WorldWideScience

Sample records for human color perception

  1. Prediction of object detection, recognition, and identification [DRI] ranges at color scene images based on quantifying human color contrast perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Ephi; Levin, Ilia; Yaron, Ofer

    2016-10-01

    We propose a novel approach to predict, for specified color imaging system and for objects with known characteristics, their detection, recognition, identification (DRI) ranges in a colored dynamic scene, based on quantifying the human color contrast perception. The method refers to the well established L*a*b*, 3D color space. The nonlinear relations of this space are intended to mimic the nonlinear response of the human eye. The metrics of L*a*b* color space is such that the Euclidian distance between any two colors in this space is approximately proportional to the color contrast as perceived by the human eye/brain. The result of this metrics leads to the outcome that color contrast of any two points is always greater (or equal) than their equivalent grey scale contrast. This meets our sense that looking on a colored image, contrast is superior to the gray scale contrast of the same image. Yet, color loss by scattering at very long ranges should be considered as well. The color contrast derived from the distance between the colored object pixels and to the nearby colored background pixels, as derived from the L*a*b* color space metrics, is expressed in terms of gray scale contrast. This contrast replaces the original standard gray scale contrast component of that image. As expected, the resulted DRI ranges are, in most cases, larger than those predicted by the standard gray scale image. Upon further elaboration and validation of this method, it may be combined with the next versions of the well accepted TRM codes for DRI predictions. Consistent prediction of DRI ranges implies a careful evaluation of the object and background color contrast reduction along the range. Clearly, additional processing for reconstructing the objects and background true colors and hence the color contrast along the range, will further increase the DRI ranges.

  2. Real-time multiple human perception with color-depth cameras on a mobile robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Reardon, Christopher; Parker, Lynne E

    2013-10-01

    The ability to perceive humans is an essential requirement for safe and efficient human-robot interaction. In real-world applications, the need for a robot to interact in real time with multiple humans in a dynamic, 3-D environment presents a significant challenge. The recent availability of commercial color-depth cameras allow for the creation of a system that makes use of the depth dimension, thus enabling a robot to observe its environment and perceive in the 3-D space. Here we present a system for 3-D multiple human perception in real time from a moving robot equipped with a color-depth camera and a consumer-grade computer. Our approach reduces computation time to achieve real-time performance through a unique combination of new ideas and established techniques. We remove the ground and ceiling planes from the 3-D point cloud input to separate candidate point clusters. We introduce the novel information concept, depth of interest, which we use to identify candidates for detection, and that avoids the computationally expensive scanning-window methods of other approaches. We utilize a cascade of detectors to distinguish humans from objects, in which we make intelligent reuse of intermediary features in successive detectors to improve computation. Because of the high computational cost of some methods, we represent our candidate tracking algorithm with a decision directed acyclic graph, which allows us to use the most computationally intense techniques only where necessary. We detail the successful implementation of our novel approach on a mobile robot and examine its performance in scenarios with real-world challenges, including occlusion, robot motion, nonupright humans, humans leaving and reentering the field of view (i.e., the reidentification challenge), human-object and human-human interaction. We conclude with the observation that the incorporation of the depth information, together with the use of modern techniques in new ways, we are able to create an

  3. Digital color acquisition, perception, coding and rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine; Macaire, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    In this book the authors identify the basic concepts and recent advances in the acquisition, perception, coding and rendering of color. The fundamental aspects related to the science of colorimetry in relation to physiology (the human visual system) are addressed, as are constancy and color appearance. It also addresses the more technical aspects related to sensors and the color management screen. Particular attention is paid to the notion of color rendering in computer graphics. Beyond color, the authors also look at coding, compression, protection and quality of color images and videos.

  4. Artificial color perception using microwaves

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Debesh

    2013-01-01

    We report the feasibility of artificial color perception under microwave illumination using a standard microwave source and an antenna. We have sensed transmitted microwave power through color objects and have distinguished the colors by analyzing the sensed transmitted power. Experiments are carried out using a Gunn diode as the microwave source, some colored liquids as the objects and a microwave diode as the detector. Results are presented which open up an unusual but new way of perceiving colors using microwaves.

  5. Artificial color perception using microwaves

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury, Debesh; Caulfield, H. John

    2013-01-01

    We report the feasibility of artificial color perception under microwave illumination using a standard microwave source and an antenna. We have sensed transmitted microwave power through color objects and have distinguished the colors by analyzing the sensed transmitted power. Experiments are carried out using a Gunn diode as the microwave source, some colored liquids as the objects and a microwave diode as the detector. Results are presented which open up an unusual but new way of perceiving...

  6. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    2008-01-01

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a Colo

  7. Modeling human color categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Th.E.; Kisters, P.M.F.

    A unique color space segmentation method is introduced. It is founded on features of human cognition, where 11 color categories are used in processing color. In two experiments, human subjects were asked to categorize color stimuli into these 11 color categories, which resulted in markers for a

  8. Color Perception of the Textile and Clothing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雁; 李栋高; 陈之戈

    2004-01-01

    The color perception is related to color objects, vision system and central nervous system. The methods of evaluation, classification and prediction of the color perception are investigated and analyzed in this paper. The artificial neural networks are used for color perception, clustering and predicting based on the given data obtained from both objective measurement and subjective evaluation.

  9. Removal of Color Scratches from Old Motion Picture Films Exploiting Human Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Vitulano

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a unified model for both detection and restoration of line scratches on color movies is presented. It exploits a generalization of the light diffraction effect for modeling the shape of scratches, while perception laws are used for their automatic detection and removal. The detection algorithm has a high precision in terms of number of detected true scratches and reduced number of false alarms. The quality of the restored images is satisfying from a subjective (visual point of view if compared with the state-of-the-art approaches. The use of very simple operations in both detection and restoration phases makes the implemented algorithms appealing for their low computing time.

  10. Human preference for individual colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Stephen E.; Schloss, Karen B.

    2010-02-01

    Color preference is an important aspect of human behavior, but little is known about why people like some colors more than others. Recent results from the Berkeley Color Project (BCP) provide detailed measurements of preferences among 32 chromatic colors as well as other relevant aspects of color perception. We describe the fit of several color preference models, including ones based on cone outputs, color-emotion associations, and Palmer and Schloss's ecological valence theory. The ecological valence theory postulates that color serves an adaptive "steering' function, analogous to taste preferences, biasing organisms to approach advantageous objects and avoid disadvantageous ones. It predicts that people will tend to like colors to the extent that they like the objects that are characteristically that color, averaged over all such objects. The ecological valence theory predicts 80% of the variance in average color preference ratings from the Weighted Affective Valence Estimates (WAVEs) of correspondingly colored objects, much more variance than any of the other models. We also describe how hue preferences for single colors differ as a function of gender, expertise, culture, social institutions, and perceptual experience.

