Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to these two metals caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. In arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells reductions in p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 were observed, while the total p53 protein level remained the same compared to those in passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit elevated p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation at Ser15, but reduced phosphorylation at Ser392 and total p53 protein level compared to passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were elevated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. These results demonstrate that p53 is able to respond to exposure of arsenic or Cr(VI), suggesting that BEAS-2B cells are an appropriate in vitro model to investigate arsenic or Cr(VI) induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) activates p53 and p21. • Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) causes cell transformation and tumorigenesis. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit

  7. A homologue of Drosophila aurora kinase is oncogenic and amplified in human colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, J R; Anderson, L; Zhu, Y; Mossie, K; Ng, L; Souza, B; Schryver, B; Flanagan, P; Clairvoyant, F; Ginther, C; Chan, C S; Novotny, M; Slamon, D J; Plowman, G D

    1998-06-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies in lower eukaryotes have identified several proteins that ensure accurate segregation of chromosomes. These include the Drosophila aurora and yeast Ipl1 kinases that are required for centrosome maturation and chromosome segregation. We have identified two human homologues of these genes, termed aurora1 and aurora2, that encode cell-cycle-regulated serine/threonine kinases. Here we demonstrate that the aurora2 gene maps to chromosome 20q13, a region amplified in a variety of human cancers, including a significant number of colorectal malignancies. We propose that aurora2 may be a target of this amplicon since its DNA is amplified and its RNA overexpressed, in more than 50% of primary colorectal cancers. Furthermore, overexpression of aurora2 transforms rodent fibroblasts. These observations implicate aurora2 as a potential oncogene in many colon, breast and other solid tumors, and identify centrosome-associated proteins as novel targets for cancer therapy.

  8. STRAP Promotes Stemness of Human Colorectal Cancer via Epigenetic Regulation of the NOTCH Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lin; Vu, Trung; Yuan, Guandou; Datta, Pran K

    2017-10-15

    NOTCH signaling exerts essential roles in normal and malignant intestinal physiology and the homeostasis of cancer stem-like cells (CSC), but the basis for this latter role remains obscure. The signaling scaffold protein STRAP is upregulated in several cancers, where it promotes tumorigenicity and metastasis. Here we report a novel oncogenic function for STRAP in maintaining CSC subpopulations in a heterogeneous mixture by antagonizing formation of the chromatin modifier PRC2 and by epigenetically activating NOTCH signals in human colorectal cancer. Silencing STRAP sensitized colorectal cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro and in vivo STRAP depletion also contributed to a reduced stem-like phenotype of colorectal cancer cells, as indicated by reduced expression of the CSC signature and NOTCH signaling regulators in vitro and by diminished tumorigenesis in vivo Genes encoding some upstream activators of NOTCH were highly enriched for H3K27me3, which forms repressive chromatin domains upon STRAP silencing. Mechanistically, STRAP competitively disrupted association of the PRC2 subunits EZH2 and SUZ12, thereby inhibiting PRC2 assembly. Restoring the NOTCH pathway by lentiviral expression of NICD1 or HES1 in STRAP-depleted tumor cells reversed the CSC phenotype. In 90 colorectal cancer clinical specimens, a significant positive correlation was documented between the expression of STRAP and HES1. Overall, our findings illuminated a novel STRAP-NOTCH1-HES1 molecular axis as a CSC regulator in colorectal cancer, with potential implications to improve treatment of this disease. Cancer Res; 77(20); 5464-78. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Colorectal carcinogenesis-update and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raskov, Hans; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    metabolism, high risk luminal environment, inflammation, as well as lifestyle factors such as diet, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. In recent years focus has turned towards the genetics and molecular biology of CRC and several interesting and promising correlations and pathways have been discovered...

  10. Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, S.M.; Ellwein, L.B. (Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha (USA))

    1990-08-31

    Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

  11. Human epidermal growth factor (Her-2) in gastric and colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Asma; Qureshi, Muhammad Asif; Mirza, Talat; Khalid, Abdullah Bin

    2017-07-01

    Gastrointestinal (GIT) malignancies are a substantial health concern. Most patients present to the clinics with advanced and un-resectable diseases, so it remains difficult to cure with the existing chemotherapeutic regimes. It is therefore extremely important to devise novel therapeutic targets in these neoplasms in order to improve patient's survival. One such target is human epidermal growth factor, also known as Her-2. Although Her-2 expression and the use of a-Her-2 medications in breast cancers is well established, but its expression and potential use as a therapeutic target in gastrointestinal malignancies remains controversial and heavily debated. This review was planned to summarise the available literature extracted from the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM) and Pubmed Central, related to expression of Her-2 in gastric and colorectal adenocarcinomas and their correlation with different parameters. Moreover, we also planned to discuss available data in support of using a-Her-2 in gastric and colorectal malignancies.

  12. Occurrence of BK Virus and Human Papilloma Virus in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Jarzyński

    2017-09-01

    Developing colorectal cancer can show no symptoms, even for many years. This is why it is so important to become familiar with as many etiological factors as possible. The development of many human neoplasms is often initiated by exposure to infectious agents – such as bacterial or viral infections. Similar to the human papillomavirus, the BK virus was detected in clinical specimens. It seems that HPV and BKV infections can contribute to the neoplastic process, which requires detailed studies on a larger group of patients.

  13. Microbiota, Inflammation and Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécily Lucas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, is a multifactorial disease involving genetic, environmental and lifestyle risk factors. In addition, increased evidence has established a role for the intestinal microbiota in the development of colorectal cancer. Indeed, changes in the intestinal microbiota composition in colorectal cancer patients compared to control subjects have been reported. Several bacterial species have been shown to exhibit the pro-inflammatory and pro-carcinogenic properties, which could consequently have an impact on colorectal carcinogenesis. This review will summarize the current knowledge about the potential links between the intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer, with a focus on the pro-carcinogenic properties of bacterial microbiota such as induction of inflammation, the biosynthesis of genotoxins that interfere with cell cycle regulation and the production of toxic metabolites. Finally, we will describe the potential therapeutic strategies based on intestinal microbiota manipulation for colorectal cancer treatment.

  14. The chemopreventive action of bromelain, from pineapple stem (Ananas comosus L.), on colon carcinogenesis is related to antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Barbara; Fasolino, Ines; Pagano, Ester; Capasso, Raffaele; Pace, Simona; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Milic, Natasa; Orlando, Pierangelo; Izzo, Angelo A; Borrelli, Francesca

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is an important health problem across the world. Here, we investigated the possible antiproliferative/proapoptotic effects of bromelain (from the pineapple stem Ananas comosus L., family Bromeliaceae) in a human colorectal carcinoma cell line and its potential chemopreventive effect in a murine model of colon cancer. Proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells by the (3) H-thymidine incorporation assay and caspase 3/7 activity measurement, respectively. Extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) and Akt expression were evaluated by Western blot analysis, reactive oxygen species production by a fluorimetric method. In vivo, bromelain was evaluated using the azoxymethane murine model of colon carcinogenesis. Bromelain reduced cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis in Caco-2 cells. The effect of bromelain was associated to downregulation of pERK1/2/total, ERK, and pAkt/Akt expression as well as to reduction of reactive oxygen species production. In vivo, bromelain reduced the development of aberrant crypt foci, polyps, and tumors induced by azoxymethane. Bromelain exerts antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in colorectal carcinoma cells and chemopreventive actions in colon carcinogenesis in vivo. Bromelain-containing foods and/or bromelain itself may represent good candidates for colorectal cancer chemoprevention. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Polymorphic expression of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase UGTlA gene in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymorphism of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes is known to play an important role in increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer. UGT1A gene locus has been suggested to define tissue-specific glucuronidation activity. Reduced capacity of glucuronidation is correlated with the development of colorectal cancer. Therefore, we sought to explore polymorphism of UGTlA gene in human colorectal cancer. METHODS: Cancerous and healthy tissues were obtained from selectedpatients. Blood samples were collected and UGTlA mRNA transcriptions were analyzed. Genomic DNA was prepared and UGTlA8 exon-1 sequences were amplified, visualized and purified. The extracted DNA was subcloned and sequenced. Two-tailed Fisher's exact test, Odds ratios (ORs, confidence interval (CIs and Logistics Regression Analysis were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: UGTlA mRNA expression was reduced in cancerous tissues compared with healthy tissues from the same patient . The UGTlA mRNA expression of healthy tissue in study patients was lower than control . The mRNA expression of cancerous tissue was down-regulated in UGTlAl, 1A3, 1A4, lA6, 1A9 and up-regulated in UGTlA8 and UGTlAl0 UGT1A5 and UGT1A7 were not expressed in colonic tissue of either group. The allele frequency of WT UGTlA8*1 was higher (p = 0.000, frequency of UGTlA8*3 was lowered in control group (p = 0.000. The expression of homozygous UGTlA8*1 was higher in control group (p = 0.000. Higher frequency of both heterozygous UGTlA8*1/*3 and UGTlA8*2/*3 were found in study group (p = 0.000; p = 0.000. The occurrence of colorectal cancer was mainly related to the presence of polymorphic UGTlA8*3 alleles (p = 0.000. CONCLUSION: Regulation of human UGT1A genes is tissue-specific. Individual variation in polymorphic expressions of UGTlA gene locus was noted in all types of colonic tissue tested, whereas hepatic tissue expression was uniform. The high incidence of UGTlA8

  16. Disruption of clock gene expression in human colorectal liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Huisman (Sander); K.R. Ahmadi (Kourosh); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); C. Verhoef (Kees); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); R.W.F. de Bruin (Ron)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe circadian timing system controls about 40 % of the transcriptome and is important in the regulation of a wide variety of biological processes including metabolic and proliferative functions. Disruption of the circadian clock could have significant effect on human health and has an

  17. Dietary flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Barupal, Dinesh K.; Rothwell, Joseph A.; Jenab, Mazda; Fedirko, Veronika; Romieu, Isabelle; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Overvad, Kim; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Affret, Aurélie; His, Mathilde; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Kritikou, Maria; Saieva, Calogero; Agnoli, Claudia; Santucci de Magistris, Maria; Tumino, Rosario; Fasanelli, Francesca; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Merino, Susana; Jakszyn, Paula; Sánchez, Maria José; Dorronsoro, Miren; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Sonestedt, Emily; Ericson, Ulrika; Maria Nilsson, Lena; Bodén, Stina; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Peeters, Petra H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074099655; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay Thee; Freisling, Heinz; Cross, Amanda J.; Riboli, Elio; Scalbert, Augustin

    2017-01-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to inhibit colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and protect against colorectal carcinogenesis in animal models. However, epidemiological evidence on the potential role of flavonoid intake in colorectal cancer (CRC) development remains sparse and inconsistent. We

  18. Effect of [10]-Gingerol on [Ca2+]i and Cell Death in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Yi Chen; Yi-Wen Li; Soong-Yu Kuo

    2009-01-01

    The effect of [10]-gingerol on cytosol free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and viability is large unknown. This study examines the early signaling effects of [10]-gingerol on human colorectal cancer cells. It was found that this compound caused a slow and sustained rise of [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner. [10]-Gingerol also induced a [Ca2+]i rise when extracellular Ca2+ was removed, but the magnitude was reduced by 38%. In a Ca2+-free medium, the [10]-gingerol-induced [Ca2+]i rise w...

  19. Anticancer effects of sweet potato protein on human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-Gao; Mu, Tai-Hua; Deng, Le

    2013-06-07

    To investigate the effects of proteins purified from sweet potato storage roots on human colorectal cancer cell lines. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, Hoechst 33258 nuclear staining and Boyden transwell chamber methods were used to determine whether purified sweet potato protein (SPP) from fresh sweet potato roots affected proliferation, migration and invasion, respectively, of human colorectal cancer SW480 cells in vitro. The inhibitory effects of SPP on growth of human colorectal cancer HCT-8 cells intraperitoneally xenografted in nude mice and spontaneous lung metastasis of murine Lewis lung carcinoma 3LL cells subcutaneously transplanted in C57 BL/6 mice were also investigated in vivo. SPP inhibited the proliferation of SW480 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 38.732 μmol/L (r (2) = 0.980, P = 0.003) in the MTT assay. Hoechst 33258 nuclear staining further revealed inhibition of cell viability and induction of apoptosis by SPP. The transwell assay disclosed significant reduction in migrated cells/field by 8 μmol/L SPP (8.4 ± 2.6 vs 23.3 ± 5.4, P = 0.031) and invaded cells/field through the ECMatrix by 0.8 μmol/L SPP, compared with the control (25.2 ± 5.2 vs 34.8 ± 6.1, P = 0.038). Both intraperitoneal (ip) and intragastric (ig) administration of SPP led to significant suppression of growth of intraperitoneally inoculated HCT-8 cells in nude mice to 58.0% ± 5.9% (P = 0.037) and 43.5% ± 7.1% (P = 0.004) of the controls, respectively, after 9 d treatment. Bloody ascites additionally disappeared after ip injection of trypsin inhibitor. Notably, ig and ip administration of SPP induced a significant decrease in spontaneous pulmonary metastatic nodule formation in C57 BL/6 mice (21.0 ± 12.3 and 27.3 ± 12.7 nodules/lung vs 42.5 ± 4.5 nodules/lung in controls, respectively, P < 0.05) after 25 d treatment. Moreover, the average weight of primary tumor nodules in the hind leg of mice decreased from

  20. miR-297 modulates multidrug resistance in human colorectal carcinoma by down-regulating MRP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Liang, Xin; Shen, Ke; Cui, Daling; Zheng, Yuanhong; Xu, Jianhua; Fan, Zhongze; Qiu, Yanyan; Li, Qi; Ni, Lei; Liu, Jianwen

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a frequent cause of cancer-related death in men and women. miRNAs (microRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression negatively at the post-transcriptional level. In the present study we investigated the possible role of microRNAs in the development of MDR (multidrug resistance) in colorectal carcinoma cells. We analysed miRNA expression levels between MDR colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116/L-OHP cells and their parent cell line HCT116 using a miRNA microarray. miR-297 showed lower expression in HCT116/L-OHP cells compared with its parental cells. MRP-2 (MDR-associated protein 2) is an important MDR protein in platinum-drug-resistance cells and is a predicted target of miR-297. Additionally miR-297 was down-regulated in a panel of human colorectal carcinoma tissues and negatively correlated with expression levels of MRP-2. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of miR-297 in MDR colorectal carcinoma cells reduced MRP-2 protein level and sensitized these cells to anti-cancer drugs in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-297 could play a role in the development of MDR in colorectal carcinoma cells, at least in part by modulation of MRP-2.

  1. MiR-4282 suppresses proliferation and mobility of human colorectal carcinoma cells by targeting semaphorin 3E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xing; Wang, Meng; Wang, Hao; Shen, Xiaofei; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs play an important role in cancer development. Deregulation of microRNAs can lead to tumorigenesis. Class 3 semaphorin, semaphorin 3E (Sema3E), has been shown to be implicated in tumor growth and metastasis. The role of miR-4282 in regulating colorectal carcinoma and its correlation to Sema3E remain uncertain. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the levels of miR-4282 and Sema3E in colorectal carcinoma cells and colorectal tumor tissues. Sema3E protein level in cell lines and human tissues was analyzed by western blot Transient transfections of miR-4282 inhibitor or mimics were conducted to silence or overexpress miR-4282. Sema3E siRNA was transfected to knockdown Sema3E in tumor cell lines. MTT assay was employed to measure colorectal tumor cell growth. Migration and invasion of the cells were examined by trans-well assays. Luciferase reporter assays were performed to confirm miR-4282 targeted at Sema3E. In the present study, reduced miR-4282 expression was observed in the colorectal carcinoma cell lines and human carcinoma tissues in comparison with normal human colon cells (Phuman colorectal tumor tissues (Pmobility (P<0.05). Sema3E was predicted as a target of miR-4282 in miRDB database. We found that miR-4282 overexpression significantly reduced luciferase activity of pRL-Sema3E-3'-UTR (P<0.05), but failed to alter the activity of pRL-sema3E-3'-UTR-mutation. Also, miR4282 overexpression suppressed Sema3E expression in the colorectal carcinoma cell lines. To further confirm the role of Sema3E suppression in the function of the colorectal carcinoma cells by miR-4282, HT29 and HCT116 cells were transfected with Sema3E siRNA. We found that cell growth, migration and invasion of HT29 and HCT116 cells were dramatically inhibited by Sema3E knockdown (P<0.05). Our findings suggested that miR-4282 is a tumor suppressor in colorectal carcinoma cells and exerted its inhibitory effect on the tumor cells

  2. Sp1 upregulates expression of TRF2 and TRF2 inhibition reduces tumorigenesis in human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Ruizhe; Wang, Qi; Gao, Yabo; Qi, Xiaoguang; Jiang, He; Yao, Jingjing; Lin, Xiaolin; Wu, Yunlin; Wang, Lifu

    2009-11-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) plays a key role in the protective activity of telomere and is overexpression in several kinds of solid cancer cells. However, the role of overexpressed TRF2 in colorectal carcinoma remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of TRF2, address the mechanism of TRF2 overexpression in human colorectal carcinoma. In present study, we examined the expression of TRF2 in colorectal cancer tissues from 39 patients, peritumoral normal tissues from 21 patients, and colon carcinoma SW480 cell line by quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot. After siRNA silencing TRF2 expression in SW480, tumorigenesis of TRF2 was tested by cell proliferation, soft agar assay, cytofluorimetric analysis and cytogenetic analysis. To discover transcription factor that mediated TRF2 expression, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (Chip) Assay and Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) were employed. Overexpression of TRF2 protein was detected in SW480 cells and 19 of 39 colorectal carcinoma tissues (49%), no overexpression was observed in 21 of 21 adjacent peritumoral normal colorectal tissues. After siRNA silencing TRF2 expression, the proliferation and colony formation of SW480 cells were significantly inhibited. Defective TRF2 induced apoptosis and increased chromosomal instability in SW480 cells, in which there were more end-to-end fusions and ring chromosomes. Chip assay and EMSA showed that transcription factor Sp1 is involved in upregulation of TRF2. These results indicate that TRF2 is overexpressed in colorectal carcinoma, Sp1 upregulates TRF2 expression, TRF2 inhibition reduces tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer, which suggests that TRF2 and SP1 may become new targets for the development of anti-cancer therapy in colorectal carcinoma.

  3. Hypoxia-targeted triple suicide gene therapy radiosensitizes human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hung Tsung; Xing, Ligang; Deng, Xuelong; Sun, Xiaorong; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2014-08-01

    The hypoxic microenvironment, an important feature of human solid tumors but absent in normal tissue, may provide an opportunity for cancer-specific gene therapy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether hypoxia-driven triple suicide gene TK/CD/UPRT expression enhances cytotoxicity to ganciclovir (GCV) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and sensitizes human colorectal cancer to radiation in vitro and in vivo. Stable transfectant of human colorectal HCT8 cells was established which expressed hypoxia-inducible vectors (HRE-TK/eGFP and HRE-CD/UPRT/mDsRed). Hypoxia-induced expression/function of TK, CD and UPRT was verified by western blot analysis, flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy and cytotoxicity assay of GCV and 5-FC. Significant radiosensitization effects were detected after 5-FC and GCV treatments under hypoxic conditions. In the tumor xenografts, the distribution of TK/eGFP and CD/UPRT/mDsRed expression visualized with fluorescence microscopy was co-localized with the hypoxia marker pimonidazole positive staining cells. Furthermore, administration of 5-FC and GCV in mice in combination with local irradiation resulted in tumor regression, as compared with prodrug or radiation treatments alone. Our data suggest that the hypoxia-inducible TK/GCV+CDUPRT/5-FC triple suicide gene therapy may have the ability to specifically target hypoxic cancer cells and significantly improve the tumor control in combination with radiotherapy.

  4. Solubilized antigen of Blastocystis hominis facilitates the growth of human colorectal cancer cells, HCT116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramathi, Samudi; Suresh, Kumar; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2010-03-01

    Blastocystis hominis is one of the most common intestinal protozoan parasites in humans, and reports have shown that blastocystosis is coupled with intestinal disorders. In the past, researchers have developed an in vitro model using B. hominis culture filtrates to investigate its ability in triggering inflammatory cytokine responses and transcription factors in human colonic epithelial cells. Studies have also correlated the inflammation by parasitic infection with cancer. The present study provides evidence of the parasite facilitating cancer cell growth through observing the cytopathic effect, cellular immunomodulation, and apoptotic responses of B. hominis, especially in malignancy. Here we investigated the effect of solubilized antigen from B. hominis on cell viability, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and human colorectal carcinoma cells (HCT116). The gene expressions of cytokines namely interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma, nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (a gene transcription factor), and proapoptotic genes namely protein 53 and cathepsin B were also studied. Results exhibited favor the fact that antigen from B. hominis, at a certain concentration, could facilitate the growth of HCT116 while having the ability to downregulate immune cell responses (PBMCs). Therefore, there is a vital need to screen colorectal cancer patients for B. hominis infection as it possesses the ability to enhance the tumor growth.

  5. Autophagy mediates cytotoxicity of human colorectal cancer cells treated with garcinielliptone FC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Shen-Jeu; Yen, Cheng-Hsin; Lin, Ting-Yu; Jiang-Shieh, Ya-Fen; Lin, Chun-Nan; Chen, Jyun-Ti; Su, Chun-Li

    2018-01-01

    The tautomeric pair of garcinielliptone FC (GFC) is a novel tautomeric pair of polyprenyl benzophenonoid isolated from the pericarps of Garcinia subelliptica Merr. (G. subelliptica, Clusiaceae), a tree with abundant sources of polyphenols. Our previous report demonstrated that GFC induced apoptosis on various types of human cancer cell lines including chemoresistant human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells. In the present study, we observed that many autophagy-related genes in GFC-treated HT-29 cells were up- and down-regulated using a cDNA microarray containing oncogenes and kinase genes. GFC-induced autophagy of HT-29 cells was confirmed by observing the formation of acidic vesicular organelles, LC3 puncta, and double-membrane autophagic vesicles using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Inhibition of AKT/mTOR/P70S6K signaling as well as formation of Atg5-Atg12 and PI3K/Beclin-1 complexes were observed using Western blot. Administration of autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine and shRNA Atg5) and apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD showed that the GFC-induced autophagy was cytotoxic form and GFC-induced apoptosis enhanced GFC-induced autophagy. Our data suggest the involvement of autophagy and apoptosis in GFC-induced anticancer mechanisms of human colorectal cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. In Vitro Chemical Carcinogenesis and Co-Carcino-genesis in Human Cells Initiated by Hydrazine and Polynuclear Components of Jet Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    cats exposed to methylnitrosourea, Cancer Res., 38, 996, 1978. 12. Prehn, R.T’, Function of depressed immunologic reactivity during carcinogenesis, 3...4/8 UDH 50.0 N.D. 5.1 4/8 MAMA 3.6 N.D. 900.0 2/16 B(a)P 10.0 39 1.0 6/10 MMS 0.1 2500 0 0/6 U.V. 40 J.m-2 78 20.0 4/6 137Cs 100 r 39 13.1 3/7...intracellular distribution and binding of benzo(a)pyrene in human dysloid fibroblasts. Cancer Letters 10:57-65. 2. G. Milo, G.A. Ackerman, and I

  7. Molecular conservation of estrogen-response associated with cell cycle regulation, hormonal carcinogenesis and cancer in zebrafish and human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindarajan Kunde R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebrafish is recognized as a versatile cancer and drug screening model. However, it is not known whether the estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that are involved in estrogen-dependent carcinogenesis and human cancer are operating in zebrafish. In order to determine the potential of zebrafish model for estrogen-related cancer research, we investigated the molecular conservation of estrogen responses operating in both zebrafish and human cancer cell lines. Methods Microarray experiment was performed on zebrafish exposed to estrogen (17β-estradiol; a classified carcinogen and an anti-estrogen (ICI 182,780. Zebrafish estrogen-responsive genes sensitive to both estrogen and anti-estrogen were identified and validated using real-time PCR. Human homolog mapping and knowledge-based data mining were performed on zebrafish estrogen responsive genes followed by estrogen receptor binding site analysis and comparative transcriptome analysis with estrogen-responsive human cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D and Ishikawa. Results Our transcriptome analysis captured multiple estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that increased cell proliferation, promoted DNA damage and genome instability, and decreased tumor suppressing effects, suggesting a common mechanism for estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. Comparative analysis revealed a core set of conserved estrogen-responsive genes that demonstrate enrichment of estrogen receptor binding sites and cell cycle signaling pathways. Knowledge-based and network analysis led us to propose that the mechanism involving estrogen-activated estrogen receptor mediated down-regulation of human homolog HES1 followed by up-regulation cell cycle-related genes (human homologs E2F4, CDK2, CCNA, CCNB, CCNE, is highly conserved, and this mechanism may involve novel crosstalk with basal AHR. We also identified mitotic roles of polo-like kinase as a conserved signaling pathway with multiple entry

  8. Molecular conservation of estrogen-response associated with cell cycle regulation, hormonal carcinogenesis and cancer in zebrafish and human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Siew Hong; Lee, Serene G P; Lin, Chin Y; Thomsen, Jane S; Fu, Pan Y; Murthy, Karuturi R K; Li, Haixia; Govindarajan, Kunde R; Nick, Lin C H; Bourque, Guillaume; Gong, Zhiyuan; Lufkin, Thomas; Liu, Edison T; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan

    2011-05-16

    The zebrafish is recognized as a versatile cancer and drug screening model. However, it is not known whether the estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that are involved in estrogen-dependent carcinogenesis and human cancer are operating in zebrafish. In order to determine the potential of zebrafish model for estrogen-related cancer research, we investigated the molecular conservation of estrogen responses operating in both zebrafish and human cancer cell lines. Microarray experiment was performed on zebrafish exposed to estrogen (17β-estradiol; a classified carcinogen) and an anti-estrogen (ICI 182,780). Zebrafish estrogen-responsive genes sensitive to both estrogen and anti-estrogen were identified and validated using real-time PCR. Human homolog mapping and knowledge-based data mining were performed on zebrafish estrogen responsive genes followed by estrogen receptor binding site analysis and comparative transcriptome analysis with estrogen-responsive human cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D and Ishikawa). Our transcriptome analysis captured multiple estrogen-responsive genes and signaling pathways that increased cell proliferation, promoted DNA damage and genome instability, and decreased tumor suppressing effects, suggesting a common mechanism for estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. Comparative analysis revealed a core set of conserved estrogen-responsive genes that demonstrate enrichment of estrogen receptor binding sites and cell cycle signaling pathways. Knowledge-based and network analysis led us to propose that the mechanism involving estrogen-activated estrogen receptor mediated down-regulation of human homolog HES1 followed by up-regulation cell cycle-related genes (human homologs E2F4, CDK2, CCNA, CCNB, CCNE), is highly conserved, and this mechanism may involve novel crosstalk with basal AHR. We also identified mitotic roles of polo-like kinase as a conserved signaling pathway with multiple entry points for estrogen regulation. The findings

  9. Possible contributing role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as a cofactor in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromseree, Sirinart; Pientong, Chamsai; Swangphon, Piyawut; Chaiwongkot, Arkom; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan; Tungsiriwattana, Thumwadee; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Vendrig, Tineke; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2015-12-01

    Persistent infection with EBV has been linked to the development of malignancies including HPV-associated cervical carcinoma. However, the role of EBV in HPV-associated cervical cancer is still poorly understood. To determine the possible contributing role of EBV in HPV-associated cervical carcinogenesis according to HPV genotypes, HPV genome status and EBV localization. Cervical tissues, including 82 with no squamous intraepithelial lesions (noSILs), 85 low-grade SILs (LSILs), 85 high grade SILs (HSILs) and 40 squamous cell carcinoma samples (SCC) were investigated using PCR and dot blot hybridization for EBV detection and PCR and reverse line blot hybridization for HPV genotyping. The amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts assay and in situ hybridization were used to determine HPV physical status and EBV EBER localization, respectively. EBV was detected increasingly from noSIL (13.4%), LSIL (29.4%) to HSIL (49.4%) samples. The prevalence of HPV-EBV co-infection was significantly higher in any grade of lesion than in noSIL samples (pEBV co-infection was more common in cases with episomal forms of high-risk (HR) HPV whereas HPV alone was more common in cases with integrated HR-HPV. In addition, EBER staining demonstrated that EBV was mainly present in infiltrating lymphocytes. Infiltrating EBV-infected lymphocytes may play a role in cancer progression of cervical lesion containing episomal HR-HPV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Dual Role of Inflammation in Colon Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Stolfi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation characterizing patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD represents a major risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer. Mechanisms underlying this neoplastic transformation are not fully understood though studies in experimental models of colon carcinogenesis suggest that inflammatory cell-derived cytokines either directly or indirectly stimulate the uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. Nevertheless, under specific inflammatory conditions, immune cells can boost an anti-tumor immune response with the down-stream effect of eliminating dysplastic and cancerous cells. This review outlines the beneficial and detrimental role of inflammation in colon carcinogenesis.

  11. Knockdown of astrocyte elevated gene-1 inhibits tumor growth and modifies microRNAs expression profiles in human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Sujun [East Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Geriatrics, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Wu, Binwen, E-mail: wubinwengd@aliyun.com [East Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Geriatrics, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Li, Dongfeng; Zhou, Weihong; Deng, Gang; Zhang, Kaijun; Li, Youjia [East Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Geriatrics, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • AEG-1 expression in CRC cell lines and down-regulation or upregulation of AEG-1 in vitro. • Knockdown of AEG-1 inhibits cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. • Upregulation of AEG-1 enhances proliferation, invasion and colony formation. • Knockdown of AEG-1 accumulates G0/G1-phase cells and promotes apoptosis in CRC cells. • AEG-1 knockdown increases 5-FU cytotoxicity. - Abstract: Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), upregulated in various types of malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC), has been reported to be associated with the carcinogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are widely involved in the initiation and progression of cancer. However, the functional significance of AEG-1 and the relationship between AEG-1 and microRNAs in human CRC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AEG-1 could serve as a potential therapeutic target of human CRC and its possible mechanism. We adopted a strategy of ectopic overexpression or RNA interference to upregulate or downregulate expression of AEG-1 in CRC models. Their phenotypic changes were analyzed by Western blot, MTT and transwell matrix penetration assays. MicroRNAs expression profiles were performed using microarray analysis followed by validation using qRT-PCR. Knockdown of AEG-1 could significantly inhibit colon cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion and promotes apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of AEG-1 could significantly enhance cell proliferation, invasion and reduced apoptisis. AEG-1 directly contributes to resistance to chemotherapeutic drug. Targeted downregulation of AEG-1 might improve the expression of miR-181a-2{sup ∗}, -193b and -193a, and inversely inhibit miR-31 and -9{sup ∗}. Targeted inhibition of AEG-1 can lead to modification of key elemental characteristics, such as miRNAs, which may become a potential effective therapeutic strategy for CRC.

  12. Nutrients, Foods, and Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigation have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grain have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits and vegetables. Nutrients and foods may also interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of over-nutrition and obesity—risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:25575572

  13. Registered report: Fusobacterium nucleatum infection is prevalent in human colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repass, John; Maherali, Nimet; Owen, Kate

    2016-02-11

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from 'Fusobacterium nucleatum infection is prevalent in human colorectal carcinoma' by Castellarin and colleagues published in Genome Research in 2012 (Castellarin et al., 2012). The experiment to be replicated is reported in Figure 2. Here, Castellarin and colleagues performed a metagenomic analysis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) to identify potential associations between inflammatory microorganisms and gastrointestinal cancers. They conducted quantitative real-time PCR on genomic DNA isolated from tumor and matched normal biopsies from a patient cohort and found that the overall abundance of Fusobacterium was 415 times greater in CRC versus adjacent normal tissue. These results confirmed earlier studies and provide evidence for a link between tissue-associated bacteria and tumorigenesis. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife.

  14. Utilisation of tracer monoclonal antibodies for the immunoscintigraphic detection of human colorectal cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatal, J.F.; Douillard, J.Y.; Kremer, M.; Curtet, C.; Le Mevel, B. (INSERM, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes (France)); Fumoleau, P. (Centre Rene Gauducheau, Nantes (France)); Bourdoiseau, M. (Office des Rayonnements Ionisants, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1983-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies, 17-1A and 19-9, with recognized human gastrointestinal cancers in cell cultures, were labeled with iodine 131 for immunoscintigraphic application. With the intact /sup 131/I-17-1A antibody, 21 out of 35 (60%) primary or secondary colorectal cancer sites were visualized, whereas all 21 nonepitheliomatous colic cancer sites or noncolic cancer sites were negative. With F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments of the 19-9 antibody, 18 out of 27 (67%) colorectal cancer sites were positive. With both radioantibodies, the bestly contrasted tumor images were late, 4 to 5 days after injection. A study with paired-label technique, associating a specific iodine-131-labeled antibody with a non-specific iodine-125-labeled immunoglobulin, demonstrated, that tumor uptake was indeed specific for the 17-1A or 19-9 antibody in tumor and normal colon fragments obtained during operations on 4 patients. A preliminary prospective study showed that only immunoscintigraphy was able to confirm and localize a recurrence of rectal cancer in one patient. A larger series will be necessary to validate the clinical benefit of the technique, as compared with the results of other diagnostic techniques, before immunoscintigraphy can be proposed for routine clinical use.

  15. Applications of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant cytokines for the treatment of human colorectal and other carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, J.W.; Smalley, R.V.; Borden, E.C.; Martin, E.W.; Guadagni, F.; Roselli, M.; Schlom, J. (Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which recognize a human tumor antigen, termed tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72), have successfully been used to localize primary as well as metastatic colorectal tumor lesions in patients. The localization of the anti-TAG-72 MAbs has also been exploited intraoperatively using a hand-held gamma probe. That procedure, termed radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS), has identified occult tumors which were not detected using standard external imaging techniques. In another clinical trial, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was administered intraperitoneally to patients diagnosed with either gastrointestinal or ovarian carcinoma with secondary ascites. Analysis of the tumor cells isolated from the malignant ascites revealed a substantial increase in TAG-72 expression on the surface of tumor cells isolated from seven of eight patients. The results provide evidence that the combination of an anti-carcinoma MAb with the administration of a cytokine, such as IFN-gamma, may be an effective approach for the detection and subsequent treatment, of colorectal carcinoma. 15 references.

  16. Exacerbation of colon carcinogenesis by Blastocystis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide and the number is increasing every year. Despite advances in screening programs, CRC remains as the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer (CRC) and has been shown to be associated with Blastocystis sp., a common intestinal microorganism. In the present study, we aimed to identify a role for Blastocystis sp. in exacerbating carcinogenesis using in vivo rat model. Methylene blue staining was used to identify colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and adenomas formation in infected rats whilst elevation of oxidative stress biomarker levels in the urine and serum samples were evaluated using biochemical assays. Histological changes of the intestinal mucosa were observed and a significant number of ACF was found in Blastocystis sp. infected AOM-rats compared to the AOM-controls. High levels of urinary oxidative indices including advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP) and hydrogen peroxide were observed in Blastocystis sp. infected AOM-rats compared to the uninfected AOM-rats. Our study provides evidence that Blastocystis sp. has a significant role in enhancing AOM-induced carcinogenesis by resulting damage to the intestinal epithelium and promoting oxidative damage in Blastocystis sp. infected rats. PMID:28859095

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis in rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Toyoda, Takeshi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tatematsu, Masae

    2013-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for gastric carcinogenesis in human. In carcinogen-treated Mongolian gerbils, H. pylori infection enhances stomach carcinogenesis, while infection alone induced severe hyperplasia called heterotopic proliferative glands. A high-salt diet or early acquisition of the bacteria exacerbates inflammation and carcinogenesis. Oxygen radical scavengers or anti-inflammatory chemicals as well as eradication of H. pylori are effective to prevent carcinogenesis. H. pylori-associated inflammation induces intestinal metaplasia and intestinalization of stomach cancers independently. It is necessary to control cancer development not only in H. pylori-positive cases but also in H. pylori-negative metaplastic gastritis.

  18. GSTT2 promoter polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Sun-A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione S-transferases are a group of enzymes that participate in detoxification and defense mechanisms against toxic carcinogens and other compounds. These enzymes play an important role in human carcinogenesis. In the present study, we sought to determine whether GSTT2 promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are associated with colorectal cancer risk. Methods A total of 436 colorectal cancer patients and 568 healthy controls were genotyped for three GSTT2 promoter SNPs (-537G>A, -277T>C and -158G>A, using real-time TaqMan assay and direct sequencing. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA was performed to determine the effects of polymorphisms on protein binding to the GSTT2 promoter. Results The -537A allele (-537G/A or A/A was significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR = 1.373, p = 0.025, while the -158A allele (-158G/A or A/A was involved in protection against colorectal cancer (OR = 0.539, p = 0.032. Haplotype 2 (-537A, -277T, -158G was significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR = 1.386, p = 0.021, while haplotype 4 (-537G, -277C, -158A protected against colorectal cancer (OR = 0.539, p = 0.032. EMSA data revealed lower promoter binding activity in the -537A allele than its -537G counterpart. Conclusion Our results collectively suggest that SNPs and haplotypes of the GSTT2 promoter region are associated with colorectal cancer risk in the Korean population.

  19. BRAFV600E: implications for carcinogenesis and molecular therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cantwell-Dorris, Emma R

    2012-02-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)\\/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is frequently mutated in human cancer. This pathway consists of a small GTP protein of the RAS family that is activated in response to extracellular signaling to recruit a member of the RAF kinase family to the cell membrane. Active RAF signals through MAP\\/ERK kinase to activate ERK and its downstream effectors to regulate a wide range of biological activities including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and survival. Mutations in the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogenes homolog B1 (BRAF) isoform of the RAF kinase or KRAS isoform of the RAS protein are found as activating mutations in approximately 30% of all human cancers. The BRAF pathway has become a target of interest for molecular therapy, with promising results emerging from clinical trials. Here, the role of the most common BRAF mutation BRAF(V600E) in human carcinogenesis is investigated through a review of the literature, with specific focus on its role in melanoma, colorectal, and thyroid cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target.

  20. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Phlorofucofuroeckol A via Upregulation of Activating Transcription Factor 3 against Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ji Eo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phlorofucofuroeckol A (PFF-A, one of the phlorotannins found in brown algae, has been reported to exert anti-cancer property. However, the molecular mechanism for the anti-cancer effect of PFF-A has not been known. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 has been reported to be associated with apoptosis in colorectal cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which PFF-A stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A decreased cell viability through apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A increased ATF3 expression through regulating transcriptional activity. The responsible cis-element for ATF3 transcriptional activation by PFF-A was cAMP response element binding protein (CREB, located between positions −147 and −85 of the ATF3 promoter. Inhibition of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK 3β, and IκB kinase (IKK-α blocked PFF-A-mediated ATF3 expression. ATF3 knockdown by ATF3 siRNA attenuated the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP by PFF-A, while ATF3 overexpression increased PFF-A-mediated cleaved PARP. These results suggest that PFF-A may exert anti-cancer property through inducing apoptosis via the ATF3-mediated pathway in human colorectal cancer cells.

  1. A hot L1 retrotransposon evades somatic repression and initiates human colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Emma C.; Gardner, Eugene J.; Masood, Ashiq; Chuang, Nelson T.; Vertino, Paula M.; Devine, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    Although human LINE-1 (L1) elements are actively mobilized in many cancers, a role for somatic L1 retrotransposition in tumor initiation has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we identify a novel somatic L1 insertion in the APC tumor suppressor gene that provided us with a unique opportunity to determine whether such insertions can actually initiate colorectal cancer (CRC), and if so, how this might occur. Our data support a model whereby a hot L1 source element on Chromosome 17 of the patient's genome evaded somatic repression in normal colon tissues and thereby initiated CRC by mutating the APC gene. This insertion worked together with a point mutation in the second APC allele to initiate tumorigenesis through the classic two-hit CRC pathway. We also show that L1 source profiles vary considerably depending on the ancestry of an individual, and that population-specific hot L1 elements represent a novel form of cancer risk. PMID:27197217

  2. Anti-inflammatory effect of lycopene in SW480 human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jae Hoon; Kim, Woo Kyoung; Ha, Ae Wha; Kim, Myung Hwan; Chang, Moon Jeong

    2017-04-01

    Although the antioxidative effects of lycopene are generally known, the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory properties of lycopene are not fully elucidated. This study aimed to examine the role and mechanism of lycopene as an inhibitor of inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated SW 480 human colorectal cancer cells were treated with 0, 10, 20, and 30 µM lycopene. The MTT assay was performed to determine the effects of lycopene on cell proliferation. Western blotting was performed to observe the expression of inflammation-related proteins, including nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitor kappa B (IκB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 (p38 MAP kinase). Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to investigate the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were determined via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In cells treated with lycopene and LPS, the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS, and COX-2 were decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner (P lycopene concentration (P lycopene concertation (P Lycopene restrains NF-κB and JNK activation, which causes inflammation, and suppresses the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2, and iNOS in SW480 human colorectal cancer cells.

  3. Dietary Patterns and Colorectal Adenomas in Lynch Syndrome The GEOLynch Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botma, Akke; Vasen, Hans F. A.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Kampman, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) have a high risk of developing colorectal cancer due to mutations in mismatch repair genes. Because dietary factors, alone and in combination, influence sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis, the association of dietary patterns with colorectal adenomas in

  4. Naja Naja Oxiana Venom Fraction Selectively Induces ROS-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Colorectal Tumor Cells by Directly Targeting Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Amir; Omranipour, Ramesh; Fakhri, Sara; Mirshamsi, Mohammadreza; Zangeneh, Fatemeh; Vatanpour, Hossein; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2017-08-27

    Objective: To investigate the selective effect of Naja naja oxiana crude venom and its fractions on human colorectal cancer mitochondria to activate apoptosis signaling. Methods: Cells and mitochondria isolated from human cancerous and normal colorectal tissues exposed to N. oxiana crude venom and its fractions obtained from size-exclusion chromatography and then mitochondrial parameters related to up-stream cell death signalling such as reactive oxygen species formation, MMP, mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c release and ATP content as mitochondrial parameters and activation of caspase3 and finally apoptosis/necrosis % were then assayed as cellular parameters. Result: Our findings indicated that crude venom (15, 30 and 60 μg/ml) and fraction 3; F3; (10, 20 and 40 μg/ml) of N. Oxiana venom induced a significant (p<0.05) increase of reactive oxygen species level, swelling of mitochondria, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), release of cytochrome c, activated caspase3 and decrease ATP content only in colon cancer tissue group but not from the healthy colon tissue group. Our results also showed that fraction 3 of venom decreased the percentage of viable cells and induced apoptosis in cancerous colorectal cells. Conclusion: F3 fraction of N. Oxiana venom is a suitable candidate for further studies as a new drug treatment of colorectal cancer due to its high capacity for induction of apoptosis signaling via mitochondrial pathway. Creative Commons Attribution License

  5. A importância do gene p53 na carcinogênese humana The importance of the p53 gene in human carcinogenesis

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    Agnes C. Fett-Conte

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Existem várias razões que justificam o título de "guardião do genoma" do gene P53. Seu envolvimento, direto ou indireto, tem sido observado na etiopatogenia de praticamente todas as neoplasias humanas, incluindo as leucemias e linfomas. Conhecer seus mecanismos de ação é fundamental para compreender os aspectos moleculares da carcinogênese. O presente trabalho apresenta uma revisão sobre as características deste gene e sua importância no diagnóstico, prognóstico e terapêutica, o que faz dele um alvo em potencial das estratégias de terapia gênica.There are several reasons which justify the name of 'guardian of the genome' given to the P53 gene. Its involvement either directly or indirectly has been observed in the pathology of practically all human neoplasias, including leukemia and lymphomas. Knowledge of its mechanisms of action is fundamental to understand molecular aspects of carcinogenesis. This work presents a revision of the characteristics of this gene and its importance in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment and why this makes it a potential target for gene therapy strategies.

  6. Effects of NVP-BEZ235 on the proliferation, migration, apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Yu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Jianxia; Tong, Yili; Yao, Jianfeng

    2016-07-01

    The phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays a significant role in colorectal adenocarcinoma. NVP-BEZ235 (dactolisib) is a novel dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR. The effects of NVP-BEZ235 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma are still unclear. In the present study, we aimed to explore the proliferation, migration, apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 3 µM) for 24 and 48 h, respectively. Cells were also treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0.1 µM), DDP (100, 300 and 1,000 µM), and NVP-BEZ235 (0.1 µM) combined with DDP (100, 300 and 1,000 µM) respectively, and cultured for 24 h after treatment. MTT assay was utilized to evaluate the effects of NVP-BEZ235 alone or NVP-BEZ235 combined with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (DDP) on proliferation of HT-29 cells. Cell wound-scratch assay was used detect cell migration. In addition, expression of microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (MAP1LC3B and LC3B) in HT-29 cells was detected by immunofluorescence at 48 h after NVP-BEZ235 (1 µM) treatment. Expression of proteins involved in cell cycle and proliferation (p-Akt, p-mTOR and cyclin D1), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), and autophagy (cleaved LC3B and Beclin-1) were detected by western blot analysis. NVP-BEZ235 inhibited the proliferation and migration of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. NVP-BEZ235 decreased protein expression of p-Akt, p-mTOR and cyclin D1, and increased protein expression of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved LC3B and Beclin-1 as the concentrations and the incubation time of NVP-BEZ235 increased. In addition, NVP-BEZ235 and DDP had synergic effects in inhibiting cell proliferation and migration. The expression of protein involved in apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) was higher in drug combination group compared to the NVP-BEZ235 single treatment group. NVP-BEZ235

  7. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Damania, Dhwanil; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Cruz, Mart Dela; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA) targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS) to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  8. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Stypula-Cyrus

    Full Text Available Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC. However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  9. Human FK506 binding protein 65 is associated with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sanne Harder; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2005-01-01

    We initiated the present study to identify new genes associated with colorectal cancer. In a previously published microarray study an EST (W80763), later identified as the gene hFKBP10 (NM_021939), was found to be strongly expressed in tumors while absent in the normal mucosa. Here we describe...... this gene hFKBP10 together with its encoded protein hFKBP65 as a novel marker associated with colorectal cancer. Analysis of 31 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 14 normal colorectal mucosa by RealTime PCR for hFKBP10 showed a significant up-regulation in tumors, when compared with normal mucosa...... 72 kDa. Cellular localization and glycosylation studies revealed the hFKBP65 protein to be localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, and to be N-glycosylated. In conclusion, the protein hFKBP65 is associated with colorectal cancer, and we hypothesize the protein to be involved in fibroblast...