  11. The color of night: Surface color perception under dim illuminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Joel; Lutze, Margaret; Cao, Dingcai; Zele, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Several studies document rudimentary color vision under dim illumination. Here, hue perceptions of paper color samples were determined for a wide range of light levels, including very low light levels where rods alone mediate vision. The appearances of 24 paper color samples from the OSA Uniform Color Scales were gauged under successively dimmer illuminations from 10-0.0003 Lux. Triads of samples were chosen representing each of eight basic color categories; red, pink, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, and gray. Samples within each triad varied in lightness. Observers sorted samples into groups that they could categorize with specific color names. Above 0.32 Lux, observers sorted the samples into the originally chosen color groups with few exceptions. For 0.1-0.01 Lux, the red and orange samples were usually correctly identified as either red or orange. The remaining samples tended to be grouped into two categories, associated with the scotopic sample reflectance. The lowest reflectance samples were below threshold and were named black. The higher reflectance group was named predominately as green or blue-green (three observers; the fourth observer used blue or achromatic). At the three dimmest levels (< or = 0.0032 Lux) there continued to be conspicuous color percepts. Color categories were reliably assigned based on relative sample scotopic lightness. Of the samples above threshold, those with lower reflectance were classified as red or orange (all observers) and the higher reflectance samples as green or blue-green (three observers) or achromatic or blue (the fourth observer). Rods and L-cones presumably mediated color percepts at the intermediate light levels used in the study. At the three lowest light levels there were distinct color appearances mediated exclusively by rods. We speculate that at these light levels the visual system estimates probable colors based on prior natural experience.

  12. Human Preferences for Colorful Birds: Vivid Colors or Pattern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvie Lišková

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we found that the shape of a bird, rather than its color, plays a major role in the determination of human preferences. Thus, in the present study, we asked whether the preferences of human respondents towards uniformly shaped, colorful birds are determined by pattern rather than color. The experimental stimuli were pictures of small passerine birds of the family Pittidae possessing uniform shape but vivid coloration. We asked 200 participants to rank 43 colored and 43 identical, but grayscaled, pictures of birds. To find the traits determining human preferences, we performed GLM analysis in which we tried to explain the mean preference ranks and PC axes by the following explanatory variables: the overall lightness and saturation, edges (pattern, and the portion of each of the basic color hues. The results showed that the mean preference ranks of the grayscale set is explained mostly by the birds' pattern, whereas the colored set ranking is mostly determined by the overall lightness. The effect of colors was weaker, but still significant, and revealed that people liked blue and green birds. We found no significant role of the color red, the perception of which was acquired relatively recently in evolution.

  13. Effects of color and colored light on depth perception

    OpenAIRE

    Atlı, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Interior Architecture and Environment Design and the Institute of Economics and Social Sciences of Bilkent University, 2010. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2010. Includes bibliographical references leaves 75-78. The main purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between different objects and background colors, and depth perception in interior spaces. The experiment was conducted in two phases which consist of colored background...

  14. Color Perception and Factor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Hugh

    1986-01-01

    Provides background theory and an experiment relating to chemometrics. Describes the phenomenon where solutions are dichromatic or dichromic. Discusses the difficulty students have in describing such solutions that appear to be several different colors at the same time. (TW)

  15. Coloring night vision imagery for depth perception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Gu; Shaoyuan Sun; Jian'an Fang

    2009-01-01

    Depth perception for night vision(NV)imagery could largely improve scene comprehension.We present a novel scheme to give fused multi-band NV imagery smoothly natural color appearance as well as depth sense from color.Our approach is based on simulating color cues by varying saturation values of each object in the color NV image,in correspondence with the ratio between the infrared and low-light-level sensor outputs which in practice is the depth feature for same materials.We render the NV image segment-by-segment by taking advantage of image segmentation,dominant color transfer,saturation variation,and image fusion.Experiments have shown that the proposed scheme can achieve satisfying results.

  16. Perception of Coloration in Diotic Reverberant Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Linda K.

    These experiments explored the perception, termed coloration, of the frequency domain characterization of reverberant sound. The beginning premise was that the standard deviation, (sigma), of the room frequency response, H(f), was a good measure of coloration. Using simulated rooms, reverberant noise stimuli were created which differed only in their perceived frequency spectra and not in their perceived temporal characteristics. Four experiments were run. In two experiments subjects heard pairs of reverberant noises representing different rooms and made difference judgments; data from these experiments were analyzed using multidimensional scaling techniques. It was determined that coloration has both quantity and quality. Both quantity and quality of coloration are derived primarily from the early reflections, i.e., the first 10 msec, of a room's impulse response, h(t). Quantity of coloration is related to the standard deviation of H(f), but is best described by a model which uses a critical band-like filter to smooth H(f) before calculating the standard deviation, (sigma)(,CB). Quantity of coloration can be manipulated with little variation in coloration quality by varying the reflectivity, (beta), of the surfaces in a given room. Quality of coloration is a complex pitch-like quality associated with the particular reflections in a room. Differences in quality between rooms were described accurately by calculating the standard deviation of the difference, (sigma)(,CBDIF), between two smoothed room spectra. In the third experiment, subjects judged quantity of coloration in two tasks, a paired comparison task and an absolute judgment task, and (sigma)(,CB) was substantiated as a measure of quantity of coloration. In the last experiment, a Thurstone paired comparison task and analysis was used to determine that the range of the coloration quantity continuum is about 5 1/2 jnd's.

  17. Health risks occurring when color is percepted under led lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Kaptsov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with problems of color perception under LED lighting. We revealed that inadequate perception of a signal color by a driver led to greater risks of transport accidents. We reviewed both Jung-Helmholtz three-color hypothesis and a modern one based on fiber-optical approach to functioning of "Mueller cells and cones" system. We made an attempt to explain a number of effects related to visibility curves and time delays when defining color of light signals. Our research on assessing influence exerted by LED lighting on functional state and working capacity of railway workers during which we applied occupational selection techniques revealed negative changes. We proved there was a decrease in functional resistance to color sense between red and green signals as well as longer response time for complicated sight-motor reaction and significant decrease in readiness to emergency actions (resistance to monotony in examined individuals. The article also contains data on time peculiarities which are characteristic for defining signals color in relation to red signal (650 nm. We showed that when red color LEDs with wave length much shorter than 650 nm were used in signaling devices it caused risks of inadequate color detection, longer reaction to inhibiting signals, and greater possibility of transport accidents and negative events in everyday life. These peculiarities should be taken into account when designing traffic lights and other signaling devices which provide transport safety. We also proved that signaling traffic lights for transport systems should be designed allowing for physiology of color perception by a human visual analyzer; application of LEDs with wave length shorter than 650 nm should be absolutely excluded

  18. Synesthesia for color is linked to improved color perception but reduced motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banissy, Michael J; Tester, Victoria; Muggleton, Neil G; Janik, Agnieszka B; Davenport, Aimee; Franklin, Anna; Walsh, Vincent; Ward, Jamie

    2013-12-01

    Synesthesia is a rare condition in which one property of a stimulus (e.g., shape) triggers a secondary percept (e.g., color) not typically associated with the first. Work on synesthesia has predominantly focused on confirming the authenticity of synesthetic experience, but much less research has been conducted to examine the extent to which synesthesia is linked to broader perceptual differences. In the research reported here, we examined whether synesthesia is associated with differences in color and motion processing by comparing these abilities in synesthetes who experience color as their evoked sensation with nonsynesthetic participants. We show that synesthesia for color is linked to facilitated color sensitivity but decreased motion sensitivity. These findings are discussed in relation to the neurocognitive mechanisms of synesthesia and interactions between color and motion processing in typical adults.