  10. S100A10 protein expression is associated with oxaliplatin sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells

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    Suzuki Sayo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individual responses to oxaliplatin (L-OHP-based chemotherapy remain unpredictable. The objective of our study was to find candidate protein markers for tumor sensitivity to L-OHP from intracellular proteins of human colorectal cancer (CRC cell lines. We performed expression difference mapping (EDM analysis of whole cell lysates from 11 human CRC cell lines with different sensitivities to L-OHP by using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS, and identified a candidate protein by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry ion trap time-of-flight (LCMS-IT-TOF. Results Of the qualified mass peaks obtained by EDM analysis, 41 proteins were differentially expressed in 11 human colorectal cancer cell lines. Among these proteins, the peak intensity of 11.1 kDa protein was strongly correlated with the L-OHP sensitivity (50% inhibitory concentrations (P R2 = 0.80. We identified this protein as Protein S100-A10 (S100A10 by MS/MS ion search using LCMS-IT-TOF. We verified its differential expression and the correlation between S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells and their L-OHP sensitivities by Western blot analyses. In addition, S100A10 protein expression levels were not correlated with sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, suggesting that S100A10 is more specific to L-OHP than to 5-fluorouracil in CRC cells. S100A10 was detected in cell culture supernatant, suggesting secretion out of cells. Conclusions By proteomic approaches including SELDI technology, we have demonstrated that intracellular S100A10 protein expression levels in drug-untreated CRC cells differ according to cell lines and are significantly correlated with sensitivity of CRC cells to L-OHP exposure. Our findings provide a new clue to searching predictive markers of the response to L-OHP, suggesting that S100A10 is expected to be one of the candidate protein markers.

  11. [In vitro and in vivo effects of mango pulp (Mangifera indica cv. Azucar) in colon carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Bernal, Andrea; Amparo Urango, Luz; Rojano, Benjamín; Maldonado, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Mango pulp contains ascorbic acid, carotenoids, polyphenols, terpenoids and fiber which are healthy and could protect against colon cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and preventive capacity of an aqueous extract of Mangifera indica cv. Azúcar on a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480) and in a rodent model of colorectal cancer, respectively. The content of total phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids were also analyzed in the extract. SW480 cell growth was inhibited in a dose and time dependent manner by 22.3% after a 72h exposure to the extract (200 µg/ mL). Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Balb/c mice by two intra-peritoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM) at the third and fourth week of giving mango in drinking water (0.3%, 0.6%, 1.25%). After 10 weeks of treatment, in the colon of mice receiving 0.3% mango, aberrant crypt foci formation was inhibited more than 60% (p=0,05) and the inhibition was dose-dependent when compared with controls receiving water. These results show that mango pulp, a natural food, non toxic, part of human being diet, contains bioactive compounds able to reduce growth of tumor cells and to prevent the appearance of precancerous lesions in colon during carcinogenesis initiation.

  12. Liver Development, Regeneration, and Carcinogenesis

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    Janet W. C. Kung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of putative liver stem cells has brought closer the previously separate fields of liver development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis. Significant overlaps in the regulation of these processes are now being described. For example, studies in embryonic liver development have already provided the basis for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. As a result, the understanding of the cell biology of proliferation and differentiation in the liver has been improved. This knowledge can be used to improve the function of hepatocyte-like cells for drug testing, bioartificial livers, and transplantation. In parallel, the mechanisms regulating cancer cell biology are now clearer, providing fertile soil for novel therapeutic approaches. Recognition of the relationships between development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis, and the increasing evidence for the role of stem cells in all of these areas, has sparked fresh enthusiasm in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and has led to new targeted therapies for liver cirrhosis and primary liver cancers.

  13. Identification of diagnostic markers in colorectal cancer via integrative epigenomics and genomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok-Sin, Teow; Mokhtar, Norfilza Mohd; Ali Hassan, Nur Zarina; Sagap, Ismail; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Harun, Roslan; Jamal, Rahman

    2015-07-01

    Apart from genetic mutations, epigenetic alteration is a common phenomenon that contributes to neoplastic transformation in colorectal cancer. Transcriptional silencing of tumor-suppressor genes without changes in the DNA sequence is explained by the existence of promoter hypermethylation. To test this hypothesis, we integrated the epigenome and transcriptome data from a similar set of colorectal tissue samples. Methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina InfiniumHumanMethylation27 BeadChip on 55 paired cancer and adjacent normal epithelial cells. Fifteen of the 55 paired tissues were used for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Validation was carried out on 150 colorectal tissues using the methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) technique. PCA and supervised hierarchical clustering in the two microarray datasets showed good separation between cancer and normal samples. Significant genes from the two analyses were obtained based on a ≥2-fold change and a false discovery rate (FDR) p-value of cancer tissues with high purity. The integrated analysis gives additional insight regarding the regulation of colorectal cancer-associated genes and their underlying mechanisms that contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis.

  14. [OBESITY AND ENDOMETRIAL CARCINOGENESIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, P; Parahuleva, P

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is one of the main cancers occurring in industrialized countries. According to the National Cancer Registry in Bulgaria, cancer of the uterine body occupies 8.6% from all cancers in women and ranks second in frequency. It is found that over weight and obesity are a major risk factor for the development of endometrial cancer and the mortality associated with it. Adipose tissue is seen as endocrine organ, synthesizing so called adipocytokine - leptin, adiponectin, vistafin, that play a key role in the carcinogenesis of endometrial cancer and can be used as new markers for establishing the potential risk of this disease. The link between obesity, insulin resistance and endometrial cancer that has been proven, determines it as a socially significant disease. All this makes it necessary to clarify and specify the role of obesity in endometrial carcinogenesis and the development of strategies for the prevention and early diagnosis.

  15. Thymus vulgaris (thyme) inhibits proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Menhali, Afnan; Al-Rumaihi, Aisha; Al-Mohammed, Hana; Al-Mazrooey, Hana; Al-Shamlan, Maryam; AlJassim, Meaad; Al-Korbi, Noof; Eid, Ali Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Its prognosis remains poor for patients with several grades of this disease. This underscores the need for alternative modalities, such as herbal medicines, to treat this disease. A commonly used plant that appears to be of high medicinal value is Thymus vulgaris L. However, the effects of this plant on the malignant behavior of human CRC cells remains poorly investigated. This study was undertaken to determine the anticancer efficacy of T. vulgaris extract (TVE) in CRC cells. Our results show that TVE inhibits proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. This decreased proliferation was concomitant with increased apoptotic cell death as evidenced by increased caspase3/7 activity. Moreover, TVE also decreased adhesion to fibronectin in a concentration-dependent manner. The migratory and invasive capacities of HCT116 cells were significantly inhibited by TVE. Taken together, these data suggest that the TVE inhibits malignant phenotype of colon cancer cells. Therefore, T. vulgaris could have an anticancer effect and that some of its bioactive compounds may prove to be effective treatment modalities for human CRC.

  16. Detection of human papillomavirus infection by molecular tests and its relation to colonic polyps and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Gazzaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To prospectively examine the association between human papilloma virus (HPV colonization of the colonic mucosa and the development of colorectal polyps (CRPs, and colorectal cancer (CRC in Saudi Arabia. Methods: A case control study was performed between January 2013 and December 2014. All eligible patients underwent standard diagnostic colonoscopy. Patients with polyps or colorectal cancer were considered cases, while those with any other endoscopic findings were controls. Biopsy samples from polyps and tumors, and/or from normal colonic mucosa were acquired. Human papilloma virus colonization was detected using a hybrid capture technique of samples taken from both normal tissue, and CRPs and CRC. The association between HPV and CRPs/CRC was evaluated. Results: A total of 132 patients were recruited. The mean age was 53 (±15.9 years. Sixty patients had endoscopically detectable CRPs/CRC, and 72 had either inflammation or normal endoscopic evaluations. Only 4 (0.8% of the 132 samples that were collected and analyzed were positive for the HPV gene. Statistical analysis did not identify any significant association between HPV colonization and the presence of CRPs/CRC. The only significant predictor of detecting CRPs/CRC on colonoscopy was symptomatic presentation (odds ratio=11.072, 95% confidence interval 4.7-26.2, p<0.001. Conclusion: Human papilloma virus colonic colonization is rare in Saudi Arabia. An association between HPV colonization and CRP/CRC development could not be identified in this cohort of patients.

  17. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin Boo [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Lee, Seong-Ho, E-mail: slee2000@umd.edu [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  18. Chemical Carcinogen (Hydrazine, Polynuclear Hydrocarbon and/or Synthetic Jet Fuel Components) Induced Carcinogenesis of Human Cells, In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Yohn. D. S. Alterations of enzymesouis long-term replication of feline leukemia virtu5 associated with plasmat membranes and cellular fFeLVI in an...environment to the nucleus of the cell. B[a]P is transported into human foreskin fibroblasts from the plasma membrane to the nucleus by binding as the...transport across the nuclear membrane is temperature dependent. When the temperature of the cultures is dropped from 370C to 40C BP is not found in the

  19. A novel method to capture methylated human DNA from stool: implications for colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hongzhi; Harrington, Jonathan; Rego, Rafaela L; Ahlquist, David A

    2007-09-01

    Assay of methylated DNA markers in stool is a promising approach for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. A method to capture hypermethylated CpG islands from stool would enrich target analyte and allow optimal assay sensitivity. Methyl-binding domain (MBD) protein was produced using a pET6HMBD plasmid with MBD DNA sequence cloned from rat MeCP2 gene and bound to a column of nickel-agarose resin. We first established the feasibility of using the MBD column to extract methylated human DNA in a high background of fecal bacterial DNA. To explore the impact of MBD enrichment on detection sensitivity, the tumor-associated methylated vimentin gene was assayed with methylation-specific PCR from stools to which low amounts of cancer cell DNA (0-50 ng) were added and from stools from CRC patients and healthy individuals. Stools from cancer patients were selected with low amounts of human DNA (median 7 ng, range 0.5-832 ng). With MBD enrichment, methylated vimentin was detected in stools enriched with >/=10 ng of cancer cell DNA and in CRC stool with a range of native human DNA amounts from 4 to 832 ng. Without MBD enrichment, methylated vimentin was not detected in the enriched stools and was detected in only 1 cancer stool with high human DNA (832 ng). In stools from healthy individuals methylated vimentin was not detected, with or without MBD enrichment. MBD capture increases assay sensitivity for detecting methylated DNA markers in stool. Applied clinical studies for stool cancer screening are indicated.

  20. Diet-induced obesity elevates colonic TNF-alpha in mice and is accompanied by an activation of Wnt signaling: a mechanism for obesity-associated colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation associated with obesity may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether the Wnt pathway, an intracellular signaling cascade that plays a critical role in colorectal carcinogenesis, is activated by obesity-induce...

  1. Colorectal Cancer: Genetics is Changing Everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuch, Joshua C; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease caused by mutational or epigenetic alterations in DNA. There has been a remarkable expansion of the molecular understanding of colonic carcinogenesis in the last 30 years and that understanding is changing many aspects of colorectal cancer care. It is becoming increasingly clear that there are genetic subsets of colorectal cancer that have different risk factors, prognosis, and response to treatment. This article provides a general update on colorectal cancer and highlights the ways that genetics is changing clinical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of [10]-Gingerol on [Ca2+]i and Cell Death in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yi Chen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of [10]-gingerol on cytosol free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i and viability is large unknown. This study examines the early signaling effects of [10]-gingerol on human colorectal cancer cells. It was found that this compound caused a slow and sustained rise of [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner. [10]-Gingerol also induced a [Ca2+]i rise when extracellular Ca2+ was removed, but the magnitude was reduced by 38%. In a Ca2+-free medium, the [10]-gingerol-induced [Ca2+]i rise was partially abolished by depleting stored Ca2+ with thapsigargin (an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump inhibitor. The elevation of [10]-gingerol-caused [Ca2+]i in a Ca2+-containing medium was not affected by modulation of protein kinase C activity. The [10]-gingerol-induced Ca2+ influx was insensitive to L-type Ca2+ channel blockers. At concentrations of 10-100 mM, [10]-gingerol killed cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings suggest that [10]-gingerol induces [Ca2+]i rise by causing Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca2+ influx from non-L-type Ca2+ channels in SW480 cancer cells.

  3. Dynamic modulation of thymidylate synthase gene expression and fluorouracil sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Wakasa

    Full Text Available Biomarkers have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy. However, many biomarker candidates are still in debate. In addition to clinical studies, a priori experimental approaches are needed. Thymidylate synthase (TS expression is a long-standing candidate as a biomarker for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment of cancer patients. Using the Tet-OFF system and a human colorectal cancer cell line, DLD-1, we first constructed an in vitro system in which TS expression is dynamically controllable. Quantitative assays have elucidated that TS expression in the transformant was widely modulated, and that the dynamic range covered 15-fold of the basal level. 5-FU sensitivity of the transformant cells significantly increased in response to downregulated TS expression, although being not examined in the full dynamic range because of the doxycycline toxicity. Intriguingly, our in vitro data suggest that there is a linear relationship between TS expression and the 5-FU sensitivity in cells. Data obtained in a mouse model using transformant xenografts were highly parallel to those obtained in vitro. Thus, our in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that TS expression is a determinant of 5-FU sensitivity in cells, at least in this specific genetic background, and, therefore, support the possibility of TS expression as a biomarker for 5-FU-based cancer chemotherapy.

  4. Effect of crude saponins from Gaultheria trichophylla extract on growth inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiaz Alam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Gaultheria also comprised of species with reported cytotoxic activities. Current research work was carried out to evaluate G. trichophylla crude extract and respective saponins fraction against human colorectal cancer cell line (Caco-2 based on cell viability assays. Caco-2 cells treated with the crude extract showed significant growth inhibition (p< 0.001 in a dose dependent manner with apparent IC50 value of 200 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL in MTT and NRU assays respectively. The fractioned crude saponins showed an enhanced response and inhibited the growth of Caco-2 by 93.6 and 97.4% in MTT and NRU assays respectively, with compared to actinomycin-D (65%. The DAPI staining of cell treated with crude saponins observed under confocal microscope showed shrunken nuclei with apparent nuclear fragmentation and chromatin condensation indicating apoptosis mode of cell death. The study exhibited that the G. Trichophylla saponins induced apoptosis of Caco-2 cell lines. This study provides new evidences to further explore this plant for the novel targets in anticancer drug development.

  5. Redesign of a computerized clinical reminder for colorectal cancer screening: a human-computer interaction evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Jason J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on barriers to the use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS learned in an earlier field study, we prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's colorectal cancer (CRC screening clinical reminder to compare against the VHA's current CRC reminder. Methods In a controlled simulation experiment, 12 primary care providers (PCPs used prototypes of the current and redesigned CRC screening reminder in a within-subject comparison. Quantitative measurements were based on a usability survey, workload assessment instrument, and workflow integration survey. We also collected qualitative data on both designs. Results Design enhancements to the VHA's existing CRC screening clinical reminder positively impacted aspects of usability and workflow integration but not workload. The qualitative analysis revealed broad support across participants for the design enhancements with specific suggestions for improving the reminder further. Conclusions This study demonstrates the value of a human-computer interaction evaluation in informing the redesign of information tools to foster uptake, integration into workflow, and use in clinical practice.

  6. The peiminine stimulating autophagy in human colorectal carcinoma cells via AMPK pathway by SQSTM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process, which functions in maintenance of cellular homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. The self-eating process engulfs cellular long-lived proteins and organelles with double-membrane vesicles, and forms a so-called autophagosome. Degradation of contents via fusion with lysosome provides recycled building blocks for synthesis of new molecules during stress, e.g. starvation. Peiminine is a steroidal alkaloid extracted from Fritillaria thunbergii which is widely used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Previously, peiminine has been identified to induce autophagy in human colorectal carcinoma cells. In this study, we further investigated whether peiminine could induce autophagic cell death via activating autophagy-related signaling pathway AMPK-mTOR-ULK by promoting SQSTM1(P62. Xenograft tumor growth in vivo suggested that both peiminine and starvation inhibit the growth of tumor size and weight, which was prominently enhanced when peiminine and starvation combined. The therapeutical effect of peiminine in cancer treatment is to be expected.

  7. Human cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 may act as a tumor promoter in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhen-Zhai; Xu, Jian-Gang; Zhou, Yu-Hui; Zheng, Ji-Hang; Lin, Ke-Zhi; Zheng, Shu-Zhi; Ye, Meng-Si; He, Yun; Liu, Chang-Bao; Xue, Zhan-Xiong

    2016-03-07

    To assess human cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 gene function in colorectal cancer (CRC) pathogenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to determine US28 expression in 103 CRC patient samples and 98 corresponding adjacent noncancerous samples. Patient data were compared by age, sex, tumor location, histological grade, Dukes' stage, and overall mean survival time. In addition, the US28 gene was transiently transfected into the CRC LOVO cell line, and cell proliferation was assessed using a cell counting kit-8 assay. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and a cell invasion transwell assay were also carried out. US28 levels were clearly higher in CRC tissues (38.8%) than in adjacent noncancerous samples (7.1%) (P = 0.000). Interestingly, elevated US28 amounts in CRC tissues were significantly associated with histological grade, metastasis, Dukes' stage, and overall survival (all P < 0.05); meanwhile, US28 expression was not significantly correlated with age, sex or tumor location. In addition, multivariate Cox regression data revealed US28 level as an independent CRC prognostic marker (P = 0.000). LOVO cells successfully transfected with the US28 gene exhibited higher viability, greater chemotherapy resistance, accelerated cell cycle progression, and increased invasion ability. US28 expression is predictive of poor prognosis and may promote CRC.

  8. Training in laparoscopic colorectal surgery: A new educational model using specially embalmed human anatomical specimen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Slieker (Juliette); H. Theeuwes (Hilco); G.L. van Rooijen (Göran); J.F. Lange (Johan); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: With an increasing percentage of colorectal resections performed laparoscopically nowadays, there is more emphasis on training "before the job" on operative skills, including the comprehension of specific laparoscopic surgical anatomy. As integration of technical skills with

  9. Cannabinoid receptor-independent cytotoxic effects of cannabinoids in human colorectal carcinoma cells: synergism with 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Sofia B; Lindgren, Theres; Jonsson, Maria; Jacobsson, Stig O P

    2009-03-01

    Cannabinoids (CBs) have been found to exert antiproliferative effects upon a variety of cancer cells, including colorectal carcinoma cells. However, little is known about the signalling mechanisms behind the antitumoural effect in these cells, whether the effects are shared by endogenous lipids related to endocannabinoids, or whether such effects are synergistic with treatment paradigms currently used in the clinic. The aim of this preclinical study was to investigate the effect of synthetic and endogenous CBs and their related fatty acids on the viability of human colorectal carcinoma Caco-2 cells, and to determine whether CB effects are synergistic with those seen with the pyrimidine antagonist 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The synthetic CB HU 210, the endogenous CB anandamide, the endogenous structural analogue of anandamide, N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly), as well as the related polyunsaturated fatty acids arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid showed antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects in the Caco-2 cells, as measured by using [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay, the CyQUANT proliferation assay and calcein-AM fluorescence. HU 210 was the most potent compound examined, followed by anandamide, whereas NAGly showed equal potency and efficacy as the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, HU 210 and 5-FU produced synergistic effects in the Caco-2 cells, but not in the human colorectal carcinoma cell lines HCT116 or HT29. The compounds examined produced cytotoxic, rather than antiproliferative effects, by a mechanism not involving CB receptors, since the CB receptor antagonists AM251 and AM630 did not attenuate the effects, nor did pertussis toxin. However, alpha-tocopherol and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME attenuated the CB toxicity, suggesting involvement of oxidative stress. It is concluded that the CB system may provide new targets for the development of drugs to treat colorectal cancer.

  10. Estradiol agonists inhibit human LoVo colorectal-cancer cell proliferation and migration through p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ju, Da-Tong; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Tsai, Ying-Lan; Shen, Chia-Yao; Chang, Sheng-Huang; Chung, Li-Chin; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2014-11-28

    To investigate the effects of 17β-estradiol via estrogen receptors (ER) or direct administration of ER agonists on human colorectal cancer. LoVo cells were established from the Bioresource Collection and Research Center and cultured in phenol red-free DMEM (Sigma, United States). To investigate the effects of E2 and/or ER selective agonists on cellular proliferation, LoVo colorectal cells were treated with E2 or ER-selective agonists for 24 h and 48 h and subjected to the MTT (Sigma) assay to find the concentration. And investigate the effects of E2 and/or ER selective agonists on cell used western immunoblotting to find out the diversification of signaling pathways. In order to observe motility and migration the wound healing assay and a transwell chamber (Neuro Probe) plate were tased. For a quantitative measure, we counted the number of migrating cells to the wound area post-wounding for 24 h. We further examined the cellular migration-regulating factors urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in human LoVo cells so gelatin zymography that we used and gelatinolytic activity was visualized by Coomassie blue staining. And these results are presented as means ± SE, and statistical comparisons were made using Student's t-test. The structure was first compared with E2 and ER agonists. We then treated the LoVo cells with E2 and ER agonists (10(-8) mol/L) for 24 h and 48 h and subsequently measured the cell viability using MTT assay. Our results showed that treatment with 17β-estradiol and/or ER agonists in human LoVo colorectal cancer cells activated p53 and then up-regulated p21 and p27 protein levels, subsequently inhibiting the downstream target gene, cyclin D1, which regulates cell proliferation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the anti-tumorigenesis effects of 17β-estradiol and/or ER agonists and suggest that these compounds may prove to be a potential alternative

  11. Rosiglitazone enhances the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Shu-Jun, E-mail: chiusj@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Institute of Radiation Sciences, Tzu Chi Technology College, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Hsaio, Ching-Hui; Tseng, Ho-Hsing; Su, Yu-Han [Department of Life Science, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Shih, Wen-Ling [Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jeng-Woei; Chuah, Jennifer Qiu-Yu [Department of Life Science, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)

    2010-04-09

    Combined-modality treatment has improved the outcome in cases of various solid tumors, and radiosensitizers are used to enhance the radiotherapeutic efficiency. Rosiglitazone, a synthetic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {gamma} used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been shown to reduce tumor growth and metastasis in human cancer cells, and may have the potential to be used as a radiosensitizer in radiotherapy for human colorectal cancer cells. In this study, rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of p53-wild type HCT116 cells but not p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Interestingly, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiosensitivity in p53-mutant HT-29 cells but not HCT116 cells, and prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and enhanced radiation-induced cell growth inhibition in HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with rosiglitazone also suppressed radiation-induced H2AX phosphorylation in response to DNA damage and AKT activation for cell survival; on the contrary, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiation-induced caspase-8, -9, and -3 activation and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells. In addition, pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk, attenuated the levels of caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in radiation-exposed cancer cells in combination with rosiglitazone pretreatment. Our results provide proof for the first time that rosiglitazone suppresses radiation-induced survival signals and DNA damage response, and enhances the radiation-induced apoptosis signaling cascade. These findings can assist in the development of rosiglitazone as a novel radiosensitizer.

  12. Portuguese propolis disturbs glycolytic metabolism of human colorectal cancer in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Propolis is a resin collected by bees from plant buds and exudates, which is further processed through the activity of bee enzymes. Propolis has been shown to possess many biological and pharmacological properties, such as antimicrobial, antioxidant, immunostimulant and antitumor activities. Due to this bioactivity profile, this resin can become an alternative, economic and safe source of natural bioactive compounds. Antitumor action has been reported in vitro and in vivo for propolis extracts or its isolated compounds; however, Portuguese propolis has been little explored. The aim of this work was to evaluate the in vitro antitumor activity of Portuguese propolis on the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT-15, assessing the effect of different fractions (hexane, chloroform and ethanol residual) of a propolis ethanol extract on cell viability, proliferation, metabolism and death. Methods Propolis from Angra do Heroísmo (Azores) was extracted with ethanol and sequentially fractionated in solvents with increasing polarity, n-hexane and chloroform. To assess cell viability, cell proliferation and cell death, Sulforhodamine B, BrDU incorporation assay and Anexin V/Propidium iodide were used, respectively. Glycolytic metabolism was estimated using specific kits. Results All propolis samples exhibited a cytotoxic effect against tumor cells, in a dose- and time-dependent way. Chloroform fraction, the most enriched in phenolic compounds, appears to be the most active, both in terms of inhibition of viability and cell death. Data also show that this cytotoxicity involves disturbance in tumor cell glycolytic metabolism, seen by a decrease in glucose consumption and lactate production. Conclusion Our results show that Portuguese propolis from Angra do Heroísmo (Azores) can be a potential therapeutic agent against human colorectal cancer. PMID:23870175

  13. Dietary fiber, source foods and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Kazuhiro; Kono, Suminori; Yin, Guang; Toyomura, Kengo; Nagano, Jun; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Mibu, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2010-10-01

    Despite much evidence from laboratory work, epidemiological evidence remains elusive regarding the role of dietary fiber in colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated associations of dietary fiber and source foods with colorectal cancer risk in the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study, a community-based case-control study. The study subjects were 816 incident cases of colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Nutrient and food intakes were estimated on the basis of a computer-assisted interview regarding 148 dietary items. Odds ratios of colorectal cancer according to quintile categories of energy-adjusted intakes of dietary fiber and food groups were obtained with adjustment for non-dietary factors and dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 fatty acids. Total, soluble and insoluble dietary fibers were not measurably associated with overall risk or subsite-specific risk of colorectal cancer. By contrast, rice consumption was associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (trend p = 0.03), particularly of distal colon and rectal cancer (trend p = 0.02), and high intake of non-rice cereals tended to be related to an increased risk of colon cancer (trend p = 0.07). There was no association between vegetable consumption and colorectal cancer, whereas individuals with the lowest intake of fruits tended to have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The present study did not corroborate a protective association between dietary fiber and colorectal cancer, but suggested a decreased risk of distal colorectal cancer associated with rice consumption.

  14. Molecular biology in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Manuel; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo

    2006-06-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease. Colorectal cancer is probably the type of cancer for which the most is known about the genes affected by cancer-causing mutations, their normal functions and their carcinogenic effects when mutated. Most cancer-causing mutations are somatic, occurring in the affected tissue during the course of carcinogenesis. However, most cancers also have a hereditary component that is caused by predisposing mutations that affect the germline, are heritable and contribute to the initiation of carcinogenesis. High-penetrance mutations confer predisposition to colorectal cancer mainly in Lynch syndrome (which involves mutations in mismatch-repair genes) and in familial adenomatous polyposis (which involves mutations in the APC tumour suppressor). Together, these conditions account for 5% or less of all cases of colorectal cancer. Low-penetrance mutations account for a high proportion of all the attributable risk of colorectal cancer, in both familial and sporadic cases. These mutations are more difficult to identify, but mainly due to the implementation of association studies, are increasingly being detected and characterized. The identification of both high- and low-penetrance mutations contributes significantly to our understanding of the molecular genetic processes occurring in cancer. This understanding facilitates the development of therapeutic drugs and preventive strategies.

  15. Inflammation-associated serum and colon markers as indicators of dietary attenuation of colon carcinogenesis in ob/ob mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentor-Marcel, Roycelynn A; Bobe, Gerd; Barrett, Kathleen G; Young, Matthew R; Albert, Paul S; Bennink, Maurice R; Lanza, Elaine; Colburn, Nancy H

    2009-01-01

    Although inflammatory cytokines and obesity-associated serum proteins have been reported as biomarkers of colorectal adenoma risk in humans, little is known of biomarkers of response to interventions that attenuate tumorigenesis. Dietary navy beans and their fractions attenuate colon carcinogenesis in carcinogen-induced genetically obese mice. We hypothesized that this attenuation would be associated with changes in inflammatory cytokines and obesity-related serum proteins that may serve as measures of efficacy. ob/ob mice (n = 160) were injected with the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) to induce colon cancer and randomly placed on one of four diets (control, whole navy bean, bean residue fraction, or bean extract fraction) for 26 to 28 wk. Serum was analyzed for 14 inflammation- or obesity-related proteins, and colon RNA was analyzed for expression of 84 inflammation-associated genes. Six of 14 serum proteins were increased [i.e., interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IFN gamma, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor] in hyperplastic/dysplastic stages of colon carcinogenesis. Bean-fed mice had significantly higher monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and lower IL-6 levels in serum. In colon mucosa, 55 of 84 inflammation-associated genes differed between AOM-induced and noninduced mice. Of the 55 AOM-induced genes, 5 were counteracted by bean diets, including IL-6 whose increase in expression levels was attenuated by bean diets in AOM-induced mice. In summary, IL-6 emerged as a serum protein that was increased in hyperplastic/dysplastic stages of colon carcinogenesis, but attenuated with bean-based diet in serum and colon mucosa. Changes in a subset of inflammation-associated serum proteins and colon gene expression may serve as response indicators of dietary attenuation of colon carcinogenesis.

  16. 2-Hydroxymelatonin, a Predominant Hydroxylated Melatonin Metabolite in Plants, Shows Antitumor Activity against Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Zhou, Rui; Park, So-Yeon; Back, Kyoungwhan; Bae, Woo Kyun; Kim, Kyung Keun; Kim, Hangun

    2017-03-14

    2-Hydroxymelatonin is a predominant hydroxylated melatonin metabolite in plants. To investigate whether it has potent cytotoxic effects on colorectal cancer cells, four colorectal cancer cell lines, Caco2, HCT116, DLD1, and CT26, were treated with 2-hydroxymelatonin and melatonin. 2-Hydroxymelatonin had a much lower IC50 value than melatonin in the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The cytotoxic effect of 2-hydroxymelatonin was much stronger than that of melatonin at high concentrations (1000 or 2000 μM) in HCT116, DLD1, and CT26 cells, but only at intermediate concentrations (250 or 500 μM) in Caco2 cells. The cytotoxicity of 2-hydroxymelatonin was induced through activation of the apoptotic signaling pathway, as confirmed by Hoechst staining and Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double labeling of cells treated with a lethal dose (1 mM). However, sub-lethal doses of 2-hydroxymelatonin inhibited the invasive ability of Caco2 cells. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were significantly regulated by 2-hydroxymelatonin. Overall, the anti-cancer activity of 2-hydroxymelatonin is more potent than that of melatonin. Taken together, 2-hydroxymelatonin exhibits potent anti-cancer activity against human colorectal cancer cells via induction of apoptosis and inhibition of EMT.

  17. Modified bacterial cellulose scaffolds for localized doxorubicin release in human colorectal HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Cacicedo, Maximiliano; E León, Ignacio; S Gonzalez, Jimena; M Porto, Luismar; A Alvarez, Vera; Castro, Guillermo R

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) films modified by the in situ method with the addition of alginate (Alg) during the microbial cultivation of Gluconacetobacter hansenii under static conditions increased the loading of doxorubicin by at least three times. Biophysical analysis of BC-Alg films by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and FTIR showed a highly homogeneous interpenetrated network scaffold without changes in the BC crystalline structure but with an increased amorphous phase. The main molecular interactions determined by FTIR between both biopolymers clearly suggest high compatibility. These results indicate that alginate plays a key role in the biophysical properties of the hybrid BC matrix. BC-Alg scaffold analysis by nitrogen adsorption isotherms revealed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method an increase in surface area of about 84% and in pore volume of more than 200%. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model also showed an increase of about 25% in the pore size compared to the BC film. Loading BC-Alg scaffolds with different amounts of doxorubicin decreased the cell viability of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line compared to the free Dox from around 95-53% after 24h and from 63% to 37% after 48 h. Dox kinetic release from the BC-Alg nanocomposite displayed hyperbolic curves related to the different amounts of drug payload and was stable for at least 14 days. The results of the BC-Alg nanocomposites show a promissory potential for anticancer therapies of solid tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential BCCIP gene expression in primary human ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma and colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Cao, Lingling; Ni, Jinsong; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Xiaoming; Wang, Yanfang; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Lingyao; Wang, Jin; Yue, Ying; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2013-12-01

    Human BCCIP, a protein which interacts with BRCA2 and CDKN1A (Cip1, p21), has been implicated in many cellular processes including cell cycle regulation, DNA recombination and damage repair, telomere maintenance, embryonic development and genomic stability. BCCIP gene expression, which is an important BRCA2 cofactor in tumor suppression, has been identified in some primary cancers. Thus, we investigated the role of BCCIP expression in a large sample of clinically diagnosed primary ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues. Using clinically diagnosed frozen primary cancer tissues, quantitative PCR (qPCR), western blot analysis (WB) and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) approaches were used to detect and measure gene expression. Reduced BCCIP gene expression in ovarian cancer, RCC and CRC tissues occurred in 74, 89 and 75% of tissue samples, respectively. qPCR analysis of mRNA expression in 54 ovarian cancer, 50 RCC and 44 CRC samples revealed significant (>2-fold decreased) BCCIP downregulation in 56, 70 and 46% of tissue samples, respectively. Although BCCIP expression in three different tumor tissues decreased, the relationship between BCCIP expression and clinicopathological features of each cancer was distinct. Compared to normal tissues, BCCIP expression in ovarian cancers was significantly downregulated in serous, endometrioid and mucinous carcinomas. Downregulation of BCCIP expression was strongly associated with clear cell RCC (ccRCC) and Fuhrman tumor grading, but significant differences in BCCIP expression between CRC and matched normal tissues occurred only in male CRC tissues (povarian cancer and RCC tissue samples (povarian cancer, RCC and CRC tissues, suggesting a role for the gene in the pathogenesis of these cancers.

  19. Induction of Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Colorectal Carcinoma by Litchi Seed Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Litchi (Litchi chinensis fruit products possess rich amounts of flavanoids and proanthocyanidins. Its pericarp has been shown to inhibit breast and liver cancer cell growth. However, the anticolorectal cancer effect of Litchi seed extract has not yet been reported. In this study, the effects of polyphenol-rich Litchi seed ethanol extract (LCSP on the proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of two colorectal cancer cell lines Colo320DM and SW480 were examined. The results demonstrated that LCSP significantly induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner and arrested cell cycle in G2/M in colorectal carcinoma cells. LCSP also suppressed cyclins and elevated the Bax : Bcl-2 ratio and caspase 3 activity. This study provides in vitro evidence that LCSP serves as a potential chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer.

  20. Increased expression of protease-activated receptor 4 and Trefoil factor 2 in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyu Yu

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4, a member of G-protein coupled receptors family, was recently reported to exhibit decreased expression in gastric cancer and esophageal squamous cancer, yet increased expression during the progression of prostate cancer. Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2, a small peptide constitutively expressed in the gastric mucosa, plays a protective role in restitution of gastric mucosa. Altered TFF2 expression was also related to the development of gastrointestinal cancer. TFF2 has been verified to promote cell migration via PAR4, but the roles of PAR4 and TFF2 in the progress of colorectal cancer are still unknown. In this study, the expression level of PAR4 and TFF2 in colorectal cancer tissues was measured using real-time PCR (n = 38, western blotting (n=38 and tissue microarrays (n = 66. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PAR4 and TFF2 were remarkably increased in colorectal cancer compared with matched noncancerous tissues, especially in positive lymph node and poorly differentiated cancers. The colorectal carcinoma cell LoVo showed an increased response to TFF2 as assessed by cell invasion upon PAR4 expression. However, after intervention of PAR4 expression, PAR4 positive colorectal carcinoma cell HT-29 was less responsive to TFF2 in cell invasion. Genomic bisulfite sequencing showed the hypomethylation of PAR4 promoter in colorectal cancer tissues and the hypermethylation in the normal mucosa that suggested the low methylation of promoter was correlated to the increased PAR4 expression. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the up-regulated expression of PAR4 and TFF2 frequently occurs in colorectal cancer tissues, and that overexpression of PAR4 may be resulted from promoter hypomethylation. While TFF2 promotes invasion activity of LoVo cells overexpressing PAR4, and this effect was significantly decreased when PAR4 was knockdowned in HT-29 cells. Our findings will be helpful in further investigations into the

  1. Expression of NDRG2 is down-regulated in high-risk adenomas and colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anders; Vogel, Lotte K.; Lewinsky, Rikke H

    2007-01-01

    to examine NDRG2 mRNA expression in colon cancer. By examining affected and normal tissue from individuals with colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, as well as in healthy individuals, we aim to determine whether and at which stages NDRG2 down-regulation occurs during colonic carcinogenesis. METHODS: Using......BACKGROUND: It has recently been shown that NDRG2 mRNA is down-regulated or undetectable in several human cancers and cancer cell-lines. Although the function of NDRG2 is unknown, high NDRG2 expression correlates with improved prognosis in high-grade gliomas. The aim of this study has been......-regulation is a cause or consequence of the progression of colorectal adenomas to carcinoma....

  2. AAV-mediated human PEDF inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in murine colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Qin Jie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis, therefore antiangiogenic therapy was widely investigated as a promising approach for cancer therapy. Recently, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF has been shown to be the most potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. Adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors have been intensively studied due to their wide tropisms, nonpathogenicity, and long-term transgene expression in vivo. The objective of this work was to evaluate the ability of AAV-mediated human PEDF (hPEDF as a potent tumor suppressor and a potential candidate for cancer gene therapy. Methods Recombinant AAV2 encoding hPEDF (rAAV2-hPEDF was constructed and produced, and then was assigned for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Conditioned medium from cells infected with rAAV2-hPEDF was used for cell proliferation and tube formation tests of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Subsequently, colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis (CRPC mouse model was established and treated with rAAV2-hPEDF. Therapeutic efficacy of rAAV2-hPEDF were investigated, including tumor growth and metastasis, survival time, microvessel density (MVD and apoptosis index of tumor tissues, and hPEDF levels in serum and ascites. Results rAAV2-hPEDF was successfully constructed, and transmission electron microscope (TEM showed that rAAV2-hPEDF particles were non-enveloped icosahedral shape with a diameter of approximately 20 nm. rAAV2-hPEDF-infected cells expressed hPEDF protein, and the conditioned medium from infected cells inhibited proliferation and tube-formation of HUVECs in vitro. Furthermore, in CRPC mouse model, rAAV2-hPEDF significantly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis, and prolonged survival time of treated mice. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that rAAV2-hPEDF could inhibit angiogenesis and induce apoptosis in tumor tissues. Besides, hPEDF levels in serum and ascites of rAAV2-hPEDF-treated mice were significant

  3. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  4. Recent advances in metal carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    Recent advances in metal carcinogenesis are comprehensively reviewed, including (a) epidemiological and clinical aspects, (b) carcinogenesis bioassays, (c) bacterial mutagenesis, (d) mammalian cell mutagenesis, (e) chromosomal damage, (f) mammalian cell transformation, (g) microsomal metabolism, (h) DNA strandbreaks and crosslinks, (i) DNA polymerase infidelity, (j) RNA strand initiation, and (k) helical transition of B-DNA to Z-DNA. Based upon these observations, several hypotheses are proposed for the molecular pathogenesis of carcinogenesis by metal compounds. These hypotheses are amenable to experimental test by existing techniques of molecular biology.

  5. Inhibition of colon carcinogenesis by a standardized Cannabis sativa extract with high content of cannabidiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Barbara; Borrelli, Francesca; Pagano, Ester; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Pertwee, Roger G; Izzo, Angelo A

    2014-04-15

    Colon cancer is a major public health problem. Cannabis-based medicines are useful adjunctive treatments in cancer patients. Here, we have investigated the effect of a standardized Cannabis sativa extract with high content of cannabidiol (CBD), here named CBD BDS, i.e. CBD botanical drug substance, on colorectal cancer cell proliferation and in experimental models of colon cancer in vivo. Proliferation was evaluated in colorectal carcinoma (DLD-1 and HCT116) as well as in healthy colonic cells using the MTT assay. CBD BDS binding was evaluated by its ability to displace [(3)H]CP55940 from human cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. In vivo, the effect of CBD BDS was examined on the preneoplastic lesions (aberrant crypt foci), polyps and tumours induced by the carcinogenic agent azoxymethane (AOM) as well as in a xenograft model of colon cancer in mice. CBD BDS and CBD reduced cell proliferation in tumoral, but not in healthy, cells. The effect of CBD BDS was counteracted by selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists. Pure CBD reduced cell proliferation in a CB1-sensitive antagonist manner only. In binding assays, CBD BDS showed greater affinity than pure CBD for both CB1 and CB2 receptors, with pure CBD having very little affinity. In vivo, CBD BDS reduced AOM-induced preneoplastic lesions and polyps as well as tumour growth in the xenograft model of colon cancer. CBD BDS attenuates colon carcinogenesis and inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation via CB1 and CB2 receptor activation. The results may have some clinical relevance for the use of Cannabis-based medicines in cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Pathogenesis and biomarkers of carcinogenesis in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    -driven mechanisms of DNA damage, including the generation and effects of reactive oxygen species, microsatellite instability, telomere shortening and chromosomal instability, are reviewed, as are the molecular responses to genomic stress. We also discuss how these mechanisms can be translated into usable biomarkers....... Although progress has been made in the understanding of inflammation-driven carcinogenesis, markers based on these findings possess insufficient sensitivity or specificity to be usable as reliable biomarkers for risk of colorectal cancer development in patients with ulcerative colitis. However, screening...

  7. Folate-related nutrients, genetic polymorphisms, and colorectal cancer risk: the fukuoka colorectal cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Makiko; Yin, Guang; Yoshimitsu, Shin-ichiro; Ohnaka, Keizo; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2013-01-01

    One-carbon metabolism plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Meta-analyses have suggested protective associations of folate and vitamin B6 intakes with colorectal cancer primarily based on studies in Caucasians, and genetic polymorphisms pertaining to the folate metabolism have been a matter of interest. Less investigated are the roles of methionine synthase (MTR) and thymidylate synthetase (TS) polymorphisms in colorectal carcinogenesis. In a study of 816 cases and 815 community controls in Japan, we investigated associations of dietary intakes of folate, methionine, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 with colorectal cancer risk. The associations with MTR 2756A>G, MTRR 66A>G, and TSER repeat polymorphism were examined in 685 cases and 778 controls. Methionine and vitamin B12 intakes were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, but the associations were totally confounded by dietary calcium and n-3 fatty acids. The other nutrients showed no association with the risk even without adjustment for calcium and n-3 fatty acids. The TSER 2R allele was dose-dependently associated with an increased risk. The MTR and MTRR polymorphisms were unrelated to colorectal cancer risk. There was no measurable gene-gene or gene-nutrient interaction, but increased risk associated with the TSER 2R allele seemed to be confined to individuals with high folate status. This study does not support protective associations for folate and vitamin B6. The TSER 2R allele may confer an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The role of the TSER polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis may differ by ethnicity.

  8. Folic acid, polymorphism of methyl-group metabolism genes, and DNA methylation in relation to GI carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing Yuan; Xiao, Shu Dong

    2003-01-01

    DNA methylation is the main epigenetic modification after replication in humans. DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase (DNMT) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to C5 of cytosine within CpG dinucleotide sequences in the genomic DNA of higher eukaryotes. There is considerable evidence that aberrant DNA methylation plays an integral role in carcinogenesis. Folic acid or folate is crucial for normal DNA synthesis and can regulate DNA methylation, and through this, it affects cellular SAM levels. Folate deficiency results in DNA hypomethylation. Epidemiological studies have indicated that folic acid protects against gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase (MS) are the enzymes involved in folate metabolism and are thought to influence DNA methylation. MTHFR is highly polymorphic, and the variant genotypes result in decreased MTHFR enzyme activity and lower plasma folate level. Two common MTHFR polymorphisms, 677CT (or 677TT) and A1298C, and an MS polymorphism, A-->G at 2756, have been identified. Most studies support an inverse association between folate status and the rate of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. During human GI carcinogenesis, MTHFR is highly polymorphic, and the variant genotypes result in decreased MTHFR enzyme activity and lower plasma folate level, as well as aberrant methylation.