  19. Exaggerated color perception in a patient with visual form agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiongjiong; Wu, Ming; Shen, Zheng

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies on visual form agnosic patients have shown that their color perception is relatively preserved when monochromatic figures are used. However, it is unclear whether their color perception remains normal when figures are composed of two parts in different colors. The results showed that patient X.F. had difficulty in naming both colors when the two colors were placed next to each other, and in discriminating the two-color figure from the figure presented in its larger color. In contrast, X.F. could name the two colors when they were physically separated. These data suggest that X.F. manifests exaggerated color perception, producing a color filling-in effect that may be mediated by her spared early visual area.

  20. Color differences and perceptive properties of prints made with microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raša Urbas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to establish whether addition on fragranced microcapsules influences on color values and perceptive properties of prints. For this purpose, three types of printing inks were used on two sets of the paper substrate. Color properties were measured by standard methods while perceptive properties were determined by subjective method. Research has shown that microcapsules cause small color differences while perceptive analyses gave very interesting results.

  1. Modeling human color categorization: Color discrimination and color memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heskes, T.; van den Broek, Egon; Lucas, P.; Hendriks, Maria A.; Vuurpijl, L.G.; Puts, M.J.H.; Wiegerinck, W.

    2003-01-01

    Color matching in Content-Based Image Retrieval is done using a color space and measuring distances between colors. Such an approach yields non-intuitive results for the user. We introduce color categories (or focal colors), determine that they are valid, and use them in two experiments. The experim

  2. Modeling human color categorization: Color discrimination and color memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heskes, T.; van den Broek, Egon; Lucas, P.; Hendriks, Maria A.; Vuurpijl, L.G.; Puts, M.J.H.; Wiegerinck, W.

    2003-01-01

    Color matching in Content-Based Image Retrieval is done using a color space and measuring distances between colors. Such an approach yields non-intuitive results for the user. We introduce color categories (or focal colors), determine that they are valid, and use them in two experiments. The

  3. COLOR PERCEPTION HISTOGRAM FOR IMAGE RETRIEVAL USING MULTIPLE SIMILARITY MEASURES

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    R. Malini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to increase the retrieval efficiency of proposed image retrieval system on the basis of color content. A new idea of feature extraction based on color perception histogram is proposed. First, the color histogram is constructed for HSV image. Secondly, the true color and grey color components are identified based on hue and intensity. The weight for true and grey color components is calculated using NBS distance. An updated histogram is constructed using weighted true and grey color values. The color features extracted from the updated histogram of query image and for all the images in image database are compared with existing color histogram based technique by using multiple similarity measures. Experimental results show that proposed image retrieval based on the color perception histogram gives higher retrieval performance in terms of high average precision and average recall with less computational complexity.

  4. S3-2: Colorfulness Perception Adapting to Natural Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Mizokami

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Our visual system has the ability to adapt to the color characteristics of environment and maintain stable color appearance. Many researches on chromatic adaptation and color constancy suggested that the different levels of visual processes involve the adaptation mechanism. In the case of colorfulness perception, it has been shown that the perception changes with adaptation to chromatic contrast modulation and to surrounding chromatic variance. However, it is still not clear how the perception changes in natural scenes and what levels of visual mechanisms contribute to the perception. Here, I will mainly present our recent work on colorfulness-adaptation in natural images. In the experiment, we examined whether the colorfulness perception of an image was influenced by the adaptation to natural images with different degrees of saturation. Natural and unnatural (shuffled or phase-scrambled images are used for adapting and test images, and all combinations of adapting and test images were tested (e.g., the combination of natural adapting images and a shuffled test image. The results show that colorfulness perception was influenced by adaptation to the saturation of images. A test image appeared less colorful after adaptation to saturated images, and vice versa. The effect of colorfulness adaptation was the strongest for the combination of natural adapting and natural test images. The fact that the naturalness of the spatial structure in an image affects the strength of the adaptation effect implies that the recognition of natural scene would play an important role in the adaptation mechanism.

  5. Perception of neon color spreading in 3-6-month-old infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiale; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K

    2009-12-01

    Although lots of studies about neon color spreading have been reported, few of these studies have focused on the perceptual development of it in human infants. Therefore, this study explores the perceptual development of neon color spreading in infants. In experiment 1, we examined 3-6-month-olds' perception of neon color spreading in static conditions. In experiment 2, we examined 3-6-month-olds' perception of neon color spreading in moving conditions. Our results suggest that while only 5-6-month-old infants show a preference for neon color spreading in the static condition, 3-4-month-old infants also prefer neon color spreading if motion information is available.

  6. Lateralization of categorical perception of color changes with color term acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, A.; Drivonikou, G. V.; Clifford, A.; Kay, P; Regier, T.; Davies, I. R. L.

    2008-01-01

    Categorical perception (CP) of color is the faster and more accurate discrimination of two colors from different categories than two colors from the same category, even when same- and different-category chromatic separations are equated. In adults, color CP is lateralized to the left hemisphere (LH), whereas in infants, it is lateralized to the right hemisphere (RH). There is evidence that the LH bias in color CP in adults is due to the influence of color terms in the LH. Here we show that th...

  7. P1-15: Categorical Color Perception of LED Illuminant Color for Deuteranomals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeko Oishi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Color information has great value in our everyday lives, but it is not mindful of people with color vision deficiency (CVD. We can choose several color names to categorize a lot of colors around us. Eleven color names (white, black, red, green, yellow, blue, brown, orange, pink, and gray are known as basic color categories, but people with CVD cannot necessarily describe colors as people who are color vision normal (CVN do. Previous studies showed that it was hard for people with CVD to discriminate illuminant color from object color, and their color perception changed largely depending on experimental conditions. In this study we investigated categorical color perception of illuminant color for deuteranomals, using a mixture of light which consists of a red, a green, and a blue LED as a test stimulus. We tested those stimuli with three luminance levels (180 cd/m2, 18 cd/m2, 1.8 cd/m2 and two visual angles (10 deg, 0.5 deg. Subjects were three deuteranomals and three people who are CVN. Our result showed that the categorical color of mild deuteranomals was similar to that of those who were CVN, but that of severe deuteranomals was not. Severe deuteranomals judged more low chromatic colors as achromatic colors than those who were CVN. The smaller visual angle or lower luminance level the test stimulus had, the more deuteranomals confused color. The results suggest that the effect of the Bezold-Brucke phenomenon is greater to deuteranomals than to those who are CVN. Furthermore, deuteranomals use not only chromatic information but also luminance information when they describe color.