  9. Krill oil extract suppresses cell growth and induces apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayathilake, Abilasha Gayani; Senior, Paul Vincent; Su, Xiao Qun

    2016-08-30

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. The current available treatments for CRC include surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, surgery is only useful when the disease is diagnosed at the earlier stage. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with numerous side effects that decrease the patients' quality of life. Safer, effective alternatives, such as natural compounds, to chemotherapy are desirable. This study assessed the efficacy of free fatty acid (FFA) extract of krill oil on three human CRC cells lines. HCT-15, SW-480 and Caco-2 cells were treated with the FFA extracts of krill oil and fish oil for 48 h while treatments with the bioactive omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) of these marine oils, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) in comparison with a n-6 PUFA, arachnoid acid (AA, C20:4n-6) were up to 72 h at the concentrations of 50, 100, 150 and 200 μM. Effects of all the treatments on cell proliferation were assessed using a water-soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1) assay kit at 24, 48 and 72 h. Effects of FFA extract of krill oil and EPA on apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential were determined using commercial kits after 48 h of treatment. Krill oil extract inhibited cell proliferation of all three cell lines in the similar manner as fish oil extract. A significant cell apoptosis and increase in mitochondrial membrane potential were observed after the treatment with krill oil extract. EPA at the concentration of 200 μM reduced significantly the proliferation of HCT-15 and SW-480 at 24, 48 and 72 h. In addition, EPA treatment (100 and 200 μM) resulted in significant cell apoptosis in all three cell lines. No significant changes were observed after treatment with DHA and AA. Our results indicate that the FFA extract of krill oil maybe an effective chemotherapeutic agent to suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in CRC cells through its

  10. Multiple Mechanisms Are Involved in 6-Gingerol-Induced Cell Growth Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Ho; Cekanova, Maria; Baek, Seung Joon

    2008-01-01

    6-Gingerol, a natural product of ginger, has been known to possess anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities. However, the mechanisms by which it prevents cancer are not well understood in human colorectal cancer. Cyclin D1 is a proto-oncogene that is overexpressed in many cancers and plays a role in cell proliferation through activation by β-catenin signaling. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-activated gene-1 (NAG-1) is a cytokine associated with pro-apoptotic and anti-tumorigenic properties. In the present study, we examined whether 6-gingerol influences cyclin D1 and NAG-1 expression and determined the mechanisms by which 6-gingerol affects the growth of human colorectal cancer cells in vitro. 6-Gingerol treatment suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest. Subsequently, 6-gingerol suppressed cyclin D1 expression and induced NAG-1 expression. Cyclin D1 suppression was related to inhibition of β-catenin translocation and cyclin D1 proteolysis. Furthermore, experiments using inhibitors and siRNA transfection confirm the involvement of the PKCε and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β pathways in 6-gingerol-induced NAG-1 expression. The results suggest that 6-gingerol stimulates apoptosis through upregulation of NAG-1 and G1 cell cycle arrest through downregulation of cyclin D1. Multiple mechanisms appear to be involved in 6-gingerol action, including protein degradation as well as β-catenin, PKCε, and GSK-3β pathways. PMID:18058799

  11. A comparison of human cadaver and augmented reality simulator models for straight laparoscopic colorectal skills acquisition training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Fabien; Champagne, Bradley J; Augestad, Knut M; Neary, Paul C; Senagore, Anthony J; Ellis, Clyde N; Delaney, Conor P

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the human cadaver model with an augmented reality simulator for straight laparoscopic colorectal skills acquisition. Thirty-five sigmoid colectomies were performed on a cadaver (n = 7) or an augmented reality simulator (n = 28) during a laparoscopic training course. Prior laparoscopic colorectal experience was assessed. Objective structured technical skills assessment forms were completed by trainers and trainees independently. Groups were compared according to technical skills and events scores and satisfaction with training model. Prior laparoscopic experience was similar in both groups. For trainers and trainees, technical skills scores were considerably better on the simulator than on the cadaver. For trainers, generic events score was also considerably better on the simulator than on the cadaver. The main generic event occurring on both models was errors in the use of retraction. The main specific event occurring on both models was bowel perforation. Global satisfaction was better for the cadaver than for the simulator model (p < 0.001). The human cadaver model was more difficult but better appreciated than the simulator for laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy training. Simulator training followed by cadaver training can appropriately integrate simulators into the learning curve and maintain the benefits of both training methodologies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Characterization of a large panel of patient-derived tumor xenografts representing the clinical heterogeneity of human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Sylvia; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Lacroix, Ludovic; Pocard, Marc; Goéré, Diane; Mariani, Pascale; Landron, Sophie; Bigot, Ludovic; Nemati, Fariba; Dartigues, Peggy; Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Lantuas, Denis; Morgand, Loïc; Pham, Emmanuel; Gonin, Patrick; Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Job, Bastien; Dessen, Philippe; Bruno, Alain; Pierré, Alain; De Thé, Hugues; Soliman, Hany; Nunes, Manoel; Lardier, Guillaume; Calvet, Loreley; Demers, Brigitte; Prévost, Grégoire; Vrignaud, Patricia; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Duchamp, Olivier; Berthet, Cyril

    2012-10-01

    Patient-derived xenograft models are considered to represent the heterogeneity of human cancers and advanced preclinical models. Our consortium joins efforts to extensively develop and characterize a new collection of patient-derived colorectal cancer (CRC) models. From the 85 unsupervised surgical colorectal samples collection, 54 tumors were successfully xenografted in immunodeficient mice and rats, representing 35 primary tumors, 5 peritoneal carcinoses and 14 metastases. Histologic and molecular characterization of patient tumors, first and late passages on mice includes the sequence of key genes involved in CRC (i.e., APC, KRAS, TP53), aCGH, and transcriptomic analysis. This comprehensive characterization shows that our collection recapitulates the clinical situation about the histopathology and molecular diversity of CRC. Moreover, patient tumors and corresponding models are clustering together allowing comparison studies between clinical and preclinical data. Hence, we conducted pharmacologic monotherapy studies with standard of care for CRC (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and cetuximab). Through this extensive in vivo analysis, we have shown the loss of human stroma cells after engraftment, observed a metastatic phenotype in some models, and finally compared the molecular profile with the drug sensitivity of each tumor model. Through an experimental cetuximab phase II trial, we confirmed the key role of KRAS mutation in cetuximab resistance. This new collection could bring benefit to evaluate novel targeted therapeutic strategies and to better understand the basis for sensitivity or resistance of tumors from individual patients.

  13. High occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Clostridium difficile in the intestinal microbiota of colorectal carcinoma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fukugaiti,Márcia H.; Aline Ignacio; Miriam R. Fernandes; Ulysses Ribeiro Júnior; Viviane Nakano; Avila-Campos, Mario J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal carcinoma is considered the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Several microorganisms have been associated with carcinogenesis, including Enterococcus spp., Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, pathogenic E. coli strains and oral Fusobacterium. Here we qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the presence of oral and intestinal microorganisms in the fecal microbiota of colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. Seventeen patients...

  14. K-ras oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Pachen, M.M.M.; Smits, K.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Activation of K-ras oncogene has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis, being mutated in 30-60% of the adenocarcinomas. In this study, 737 incident colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, originating from 120 852 men and women (55-69 years at baseline) participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study

  15. Biomarkers Related to One-Carbon Metabolism as Potential Risk Factors for Distal Colorectal Adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, de S.; Schneede, J.; Ueland, P.M.; Vollset, S.E.; Meyer, K.; Fredriksen, A.; Midttun, O.; Bjorge, T.; Kampman, E.; Bretthauer, M.; Hoff, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Efficient one-carbon metabolism, which requires adequate supply of methyl group donors and B-vitamins, may protect against colorectal carcinogenesis. However, plasma folate and vitamins B2 and B12 have inconsistently been associated with colorectal cancer risk, and there have been no

  16. Biomarkers related to one-carbon metabolism as potential risk factors for distal colorectal adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Schneede, J.; Ueland, P.M.; Vollset, S.E.; Meyer, K.; Fredriksen, A.; Midttun, O.; Bjorge, T.; Kampman, E.; Bretthauer, M.; Hoff, G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efficient one-carbon metabolism, which requires adequate supply of methyl group donors and B-vitamins, may protect against colorectal carcinogenesis. However, plasma folate and vitamins B2 and B12 have inconsistently been associated with colorectal cancer risk, and there have been no

  17. Total antioxidant status value and superoxide dismutase activity in human colorectal cancer tissue depending on the stage of the disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocot, Joanna; Kiełczykowska, Małgorzata; Dąbrowski, Wojciech; Piłat, Jacek; Rudzki, Sławomir; Musik, Irena

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in developed countries. Oxidative stress can cause damage to colonocytes by inducing cell cytokine synthesis and triggering the process of carcinogenesis. The aim of the study was to analyze relationships between: 1] total antioxidant status (TAS) value in CRC tissue and healthy colon tissue; 2] superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in CRC tissue and healthy colon tissue; 3] TAS value in CRC tissue and the stage of colorectal cancer; and 4] SOD activity in CRC tissue and the stage of colorectal cancer. Adult patients undergoing colonic surgery for CRC were studied. The patients were divided into four groups according to the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors. Spectrophotometric methods were used to measure TAS values and SOD activity, using diagnostic kits produced by Randox Laboratories. The mean TAS value in CRC tissue was 0.0073 ± 0.0038 mmol/g of tissue, which was not significantly different from the mean value in healthy tissue (0.0067 ± 0.0035 mmol/g of tissue). SOD activity was 170 ± 32 U/g of tissue and was significantly higher in CRC than in healthy tissue (107 ± 25 U/g of tissue). In stages I, II and III of CRC, SOD activity as well as TAS value were increased in tumor tissue as compared to healthy tissue. Both SOD activity and TAS value markedly decreased in stage IV in contrast to the other stages of the disease. The study results suggest that TAS and SOD monitoring could be valuable during the treatment of CRC.

  18. Genetic variants of methyl metabolizing enzymes and epigenetic regulators: Associations with promoter CpG island hypermethylation in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Wouters, K.A.D.; Gottschalk, R.W.H.; Schooten, F.J. van; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Weijenberg, M.P.; Engeland, M. van

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation affects carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. Folate metabolizing enzymes may influence the bioavailability of methyl groups, whereas DNA and histone methyltransferases are involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. We studied associations of genetic variants of

  19. Molecular Signatures of Human Regulatory T Cells in Colorectal Cancer and Polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Adzimah Johdi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs, a subset of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, play a pivotal role in regulating immune homeostasis. An increase in Tregs was reported in many tumors to be associated with immune suppression and evasion in cancer patients. Despite the importance of Tregs, the molecular signatures that contributed to their pathophysiological relevance remain poorly understood and controversial. In this study, we explored the gene expression profiles in Tregs derived from patients with colorectal cancer [colorectal carcinoma (CRC, n = 15], colorectal polyps (P, n = 15, and in healthy volunteers (N, n = 15. Tregs were analyzed using CD4+CD25+CD127lowFoxP3+ antibody markers. Gene expression profiling analysis leads to the identification of 61 and 66 immune-related genes in Tregs derived from CRC and P patients, respectively, but not in N-derived Treg samples. Of these, 30 genes were differentially expressed both in CRC- and P-derived Tregs when compared to N-derived Tregs. Most of the identified genes were involved in cytokine/chemokine mediators of inflammation, chemokine receptor, lymphocyte activation, and T cell receptor (TCR signaling pathways. This study highlights some of the molecular signatures that may affect Tregs’ expansion and possible suppression of function in cancer development. Our findings may provide a better understanding of the immunomodulatory nature of Tregs and could, therefore, open up new avenues in immunotherapy.

  20. Lysyl Oxidase Gene G473A Polymorphism and Cigarette Smoking in Association with a High Risk of Lung and Colorectal Cancers in a North Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoli; Shen, Yanqing; Cheng, Guang; Bo, Haimei; Lin, Jia; Zheng, Maogen; Li, Jianmin; Zhao, Yinzhi; Li, Wande

    2016-06-28

    The relationship among the lysyl oxidase (LOX) G473A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), cigarette smoking and lung, colorectal, colon and rectum cancer susceptibility was studied in 200 cases of lung cancer, 335 cases of colorectal cancer including 130 cases of colon cancer and 205 cases of rectum cancer, and 335 healthy people in Tangshan, China. Peripheral blood DNA samples were collected, DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) performed, followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. In comparison to LOX473GG genotype carriers, individuals with LOX473AA exhibited a higher susceptibility to lung, colon-rectum, colon, and rectum cancers with OR values amounting to 3.84-, 2.74-, 2.75-, and 2.74-fold of the control, respectively. In the LOX 473AA-positive population, females were more susceptible than males to carcinogenesis with OR values (female vs. male): 5.25 vs. 3.23, 2.29 vs. 1.51, 2.27 vs. 1.45, and 2.25 vs. 1.53, respectively, for lung, colon-rectum combined, colon, and rectum cancers. LOX G473A polymorphism apparently elevated human sensitivity to cigarette smoking carcinogens for eliciting cancers in the lung and colon only. Thus, LOX G473A polymorphism positively correlates with carcinogenesis and it may be used as an ideal intrinsic biomarker for prediction or diagnosis of carcinogenesis in humans.

  1. Lysyl Oxidase Gene G473A Polymorphism and Cigarette Smoking in Association with a High Risk of Lung and Colorectal Cancers in a North Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoli Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship among the lysyl oxidase (LOX G473A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, cigarette smoking and lung, colorectal, colon and rectum cancer susceptibility was studied in 200 cases of lung cancer, 335 cases of colorectal cancer including 130 cases of colon cancer and 205 cases of rectum cancer, and 335 healthy people in Tangshan, China. Peripheral blood DNA samples were collected, DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP performed, followed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. In comparison to LOX473GG genotype carriers, individuals with LOX473AA exhibited a higher susceptibility to lung, colon-rectum, colon, and rectum cancers with OR values amounting to 3.84-, 2.74-, 2.75-, and 2.74-fold of the control, respectively. In the LOX 473AA-positive population, females were more susceptible than males to carcinogenesis with OR values (female vs. male: 5.25 vs. 3.23, 2.29 vs. 1.51, 2.27 vs. 1.45, and 2.25 vs. 1.53, respectively, for lung, colon-rectum combined, colon, and rectum cancers. LOX G473A polymorphism apparently elevated human sensitivity to cigarette smoking carcinogens for eliciting cancers in the lung and colon only. Thus, LOX G473A polymorphism positively correlates with carcinogenesis and it may be used as an ideal intrinsic biomarker for prediction or diagnosis of carcinogenesis in humans.

  2. The gut microbiota in conventional and serrated precursors of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brandilyn A; Dominianni, Christine; Shapiro, Jean A; Church, Timothy R; Wu, Jing; Miller, George; Yuen, Elizabeth; Freiman, Hal; Lustbader, Ian; Salik, James; Friedlander, Charles; Hayes, Richard B; Ahn, Jiyoung

    2016-12-30

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease arising from at least two precursors-the conventional adenoma (CA) and the serrated polyp. We and others have previously shown a relationship between the human gut microbiota and colorectal cancer; however, its relationship to the different early precursors of colorectal cancer is understudied. We tested, for the first time, the relationship of the gut microbiota to specific colorectal polyp types. Gut microbiota were assessed in 540 colonoscopy-screened adults by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of stool samples. Participants were categorized as CA cases (n = 144), serrated polyp cases (n = 73), or polyp-free controls (n = 323). CA cases were further classified as proximal (n = 87) or distal (n = 55) and as non-advanced (n = 121) or advanced (n = 22). Serrated polyp cases were further classified as hyperplastic polyp (HP; n = 40) or sessile serrated adenoma (SSA; n = 33). We compared gut microbiota diversity, overall composition, and normalized taxon abundance among these groups. CA cases had lower species richness in stool than controls (p = 0.03); in particular, this association was strongest for advanced CA cases (p = 0.004). In relation to overall microbiota composition, only distal or advanced CA cases differed significantly from controls (p = 0.02 and p = 0.002). In taxon-based analysis, stool of CA cases was depleted in a network of Clostridia operational taxonomic units from families Ruminococcaceae, Clostridiaceae, and Lachnospiraceae, and enriched in the classes Bacilli and Gammaproteobacteria, order Enterobacteriales, and genera Actinomyces and Streptococcus (all q diversity or composition from controls, though sample size for these groups was small. Few taxa were differentially abundant between HP cases or SSA cases and controls; among them, class Erysipelotrichi was depleted in SSA cases. Our results indicate that gut microbes may play a role in the early stages

  3. The classification of secondary colorectal liver cancer in human biopsy samples using angular dispersive x-ray diffraction and multivariate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Farquharson, Michael J.

    2009-08-01

    The motivation behind this study is to assess whether angular dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) data, processed using multivariate analysis techniques, can be used for classifying secondary colorectal liver cancer tissue and normal surrounding liver tissue in human liver biopsy samples. The ADXRD profiles from a total of 60 samples of normal liver tissue and colorectal liver metastases were measured using a synchrotron radiation source. The data were analysed for 56 samples using nonlinear peak-fitting software. Four peaks were fitted to all of the ADXRD profiles, and the amplitude, area, amplitude and area ratios for three of the four peaks were calculated and used for the statistical and multivariate analysis. The statistical analysis showed that there are significant differences between all the peak-fitting parameters and ratios between the normal and the diseased tissue groups. The technique of soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to classify normal liver tissue and colorectal liver metastases resulting in 67% of the normal tissue samples and 60% of the secondary colorectal liver tissue samples being classified correctly. This study has shown that the ADXRD data of normal and secondary colorectal liver cancer are statistically different and x-ray diffraction data analysed using multivariate analysis have the potential to be used as a method of tissue classification.

  4. Thymosin β4 induces invasion and migration of human colorectal cancer cells through the ILK/AKT/β-catenin signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piao, Zhengri [Research Center for Molecular Therapeutic to GI Tract of Cancer Center, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Center for Creative Biomedical Scientists (BK-21 Plus Project), Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Chang-Soo [Research Center for Molecular Therapeutic to GI Tract of Cancer Center, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Mi-Ran [Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chan [Department of Pathology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young-Kyu, E-mail: parkyk@jnu.ac.kr [Research Center for Molecular Therapeutic to GI Tract of Cancer Center, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Center for Creative Biomedical Scientists (BK-21 Plus Project), Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Tβ4 is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer cells. • The overexpression of Tβ4 is correlated with stage of colorectal cancer. • Tβ4 stimulates cell adhesion, invasion, migration and EMT. • Tβ4 activates the ILK/AKT/β-catenin signaling pathway. - Abstract: Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) is a 43-amino-acid peptide involved in many biological processes. However, the precise molecular signaling mechanism(s) of Tβ4 in cell invasion and migration remain unclear. In this study, we show that Tβ4 was significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues and high levels of Tβ4 were correlated with stage of colorectal cancer, and that Tβ4 expression was associated with morphogenesis and EMT. Tβ4-upregulated cancer cells showed increased adhesion, invasion and migration activity, whereas Tβ4-downregulated cells showed decreased activities. We also demonstrated that Tβ4 interacts with ILK, which promoted the phosphorylation and activation of AKT, the phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK3β, the expression and nuclear localization of β-catenin, and integrin receptor activation. These results suggest that Tβ4 is an important regulator of the ILK/AKT/β-catenin/Integrin signaling cascade to induce cell invasion and migration in colorectal cancer cells, and is a potential target for cancer treatment.

  5. Molecular Cytogenetics: Genomic Imbalances in Colorectal Cancer and their Clinical Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Grade

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal aberrations play a dominant role in colorectal carcinogenesis. The application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH based techniques such as comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and spectral karyotyping (SKY revealed that colorectal carcinomas are characterized by a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances which sequentially accumulate during cancer progression. This review aims to summarize molecular cytogenetic studies, provides a background on the functional relevance of chromosomal aberrations for colorectal cancer progression and discusses their potential clinical impact.

  6. Toward a Model of Human Information Processing for Decision-Making and Skill Acquisition in Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Eoin J; McMahon, Muireann; Walsh, Michael T; Coffey, J Calvin; O Sullivan, Leonard

    2017-10-03

    To create a human information-processing model for laparoscopic surgery based on already established literature and primary research to enhance laparoscopic surgical education in this context. We reviewed the literature for information-processing models most relevant to laparoscopic surgery. Our review highlighted the necessity for a model that accounts for dynamic environments, perception, allocation of attention resources between the actions of both hands of an operator, and skill acquisition and retention. The results of the literature review were augmented through intraoperative observations of 7 colorectal surgical procedures, supported by laparoscopic video analysis of 12 colorectal procedures. The Wickens human information-processing model was selected as the most relevant theoretical model to which we make adaptions for this specific application. We expanded the perception subsystem of the model to involve all aspects of perception during laparoscopic surgery. We extended the decision-making system to include dynamic decision-making to account for case/patient-specific and surgeon-specific deviations. The response subsystem now includes dual-task performance and nontechnical skills, such as intraoperative communication. The memory subsystem is expanded to include skill acquisition and retention. Surgical decision-making during laparoscopic surgery is the result of a highly complex series of processes influenced not only by the operator's knowledge, but also patient anatomy and interaction with the surgical team. Newer developments in simulation-based education must focus on the theoretically supported elements and events that underpin skill acquisition and affect the cognitive abilities of novice surgeons. The proposed human information-processing model builds on established literature regarding information processing, accounting for a dynamic environment of laparoscopic surgery. This revised model may be used as a foundation for a model describing robotic

  7. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Cyclooxygenase as a target for chemoprevention in colorectal cancer: lost cause or a concept coming of age?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doherty, Glen A

    2009-02-01

    COX-2 is upregulated at an early stage in colorectal carcinogenesis and generates prostaglandins, which promote cancer cell proliferation, impair apoptosis and enhance angiogenesis, promoting tumour growth and metastasis. There are ample data from animal models and human studies to demonstrate enhanced tumour progression associated with COX-2 activity in cancer cells. Conversely, NSAIDs including aspirin inhibit COX-2 and, therefore, have anti-neoplastic properties. There has been sustained interest in COX-2 as a chemopreventive target in colorectal cancer (CRC) and although both aspirin and COX-2 selective NSAIDs have demonstrated efficacy, adverse effects have limited their widespread adoption. In particular, evidence of the cardiovascular effects of COX-2 selective inhibitors has led to questioning of the suitability of COX-2 as a target for chemoprevention. This review examines the basis for targeting COX-2 in CRC chemoprevention, evaluates the efficacy and safety of the approach and examines future strategies in this area.

  9. Imaging of dihydrofolate reductase fusion gene expression in xenografts of human liver metastases of colorectal cancer in living rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Bertino, Joseph R.; Banerjee, Debabrata [Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/UMDNJ, 195 Little Albany Street, NJ 08903, New Brunswick (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald; Tjuvajev, Juri Gelovani [Department of Neurooncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gusani, Niraj J.; Fong, Yuman [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gade, Terence; Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Balatoni, Julius; Finn, Ronald [Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Akhurst, Tim; Larson, Steven [Nuclear Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Radionuclide imaging has been demonstrated to be feasible to monitor transgene expression in vivo. We hypothesized that a potential application of this technique is to non-invasively detect in deep tissue, such as cancer cells metastatic to the liver, a specific molecular response following systemic drug treatment. Utilizing human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from a patient's liver lesion we first developed a nude rat xenograft model for colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver. Expression of a dihydrofolate reductase-herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase fusion (DHFR-HSV1 TK) transgene in the hepatic tumors was monitored in individual animals using the tracer [{sup 124}I]2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodouracil-{beta}-d-arabinofuranoside (FIAU) and a small animal micro positron emission tomograph (microPET), while groups of rats were imaged using the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a clinical gamma camera. Growth of the human metastatic colorectal cancer cells in the rat liver was detected using magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by surgical inspection. Single as well as multiple lesions of different sizes and sites were observed in the liver of the animals. Next, using a subset of rats bearing hepatic tumors, which were retrovirally bulk transduced to express the DHFR-HSV1 TK transgene, we imaged the fusion protein expression in the hepatic tumor of living rats using the tracer [{sup 124}I]FIAU and a microPET. The observed deep tissue signals were highly specific for the tumors expressing the DHFR-HSV1 TK fusion protein compared with parental untransduced tumors and other tissues as determined by gamma counting of tissue samples. A subsequent study used the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a gamma camera to monitor two groups of transduced hepatic tumor-bearing rats. Prior to imaging, one group was treated with trimetrexate to exploit DHFR-mediated upregulation of the fusion gene product. Imaging in the living animal as well as subsequent gamma

  10. Cytotoxic Effect of Luteolin on Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Line (HCT-15: Crucial Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species

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    Ashok Kumar Pandurangan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer, a major health concern worldwide, is the third mostcommon form of cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Theflavonoids are naturally occurring diphenylpropanoids ubiquitous in plant foods andimportant components of the human diet. Luteolin, a bioflavonoid, possesses manybeneficial effects including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic activities. Methods:We used the HCT-15 colon adenocarcinoma cell line in this study. Cellswere treated with luteolin (100 µM. Results: Membrane damage markers such as alkaline phosphatase and lactatedehydrogenase were analyzed in a time-dependent manner. Luteolin increased reactiveoxygen species in a time-dependent manner. DNA damage, a hallmark of apoptosis,was induced by luteolin as analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Conclusion: Luteolin acts as a potential cytotoxic agent that can be used to treatcolorectal cancer.

  11. Personalized Proteome Profiles of Healthy and Tumor Human Colon Organoids Reveal Both Individual Diversity and Basic Features of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Alba; van den Toorn, Henk W P; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2017-01-03

    Diseases at the molecular level are complex and patient dependent, necessitating development of strategies that enable precision treatment to optimize clinical outcomes. Organoid technology has recently been shown to have the potential to recapitulate the in vivo characteristics of the original individual's tissue in a three-dimensional in vitro culture system. Here, we present a quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and a comparative transcriptomic analysis of human colorectal tumor and healthy organoids derived, in parallel, from seven patients. Although gene and protein signatures can be derived to distinguish the tumor organoid population from healthy organoids, our data clearly reveal that each patient possesses a distinct organoid signature at the proteomic level. We demonstrate that a personalized patient-specific organoid proteome profile can be related to the diagnosis of a patient and with future development contribute to the generation of personalized therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular biology of nickel carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, M. [Nelson Institute of Environmental Medicine and the Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York University Medical Center, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms of nickel carcinogenesis are discussed and reviewed with emphasis on work done in my laboratory. The most important determinant of nickel carcinogenesis is the ability of the nickel ion to reach relevant targets for carcinogenesis, which involves chromatin and depends on the ability of the nickel compound to enter cells. The mechanisms that regulate the phagocytosis and intracellular dissolution of the highly carcinogenic particulate nickel compounds are discussed, as is the ability of these nickel compounds to enhance the DNA methylation pattern and turn off the expression of critical tumor suppressor genes. These findings show these nickel compounds to be a somewhat unique class of carcinogens. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 4 tabs., 31 refs.

  13. Evolving Concepts in Lung Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomperts, Brigitte N.; Spira, Avrum; Massion, Pierre P.; Walser, Tonya C.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Minna, John D.; Dubinett, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Lung carcinogenesis is a complex, stepwise process that involves the acquisition of genetic mutations and epigenetic changes that alter cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, invasion, and metastasis. Here, we review some of the latest concepts in the pathogenesis of lung cancer and highlight the roles of inflammation, the “field of cancerization,” and lung cancer stem cells in the initiation of the disease. Furthermore, we review how high throughput genomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, and proteomics are advancing the study of lung carcinogenesis. Finally, we reflect on the potential of current in vitro and in vivo models of lung carcinogenesis to advance the field and on the areas of investigation where major breakthroughs will lead to the identification of novel chemoprevention strategies and therapies for lung cancer. PMID:21500122

  14. pH-sensitive nanomicelles for controlled and efficient drug delivery to human colorectal carcinoma LoVo cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Ting Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The triblock copolymers PEG-P(Asp-DIP-P(Lys-Ca (PEALCa of polyethylene glycol (PEG, poly(N-(N',N'-diisopropylaminoethyl aspartamide (P(Asp-DIP, and poly (lysine-cholic acid (P(Lys-Ca were synthesized as a pH-sensitive drug delivery system. In neutral aqueous environment such as physiological environment, PEALCa can self-assemble into stable vesicles with a size around 50-60 nm, avoid uptake by the reticuloendothelial system (RES, and encase the drug in the core. However, the PEALCa micelles disassemble and release drug rapidly in acidic environment that resembles lysosomal compartments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The anticancer drug Paclitaxel (PTX and hydrophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO were encapsulated inside the core of the PEALCa micelles and used for potential cancer therapy. Drug release study revealed that PTX in the micelles was released faster at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.4. Cell culture studies showed that the PTX-SPIO-PEALCa micelle was effectively internalized by human colon carcinoma cell line (LoVo cells, and PTX could be embedded inside lysosomal compartments. Moreover, the human colorectal carcinoma (CRC LoVo cells delivery effect was verified in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histology analysis. Consequently effective suppression of CRC LoVo cell growth was evaluated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicated that the PTX-SPION-loaded pH-sensitive micelles were a promising MRI-visible drug release system for colorectal cancer therapy.

  15. Nutrients, foods, and colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigations have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grains have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat have been associated with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits, and vegetables. Nutrients and foods also may interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of overnutrition and obesity-risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bacterionomics and vironomics in carcinogenesis

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    Pratiwi Sudarmono

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Virus and bacteria are microbes which are very common cause human infection. Most of the bacterial infection can be eradicated by antibiotics and infection symptoms disappear. But for virus infection, once infected, the virus will persistently stay in the host, even undergo not only a lytic cycle but also integrated into host genome. Nowadays, at least 6 virus type are consistently related to human cancer, such as EBV,HPV,HTLV,HBV,HCV,HKSV, and the new one Merkel Virus (MCV. Although not every infected people will get cancer, but around 20% of the whole cancer in human are caused by viral oncogene. Class one oncogenic bacterial is Helicobacter pylori. Infection with this bacteria can cause persistent gastro duodenal inflammation which cause some alteration in gastric cell growth into transformation. Expression of Cag gene and Vac gene and some expression of OMP protein usually link to gastric cancer. Molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis for every virus which cause infection  is a very complex , which include several processes caused by cell transformation. Besides, other host and environmental factors are also play a significant role in cancer development. Some scientist put a Hallmark analysis as a model to quickly summarize what pathobiology process will happen and what gene or protein caused the process. The Hallmark analysis comprise of several process which may happen simultaneously because some of the Hallmark is caused by the same protein. The Hallmark consists of various virus strategies in oncogenesis such as promoting angiogenesis, avoiding immune destruction, genome instability and mutation, deregulating cellular energetic, resisting cell death, sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, enabling cellular immortality, promoting inflammation and activation metastasis. For example, infection by HPV, will cause low grade dysplasia which can continue to invasive cervical cancer. After host cell transformation, in

  17. Oxidative stress and inflammation in liver carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Olaya

    2007-02-01

    series of transcription factors. Moreover, in addition to direct production of ROS by these pathogens, liver infiltration by activated phagocytic cells provides an additional source of ROS production that promotes oxidative stress via interleukin or NO production that can damage proteins, lipids and DNA.

    Nuclear MSI was demonstrated first in familial hereditary colorectal cancer (HNPCC and then in sporadic cancers, primarily digestive tract cancers such as colorectal, gastric and pancreatic cancers.In HCC, although nuclear MSI has been shown in some studies (15,18, there is as yet no direct evidence of alteration of the MMR genes and the biological and the clinicopathological significance of the lowlevel MSI seen in HCC is unclear. MSI has also been shown to occur in inflammatory tissues such as chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis as well as in ulcerative colitis, chronic pancreatitis and in non digestive inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

    Recently, the role of mitochondria in carcinogenesis has been under numerous investigation, in part because their prominent role in apoptosis, ROS production and other aspects of tumour biology. The mitochondrial genome is particularly susceptible to mutations because of the high level of ROS generation in this organelle, coupled with a relatively low level of DNA repair. Somatic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been shown in HCC as was also observed MSI. These findings suggest a potential role for mitochondrial genome instability in the early steps of tumorigenesis.

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury can occur in several situations and is a major cause of cell damage during surgery. Cells and tissues subjected to hypoxia by prolonged ischemia become acidic

  18. Defining the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis using mouse models

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    Natalia A Ignatenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and diet are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death in the US and worldwide. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM models have made a significant contribution to the characterization of colorectal cancer risk factors. Reliable, reproducible, and clinically relevant animal models help in the identification of the molecular events associated with disease progression and in the development of effictive treatment strategies. This review is focused on the use of mouse models for studying the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis. We describe how the available mouse models of colon cancer such as the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mice and knockout genetic models facilitate understanding of the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis and help in the development of a rational strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  19. Fas Ligand Expression in Lynch Syndrome-Associated Colorectal Tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornstra, Jan J.; de Jong, Steven; Boersma-van Eck, Wietske; Zwart, Nynke; Hollema, Harry; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    Fas Ligand (FasL) expression by cancer cells may contribute to tumour immune escape via the Fas counterattack against tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Whether this plays a role in colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome was examined studying FasL expression, tumour cell apoptosis and

  20. Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  1. Dietary factors and Truncating APC Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  2. Phosphoproteome Characterization of Human Colorectal Cancer SW620 Cell-Derived Exosomes and New Phosphosite Discovery for C-HPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiahui; Cui, Yizhi; Yan, Ziqi; Luo, Yanzhang; Zhang, Wanling; Deng, Suyuan; Tang, Shengquan; Zhang, Gong; He, Qing-Yu; Wang, Tong

    2016-11-04

    Identification of all phosphorylation forms of known proteins is a major goal of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP). Recent studies have found that certain phosphoproteins can be encapsulated in exosomes and function as key regulators in tumor microenvironment, but no deep coverage phosphoproteome of human exosomes has been reported to date, which makes the exosome a potential source for the new phosphosite discovery. In this study, we performed highly optimized MS analyses on the exosomal and cellular proteins isolated from human colorectal cancer SW620 cells. With stringent data quality control, 313 phosphoproteins with 1091 phosphosites were confidently identified from the SW620 exosome, from which 202 new phosphosites were detected. Exosomal phosphoproteins were significantly enriched in the 11q12.1-13.5 region of chromosome 11 and had a remarkably high level of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins (6.4%), which were functionally relevant to ephrin signaling pathway-directed cytoskeleton remodeling. In conclusion, we here report the first high-coverage phosphoproteome of human cell-secreted exosomes, which leads to the identification of new phosphosites for C-HPP. Our findings provide insights into the exosomal phosphoprotein systems that help to understand the signaling language being delivered by exosomes in cell-cell communications. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange consortium with the data set identifier PXD004079, and iProX database (accession number: IPX00076800).

  3. The Mendelian colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Ian

    2015-11-01

    A small minority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) (≤5%) are caused by a single, inherited faulty gene. These diseases, the Mendelian colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes, have been central to our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in general. Most of the approximately 13 high-penetrance genes that predispose to CRC primarily predispose to colorectal polyps, and each gene is associated with a specific type of polyp, whether conventional adenomas (APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, NTHL1), juvenile polyps (SMAD4, BMPR1A), Peutz-Jeghers hamartomas (LKB1/STK11) and mixed polyps of serrated and juvenile types (GREM1). Lynch syndrome (MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2), by contrast, is associated primarily with cancer risk. Major functional pathways are consistently inactivated in the Mendelian CRC syndromes: certain types of DNA repair (proofreading of DNA replication errors, mismatch repair and base excision repair) and signalling (bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt signalling and mTOR). The inheritance of the CRC syndromes also varies: most are dominant but some of the DNA repair deficiencies are recessive. Some of the Mendelian CRC genes are especially important because they play a role through somatic inactivation in sporadic CRC (APC, MLH1, SMAD4, POLE). Additional Mendelian CRC genes may remain to be discovered and searches for these genes are ongoing, especially in patients with multiple adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer. © 2015 UICC.

  5. MicroRNA-627 mediates the epigenetic mechanisms of vitamin D to suppress proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells and growth of xenograft tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padi, Sathish K R; Zhang, Qunshu; Rustum, Youcef M; Morrison, Carl; Guo, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin D protects against colorectal cancer through unclear mechanisms. We investigated the effects of calcitriol (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; the active form of vitamin D) on levels of different microRNAs (miRNAs) in colorectal cancer cells from humans and xenograft tumors in mice. Expression of miRNAs in colorectal cancer cell lines was examined using the Ambion mirVana miRNA Bioarray. The effects of calcitriol on expression of miR-627 and cell proliferation were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and WST-1 assay, respectively; growth of colorectal xenograft tumors was examined in nude mice. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze levels of miR-627 in human colon adenocarcinoma samples and nontumor colon mucosa tissues (controls). In HT-29 cells, miR-627 was the only miRNA significantly up-regulated by calcitriol. Jumonji domain containing 1A (JMJD1A), which encodes a histone demethylase, was found to be a target of miR-627. By down-regulating JMJD1A, miR-627 increased methylation of histone H3K9 and suppressed expression of proliferative factors, such as growth and differentiation factor 15. Calcitriol induced expression of miR-627, which down-regulated JMJD1A and suppressed growth of xenograft tumors from HCT-116 cells in nude mice. Overexpression of miR-627 prevented proliferation of colorectal cancer cell lines in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Conversely, blocking the activity of miR-627 inhibited the tumor suppressive effects of calcitriol in cultured colorectal cancer cells and in mice. Levels of miR-627 were decreased in human colon adenocarcinoma samples compared with controls. miR-627 mediates tumor-suppressive epigenetic activities of vitamin D on colorectal cancer cells and xenograft tumors in mice. The messenger RNA that encodes the histone demethylase JMJD1A is a direct target of miR-627. Reagents designed to target JMJD1A or its messenger RNA, or increase the function of miR-627, might have the same

  6. Silencing of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNA interference suppresses human colorectal carcinoma growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Haibo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RhoA and RhoC have been proved to be over-expressed in many solid cancers, including colorectal cancer. The reduction of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNA interference (RNAi resulted growth inhibition of cancer cells. The present study was to evaluate the effect of silencing of RhoA and RhoC expression by RNAi on growth of human colorectal carcinoma (CRC in tumor-bearing nude mice in vivo. Methods To establish HCT116 cell transplantable model, the nude mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 1.0 × 107 HCT116 cells and kept growing till the tumor xenografts reached 5-7 mm in diameter. Then the mice were randomly assigned to three groups(seven mice in each group: (1 normal saline(NS group, (2replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the negative control shRNA (Ad-HK group and (3replication-defective recombinant adenovirus carrying the 4-tandem linked RhoA and RhoC shRNAs (Ad-RhoA-RhoC group. Ad-HK (4 × 108 pfu, 30 ul/mouse, Ad-RhoA-RhoC (4 × 108 pfu, 30 ul/mouse or PBS (30 ul/mouse was injected intratumorally four times once every other day. The weight and volumes of tumor xenografts were recorded. The levels of RhoA and RhoC mRNA transcripts and proteins in tumor xenografts were detected by reverse quantitative transcription polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining respectively. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay was used to detect the death of cells. Results The xenografts in mice could be seen at 5th day from the implantation of HCT116 cells and all had reached 5-7 mm in size at 9th day. After injection intratumorally, the growth speed of tumor xenografts in Ad-RhoA-RhoC group was significantly delayed compared with those in NS and Ad-HK group(P RhoA and RhoC reduced more in Ad-RhoA-RhoC group than those in NS and Ad-HK group. The relative RhoA and RhoC mRNA transcripts were decreased to 48% and 43% respectively (P RhoA and Rho

  7. Simvastatin inhibits tumor angiogenesis in HER2-overexpressing human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zheng, Junhua; Xu, Bin; Ling, Jie; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yongbing

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of the HER2 oncogene contributes to tumor angiogenesis, which is an essential hallmark of cancer. Simvastatin has been reported to exhibit antitumor activities in several cancers; however, its roles and molecular mechanismsin the regulation of colorectal angiogenesis remain to be clarified. Here, we show that colon cancer cells express high levels of VEGF, total HER2 and phosphorylated HER2, and simvastatin apparently decreased their expression in HER2-overexpressing colon cancer cells. Simvastatin pretreatment reduced endothelial tube formation in vitro and microvessel density in vivo. Furthermore, simvastatin markedly inhibited tumor angiogenesis even in the presence of heregulin (HRG)-β1 (a HER2 co-activator) pretreatment in HER2+ tumor cells. Mechanistic investigation showed that simvastatin significantly abrogated HER2-induced tumor angiogenesis by inhibiting VEGF secretion. Together, these results provide a novel mechanism underlying the simvastatin-induced inhibition of tumor angiogenesis through regulating HER2/VEGF axis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Increased rectal microbial richness is associated with the presence of colorectal adenomas in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanapareddy, Nina; Legge, Ryan M; Jovov, Biljana; McCoy, Amber; Burcal, Lauren; Araujo-Perez, Felix; Randall, Thomas A; Galanko, Joseph; Benson, Andrew; Sandler, Robert S; Rawls, John F; Abdo, Zaid; Fodor, Anthony A; Keku, Temitope O

    2012-10-01

    Differences in the composition of the gut microbial community have been associated with diseases such as obesity, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer (CRC). We used 454 titanium pyrosequencing of the V1-V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene to characterize adherent bacterial communities in mucosal biopsy samples from 33 subjects with adenomas and 38 subjects without adenomas (controls). Biopsy samples from subjects with adenomas had greater numbers of bacteria from 87 taxa than controls; only 5 taxa were more abundant in control samples. The magnitude of the differences in the distal gut microbiota between patients with adenomas and controls was more pronounced than that of any other clinical parameters including obesity, diet or family history of CRC. This suggests that sequence analysis of the microbiota could be used to identify patients at risk for developing adenomas.

  9. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer.

  10. Curcumin analog EF24 induces apoptosis via ROS-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guodong; Feng, Chen; Vinothkumar, Rajamanickam; Chen, Weiqian; Dai, Xuanxuan; Chen, Xi; Ye, Qingqing; Qiu, Chenyu; Zhou, Huiping; Wang, Yi; Liang, Guang; Xie, Yubo; Wu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy with high mortality rates worldwide. Improved therapeutic strategies with minimal adverse side effects are urgently needed. In this study, the anti-tumor effects of EF24, a novel analog of the natural compound curcumin, were evaluated in colorectal cancer cells. The anti-tumor activity of EF24 on human colon cancer lines (HCT-116, SW-620, and HT-29) was determined by measures of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and mitochondrial function. The contribution of ROS in the EF24-induced anti-tumor activity was evaluated by measures of H2O2 and pretreatment with an ROS scavenger, NAC. The findings indicated that EF24 treatment dose-dependently inhibited cell viability and caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in all the tested colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that EF24 treatment induced apoptosis effectively via enhancing intracellular accumulation of ROS in both HCT-116 and SW-620 cells, but with moderate effects in HT-29 cells. We found that EF24 treatment decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in the colon cancer cells, leading to the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. Also, EF24 induced activation of caspases 9 and 3, causing decreased Bcl-2 protein expression and Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Pretreatment with NAC, a ROS scavenger, abrogated the EF24-induced cell death, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting an upstream ROS generation which was responsible for the anticancer effects of EF24. Our findings support an anticancer mechanism by which EF24 enhanced ROS accumulation in colon cancer cells, thereby resulting in mitochondrial membrane collapse and activated intrinsic apoptotic signaling. Thus, EF24 could be a potential candidate for therapeutic application of colon cancer.

  11. Microsatellite Instability of Gastric and Colorectal Cancers as a Predictor of Synchronous Gastric or Colorectal Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Beak; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-03-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) plays a crucial role in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to clarify whether MSI is a useful marker for predicting synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms. Consecutive patients who underwent both esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy before the resection of gastric or colorectal cancers were included. MSI was analyzed using two mononucleotide and three dinucleotide markers. In total, 434 gastric cancers (372 microsatellite stability [MSS], 21 low incidence of MSI [MSI-L], and 41 high incidence of MSI [MSI-H]) and 162 colorectal cancers (138 MSS, 9 MSI-L, and 15 MSI-H) were included. Patients with MSI gastric cancer had a higher prevalence of synchronous colorectal cancer, colorectal adenoma, and gastric adenoma than those with MSS gastric cancers (4.8% vs 0.5%, p=0.023; 11.3% vs 3.2%, p=0.011; 3.2% vs 1.2%, p=0.00, respectively). The prevalence of synchronous colorectal adenomas was highest in MSI-L gastric cancers (19.0%), compared with MSI-H (7.3%) or MSS (3.2%) gastric cancers (p=0.002). In addition, there were no significant differences in the prevalence rates of synchronous colorectal adenoma among the MSI-H (13.3%), MSI-L (11.1%), and MSS (12.3%) colorectal cancers (p=0.987). The presence of MSI in gastric cancer may be a predictor of synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms, whereas MSI in colorectal cancer is not a predictor of synchronous colorectal adenoma.

  12. Microsatellite Instability of Gastric and Colorectal Cancers as a Predictor of Synchronous Gastric or Colorectal Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Beak; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Microsatellite instability (MSI) plays a crucial role in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to clarify whether MSI is a useful marker for predicting synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent both esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy before the resection of gastric or colorectal cancers were included. MSI was analyzed using two mononucleotide and three dinucleotide markers. Results In total, 434 gastric cancers (372 microsatellite stability [MSS], 21 low incidence of MSI [MSI-L], and 41 high incidence of MSI [MSI-H]) and 162 colorectal cancers (138 MSS, 9 MSI-L, and 15 MSI-H) were included. Patients with MSI gastric cancer had a higher prevalence of synchronous colorectal cancer, colorectal adenoma, and gastric adenoma than those with MSS gastric cancers (4.8% vs 0.5%, p=0.023; 11.3% vs 3.2%, p=0.011; 3.2% vs 1.2%, p=0.00, respectively). The prevalence of synchronous colorectal adenomas was highest in MSI-L gastric cancers (19.0%), compared with MSI-H (7.3%) or MSS (3.2%) gastric cancers (p=0.002). In addition, there were no significant differences in the prevalence rates of synchronous colorectal adenoma among the MSI-H (13.3%), MSI-L (11.1%), and MSS (12.3%) colorectal cancers (p=0.987). Conclusions The presence of MSI in gastric cancer may be a predictor of synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms, whereas MSI in colorectal cancer is not a predictor of synchronous colorectal adenoma. PMID:26087787

  13. A role for human MUC4 mucin gene, the ErbB2 ligand, as a target of TGF-beta in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Perrais, Michaël; Mariette, Christophe; Batra, Surinder K; Aubert, Jean-Pierre; Pigny, Pascal; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2004-07-29

    MUC4: encodes a large transmembrane mucin that is overexpressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The molecular mechanisms responsible for that altered pattern of expression are unknown. TGF-beta, a pleiotropic cytokine, regulates numerous genes involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis via activation of the Smads proteins and MUC4 promoter is rich in Smad-binding elements. Our aim was to study whether the regulation of MUC4 expression by TGF-beta in pancreatic cancer cells was strictly dependent on Smad4 activity. Three pancreatic cancer cell lines, CAPAN-1 (MUC4+/Smad4-), CAPAN-2 (MUC4+/Smad4+) and PANC-1 (MUC4-/Smad4+), were used. By RT-PCR, transfection assays and immunohistochemistry, we show that (i) both MUC4 mRNA and apomucin expression are upregulated by TGF-beta, (ii) Smad2 positively cooperates with Smad4 to activate the promoter, (iii) activation of Smad4 by exogenous TGF-beta induces Smad4 binding to the promoter, (iv) Smad7 and c-ski both inhibit activation by Smad4. When Smad4 is mutated and inactive, TGF-beta activates MUC4 expression via MAPK, PI3K and PKA signaling pathways. Absence of expression in PANC-1 cells is due to histone deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that upregulation of MUC4 by TGF-beta is restricted to well-differentiated pancreatic cancer cells, and point out a novel mechanism for TGF-beta as a key molecule in targeting MUC4 overexpression in pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

  14. Transcription coupled repair deficiency protects against human mutagenesis and carcinogenesis: Personal Reflections on the 50th anniversary of the discovery of xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, James E

    2017-10-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients who lack the main damage recognition protein for global genome repair (GGR), XPC, have greatly increased skin cancer rates and elevated mutation frequencies originating from unrepaired ultraviolet photoproducts in the nontranscribed regions of the genome and in nontranscribed strands of expressed genes. But they show no increased mutations in transcribed strands. In contrast, cancer is absent from Cockayne syndrome (CS) patients that have defective transcription coupled repair (TCR) despite severe photosensitivity, CS patients remarkably show no elevation of UV induced mutagenesis implying that defective TCR may be protective against mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Mutation avoidance in CS is postulated to occur through arrested transcription that generates a tripled stranded R loop consisting of DNA double strands and a nascent mRNA strand. R loops result in S phase apoptosis or activation of ATM kinase that causes a delay in DNA replication until TCR, or transcript cleavage by TFIIS or RNAaseH, relieves the transcription block. Resumption of replication then occurs on repaired DNA without concomitant mutagenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression of insulin-like growth factor system components in colorectal tissue and its relation with serum IGF levels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Voskuil, D.W.; Bosma, A.; Majoor, D.M.; Doorn, J. van; Cats, A.; Depla, A.C.; Timmer, R.; Witteman, B.J.; Wesseling, J.; Kampman, E.; Veer, L.J. van 't

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: The insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-system has been implicated in colorectal tumor carcinogenesis. Although both tumor expression levels and serum concentrations of IGF-system components are related to colorectal cancer risk, it is unknown whether IGF levels in tissue and serum are

  16. Expression of insulin-like growth factor system components in colorectal tissue and its relation with serum IGF levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Voskuil, D.W.; Bosma, A.; Majoor, D.M.; Doorn, van J.; Cats, A.; Depla, A.; Timmer, R.; Witteman, B.J.M.; Wesseling, J.; Kampman, E.; van't Veer, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-system has been implicated in colorectal tumor carcinogenesis. Although both tumor expression levels and serum concentrations of IGF-system components are related to colorectal cancer risk, it is unknown whether IGF levels in tissue and serum are

  17. Transgenerational teratogenesis and carcinogenesis by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Taisei [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2000-07-01

    This paper thoroughly reviews studies on transgenerational teratogenesis and carcinogenesis induced by radiation and summarizes currently available data from animal studies. The discussions focus on the incidence of tumors, malformations, and mutations in the offspring after parental exposure to radiation, as well as estimated relative risks of congenital malformations and stillbirths in the offspring after parental X-ray exposure. The data suggest that different types of tumors are induced in offspring, because of strain differences in the experimental animals. The results of epidemiological studies in human populations, such as the children of atomic bomb survivors, conflict with the findings in animal studies. The author points to the following reasons for the differences between the results in animals and humans: differences in radiation doses, timing of exposure, and genetic predisposition, etc. While pointing out issues that need to be investigated further, the author indicates that clear strain differences exist in types of tumors induced and in tumor incidences in the offspring of animals that were irradiated before the offspring were conceived, and that genetic predisposition is therefore important in transgenerational carcinogenesis. (K.H.)

  18. An Emergence Framework of Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigston, Elizabeth A W; Williams, Bryan R G

    2017-01-01

    Experimental paradigms provide the framework for the understanding of cancer, and drive research and treatment, but are rarely considered by clinicians. The somatic mutation theory (SMT), in which cancer is considered a genetic disease, has been the predominant traditional model of cancer for over 50 years. More recently, alternative theories have been proposed, such as tissue organization field theory (TOFT), evolutionary models, and inflammatory models. Key concepts within the various models have led to them being difficult to reconcile. Progressively, it has been recognized that biological systems cannot be fully explained by the physicochemical properties of their constituent parts. There is an increasing call for a 'systems' approach. Incorporating the concepts of 'emergence', 'systems', 'thermodynamics', and 'chaos', a single integrated framework for carcinogenesis has been developed, enabling existing theories to become compatible as alternative mechanisms, facilitating the integration of bioinformatics and providing a structure in which translational research can flow from both 'benchtop to bedside' and 'bedside to benchtop'. In this review, a basic understanding of the key concepts of 'emergence', 'systems', 'system levels', 'complexity', 'thermodynamics', 'entropy', 'chaos', and 'fractals' is provided. Non-linear mathematical equations are included where possible to demonstrate compatibility with bioinformatics. Twelve principles that define the 'emergence framework of carcinogenesis' are developed, with principles 1-10 encapsulating the key concepts upon which the framework is built and their application to carcinogenesis. Principle 11 relates the framework to cancer progression. Principle 12 relates to the application of the framework to translational research. The 'emergence framework of carcinogenesis' collates current paradigms, concepts, and evidence around carcinogenesis into a single framework that incorporates previously incompatible viewpoints

  19. Novel understanding of ABC transporters ABCB1/MDR/P-glycoprotein, ABCC2/MRP2, and ABCG2/BCRP in colorectal pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Svenningsen, Katrine; Knudsen, Lina Almind

    2015-01-01

    transporter proteins, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative, colitis, Crohns disease, colorectal cancer, colitis, intestinal inflammation, intestinal carcinogenesis, ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp/CD243/MDR1), ABCC2/multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), Abcb1....../Mdr1a, abcc2/Mrp2, abcg2/Bcrp, knock-out mice, tight junction, membrane lipid function. RESULTS: Recently, human studies reported that changes in the levels of ABC transporters were early events in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence leading to CRC. A link between ABCB1, high fat diet and gut microbes...

  20. The Hamster Buccal Pouch Model of Oral Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagini, Siddavaram; Kowshik, Jaganathan

    2016-01-01

    The hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model is one of the most well-characterized animal tumor models used as a prelude to investigate multistage oral carcinogenesis and to assess the efficacy of chemointervention. Hamster buccal pouch carcinomas induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) show extensive similarities to human oral squamous cell carcinomas. The HBP model offers a number of advantages including a simple and predictable tumor induction procedure, easy accessibility for examination and follow-up of lesions, and reproducibility. This model can be used to test both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T D

    1999-01-24

    An array of epidemiological results and databases on test animal indicate that risk of cancer and atherosclerosis can be up- or down-regulated by diet through a range of 200%. Other factors contribute incrementally and include the natural terrestrial environment and various human activities that jointly produce complex exposures to endotoxin-producing microorganisms, ionizing radiations, and chemicals. Ordinary personal habits and simple physical irritants have been demonstrated to affect the immune response and risk of disease. There tends to be poor statistical correlation of long-term risk with single agent exposures incurred throughout working careers. However, Agency recommendations for control of hazardous exposures to humans has been substance-specific instead of contextually realistic even though there is consistent evidence for common mechanisms of toxicological and carcinogenic action. That behavior seems to be best explained by molecular stresses from cellular oxygen metabolism and phagocytosis of antigenic invasion as well as breakdown of normal metabolic compounds associated with homeostatic- and injury-related renewal of cells. There is continually mounting evidence that marrow stroma, comprised largely of monocyte-macrophages and fibroblasts, is important to phagocytic and cytokinetic response, but the complex action of the immune process is difficult to infer from first-principle logic or biomarkers of toxic injury. The many diverse database studies all seem to implicate two important processes, i.e., the univalent reduction of molecular oxygen and breakdown of aginuine, an amino acid, by hydrolysis or digestion of protein which is attendant to normal antigen-antibody action. This behavior indicates that protection guidelines and risk coefficients should be context dependent to include reference considerations of the composite action of parameters that mediate oxygen metabolism. A logic of this type permits the realistic common-scale modeling of

  2. Anacyclus Pyrethrum Extract Exerts Anticancer Activities on the Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Line (HCT) by Targeting Apoptosis, Metastasis and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali; Mansoori, Behzad; Baradaran, Pooneh Chokhachi; Baradaran, Sepideh Chokhachi; Baradaran, Behzad

    2017-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the USA. There are a number of medicinal plants triggering apoptosis response in cancer cells, thus have a therapeutic potential. On the other hand, due to traditional uses and availability of Anacyclus pyrethrum extract, we decided to evaluate the efficacy of this medicinal herb on human colorectal cancer cell line (HCT). In the present study, the cytotoxic effects of Anacyclus pyrethrum extract were assessed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and trypan blue viability dye. Then, flow cytometry assay was exploited to measure cell death and apoptosis stage. The scratch test was exploited to assess the effect of Anacyclus pyrethrum on the migration of cancer cells. The expression levels of Caspase 3, Bcl-2, MMP1, and Vimentin genes were quantified by real-time PCR. Finally, cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. MTT assay showed that Anacyclus pyrethrum extract significantly inhibited the cell growth. According to the flow cytometry assay result, the herbal extract was able to induce apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. Our findings also demonstrated that the plant extract substantially increases the caspase 3 mRNA expression, while decreases Bcl-2, MMP1, and Vimentin. Cell cycle arrest occurred in G1 stage, due to the results of flow cytometry. These results indicate that Anacyclus pyrethrum extract can successfully induce apoptosis in HCT cells. Therefore, it could be used as a novel therapeutic candidate for colorectal cancer treatment.

  3. Anticancer bioactive peptides suppress human colorectal tumor cell growth and induce apoptosis via modulating the PARP-p53-Mcl-1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-ya; Shi, Ying-xu; Yan, Mei-rong; Xi, Yaguang; Su, Xiu-lan

    2015-12-01

    We have reported novel anticancer bioactive peptides (ACBPs) that show tumor-suppressive activities in human gastric cancer, leukemia, nasopharyngeal cancer, and gallbladder cancer. In this study, we investigated the effects of ACBPs on human colorectal cancer and the underlying mechanisms. Cell growth and apoptosis of human colorectal tumor cell line HCT116 were measured using cell proliferation assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression levels of PARP, p53 and Mcl1A were assessed with Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. For evaluation of the in vivo antitumor activity of ACBPs, HCT116 xenograft nude mice were treated with ACBPs (35 μg/mL, ip) for 10 days. Treatment of HCT116 cells with ACBPs (35 μg/mL) for 4-6 days significantly inhibited the cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of HCT116 cells with ACBPs (35 μg/mL) for 6-12 h significantly enhanced UV-induced apoptosis, increased the expression of PARP and p53, and decreased the expression of Mcl-1. Administration of ACBPs did not change the body weight of HCT116 xenograft nude mice, but decreased the tumor growth by approximately 43%, and increased the expression of PARP and p53, and decreased the expression of Mcl-1 in xenograft mouse tumor tissues. Administration of ACBPs inhibits human colorectal tumor cell growth and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo through modulating the PARP-p53-Mcl-1 signaling pathway.

  4. Baicalin Induces Apoptosis in SW620 Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells in Vitro and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Shiuan Tzeng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, colorectal cancer (CRC is the second most frequent malignancy and the fourth most common cause of cancer death. Baicalin, a flavone derivative isolated and purified from the dry root of Scutellaria, was assessed for its antitumor effects in human SW620 CRC cells. Baicalin (200 μM inhibited proliferation of SW620 cells. Baicalin (200 μM increased activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in SW620 cells. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis of baicalin-treated SW620 cells showed an increase in sub-G1 cells, and the dihydroethidium assay showed significant enhancement of intracellular peroxide production in baicalin-treated cells. Addition of N-acetylcysteine prevented most of the baicalin-induced apoptosis, which in turn mediated cytotoxicity in human SW620 cells. In vivo, baicalin (50 mg/kg/day, i.p. treatment inhibited 55% of tumor growth in xenografted nude mice by 4 weeks, compared to that of the vehicle control (p < 0.05. Baicalin had no noteworthy influence on body weight. Thus, we suggest the development of baicalin as a potential leading antitumor agent in CRC.

  5. Epigenomic diversity of colorectal cancer indicated by LINE-1 methylation in a database of 869 tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schernhammer Eva S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation plays a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis. LINE-1 (L1 retrotransposon constitutes a substantial portion of the human genome, and LINE-1 methylation correlates with global DNA methylation status. LINE-1 hypomethylation in colon cancer has been strongly associated with poor prognosis. However, whether LINE-1 hypomethylators constitute a distinct cancer subtype remains uncertain. Recent evidence for concordant LINE-1 hypomethylation within synchronous colorectal cancer pairs suggests the presence of a non-stochastic mechanism influencing tumor LINE-1 methylation level. Thus, it is of particular interest to examine whether its wide variation can be attributed to clinical, pathologic or molecular features. Design Utilizing a database of 869 colorectal cancers in two prospective cohort studies, we constructed multivariate linear and logistic regression models for LINE-1 methylation (quantified by Pyrosequencing. Variables included age, sex, body mass index, family history of colorectal cancer, smoking status, tumor location, stage, grade, mucinous component, signet ring cells, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP, microsatellite instability, expression of TP53 (p53, CDKN1A (p21, CTNNB1 (β-catenin, PTGS2 (cyclooxygenase-2, and FASN, and mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA. Results Tumoral LINE-1 methylation ranged from 23.1 to 90.3 of 0-100 scale (mean 61.4; median 62.3; standard deviation 9.6, and distributed approximately normally except for extreme hypomethylators [LINE-1 methylation Conclusions LINE-1 extreme hypomethylators appear to constitute a previously-unrecognized, distinct subtype of colorectal cancers, which needs to be confirmed by additional studies. Our tumor LINE-1 methylation data indicate enormous epigenomic diversity of individual colorectal cancers.

  6. Global histone modification of histone H3 in colorectal cancer and its precursor lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Tadao; Kondo, Tetsuo; Ma, Defu; Niu, Dongfeng; Mochizuki, Kunio; Kawasaki, Tomonori; Yamane, Tetsu; Iino, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki; Katoh, Ryohei

    2012-06-01

    Chromatin remodeling through histone modification is an important mechanism of epigenetic gene dysregulation in human cancers. However, little is known about global alteration of histone status during tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Histone H3 status was examined in benign and malignant colorectal tumors by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. For immunohistochemical evaluation, 4 anti-histone H3 antibodies, specific to dimethylation at lysine 4 (H3K4me2), acetylation at lysine 9 (H3K9ac), dimethylation at lysine 9 (H3K9me2), and trimethylation at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), were used. On immunohistochemistry, H3K4me2, H3K9ac, and H3K27me3 showed no significant changes between normal and colorectal tumors. On the other hand, the global level of H3K9me2 was distinctly higher in neoplastic cells (adenoma and adenocarcinoma) than in normal glandular cells. In addition, it was significantly higher in adenocarcinoma than in adenoma. Correspondingly, Western blotting confirmed that H3K9me2 expression was significantly higher in adenocarcinomas than in normal colorectal mucosa. No alteration of H3K9me2 was observed with tumor differentiation and with the histological subtypes of colorectal cancers. These results suggest that aberration of the global H3K9me2 level is an important epigenetic event in colorectal tumorigenesis and carcinogenesis involved with gene regulation in neoplastic cells through chromatin remodeling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ferrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors.

  8. Circulating Inflammatory Mediators as Potential Prognostic Markers of Human Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Di Caro

    Full Text Available Cytokines and chemokines in the tumor microenvironment drive metastatic development and their serum levels might mirror the ongoing inflammatory reaction at the tumor site. Novel highly sensitive tools are needed to identify colorectal cancer patients at high risk of recurrence that should be more closely monitored during post-surgical follow up. Here we study whether circulating inflammatory markers might be used to predict recurrence in CRC patients.Circulating levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, IL-10, TNFalpha, CCL2, CXCL8, VEGF and the acute phase protein Pentraxin-3 were measured by ELISA in preoperative serum samples prospectively collected from a cohort of sixty-nine patients undergoing surgical resection for stage 0-IV CRC and associated with post-operative disease recurrence.Cox multivariate analysis showed that combined high levels (≥ROC cut off-value of CXCL8, VEGF and Pentraxin3 were associated with increased risk of disease recurrence [HR: 14.28; 95%CI: (3.13-65.1] independently of TNM staging. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that CXCL8, VEGF and Pentraxin3 levels were significantly associated with worse survival (P<0.001.Circulating inflammatory mediators efficiently predicted postoperative recurrence after CRC surgery. Therefore, this study suggest that their validation in large-scale clinical trials may help in tailoring CRC post-surgical management.

  9. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplasia (PN hyperplasia) is found to be a preneoplastic lesion of the rat urinary bladder. Therefore, the promoting and inhibitory effects of various chemicals in two-stage urinary bladder carcinogenesis were judged by measuring PN hyperplasia in rats. Dose-dependent and organ-specific effects of the urinary bladder promoter, saccharin, in the induction of PN hyperplasia were shown in rats after initiation by BBN. The promoting effect of saccharin was seen more clearly in the urinary bladder of rats after potent initiation. A strain difference in susceptibility of the urinary bladder to the promoter was also shown. These results suggest that the above various factors may also have modifying activities on urinary bladder carcinogenesis in man. PMID:6832095

  10. Salidroside induces apoptosis and autophagy in human colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Yao; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Mingyan

    2016-12-01

    The role of salidroside in colon cancer remains unknown. Here we show that salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside extracted from Rhodiola rosea, exhibited potent anti-proliferative properties in human colorectal cancer cells via inducing apoptosis and autophagy. We ascertained that salidroside exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, salidroside induced cell apoptosis, accompanied by an increase of chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation, and a decrease of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression ratio. We also found that salidroside induced autophagy, evidenced by increased LC3+ autophagic vacuoles, positive acridine orange-stained cells, enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, and elevation of Beclin-1. Treatment with autophagy-specific inhibitors [3-methyladenine (3-MA) and bafilomycin A1 (BA)] enhanced salidroside-induced apoptosis, indicating that salidroside-mediated autophagy may protect HT29 cells from undergoing apoptotic cell death. Additionally, salidroside decreased the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt and mTOR. Treatment with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 augmented the effects of salidroside on the expression of Akt and mTOR. These findings indicate that salidroside could suppress the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. This study may provide a rationale for future clinical application using salidroside as a chemotherapeutic agent for human colorectal cancer.

  11. (Radiation carcinogenesis in the whole body system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1990-12-14

    The objectives of the trip were: to take part in and to give the summary of a Symposium on Radiation Carcinogenesis at Tokyo, and to give a talk at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences at Chiba. The breadth of the aspects considered at the conference was about as broad as is possible, from effects at the molecular level to human epidemiology, from the effects of tritium to cancer induction by heavy ions. The events induced by cancer that lead to cancer and the events that are secondary are beginning to come into better focus but much is still not known. Interest in suppressor genes is increasing rapidly in the studies of human tumors and many would predict that the three or four suppressor genes associated with cancer are only the first sighting of a much larger number.

  12. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detected by optical colonoscopy. Virtual colonoscopy uses virtual reality technology to produce three-dimensional images of the ... that if current trends in reducing risk factors, increased screening, and better treatment persist, colorectal cancer mortality ...

  13. Surface-bound galectin-4 regulates gene transcription and secretion of chemokines in human colorectal cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, U Subrahmanyeswara; Rao, Prema S

    2017-03-01

    One long-term complication of chronic intestinal inflammation is the development of colorectal cancer. However, the mechanisms linking inflammation to the colorectal tumorigenesis are poorly defined. Previously, we have demonstrated that galectin-4 is predominantly expressed in the luminal epithelia of the gastrointestinal tract, and its loss of expression plays a key role in the colorectal tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism by which galectin-4 regulates inflammation-induced tumorigenesis is unclear. Here, we show that galectin-4 secreted by the colorectal cancer cell lines was bound to the cell surface. Neutralization of surface-bound galectin-4 with anti-galectin-4 antibody resulted in increased cell proliferation with concomitant secretion of several chemokines into the extracellular medium. Neutralization of the surface-bound galectin-4 also resulted in the up-regulation of transcription of 29 genes, several of which are components of multiple inflammation signaling pathways. In an alternate experiment, binding of recombinant galectin-4 protein to cell surface of the galectin-4-negative colorectal cancer cells resulted in increased p27, and decreased cyclin D1 and c-Myc levels, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Together, these data demonstrated that surface-bound galectin-4 is a dual function protein-down-regulating cell proliferation and chemokine secretion in galectin-4-expressing colorectal cancer cells on one hand and inducing apoptosis in galectin-4-negative colorectal cancer cells on the other hand.

  14. A Review of the Role of Neurotensin and Its Receptors in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyang Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotensin (NTS is a physiologically occurring hormone which affects the function of the gastrointestinal (GI tract. In recent years, NTS, acting through its cellular receptors (NTSR, has been implicated in the carcinogenesis of several cancers. In colorectal cancer (CRC, a significant body of evidence, from in vitro and in vivo studies, is available which elucidates the molecular biology of NTS/NTSR signalling and the resultant growth of CRC cells. There is growing clinical data from human studies which corroborate the role NTS/NTSR plays in the development of human CRC. Furthermore, blockade and modulation of the NTS/NTSR signalling pathways appears to reduce CRC growth in cell cultures and animal studies. Lastly, NTS/NTSR also shows potential of being utilised as a diagnostic biomarker for cancers as well as targets for functional imaging. We summarise the existing evidence and understanding of the role of NTS and its receptors in CRC.

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms of nickel carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salnikow, K; Costa, M

    2000-01-01

    This article considers the mechanism of nickel carcinogenesis, focusing primarily on the epigenetic changes associated with exposure of cells to carcinogenic nickel compounds. We discuss the delivery of nickel in the cell and contrast the genetic and epigenetic changes that have occurred. Within the epigenetic effects, alteration in the levels of transcription factors, such as ATF-1, p53, HIF-1, HIF-1alpha, and NFkappaB, are considered. The relationship between nickel and calcium metabolism and the role it plays in nickel carcinogenesis is also considered, as are reactive oxygen species and the interactions of nickel with proteins. We discuss these epigenetic discussions in light of the effects that nickel has on inducing DNA methylation in cells. It is of interest that nickel induces both a variety of signaling pathways as well as genes that seem to be important for the survival of cancer cells. It is also interesting that the same genes induced or repressed by nickel are similarly overexpressed or not expressed in nickel-transformed cells. It is suggested that this may represent a selection process crucial to the nickel carcinogenesis process.

  16. The roles of diol epoxide and o-quinone pathways in mouse lung tumorigenesis induced by benzo(a)pyrene: relevance to human lung carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is sufficient epidemiological evidence supported by experimental data that some PAH-containing complex environmental mixtures pose risks to human health by increasing lung cancer incidence. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has determined that human respirator...

  17. Post-Operative Plasma Osteopontin Predicts Distant Metastasis in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lui; Wan, Timothy Ming-Hun; Lam, Colin Siu-Chi; Chow, Ariel Ka-Man; Wong, Sunny Kit-Man; Man, Johnny Hon-Wai; Li, Hung-Sing; Cheng, Nathan Shiu-Man; Pak, Ryan Chung-Hei; Cheung, Alvin Ho-Kwan; Yau, Thomas Chung-Cheung; Lo, Oswens Siu-Hung; Foo, Dominic Chi-Chung; Poon, Jensen Tung-Chung; Poon, Ronnie Tung-Ping; Pang, Roberta Wen-Chi; Law, Wai-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Background The overall prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unsatisfactory due to cancer metastasis after operation. This study aims to investigate the clinical significance of plasma osteopontin (OPN) levels as minimally invasive, predictive, and surrogate biomarkers for prognosis of CRC patients. Methods This randomized study design consists of pre-operative and post-operative plasma samples from a total of 79 patients. We determined plasma levels of OPN by ELISA and examined their correlation with the clinicopathological parameters of CRC patients. The effects of endogenous and exogenous OPN on CRC metastasis were investigated by examination of the effect on regulators of epithelial to messenchymal transition and migration assay. Results Our findings demonstrated for the first time the clinical correlation of plasma OPN with metastasis of CRC patients. High post-operative plasma OPN level (>153.02 ng/ml) associated with development of metastasis after curative resection (poperative plasma OPN level correlated with disease-free survival of CRC patients (p=0.009) and was an independent factor for predicting development of metastasis in CRC patients after curative resection (p=0.036). Our in vitro model showed that OPN ectopic expression induced DLD1 cell migration through Snail and Twist1 overexpression and E-cadherin repression, and secretory OPN level enhanced cell migration. Conclusions The results of the current study suggest that post-operative plasma OPN correlated with post-operative metastasis, suggesting that it is a potential non-invasive biomarker for the development of future metastasis in CRC patients. In addition, OPN was shown to be involved in the metastatic process and thus inhibition of OPN is a potential therapeutic approach to treat CRC patients. PMID:25961724

  18. Effect of a novel oral chemotherapeutic agent containing a combination of trifluridine, tipiracil and the novel triple angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib, on human colorectal cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Norihiko; Nakagawa, Fumio; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Takechi, Teiji

    2016-12-01

    Trifluridine/tipiracil (TFTD) is a combination drug that is used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer and was formerly known as TAS-102. It is a combination of two active pharmaceutical compounds, trifluridine, an antineoplastic thymidine-based nucleoside analog, and tipiracil, which enhances the bioavailability of trifluridine in vivo. TFTD is used for the treatment of patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer that is resistant to standard therapies. In the present study, the anticancer effects of trifluridine in combination with nintedanib, an oral triple angiokinase inhibitor, on human colorectal cancer cell lines were investigated. The cytotoxicity against DLD-1, HT-29, and HCT116 cell lines was determined by the crystal violet staining method. The combination of trifluridine and nintedanib exerted an additive effect on the growth inhibition of DLD-1 and HT-29 cells and a sub-additive effect on HCT116 cells, as determined by isobologram analyses. Subsequently, the human colorectal cancer cell lines were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice to allow the evaluation of the in vivo tumor growth inhibitory effects of TFTD and nintedanib combination therapy. TFTD (150 mg/kg/day) and/or nintedanib (40 mg/kg/day) were orally administered to the mice twice daily from day 1 to day 14. The tumor growth inhibition with combination therapy was 61.5, 72.8, 67.6 and 67.5% for the DLD-1, DLD-1/5-FU, HT-29, and HCT116 xenografts, respectively. This was significantly (Pnintedanib. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the combination of TFTD and nintedanib in the treatment of colorectal cancer xenografts. The concentration of trifluridine incorporated into DNA in the HT-29 and HCT116 tumors was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The incorporation levels following treatment with TFTD and nintedanib for 14 consecutive days were higher than those associated with TFTD treatment alone. The

  19. The Cytotoxic Effect of Essential Oil of Syrian Citrus limon Peel on Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cell Line (Lim1863

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eyad Chatty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Essential oils are the volatile fraction of aromatic and medicinal plants created after extraction by steam or water distillation. Species of the genus Citrus(Rutaceae have been widely used in traditional medicine as volatile oils and are currently the subject of numerous research. Citrus essential oil consists of different terpens that have antitumor activities. This study determines the cytotoxic effect of the essential oils of Citrus limon L. peels on a colorectal cancer cell line (LIM1863.Methods: We harvested four samples from four locations in Syria. Essential oils were prepared by hydrodistillation and analyzed by Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS.Various concentrations ofessential oils (0.5-48 μg/ml were added to cultured cells and incubated for 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated byMTT-basedcytotoxicity assay.Results: We noted 18 components that represented 98.81% of the total oil content. The major components were: limonene (61.8%-73.8%, γ-terpinene (9.4%-10.4%, β-pinene (3.7%-6.9%, O-cymene(1%-2.4%,and citral (0.8%-5.4%.The obtained IC50 value range of Citrus limon essential oils was 5.75-7.92 μg/ml against LIM1863.Conclusion: This study revealed that Syrian Citrus limon essential oil has a cytotoxic effect on the human colorectalcarcinoma cell line LIM1863 when studied in vitro.

  20. Anticancer Activity of Marine Sponge Hyrtios sp. Extract in Human Colorectal Carcinoma RKO Cells with Different p53 Status

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    Hyun Kyung Lim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug development using marine bioresources is limited even though the ocean occupies about 70% of the earth and contains a large number of biological materials. From the screening test of the marine sponge extracts, we found Hyrtios sp. sponge collected from Chuuk island, Micronesia. In this study, the Hyrtios sp. extract was examined for anticancer activity against human colorectal carcinoma RKO cells that are wildtype for p53 and RKO-E6 that are p53 defective. The Hyrtios sp. extract dose-dependently inhibited viability in both cell lines. Multinucleation as an indication of mitotic catastrophe was also observed. Cytotoxicity tests gave significantly different results for RKO and RKO-E6 cells after 48 h exposure to Hyrtios sp. extract. In RKO cells treated with Hyrtios sp. extract, cell death occurred by induction of p53 and p21 proteins. In p53-defective RKO-E6 cells, Hyrtios sp. extract decreased expression of JNK protein and increased p21 protein. These results indicate that Hyrtios sp. extract induced apoptosis via different pathways depending on p53 status and could be a good natural product for developing new anticancer drugs.

  1. Cytotoxic Activity of Kenaf Seed Oils from Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extraction towards Human Colorectal Cancer (HT29 Cell Lines

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    Siti Aisyah Abd Ghafar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus from the family Malvaceae, is a valuable fiber plant native to India and Africa and is currently planted as the fourth commercial crop in Malaysia. Kenaf seed oil contains alpha-linolenic acid, phytosterol such as β-sitosterol, vitamin E, and other antioxidants with chemopreventive properties. Kenaf seeds oil (KSO was from supercritical carbon dioxide extraction fluid (SFE at 9 different permutations of parameters based on range of pressures from 200 to 600 bars and temperature from 40 to 80°C. They were 200/40, 200/60, 200/80, 400/40, 400/60, 400/80, 600/40, 600/60, and 600/80. Extraction from 9 parameters of KSO-SFE was screened for cytotoxicity towards human colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3 cell lines using MTS assay. KSO-SFE at 600/40 showed the strongest cytotoxicity towards HT29 with IC50 of 200 µg/mL. The IC50 for NIH/3T3 was not detected even at highest concentration employed. Cell cycle analysis showed a significant increase in the accumulation of KSO-SFE-treated cells at sub-G1 phase, indicating the induction of apoptosis by KSO-SFE. Further apoptosis induction was confirmed by Annexin V/PI and AO/PI staining.

  2. Sanguinarine induces apoptosis in human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells through ROS-mediated Egr-1 activation and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Min Ho; Kim, Gi-Young; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2013-07-04

    We examined the effects of sanguinarine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid, on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the association of these effects with apoptotic cell death in a human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cell line. Sanguinarine generated ROS, which was followed by a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), the activation of caspase-9 and -3, and the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins, such as Bcl2, XIAP and cIAP-1. Sanguinarine also promoted the activation of caspase-8 and truncation of Bid (tBid). However, the quenching of ROS generation by N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a scavenger of ROS, reversed the sanguinarine-induced apoptosis effects via inhibition of the MMP collapse, tBid expression, and activation of caspases. Sanguinarine also markedly induced the expression of the early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) during the early period, after which expression level was decreased. In addition, HCT-116 cells transfected with Egr-1 siRNA displayed significant blockage of sanguinarine-induced apoptotic activity in a ROS-dependent manner. These observations clearly indicate that ROS, which are key mediators of Egr-1 activation and MMP collapse, are involved in the early molecular events in the sanguinarine-induced apoptotic pathway acting in HCT-116 cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Crataegus azarolus Leaves Induce Antiproliferative Activity, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Human HT-29 and HCT-116 Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Nadia; Pinon, Aline; Limami, Youness; Simon, Alain; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-05-01

    Limited success has been achieved in extending the survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). There is a strong need for novel agents in the treatment and prevention of CRC. Therefore, in the present study we evaluated the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic potential of Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract in HCT-116 and HT-29 human colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, we attempted to investigate the signaling pathways that should be involved in its cytotoxic effect. The Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract-induced growth inhibitory effect was associated with DNA fragmentation, sub-G1 peak, loss of mitochondrial potential, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. In addition, ethyl acetate extract of Crataegus azarolus induced the cleavage of caspase-8. It has no effect on steady-state levels of total Bcl-2 protein. Whereas Bax levels decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in both tested cell lines. Taken together, these findings confirm the involvement of the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The apoptotic cell death induced by ethyl acetate extract of Crataegus azarolus was accompanied by an enhancement of the p21 expression but not through p53 activation in human colorectal cancer cells. The above-mentioned data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract-induced apoptosis in CRC. Therefore, this compound should be a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of CRC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of ...

  5. The interactions of dietary tomato powder and soy germ on prostate carcinogenesis in the TRAMP model

    OpenAIRE

    Zuniga, Krystle E.; Clinton, Steven K.; Erdman, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between bioactive rich food components within a complex human diet for the inhibition of prostate carcinogenesis (PCa) are largely unknown and difficult to quantify in humans. Tomato and soy products have each shown anti-PCa activity in laboratory studies. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of dietary tomato and soy germ, alone and in combination, for the inhibition of prostate carcinogenesis in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP...

  6. Human voltage-gated proton channel hv1: a new potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    Full Text Available Solid tumors exist in a hypoxic microenvironment, and possess high-glycolytic metabolites. To avoid the acidosis, tumor cells must exhibit a dynamic cytosolic pH regulation mechanism(s. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 mediates NADPH oxidase function by compensating cellular loss of electrons with protons. Here, we showed for the first time, that Hv1 expression is increased in colorectal tumor tissues and cell lines, associated with poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry showed that Hv1 is strongly expressed in adenocarcinomas but not or lowly expressed in normal colorectal or hyperplastic polyps. Hv1 expression in colorectal cancer is significantly associated with the tumor size, tumor classification, lymph node status, clinical stage and p53 status. High Hv1 expression is associated significantly with shorter overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that Hv1 is highly expressed in colorectal cancer cell lines, SW620, HT29, LS174T and Colo205, but not in SW480. Inhibitions of Hv1 expression and activity in the highly metastatic SW620 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA and Zn(2+ respectively, markedly decrease the cell invasion and migration, restraint proton extrusion and the intracellular pH recovery. Our results suggest that Hv1 may be used as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma, and a potential target for anticancer drugs in colorectal cancer therapy.

  7. Alterations of Histone H1 Phosphorylation During Bladder Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telu, Kelly H.; Abbaoui, Besma; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Zynger, Debra L.; Clinton, Steven K.

    2013-01-01

    There is a crucial need for development of prognostic and predictive biomarkers in human bladder carcinogenesis in order to personalize preventive and therapeutic strategies and improve outcomes. Epigenetic alterations, such as histone modifications, are implicated in the genetic dysregulation that is fundamental to carcinogenesis. Here we focus on profiling the histone modifications during the progression of bladder cancer. Histones were extracted from normal human bladder epithelial cells, an immortalized human bladder epithelial cell line (hTERT), and four human bladder cancer cell lines (RT4, J82, T24, and UMUC3) ranging from superficial low-grade to invasive high-grade cancers. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) profiling revealed a statistically significant increase in phosphorylation of H1 linker histones from normal human bladder epithelial cells to low-grade superficial to high-grade invasive bladder cancer cells. This finding was further validated by immunohistochemical staining of the normal epithelium and transitional cell cancer from human bladders. Cell cycle analysis of histone H1 phosphorylation by western blotting showed an increase of phosphorylation from G0/G1 phase to M phase, again supporting this as a proliferative marker. Changes in histone H1 phosphorylation status may further clarify epigenetic changes during bladder carcinogenesis and provide diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers or targets for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:23675690

  8. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition and its role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing-Chao; Gao, Ren-Yuan; Wu, Wen; Qin, Huan-Long

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a collection of events that allows the conversion of adherent epithelial cells, tightly bound to each other within an organized tissue, into independent fibroblastic cells possessing migratory properties and the ability to invade the extracellular matrix. EMT contributes to the complex architecture of the embryo by permitting the progression of embryogenesis from a simple single-cell layer epithelium to a complex three-dimensional organism composed of both epithelial and mesenchymal cells. However, in most tissues EMT is a developmentally restricted process and fully differentiated epithelia typically maintain their epithelial phenotype. Recently, elements of EMT, specially the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers, have been observed in pathological states, including epithelial cancers. Increasing evidence has confirmed its presence in human colon during colorectal carcinogenesis. In general, chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the causes of many human cancers including colorectal cancer(CRC). Accordingly, epidemiologic and clinical studies indicate that patients affected by ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease, have an increased risk of developing CRC. A large body of evidence supports roles for the SMAD/STAT3 signaling pathway, the NF-kB pathway, the Ras-mitogen- activated protein kinase/Snail/Slug and microRNAs in the development of colorectal cancers via epithelial-to- mesenchymal transition. Thus, EMT appears to be closely involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, and analysis refered to it can yield novel targets for therapy.

  9. An Emergence Framework of Carcinogenesis

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    Elizabeth A. W. Sigston

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental paradigms provide the framework for the understanding of cancer, and drive research and treatment, but are rarely considered by clinicians. The somatic mutation theory (SMT, in which cancer is considered a genetic disease, has been the predominant traditional model of cancer for over 50 years. More recently, alternative theories have been proposed, such as tissue organization field theory (TOFT, evolutionary models, and inflammatory models. Key concepts within the various models have led to them being difficult to reconcile. Progressively, it has been recognized that biological systems cannot be fully explained by the physicochemical properties of their constituent parts. There is an increasing call for a ‘systems’ approach. Incorporating the concepts of ‘emergence’, ‘systems’, ‘thermodynamics’, and ‘chaos’, a single integrated framework for carcinogenesis has been developed, enabling existing theories to become compatible as alternative mechanisms, facilitating the integration of bioinformatics and providing a structure in which translational research can flow from both ‘benchtop to bedside’ and ‘bedside to benchtop’. In this review, a basic understanding of the key concepts of ‘emergence’, ‘systems’, ‘system levels’, ‘complexity’, ‘thermodynamics’, ‘entropy’, ‘chaos’, and ‘fractals’ is provided. Non-linear mathematical equations are included where possible to demonstrate compatibility with bioinformatics. Twelve principles that define the ‘emergence framework of carcinogenesis’ are developed, with principles 1–10 encapsulating the key concepts upon which the framework is built and their application to carcinogenesis. Principle 11 relates the framework to cancer progression. Principle 12 relates to the application of the framework to translational research. The ‘emergence framework of carcinogenesis’ collates current paradigms, concepts, and evidence around

  10. Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid Induces Apoptosis via Reduction of COX-2 Expression in TPA-Induced HT-29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Ju Shin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA is one of the bioactive compounds found in cheonggukjang, a fast-fermented soybean paste widely utilized in Korean cooking. PGA is reported to have a number of beneficial health effects, and interestingly, it has been identified as a possible anti-cancer compound through its ability to promote apoptosis in cancer cells, although the precise molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Our findings demonstrate that PGA inhibits the pro-proliferative functions of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA, a known chemical carcinogen in HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells. This inhibition was accompanied by hallmark apoptotic phenotypes, including DNA fragmentation and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and caspase 3. In addition, PGA treatment reduced the expression of genes known to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer cells, including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. Lastly, PGA promoted activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein (AMPK in HT-29 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that PGA treatment enhances apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells, in part by modulating the activity of the COX-2 and AMPK signaling pathways. These anti-cancer functions of PGA make it a promising compound for future study.

  11. Dietary B vitamin and methionine intake and MTHFR C677T genotype on risk of colorectal tumors in Lynch syndrome : the GEOLynch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, Audrey Y.; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Botma, Akke; Heine-Broring, Renate C.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Harryvan, Jan L.; Winkels, Renate M.; Kampman, Ellen

    Dietary intake of B vitamins and methionine, essential components of DNA synthesis and methylation pathways, may influence colorectal tumor (CRT) development. The impact of B vitamins on colorectal carcinogenesis in individuals with Lynch syndrome (LS) is unknown but is important given their high

  12. Dietary B vitamin and methionine intake and MTHFR C677T genotype on risk of colorectal tumors in Lynch syndrome: the GEOLynch cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, A.Y.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Nagengast, F.M.; Botma, A.; Heine-Bröring, R.C.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Harryvan, J.L.; Winkels, R.M.; Kampman, E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dietary intake of B vitamins and methionine, essential components of DNA synthesis and methylation pathways, may influence colorectal tumor (CRT) development. The impact of B vitamins on colorectal carcinogenesis in individuals with Lynch syndrome (LS) is unknown but is important given their

  13. Sucrose enhancement of the early steps of colon carcinogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, D; Zhang, X M; Medline, A; Bruce, W R; Archer, M C

    1993-04-01

    The association of refined sugars and colorectal cancers and polyps in three recent case-control studies led us to investigate the effects of sucrose, fructose and glucose on colonic epithelial proliferation and sensitivity to carcinogenesis. CF1 and C57BL/6J mice were used; proliferation was assessed as vincristine-accumulated mitotic figures per crypt section; sensitivity to carcinogenesis was assessed as the number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) per colon observed following the colon carcinogen, azoxymethane (AOM, 3 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg). Oral gavages of sucrose and fructose in CF1 mice (10 g/kg) increased colonic proliferation 16 h later (2.8 +/- 0.6 and 4.1 +/- 0.7 (mean +/- SEM) accumulated mitotic figures/crypt section), compared with glucose and water (1.0 +/- 0.2 and 0.4 +/- 0.1). Sucrose and fructose given 14 h prior to the AOM (5 mg/kg) increased the sensitivity of the colon to carcinogenesis (18.4 +/- 1.5 and 13.1 +/- 1.8 ACF/colon), compared with glucose and water (11.4 +/- 2.0 and 8.6 +/- 1.1). Similar results were observed with C57BL/6J mice. We conclude that dietary sucrose and fructose may represent risk factors for colorectal cancer through a direct effect of the sugars on colonic epithelial proliferation.

  14. Tumor-derived CXCL5 promotes human colorectal cancer metastasis through activation of the ERK/Elk-1/Snail and AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingkun; Ou, Baochi; Han, Dingpei; Wang, Puxiongzhi; Zong, Yaping; Zhu, Congcong; Liu, Di; Zheng, Minhua; Sun, Jing; Feng, Hao; Lu, Aiguo

    2017-03-29

    Metastasis is a major cause of death in human colorectal cancer patients. However, the contribution of chemokines in the tumor microenvironment to tumor metastasis is not fully understood. Herein, we examinined several chemokines in colorectal cancer patients using chemokine ELISA array. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect expression of CXCL5 in colorectal cancer patients tissues. Human HCT116 and SW480 cell lines stably transfected with CXCL5, shCXCL5 and shCXCR2 lentivirus plasmids were used in our in vitro study. Immunoblot, immunofluorescence and transwell assay were used to examine the molecular biology and morphological changes in these cells. In addition, we used nude mice to detect the influence of CXCL5 on tumor metastasis in vivo. We found that CXCL5 was overexpressed in tumor tissues and associated with advanced tumor stage as well as poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. We also demonstrated that CXCL5 was primarily expressed in the tumor cell cytoplasm and cell membranes, which may indicate that the CXCL5 was predominantly produced by cancer epithelial cells instead of fibroblasts in the tumor mesenchyme. Additionally, overexpression of CXCL5 enhanced the migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells by inducing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through activation of the ERK/Elk-1/Snail pathway and the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway in a CXCR2-dependent manner. The silencing of Snail and β-catenin attenuated CXCL5/CXCR2-enhanced cell migration and invasion in vitro. The elevated expression of CXCL5 can also potentiate the metastasis of colorectal cancer cells to the liver in vivo in nude mice intrasplenic injection model. In conclusion, our findings support CXCL5 as a promoter of colorectal cancer metastasis and a predictor of poor clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients.