  8. Simultaneous contrast and gamut relativity in achromatic color perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladusich, Tony

    2012-09-15

    Simultaneous contrast refers to the respective whitening or blackening of physically identical image regions surrounded by regions of low or high luminance, respectively. A common method of measuring the strength of this effect is achromatic color matching, in which subjects adjust the luminance of a target region to achieve an achromatic color match with another region. Here I present psychophysical data questioning the assumption--built into many models of achromatic color perception--that achromatic colors are represented as points in a one-dimensional (1D) perceptual space, or an absolute achromatic color gamut. I present an alternative model in which the achromatic color gamut corresponding to a target region is defined relatively, with respect to surround luminance. Different achromatic color gamuts in this model correspond to different 1D lines through a 2D perceptual space composed of blackness and whiteness dimensions. Each such line represents a unique gamut of achromatic colors ranging from black to white. I term this concept gamut relativity. Achromatic color matches made between targets surrounded by regions of different luminance are shown to reflect the relative perceptual distances between points lying on different gamut lines. The model suggests a novel geometrical approach to simultaneous contrast and achromatic color matching in terms of the vector summation of local luminance and contrast components, and sets the stage for a unified computational theory of achromatic color perception. 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

  9. Short-term memory affects color perception in context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olkkonen

    Full Text Available Color-based object selection - for instance, looking for ripe tomatoes in the market - places demands on both perceptual and memory processes: it is necessary to form a stable perceptual estimate of surface color from a variable visual signal, as well as to retain multiple perceptual estimates in memory while comparing objects. Nevertheless, perceptual and memory processes in the color domain are generally studied in separate research programs with the assumption that they are independent. Here, we demonstrate a strong failure of independence between color perception and memory: the effect of context on color appearance is substantially weakened by a short retention interval between a reference and test stimulus. This somewhat counterintuitive result is consistent with Bayesian estimation: as the precision of the representation of the reference surface and its context decays in memory, prior information gains more weight, causing the retained percepts to be drawn toward prior information about surface and context color. This interaction implies that to fully understand information processing in real-world color tasks, perception and memory need to be considered jointly.

  10. The influence of color on emotional perception of natural scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codispoti, Maurizio; De Cesarei, Andrea; Ferrari, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Is color a critical factor when processing the emotional content of natural scenes? Under challenging perceptual conditions, such as when pictures are briefly presented, color might facilitate scene segmentation and/or function as a semantic cue via association with scene-relevant concepts (e.g., red and blood/injury). To clarify the influence of color on affective picture perception, we compared the late positive potentials (LPP) to color versus grayscale pictures, presented for very brief (24 ms) and longer (6 s) exposure durations. Results indicated that removing color information had no effect on the affective modulation of the LPP, regardless of exposure duration. These findings imply that the recognition of the emotional content of scenes, even when presented very briefly, does not critically rely on color information.

  11. Physiological modeling for detecting degree of perception of a color-deficient person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, T; Prince, Shanthi

    2017-04-01

    Physiological modeling of retina plays a vital role in the development of high-performance image processing methods to produce better visual perception. People with normal vision have an ability to discern different colors. The situation is different in the case of people with color blindness. The aim of this work is to develop a human visual system model for detecting the level of perception of people with red, green and blue deficiency by considering properties like luminance, spatial and temporal frequencies. Simulation results show that in the photoreceptor, outer plexiform and inner plexiform layers, the energy and intensity level of the red, green and blue component for a normal person is proved to be significantly higher than for dichromats. The proposed method explains with appropriate results that red and blue color blindness people could not perceive red and blue color completely.

  12. Surface color perception and equivalent illumination models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, David H; Maloney, Laurence T

    2011-05-02

    Vision provides information about the properties and identity of objects. The ease with which we perceive object properties belies the difficulty of the underlying information-processing task. In the case of object color, retinal information about object reflectance is confounded with information about the illumination as well as about the object's shape and pose. There is no obvious rule that allows transformation of the retinal image to a color representation that depends primarily on object surface reflectance. Under many circumstances, however, object color appearance is remarkably stable across scenes in which the object is viewed. Here, we review a line of experiments and theory that aim to understand how the visual system stabilizes object color appearance. Our emphasis is on models derived from explicit analysis of the computational problem of estimating the physical properties of illuminants and surfaces from the retinal image, and experiments that test these models. We argue that this approach has considerable promise for allowing generalization from simplified laboratory experiments to richer scenes that more closely approximate natural viewing. We discuss the relation between the work we review and other theoretical approaches available in the literature.

  13. Color Me Human: Expanding Diversity Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Ruben

    Color Me Human, an initiative of Hawkeye Community College to provide student leadership and commitment by fostering greater appreciation for campus diversity, was implemented in 1996 through a student-driven approach. The Color Me Human Program not only embraces diversity, but builds individual commitment and community among students, faculty,…

  14. LED light with enhanced color saturation and improved white light perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiangfen; Xu, Wei; Han, Qiuyi; Zhang, Shanduan

    2016-01-11

    The light emitting diodes (LEDs) with high light quality were investigated to enhance the color appearance of the illuminated objects and increase the white light perception of the ambience. The spectral power distributions of the LED lights were optimized by addition of the RGB components and by shifting the color coordinate below the blackbody line to get desired color rendering index (CRI) and high gamut area index (GAI). The results of the human factor study reveal that the "perfect" white light can be achieved to both enhance color saturation and improve light visual impression. The effects of observer metamerism were studied to clarify the observed phenomenon that the white lights with the same color coordinates were perceived differently by real observers.

  15. Categorical perception of color: evidence from secondary category boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-rasheed AS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abdulrahman Saud Al-rasheed Department of Psychology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Despite a plethora of behavioral research exploring the phenomenon of color categorical perception (CP known as "better discrimination between pair of colors stimuli from different categories and pair of colors stimuli from the same category even when the stimulus differences between the pairs of stimuli are equal", most of the evidence for the CP of color was derived from Roman or top-to-down script readers and very rarely from right-to-left script readers in primary category. To date, no studies of color CP have been conducted on right-to-left script readers in secondary category boundary to support this theory. Three experiments have been conducted: Experiments 1 and 2 established the Arabic blue–purple secondary category boundary, and Experiment 3 tested the CP of color in the blue–purple category boundary. Sixty participants (30 men and 30 women took part in this study. All spoke Arabic as their first language, and all were undergraduate or postgraduate students at King Saud University. Their ages ranged from 18–35 years with a mean age of 21.9 years (SD =5.2. The result indicated that for Experiments 1 and 2, it appeared that the Arabic blue–purple category boundary was approximately 10PB and it is in the same location as for English. For Experiment 3, reaction times in the between-categories condition were significantly faster than those in the within-category condition; this suggested that CP of color was shown in the Arabic's blue–purple secondary category boundary. Keywords: categorical perception, CP of color, categorization, blue–purple category boundary, secondary category boundary