  15. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  16. Anti-cancer effect and the underlying mechanisms of gypenosides on human colorectal cancer SW-480 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gypenosides (Gyp, the main components from Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino, are widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-cancer effect and the underlying mechanisms of Gyp on human colorectal cancer cells SW-480. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The inhibitory effect of Gyp on SW-480 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Apoptotic cell death was detected by nuclear Hoechst 33342 staining and DNA fragmentation analysis. Apoptosis was analyzed using Annexin V-PE/7-amino-actinomycin D staining. Cell membrane integrity was evaluated with flow cytometry following PI staining. Changes of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm were detected through flow cytometry analysis of rhodamine 123 (Rh123. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in Gyp induced cell death was investigated by intracellular ROS generation and general ROS scavenger. Wound-healing assay was carried out to investigate Gyp-inhibited migration of SW-480 cells in vitro. Additionally, the alterations in F-actin microfilaments were analyzed by FITC-labeled phalloidin toxin staining and the morphological changes were evaluated under scanning electron microscope (SEM. RESULTS: After the Gyp treatment, the plasma membrane permeability of SW-480 cell was increased, Δψm was decreased significantly, the level of intracellular ROS level was increased, DNA fragmentation and apoptotic morphology were observed. Cells treated with Gyp exert serious microfilament network collapse as well as the significant decrease in the number of microvilli. Gyp induced the changes of cell viability, cell migration, intracellular ROS generation and nuclear morphology were alleviated obviously by NAC. CONCLUSION: The results in this study implied that ROS play an important role in Gyp induced cell toxicity and apoptosis, and the mitochondria damage may be upstream of ROS generation post Gyp treatment. The findings of the present study provide new evidences for anti

  17. Inhibition of the angiogenesis and growth of Aloin in human colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qin; Pan, Hongming; Lou, Haizhou; Xu, Yinghua; Tian, Lu

    2013-07-12

    Angiogenesis has been an attractive target for drug therapy. Aloin (AL), an natural compound derived from Aloe barbadensis Miller leaves, has been shown to possess anti-cancer potential activities. However, its roles in tumor angiogenesis and the involved molecular mechanism are unknown. To evaluate the antiangiogenic and anticancer activities of AL, endothelial cell scratch, modified Boyden chamber inserts and tube formation assays were done in HUVECs, and MTT and Live-Dead assays were used to determine the proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. The inhibition effects of AL were further confirmed by a mouse xenograft model in vivo. The expression levels of STAT3 signaling pathway and that mediated-target genes were measured in HUVECs and SW620 cells by Western blots. Here, we demonstrated that AL significantly inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration and tube formation in vitro. Western blotting showed that AL suppressed activation of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) 2 and STAT3 phosphorylation in endothelial cells. In addition, the constitutively activated STAT3 protein, and the expression of STAT3-regulated antiapoptotic (Bcl-xL), proliferative (c-Myc), and angiogenic (VEGF) proteins were also down-regulated in response to AL in human SW620 cancer cells. Consistent with the above findings, AL inhibited tumor cell viability and induced cell apoptosis in vitro, and substantially reduced tumor volumes and weight in vivo mouse xenografts, without obviously toxicity. Our studies provided the first evidence that AL may inhibit tumor angiogenesis and growth via blocking STAT3 activation, with the potential of a drug candidate for cancer therapy.

  18. Modulatory effects of quercetin on proliferation and differentiation of the human colorectal cell line Caco-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dihal, A.A.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B.v.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Stierum, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the dietary flavonoid quercetin was investigated on proliferation and differentiation of the human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Confluent Caco-2 monolayers exposed to quercetin showed a biphasic effect on cell proliferation and a decrease in cell differentiation (0.001

  19. Colorectal Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peter Donald

    history, young age at onset and presence of other specific tumours and defects. Among these defects are ... medical advice. Only 2 (6.3%) patients completed their treatment regimen. Conclusion: The incidence of colorectal cancer is still low in our environment but treatment outcome remains poor due to late presentation.

  20. Carcinogenesis in tissue culture. 29: neoplastic transformation of a normal human diploid cell strain, WI-38, with Co-60 gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namba, M.; Nishitani, K.; Kimoto, T.

    1978-08-01

    WI-38 normal human diploid fibroblasts were exposed to Co-60 gamma rays 4 times at a total dose of 1400 rads and transformed into neoplastic cells in culture. The transformed WI-38 cells which are growing steadily without showing aging phenomena at the present time showed epithelial-like morphology, abnormal karyology, B-type isoenzyme pattern of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and produced sarcomas when transplanted into cheek pouches of hamsters treated with anti-hamster thymocyte serum.

  1. Gut Microbe-Mediated Suppression of Inflammation-Associated Colon Carcinogenesis by Luminal Histamine Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunxu; Ganesh, Bhanu Priya; Shi, Zhongcheng; Shah, Rajesh Rasik; Fultz, Robert; Major, Angela; Venable, Susan; Lugo, Monica; Hoch, Kathleen; Chen, Xiaowei; Haag, Anthony; Wang, Timothy C; Versalovic, James

    2017-10-01

    Microbiome-mediated suppression of carcinogenesis may open new avenues for identification of therapeutic targets and prevention strategies in oncology. Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) deficiency has been shown to promote inflammation-associated colorectal cancer by accumulation of CD11b+Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells, indicating a potential antitumorigenic effect of histamine. Here, we demonstrate that administration of hdc+Lactobacillus reuteri in the gut resulted in luminal hdc gene expression and histamine production in the intestines of Hdc-/- mice. This histamine-producing probiotic decreased the number and size of colon tumors and colonic uptake of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose by positron emission tomography in Hdc-/- mice. Administration of L. reuteri suppressed keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), Il22, Il6, Tnf, and IL1α gene expression in the colonic mucosa and reduced the amounts of proinflammatory, cancer-associated cytokines, keratinocyte chemoattractant, IL-22, and IL-6, in plasma. Histamine-generating L. reuteri also decreased the relative numbers of splenic CD11b+Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells. Furthermore, an isogenic HDC-deficient L. reuteri mutant that was unable to generate histamine did not suppress carcinogenesis, indicating a significant role of the cometabolite, histamine, in suppression of chronic intestinal inflammation and colorectal tumorigenesis. These findings link luminal conversion of amino acids to biogenic amines by gut microbes and probiotic-mediated suppression of colorectal neoplasia. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Survivin −31 Snp in Human Colorectal Cancer Correlates with Survivin Splice Variant Expression and Improved Overall Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna G. Antonacopoulou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survivin is involved in the regulation of cell division and survival, two key processes in cancer. The majority of studies on survivin in colorectal cancer (CRC have focused on protein expression and less is known about the expression of survivin splicing variants or survivin gene polymorphisms in CRC. In the present study, the mRNA levels of the five known isoforms of survivin as well as survivin protein were assessed in matched normal and neoplastic colorectal tissue. Moreover, the 9386C/T and −31G/C polymorphisms were investigated.

  3. The Role of HPV E6 and E7 Oncoproteins in HPV-associated Cervical Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Eun-Kyoung; Park, Jong-Sup

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading world causes of cancer morbidity and mortality in woman, with more than 98% related to a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection origin. Infection with specific subtypes of HPV has been strongly implicated in cervical carcinogenesis. The identification and functional verification of host proteins associated with HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins may provide useful information in understanding cervical carcinogenesis and the development of cervical cancer-specific m...

  4. Cytochalasin E in the lichen Pleurosticta acetabulum. Anti-proliferative activity against human HT-29 colorectal cancer cells and quantitative variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delebassée, Sylvie; Mambu, Lengo; Pinault, Emilie; Champavier, Yves; Liagre, Bertrand; Millot, Marion

    2017-09-01

    A biological screening of sixteen lichen extracts on human HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, led to the selection of Pleurosticta acetabulum, a lichen widely present in tree barks in Europe. Bioguided purification of the acetonic extract resulted in the isolation of cytochalasin E, a common fungal metabolite. This compound is responsible for the anti-proliferative activity of the extract. Its presence in lichens is reported here for the first time. LC-MS quantitation of cytochalasin E in different samples of P. acetabulum demonstrated quantitative variations of cytochalasin E production in the lichen and especially high concentrations in apothecia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Helicobacter pylori and colorectal neoplasia: Is there a causal link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos; Georgopoulos, Sotirios D

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was recognized as an infectious cause of gastric cancer, there has been increasing interest in examining its potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Data from case-control and cross-sectional studies, mostly relying on hospital-based samples, and several meta-analyses have shown a positive statistical relationship between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasia. However, the possibility exists that the results have been influenced by bias, including the improper selection of patients and disparities with respect to potential confounders. While the evidence falls short of a definitive causal link, it appears that infection with H. pylori/H. pylori-related gastritis is associated with an increased, although modest, risk of colorectal adenoma and cancer. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for this association remain uncertain. H. pylori has been detected in colorectal malignant tissues; however, the possibility that H. pylori is a direct activator of colonic carcinogenesis remains purely hypothetical. On the other hand, experimental data have indicated a series of potential oncogenic interactions between these bacteria and colorectal mucosa, including induction and perpetuation of inflammatory responses, alteration of gut microflora and release of toxins and/or hormonal mediators, such as gastrin, which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:26811614

  6. Diagnosing lynch syndrome in absence of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Knezetic, Joseph; Lanspa, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    There are many ways in which a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can be made, most prominent of which is family history, presence of cancer, high microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry, and a mismatch repair germline mutation. There are at least four molecular pathways for colorectal cancer carcinogenesis: 1) adenoma-carcinoma sequence; 2) hereditary microsatellite instability; 3) serrated pathway; 4) epidermal growth factor receptor. The answer to diagnosing Lynch syndrome in the absence of colorectal cancer may be partially based upon the phenotypic characteristics of the colonic polyps should they be identified at colonoscopy, specifically their phenotypic characteristics of location, size, histology, number, and age of polyp onset.

  7. Loss of HLTF function promotes intestinal carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhu Sumit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HLTF (Helicase-like Transcription Factor is a DNA helicase protein homologous to the SWI/SNF family involved in the maintenance of genomic stability and the regulation of gene expression. HLTF has also been found to be frequently inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in human colon cancers. Whether this epigenetic event is required for intestinal carcinogenesis is unknown. Results To address the role of loss of HLTF function in the development of intestinal cancer, we generated Hltf deficient mice. These mutant mice showed normal development, and did not develop intestinal tumors, indicating that loss of Hltf function by itself is insufficient to induce the formation of intestinal cancer. On the Apcmin/+ mutant background, Hltf- deficiency was found to significantly increase the formation of intestinal adenocarcinoma and colon cancers. Cytogenetic analysis of colon tumor cells from Hltf -/-/Apcmin/+ mice revealed a high incidence of gross chromosomal instabilities, including Robertsonian fusions, chromosomal fragments and aneuploidy. None of these genetic alterations were observed in the colon tumor cells derived from Apcmin/+ mice. Increased tumor growth and genomic instability was also demonstrated in HCT116 human colon cancer cells in which HLTF expression was significantly decreased. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate that loss of HLTF function promotes the malignant transformation of intestinal or colonic adenomas to carcinomas by inducing genomic instability. Our findings highly suggest that epigenetic inactivation of HLTF, as found in most human colon cancers, could play an important role in the progression of colon tumors to malignant cancer.

  8. In vitro cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles and zinc oxide nanoparticles to human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yijuan; Guan, Rongfa; Lyu, Fei; Kang, Tianshu; Wu, Yihang; Chen, Xiaoqiang

    2014-11-01

    With the increasing applications of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in foods and cosmetics, the concerns about the potential toxicities to human have been raised. The aims of this study are to observe the cytotoxicity of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs to human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells in vitro, and to discover the toxicity mechanism of nanoparticles on Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 cells were exposed to 10, 25, 50, 100, 200μg/mL of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs (90nm). AO/EB double staining was used to characterize the morphology of the treated cells. The cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to detect the proliferation of the cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) assay were used to explore the oxidative damage of Caco-2 cells. The results showed that Ag NPs and ZnO NPs (0-200μg/mL) had highly significant effect on the Caco-2 cells activity. ZnO NPs exerted higher cytotoxicity than Ag NPs in the same concentration range. ZnO NPs have dose-depended toxicity. The LD50 of ZnO NPs in Caco-2 cells is 0.431mg/L. Significant depletion of SOD level, variation in GSH level and release of ROS in cells treated by ZnO NPs were observed, which suggests that cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs in intestine cells might be mediated through cellular oxidative stress. While Caco-2 cells treated with Ag NPs at all experimental concentrations showed no cellular oxidative damage. Moreover, the cells' antioxidant capacity increased, and reached the highest level when the concentration of Ag NPs was 50μg/mL. Therefore, it can be concluded that Ag NPs are safer antibacterial material in food packaging materials than ZnO NPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. In vitro cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles and zinc oxide nanoparticles to human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yijuan [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Biometrology and Inspection and Quarantine, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Guan, Rongfa, E-mail: rongfaguan@163.com [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Biometrology and Inspection and Quarantine, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Lyu, Fei [Department of Food Science and Technology, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Kang, Tianshu; Wu, Yihang [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Biometrology and Inspection and Quarantine, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, Xiaoqiang [Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430068 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The characterization of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs. • The various morphologies of Caco-2 cells stained with AO/EB. • The viability of Caco-2 cells after Ag NPs and ZnO NPs exposure. • The cytotoxicity of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs on Caco-2 cells by oxidative stress assays. - Abstract: With the increasing applications of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in foods and cosmetics, the concerns about the potential toxicities to human have been raised. The aims of this study are to observe the cytotoxicity of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs to human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells in vitro, and to discover the toxicity mechanism of nanoparticles on Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 cells were exposed to 10, 25, 50, 100, 200 μg/mL of Ag NPs and ZnO NPs (90 nm). AO/EB double staining was used to characterize the morphology of the treated cells. The cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to detect the proliferation of the cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) assay were used to explore the oxidative damage of Caco-2 cells. The results showed that Ag NPs and ZnO NPs (0–200 μg/mL) had highly significant effect on the Caco-2 cells activity. ZnO NPs exerted higher cytotoxicity than Ag NPs in the same concentration range. ZnO NPs have dose-depended toxicity. The LD{sub 50} of ZnO NPs in Caco-2 cells is 0.431 mg/L. Significant depletion of SOD level, variation in GSH level and release of ROS in cells treated by ZnO NPs were observed, which suggests that cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs in intestine cells might be mediated through cellular oxidative stress. While Caco-2 cells treated with Ag NPs at all experimental concentrations showed no cellular oxidative damage. Moreover, the cells’ antioxidant capacity increased, and reached the highest level when the concentration of Ag NPs was 50 μg/mL. Therefore, it can be concluded that Ag NPs are safer antibacterial material in food packaging materials

  10. Genetic factors for breast carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Enrique Miguel-Soca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a multifactorial genenetic disease in which oncogenes derived from normal cellular genes intervene, which constitute positive signals of cellular proliferation and tumour suppressor genes and represent negative signals of cells multiplication and differentiation. Although these alterations which affect germinal cells produce inherited cancers, in most of the cases somatic cell genes are affected. To the susceptibility of cancer due to genes as BRCA1 and BCRA2, the effect of factors associated to environment, life style and toxic habits are added, these determine a complex interrelation genes-environment which imply an activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumour suppressors. The objective of this review in to offer an updated view about the main genes implied in breast carcinogenesis. The topic is controversial y currently deeply investigated.

  11. OVOL2, an Inhibitor of WNT Signaling, Reduces Invasive Activities of Human and Mouse Cancer Cells and Is Down-regulated in Human Colorectal Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guo-Dong; Sun, Guang-Bin; Jiao, Peng; Chen, Chen; Liu, Qing-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Rui; Cai, Wang-Yu; Li, Sheng-Nan; Wu, Jia-Fa; Liu, Yun-Jia; Wu, Rong-Si; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Chan, Err-Cheng; Liou, Yih-Cherng; Li, Bo-An

    2016-03-01

    Activation of WNT signaling promotes the invasive activities of several types of cancer cells, but it is not clear if it regulates the same processes in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells, or what mechanisms are involved. We studied the expression and function of OVOL2, a member of the Ovo family of conserved zinc-finger transcription factors regulated by the WNT signaling pathway, in intestinal tumors of mice and human beings. We analyzed the expression of OVOL2 protein and messenger RNA in CRC cell lines and tissue arrays, as well as CRC samples from patients who underwent surgery at Xiamen University in China from 2009 to 2012; clinical information also was collected. CRC cell lines (SW620) were infected with lentivirus expressing OVOL2, analyzed in migration and invasion assays, and injected into nude mice to assess tumor growth and metastasis. Tandem affinity purification was used to purify the OVOL2-containing complex from CRC cells; the complex was analyzed by liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry, and immunoprecipitation experiments. Gene promoter activities were measured in luciferase reporter assays. We analyzed mice with an intestine-specific disruption of Ovol2 (Ovol2(flox/+) transgenic mice), as well as Apc(min/+) mice; these mice were crossed and analyzed. Analysis of data from patients indicated that the levels of OVOL2 messenger RNA were significantly lower in colon carcinomas than adenomas, and decreased significantly as carcinomas progressed from grades 2 to 4. Immunohistochemical analysis of a tissue array of 275 CRC samples showed a negative association between tumor stage and OVOL2 level. Overexpression of OVOL2 in SW620 cells decreased their migration and invasion, reduced markers of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and suppressed their metastasis as xenograft tumors in nude mice; knockdown of OVOL2 caused LS174T cells to transition from epithelial to mesenchymal phenotypes. OVOL2 bound T-cell factor (TCF)4 and

  12. Combined 5-FU and ChoKα inhibitors as a new alternative therapy of colorectal cancer: evidence in human tumor-derived cell lines and mouse xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de la Cueva

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third major cause of cancer related deaths in the world. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but as a single-agent renders low response rates. Choline kinase alpha (ChoKα, an enzyme that plays a role in cell proliferation and transformation, has been reported overexpressed in many different tumors, including colorectal tumors. ChoKα inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials as a novel antitumor strategy.ChoKα specific inhibitors, MN58b and TCD-717, have demonstrated a potent antitumoral activity both in vitro and in vivo against several tumor-derived cell line xenografts including CRC-derived cell lines. The effect of ChoKα inhibitors in combination with 5-FU as a new alternative for the treatment of colon tumors has been investigated both in vitro in CRC-tumour derived cell lines, and in vivo in mouse xenografts models. The effects on thymidilate synthase (TS and thymidine kinase (TK1 levels, two enzymes known to play an essential role in the mechanism of action of 5-FU, were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis. The combination of 5-FU with ChoKα inhibitors resulted in a synergistic effect in vitro in three different human colon cancer cell lines, and in vivo against human colon xenografts in nude mice. ChoKα inhibitors modulate the expression levels of TS and TK1 through inhibition of E2F production, providing a rational for its mechanism of action.Our data suggest that both drugs in combination display a synergistic antitumoral effect due to ChoKα inhibitors-driven modulation of the metabolization of 5-FU. The clinical relevance of these findings is strongly supported since TCD-717 has recently entered Phase I clinical trials against solid tumors.

  13. Diet, aberrant crypt foci and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, W R; Archer, M C; Corpet, D E; Medline, A; Minkin, S; Stamp, D; Yin, Y; Zhang, X M

    1993-11-01

    We have used the aberrant crypt focus (ACF) assay to test and develop hypotheses linking diet and colon cancer. The hypotheses were suggested by epidemiological studies that identified possible dietary factors associated with colorectal cancer risk. The ACF assay was used to quantitate the effect of the dietary factors on the initiation and growth of these putative precursors of colon cancers in experimental animals. Using this approach we have developed 3 new hypotheses for the role of diet in colorectal cancer. These are (1) a risk associated with 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde in caramelized sugar, (2) a risk associated with some factor in thermolyzed casein, and (3) a risk associated with single nutrient boluses of sucrose and fructose. The importance of these hypotheses has still to be tested in long term carcinogenesis experiments, in analytic epidemiology studies and then, perhaps, in intervention trials.

  14. Sites of origin of oral cavity cancer in nonsmokers vs smokers: possible evidence of dental trauma carcinogenesis and its importance compared with human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Brendan J; Zammit, Andrew P; Lewandowski, Andrew W; Bashford, Julia J; Dragovic, Adrian S; Perry, Emily J; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Perry, Christopher F L

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high and possibly rising incidence of mouth squamous cell carcinoma in nonsmokers, especially women, without obvious cause has been noted by previous authors. Is chronic dental trauma and irritation a carcinogen, and what is its importance compared with human papillomavirus (HPV) oropharyngeal cancer in nonsmokers? To determine whether oral cavity cancers occurred more commonly at sites of dental trauma and how the position of these cancers varied between nonsmokers lacking major identified carcinogens and smokers. If these cancers occurred more frequently at sites of chronic trauma, especially in nonsmokers, it would suggest chronic dental trauma as a possible carcinogen. A retrospective analysis of 881 patients with oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancers seen through a tertiary referral hospital between 2001 and 2011 was performed. Patient medical records were analyzed to determine the location of the tumor within the oral cavity and oropharynx and how it relates to patient demographics, smoking and alcohol histories, and comorbidities. Dental histories were also sought, including use of dentures. Nonsmokers comprised 87 of 390 patients with mouth cancer (22%) and 48 of 334 patients with oropharyngeal cancer (14%). Female nonsmoking patients included 53 with oral cancer (61%) but only 12 with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (25%). Oral cancers occurred on the lateral tongue, a potential site of chronic dental trauma, in 57 nonsmokers (66%) compared with 107 smokers/ex-smokers (33%) (P Oral cavity cancers occur predominantly at sites of potential dental and denture trauma, especially in nonsmokers without other risk factors. Recognizing teeth irritation as a potential carcinogen would have an impact on prevention and treatment strategies.

  15. Clinical and Biological Features of Interval Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yu Mi; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2017-01-01

    Interval colorectal cancer (I-CRC) is defined as a CRC diagnosed within 60 months after a negative colonoscopy, taking into account that 5 years is the ?mean sojourn time.? It is important to prevent the development of interval cancer. The development of interval colon cancer is associated with female sex, old age, family history of CRC, comorbidities, diverticulosis, and the skill of the endoscopist. During carcinogenesis, sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps) share many genomic and colo...

  16. Fusobacterium nucleatum Promotes Chemoresistance to Colorectal Cancer by Modulating Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, TaChung; Guo, Fangfang; Yu, Yanan; Sun, Tiantian; Ma, Dan; Han, Jixuan; Qian, Yun; Kryczek, Ilona; Sun, Danfeng; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Chen, Yingxuan; Chen, Haoyan; Hong, Jie; Zou, Weiping; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2017-07-27

    Gut microbiota are linked to chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Chemotherapy failure is the major cause of recurrence and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. Here, we investigated the contribution of gut microbiota to chemoresistance in patients with colorectal cancer. We found that Fusobacterium (F.) nucleatum was abundant in colorectal cancer tissues in patients with recurrence post chemotherapy, and was associated with patient clinicopathological characterisitcs. Furthermore, our bioinformatic and functional studies demonstrated that F. nucleatum promoted colorectal cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, F. nucleatum targeted TLR4 and MYD88 innate immune signaling and specific microRNAs to activate the autophagy pathway and alter colorectal cancer chemotherapeutic response. Thus, F. nucleatum orchestrates a molecular network of the Toll-like receptor, microRNAs, and autophagy to clinically, biologically, and mechanistically control colorectal cancer chemoresistance. Measuring and targeting F. nucleatum and its associated pathway will yield valuable insight into clinical management and may ameliorate colorectal cancer patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanoindentation characterisation of human colorectal cancer cells considering cell geometry, surface roughness and hyperelastic constitutive behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Uva, Antonio E.; Papi, Massimiliano; Fiorentino, Michele; De Spirito, Marco; Monno, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Characterisation of the mechanical behaviour of cancer cells is an issue of crucial importance as specific cell mechanical properties have been measured and utilized as possible biomarkers of cancer progression. Atomic force microscopy certainly occupies a prominent place in the field of the mechanical characterisation devices. We developed a hybrid approach to characterise different cell lines (SW620 and SW480) of the human colon carcinoma submitted to nanoindentation measurements. An ad hoc algorithm was written that compares the force-indentation curves experimentally retrieved with those predicted by a finite element model that simulates the nanoindentation process and reproduces the cell geometry and the surface roughness. The algorithm perturbs iteratively the values of the cell mechanical properties implemented in the finite element model until the difference between the experimental and numerical force-indentation curves reaches the minimum value. The occurrence of this indicates that the implemented material properties are very close to the real ones. Different hyperelastic constitutive models, such as Arruda-Boyce, Mooney-Rivlin and Neo-Hookean were utilized to describe the structural behaviour of indented cells. The algorithm was capable of separating, for all the cell lines investigated, the mechanical properties of cell cortex and cytoskeleton. Material properties determined via the algorithm were different with respect to those obtained with the Hertzian contact theory. This demonstrates that factors such as: the cell geometry/anatomy and the hyperelastic constitutive behaviour, which are not contemplated in the Hertz’s theory hypotheses, do affect the nanoindentation measurements. The proposed approach represents a powerful tool that, only on the basis of nanoindentation measurements, is capable of characterising material at the subcellular level.

  18. Cervical Carcinogenesis and Immune Response Gene Polymorphisms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash M. Mehta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The local immune response is considered a key determinant in cervical carcinogenesis after persistent infection with oncogenic, high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV infections. Genetic variation in various immune response genes has been shown to influence risk of developing cervical cancer, as well as progression and survival among cervical cancer patients. We reviewed the literature on associations of immunogenetic single nucleotide polymorphism, allele, genotype, and haplotype distributions with risk and progression of cervical cancer. Studies on HLA and KIR gene polymorphisms were excluded due to the abundance on literature on that subject. We show that multiple genes and loci are associated with variation in risk of cervical cancer. Rather than one single gene being responsible for cervical carcinogenesis, we postulate that variations in the different immune response genes lead to subtle differences in the effectiveness of the antiviral and antitumour immune responses, ultimately leading to differences in risk of developing cervical cancer and progressive disease after HPV infection.

  19. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara R. Litwin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements. HPV-associated cancers have recurrent somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN, human leukocyte antigen A and B (HLA-A and HLA-B-A/B, and the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ pathway, and rarely have mutations in the tumor protein p53 (TP53 and RB transcriptional corepressor 1 (RB1 tumor suppressor genes. There are some variations by tumor site, such as NOTCH1 mutations which are primarily found in head and neck cancers. Understanding the somatic events following HPV infection and persistence can aid the development of early detection biomarkers, particularly when mutations in precancers are characterized. Somatic mutations may also influence prognosis and treatment decisions.

  20. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Clarke, Megan A; Dean, Michael; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2017-08-03

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC)-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements. HPV-associated cancers have recurrent somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha ( PIK3CA ) and phosphatase and tensin homolog ( PTEN ), human leukocyte antigen A and B ( HLA-A and HLA-B ) -A/B , and the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway, and rarely have mutations in the tumor protein p53 ( TP53 ) and RB transcriptional corepressor 1 ( RB1 ) tumor suppressor genes. There are some variations by tumor site, such as NOTCH1 mutations which are primarily found in head and neck cancers. Understanding the somatic events following HPV infection and persistence can aid the development of early detection biomarkers, particularly when mutations in precancers are characterized. Somatic mutations may also influence prognosis and treatment decisions.

  1. Antitumorigenic effect of atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge on human colorectal cancer cells via regulation of Sp1 transcription factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Duksun; Cho, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Ra Ham; Bang, Woong; Park, Kyungho; Kim, Minseok S.; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chae, Jung-Il; Moon, Se Youn

    2017-02-01

    Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HT29 and HCT116) were exposed to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure to investigate the anticancer capacity of the plasma. The dose- and time-dependent effects of DBDP on cell viability, regulation of transcription factor Sp1, cell-cycle analysis, and colony formation were investigated by means of MTS assay, DAPI staining, propidium iodide staining, annexin V-FITC staining, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and anchorage-independent cell transformation assay. By increasing the duration of plasma dose times, significant reductions in the levels of both Sp1 protein and Sp1 mRNA were observed in both cell lines. Also, expression of negative regulators related to the cell cycle (such as p53, p21, and p27) was increased and of the positive regulator cyclin D1 was decreased, indicating that the plasma treatment led to apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. In addition, the sizes and quantities of colony formation were significantly suppressed even though two cancer promoters, such as TPA and epidermal growth factor, accompanied the plasma treatment. Thus, plasma treatment inhibited cell viability and colony formation by suppressing Sp1, which induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in these two human colorectal cancer cell lines.

  2. Highly efficient elimination of colorectal tumor-initiating cells by an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody engaging human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Herrmann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available With their resistance to genotoxic and anti-proliferative drugs and potential to grow tumors and metastases from very few cells, cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells (TICs are a severe limitation for the treatment of cancer by conventional therapies. Here, we explored whether human T cells that are redirected via an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody called MT110 can lyse colorectal TICs and prevent tumor growth from TICs. MT110 recognizes EpCAM, a cell adhesion molecule expressed on TICs from diverse human carcinoma, which was recently shown to promote tumor growth through engagement of elements of the wnt pathway. MT110 was highly potent in mediating complete redirected lysis of KRAS-, PI3 kinase- and BRAF-mutated colorectal TICs, as demonstrated in a soft agar assay. In immunodeficient mice, MT110 prevented growth of tumors from a 5,000-fold excess of a minimally tumorigenic TIC dose. T cells engaged by MT110 may provide a potent therapeutic means to eradicate TICs and bulk tumor cells derived thereof.

  3. One to 2-year surveillance intervals reduce risk of colorectal cancer in families with Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, Hans F. A.; Abdirahman, Mohamed; Brohet, Richard; Langers, Alexandra M. J.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; van Kouwen, Mariette; Koornstra, Jan Jacob; Boot, Henk; Cats, Annemieke; Dekker, Evelien; Sanduleanu, Silvia; Poley, Jan-Werner; Hardwick, James C. H.; de Vos tot Nederveen Cappel, Wouter H.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Tan, T. Gie; Jacobs, Maarten A. J. M.; Mohamed, Faig Lall A.; de Boer, Sijbrand Y.; van de Meeberg, Paul C.; Verhulst, Marie-Louise; Salemans, Jan M.; van Bentem, Nico; Westerveld, B. Dik; Vecht, Juda; Nagengast, Fokko M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Two percent to 4% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) are associated with Lynch syndrome. Dominant clustering of CRC (non-Lynch syndrome) accounts for 1%-3% of the cases. Because carcinogenesis is accelerated in Lynch syndrome, an intensive colonoscopic surveillance program

  4. DNA methyltransferase and alcohol dehydrogenase: gene-nutrient interactions in relation to risk of colorectal polyps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, A.Y.; Poole, E.M.; Bigler, J.; Whitton, J.; Potter, J.D.; Ulrich, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in DNA methylation are a characteristic of colorectal carcinogenesis. Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is essential for providing one-carbon groups for DNA methylation via DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Alcohol, a folate antagonist, could adversely affect one-carbon metabolism. In

  5. Red and Processed Meat and Colorectal Cancer Incidence: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, D.S.M.; Lau, R.; Aune, D.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The evidence that red and processed meat influences colorectal carcinogenesis was judged convincing in the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research report. Since then, ten prospective studies have published new results. Here we update the evidence from

  6. Red and processed meat and colorectal cancer incidence: meta-analysis of prospective studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, D.S.; Lau, R.; Aune, D.; Vieira, R.; Greenwood, D.C.; Kampman, E.; Norat, T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The evidence that red and processed meat influences colorectal carcinogenesis was judged convincing in the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research report. Since then, ten prospective studies have published new results. Here we update the evidence from

  7. COX-2 inhibition as a tool to treat and prevent colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuynman, J. B.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Richel, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    The cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme has a fundamental role in the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. The anticarcinogenic mechanisms of NSAIDs are not completely understood and appear to be only partially dependent on inhibition tumoral COX-2. Moreover, the mechanisms of NSAIDs depend on the

  8. Prognostic significance of COX-2 and β-catenin in colorectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani Kazem

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Both β-catenin and COX-2 expression may play an important role in the evolution of colon carcinogenesis. Increased expression of both could be used as a marker of tumor progression and poor prognosis. This might be of therapeutic value for allocating patients with colorectal carcinoma to different treatment modalities.

  9. Differential expression of the CCN family member WISP-1, WISP-2 and WISP-3 in human colorectal cancer and the prognostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Simon R; Davies, Mansel Leigh; Sanders, Andrew; Parr, Chris; Torkington, Jared; Jiang, Wen G

    2010-05-01

    The WISPs (Wnt-inducted secreted proteins, WISP-1, WISP-2 and WISP-3) are part of the CCN family. These molecules are known to play a diverse role in cells but their role in cancer cells remains controversial. We analysed the expression of the three WISP molecules at the mRNA and protein levels in a cohort of 94 human colorectal tumours and 80 normal colorectal tissues and correlated the results with the pathological features and clinical outcome of the patients. WISP-1 transcripts were found at higher levels in the tumour samples than in the normal tissue (p=0.0015); higher in patients with Dukes stage B and C compared to Dukes A (p=0.017 and p=0.024, respectively); higher in patients with moderately and poorly differentiated cancers compared to the well differentiated cancers (p=0.020 and p=0.076, respectively and p=0.0035 when combined); higher in node positive tumours compared with the node negative (p=0.11) and in the patients with higher TNM staging (TNM 2, 3 and 4 compared to TNM 1 p=0.037). WISP-2 showed the opposite pattern with lower levels of expression in cancer cells compared to normal (p=0.082). Although no significant differences were found within the cancer group when indices of a more aggressive tumour were compared to the normal tissue a significant reduction in expression was found (Dukes C p=0.044, poorly differentiated p=0.019, TNM 3 p=0.020 and node positive disease p=0.048). WISP-3 transcript levels showed no significant differences between groups. WISPs may play important but contrasting roles in colorectal cancer with WISP-1 appearing to act as a factor stimulating aggressiveness, WISP-2 as a tumour suppressor and WISP-3 having no definable beneficial or detrimental role.

  10. Metformin inhibits 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced breast carcinogenesis and adduct formation in human breast cells by inhibiting the cytochrome P4501A1/aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maayah, Zaid H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ghebeh, Hazem [Stem Cell & Tissue Re-Engineering, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia); Alhaider, Abdulqader A. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Camel Biomedical Research Unit, College of Pharmacy and Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); El-Kadi, Ayman O.S. [Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Korashy, Hesham M., E-mail: hkorashy@ksu.edu.sa [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-04-15

    Recent studies have established that metformin (MET), an oral anti-diabetic drug, possesses antioxidant activity and is effective against different types of cancer in several carcinogen-induced animal models and cell lines. However, whether MET can protect against breast cancer has not been reported before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential chemopreventive effect of MET in non-cancerous human breast MCF10A cells and explore the underlying mechanism involved, specifically the role of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1)/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. Transformation of the MCF10A cells into initiated breast cancer cells with DNA adduct formation was conducted using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), an AhR ligand. The chemopreventive effect of MET against DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was evidenced by the capability of MET to restore the induction of the mRNA levels of basic excision repair genes, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1), and the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Interestingly, the inhibition of DMBA-induced DNA adduct formation was associated with proportional decrease in CYP1A1 and in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene expression. Mechanistically, the involvements of AhR and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the MET-mediated inhibition of DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and NQO1 gene expression were evidenced by the ability of MET to inhibit DMBA-induced xenobiotic responsive element and antioxidant responsive element luciferase reporter gene expression which suggests an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent transcriptional control. However, the inability of MET to bind to AhR suggests that MET is not an AhR ligand. In conclusion, the present work shows a strong evidence that MET inhibits the DMBA-mediated carcinogenicity and adduct formation by inhibiting the expression of CYP1A1 through an AhR ligand-independent mechanism

  11. Protein expression analysis of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Yumiko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC development. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in protein expression between CRC and the surrounding nontumorous colonic tissues in the mice that received azoxymethane (AOM and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS using a proteomic analysis. Materials and Methods: Male ICR mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight, followed by 2% (w/v DSS in their drinking water for seven days, starting one week after the AOM injection. Colonic adenocarcinoma developed after 20 weeks and a proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultraflex TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was conducted in the cancerous and nontumorous tissue specimens. Results: The proteomic analysis revealed 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues in comparison to the nontumorous tissues. There were five markedly increased proteins (beta-tropomyosin, tropomyosin 1 alpha isoform b, S100 calcium binding protein A9, and an unknown protein and 16 markedly decreased proteins (Car1 proteins, selenium-binding protein 1, HMG-CoA synthase, thioredoxin 1, 1 Cys peroxiredoxin protein 2, Fcgbp protein, Cytochrome c oxidase, subunit Va, ETHE1 protein, and 7 unknown proteins. Conclusions: There were 21 differentially expressed proteins in the cancerous tissues of the mice that received AOM and DSS. Their functions include metabolism, the antioxidant system, oxidative stress, mucin production, and inflammation. These findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of inflammation-related colon carcinogenesis and the establishment of novel therapies and preventative strategies to treat carcinogenesis in the inflamed colon.

  12. Recent progress in nickel carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Positive bacterial mutagenesis tests have been obtained with Ni(II) in Corynybacterium, but not in E. coli, S. typhimurium, or B. subtilis. Transformation assays of several soluble and crystalline Ni compounds have been positive in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Ni(II) binds to DNA, RNA, and nucleoproteins, and becomes localized in nucleoli. Genotoxic effects of Ni include: (a) chromosomal aberrations, including sister-chromatid exchanges, (b) DNA strandbreaks and DNA-protein crosslinks, (c) inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis, (d) infidelity of DNA transcription, and (e) mutations at the HGPRTase locus in Chinese hamster cells and the TK locus in mouse lymphoma cells. These findings are consistent with somatic mutation as the mechanism for initiation of nickel carcinogenesis. Ni compounds cause reversible transition of double-stranded poly(dG-dC) DNA from the right-handed B-helix to the left-handed Z-helix, suggesting a mechanism whereby nickel might modulate oncogene expression. 99 references, 4 tables.

  13. Exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis and autotaxin expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kadekar

    Full Text Available Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA. The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development.

  14. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  15. Synergistic chemopreventive effects of nobiletin and atorvastatin on colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Qiu, Peiju; Rakariyatham, Kanyasiri; Li, Fang; Gao, Zili; Cai, Xiaokun; Wang, Minqi; Xu, Fei; Zheng, Jinkai; Xiao, Hang

    2017-04-01

    Different cancer chemopreventive agents may act synergistically and their combination may produce enhanced protective effects against carcinogenesis than each individual agent alone. Herein, we investigated the chemopreventive effects of nobiletin (NBT, a citrus polymethoxyflavone) and atorvastatin (ATST, a lipid-lowering drug) in colon cancer cells/macrophages and an azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis rat model. The results demonstrated that co-treatments of NBT/ATST produced enhanced growth inhibitory and anti-inflammatory effects on the colon cancer cells and macrophages, respectively. Isobologram analysis confirmed that these interactions between NBT and ATST were synergistic. NBT/ATST co-treatment also synergistically induced extensive cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Oral administration of NBT (0.1%, w/w in diet) or ATST (0.04%, w/w in diet) significantly decreased colonic tumor incidence and multiplicity in AOM-treated rats. Most importantly, co-treatment of NBT/ATST at their half doses (0.05% NBT + 0.02% ATST, w/w in diet) resulted in even stronger inhibitory effects on colonic tumor incidence and multiplicity than did NBT or ATST alone at higher doses. Statistical analysis confirmed that the enhanced chemopreventive activities against colon carcinogenesis in rats by the NBT/ATST combination were highly synergistic. Our results further demonstrated that NBT/ATST co-treatment profoundly modulated key cellular signaling regulators associated with inflammation, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis in the colon of AOM-treated rats. In conclusion, for the first time, our results demonstrated a strong synergy in inhibiting colon carcinogenesis produced by the co-treatment of NBT and ATST, which provided a scientific basis for using NBT in combination with ATST for colon cancer chemoprevention in humans. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  16. The role of cyclooxygenase in n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid mediated effects on cell proliferation, PGE2 synthesis and cytotoxicity in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommels, Y.E.M.; Haring, M.M.G.; Keestra, N.G.M.; Alink, G.M.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Ommen, B. van

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the role of the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) and its prostaglandin product PGE2 in n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-mediated effects on cellular proliferation of two human colorectal carcinoma cell lines. The long chain PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid

  17. Antiproliferative and apoptosis inducing effects of citral via p53 and ROS-induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in human colorectal HCT116 and HT29 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Bassem Y; Sarker, Md Moklesur Rahman; Kamarudin, Muhamad Noor Alfarizal; Mohan, Gokula

    2017-12-01

    Despite various anticancer reports, antiproliferative and apoptosis inducing activity of citral in HCT116 and HT29 cells have never been reported. This study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing effects of citral in colorectal cancer cell lines. The citral-treated cells were subjected to MTT assay followed by flow cytometric Annexin V-FITC/PI, mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) determination. The apoptotic proteins expression was investigated by Western blot analysis. Citral inhibited the growth of HCT116 and HT29 cells by dose- and time-dependent manner without inducing cytotoxicity in CCD841-CoN normal colon cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that citral (50-200μM; 24-48h) induced the externalization of phoshpotidylserine and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential in HCT116 and HT29 cells. Citral elevated intracellular ROS level while attenuating GSH levels in HCT116 and HT29 cells which were reversed with N-acetycysteine (2mM) pre-treatment indicating that citral induced mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis via augmentation of intracellular ROS. Citral induced the phosphorylation of p53 protein and the expression of Bax while decreasing Bc-2 and Bcl-xL expression which promoted the cleavage of caspase-3. Collectively, our data suggest that citral induced p53 and ROS-mediated mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in human colorectal cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Downregulated Ku70 and ATM associated to poor prognosis in colorectal cancer among Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuanfang Lu,1,2 Jingyan Gao,1,3 Yuanming Lu,1 1Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Guilin Medical University, Guangxi, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Clinical Research Center, Affiliated 2nd Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Human Anatomy and Histo-Embryology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Background: Double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs are a key factor in carcinogenesis. The necessary repair of DSBs is pivotal in maintaining normal cell division. To address the relationship between altered expression of DSB repair of proteins Ku70 and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM in colorectal cancer (CRC, we examined the expression levels and patterns of Ku70 and ATM in CRC samples. Methods: Expression and coexpression of Ku70 and ATM were investigated by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays and confirmed further with fluorescent immunohistochemistry in CRC and pericancerous samples from 112 Chinese patients. Results: Downexpression patterns for both Ku70 and ATM were found in the CRC samples and were significantly associated with advanced tumor node metastasis stage and decreased 5-year overall survival rate. Conclusion: Downregulated Ku70 and ATM were associated with poor disease-free survival. Loss of Ku70 and ATM expression might act as a biomarker to predict poor prognosis in patients with CRC. Keywords: DNA double-strand breaks, ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, Ku70, colorectal cancer

  19. Potential of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics for management of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Maya; Ambalam, Padma; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Pithva, Sheetal; Kothari, Charmy; Patel, Arti T; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Dave, J M; Vyas, B R M

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and is the fourth most common malignant neoplasm in USA. Escaping apoptosis and cell mutation are the prime hallmarks of cancer. It is apparent that balancing the network between DNA damage and DNA repair is critical in preventing carcinogenesis. One-third of cancers might be prevented by nutritious healthy diet, maintaining healthy weight and physical activity. In this review, an attempt is made to abridge the role of carcinogen in colorectal cancer establishment and prognosis, where special attention has been paid to food-borne mutagens and functional role of beneficial human gut microbiome in evading cancer. Further the significance of tailor-made prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics in cancer management by bio-antimutagenic and desmutagenic activity has been elaborated. Probiotic bacteria are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a healthy benefit on the host. Prebiotics are a selectively fermentable non-digestible oligosaccharide or ingredient that brings specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity of the gastrointestinal microflora, conferring health benefits. Synbiotics are a combination of probiotic bacteria and the growth promoting prebiotic ingredients that purport "synergism."

  20. Expression of the phosphorylated MEK5 protein is associated with TNM staging of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Bang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of MEK5 in many cancers is associated with carcinogenesis through aberrant cell proliferation. In this study, we determined the level of phosphorylated MEK5 (pMEK5 expression in human colorectal cancer (CRC tissues and correlated it with clinicopathologic data. Methods pMEK5 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA containing 335 clinicopathologic characterized CRC cases and 80 cases of nontumor colorectal tissues. pMEK5 expression of 19 cases of primary CRC lesions and paired with normal mucosa was examined by Western blotting. The relationship between pMEK5 expression in CRC and clinicopathologic parameters, and the association of pMEK5 expression with CRC survival were analyzed respectively. Results pMEK5 expression was significantly higher in CRC tissues (185 out of 335, 55.2% than in normal tissues (6 out of 80, 7.5%; P P = 0.001, lymph node metastasis (P P P P P = 0.002 and 5-year overall survival rate (P P = 0.139; OS: P = 0.071. Conclusions pMEK5 expression is correlated with the staging of CRC and its expression might be helpful to the TNM staging system of CRC.

  1. Anticancer activity of calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb. through downregulation of cyclin D1 via inducing proteasomal degradation and transcriptional inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su Bin; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Son, Ho-Jun; Um, Yurry; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2017-09-05

    Although it has been reported to contain high polyphenols, the pharmacological studies of the calyx of Diospyros kaki Thunb (DKC) have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we elucidated anti-cancer activity and potential molecular mechanism of DKC against human colorectal cancer cells. Anti-cell proliferative effect of 70% ethanol extracts from the calyx of Diospyros kaki (DKC-E70) was evaluated by MTT assay. The effect of DKC-E70 on the expression of cyclin D1 in the protein and mRNA level was evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. DKC-E70 suppressed the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480, LoVo and HT-29. Although DKC-E70 decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level, decreased level of cyclin D1 protein by DKC-E70 occurred at the earlier time than that of cyclin D1 mRNA, which indicates that DKC-E70-mediated downregulation of cyclin D1 protein may be a consequence of the induction of degradation and transcriptional inhibition of cyclin D1. In cyclin D1 degradation, we found that cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70 was attenuated in presence of MG132. In addition, DKC-E70 phosphorylated threonine-286 (T286) of cyclin D1 and T286A abolished cyclin D1 downregulation by DKC-E70. We also observed that DKC-E70-mediated T286 phosphorylation and subsequent cyclin D1 degradation was blocked in presence of the inhibitors of ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β. In cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition, DKC-E70 inhibited the expression of β-catenin and TCF4, and β-catenin/TCF-dependent luciferase activity. Our results suggest that DKC-E70 may downregulate cyclin D1 as one of the potential anti-cancer targets through cyclin D1 degradation by T286 phosphorylation dependent on ERK1/2, p38 or GSK3β, and cyclin D1 transcriptional inhibition through Wnt signaling. From these findings, DKC-E70 has potential to be a candidate for the development of chemoprevention or therapeutic agents for human colorectal cancer.

  2. Role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in Indian men and is the leading cause of cancer deaths. It is considered as a multistep and multifactorial disease. Besides accumulation of genetic mutations, numerous other carcinogens are involved. In this category, viral and chemical carcinogens are well studied and documented. However, in the oral cavity, the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites, and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies, but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways, and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. This review presents possible carcinogenesis pathway involved in bacterial carcinogenesis, commonly implicated bacteria in oral carcinogenesis, and their role in cancer therapeutics as well.

  3. Sensing Bacterial-Induced DNA Damaging EffectsviaNatural Killer Group 2 Member D Immune Receptor: From Dysbiosis to Autoimmunity and Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, J Luis; Minami, Mika

    2018-01-01

    The human genome is constantly exposed to exogenous and endogenous DNA damaging factors that frequently cause DNA damages. Unless repaired, damaged DNA can result in deleterious mutations capable of causing malignant transformation. Accordingly, cells have developed an advanced and effective surveillance system, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, which maintains genetic integrity. In addition to well-defined outcomes, such as cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence, another consequence of DDR activation is the induction of natural killer group 2 member D ligands (NKG2D-Ls) on the surface of stressed cells. Consequently, NKG2D-Ls-expressing cells are recognized and eliminated by NKG2D receptor-expressing immune cells, including NK cells, and various subsets of T-cells. Recent pieces of evidence indicate that commensal microbial imbalance (known as dysbiosis) can trigger DDR activation in host cells, which may result in sustained inflammatory responses. Therefore, dysbiosis can be seen as an important source of DNA damage agents that may be partially responsible for the overexpression of NKG2D-Ls on intestinal epithelial cells that is frequently observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and other disorders associated with altered human microbiota, including the development of colorectal cancer. In this article, we discuss recent evidence that appears to link an altered human microbiota with autoimmunity and carcinogenesis via the activation of DDR signals and the induction of NKG2D-Ls in stressed cells.

  4. Metals distribution in colorectal biopsies: New insight on the elemental fingerprint of tumour tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Leslie; Barabino, Gabriele; Klein, Jean-Philippe; Bitounis, Dimitrios; Pourchez, Jérémie; Forest, Valérie; Boudard, Delphine; Leclerc, Lara; Sarry, Gwendoline; Roblin, Xavier; Cottier, Michèle; Phelip, Jean-Marc

    2015-07-01

    Some studies have linked colorectal cancer to metal exposure. Our objective was to evaluate the element distribution in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies, adjacent non-tumour tissues, and healthy controls. The study is a case-control study which compared the element distribution in colon biopsies from two groups of patients: with colorectal cancer (2 types of samples: colorectal cancer biopsies and adjacent non-tumour tissues) and healthy controls. Fifteen metal concentrations (Aluminium, Boron, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Nickel, Lead, Selenium, Silicon, Titanium, Vanadium, and Zinc) were quantified by using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. 104 patients were included: 76 in the colorectal cancer group, 28 in the healthy control group. Among the 15 elements analyzed, only boron, chromium, zinc, silicon and magnesium were found at clearly detectable concentrations. Colorectal tumour biopsies had significantly higher concentrations of magnesium as compared to adjacent non-tumour or healthy tissues. Zinc concentration followed the same trend but differences were not statistically significant. In addition, concentration of silicon was higher in colorectal cancer tissue than in healthy non-cancer tissue, while chromium was mostly found in adjacent non-tumour tissue. Magnesium, chromium, zinc and silicon were found in noteworthy concentrations in colorectal tumour. Their potential role in colorectal carcinogenesis should be explored. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Paracrine Regulation of Prostatic Carcinogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayward, Simon

    2003-01-01

    .... The objective of the proposed research is to establish immortalized stromal cell lines derived from normal human prostate and from human prostate cancer and to use these cells to investigate the role...

  6. Telomerase abrogation dramatically accelerates TRF2-induced epithelial carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Raquel; Muñoz, Purificación; Flores, Juana M.; Klatt, Peter; Blasco, María A.

    2007-01-01

    TRF2 is a telomere-binding protein with roles in telomere protection and telomere-length regulation. The fact that TRF2 is up-regulated in some human tumors suggests a role of TRF2 in cancer. Mice that overexpress TRF2 in the skin, K5TRF2 mice, show critically short telomeres and are susceptible to UV-induced carcinogenesis as a result of deregulated XPF/ERCC1 activity, a nuclease involved in UV damage repair. Here we demonstrate that, when in combination with telomerase deficiency, TRF2 acts...

  7. Anticancer Effect of Lycopene in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2015-06-01

    Gastric cancer ranks as the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Risk factors of gastric carcinogenesis include oxidative stress, DNA damage, Helicobacter pylori infection, bad eating habits, and smoking. Since oxidative stress is related to DNA damage, smoking, and H. pylori infection, scavenging of reactive oxygen species may be beneficial for prevention of gastric carcinogenesis. Lycopene, one of the naturally occurring carotenoids, has unique structural and chemical features that contributes to a potent antioxidant activity. It shows a potential anticancer activity and reduces gastric cancer incidence. This review will summarize anticancer effect and mechanism of lycopene on gastric carcinogenesis based on the recent experimental and clinical studies.

  8. Understanding Carcinogenesis for Fighting Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Tanaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are able to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will give us important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, assessing cancer risk, and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from research using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as interventions with molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy.

  9. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer: Age Family history of colorectal cancer Personal history Inherited risk Alcohol Cigarette smoking Obesity The following protective factors decrease the risk of colorectal cancer: Physical activity Aspirin Combination hormone replacement therapy Polyp removal It is ...

  10. Allele-specific gene expression in carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Krivtsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent large-scale genomic studies established the occurrence of multiple DNA sequence variants in genomes of healthy individuals that differ from the reference sequence. Among these variants mostly represented by germline single nucleotide polymorphisms disease-related alleles are detected including alleles which are associated with monogenic disorders, and putative deleterious genetic variants. Apart from functional significance of a particular variant and of a gene harboring it, the penetrance of these allelic variants depends on their expression level and can be determined by preferential expression of a particular allele, or allele-specific expression. It is estimated that 20–30 % of genes present in the human genome display allelic bias in a tissue-specific manner. Allele-specific expression is defined by a range of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms including cis-regulatory polymorphisms, allele-specific binding of transcription factors, allele-specific DNA methylation and regulation through non-coding RNA.Although the data on the issue are scarce, allele-specific expression has been reported to be implicated in several hereditary disorders including benign and malignant tumors of the large intestine. Recent studies that estimate allele-specific expression incidence in tumors and identify wide range of genes displaying allelic imbalance indicate that allele-specific expression might play a significant role in carcinogenesis. Eventually, estimation of transcriptional rate of allelic variants which cause dysfunction of oncogenes and tumor suppressors may prove to be essential for rational choice of antitumor therapeutic strategy. In this review, we outline the main concepts and mechanisms of allele-specific expression and the data on allelic imbalance in tumors.

  11. Implications of tyrosine phosphoproteomics in cervical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFord James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide cervical cancer remains a leading cause of mortality from gynecologic malignancies. The link between cervical cancer and persistent infection with HPV has been established. At a molecular level little is known about the transition from the precancerous state to invasive cancer. To elucidate this process, cervical biopsies from human specimens were obtained from precancerous state to stage III disease. Methods Cervical biopsies were obtained from patients with a diagnosis of cervical cancer undergoing definitive surgery or staging operation. Biopsies were obtained from patients with precancerous lesions at the time of their excisional procedure. Control samples were obtained from patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions such as fibroids. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using two dimensional gel electrophoresis with subsequent trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-TOF protein identification. Candidate proteins were then further studied using western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry. Results Annexin A1 and DNA-PKcs were found to be differentially expressed. Phosphorylated annexin A1 was up regulated in diseased states in comparison to control and its level was strongly detected in the serum of cervical cancer patients compared to controls. DNA-PKcs was noted to be hyperphosphorylated and fragmented in cancer when compared to controls. By immunohistochemistry annexin A1 was noted in the vascular environment in cancer and certain precancerous samples. Conclusion This study suggests a probable role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cervical carcinogenesis. Annexin A1 and DNA-PK cs may have synergistic effects with HPV infection. Precancerous lesions that may progress to cervical cancer may be differentiated from lesions that will not base on similar immunohistochemical profile to invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Bergenin suppresses the growth of colorectal cancer cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate anticancer effects of bergenin on human colorectal cancer cell lines. Methods: Human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HCT116 was treated with various concentrations of bergenin for 24 and 48 h. Cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were analyzed ...

  13. Oxidative stress triggered by naturally occurring flavone apigenin results in senescence and chemotherapeutic effect in human colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacoli Banerjee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies involving phytochemical polyphenolic compounds have suggested flavones often exert pro-oxidative effect in vitro against wide array of cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro pro-oxidative activity of apigenin, a plant based flavone against colorectal cancer cell lines and investigate cumulative effect on long term exposure. In the present study, treatment of colorectal cell lines HT-29 and HCT-15 with apigenin resulted in anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects characterized by biochemical and morphological changes, including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential which aided in reversing the impaired apoptotic machinery leading to negative implications in cancer pathogenesis. Apigenin induces rapid free radical species production and the level of oxidative damage was assessed by qualitative and quantitative estimation of biochemical markers of oxidative stress. Increased level of mitochondrial superoxide suggested dose dependent mitochondrial oxidative damage which was generated by disruption in anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic protein balance. Continuous and persistent oxidative stress induced by apigenin at growth suppressive doses over extended treatment time period was observed to induce senescence which is a natural cellular mechanism to attenuate tumor formation. Senescence phenotype inducted by apigenin was attributed to changes in key molecules involved in p16-Rb and p53 independent p21 signaling pathways. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma was inhibited and significant up-regulation of p21 led to simultaneous suppression of cyclins D1 and E which indicated the onset of senescence. Pro-oxidative stress induced premature senescence mediated by apigenin makes this treatment regimen a potential chemopreventive strategy and an in vitro model for aging research.

  14. The protective role of Lychnophora ericoides Mart. (Brazilian arnica) in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Cleverson Rodrigues; Turatti, Aline; Gouvea, Dayana Rubio; Gobbo-Neto, Leonardo; Diniz, Andrea; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Garcia, Sérgio Britto

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and colon rectal mucosal epithelial cell proliferation have been shown to be increased in patients with colon cancer and have been largely used for early detection of factors that influence colorectal carcinogenesis in rats. Fifty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups. The groups G1 to G4 were given 4 injections of the carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). The G2 group received Lychnophora ericoides (LE) extracts for 6 wk. The groups G3 and G4 received LE for 4 wk and 2 wk, respectively, at the postinitiation and initiation phases of colonic carcinogenesis. The group G5 was the control. Forty-two days after the first injections of DMH for the neoplasic induction, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and an attenuation of the increase in cell proliferation induced by DMH in all the LE-treated groups. Thus, we concluded that Lychnophora ericoides extracts were effective against the development of cancer. These data suggest that LE has a protective influence on the process of colon carcinogenesis, suppressing both the initiation and the promotion of colonic carcinogenesis.

  15. Clinicopathologic study of intestinal spirochetosis in Japan with special reference to human immunodeficiency virus infection status and species types: analysis of 5265 consecutive colorectal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Yoko; Takahashi, Masae; Horiguchi, Shin-ichiro; Funata, Nobuaki; Koizumi, Koichi; Okudela, Koji; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Ohashi, Kenichi

    2015-01-13

    Previous studies reported that the incidence of intestinal spirochetosis was high in homosexual men, especially those with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection. The aim of the present study was to clarify the clinicopathological features of intestinal spirochetosis in Japan with special reference to Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection status and species types. A pathology database search for intestinal spirochetosis was performed at Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Disease Center Komagome Hospital between January 2008 and October 2011, and included 5265 consecutive colorectal biopsies from 4254 patients. After patient identification, a retrospective review of endoscopic records and clinical information was performed. All pathology slides were reviewed by two pathologists. The length of the spirochetes was measured using a digital microscope. Causative species were identified by polymerase chain reaction. Intestinal spirochetosis was diagnosed in 3 out of 55 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive patients (5.5%). The mean length of intestinal spirochetes was 8.5 μm (range 7-11). Brachyspira pilosicoli was detected by polymerase chain reaction in all 3 patients. Intestinal spirochetosis was also diagnosed in 73 out of 4199 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients (1.7%). The mean length of intestinal spirochetes was 3.5 μm (range 2-8). The species of intestinal spirochetosis was identified by polymerase chain reaction in 31 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients. Brachyspira aalborgi was detected in 24 cases (78%) and Brachyspira pilosicoli in 6 cases (19%). Both Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira pilosicoli were detected in only one Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patient (3%). The mean length of Brachyspira aalborgi was 3.8 μm, while that of Brachyspira pilosicoli was 5.5 μm. The length of Brachyspira pilosicoli was significantly longer than that of Brachyspira aalborgi (p < 0.01). The lengths of intestinal spirochetes were

  16. Potent suppression of both spontaneous and carcinogen-induced colitis-associated colorectal cancer in mice by dietary celastrol supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Emily C; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Yoon, Ji Hee; Tochtrop, Gregory P; Letterio, John J; Choi, Sung Hee

    2018-01-12

    Celastrol is an anti-inflammatory natural triterpenoid, isolated from the herb Tripterygium wilfordii or thunder god vine. Here, we define mechanisms mediating anti-inflammatory activity of celastrol and demonstrate efficacy of a dietary celastrol supplement for chemoprevention of inflammation-driven carcinogenesis in mice. Dietary celastrol (31.25 ppm in rodent diet from 8 weeks to 25 weeks of age) is well tolerated and protects against LPS-induced acute inflammation in C57BL/6 mice, potently suppressing LPS-induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β. To test whether dietary celastrol suppresses inflammation-driven colorectal cancer (CRC), we employed a unique model of spontaneous, inflammation-driven CRC in mice harboring a germ line deletion of the p27Kip1 gene and a T cell-specific deletion of Smad4 gene (Smad4co/co;Lck-crep27Kip1-/-or DKO), which develop severe intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis as early as 3 months of age. Exposure of DKO mice to daily dietary celastrol (12.5 ppm in diet) from 6 weeks of age significantly suppressed development of colitis-associated CRC (CAC). Celastrol chemoprevention of CAC in this new model of intestinal neoplasia was associated with significant suppression of iNOS at 4 months of age, and iNOS, COX-2 and NFκB at 6 months of age, with significant reduction in inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-1β. Chemoprevetion of CAC by dietary celastrol was further confirmed in the model of azoxymethane (AOM) plus dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice. These data suggest the potential for celastrol as a safe and effective dietary supplement in the chemoprevention of CAC in humans. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. RAGE mediates S100A4-induced cell motility via MAPK/ERK and hypoxia signaling and is a prognostic biomarker for human colorectal cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlmann, Mathias; Okhrimenko, Anna; Marcinkowski, Patrick; Osterland, Marc; Herrmann, Pia; Smith, Janice; Heizmann, Claus W.; Schlag, Peter M.; Stein, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Survival of colorectal cancer patients is strongly dependent on development of distant metastases. S100A4 is a prognostic biomarker and inducer for colorectal cancer metastasis. Besides exerting intracellular functions, S100A4 is secreted extracellularly. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is one of its interaction partners. The impact of the S100A4-RAGE interaction for cell motility and metastasis formation in colorectal cancer has not been elucidated so far. Here we demonstrate the RAGE-dependent increase in migratory and invasive capabilities of colorectal cancer cells via binding to extracellular S100A4. We show the direct interaction of S100A4 and RAGE, leading to hyperactivated MAPK/ERK and hypoxia signaling. The S100A4-RAGE axis increased cell migration (PRAGE and RAGE-specific antibodies. In colorectal cancer patients, not distantly metastasized at surgery, high RAGE expression in primary tumors correlated with metachronous metastasis, reduced overall (P=0.022) and metastasis-free survival (P=0.021). In summary, interaction of S100A4-RAGE mediates S100A4-induced colorectal cancer cell motility. RAGE by itself represents a biomarker for prognosis of colorectal cancer. Thus, therapeutic approaches targeting RAGE or intervening in S100A4-RAGE-dependent signaling early in tumor progression might represent alternative strategies restricting S100A4-induced colorectal cancer metastasis. PMID:24952599

  18. [Burden of colorectal cancer in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Jufang; Huang, Huiyao; Ren, Jiansong; Li, Ni; Dai, Min

    2015-07-01

    To understand the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in China. The data from GLOBOCAN 2012, Chinese Cancer Registry Annual Report 2012, Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5), the Three National Death Cause Surveys in China and WHO Mortality Database were used to learn about the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer and related trends in China. It was estimated by GLOBOCAN 2012 that in 2012 the age-standardized incidence of colorectal cancer in China was 16.9 per 100 000 in males and 11.6 per 100 000 in females, and the age-standardized mortality was 9.0 per 100 000 in males and 6.1 per 100 000 in females. GLOBOCAN 2012 estimated that colorectal cancer incidence and mortality would increase with the level of human development index. China's human development level was high, suggesting that the burden of colorectal cancer would be more serious in China with the development of social economy. The data from CI5 Volume IV and GLOBOCAN 2012 indicated that the incidence of colorectal cancer began to increase obviously at age of 50 years in China. Chinese Cancer Registry Annual Report 2012 showed that the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in urban population were two times higher than those in rural population in 2009, the proportions of colon cancer among colorectal and anus cancers, which was 49.0% in males and 54.2% in females, 53.4% in urban population and 41.7% in rural population. CI5 Volumes IV-X showed that colon cancer and rectum and anus cancer incidence in Shanghai for both males and females were increasing during the period 1973-2007. The percentage change in colon cancer and rectum and anus cancer incidence between 1973-1977 and 2003-2007 increased by 138.8% and 31.1% in males, 146.7% and 49.1% in females, respectively. The data from the Three National Death Cause Surveys showed that the crude mortality of colorectal cancer increased by 77.9% form mid 1970's (1973-1975) to mid 2000's (2004-2005). WHO Mortality Database showed

  19. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer.

  20. Bisphenol A as epigenetic modulator: setting the stage for carcinogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luciana L; Couto, Renata; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most widely produced chemicals worldwide and is often used in the production of food and beverage containers. As a result of BPA contact with food, drink and toiletries, its ingestion and absorption by humans has been growing. The industrialization and modern lifestyles brought a constant exposure to several health-disturbing compounds and ushered a new era of chronic diseases. The endocrine disruptor potential of BPA is well known, but the research around its epigenotoxic effects raised further concerns whether chronic exposure to BPA can contribute to chronic human illness, including cancer in hormone-sensitive organs. Focusing on computerized databases, we reviewed original and review articles which elucidate and link some of the information already available about BPA and related epigenetic alterations. A number of studies indicate that short-term administration of low or high-doses of BPA may be associated with an increased risk of epigenetic modifications, increasing the risk for carcinogenesis. However, it is clear that more studies considering real daily exposures are essential to define a real tolerable daily intake and to tighten up manufactory regulations. In this review, we highlight some evidences suggesting a relationship between BPA exposure, genotoxic activity and epigenetic modifications, which may prime for carcinogenesis. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  1. Influence of chronic low-dose/dose-rate high-LET irradiation from radium-226 in a human colorectal carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nguyen T K; Sokeechand, Bibi S H; Seymour, Colin B; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate potential damages of chronic environmentally relevant low-dose/dose-rate high-LET irradiation from a naturally occurring alpha-emitting radionuclide (radium-226, (226)Ra) on a human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 p53(+/+) cell line. Clonogenic survival assays and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) measurement with a sensitive fluorescent MMP probe JC-1 were performed in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells chronically exposure to low doses/dose rates of (226)Ra with high-LET. Comparisons were made with the human non-transformed keratinocyte HaCaT cell line and acute low-dose direct low-LET gamma radiation. The chronic low-dose/dose-rate alpha radiation (CLD/DRAR) did not reduce the clonogenic survival of HCT116 p53(+/+) cells over the period of 70 days of exposure. Only one significant reduction in the HCT116 p53(+/+) cells' clonogenic survival was when cells were grown with 10,000mBq/mL (226)Ra for 40 days and progeny cells were clonogenically assessed in the presence of 10,000mBq/mL (226)Ra. The cumulative doses that cells received during this period ranged from 0.05 to 46.2mGy. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dropped initially in both HCT116 p53(+/+) and HaCaT cells in response to CLD/DRAR. The MMP in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells recovered more quickly at all dose points than and that in HaCaT cells until the end of the exposure period. The highest dose rate of 0.66mGy/day depolarized the HaCaT's mitochondria more consistently during the exposure period. The faster recovery status of the MMP in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells than that in HaCaT cells was also observed after exposure to acute low-dose gamma rays. Overall, it was found that CLD/DRAR had little impact on the MMP of human colorectal cancer and keratinocyte cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Aspirin and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancher, Adrien; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Sefrioui, David

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. Aspirin has been identified as a protective factor against the apparition of colorectal cancer. There are several mechanisms about the actions by aspirin on colorectal tumorogenesis. These are not perfectly known nowadays. On one hand, there are direct mechanisms on colorectal mucosa, on the other hand there are indirect mechanisms through platelet functions. Aspirin also plays a role by its anti-inflammatory action and the stimulation of antitumor immunity. Several studies show that long-term treatment with low-doses of aspirin decreases the incidence of adenomas and colorectal cancers. In the United States, aspirin is currently recommended for primary prevention of the risk of colorectal cancer in all patients aged 50 to 59, with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular event greater than 10 %. However, primary prevention with aspirin should not be a substitute for screening in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, aspirin seems to be beneficial when used in post-diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It could actually decrease the risk of metastasis in case of a localized colorectal cancer, and increase the survival in particular, concerning PIK3CA mutated tumors. The association of aspirin with neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer by radiochimiotherapy seems to have beneficial effects. French prospective randomized study is currently being conducted to investigate postoperative aspirin in colorectal cancers with a PIK3CA mutation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Animal Models to Study the Role of Long-Term Hypergastrinemia in Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidar Fossmark

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic hypergastrinemia due to chronic atrophic gastritis or gastrinomas have an increased risk of developing gastric malignancy, and it has been questioned whether also patients with hypergastrinemia caused by long-term use of acid inhibiting drugs are at risk. Gastric carcinogenesis in humans is affected by numerous factors and progresses slowly over years. When using animal models with the possibility of intervention, a complex process can be dissected by studying the role of hypergastrinemia in carcinogenesis within a relatively short period of time. We have reviewed findings from relevant models where gastric changes in animal models of long-term hypergastrinemia have been investigated. In all species where long-term hypergastrinemia has been induced, there is an increased risk of gastric malignancy. There is evidence that hypergastrinemia is a common causative factor in carcinogenesis in the oxyntic mucosa, while other cofactors may vary in the different models.

  4. Potential roles of microRNAs and ROS in colorectal cancer: diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingmei; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Zuo, Li

    2017-01-01

    As one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide, colorectal adenocarcinoma often occurs sporadically in individuals aged 50 or above and there is an increase among younger patients under 50. Routine screenings are recommended for this age group to improve early detection. The multifactorial etiology of colorectal cancer consists of both genetic and epigenetic factors. Recently, studies have shown that the development and progression of colorectal cancer can be attributed to aberrant expression of microRNA. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a key role in cancer cell survival, can also lead to carcinogenesis and cancer exacerbations. Given the rapid accumulating knowledge in the field, an updated review regarding microRNA and ROS in colorectal cancer is necessary. An extensive literature search has been conducted in PubMed/Medline databases to review the roles of microRNAs and ROS in colorectal cancer. Unique microRNA expression in tumor tissue, peripheral blood, and fecal samples from patients with colorectal cancer is outlined. Therapeutic approaches focusing on microRNA and ROS in colorectal cancer treatment is also delineated. This review aims to summarize the newest knowledge on the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer in the hopes of discovering novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic techniques. PMID:28061475

  5. RECENT ADVANCES IN ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS: MODES OF ACTION, ANIMAL MODEL SYSTEMS AND METHYLATED ARSENIC METABOLITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Recent advances in our knowledge of arsenic carcinogenesis include the development of rat or mouse models for all human organs in which inorganic arsenic is known to cause cancer -skin, lung, urinary bladder, liver and kidney. Tumors can be produced from eit...

  6. hTERT promoter activity and CpG methylation in HPV-induced carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilde, J.; Kooter, J.M.; Overmeer, R.M.; Kramer, D.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Steenbergen, R.D.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Activation of telomerase resulting from deregulated hTERT expression is a key event during high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV)-induced cervical carcinogenesis. In the present study we examined hTERT promoter activity and its relation to DNA methylation as one of the potential

  7. Detection of HPV and the role of p16INK4A overexpression as a surrogate marker for the presence of functional HPV oncoprotein E7 in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lardon Filip

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the well-recognized etiological role of human papillomavirus (HPV in cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinogenesis, a potential role of HPV in colorectal carcinogenesis has been suggested. For that reason, the aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of HPV DNA in colorectal carcinomas (CRC and to study overexpression of p16INK4A as a marker for the presence of an active HPV oncoprotein E7. These findings were correlated with clinical and pathological prognostic factors of CRC. Methods The presence of HPV was assessed using a multiplex PCR system of 10 non-biotinylated primers. The amplified fragments of HPV positive samples were further analyzed by a highly sensitive, broad spectrum SPF10 PCR and subsequently genotyped using reverse hybridization in a line probe assay. P16INK4A protein expression was investigated in a subset of 90 (30 HPV positive and 60 HPV negative CRC samples by immunohistochemistry. Results HPV DNA was found in 14.2% of the CRC samples with HPV16 as the most prevalent type. No significant differences in clinical and pathological variables were found between HPV positive and negative CRCs, except for age. HPV positive patients were significantly younger (p = 0.05. There was no significant correlation between the presence of HPV and overexpression of p16INK4A (p = 0.325. Conclusions In conclusion, the presence of oncogenic HPV DNA in a small cohort of CRC samples may suggest that HPV may be involved in the carcinogenesis of some CRC. However, contrary to what has been observed in head and neck squamous cell cancer and cancer of the uterine cervix, p16INK4A does not seem to be a surrogate marker for an active HPV infection in CRC. Therefore, further functional analyses are necessary to elucidate the role of HPV in CRC.

  8. Elephantopus scaber induces apoptosis through ROS-dependent mitochondrial signaling pathway in HCT116 human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chim Kei; Supriady, Hadi; Goh, Bey Hing; Kadir, Habsah Abdul

    2015-06-20

    Elephantopus scaber also known as Elephant's foot (Asteraceae family) has a plethora of traditional applications including dysuria, diarrhea, dysentery, leukemia and cancer. This study aimed to investigate the apoptosis inducing effects of E. scaber and the underlying mechanisms in HCT116 colorectal cell line. The MTT assay was used to determine the IC50 values on cancer cell lines by the ethanol, hexane, ethyl acetate and water fractions. Apoptosis was detected by cell morphologic observation through Hoechst 33342/PI dual staining, phosphatidylserine externalization by Annexin V/PI staining and DNA fragmentation by TUNEL assay. The caspase activity, Bcl-2 family and p53 proteins were determined by flow cytometric analysis. The cleaved PARP protein expression was assessed by western blot analysis The ethanol extract of E. scaber and its fractions significantly inhibited the growth of HCT116 and HT-29 cells and induced apoptosis. The E. scaber ethyl acetate fraction (ESEAF) was the most potent on HCT116 cell line with the IC50 value of 1.42 ± 0.10 µg/mL. The induction of apoptosis was marked by nuclear shrinkage accompanied with chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and phosphatidylserine externalization. The results showed that ESEAF-induced apoptosis was associated with an upregulation of proapoptotic Bax, elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). In addition, a compromised mitochondrial membrane potential and overproduction of ROS demonstrated the involvement of the mitochondrial signaling pathway. Mechanistic studies further revealed that ESEAF caused the augmentation of the intracellular ROS, subsequently incited the increase in p53 protein expression and led to oligomerization of Bax, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and caspases cascade (caspase-3/7 and -9) in a time-dependent manner. The attenuation of intracellular ROS

  9. Aberrant DNA methylation of WNT pathway genes in the development and progression of CIMP-negative colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Csabai, István; Bodor, András; Ribli, Dezső; Krenács, Tibor; Patai, Árpád V; Wichmann, Barnabás; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tóth, Kinga; Valcz, Gábor; Spisák, Sándor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-08-02

    The WNT signaling pathway has an essential role in colorectal carcinogenesis and progression, which involves a cascade of genetic and epigenetic changes. We aimed to analyze DNA methylation affecting the WNT pathway genes in colorectal carcinogenesis in promoter and gene body regions using whole methylome analysis in 9 colorectal cancer, 15 adenoma, and 6 normal tumor adjacent tissue (NAT) samples by methyl capture sequencing. Functional methylation was confirmed on 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated colorectal cancer cell line datasets. In parallel with the DNA methylation analysis, mutations of WNT pathway genes (APC, β-catenin/CTNNB1) were analyzed by 454 sequencing on GS Junior platform. Most differentially methylated CpG sites were localized in gene body regions (95% of WNT pathway genes). In the promoter regions, 33 of the 160 analyzed WNT pathway genes were differentially methylated in colorectal cancer vs. normal, including hypermethylated AXIN2, CHP1, PRICKLE1, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, and hypomethylated CACYBP, CTNNB1, MYC; 44 genes in adenoma vs. NAT; and 41 genes in colorectal cancer vs. adenoma comparisons. Hypermethylation of AXIN2, DKK1, VANGL1, and WNT5A gene promoters was higher, while those of SOX17, PRICKLE1, DAAM2, and MYC was lower in colon carcinoma compared to adenoma. Inverse correlation between expression and methylation was confirmed in 23 genes, including APC, CHP1, PRICKLE1, PSEN1, and SFRP1. Differential methylation affected both canonical and noncanonical WNT pathway genes in colorectal normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Aberrant DNA methylation appears already in adenomas as an early event of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  10. DCLK1 immunoreactivity in colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellows CF

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Gagliardi1, Monica Goswami1, Roberto Passera2, Charles F Bellows11Department of Surgery and Pathology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Division of Nuclear Medicine Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria San Giovanni Battista, Turin, ItalyIntroduction: Microtubule-associated doublecortin and CaM kinase-like-1 (DCLK1 is a novel candidate marker for intestinal stem cells. The aim of our study was to assess DCLK1 immunoreactivity in colorectal carcinogenesis and its correlation with prognosis.Methods: DCLK1 immunostaining was performed in colorectal tissue from 71 patients, including 18 adenomatous polyps, 40 primary adenocarcinomas, and 14 metastatic lesions. Each case was evaluated by a combined scoring method based on the intensity of staining (score 0–3 and the percentage of tissue staining positive (score 0–3. Immunoexpression for DCLK1 was considered as positive when the combined score was 2–6 and negative with a score of 0–1.Results: Overall, 14/18 (78% of polyps, 30/40 (75% of primary adenocarcinomas, and 7/14 (50% of distant metastases were positive for DCLK1. In adenomatous polyps and primary cancer there was no association between DCLK1 staining score and tumor pathology. However, after curative colorectal cancer resection, patients whose tumor had a high (≥5 combined staining score had increased cancer-specific mortality compared to patients with low (0–4 staining score (hazard ratio 5.89; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–28.47; P = 0.027.Conclusion: We found that DCLK1 is frequently expressed in colorectal neoplasia and may be associated with poor prognosis. Further studies are necessary to validate the use of DCLK1 as a prognostic marker.Keywords: DCLK1, DCAMKL-1, gastrointestinal stem cell, cancer stem cell, adenomatous polyps, liver metastasis, immunohistochemistry

  11. The MYC 3′ Wnt-Responsive Element Drives Oncogenic MYC Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri A. Rennoll

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway drive colorectal cancer (CRC by deregulating expression of downstream target genes including the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC. The critical regulatory DNA enhancer elements that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRC have yet to be fully elucidated. In previous reports, we correlated T-cell factor (TCF and β-catenin binding to the MYC 3′ Wnt responsive DNA element (MYC 3′ WRE with MYC expression in HCT116 cells. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to determine whether this element is a critical driver of MYC. We isolated a clonal population of cells that contained a deletion of a single TCF binding element (TBE within the MYC 3′ WRE. This deletion reduced TCF/β-catenin binding to this regulatory element and decreased MYC expression. Using RNA-Seq analysis, we found altered expression of genes that regulate metabolic processes, many of which are known MYC target genes. We found that 3′ WRE-Mut cells displayed a reduced proliferative capacity, diminished clonogenic growth, and a decreased potential to form tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that the MYC 3′ WRE is a critical driver of oncogenic MYC expression and suggest that this element may serve as a therapeutic target for CRC.

  12. Dietary Chemoprevention of PhIP Induced Carcinogenesis in Male Fischer 344 Rats with Tomato and Broccoli

    OpenAIRE

    Canene-Adams, Kirstie; Sfanos, Karen S.; Liang, Chung-Tiang; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Nelson, William G.; Brayton, Cory; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2013-01-01

    The heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-B]pyridine (PhIP), found in meats cooked at high temperatures, has been implicated in epidemiological and rodent studies for causing breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. A previous animal study using a xenograft model has shown that whole tomato and broccoli, when eaten in combination, exhibit a marked effect on tumor reduction compared to when eaten alone. Our aim was to determine if PhIP-induced carcinogenesis can be prevente...

  13. Comprehensive and Holistic Analysis of HT-29 Colorectal Cancer Cells and Tumor-Bearing Nude Mouse Model: Interactions Among Fractions Derived From the Chinese Medicine Formula Tian Xian Liquid in Effects on Human Colorectal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Annballaw Bridget; Cheung, Ho Pan; Lin, Li-Zhu; Ng, Tzi Bun; Lao, Lixing; Zhang, Yanbo; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Tong, Yao; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing

    2017-09-01

    The Chinese medicine formula Tian Xian Liquid (TXL) has been used clinically for cancer therapy in China for more than 25 years. However, the comprehensive and holistic effects of its bioactive fractions for various antitumor therapeutic effects have not been unraveled. This is the first study to scientifically elucidate the holistic effect of Chinese medicine formula for treating colon cancer, hence allowing a better understanding of the essence of Chinese medicine formula, through the comparison of the actions of TXL and its functional constituent fractions, including ethyl acetate (EA), butanol (BU), and aqueous (WA) fractions. Tissue-specific proliferative/antiproliferative effects of these fractions on human colorectal carcinoma HT-29 cells and splenocytes were studied by using the MTT assay. Their modulations on the expression of markers of antiproliferation, antimetastasis, reversion of multidrug resistance in treated HT-29 cells were examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, and their modulations in a xenografted nude mouse model were examined by Western blot analysis. Results revealed that EA fraction slightly inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells, but tissue-specifically exerted the most potent antiproliferative effect on splenocytes. On the contrary, only TXL and BU fraction tissue-specifically contributed to the proliferation of splenocytes, but inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells. WA fraction exerted the most potent antiproliferative effect on HT-29 cells and also the strongest inhibitory action on tumor size in the nude mouse model in our previous study. In the HT-29 model, TXL and WA fraction exerted the most pronounced effect on upregulation of p21 mRNA and protein; TXL, and EA and WA fractions exerted the effect on downregulation of G1 phase cell cycle protein, cyclin D1 mRNA and protein; EA and BU fractions exerted the most prominent anti-invasive effect on anti-invasion via downregulation of MMP-1 m

  14. Colorectal cancer: lifestyle and dietary factors Cáncer colorrectal: hábitos de vida y factores dietéticos

    OpenAIRE

    M. P. Corrêa Lima; Gomes-da-Silva,M.H.G.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the most common tumor in the developed countries, and the number of new cases annualy is aproximately equal for men and women. Several environmental factors can interact in all steps of carcinogenesis. Lately the balance between genetic predisposition and these factors, including nutritional components and lifestyle behaviors, determines individual susceptibility to develop colorectal cancer. The aim of this study is to revise the references about lifestyle ...

  15. Molecular cloning, genomic characterization and over-expression of a novel gene, XRRA1, identified from human colorectal cancer cell HCT116Clone2_XRR and macaque testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashimoto Katsuyuki

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of our investigation into the genetic basis of tumor cell radioresponse, we have isolated several clones with a wide range of responses to X-radiation (XR from an unirradiated human colorectal tumor cell line, HCT116. Using human cDNA microarrays, we recently identified a novel gene that was down-regulated by two-fold in an XR-resistant cell clone, HCT116Clone2_XRR. We have named this gene as X-ray radiation resistance associated 1 (XRRA1 (GenBank BK000541. Here, we present the first report on the molecular cloning, genomic characterization and over-expression of the XRRA1 gene. Results We found that XRRA1 was expressed predominantly in testis of both human and macaque. cDNA microarray analysis showed three-fold higher expression of XRRA1 in macaque testis relative to other tissues. We further cloned the macaque XRRA1 cDNA (GenBank AB072776 and a human XRRA1 splice variant from HCT116Clone2_XRR (GenBank AY163836. In silico analysis revealed the full-length human XRRA1, mouse, rat and bovine Xrra1 cDNAs. The XRRA1 gene comprises 11 exons and spans 64 kb on chromosome 11q13.3. Human and macaque cDNAs share 96% homology. Human XRRA1 cDNA is 1987 nt long and encodes a protein of 559 aa. XRRA1 protein is highly conserved in human, macaque, mouse, rat, pig, and bovine. GFP-XRRA1 fusion protein was detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of HCT116 clones and COS-7 cells. Interestingly, we found evidence that COS-7 cells which over-expressed XRRA1 lacked Ku86 (Ku80, XRCC5, a non-homologous end joining (NHEJ DNA repair molecule, in the nucleus. RT-PCR analysis showed differential expression of XRRA1 after XR in HCT116 clones manifesting significantly different XR responses. Further, we found that XRRA1 was expressed in most tumor cell types. Surprisingly, mouse Xrra1 was detected in mouse embryonic stem cells R1. Conclusions Both XRRA1 cDNA and protein are highly conserved among mammals, suggesting that XRRA1 may have

  16. Role of micro-RNA in colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio; Menéndez Sánchez, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in carcinogenesis through postranscriptional gene regulatory activity. These molecules are involved in various physiological and pathological functions, such as apoptosis, cell proliferation and differentiation, which indicates their functionality in carcinogenesis as tumour suppressor genes or oncogenes. Several studies have determined the presence of microRNAs in different neoplastic diseases such as colon, prostate, breast, stomach, pancreas, and lung cancer. There are promising data on the usefulness of quantifying microRNAs in different organic fluids and tissues. We have conducted a review of the determinations of microRNAs in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Etiology of colorectal cancer and antioxidant barrier of the organism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimczak, Alicja; Kubiak, Katarzyna; Cybulska, Magdalena; Kula, Agnieszka; Dziki, Łukasz; Malinowska, Katarzyna

    2010-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious medical and economic problem in Poland, as the detection and results of its treatment are very low. Due to this fact, medical research is still conducted in order to find out the symptoms of this tumor and proper preventive measures. According to one hypothesis of carcinogenesis, the process of creating the tumor begins and develops when the balance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their deactivation by the "antioxidant protective barrier of the organism" is disturbed. As a result of this theory, it has been decided to examine the plasma concentration of the dietary minerals which work as antioxidants. The results entailed conclusions which prove the free radicals theory of carcinogenesis. They also confirm the part which the antioxidant protective barrier plays in the defence against ROS and their carcinogenic consequences.

  18. Overexpression of arginine transporter CAT-1 is associated with accumulation of L-arginine and cell growth in human colorectal cancer tissue.

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    Ying Lu

    Full Text Available We previously showed that L-arginine (Arg accumulates in colorectal cancer tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which Arg accumulates and determine its biological significance. The concentration of Arg and Citrulline (Cit in sera and tumor tissues from colorectal cancer (CRC patients was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The expression of Arg transporters was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarray. We also transfected the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 with siRNA specific for the Arg transporter CAT-1 and measured the induction of apoptosis by flow cytometry and cell proliferation by MTT assay. Consistent with our previous results, serum Arg and Cit concentrations in colorectal cancer patients were significantly lower than those in normal volunteers, while Arg and Cit concentrations in colorectal cancer tissues were significantly higher than in matched adjacent normal colon tissues. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the CAT-1 gene was highly overexpressed in 70.5% of colorectal cancer tissue samples relative to adjacent normal colon tissues in all 122 patients with colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarray confirmed that the expression of CAT-1 was higher in all 25 colorectal cancer tissues tested. CAT-1 siRNA significantly induced apoptosis of HCT-116 cells and subsequently inhibited cell growth by 20-50%. Our findings indicate that accumulation of L-Arg and Cit and cell growth in colorectal cancer tissues is associated with over-expression of the Arg transporter gene CAT-1. Our results may be useful for the development of molecular diagnostic tools and targeted therapy for colorectal cancer.

  19. Crosstalk between Wnt Signaling and RNA Processing in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bordonaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA processing involves a variety of processes affecting gene expression, including the removal of introns through RNA splicing, as well as 3' end processing (cleavage and polyadenylation. Alternative RNA processing is fundamentally important for gene regulation, and aberrant processing is associated with the initiation and progression of cancer. Deregulated Wnt signaling, which is the initiating event in the development of most cases of human colorectal cancer (CRC, has been linked to modified RNA processing, which may contribute to Wnt-mediated colonic carcinogenesis. Crosstalk between Wnt signaling and alternative RNA splicing with relevance to CRC includes effects on the expression of Rac1b, an alternatively spliced gene associated with tumorigenesis, which exhibits alternative RNA splicing that is influenced by Wnt activity. In addition, Tcf4, a crucial component of Wnt signaling, also exhibits alternative splicing, which is likely involved in colonic tumorigenesis. Modulation of 3' end formation, including of the Wnt target gene COX-2, also can influence the neoplastic process, with implications for CRC. While many human genes are dependent on introns and splicing for normal levels of gene expression, naturally intronless genes exist with a unique metabolism that allows for intron-independent gene expression. Effects of Wnt activity on the RNA metabolism of the intronless Wnt-target gene c-jun is a likely contributor to cancer development. Further, butyrate, a breakdown product of dietary fiber and a histone deacetylase inhibitor, upregulates Wnt activity in CRC cells, and also modulates RNA processing; therefore, the interplay between Wnt activity, the modulation of this activity by butyrate, and differential RNA metabolism in colonic cells can significantly influence tumorigenesis. Determining the role played by altered RNA processing in Wnt-mediated neoplasia may lead to novel interventions aimed at restoring normal RNA metabolism for

  20. Concepts of threshold in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch-Volders, M; Aardema, M; Elhajouji, A

    2000-01-03

    Although the existence of a threshold in the dose effect relationship is well documented for many, if not most, types of toxicological effects the existence of a threshold for the mutagenic effects of ionising radiation and of certain chemicals has been questioned since the middle of the century and only recently the question of thresholds for radiation and chemical carcinogenesis has been addressed. The essential facts for the interpretation of threshold dose-response curves are common to all type of effects and are: (i) the number and the identity of the target; (ii) the type and sensitivity of the endpoint used to quantify the effect. We therefore will first try to model the type of interactions which may be expected between a mutagen and its target and define from this whether a threshold dose-effect can be expected; in a second step the concept will be extended to heritable mutations and carcinogenesis.

  1. Global metabolic reprogramming of colorectal cancer occurs at adenoma stage and is induced by MYC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kiyotoshi; Yachida, Shinichi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Oshima, Minoru; Nakagawa, Toshitaka; Akamoto, Shintaro; Tabata, Sho; Saitoh, Kaori; Kato, Keiko; Sato, Saya; Igarashi, Kaori; Aizawa, Yumi; Kajino-Sakamoto, Rie; Kojima, Yasushi; Fujishita, Teruaki; Enomoto, Ayame; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Ishikawa, Takamasa; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji; Okano, Keiichi; Tomita, Masaru; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Shinji; Aoki, Masahiro; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2017-09-12

    Cancer cells alter their metabolism for the production of precursors of macromolecules. However, the control mechanisms underlying this reprogramming are poorly understood. Here we show that metabolic reprogramming of colorectal cancer is caused chiefly by aberrant MYC expression. Multiomics-based analyses of paired normal and tumor tissues from 275 patients with colorectal cancer revealed that metabolic alterations occur at the adenoma stage of carcinogenesis, in a manner not associated with specific gene mutations involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. MYC expression induced at least 215 metabolic reactions by changing the expression levels of 121 metabolic genes and 39 transporter genes. Further, MYC negatively regulated the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and maintenance but positively regulated genes involved in DNA and histone methylation. Knockdown of MYC in colorectal cancer cells reset the altered metabolism and suppressed cell growth. Moreover, inhibition of MYC target pyrimidine synthesis genes such as CAD, UMPS, and CTPS blocked cell growth, and thus are potential targets for colorectal cancer therapy.

  2. High occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Clostridium difficile in the intestinal microbiota of colorectal carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia H. Fukugaiti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractColorectal carcinoma is considered the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Several microorganisms have been associated with carcinogenesis, including Enterococcus spp., Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, pathogenic E. coli strains and oral Fusobacterium. Here we qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the presence of oral and intestinal microorganisms in the fecal microbiota of colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. Seventeen patients (between 49 and 70 years-old visiting the Cancer Institute of the Sao Paulo State were selected, 7 of whom were diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma. Bacterial detection was performed by qRT-PCR. Although all of the tested bacteria were detected in the majority of the fecal samples, quantitative differences between the Cancer Group and healthy controls were detected only for F. nucleatum and C. difficile. The three tested oral microorganisms were frequently observed, suggesting a need for furthers studies into a potential role for these bacteria during colorectal carcinoma pathogenesis. Despite the small number of patients included in this study, we were able to detect significantly more F. nucleatumand C. difficile in the Cancer Group patients compared to healthy controls, suggesting a possible role of these bacteria in colon carcinogenesis. This finding should be considered when screening for colorectal cancer.