  16. Perception of color emotions for single colors in red-green defective observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Keiko; Inoue, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that inherited red-green color deficiency, which involves both the protan and deutan deficiency types, is common in men. For red-green defective observers, some reddish colors appear desaturated and brownish, unlike those seen by normal observers. Despite its prevalence, few studies have investigated the effects that red-green color deficiency has on the psychological properties of colors (color emotions). The current study investigated the influence of red-green color deficiency on the following six color emotions: cleanliness, freshness, hardness, preference, warmth, and weight. Specifically, this study aimed to: (1) reveal differences between normal and red-green defective observers in rating patterns of six color emotions; (2) examine differences in color emotions related to the three cardinal channels in human color vision; and (3) explore relationships between color emotions and color naming behavior. Thirteen men and 10 women with normal vision and 13 men who were red-green defective performed both a color naming task and an emotion rating task with 32 colors from the Berkeley Color Project (BCP). Results revealed noticeable differences in the cleanliness and hardness ratings between the normal vision observers, particularly in women, and red-green defective observers, which appeared mainly for colors in the orange to cyan range, and in the preference and warmth ratings for colors with cyan and purple hues. Similarly, naming errors also mainly occurred in the cyan colors. A regression analysis that included the three cone-contrasts (i.e., red-green, blue-yellow, and luminance) as predictors significantly accounted for variability in color emotion ratings for the red-green defective observers as much as the normal individuals. Expressly, for warmth ratings, the weight of the red-green opponent channel was significantly lower in color defective observers than in normal participants. In addition, the analyses for individual warmth ratings in

  17. Perception of color emotions for single colors in red-green defective observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Sato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that inherited red-green color deficiency, which involves both the protan and deutan deficiency types, is common in men. For red-green defective observers, some reddish colors appear desaturated and brownish, unlike those seen by normal observers. Despite its prevalence, few studies have investigated the effects that red-green color deficiency has on the psychological properties of colors (color emotions. The current study investigated the influence of red-green color deficiency on the following six color emotions: cleanliness, freshness, hardness, preference, warmth, and weight. Specifically, this study aimed to: (1 reveal differences between normal and red-green defective observers in rating patterns of six color emotions; (2 examine differences in color emotions related to the three cardinal channels in human color vision; and (3 explore relationships between color emotions and color naming behavior. Thirteen men and 10 women with normal vision and 13 men who were red-green defective performed both a color naming task and an emotion rating task with 32 colors from the Berkeley Color Project (BCP. Results revealed noticeable differences in the cleanliness and hardness ratings between the normal vision observers, particularly in women, and red-green defective observers, which appeared mainly for colors in the orange to cyan range, and in the preference and warmth ratings for colors with cyan and purple hues. Similarly, naming errors also mainly occurred in the cyan colors. A regression analysis that included the three cone-contrasts (i.e., red-green, blue-yellow, and luminance as predictors significantly accounted for variability in color emotion ratings for the red-green defective observers as much as the normal individuals. Expressly, for warmth ratings, the weight of the red-green opponent channel was significantly lower in color defective observers than in normal participants. In addition, the analyses for individual warmth

  18. Neural networks for perception human and machine perception

    CERN Document Server

    Wechsler, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Neural Networks for Perception, Volume 1: Human and Machine Perception focuses on models for understanding human perception in terms of distributed computation and examples of PDP models for machine perception. This book addresses both theoretical and practical issues related to the feasibility of both explaining human perception and implementing machine perception in terms of neural network models. The book is organized into two parts. The first part focuses on human perception. Topics on network model ofobject recognition in human vision, the self-organization of functional architecture in t

  19. Human-eye versus computerized color matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, A U; Sim, C P; Loh, W L; Teo, J H

    1999-01-01

    This project compared the difference in color matching between human-eye assessment and computerized colorimetry. Fifty dental personnel were asked to color match Vita Lumin shade tabs to seven different randomly arranged test tabs from the Z100 shade guide. All evaluators were blinded to the shades of the test tabs and were asked to match only body shade of the Vita Lumin tab to the middle third or body of each test tab. The results obtained were subsequently computed into L*a*b* values and compared with results obtained by computerized colorimetry. Results indicate that the difference in color matching between human-eye assessment and computerized colorimetry is shade dependent. Discrepancy was significant for b* coordinates for shades A1 and B2 and L* and b* coordinates for shade C4. For all shades evaluated, color difference between human-eye and computerized color matching is perceivable under clinical settings, as delta E values are greater than 3. There is a need for correction factors in the formal specification of the color-matching software due to the discrepancy between human-eye and computerized colorimetric color matching.

  20. Perception of the color red enhances the force and velocity of motor output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Andrew J; Aarts, Henk

    2011-04-01

    The present research examined whether perception of the color red influences basic motor functioning. Prior research on color and motor functioning has been guided by ill-defined theoretical statements, and has been plagued by methodological problems. Drawing on theoretical and empirical work on the threat-behavior link in human and nonhuman animals, we proposed and tested the prediction that perceiving red enhances the force and velocity of motor output. Experiment 1 demonstrated that red, relative to gray (matched to red on lightness), facilitates pinchgrip force. Experiment 2 demonstrated that red, relative to gray (matched to red on lightness) and blue (matched to red on lightness and chroma) facilitates handgrip force and the velocity of that force. These findings clearly establish a link between red and basic motor action, illustrate the importance of rigorous experimental methods when testing color effects, and highlight the need to attend to the functional, as well as aesthetic, value of color.

  1. Auto white balance method using a pigmentation separation technique for human skin color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satomi; Kakinuma, Akihiro; Kamijo, Naohiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2017-02-01

    The human visual system maintains the perception of colors of an object across various light sources. Similarly, current digital cameras feature an auto white balance function, which estimates the illuminant color and corrects the color of a photograph as if the photograph was taken under a certain light source. The main subject in a photograph is often a person's face, which could be used to estimate the illuminant color. However, such estimation is adversely affected by differences in facial colors among individuals. The present paper proposes an auto white balance algorithm based on a pigmentation separation method that separates the human skin color image into the components of melanin, hemoglobin and shading. Pigment densities have a uniform property within the same race that can be calculated from the components of melanin and hemoglobin in the face. We, thus, propose a method that uses the subject's facial color in an image and is unaffected by individual differences in facial color among Japanese people.

  2. Auto white balance method using a pigmentation separation technique for human skin color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satomi; Kakinuma, Akihiro; Kamijo, Naohiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2016-11-01

    The human visual system maintains the perception of colors of an object across various light sources. Similarly, current digital cameras feature an auto white balance function, which estimates the illuminant color and corrects the color of a photograph as if the photograph was taken under a certain light source. The main subject in a photograph is often a person's face, which could be used to estimate the illuminant color. However, such estimation is adversely affected by differences in facial colors among individuals. The present paper proposes an auto white balance algorithm based on a pigmentation separation method that separates the human skin color image into the components of melanin, hemoglobin and shading. Pigment densities have a uniform property within the same race that can be calculated from the components of melanin and hemoglobin in the face. We, thus, propose a method that uses the subject's facial color in an image and is unaffected by individual differences in facial color among Japanese people.

  3. Smooth pursuit eye movements improve temporal resolution for color perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Terao

    Full Text Available Human observers see a single mixed color (yellow when different colors (red and green rapidly alternate. Accumulating evidence suggests that the critical temporal frequency beyond which chromatic fusion occurs does not simply reflect the temporal limit of peripheral encoding. However, it remains poorly understood how the central processing controls the fusion frequency. Here we show that the fusion frequency can be elevated by extra-retinal signals during smooth pursuit. This eye movement can keep the image of a moving target in the fovea, but it also introduces a backward retinal sweep of the stationary background pattern. We found that the fusion frequency was higher when retinal color changes were generated by pursuit-induced background motions than when the same retinal color changes were generated by object motions during eye fixation. This temporal improvement cannot be ascribed to a general increase in contrast gain of specific neural mechanisms during pursuit, since the improvement was not observed with a pattern flickering without changing position on the retina or with a pattern moving in the direction opposite to the background motion during pursuit. Our findings indicate that chromatic fusion is controlled by a cortical mechanism that suppresses motion blur. A plausible mechanism is that eye-movement signals change spatiotemporal trajectories along which color signals are integrated so as to reduce chromatic integration at the same locations (i.e., along stationary trajectories on the retina that normally causes retinal blur during fixation.

  4. Perception and Action Selection Dissociate Human Ventral and Dorsal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikkai, Akiko; Jerde, Trenton A.; Curtis, Clayton E.

    2011-01-01

    We test theories about the functional organization of the human cortex by correlating brain activity with demands on perception versus action selection. Subjects covertly searched for a target among an array of 4, 8, or 12 items (perceptual manipulation) and then, depending on the color of the array, made a saccade toward, away from, or at a right…

  5. Color synesthesia. Insight into perception, emotion, and consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Avinoam B.; Sanda, Nicolae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Synesthesia is an extraordinary perceptual phenomenon, in which individuals experience unusual percepts elicited by the activation of an unrelated sensory modality or by a cognitive process. Emotional reactions are commonly associated. The condition prompted philosophical debates on the nature of perception and impacted the course of art history. It recently generated a considerable interest among neuroscientists, but its clinical significance apparently remains underevaluated. This review focuses on the recent studies regarding variants of color synesthesia, the commonest form of the condition. Recent findings Synesthesia is commonly classified as developmental and acquired. Developmental forms predispose to changes in primary sensory processing and cognitive functions, usually with better performances in certain aspects and worse in others, and to heightened creativity. Acquired forms of synesthesia commonly arise from drug ingestion or neurological disorders, including thalamic lesions and sensory deprivation (e.g., blindness). Cerebral exploration using structural and functional imaging has demonstrated distinct patterns in cortical activation and brain connectivity for controls and synesthetes. Artworks of affected painters are most illustrative of the nature of synesthetic experiences. Summary Results of the recent investigations on synesthesia offered a remarkable insight into the mechanisms of perception, emotion and consciousness, and deserve attention both from neuroscientists and from clinicians. PMID:25545055

  6. Color synesthesia. Insight into perception, emotion, and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Avinoam B; Sanda, Nicolae

    2015-02-01

    Synesthesia is an extraordinary perceptual phenomenon, in which individuals experience unusual percepts elicited by the activation of an unrelated sensory modality or by a cognitive process. Emotional reactions are commonly associated. The condition prompted philosophical debates on the nature of perception and impacted the course of art history. It recently generated a considerable interest among neuroscientists, but its clinical significance apparently remains underevaluated. This review focuses on the recent studies regarding variants of color synesthesia, the commonest form of the condition. Synesthesia is commonly classified as developmental and acquired. Developmental forms predispose to changes in primary sensory processing and cognitive functions, usually with better performances in certain aspects and worse in others, and to heightened creativity. Acquired forms of synesthesia commonly arise from drug ingestion or neurological disorders, including thalamic lesions and sensory deprivation (e.g., blindness). Cerebral exploration using structural and functional imaging has demonstrated distinct patterns in cortical activation and brain connectivity for controls and synesthetes. Artworks of affected painters are most illustrative of the nature of synesthetic experiences. Results of the recent investigations on synesthesia offered a remarkable insight into the mechanisms of perception, emotion and consciousness, and deserve attention both from neuroscientists and from clinicians.

  7. Synesthetic grapheme-color percepts exist for newly encountered Hebrew, Devanagari, Armenian and Cyrillic graphemes

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, Christopher David; Berryhill, Marian E.

    2013-01-01

    Grapheme-color synesthetes experience color, not physically present, when viewing symbols. Synesthetes cannot remember learning these associations. Must synesthetic percepts be formed during a sensitive period? Can they form later and be consistent? What determines their nature? We tested grapheme-color synesthete, MC2, before, during and after she studied Hindi abroad. We investigated whether novel graphemes elicited synesthetic percepts, changed with familiarity, and/or benefited from phone...

  8. A quantitative theory of human color choices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Komarova, Natalia L; Jameson, Kimberly A

    2013-01-01

    ... color standards are important. Still, with regard to color appearance many perceptual and cognitive factors are known to contribute to color similarity, and, in general, to all cognitive judgments of color...

  9. Uncertainty principle in human visual perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Mikhael I.; Ugolev, Dmitry A.

    1994-05-01

    The orthodox data concerning the contrast sensitivity estimation for sine-wave gratings were formally analyzed. The result of our analysis made feasible a threshold energy value (Delta) E -- energetic equivalent to quantum of perception -- as (Delta) E equals (alpha) (Delta) L(Delta) X2, where (alpha) is a proportionality coefficient, (Delta) L is a threshold luminance, and (Delta) X is a half-period of grating. The value of (Delta) E is a constant for a given value of mean luminance L of the grating and for a middle spatial frequency region. So the `exchange' between luminance threshold (Delta) L and spatial resolution (Delta) X2 values takes place; the increasing of one is followed by the decreasing of the other. We treated this phenomenon as a principle of uncertainty in human visual perception and proved its correctness for other spatial frequencies. Taking into account threshold wavelength ((Delta) (lambda) ) and time ((Delta) t) the uncertainty principle may be extended to a wider class of visual perception problems, including color and flicker objects recognition. So, we suggest the uncertainty principle proposed above is to be one of the cornerstones of the evolution of cognitive systems.

  10. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans

    OpenAIRE

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A.; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L.; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M.; Swanbeck, Sonja N.; Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection...

  11. Age, Health and Attractiveness Perception of Virtual (Rendered) Human Hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bernhard; Hufschmidt, Carla; Hirn, Thomas; Will, Susanne; McKelvey, Graham; Lankhof, John

    2016-01-01

    The social significance of physical appearance and beauty has been documented in many studies. It is known that even subtle manipulations of facial morphology and skin condition can alter people's perception of a person's age, health and attractiveness. While the variation in facial morphology and skin condition cues has been studied quite extensively, comparably little is known on the effect of hair on social perception. This has been partly caused by the technical difficulty of creating appropriate stimuli for investigations of people's response to systematic variation of certain hair characteristics, such as color and style, while keeping other features constant. Here, we present a modeling approach to the investigation of human hair perception using computer-generated, virtual (rendered) human hair. In three experiments, we manipulated hair diameter (Experiment 1), hair density (Experiment 2), and hair style (Experiment 3) of human (female) head hair and studied perceptions of age, health and attractiveness. Our results show that even subtle changes in these features have an impact on hair perception. We discuss our findings with reference to previous studies on condition-dependent quality cues in women that influence human social perception, thereby suggesting that hair is a salient feature of human physical appearance, which contributes to the perception of beauty.