  3. Sensitive High-Resolution Melting Analysis for Screening of KRAS and BRAF Mutations in Iranian Human Metastatic Colorectal Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niya, Mohammad Hadi Karbalaie; Basi, Ali; Koochak, Aghigh; Tameshkel, Fahimeh Safarnezhad; Rakhshani, Nasser; Zamani, Farhad; Imanzade, Farid; Rezvani, Hamid; sereshki, Mohammad Mahdi Adib; Sohrabi, Masoud Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigations of methods for detection of mutations have uncovered major weaknesses of direct sequencing and pyrosequencing, with their high costs and low sensitivity in screening for both known and unknown mutations. High resolution melting (HRM) analysis is an alternative tool for the rapid detection of mutations. Here we describe the accuracy of HRM in screening for KRAS and BRAF mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRCs) samples. Materials and Methods: A total of 1000 mCRC patients in Mehr Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from Feb 2008 to May 2012 were examined for KRAS mutations and 242 of them were selected for further assessment of BRAF mutations by HRM analysis. In order to calculate the sensitivity and specificity, HRM results were checked by pyrosequencing as the golden standard and Dxs Therascreen as a further method. Results: In the total of 1,000 participants, there were 664 (66.4%) with wild type and 336 (33.6%) with mutant codons 12 and/or 13 of the KRAS gene. Among 242 samples randomly checked for the BRAF gene, all were wild type by HRM. Pyrosequencing and Dxs Therascreen results were in line with those of the HRM. In this regard, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM were evaluated as 100%. Conclusion: The findings suggest that the HRM, in comparison with DNA sequencing, is a more appropriate method for precise scanning of KRAS and BRAF mutations. It is also possible to state that HRM may be an attractive technique for the detection of known or unknown somatic mutations in other genes. PMID:28122448

  4. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  5. [Oxidative stress in prostate hypertrophy and carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyszewski, Waldemar M; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2009-07-20

    Aging, significant impairment of the oxidation/reduction balance, infection, and inflammation are recognized risk factors of benign hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Chronic symptomatic and asymptomatic prostate inflammatory processes generate significantly elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and halogenated compounds. Prostate cancer patients showed significantly higher lipid peroxidation and lower antioxidant levels in peripheral blood than healthy controls, whereas patients with prostate hyperplasia did not show such symptoms. Oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress causes DNA modifications leading to genome instability that may initiate carcinogenesis; however, it was shown that oxidative damage alone is not sufficient to initiate this process. Peroxidation products induced by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species seem to take part in epigenetic mechanisms regulating genome activity. One of the most common changes occurring in more than 90% of all analyzed prostate cancers is the silencing of GSTP1 gene activity. The gene encodes glutathione transferase, an enzyme participating in detoxification processes. Prostate hyperplasia is often accompanied by chronic inflammation and such a relationship was not observed in prostate cancer. The participation of infection and inflammation in the development of hyperplasia is unquestionable and these factors probably also take part in initiating the early stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Thus it seems that therapeutic strategies that prevent genome oxidative damage in situations involving oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress, i.e. use of antioxidants, plant steroids, antibiotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, could help prevent carcinogenesis.

  6. Oxidative stress in prostate hypertrophy and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar M. Przybyszewski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aging, significant impairment of the oxidation/reduction balance, infection, and inflammation are recognized risk factors of benign hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Chronic symptomatic and asymptomatic prostate inflammatory processes generate significantly elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and halogenated compounds. Prostate cancer patients showed significantly higher lipid peroxidation and lower antioxidant levels in peripheral blood than healthy controls, whereas patients with prostate hyperplasia did not show such symptoms. Oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress causes DNA modifications leading to genome instability that may initiate carcinogenesis; however, it was shown that oxidative damage alone is not sufficient to initiate this process. Peroxidation products induced by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species seem to take part in epigenetic mechanisms regulating genome activity. One of the most common changes occurring in more than 90�0of all analyzed prostate cancers is the silencing of GSTP1 gene activity. The gene encodes glutathione transferase, an enzyme participating in detoxification processes. Prostate hyperplasia is often accompanied by chronic inflammation and such a relationship was not observed in prostate cancer. The participation of infection and inflammation in the development of hyperplasia is unquestionable and these factors probably also take part in initiating the early stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Thus it seems that therapeutic strategies that prevent genome oxidative damage in situations involving oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress, i.e. use of antioxidants, plant steroids, antibiotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, could help prevent carcinogenesis.

  7. Inhibition of carcinogenesis by retinoids. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettesheim, P.

    1979-01-01

    Progress made in recent years in the search for retinoids with anticarcinogenic activity is reviewed. There are many studies to be found in the literature which show no substantial effect of retinoids on carcinogenesis or tumor growth. Some of these negative findings may be related to the carcinogen dose used, the type of retinoid used, the dose, dose schedule or mode of administration of the retinoid. Others may indicate that the particular type of tumor or tumor system is, indeed, refractory to retinoids in general or to those retinoids that were tested. A great gap still exists in our knowledge concerning the pharmake-kinetics of most retinoids their availability to various normal and cancerous tissues, and the role and existence of transport and binding proteins. There are studies which indicate that under certain conditions, particularly conditions of topical application, some retinoids may even enhance carcinogenesis. It seems, however, indisputable by now that some retinoids are effective inhibitors of carcinogenesis in some organ systems and can even inhibit the growth of some established tumors. While the mechanisms of these inhibitory effects are presently not understood, it does seem clear that they are not mediated via the cytotoxic mechanisms typical of chemotherapeutic agents. The hope that retinoids might become an effective tool to halt the progression of some neoplastic diseases, seems to be justified.

  8. Metachronous colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Svendsen, L B; Mellemgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    During the period 1943-67, 903 Danish patients aged less than 40 years had colorectal carcinoma. The patients were followed up for up to 41 years and during this period 44 of 501 (9 per cent) operated on for cure developed a metachronous colorectal carcinoma. The cumulative risk of a metachronous...... colorectal carcinoma was 30 per cent after up to 41 years of observation. The occurrence of a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was evenly distributed in the observation period. The cumulative survival rate after operation for a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was 41 per cent after 20 years of observation....... We propose a lifelong follow-up programme after resection of colorectal carcinoma for cure in this age group, including annual Hemoccult test and colonoscopy at 3-year intervals....

  9. Prosurvival long noncoding RNA PINCR regulates a subset of p53 targets in human colorectal cancer cells by binding to Matrin 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Gryder, Berkley; Woods, Wendy S; Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F; Li, Xiao Ling; Jenkins, Lisa M; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Mo, Min; Dasso, Mary; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M; Zhu, Yuelin; Frier, Susan M; Moriarity, Branden S; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Lal, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, yet the function of the vast majority remains unclear. Here, we show that a p53-regulated lncRNA which we named PINCR (p53-induced noncoding RNA), is induced ~100-fold after DNA damage and exerts a prosurvival function in human colorectal cancer cells (CRC) in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Targeted deletion of PINCR in CRC cells significantly impaired G1 arrest and induced hypersensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. PINCR regulates the induction of a subset of p53 targets involved in G1 arrest and apoptosis, including BTG2, RRM2B and GPX1. Using a novel RNA pulldown approach that utilized endogenous S1-tagged PINCR, we show that PINCR associates with the enhancer region of these genes by binding to RNA-binding protein Matrin 3 that, in turn, associates with p53. Our findings uncover a critical prosurvival function of a p53/PINCR/Matrin 3 axis in response to DNA damage in CRC cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23244.001 PMID:28580901

  10. Increased Expression of Thymosin β Is Independently Correlated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α and Worse Clinical Outcome in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Yun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Thymosin β4 is a multi-functional hormone-like polypeptide, being involved in cell migration, angiogenesis, and tumor metastasis. This study was undertaken to clarify the clinicopathologic implications of thymosin β4 expression in human colorectal cancers (CRCs. Methods We investigated tissue sections from 143 patients with CRC by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we evaluated the expression patterns and the clinico-pathological significance of thymosin β4 expression in association with hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α expression in the CRC series. Results High expression of thymosin β4 was significantly correlated with lymphovascular invasion, invasion depth, regional lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM stage. Patients with high expression of thymosin β4 showed poor recurrence-free survival (p = .001 and poor overall survival (p = .005 on multivariate analysis. We also found that thymosin β4 and HIF-1α were overexpressed and that thymosin β4 expression increased in parallel with HIF-1α expression in CRC. Conclusions A high expression level of thymosin β4 indicates poor clinical outcomes and may be a useful prognostic factor in CRC. Thymosin β4 is functionally related with HIF-1α and may be a potentially valuable biomarker and possible therapeutic target for CRC.

  11. Extracellular Signals of a Human Epithelial Colorectal Adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) Cell Line Facilitate the Penetration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Strain through the Mucin Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Naoki; Yokotani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Masami; Kososhi, Mariko; Morita, Mayu; Fukunishi, Chiaki; Nishizawa, Nagisa; Gotoh, Naomasa

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can penetrate the layer of mucus formed by host intestinal epithelial cells, often resulting in sepsis in immunocompromised patients. We have previously demonstrated that P. aeruginosa can penetrate the mucin layer by flagellar motility and the degradation of the mucin layer. However, it remains unclear how P. aeruginosa initially recognizes epithelial cells. Using the human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cell line, we investigated extracellular signaling that could facilitate the penetration of P. aeruginosa through the mucin layer. The supernatant from Caco-2 cell cultures increased penetration of P. aeruginosa through an artificial mucin layer. The Caco-2 cell supernatant increased bacterial flagella-dependent swarming motility, but it did not influence P. aeruginosa growth or protease activity. Filtering of the Caco-2 cell supernatant indicated that proteins weighing Caco-2 cell supernatant attracted P. aeruginosa cells. Finally, we identified that growth-regulated oncogene-α (GRO-α) secreted by Caco-2 cells was a factor facilitating flagellar filament rotation and swarming motility, although it did not attract the bacteria. We conclude that penetration of the mucin layer by P. aeruginosa is facilitated by small proteins (Caco-2 cells, both by inducing acceleration of flagellar motility and increasing chemotaxis.

  12. Salvia fruticosa, Salvia officinalis, and rosmarinic acid induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation of human colorectal cell lines: the role in MAPK/ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Cristina P R; Lima, Cristovao F; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that nutrition is a key factor in modulating sporadic colorectal carcinoma (CRC) risk. Aromatic plants of the genus Salvia (sage) have been attributed many medicinal properties, which include anticancer activity. In the present study, the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of water extracts of Salvia fruticosa (SF) and Salvia officinalis (SO) and of their main phenolic compound rosmarinic acid (RA) were evaluated in two human colon carcinoma-derived cell lines, HCT15 and CO115, which have different mutations in the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signalling pathways. These pathways are commonly altered in CRC, leading to increased proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis. Our results show that SF, SO, and RA induce apoptosis in both cell lines, whereas cell proliferation was inhibited by the two sage extracts only in HCT15. SO, SF, and RA inhibited ERK phosphorylation in HCT15 and had no effects on Akt phosphorylation in CO115 cells. The activity of sage extracts seems to be due, at least in part, to the inhibition of MAPK/ERK pathway.

  13. Therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs targeting chemorefractory colorectal adenocarcinoma cells overexpressing endogenous retroviral elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Carballo, David; Acikelli, Ali Haydar; Klein, Jacqueline; Jastrow, Holger; Dammann, Philipp; Wyganowski, Thomas; Guemues, Cihan; Gustmann, Sebastian; Bardenheuer, Walter; Malak, Sascha; Tefett, Nora Sophia; Khosrawipour, Veria; Giger-Pabst, Urs; Tannapfel, Andrea; Strumberg, Dirk

    2015-08-12

    Endoretroviruses account for circa 8 % of all transposable elements found in the genome of humans and other animals. They represent a genetic footprint of ancestral germ-cell infections of exoviruses that is transmittable to the progeny by Mendelian segregation. Traces of human endogenous retroviruses are physiologically expressed in ovarial, testicular and placental tissues as well as in stem cells. In addition, a number of these fossil viral elements have also been related to carcinogenesis. However, a relation between endoretroviruses expression and chemoresistance has not been reported yet. Twenty colorectal carcinoma patient samples were scrutinized for HERV-WE1 and HERV-FRD1 endoretroviruses using immunohistochemical approaches. In order to search for differential expression of these elements in chemotherapy refractory cells, a resistant HCT8 colon carcinoma subline was developed by serial etoposide exposure. Endoretroviral elements were detected by immunocytochemical staining, qPCR and ELISA. IC50-values of antiviral and cytostatic drugs in HCT8 cells were determined by MTT proliferation assay. The antivirals-cytostatics interaction was evaluated by the isobologram method. In this work, we show for the first time that HERV-WE1, HERV-FRD1, HERV-31, and HERV-V1 are a) simultaneously expressed in treatment-naïve colon carcinoma cells and b) upregulated after cytostatic exposure, suggesting that these retroviral elements are intimately related to chemotherapy resistance. We found a number of antiviral drugs to have cytotoxic activity and the ability to force the downregulation of HERV proteins in vitro. We also demonstrate that the use of different antiviral compounds alone or in combination with anticancer agents results in a synergistic antiproliferative effect and downregulation of different endoretroviral elements in highly chemotherapy-resistant colorectal tumor cells. Enhanced HERV-expression is associated with chemoresistance in colon carcinomas which

  14. Clinical and Biological Features of Interval Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Mi; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2017-05-01

    Interval colorectal cancer (I-CRC) is defined as a CRC diagnosed within 60 months after a negative colonoscopy, taking into account that 5 years is the "mean sojourn time." It is important to prevent the development of interval cancer. The development of interval colon cancer is associated with female sex, old age, family history of CRC, comorbidities, diverticulosis, and the skill of the endoscopist. During carcinogenesis, sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps) share many genomic and colonic site characteristics with I-CRCs. The clinical and biological features of I-CRC should be elucidated to prevent the development of interval colon cancer.

  15. Polymorphisms in fatty acid metabolism-related genes are associated with colorectal cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeft, B.; Linseisen, J.; Beckmann, L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant tumor and the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The crucial role of fatty acids for a number of important biological processes suggests a more in-depth analysis of inter-individual differences in fatty acid metabolizing genes...... as contributing factor to colon carcinogenesis. We examined the association between genetic variability in 43 fatty acid metabolism-related genes and colorectal risk in 1225 CRC cases and 2032 controls participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Three hundred...... variants with CRC risk. Our results support the key role of prostanoid signaling in colon carcinogenesis and suggest a relevance of genetic variation in fatty acid metabolism-related genes and CRC risk....

  16. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  17. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ...

  18. Glycomics expression analysis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans of human colorectal cancer tissues and non-neoplastic mucosa by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marolla, Ana Paula Cleto [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Waisberg, Jaques [Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Saba, Gabriela Tognini [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Waisberg, Daniel Reis [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Margeotto, Fernando Beani; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    To determine the presence of glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues, since it has a central role in tumor development and progression. Tissue samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues were obtained from 64 operated patients who had colorectal carcinoma with no distant metastases. Expressions of heparan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate, dermatan sulphate and their fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with the technique for extraction and quantification of glycosaminoglycans after proteolysis and electrophoresis. The statistical analysis included mean, standard deviation, and Student’s t test. The glycosaminoglycans extracted from colorectal tissue showed three electrophoretic bands in agarose gel. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed characteristic disaccharide fragments from glycosaminoglycans, indicating their structural characterization in the tissues analyzed. Some peaks in the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were not characterized as fragments of sugars, indicating the presence of fragments of the protein structure of proteoglycans generated during the glycosaminoglycan purification. The average amount of chondroitin and dermatan increased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p=0.01). On the other hand, the average amount of heparan decreased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p= 0.03). The method allowed the determination of the glycosaminoglycans structural profile in colorectal tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissue. Neoplastic tissues showed greater amounts of chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate compared to non-neoplastic tissues, while heparan sulphate was decreased in neoplastic tissues.

  19. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zejun [Sanmen People' s Hospital of Zhejiang, Sanmen, Zhejiang, 317100 (China); Gong, Chaoju [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 310058 (China); Liu, Hong [Zhejiang Normal University – Jinhua People' s Hospital Joint Center for Biomedical Research, Jinhua, Zhejiang, 321004 (China); Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming [Sanmen People' s Hospital of Zhejiang, Sanmen, Zhejiang, 317100 (China); Song, Mintao [Department of Pathophysiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS), School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing, 100005 (China); Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian [Sanmen People' s Hospital of Zhejiang, Sanmen, Zhejiang, 317100 (China); Chen, Xiang, E-mail: sychenxiang@126.com [Sanmen People' s Hospital of Zhejiang, Sanmen, Zhejiang, 317100 (China)

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  20. Curcumin ameliorates the tumor-enhancing effects of a high-protein diet in an azoxymethane-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, So-Young; Kim, Dan-Bi; Kim, Eunjung

    2015-08-01

    An increasing number of reports suggest that a high-protein diet (HPD) is associated with an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). One of the proposed mechanisms is that an HPD increases the delivery of protein to the colon and generates various toxic metabolites that contribute to colon carcinogenesis. Curcumin was shown to exert significant preventive properties against CRC. We therefore hypothesized that curcumin can reverse the tumor-enhancing effects of an HPD. This study examined the effects of curcumin on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colorectal tumors in HPD-fed mice. A total of 30 female Balb/c mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: those fed a normal diet (20% casein), those fed an HPD (HPD; 50% casein), and those fed an HPD supplemented with curcumin (HPDC; 0.02% curcumin). The mice were subjected to an AOM-dextran sodium sulfate colon carcinogenesis protocol. Mice in the HPDC group exhibited a significant (40%) reduction in colorectal tumor multiplicity when compared with those in the HPD group. The expression of colonic inflammatory proteins (cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase), the levels of plasma inflammatory markers (nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α), fecal ammonia, short- and branched-chain fatty acid levels, and the rate of colonocyte proliferation were significantly lower in the HPDC than the HPD group. In conclusion, curcumin inhibited the development of colorectal tumors in an AOM-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis by attenuating colonic inflammation, proliferation, and toxic metabolite production. Curcumin might be useful in the chemoprevention of CRC in individuals consuming an HPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Translesion Synthesis Polymerases in the Prevention and Promotion of Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jay Stallons

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in the transformation of cells to the malignant state of cancer is the induction of mutations in the DNA of cells damaged by genotoxic agents. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS is the process by which cells copy DNA containing unrepaired damage that blocks progression of the replication fork. The DNA polymerases that catalyze TLS in mammals have been the topic of intense investigation over the last decade. DNA polymerase η (Pol η is best understood and is active in error-free bypass of UV-induced DNA damage. The other TLS polymerases (Pol ι, Pol κ, REV1, and Pol ζ have been studied extensively in vitro, but their in vivo role is only now being investigated using knockout mouse models of carcinogenesis. This paper will focus on the studies of mice and humans with altered expression of TLS polymerases and the effects on cancer induced by environmental agents.

  2. Dietary methyl donors, methyl metabolizing enzymes, and epigenetic regulators: Diet-gene interactions and promoter CpG island hypermethylation in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Wouters, K.A.D.; Gottschalk, R.W.H.; Schooten, F.J. van; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Engeland, M. van; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary methyl donors might influence DNA methylation during carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Among 609 CRC cases and 1,663 subcohort members of the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (n = 120,852), we estimated CRC risk according to methyl donor intake across genotypes of folate

  3. Activations of Both Extrinsic and Intrinsic Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Contribute to Apoptosis through p53-Mediated ATM/Fas Signaling by Emilia sonchifolia Extract, a Folklore Medicinal Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Huang, Wen-Wen; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chung, Jing-Gung; Wu, Tian-Shung; Jhan, Jia-Hua; Lin, Kuei-Li; Pai, Shu-Jen; Chiu, Yu-Jen; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2012-01-01

    Emilia sonchifolia (L.) DC (Compositae), an herbaceous plant found in Taiwan and India, is used as folk medicine. The clinical applications include inflammation, rheumatism, cough, cuts fever, dysentery, analgesic, and antibacteria. The activities of Emilia sonchifolia extract (ESE) on colorectal cancer cell death have not been fully investigated. The purpose of this study explored the induction of apoptosis and its molecular mechanisms in ESE-treated HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells in vitro. The methanolic ESE was characterized, and γ-humulene was formed as the major constituent (63.86%). ESE induced cell growth inhibition in a concentration- and time-dependent response by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells (DNA fragmentation, an apoptotic catachrestic) were found after ESE treatment by TUNEL assay and DNA gel electrophoresis. Alternatively, ESE stimulated the activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9 and their specific caspase inhibitors protected against ESE-induced cytotoxicity. ESE promoted the mitochondria-dependent and death-receptor-associated protein levels. Also, ESE increased ROS production and upregulated the levels of ATM, p53, and Fas in HCT 116 cells. Strikingly, p53 siRNA reversed ESE-reduced viability involved in p53-mediated ATM/Fas signaling in HCT 116 cells. In summary, our result is the first report suggesting that ESE may be potentially efficacious in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  4. Activations of Both Extrinsic and Intrinsic Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Contribute to Apoptosis through p53-Mediated ATM/Fas Signaling by Emilia sonchifolia Extract, a Folklore Medicinal Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Lan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emilia sonchifolia (L. DC (Compositae, an herbaceous plant found in Taiwan and India, is used as folk medicine. The clinical applications include inflammation, rheumatism, cough, cuts fever, dysentery, analgesic, and antibacteria. The activities of Emilia sonchifolia extract (ESE on colorectal cancer cell death have not been fully investigated. The purpose of this study explored the induction of apoptosis and its molecular mechanisms in ESE-treated HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells in vitro. The methanolic ESE was characterized, and γ-humulene was formed as the major constituent (63.86%. ESE induced cell growth inhibition in a concentration- and time-dependent response by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells (DNA fragmentation, an apoptotic catachrestic were found after ESE treatment by TUNEL assay and DNA gel electrophoresis. Alternatively, ESE stimulated the activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9 and their specific caspase inhibitors protected against ESE-induced cytotoxicity. ESE promoted the mitochondria-dependent and death-receptor-associated protein levels. Also, ESE increased ROS production and upregulated the levels of ATM, p53, and Fas in HCT 116 cells. Strikingly, p53 siRNA reversed ESE-reduced viability involved in p53-mediated ATM/Fas signaling in HCT 116 cells. In summary, our result is the first report suggesting that ESE may be potentially efficacious in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  5. Promoter Methylation Precedes Chromosomal Alterations in Colorectal Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Derks

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancers are characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. This study aimed to explore the timing of promoter methylation and relationship with mutations and chromosomal alterations in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: In a series of 47 nonprogressed adenomas, 41 progressed adenomas (malignant polyps, 38 colorectal carcinomas and 18 paired normal tissues, we evaluated promoter methylation status of hMLH1, O6MGMT, APC, p14ARF, p16INK4A, RASSF1A, GATA-4, GATA-5, and CHFR using methylation-specific PCR. Mutation status of TP53, APC and KRAS were studied by p53 immunohistochemistry and sequencing of the APC and KRAS mutation cluster regions. Chromosomal alterations were evaluated by comparative genomic hybridization. Results: Our data demonstrate that nonprogressed adenomas, progressed adenomas and carcinomas show similar frequencies of promoter methylation for the majority of the genes. Normal tissues showed significantly lower frequencies of promoter methylation of APC, p16INK4A, GATA-4, and GATA-5 (P-values: 0.02, 0.02, 1.1×10−5 and 0.008 respectively. P53 immunopositivity and chromosomal abnormalities occur predominantly in carcinomas (P values: 1.1×10−5 and 4.1×10−10. Conclusions: Since promoter methylation was already present in nonprogressed adenomas without chromosomal alterations, we conclude that promoter methylation can be regarded as an early event preceding TP53 mutation and chromosomal abnormalities in colorectal cancer development.

  6. Synchronous colorectal liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E.M. van der Pool (Anne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and ranks second in cancer-related deaths in many parts of the Western world. Once in the lymph or blood vessels, colorectal cancer can quickly spread and the liver is known to be a favourable site for metastases. The

  7. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis prevention by flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Belitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of anticancerogenic effects of flavanoids and isocyanates from the plants widely consumed in the midland belt of Russia were reviewed. Data of studies both in vitro and in vivo were analyzed. Special attention was paid to inhibition of targets responsible for carcinogen metabolic activation, carcinogenesis promotion and tumor progression as well as neoangiogenesis. Besides that the antioxidant properties of flavonoids and their effects on cell cycle regulation, apoptosis initiation and cell mobility were considered.

  8. The plant alkaloid and anti-leukemia drug homoharringtonine sensitizes resistant human colorectal carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranova, Lenka; Pombinho, Antonio R; Spegarova, Jarmila; Koc, Michal; Klanova, Magdalena; Molinsky, Jan; Klener, Pavel; Bartunek, Petr; Andera, Ladislav

    2013-06-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a pro-apoptotic ligand from the TNF-alpha family that is under consideration, along with agonistic anti-TRAIL receptor antibodies, as a potential anti-tumor agent. However, most primary human tumors are resistant to monotherapy with TRAIL apoptogens, and thus the potential applicability of TRAIL in anti-tumor therapy ultimately depends on its rational combination with drugs targeting these resistances. In our high-throughput screening for novel agents/drugs that could sensitize TRAIL-resistant colorectal cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, we found homoharringtonine (HHT), a cephalotaxus alkaloid and tested anti-leukemia drug, to be a very effective, low nanomolar enhancer of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis/growth suppression of these resistant cells. Co-treatment of TRAIL-resistant RKO or HT-29 cells with HHT and TRAIL led to the effective induction of apoptosis and the complete elimination of the treated cells. HHT suppressed the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and cFLIP and enhanced the TRAIL-triggered activation of JNK and p38 kinases. The shRNA-mediated down-regulation of cFLIP or Mcl-1 in HT-29 or RKO cells variably enhanced their TRAIL-induced apoptosis but it did not markedly sensitize them to TRAIL-mediated growth suppression. However, with the notable exception of RKO/sh cFLIP cells, the downregulation of cFLIP or Mcl-1 significantly lowered the effective concentration of HHT in HHT + TRAIL co-treatment. Combined HHT + TRAIL therapy also led to the strong suppression of HT-29 tumors implanted into immunodeficient mice. Thus, HHT represents a very efficient enhancer of TRAIL-induced apoptosis with potential application in TRAIL-based, anti-cancer combination therapy.

  9. Characterization of azoxymethane-induced colon tumor metastasis to lung in a mouse model relevant to human sporadic colorectal cancer and evaluation of grape seed extract efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Molly M; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2014-08-01

    The second leading cause of cancer-related deaths (both genders combined) in the United States is colorectal cancer (CRC). This emphasizes the need to develop both effective therapies for CRC patients and pre-clinical models mimicking human disease that carry translational potential in drug-development. Notably, at present there are no in situ models of CRC metastasis to lung. In our azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis study in A/J mice assessing grape seed extract (GSE) efficacy, during necropsy we also found multiple lung nodules suggestive of colon tumor metastasis to lung that were significantly inhibited in GSE fed group. Both histopathological and molecular studies were performed to characterize and establish the origin of these lesions in lung. Histologically these nodules were determined as adenocarcinoma of mucin origin. Molecular analyses by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and RT-PCR revealed strong protein and transcript levels of colon specific markers CDX2 and CK20 in these lung nodules compared to uninvolved control lung tissue. Vis-à-vis, these nodules also showed minimally expressed lung specific biomarkers, specifically surfactant D and TTF-1, in IHC analysis. Additionally, 0.25% GSE supplementation in diet (w/w) decreased the incidence of these lung nodules by 53% and their total number by 66%. Together, the characterization of this unique in situ mouse model of CRC metastasis to lung provides translational opportunities in developing effective therapies to clinically manage and treat CRC at the advanced stage. Moreover, GSE efficacy in inhibiting CRC metastasis to lung in this model further supports its translational potential in controlling CRC growth, progression and metastasis in patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Boswellic Acid Inhibits Growth and Metastasis of Human Colorectal Cancer in Orthotopic Mouse Model By Downregulating Inflammatory, Proliferative, Invasive, and Angiogenic Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vivek R.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Gelovani, Juri G.; Guha, Sushovan; Krishnan, Sunil; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous cancer therapeutics were originally identified from natural products used in traditional medicine. One such agent is acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA), derived from the gum resin of the Boswellia serrata known as Salai guggal or Indian frankincense. Traditionally it has been used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat proinflammatory conditions. In the present report, we hypothesized that AKBA can affect the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) in orthotopically-implanted tumors in nude mice. We found that the oral administration of AKBA (50-200 mg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited the growth of CRC tumors in mice, resulting in decrease in tumor volumes than those seen in vehicle-treated mice without significant decreases in body weight. In addition, we observed that AKBA was highly effective in suppressing ascites and distant metastasis to the liver, lungs, and spleen in orthotopically-implanted tumors in nude mice. When examined for the mechanism, we found that markers of tumor proliferation index Ki-67 and the microvessel density CD31; were significantly downregulated by AKBA treatment. We also found that AKBA significantly suppressed NF-κB activation in the tumor tissue and expression of pro-inflammatory (COX2), tumor survival (bcl-2, bcl-xL, IAP-1, survivin), proliferative (cyclin D1), invasive (ICAM-1, MMP-9) and angiogenic (CXCR4 and VEGF) biomarkers. When examined for serum and tissue levels of AKBA, a dose-dependent increase in the levels of the drug was detected, indicating its bioavailability. Thus, our findings suggest that this boswellic acid analogue can inhibit the growth and metastasis of human CRC in vivo through downregulation of cancer-associated biomarkers. PMID:21702037

  11. Chemopreventive Effects of Azadirachta indica on Cancer Marker Indices and Ultrastructural Changes During 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine-Induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Sun, Bo; Wu, Peiwei; Wei, Xi

    2015-09-01

    The present study elucidated the prospective of Azadirachta indica supplementation, if any, in affording chemoprevention by modulating the altered cancer markers and ultrastructural changes in DMH-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in rats. The rats were segregated into four groups viz., normal control, DMH treated, A. indica treated, and DMH+AI treated. Initiation and induction of colon carcinogenesis were achieved through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for both 10 and 20 weeks. A. indica extract was supplemented to rats at a dose rate of 100 mg/kg body weight of animals thrice a week on alternative days, ad libitum for two different time durations of 10 and 20 weeks. The study observed a significant increase in the number of aberrant crypt foci in colons of DMH-treated rats at both the time intervals which were decreased significantly upon AI supplementation. Also, a significant increase was seen in the enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, which, however, was moderated upon AI administration to DMH-treated rats. Changes in the ultrastructural architecture of colonic cells were apparent following both the treatment schedules of DMH; however, the changes were prominent following 20 weeks of DMH treatment. The most obvious changes were seen in the form of altered nuclear shape and disruption of cellular integrity, which were appreciably improved upon AI supplementation. In conclusion, the study shows the chemopreventive abilities of AI against DMH-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in rats.

  12. Integrated proteomic and genomic analysis of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators who analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples are expressed at the protein level. The integration of proteomic and genomic data, or proteogenomics, pro

  13. Scutellarin suppresses growth and causes apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells by regulating the p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Zhao, Yuying; Wang, Zhipeng; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yanqiao

    2017-02-01

    Scutellarin is a flavonoid isolated from a medicinal herb Scutellaria barbata D. Don and exerts therapeutic effects on cardiovascular diseases. However, it remains unclear whether Scutellarin exhibits anti‑tumor actions on human colon cancer. The current study aimed to investigate whether Scutellarin produces antiproliferative and pro‑apoptotic effects on HCT‑116 human colon cancer cells and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. Human colon cancer cells were exposed to different concentrations of Scutellarin, and cellular growth and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, western blot analysis and other assays. A cell viability assay demonstrated that Scutellarin treatment reduced the viability of HCT‑116 cells in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. TUNEL staining demonstrated that Scutellarin also induced apoptotic changes in HCT‑116 cells. The expression level of the anti‑apoptotic protein, Bcl‑2 apoptosis regulator (Bcl‑2), was reduced by Scutellarin in HCT‑116 cells, whereas the expression Bcl‑2 associated X apoptosis regulator (Bax) and the activation of caspase‑3 protein were increased by Scutellarin treatment. Further investigation revealed that Scutellarin significantly increased the phosphorylation of p53 protein in HCT‑116 cells. Additionally, suppression of p53 using a specific inhibitor, pifithrin‑α, abrogated the pro‑apoptotic effects of Scutellarin in HCT‑116 cells. Collectively, Scutellarin reduced the viability and induced apoptosis of human colon carcinoma cells, potentially by regulating p53 and Bcl‑2/Bax expression. These data suggested that Scutellarin may be useful as a promising anti‑tumor drug for treating colon cancer.

  14. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE AND COLORECTAL CANCER, NUTRACEUTICAL ASPECTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Mazzola

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nutraceuticals constitute a group of functional foods that provide added health benefits for various disorders including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and colorectal cancer (CRC. The main groups of nutraceuticals include probiotics, prebiotics, omega 3 and antioxidants. Studies on Nutraceutical showed that this type of food possessed similar proprieties to drugs but with the benefit of not having side effects. This mini review shows that probiotics and prebiotics, when administered simultaneously with traditional therapies, reduce IBD symptoms and reduce synthesis of enzymes probably involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. Moreover, Omega 3 reduces the synthesis of inflammation mediators and prevents carcinogenesis through interaction with the signaling pathway NOTCH1/MMP9. Moreover, antioxidants reduce the inflammatory process by inhibiting the synthesis of inflammatory mediators, and inhibit the mechanisms of cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. In brief, nutraceuticals have gained a huge clinical interest since they could be used along with traditional therapy. Bioavailability studies of nutraceutical supplements guarantee a correct intake of the substance by oral administration, a matter which would not have been possible to have entirely with the consumption of regular food only.

  15. [Standardized and structured histopathological evaluation of colorectal polyps: a practical checklist against the background of the new WHO classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretton, G B; Tannapfel, A; Schmitt, W

    2011-07-01

    Gastroenterologists removing colorectal polyps expect standardized and well-structured pathological reports, providing them with all relevant data for the further clinical management of the patient. Over the last year, a task force of clinicians and pathologists has developed a checklist to improve and harmonize endoscopic and pathological reporting of colorectal polyps. This checklist concentrates more on concrete recommendations from evidence-based guidelines and established international classifications for daily practice rather than detailed molecular pathological pathways of carcinogenesis. These recommendations are based on the current S3 guidelines for colorectal cancer (the chapter entitled "Management of colorectal polyps"), the histomorphological consensus manuscript of the GI working group of the German Society for Pathology, as well as the current WHO classification for tumors of the digestive system.

  16. Diabetes promotes DMH-induced colorectal cancer by increasing the activity of glycolytic enzymes in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanglei Jia

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the association between diabetes mellitus and colorectal carcinogenesis as well as the possible mechanism involved in this interaction. Diabetes rat models were induced with a low dose of STZ followed by a low dose of DMH to induce colorectal cancer. The formation of ACF in the colon and the incidence, number and size of tumors were measured. The activity of glycolytic enzymes in colonic tissues was also measured. The results demonstrated that both the total number of ACF and the number of foci that contain a different number of crypts were increased in diabetic rats. At the end of the experimental treatment, the incidence, number and size of tumors were also increased in diabetic rats. Overall, these data indicated that diabetes increased the risk of colorectal cancer. The activity of HK and PK in colonic tissues was increased in diabetic rats, whereas the activity of PDH was decreased. In addition, the activities of these enzymes in intratumor were higher than that of in peritumor. These data indicated that the high rate of glycolysis may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis in diabetic rats.

  17. Oxidative Stress in the Pathogenesis of Colorectal Cancer: Cause or Consequence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Perše

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing support for the concept that reactive oxygen species, which are known to be implicated in a range of diseases, may be important progenitors in carcinogenesis, including colorectal cancer (CRC. CRC is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with the highest incidence rates in western countries. Sporadic human CRC may be attributable to various environmental and lifestyle factors, such as dietary habits, obesity, and physical inactivity. In the last decades, association between oxidative stress and CRC has been intensively studied. Recently, numerous genetic and lifestyle factors that can affect an individual's ability to respond to oxidative stress have been identified. The aim of this paper is to review evidence linking oxidative stress to CRC and to provide essential background information for accurate interpretation of future research on oxidative stress and CRC risk. Brief introduction of different endogenous and exogenous factors that may influence oxidative status and modulate the ability of gut epithelial cells to cope with damaging metabolic challenges is also provided.

  18. Detection of colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Christensen, Ib J.; Rasmussen, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Serological biomarkers may be an option for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study assessed eight cancer-associated protein biomarkers in plasma from subjects undergoing first time ever colonoscopy due to symptoms attributable to colorectal neoplasia. Plasma AFP, CA19-9, CEA...... value was 18% and the negative predictive value was 97%. Combinations of serological protein biomarkers provided a significant identification of subjects with high risk of the presence of colorectal neoplasia. The present set of biomarkers could become important adjunct in early detection of CRC....

  19. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Tanaka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/ inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01 and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05. The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue carcinogenesis associated with inflammation.

  20. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takuji, E-mail: tmntt08@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) & Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-Cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Shimizu, Masahito; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei [Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Mori, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Ogaki Municipal Hospital, 4-86 Minaminokawa-cho, Ogaki 503-8502 (Japan); Watanabe, Naoki [Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) & Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-Cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Naiki, Takafumi [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Moriwaki, Hisataka [Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yoshimi, Kazuto; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi [The Institute of Laboratory Animals, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-07-21

    Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females) and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females) rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm) for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01) and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05). The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue) carcinogenesis associated with inflammation.

  1. Cancer associated epigenetic transitions identified by genome-wide histone methylation binding profiles in human colorectal cancer samples and paired normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enroth, Stefan; Rada-Iglesisas, Alvaro; Andersson, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Despite their well-established functional roles, histone modifications have received less attention than DNA methylation in the cancer field. In order to evaluate their importance in colorectal cancer (CRC), we generated the first genome-wide histone modification profiles in paired normal colon...

  2. Potential markers for early diagnostics of Colorectal cancer and Inflammatory bowel disease in humans : intestinal microorganisms and immune system (teammates or rivals)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, P.; Kučerová, Petra; Červinková, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2017), s. 59-64 E-ISSN 2560-8304 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1609 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : colorectal cancer * inflammatory bowel disease * immune markers Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. Gallstones and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of gallstone disease in 145 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer was compared with gallstone prevalence in 4,159 subjects randomly selected from a population. The group of patients had a significantly higher prevalence of gallstone disease than the population (odds ratio = 1.......59; 95 percent confidence limits 1.04-2.45), whereas cholecystectomies occurred with equal frequency in the two groups. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more right-sided cancers in patients with gallstones than in patients without. These results, together with available literature, give...... substantial evidence for an association between gallstones and colorectal cancer, an association which is not due to cholecystectomy being a predisposing factor to colorectal cancer. Sporadic findings of an association between cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer can be explained by the above relationship....

  4. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  5. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  6. Alcohol metabolism: role in toxicity and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Thomas M; Ronis, Martin J J; Seitz, Helmut K; Albano, Emanuele; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lieber, Charles S

    2003-02-01

    This article contains the proceedings of a symposium at the 2002 RSA Meeting in San Francisco, organized and co-chaired by Thomas M. Badger, Paul Shih-Jiun Yin, and Helmut Seitz. The presentations were (1) First-pass metabolism of ethanol: Basic and clinical aspects, by Charles Lieber; (2) Intracellular CYP2E1 transport, oxidative stress, cytokine release, and ALD, by Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg; (3) Pulsatile ethanol metabolism in intragastric infusion models: Potential role in toxic outcomes, by Thomas M. Badger and Martin J.J. Ronis; (4) Free radicals, adducts, and autoantibodies resulting from ethanol metabolism: Role in ethanol-associated toxicity, by Emanuele Albano; and (5) Gastrointestinal metabolism of ethanol and its possible role in carcinogenesis, by Helmut Seitz.

  7. Role of retinoic receptors in lung carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyi-Vamos Ferenc

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several in vitro and in vivo studies have examined the positive and negative effects of retinoids (vitamin A analogs in premalignant and malignant lesions. Retinoids have been used as chemopreventive and anticancer agents because of their pleiotropic regulator function in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation and apoptosis through interaction with two types of nuclear receptors: retinoic acid receptors and retinoid X receptors. Recent investigations have gradually elucidated the function of retinoids and their signaling pathways and may explain the failure of earlier chemopreventive studies. In this review we have compiled basic and recent knowledge regarding the role of retinoid receptors in lung carcinogenesis. Sensitive and appropriate biological tools are necessary for screening the risk population and monitoring the efficacy of chemoprevention. Investigation of retinoid receptors is important and may contribute to the establishment of new strategies in chemoprevention for high-risk patients and in the treatment of lung cancer.

  8. Spatial Measures of Genetic Heterogeneity During Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, K; Ryser, M D; Leder, K; Foo, J

    2017-02-01

    In this work we explore the temporal dynamics of spatial heterogeneity during the process of tumorigenesis from healthy tissue. We utilize a spatial stochastic model of mutation accumulation and clonal expansion in a structured tissue to describe this process. Under a two-step tumorigenesis model, we first derive estimates of a non-spatial measure of diversity: Simpson's Index, which is the probability that two individuals sampled at random from the population are identical, in the premalignant population. We next analyze two new measures of spatial population heterogeneity. In particular we study the typical length scale of genetic heterogeneity during the carcinogenesis process and estimate the extent of a surrounding premalignant clone given a clinical observation of a premalignant point biopsy. This evolutionary framework contributes to a growing literature focused on developing a better understanding of the spatial population dynamics of cancer initiation and progression.

  9. Intestine-specific homeobox (ISX) induces intestinal metaplasia and cell proliferation to contribute to gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Soichiro; Shibata, Wataru; Kameta, Eri; Sato, Takeshi; Ishii, Yasuaki; Kaneko, Hiroaki; Miwa, Haruo; Sasaki, Tomohiko; Tamura, Toshihide; Kondo, Masaaki; Maeda, Shin

    2016-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces chronic inflammation and intestinal metaplasia (IM) through genetic and epigenetic changes and activation of intracellular signaling pathways that contribute to gastric carcinogenesis. However, the precise mechanism of IM in gastric carcinogenesis has not been fully elucidated. We previously found that intestine-specific homeobox (ISX) mRNA expression increased in organoids cultured from Helicobacter-infected mouse mucosa. In this study, we elucidate the role of ISX in the development of IM and gastric carcinogenesis. ISX expression was assessed in Helicobacter-infected mouse and human gastric mucosa. MKN45 gastric cancer cells were co-cultured with H. pylori to determine whether Helicobacter infection induced ISX expression. We established stable MKN45 transfected cells expressing ISX (Stable-ISX MKN45) and performed a spheroid colony formation assay and a xenograft model. We performed ISX immunohistochemistry in cancer and adjacent gastric tissues. ISX expression was increased in mouse and human gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter. The presence of IM and H. pylori infection in human stomach was correlated with ISX expression. H. pylori induced ISX mRNA and protein expression. CDX1/2, cyclinD1, and MUC2 were upregulated in Stable-ISX MKN45, whereas MUC5AC was downregulated. Stable-ISX MKN45 cells formed more spheroid colonies, and had high tumorigenic ability. ISX expression in gastric cancer and adjacent mucosa were correlated. ISX expression induced by H. pylori infection may lead to IM and hyperproliferation of gastric mucosa through CDX1/2 and cyclinD1 expression, contributing to gastric carcinogenesis.

  10. Colorectal polyps in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Kalpesh; Fishman, Douglas S; Gilger, Mark A

    2012-10-01

    Colorectal polyps are a common cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in children. This review updates the information on colorectal polyps and summarizes the recent advances in genetics, diagnosis, and treatment of polyps in the large intestine. A review of recent literature regarding colorectal polyps demonstrates an estimated detected prevalence of 6.1% overall and 12.0% among those with lower gastrointestinal bleeding during pediatric colonoscopy. Non-Caucasian races (e.g., black and Hispanic) are at higher risk for colorectal polyps in childhood. Recent data show juvenile polyps may recur in approximately 45% of children with multiple polyps and 17% of children with solitary polyps. A clinical trial showed that celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, significantly reduced the number of colorectal polyps in children with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Ethical challenges related to genetic tests for FAP have been newly examined. The utility of novel endoscopic techniques (e.g., enteroscopy) in Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome to prevent intussusception have been newly described. Although colorectal polyps in children are generally benign and easily removed, careful clinical evaluation and ongoing research are needed to identify the small proportion of children at risk for cancer. The current paradigm of using the polyp number at presentation as a primary determinant of subsequent surveillance may be inadequate for many patients.