  12. Age, Health and Attractiveness Perception of Virtual (Rendered) Human Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bernhard; Hufschmidt, Carla; Hirn, Thomas; Will, Susanne; McKelvey, Graham; Lankhof, John

    2016-01-01

    The social significance of physical appearance and beauty has been documented in many studies. It is known that even subtle manipulations of facial morphology and skin condition can alter people’s perception of a person’s age, health and attractiveness. While the variation in facial morphology and skin condition cues has been studied quite extensively, comparably little is known on the effect of hair on social perception. This has been partly caused by the technical difficulty of creating appropriate stimuli for investigations of people’s response to systematic variation of certain hair characteristics, such as color and style, while keeping other features constant. Here, we present a modeling approach to the investigation of human hair perception using computer-generated, virtual (rendered) human hair. In three experiments, we manipulated hair diameter (Experiment 1), hair density (Experiment 2), and hair style (Experiment 3) of human (female) head hair and studied perceptions of age, health and attractiveness. Our results show that even subtle changes in these features have an impact on hair perception. We discuss our findings with reference to previous studies on condition-dependent quality cues in women that influence human social perception, thereby suggesting that hair is a salient feature of human physical appearance, which contributes to the perception of beauty. PMID:28066276

  13. Synesthetic grapheme-color percepts exist for newly encountered Hebrew, Devanagari, Armenian and Cyrillic graphemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Christopher David; Berryhill, Marian E

    2013-09-01

    Grapheme-color synesthetes experience color, not physically present, when viewing symbols. Synesthetes cannot remember learning these associations. Must synesthetic percepts be formed during a sensitive period? Can they form later and be consistent? What determines their nature? We tested grapheme-color synesthete, MC2, before, during and after she studied Hindi abroad. We investigated whether novel graphemes elicited synesthetic percepts, changed with familiarity, and/or benefited from phonemic information. MC2 reported color percepts to novel Devanagari and Hebrew graphemes. MC2 monitored these percepts over 6months in a Hindi-speaking environment. MC2 and synesthete DN, reported synesthetic percepts for Armenian graphemes, or Cyrillic graphemes+phonemes over time. Synesthetes, not controls, reported color percepts for novel graphemes that gained consistency over time. Phonemic information did not enhance consistency. Thus, synesthetes can form and consolidate percepts to novel graphemes as adults. These percepts may depend on pre-existing grapheme-color relationships but they can flexibly shift with familiarity.

  14. Encyclopedia of color science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Color Science and Technology provides an authoritative single source for understanding and applying the concepts of color to all fields of science and technology, including artistic and historical aspects of color. Many topics are discussed in this timely reference, including an introduction to the science of color, and entries on the physics, chemistry and perception of color. Color is described as it relates to optical phenomena of color and continues on through colorants and materials used to modulate color and also to human vision of color. The measurement of color is provided as is colorimetry, color spaces, color difference metrics, color appearance models, color order systems and cognitive color. Other topics discussed include industrial color, color imaging, capturing color, displaying color and printing color. Descriptions of color encodings, color management, processing color and applications relating to color synthesis for computer graphics are included in this work. The Encyclo...

  15. [The effect of unconscious color hue saturation on emotional state of human].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroshikh, V V; Ivanova, V Iu; Kulikov, G A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate influence of color hue saturation on emotional state of human. We use frontal EEG asymmetry to determine subject's emotional state. Our emotional stimuli summon opposite dynamics of frontal EEG asymmetry. Negative stimuli elicits decreasing of the value of frontal EEG asymmetry and positive stimuli increases the value of frontal EEG asymmetry in fronto-polar and frontal leads. Such dynamics of frontal EEG asymmetry point the emotional experience in accordance the stimulus modality. Blue and red color modification of stimuli leads changes in dynamics of frontal EEG asymmetry during presentation of emotional stimuli and after. In fact, that no one subject gave a report about color difference between stimuli during an experiment, we conclude that influence of color modification was unconscious. Our result shows the possibility of unconscious perception color modification to emotional state of human.

  16. Is Color Perception of Packages Affected by Their In-aisle Position?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Porcheddu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The retail environment is characterized by numerous competing stimuli vying for the consumer’s attention. Products packages feature both verbal and nonverbal elements. Nonverbal stimuli, like package colors, seem to be particularly relevant for perception. Knowing whether there is preferential positioning of colored items on the shelves is fundamental for retailers. In addition, some colors may be better perceived than others. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the color perception of packages in a supermarket is affected by their in-aisle position and by their color type. In a lab setting, 120 right-handed subjects were asked to look at 3 series of images on a screen. Images showed a virtual supermarket aisle. The aisle had two identical opposite gondolas, each containing the same number of items of same size and shape. In each image, apart from one single colored item, all other items were gray. In each series, the colored item was always of the same primary color (blue, red or green and it was displayed an equal number of times on the right and on the left. For each image, subjects were asked to locate the colored item as quickly as possible. Accuracy and response time of answers were recorded. Colored items were perceived more accurately and rapidly when they were displayed on the left gondola to the observer. This phenomenon was specifically color-dependent, as red and blue items were better perceived than green ones. Our results support the hypothesis of an asymmetric perception of colored items in the aisle. Retailers should consider that the consumer’s perception of colored package is more accurate and fast when the items are positioned on the left gondola. They should also consider that some colors may be more effective than others in catching customers’ attention.

  17. Retinex Poisson Equation: a Model for Color Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Limare

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1964 Edwin H. Land formulated the Retinex theory, the first attempt to simulate and explain how the human visual system perceives color. Unfortunately, the Retinex Land-McCann original algorithm is both complex and not fully specified. Indeed, this algorithm computes at each pixel an average of a very large set of paths on the image. For this reason, Retinex has received several interpretations and implementations which, among other aims, attempt to tune down its excessive complexity. But, Morel et al. have shown that the original Retinex algorithm can be formalized as a (discrete partial differential equation. This article describes the PDE-Retinex, a fast implementation of the Land-McCann original theory using only two DFT’s.