  11. DNA methylation patterns in blood of patients with colorectal cancer and adenomatous colorectal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinotti, Elisa; Melson, Joshua; Liggett, Thomas; Melnikov, Anatoliy; Yi, Qilong; Replogle, Charles; Mobarhan, Sohrab; Boni, Luigi; Segato, Sergio; Levenson, Victor

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are currently suboptimal. Blood-based screening could improve rates of earlier detection for CRC and adenomatous colorectal polyps. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of plasma-based detection of early CRC and adenomatous polyps using array-mediated analysis methylation profiling of 56 genes implicated in carcinogenesis. Methylation of 56 genes in patients with Stages I and II CRC (N=30) and those with adenomatous polyps (N=30) were compared with individuals who underwent colonoscopy and were found to have neither adenomatous changes nor CRC. Composite biomarkers were developed for adenomatous polyps and CRC, and their sensitivity and specificity was estimated using five-fold cross validation. Six promoters (CYCD2, HIC1, PAX 5, RASSF1A, RB1 and SRBC) were selected for the biomarker, which differentiated CRC patients and controls with 84% sensitivity and 68% specificity. Three promoters (HIC1, MDG1 and RASSF1A) were selected for the biomarker, which differentiated patients with adenomatous polyps and controls with sensitivity of 55% and specificity of 65%. Methylation profiling of plasma DNA can detect early CRC with significant accuracy and shows promise as a methodology to develop biomarkers for CRC screening. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  12. Cytotoxic activity of extracts and crude saponins from Zanthoxylum armatum DC. against human breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-468) and colorectal (Caco-2) cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Fiaz; Najum Us Saqib, Qazi; Waheed, Abdul

    2017-07-17

    Zanthoxylum armatum DC has been an important traditional plant known for its medicinal properties. It is well known for its antimicrobial, larvicidal and cytotoxic activities. The potential anticancer effects of the methanol extract and the crude saponins from fruit, bark and leaves of Z. armatum on breast (MDA-MB-468 and MCF-7) and colorectal (Caco-2) cancer cell lines using MTT, neutral red uptake(NRU) and DAPI stain assays were evaluated. In MTT assay the methanol extract of fruit (Zf), bark (Zb) and leaves (Zl) of Zanthoxylum armatum, showed significant and dose dependent growth inhibition of MCF-7, MDA MB-468 and Caco-2 cancer cell lines in a dose of 200 μg/ml and above. The saponins (Zf.Sa, Zb.Sa and Zl.Sa) showed significant activity against MDA MB-468 (95, 94.5 and 85.3%) as compared to MCF-7 (79.8, 9.43, 49.08%) and Caco-2 (75.8, 61.8, 68.62%) respectively. The extracts were further tested in more sensitive NRU assay and its was found that Zf extract showed higher cytotoxic activity as compared to Zb and Zl extracts with 100 μg/ml concentration. The breast cancer cell lines showed more sensitivity toward the crude saponins from fruit and bark with maximum inhibition of up to 93.81(±2.32) % with respect to 71.19(± 2.76) of Actinomycin-D. DAPI staining experiment showed that saponins from fruit induced apoptosis mode of cell death in all three types of cell lines while saponins form leaves and bark showed similar results against MDA MB-468 indicated by nuclear fragmentation and chromatin condensation. The effect of saponins from fruit, bark and leaves (Zf.Sa, Zb.Sa and Zl.Sa) against Caco-2 cell lines inhibited the growth of Caco-2 by 53.16 (±3.31) %, 66.43 (± 3.24) and 45.96 (± 10.67) respectively with respect to Actinomycin-D (4 μM) which showed the growth inhibition of 65.40(±4.29) %. The current study clearly demonstrates that the extract and crude saponins from fruit, bark and leaves of traditional medicinal plant Zanthoxyllum armatum DC

  13. Colorectal Carcinoma: A General Overview and Future Perspectives in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Mármol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death. Most cases of CRC are detected in Western countries, with its incidence increasing year by year. The probability of suffering from colorectal cancer is about 4%–5% and the risk for developing CRC is associated with personal features or habits such as age, chronic disease history and lifestyle. In this context, the gut microbiota has a relevant role, and dysbiosis situations can induce colonic carcinogenesis through a chronic inflammation mechanism. Some of the bacteria responsible for this multiphase process include Fusobacterium spp, Bacteroides fragilis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. CRC is caused by mutations that target oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and genes related to DNA repair mechanisms. Depending on the origin of the mutation, colorectal carcinomas can be classified as sporadic (70%; inherited (5% and familial (25%. The pathogenic mechanisms leading to this situation can be included in three types, namely chromosomal instability (CIN, microsatellite instability (MSI and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP. Within these types of CRC, common mutations, chromosomal changes and translocations have been reported to affect important pathways (WNT, MAPK/PI3K, TGF-β, TP53, and mutations; in particular, genes such as c-MYC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, PTEN, SMAD2 and SMAD4 can be used as predictive markers for patient outcome. In addition to gene mutations, alterations in ncRNAs, such as lncRNA or miRNA, can also contribute to different steps of the carcinogenesis process and have a predictive value when used as biomarkers. In consequence, different panels of genes and mRNA are being developed to improve prognosis and treatment selection. The choice of first-line treatment in CRC follows a multimodal approach based on tumour-related characteristics and usually comprises surgical resection followed by chemotherapy combined

  14. Colorectal Carcinoma: A General Overview and Future Perspectives in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mármol, Inés; Sánchez-de-Diego, Cristina; Pradilla Dieste, Alberto; Cerrada, Elena; Rodriguez Yoldi, María Jesús

    2017-01-19

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death. Most cases of CRC are detected in Western countries, with its incidence increasing year by year. The probability of suffering from colorectal cancer is about 4%-5% and the risk for developing CRC is associated with personal features or habits such as age, chronic disease history and lifestyle. In this context, the gut microbiota has a relevant role, and dysbiosis situations can induce colonic carcinogenesis through a chronic inflammation mechanism. Some of the bacteria responsible for this multiphase process include Fusobacterium spp, Bacteroides fragilis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli . CRC is caused by mutations that target oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and genes related to DNA repair mechanisms. Depending on the origin of the mutation, colorectal carcinomas can be classified as sporadic (70%); inherited (5%) and familial (25%). The pathogenic mechanisms leading to this situation can be included in three types, namely chromosomal instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Within these types of CRC, common mutations, chromosomal changes and translocations have been reported to affect important pathways (WNT, MAPK/PI3K, TGF-β, TP53), and mutations; in particular, genes such as c-MYC, KRAS , BRAF , PIK3CA , PTEN , SMAD2 and SMAD4 can be used as predictive markers for patient outcome. In addition to gene mutations, alterations in ncRNAs, such as lncRNA or miRNA, can also contribute to different steps of the carcinogenesis process and have a predictive value when used as biomarkers. In consequence, different panels of genes and mRNA are being developed to improve prognosis and treatment selection. The choice of first-line treatment in CRC follows a multimodal approach based on tumour-related characteristics and usually comprises surgical resection followed by chemotherapy combined with

  15. Reduced expression of EphA5 is associated with lymph node metastasis, advanced TNM stage, and poor prognosis in colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shudong; Feng, Jia; Jin, Qin; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shu

    2017-05-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is the third most common cancer and a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The prognosis of patients has improved markedly over the last 15 years because of the introduction of new therapy including molecular target drugs. To comprehensively understand the molecular process of carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma is essential for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. EphA5 is a member of the Eph family and plays a critical role in carcinogenesis of lung cancer, prostate cancer, and breast cancer. The expression profile and the role of EphA5 in colorectal carcinoma have not been well investigated till now. In this study, a set of colorectal carcinoma specimens was subjected to immunohistochemical assay using an EphA5 specific antibody. The relationship between the expression of EphA5 and clinicopathological parameters was statistically analyzed. EphA5 was positively expressed in all tested normal mucosa specimens (120/120, 100%) and partly in colorectal carcinoma specimens (70/120, 58.3%). The loss of EphA5 protein was associated with depth of wall invasion (P=0.002), poor tumor differentiation (Pcarcinoma and it may be a new therapeutic target for colorectal carcinoma.

  16. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  17. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Dr. ... patients know to help determine the best colon cancer screening test for them? Colonoscopy is considered the gold ...

  18. An essential role of Ffar2 (Gpr43) in dietary fibre-mediated promotion of healthy composition of gut microbiota and suppression of intestinal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprakasam, S; Gurav, A; Paschall, A V; Coe, G L; Chaudhary, K; Cai, Y; Kolhe, R; Martin, P; Browning, D; Huang, L; Shi, H; Sifuentes, H; Vijay-Kumar, M; Thompson, S A; Munn, D H; Mellor, A; McGaha, T L; Shiao, P; Cutler, C W; Liu, K; Ganapathy, V; Li, H; Singh, N

    2016-06-27

    Composition of the gut microbiota has profound effects on intestinal carcinogenesis. Diet and host genetics play critical roles in shaping the composition of gut microbiota. Whether diet and host genes interact with each other to bring specific changes in gut microbiota that affect intestinal carcinogenesis is unknown. Ability of dietary fibre to specifically increase beneficial gut microbiota at the expense of pathogenic bacteria in vivo via unknown mechanism is an important process that suppresses intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis. Free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2 or GPR43) is a receptor for short-chain fatty acids (acetate, propionate and butyrate), metabolites of dietary fibre fermentation by gut microbiota. Here, we show FFAR2 is down modulated in human colon cancers than matched adjacent healthy tissue. Consistent with this, Ffar2(-/-) mice are hypersusceptible to development of intestinal carcinogenesis. Dietary fibre suppressed colon carcinogenesis in an Ffar2-dependent manner. Ffar2 played an essential role in dietary fibre-mediated promotion of beneficial gut microbiota, Bifidobacterium species (spp) and suppression of Helicobacter hepaticus and Prevotellaceae. Moreover, numbers of Bifidobacterium is reduced, whereas those of Prevotellaceae are increased in human colon cancers than matched adjacent normal tissue. Administration of Bifidobacterium mitigated intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis in Ffar2(-/-) mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that interplay between dietary fibre and Ffar2 play a key role in promoting healthy composition of gut microbiota that stimulates intestinal health.

  19. Gene expression profiling signatures for the diagnosis and prevention of oral cavity carcinogenesis-genome-wide analysis using RNA-seq technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Han; Urvalek, Alison M; Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Zhang, Tuo; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2015-09-15

    We compared the changes in global gene expression between an early stage (the termination of the carcinogen treatment and prior to the appearance of frank tumors) and a late stage (frank squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)) of tongue carcinogenesis induced by the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO) in a mouse model of human oral cavity and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Gene ontology and pathway analyses show that increases in "cell cycle progression" and "degradation of basement membrane and ECM pathways" are early events during SCC carcinogenesis and that changes in these pathways are even greater in the actual tumors. Myc, NFκB complex (NFKB1/RELA), and FOS transcription networks are the major transcriptional networks induced in early stage tongue carcinogenesis. Decreases in metabolism pathways, such as in "tricarboxylic acid cycle" and "oxidative phosphorylation", occurred only in the squamous cell carcinomas and not in the early stages of carcinogenesis. We detected increases in ALDH1A3, PTGS2, and KRT1 transcripts in both the early and late stages of carcinogenesis. The identification of the transcripts and pathways that change at an early stage of carcinogenesis provides potentially useful information for early diagnosis and for prevention strategies for human tongue squamous cell carcinomas.

  20. Normalizing Microbiota-Induced Retinoic Acid Deficiency Stimulates Protective CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Immunity in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Krois, Charles R; Kenkel, Justin A; Pham, Tho D; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel A; Napoli, Joseph L; Engleman, Edgar G

    2016-09-20

    Although all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA signaling promoted tumorigenesis, whereas atRA supplementation reduced tumor burden. The benefit of atRA treatment was mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which were activated due to MHCI upregulation on tumor cells. Consistent with these findings, increased colonic expression of the atRA-catabolizing enzyme, CYP26A1, correlated with reduced frequencies of tumoral cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and with worse disease prognosis in human CRC. These results reveal a mechanism by which microbiota drive colon carcinogenesis and highlight atRA metabolism as a therapeutic target for CRC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gastric microbiota and carcinogenesis: the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Dias-Jácome

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have revealed a complex microbial community in the stomach that could also contribute to the development of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to present recent scientific evidence regarding the role of non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria in gastric carcinogenesis. Methods: A systematic review of original articles published in PubMed in the last ten years related to gastric microbiota and gastric cancer in humans was performed. Results: Thirteen original articles were included. The constitution of gastric microbiota appears to be significantly affected by gastric cancer and premalignant lesions. In fact, differences in gastric microbiota have been documented, depending on Helicobacter pylori status and gastric conditions, such as non-atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis can be associated with an increase in many bacteria (such as Lactobacillus coleohominis, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Acinetobacter baumannii as well as decrease in others (such as Porphyromonas spp, Neisseria spp, Prevotella pallens or Streptococcus sinensis. However, there is no conclusive data that confirms if these changes in microbiota are a cause or consequence of the process of carcinogenesis. Conclusions: Even though there is limited evidence in humans, microbiota differences between normal individuals, pre-malignant lesions and gastric cancer could suggest a progressive shift in the constitution of gastric microbiota in carcinogenesis, possibly resulting from a complex cross-talk between gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the specific role (if any of different microorganisms.

  2. Dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer and incident and recurrent adenoma in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Andrew T; Coleman, Helen G; Huang, Wen-Yi; Kitahara, Cari M; Cantwell, Marie M; Berndt, Sonja I

    2015-01-01

    distal colon cancer and that this effect of dietary fiber, particularly from cereals and fruit, may begin early in colorectal carcinogenesis. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01696981. PMID:26269366

  3. Dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer and incident and recurrent adenoma in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Andrew T; Coleman, Helen G; Huang, Wen-Yi; Kitahara, Cari M; Cantwell, Marie M; Berndt, Sonja I

    2015-10-01

    fiber, particularly from cereals and fruit, may begin early in colorectal carcinogenesis. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01696981. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Lactoferrin Deficiency Promotes Colitis-Associated Colorectal Dysplasia in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qiurong; Zheng, Ying; Fan, Songqing; Qin, Zailong; Li, Nan; Tang, Anliu; Ai, Feiyan; Zhang, Xuemei; Bian, Yanhui; Dang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Yanhong; Xiong, Wei; Yan, Qun; Ma, Jian; Li, Guiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Nonresolving inflammatory processes affect all stages of carcinogenesis. Lactoferrin, a member of the transferrin family, is involved in the innate immune response and anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and anti-tumor activities. We previously found that lactoferrin is significantly down-regulated in specimens of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and negatively associated with tumor progression, metastasis, and prognosis of patients with NPC. Additionally, lactoferrin expression levels are decreased in colorectal cancer as compared with normal tissue. Lactoferrin levels are also increased in the various phases of inflammation and dysplasia in an azoxymethane–dextran sulfate sodium (AOM-DSS) model of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC). We thus hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory function of lactoferrin may contribute to its anti-tumor activity. Here we generated a new Lactoferrin knockout mouse model in which the mice are fertile, develop normally, and display no gross morphological abnormalities. We then challenged these mice with chemically induced intestinal inflammation to investigate the role of lactoferrin in inflammation and cancer development. Lactoferrin knockout mice demonstrated a great susceptibility to inflammation-induced colorectal dysplasia, and this characteristic may be related to inhibition of NF-κB and AKT/mTOR signaling as well as regulation of cell apoptosis and proliferation. Our results suggest that the protective roles of lactoferrin in colorectal mucosal immunity and inflammation-related malignant transformation, along with a deficiency in certain components of the innate immune system, may lead to serious consequences under conditions of inflammatory insult. PMID:25057912

  5. Maintenance Treatment with Cetuximab and BAY86-9766 Increases Antitumor Efficacy of Irinotecan plus Cetuximab in Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, Teresa; Napolitano, Stefania; Martini, Giulia; Martinelli, Erika; Cardone, Claudia; Normanno, Nicola; Vitagliano, Donata; Morgillo, Floriana; Fenizia, Francesca; Lambiase, Matilde; Formisano, Luigi; Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2015-09-15

    The use of cetuximab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer is limited by development of resistance. We have investigated in three models of highly epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent colorectal cancer xenografts, the effect of maintenance therapy with different kinase inhibitors alone or in combination with cetuximab, after cytotoxic treatment induction with irinotecan plus cetuximab. SW48, LIM 1215, and GEO colorectal cancer cell lines were engrafted into nude mice and treated for 3 weeks with irinotecan and/or cetuximab. The combined treatment induced a significant reduction of tumor size. A subsequent experiment was performed in all three xenograft models in which after an induction treatment with irinotecan plus cetuximab, mice were randomly assigned to one of the following treatments: control, cetuximab, regorafenib, a selective PIK3CA inhibitor (PIK3CAi), a selective MEK inhibitor (MEKi), and/or the combination of each inhibitor with cetuximab. The cetuximab plus MEKi treatment determined the best antitumor activity with suppression of tumor growth. This effect was prolonged for 13 to 15 weeks after cessation of therapy and was accompanied by prolonged survival. Antitumor activity was accompanied by inhibition of the MAPK and MEK pathways. Moreover, in the cetuximab plus MEKi-treated SW48 xenograft group, KRAS mutations as a mechanism of acquired resistance were detected in 25% of cases compared with 75% KRAS mutations in the MEKi-treated group. A possible strategy to prevent and/or overcome resistance to anti-EGFR inhibitors in metastatic colorectal cancer is a maintenance therapy with cetuximab plus MEKi after an initial treatment with irinotecan plus cetuximab. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (Pcells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells.

  7. Comparison of membrane fraction proteomic profiles of normal and cancerous human colorectal tissues with gel-assisted digestion and iTRAQ labeling mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Chen, Kuei-Tien; Fan, Chung-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Chen, Yu-Ju; Yu, Jau-Song; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chien, Chih-Wei; Wu, Chien-Peng; Hung, Ray-Ping; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to uncover the membrane protein profile differences between colorectal carcinoma and neighboring normal mucosa from colorectal cancer patients. Information from cellular membrane proteomes can be used not only to study the roles of membrane proteins in fundamental biological processes, but also to discover novel targets for improving the management of colorectal cancer patients. We used solvent extraction and a gel-assisted digestion method, together with isobaric tags with related and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) reagents to label tumoral and adjacent normal tissues in a pairwise manner (n = 8). For high-throughput quantification, these digested labeled peptides were combined and simultaneously analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Using the shotgun approach, we identified a total of 438 distinct proteins from membrane fractions of all eight patients. After comparing protein expression between cancerous and corresponding normal tissue, we identified 34 upregulated and eight downregulated proteins with expression changes greater than twofold (Student's t-test, P assisted digestion and iTRAQ labeling MS is a potential approach for uncovering and comparing membrane protein profiles of tissue samples that has the potential to identify novel biomarkers.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know before using this tool: The Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool was designed for use by doctors and other health providers with their patients. If you are not a health ... your personal risk of colorectal cancer. (Colorectal cancer is another way ...

  9. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be as fortunate as we are.” Reflecting what research has proven, Valvo’s message is clear. “Screening is so important! Early detection is early cure!” Read More "Colorectal Cancer" Articles Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey / The Importance of Early Detection / Developments in Colorectal ...

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α is Associated with Positive Lymph Node Status in Patients with Recurrence of Colorectal Cancer – Indications for Anti-TNF-α Agents in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grimm

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The progressive growth of malignancies is accompanied by a decline in the immune response through mechanisms which are poorly understood. Apoptosis and induction of inflammation by tumor released cytokines as tumor escape mechanisms have been proposed to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  11. Effect of Dendrobium officinale Extraction on Gastric Carcinogenesis in Rats

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    Yi Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrobium officinale (Tie Pi Shi Hu in Chinese has been widely used to treat different diseases in China. Anticancer effect is one of the important effects of Dendrobium officinale. However, the molecular mechanism of its anticancer effect remains unclear. In the present study, gastric carcinogenesis in rats was used to evaluate the effect of Dendrobium officinale on cancer, and its pharmacological mechanism was explored. Dendrobium officinale extracts (4.8 and 2.4 g/kg were orally administered to the rats of the gastric carcinogenesis model. Compared with the cancer model group, the high dose of Dendrobium officinale extracts significantly inhibited the rate of carcinogenesis. Further analysis revealed that Dendrobium officinale extracts could regulate the DNA damage, oxidative stress, and cytokines related with carcinogenesis and induce cell apoptosis in order to prevent gastric cancer.

  12. Effect of Dendrobium officinale Extraction on Gastric Carcinogenesis in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Lan, Xi-Ming; Xu, Guo-Liang; Sun, You-Zhi; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Dendrobium officinale (Tie Pi Shi Hu in Chinese) has been widely used to treat different diseases in China. Anticancer effect is one of the important effects of Dendrobium officinale. However, the molecular mechanism of its anticancer effect remains unclear. In the present study, gastric carcinogenesis in rats was used to evaluate the effect of Dendrobium officinale on cancer, and its pharmacological mechanism was explored. Dendrobium officinale extracts (4.8 and 2.4 g/kg) were orally administered to the rats of the gastric carcinogenesis model. Compared with the cancer model group, the high dose of Dendrobium officinale extracts significantly inhibited the rate of carcinogenesis. Further analysis revealed that Dendrobium officinale extracts could regulate the DNA damage, oxidative stress, and cytokines related with carcinogenesis and induce cell apoptosis in order to prevent gastric cancer. PMID:28119756

  13. Kirsten Ras* oncogene: significance of its discovery in human cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Nobuo; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Grieco, Michele

    2016-07-19

    The KRAS/ K-RAS oncogene is crucially involved in human cancer. The term "oncogene" -- i.e., a gene able to transform a normal cell into a tumor cell - was introduced in 1969, but the word was not used in the human carcinogenesis literature until much later. Transforming Kras and Hras oncogenes from the Kirsten and Harvey sarcoma viruses were not identified until the early 1980s due to the complicated structures of the viral genomes. Orthologs of these viral oncogenes were then found in transforming DNA fragments in human cancers in the form of mutated versions of the HRAS and KRAS proto-oncogenes. Thus, RAS genes were the first human oncogenes to be identified. Subsequent studies showed that mutated KRAS acted as an in vivo oncogenic driver, as indicated by studies of anti-EGFR therapy for metastatic colorectal cancers. This review addresses the historical background and experimental studies that led to the discovery of Kirsten Ras as an oncogene, the role of mutated KRAS in human carcinogenesis, and recent therapeutic studies of cancer cells with KRAS mutations.

  14. Chemopreventive activity of grape juice concentrate (G8000TM) on rat colon carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Roseane Mendes; Campanholo, Vanessa Maria de Lima Pazine; Paiotti, Ana Paula Ribeiro; Artigiani Neto, Ricardo; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Forones, Nora Manoukian

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide in both sexes, with similar geographic patterns between genders. This neoplasm has good prognosis if the disease is diagnosed at early stages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of red grape juice on the expression of COX-2 and Ki-67 expression following colon carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane (AOM). Thirty-five rats were randomly distributed into seven groups (n=5 per group): G1: SHAM or negative control received only saline; G2 (positive control): animals received 15 mg/kg AOM; G3: animals received 1% red grape juice 2 weeks before the administration of AOM; G4: animals received 2% red grape juice 2 weeks before the administration of AOM; G5: animals received 1% red grape juice 4 weeks after the last administration of AOM; G6: animals received 2% red grape juice 4 weeks after the last administration of AOM; G7: animals received only 2% red grape juice. COX-2 mRNA expression was reduced in animals treated with 1% red grape juice before AOM induction or 2% red grape juice after AOM induction. COX-2 immunoexpression was also reduced to groups treated with red grape juice at 1% before and after AOM induction or 2% red grape juice after AOM induction. Decreased immunoexpression of Ki-67 positive cells was observed in animals treated with 1% grape juice before AOM-treated animals. Taken together, grape juice concentrate is able to exert some chemopreventive activity on rat colon carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comfrey (Symphytum officinale. L. and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-Term Carcinogenesis Model Study

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    Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri Gomes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L. (Boraginaceae is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the ‘resistant hepatocyte model’ (RHM. In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs rise in about 1–2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po, and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann–Whitney and χ2 were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05, the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001 and mitotic figures (P = 0.007, as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA positive cells (P = 0.0001 and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05. On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001 and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001 was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model.

  16. Fusobacterium and colorectal cancer: causal factor or passenger? Results from a large colorectal cancer screening study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Efrat L; Werner, Simone; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Höfler, Daniela; Gierse, Indra-Jasmin; Butt, Julia; Balavarca, Yesilda; Cuk, Katarina; Brenner, Hermann

    2017-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in both men and women. The gut microbiome is increasingly recognized as having an important role in human health and disease. Fusobacterium has been identified in former studies as a leading gut bacterium associated with colorectal cancer, but it is still not clear if it plays an oncogenic role. In the current study, fecal samples were collected prior to bowel preparation from participants of screening colonoscopy in the German BliTz study. Using 16S rRNA gene analysis, we examined the presence and relative abundance of Fusobacterium in fecal samples from 500 participants, including 46, 113, 110 and 231 individuals with colorectal cancer, advanced adenomas, non-advanced adenomas and without any neoplasms, respectively. We found that the abundance of Fusobacterium in feces was strongly associated with the presence of colorectal cancer (P-value colorectal cancer development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. DNA repair, damage signaling and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Christophe; Salles, Bernard; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2008-04-02

    The First joint meeting of the German DGDR (German Society for Research on DNA Repair) and the French SFTG (French Society of Genotoxicology) on DNA Repair was held in Toulouse, France, from September 15 to 19, 2007. It was organized by Lisa Wiesmüller and Bernard Salles together with the scientific committee consisting of Gilbert de Murcia, Jean-Marc Egly, Frank Grosse, Karl-Peter Hopfner, Georges Iliakis, Bernd Kaina, Markus Löbrich, Bernard Lopez, Daniel Marzin and Alain Sarasin. This report summarizes information presented by the speakers (invited lectures and oral communications) during the seven plenary sessions, which include (1) excision repair, (2) DNA repair and carcinogenesis, (3) double-strand break repair, (4) replication in repair and lesion bypass, (5) cellular responses to genotoxic stress, (6) DNA repair machinery within the chromatin context and (7) genotoxicology and testing. A total of 23 plenary lectures, 32 oral communications and 66 posters were presented in this rather intense 4 days meeting, which stimulated extensive discussions and highly interdisciplinary scientific exchanges among the approximately 250 participants.

  18. Theories of endometrial carcinogenesis: a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, M E

    2000-03-01

    Historical observations have suggested that endometrial carcinomas vary in histopathologic appearance and clinical features. More recent, systematic studies have provided epidemiologic, clinicopathologic, and molecular support for these observations. Specifically, studies suggest that the most common type of endometrial carcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, develops from endometrial hyperplasia in the setting of excess estrogen exposure and usually pursues an indolent clinical course. In contrast, a minority of endometrial carcinomas, best represented by serous carcinoma, do not seem to be related to estrogenic risk factors or elevated serum hormone levels, and these tumors seem to develop from atrophic rather than hyperplastic epithelium. We have proposed that serous carcinomas develop from "endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma," a lesion representing malignant transformation of the endometrial surface epithelium. Whereas endometrioid carcinoma and endometrial hyperplasia are associated with microsatellite instability and ras and PTEN mutations, serous carcinoma and endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma are associated with p53 mutations and abnormal accumulation of p53 protein. Based on these data regarding the pathogenesis of endometrioid and serous carcinoma, we have proposed a dualistic model of endometrial carcinogenesis incorporating a "classic" estrogen-driven pathway and an "alternative" pathway seemingly unrelated to hormones. It is hoped that further studies may permit the extension and modification of this model and that these advances will lead to improved diagnosis, management, and prevention.

  19. Multistage chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaga, T.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Weeks, C.E.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Skin tumors in mice can be induced by the sequential application of a subthreshold dose of a carcinogen (initiation phase) followed by repetitive treatment with a noncarcinogenic tumor promoter. The initiation phase requires only a single application of either a direct acting carcinogen or a procarcinogen which has to be metabolized before being active and is essentially an irreversible step which probably involves a somatic cell mutation. There is a good correlation between the skin tumor initiating activites of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their ability to bind covalently to epidermal DNA. Laboratory results suggest that bay region diol-epoxides are the ultimate carcinogenic form of PAH carcinogens. Potent inhibitors and stimulators of PAH tumor initiation appear to affect the level of the PAH diol-epoxide reacting with specific DNA bases. Reecent data suggests that the tumor promotion stage involves at least three important steps: (1) the induction of embryonic looking cells (dark cells) in adult epidermis; (2) an increased production of epidermal prostaglandins and polyamines; (3) sustained proliferation of dark cells. Retinoic acid specifically inhibits step two whereas the anti-inflammatory steriod fluocinolone acetonide is a potent inhibitor of steps one and three. The mechanism and the importance of a specific sequence for each step in chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin are detailed.

  20. Hypoxia and Angiogenesis in Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinogenesis

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    Nicole Horrée

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α plays an essential role in the adaptive response of cells to hypoxia, triggering biologic events associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α and proteins in the HIF-1α pathway (Glut-1, CAIX, VEGF in paraffin-embedded specimens of normal (n = 17, premalignant (n = 17 and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (n = 39 was explored by immunohistochemistry, in relation to microvessel density (MVD. Results: HIF-1α overexpression was absent in inactive endometrium but present in hyperplasia (61% and carcinoma (87%, with increasing expression in a perinecrotic fashion pointing to underlying hypoxia. No membranous expression of Glut-1 and CAIX was noticed in inactive endometrium, in contrast with expression in hyperplasia (Glut-1 0%, CAIX 61%, only focal and diffuse and carcinoma (Glut-1 94.6%, CAIX 92%, both mostly perinecrotically. Diffuse HIF-1α was accompanied by activation of downstream targets. VEGF was significantly higher expressed in hyperplasias and carcinomas compared to inactive endometrium. MVD was higher in hyperplasias and carcinomas than in normal endometrium (p < 0.001. Conclusion: HIF-1α and its downstream genes are increasingly expressed from normal through premalignant to endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, paralleled by activation of its downstream genes and increased angiogenesis. This underlines the potential importance of hypoxia and its key regulator HIF-1α in endometrial carcinogenesis.

  1. Carcinogenesis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: precursor lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoni, Antonio; Licchetta, Antonella; Scarpa, Aldo; Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Simone, Gianni; Nardulli, Patrizia; Santini, Daniele; Aieta, Michele; Delcuratolo, Sabina; Silvestris, Nicola

    2013-09-30

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma displays a variety of molecular changes that evolve exponentially with time and lead cancer cells not only to survive, but also to invade the surrounding tissues and metastasise to distant sites. These changes include: genetic alterations in oncogenes and cancer suppressor genes; changes in the cell cycle and pathways leading to apoptosis; and also changes in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The most common alterations involve the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, the HER2 gene, and the K-ras gene. In particular, the loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in this tumor, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. However, other molecular events involved in pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathogenesis contribute to its development and maintenance, specifically epigenetic events. In fact, key tumor suppressors that are well established to play a role in pancreatic adenocarcinoma may be altered through hypermethylation, and oncogenes can be upregulated secondary to permissive histone modifications. Indeed, factors involved in tumor invasiveness can be aberrantly expressed through dysregulated microRNAs. This review summarizes current knowledge of pancreatic carcinogenesis from its initiation within a normal cell until the time that it has disseminated to distant organs. In this scenario, highlighting these molecular alterations could provide new clinical tools for early diagnosis and new effective therapies for this malignancy.

  2. Carcinogenesis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Precursor Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Delcuratolo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic adenocarcinoma displays a variety of molecular changes that evolve exponentially with time and lead cancer cells not only to survive, but also to invade the surrounding tissues and metastasise to distant sites. These changes include: genetic alterations in oncogenes and cancer suppressor genes; changes in the cell cycle and pathways leading to apoptosis; and also changes in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. The most common alterations involve the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene, the HER2 gene, and the K-ras gene. In particular, the loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in this tumor, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. However, other molecular events involved in pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathogenesis contribute to its development and maintenance, specifically epigenetic events. In fact, key tumor suppressors that are well established to play a role in pancreatic adenocarcinoma may be altered through hypermethylation, and oncogenes can be upregulated secondary to permissive histone modifications. Indeed, factors involved in tumor invasiveness can be aberrantly expressed through dysregulated microRNAs. This review summarizes current knowledge of pancreatic carcinogenesis from its initiation within a normal cell until the time that it has disseminated to distant organs. In this scenario, highlighting these molecular alterations could provide new clinical tools for early diagnosis and new effective therapies for this malignancy.

  3. Multiple mucin depleted foci, high proliferation and low apoptotic response in the onset of colon carcinogenesis of the PIRC rat, mutated in Apc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Luceri, Cristina; Soares, Paulo Victoria; Lodovici, Maura; Caderni, Giovanna

    2015-03-15

    PIRC rats (F344/NTac-Apc (am1137) ) mutated in the Apc gene spontaneously develop colon tumors thus mimicking familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) more closely than Apc-based rodent models developing tumors mostly in the small intestine. To understand whether microscopic dysplastic lesions precede the development of macroscopic tumors, PIRC rat colon was examined for the presence of mucin depleted foci (MDF), microadenomas of the rodent and human colon. Few MDF (about 4/animal) were already present in 1-month-old rats and their number rapidly increases to about 250 in 8-month-old rats. These lesions showed Wnt signaling activation (nuclear β-catenin accumulation) and were dramatically decreased by sulindac (320 ppm), a drug with chemopreventive activity (MDF/rat at 4 months: 156 ± 8 and 38 ± 6 in controls and sulindac-treated rats, respectively, means ± SE, p rats. Colon proliferation (PCNA expression) was significantly higher in PIRC rats. Notably, PIRC rat NM showed resistance to apoptosis since it sustained proliferation and had lower apoptosis after a cytotoxic insult with 1,2 dimethylhydrazine. Gene expression of Myc, p21, Birc5, Ogg1, Apex1 and Sod2 were significantly up-regulated in the NM of PIRC rat. The overall results put forward PIRC rat as useful model of colon carcinogenesis, either to study the process itself or to test in vivo chemopreventive agents in both short- and long-term studies. © 2014 UICC.

  4. Intestinal carcinogenesis of two food processing contaminants, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, in transgenic FVB min mice expressing human sulfotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Camilla; Meinl, Walter; Glatt, Hansruedi; Alexander, Jan; Knutsen, Helle K; Hjertholm, Hege; Rasmussen, Tone; Husøy, Trine

    2012-12-01

    Humans express sulfotransferases (SULTs) of the SULT1A subfamily in many tissues, whilst the single SULT1A gene present in rodents is mainly expressed in liver. The food processing contaminants, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), are bioactivated by human SULT1A1 and SULT1A2. FVB multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mice, which spontaneously develop tumors and flat aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in intestine, were crossed with transgenic FVB mice expressing human SULT1A1 and 1A2 (hSULT) in several tissues, giving rise to wild-type and Min mice with and without hSULT. One-week-old Min mice with or without hSULT were given HMF (375 or 750 mg/kg bw) or saline by gavage three times a week for 11 wk. In another experiment, the F1 generation received subcutaneous injections of 50 mg/kg bw PhIP or saline 1 wk before birth, and 1, 2, and 3 wk after birth. HMF did not affect the formation of tumors, but may have induced some flat ACF (incidence 15-20%) in Min mice with and without hSULT. No control mouse developed any flat ACF. With the limitation that these putative effects were weak, they were unaffected by hSULT expression. The carcinogenic effect of PhIP increased in the presence of hSULT, with a significant increase in both incidence (31-80%) and number of colonic tumors (0.4-1.3 per animal). Thus, intestinal expression of human SULT1A1 and 1A2 might increase the susceptibility to compounds bioactivated via this pathway implying that humans might be more susceptible than conventional rodent models. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus lytic reactivation regulation and its pathogenic role in carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongde; Liu, Sufang; Hu, Jianmin; Luo, Xiangjian; Li, Namei; M.Bode, Ann; Cao, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with several types of human cancers. In the host, EBV can establish two alternative modes of life cycle, known as latent or lytic and the switch from latency to the lytic cycle is known as EBV reactivation. Although EBV in cancer cells is found mostly in latency, a small number of lytically-infected cells promote carcinogenesis through the release of growth factors and oncogenic cytokines. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which EBV reactivation is controlled by cellular and viral factors, and discusses how EBV lytic infection contributes to human malignancies. PMID:27877083

  6. Dysregulated hepatic bile acids collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoning; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Chen, Wenlian; Yan, Jingyu; Zhang, Yunjing; Lei, Sha; Ge, Kun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Liu, Jiajian; Su, Mingming; Liu, Ping; Jia, Wei

    2016-10-15

    Dysregulated bile acids (BAs) are closely associated with liver diseases and attributed to altered gut microbiota. Here, we show that the intrahepatic retention of hydrophobic BAs including deoxycholate (DCA), taurocholate (TCA), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDCA), and taurolithocholate (TLCA) were substantially increased in a streptozotocin and high fat diet (HFD) induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-hepatocellular carcinoma (NASH-HCC) mouse model. Additionally chronic HFD-fed mice spontaneously developed liver tumors with significantly increased hepatic BA levels. Enhancing intestinal excretion of hydrophobic BAs in the NASH-HCC model mice by a 2% cholestyramine feeding significantly prevented HCC development. The gut microbiota alterations were closely correlated with altered BA levels in liver and feces. HFD-induced inflammation inhibited key BA transporters, resulting in sustained increases in intrahepatic BA concentrations. Our study also showed a significantly increased cell proliferation in BA treated normal human hepatic cell lines and a down-regulated expression of tumor suppressor gene CEBPα in TCDCA treated HepG2 cell line, suggesting that several hydrophobic BAs may collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis. © 2016 UICC.

  7. Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers of Molecular Alterations in Oral Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumache, Raluca; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Andreescu, Nicoleta; Puiu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, oral cancers represent the 6th most common type of cancer. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), which is the most common type of oral cancer, is present in about 90% of the patients with this malignancy. OSCC presents a survival rate up to 80%, if it is detected in an early stage (T1), but if detected at later stages (T3 - T4) the survival rate decreases to 20 - 30%. Due to these survival rates, it is obvious that there is an urgent need to introduce new molecular biomarkers for the early, noninvasive diagnosis of oral cancers from saliva. These biomarkers will aid in increasing the survival rate of the patients for the long-term. MicroRNAs are part of a class of small, non-coding RNAs that contain 19 - 23 nucleotides. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of biochemical mechanisms, cell proliferation, and other cellular mechanisms in the human body. Recently, due to the developments in the field of molecular genetics, salivary microRNAs became important biomarkers in early detection and monitoring of oral cancers by noninvasive methods. We want to present in this review the most important genetic and epigenetic biomarkers involved in oral carcinogenesis, focusing especially on the salivary microRNAs as biomarkers in early diagnosis of OSCC.

  8. Gastrins, iron and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Graham S

    2009-09-01

    This minireview explores the connections between circulating gastrins, iron status and colorectal cancer. The peptide hormone gastrin is a major regulator of acid secretion and a potent mitogen for normal and malignant gastrointestinal cells. Gastrins bind two ferric ions with μM affinity and, in the case of non-amidated forms of the hormone, iron binding is essential for biological activity. The ferric ion ligands have been identified as glutamates 7, 8 and 9 in the 18 amino acid peptide glycine-extended gastrin. An interaction between gastrin and transferrin was first demonstrated by covalent crosslinking techniques, and has been recently confirmed by surface plasmon resonance. We have therefore proposed that gastrins act as catalysts in the loading of transferrin with iron. Several recent lines of evidence, including the facts that the concentrations of circulating gastrins are increased in mice and humans with the iron overload disease haemochromatosis, and that transferrin saturation positively correlates with circulating gastrin concentrations, suggest that gastrins may be involved in iron homeostasis. In addition the recognition that ferric ions may play an unexpected role in the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins may assist in the development of new therapies for colorectal carcinoma.

  9. Epigenetic-Mediated Downregulation of μ-Protocadherin in Colorectal Tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateusz, Bujko; Paulina, Kober; Małgorzata, Statkiewicz; Michal, Mikula; Marcin, Ligaj; Lech, Zwierzchowski; Jerzy, Ostrowski; Aleksander, Siedlecki Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis involves altered cellular interaction and tissue morphology that partly arise from aberrant expression of cadherins. Mucin-like protocadherin is implicated in intercellular adhesion and its expression was found decreased in colorectal cancer (CRC). This study has compared MUPCDH (CDHR5) expression in three key types of colorectal tissue samples, for normal mucosa, adenoma, and carcinoma. A gradual decrease of mRNA levels and protein expression was observed in progressive stages of colorectal carcinogenesis which are consistent with reports of increasing MUPCDH 5′ promoter region DNA methylation. High MUPCDH methylation was also observed in HCT116 and SW480 CRC cell lines that revealed low gene expression levels compared to COLO205 and HT29 cell lines which lack DNA methylation at the MUPCDH locus. Furthermore, HCT116 and SW480 showed lower levels of RNA polymerase II and histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) as well as higher levels of H3K27 trimethylation at the MUPCDH promoter. MUPCDH expression was however restored in HCT116 and SW480 cells in the presence of 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DNA methyltransferase inhibitor). Results indicate that μ-protocadherin downregulation occurs during early stages of tumourigenesis and progression into the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms are involved in this silencing. PMID:25972897

  10. Periodontal disease, tooth loss and colorectal cancer risk: Results from the Nurses' Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Babic, Ana; Tworoger, Shelley S; Zhang, Libin; Wu, Kana; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles; Cho, Eunyoung; Michaud, Dominique S; Stampfer, Meir J; Yu, Yau-Hua; Kim, David; Zhang, Xuehong

    2017-02-01

    Periodontal diseases including tooth loss might increase systemic inflammation, lead to immune dysregulation and alter gut microbiota, thereby possibly influencing colorectal carcinogenesis. Few epidemiological studies have examined the association between periodontal diseases and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. We collected information on the periodontal disease (defined as history of periodontal bone loss) and number of natural teeth in the Nurses' Health Study. A total of 77,443 women were followed since 1992. We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) after adjustment for smoking and other known risk factors for CRC. We documented 1,165 incident CRC through 2010. Compared to women with 25-32 teeth, the multivariable HR (95% CI) for CRC for women with periodontal disease, HRs for CRC were 0.91 (95% CI 0.74-1.12) for periodontal disease, and 1.22 (95% CI 0.91-1.63) when limited to moderate to severe periodontal disease. The results were not modified by smoking status, body mass index or alcohol consumption. Women with fewer teeth, possibly moderate or severe periodontal disease, might be at a modest increased risk of developing CRC, suggesting a potential role of oral health in colorectal carcinogenesis. © 2016 UICC.

  11. Grape seed proanthocyanidin suppression of breast cell carcinogenesis induced by chronic exposure to combined 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone and benzo[a]pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoyu; Siriwardhana, Nalin; Rathore, Kusum; Lin, Degui; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2010-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women in northern America and northern Europe; dietary prevention is a cost-efficient strategy to reduce the risk of this disease. To identify dietary components for the prevention of human breast cancer associated with long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens, we studied the activity of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) in suppression of cellular carcinogenesis induced by repeated exposures to low doses of environmental carcinogens. We used combined carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), at picomolar concentrations, to repeatedly treat noncancerous, human breast epithelial MCF10A cells to induce cellular acquisition of cancer-related properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth, and acinar-conformational disruption. Using these properties as biological target endpoints, we verified the ability of GSPE to suppress combined NNK- and B[a]P-induced precancerous cellular carcinogenesis and identified the minimal, noncytotoxic concentration of GSPE required for suppressing precancerous cellular carcinogenesis. We also identified that hydroxysteroid-11-beta-dehydrogenase 2 (HSD11B2) may play a role in NNK- and B[a]P-induced precancerous cellular carcinogenesis, and its expression may act as a molecular target endpoint in GSPE's suppression of precancerous cellular carcinogenesis. And, the ability of GSPE to reduce gene expression of cytochrome-P450 enzymes CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, which can bioactivate NNK and B[a]P, possibly contributes to the preventive mechanism for GSPE in suppression of precancerous cellular carcinogenesis. Our model system with biological and molecular target endpoints verified the value of GSPE for the prevention of human breast cell carcinogenesis induced by repeated exposures to low doses of multiple environmental carcinogens. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Studies on promoting action in skin carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saffiotti, U.; Shubik, P.

    1963-01-01

    A number of substances were tested for carcinogenic promoting activity in Swiss mice by applying them twice weekly to the clipped dorsal skin, beginning 1 wk after a single application of 9,10-dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA; 1 to 1.5% in mineral oil). Tests with silver nitrate (10% aqueous), iodoacetic acid (0.9% in acetone, fumaric acid (1% in acetone), ethylphenylpropiolate (5% in acetone), trihydroxymethylanthraquinone. (Emodin; 0.5% in acetone), oleic alcohol, monostearin (5% in acetone) and sorbitan monolaurate were essentially negative; when a single application of croton oil (5% in mineral oil) was interspersed between the carcinogen and silver nitrate, 6/20 mice developed 14 benign tumors and 1 carcinoma. N-Dodecane showed moderate promoting activity (26 tumors, with 2 carcinomas, in 12/30 mice). Tests of several petroleum fractions showed high initial promoting activity (404 tumors, with 31 carcinomas, in 36/50 mice), but the activity disappeared on storage; while there was no carcinogenic activity in mice, in New Zealand albino rabbits the petroleum fractions alone produced considerable numbers of tumors. One application of DMBA, however, did increase tumor incidence and shorten the latent period. The hexane-eluted fraction of a methanolic extract of croton seeds (which had little vesicant activity), had all the promoting activity of the original croton oil; this could be demonstrated with uethan (20 mg/day ip for 5 days) as the initiator as well as with DMBA. In conclusion, the authors distinguish sharply between the promoting activity of compounds such as croton oil, which lead mostly to benign tumors (many of which regress spontaneously), and the additive effects of carcinogenic substances which may have a stimulatory effect on the second stage of carcinogenesis; for this additive carcinogenic effect, they suggest the term developing action. Other studies on croton oil are also reviewed.

  13. The multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene polymorphism G-rs3789243-A is not associated with disease susceptibility in Norwegian patients with colorectal adenoma and colorectal cancer; a case control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, V.; Agerstjerne, L.; Jensen, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Smoking, dietary factors, and alcohol consumption are known life style factors contributing to gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. Genetic variations in carcinogen handling may affect cancer risk. The multidrug resistance 1(MDR1/ABCB1) gene encodes the transport protein P-glycoprotein (a...... in inflammation, and may thereby affect the risk of malignity. Hence, genetic variations that modify the function of P-glycoprotein may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have previously found an association between the MDR1 intron 3 G-rs3789243-A polymorphism and the risk of CRC...... was found between the MDR1 polymorphism (G-rs3789243-A) and colorectal adenomas or cancer. Carriers of the variant allele of MDR1 intron 3 had odds ratios (95% CI) of 0.97 (0.72-1.29) for developing adenomas, and 0.70 (0.41-1.21) for colorectal cancer, respectively, compared to homozygous wild type carriers...

  14. Prevention of azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate-induced mouse colon carcinogenes