  18. The perception of static colored noise: detection and masking described by CIE94

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.P.; Bijl, P.; Roelofsen, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present psychophysical data on the perception of static colored noise. In our experiments, we use the CIE94 color difference formula to quantify the noise strength and for describing our threshold data. In Experiment 1 we measure the visual detection thresholds for fixed pattern noise on a unifor

  19. The perception of static colored noise: detection and masking described by CIE94

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.P.; Bijl, P.; Roelofsen, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present psychophysical data on the perception of static colored noise. In our experiments, we use the CIE94 color difference formula to quantify the noise strength and for describing our threshold data. In Experiment 1 we measure the visual detection thresholds for fixed pattern noise on a

  20. The Role of Skin Color on Hispanic Women's Perceptions of Attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Dionne P.; Fernandez, Paula

    2012-01-01

    This study relies on qualitative methods to investigate Hispanic women's skin color perceptions. The primary goal is to identify the relevance of these perceptions on their beliefs about their own physical attractiveness. Thirty-four self-identified White-Hispanic women attending a large Hispanic Serving Institution in the southeastern United…

  1. Epistatic adaptive evolution of human color vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Yokoyama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Establishing genotype-phenotype relationship is the key to understand the molecular mechanism of phenotypic adaptation. This initial step may be untangled by analyzing appropriate ancestral molecules, but it is a daunting task to recapitulate the evolution of non-additive (epistatic interactions of amino acids and function of a protein separately. To adapt to the ultraviolet (UV-free retinal environment, the short wavelength-sensitive (SWS1 visual pigment in human (human S1 switched from detecting UV to absorbing blue light during the last 90 million years. Mutagenesis experiments of the UV-sensitive pigment in the Boreoeutherian ancestor show that the blue-sensitivity was achieved by seven mutations. The experimental and quantum chemical analyses show that 4,008 of all 5,040 possible evolutionary trajectories are terminated prematurely by containing a dehydrated nonfunctional pigment. Phylogenetic analysis further suggests that human ancestors achieved the blue-sensitivity gradually and almost exclusively by epistasis. When the final stage of spectral tuning of human S1 was underway 45-30 million years ago, the middle and long wavelength-sensitive (MWS/LWS pigments appeared and so-called trichromatic color vision was established by interprotein epistasis. The adaptive evolution of human S1 differs dramatically from orthologous pigments with a major mutational effect used in achieving blue-sensitivity in a fish and several mammalian species and in regaining UV vision in birds. These observations imply that the mechanisms of epistatic interactions must be understood by studying various orthologues in different species that have adapted to various ecological and physiological environments.

  2. Epistatic Adaptive Evolution of Human Color Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Xing, Jinyi; Liu, Yang; Faggionato, Davide; Altun, Ahmet; Starmer, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing genotype-phenotype relationship is the key to understand the molecular mechanism of phenotypic adaptation. This initial step may be untangled by analyzing appropriate ancestral molecules, but it is a daunting task to recapitulate the evolution of non-additive (epistatic) interactions of amino acids and function of a protein separately. To adapt to the ultraviolet (UV)-free retinal environment, the short wavelength-sensitive (SWS1) visual pigment in human (human S1) switched from detecting UV to absorbing blue light during the last 90 million years. Mutagenesis experiments of the UV-sensitive pigment in the Boreoeutherian ancestor show that the blue-sensitivity was achieved by seven mutations. The experimental and quantum chemical analyses show that 4,008 of all 5,040 possible evolutionary trajectories are terminated prematurely by containing a dehydrated nonfunctional pigment. Phylogenetic analysis further suggests that human ancestors achieved the blue-sensitivity gradually and almost exclusively by epistasis. When the final stage of spectral tuning of human S1 was underway 45–30 million years ago, the middle and long wavelength-sensitive (MWS/LWS) pigments appeared and so-called trichromatic color vision was established by interprotein epistasis. The adaptive evolution of human S1 differs dramatically from orthologous pigments with a major mutational effect used in achieving blue-sensitivity in a fish and several mammalian species and in regaining UV vision in birds. These observations imply that the mechanisms of epistatic interactions must be understood by studying various orthologues in different species that have adapted to various ecological and physiological environments. PMID:25522367

  3. Color in machine vision and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Color is the phenomenon of human visual perception and the module of machine vision. Color information is widely used in the areas of virtual reality and humancomputer interaction. Color is the product of a visual environment, illumination and the human brain. Research on color information representation and its processing is typically interdisciplinary. Based on our research work on human color perception and machine color vision and its application, we summarized the hotspots of color studies in recent developments and new approaches to color vision,including basic theories and the application of color information in virtual reality, content-based image retrieval, and face recognition.

  4. Complete sparing of high-contrast color input to motion perception in cortical color blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, P; Hénaff, M A; Michel, F; Landis, T; Troscianko, T; Intriligator, J

    1998-07-01

    It is widely held that color and motion are processed by separate parallel pathways in the visual system, but this view is difficult to reconcile with the fact that motion can be detected in equiluminant stimuli that are defined by color alone. To examine the relationship between color and motion, we tested three patients who had lost their color vision following cortical damage (central achromatopsia). Despite their profound loss in the subjective experience of color and their inability to detect the motion of faint colors, all three subjects showed surprisingly strong responses to high-contrast, moving color stimuli--equal in all respects to the performance of subjects with normal color vision. The pathway from opponent-color detectors in the retina to the motion analysis areas must therefore be independent of the damaged color centers in the occipitotemporal area. It is probably also independent of the motion analysis area MT/V5, because the contribution of color to motion detection in these patients is much stronger than the color response of monkey area MT.

  5. Perception of attractiveness by obesity and hair color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayson, D E; Klassen, M L

    1989-02-01

    In a study of 318 Caucasian college students, obese persons and redheaded men were seen as unattractive compared to the nonobese and other hair colors. The obesity stereotype and the hair-color stereotype appear to be evaluated separately with little interaction. The results imply that a stereotypic characteristic like obesity, which is perceived as being under a person's control, may be evaluated differently than a stereotypic characteristic independent of personal choice such as hair color.

  6. A quantitative theory of human color choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Natalia L; Jameson, Kimberly A

    2013-01-01

    The system for colorimetry adopted by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) in 1931, along with its subsequent improvements, represents a family of light mixture models that has served well for many decades for stimulus specification and reproduction when highly controlled color standards are important. Still, with regard to color appearance many perceptual and cognitive factors are known to contribute to color similarity, and, in general, to all cognitive judgments of color. Using experimentally obtained odd-one-out triad similarity judgments from 52 observers, we demonstrate that CIE-based models can explain a good portion (but not all) of the color similarity data. Color difference quantified by CIELAB ΔE explained behavior at levels of 81% (across all colors), 79% (across red colors), and 66% (across blue colors). We show that the unexplained variation cannot be ascribed to inter- or intra-individual variations among the observers, and points to the presence of additional factors shared by the majority of responders. Based on this, we create a quantitative model of a lexicographic semiorder type, which shows how different perceptual and cognitive influences can trade-off when making color similarity judgments. We show that by incorporating additional influences related to categorical and lightness and saturation factors, the model explains more of the triad similarity behavior, namely, 91% (all colors), 90% (reds), and 87% (blues). We conclude that distance in a CIE model is but the first of several layers in a hierarchy of higher-order cognitive influences that shape color triad choices. We further discuss additional mitigating influences outside the scope of CIE modeling, which can be incorporated in this framework, including well-known influences from language, stimulus set effects, and color preference bias. We also discuss universal and cultural aspects of the model as well as non-uniformity of the color space with respect to different

  7. Simulating Human Visual Perception in Nighttime Illumination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ning; DONG Weiming; WANG Jiaxin; Paul Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an image-based algorithm for simulating the visual adaptation of the human visual system to various illuminations,especially in dark nighttime conditions.The human visual system exhibits different characteristics depending on the illumination intensity,with photopic vision in bright conditions,scotopic vision in dark conditions,and mesopic vision between these two.A computational model is designed to simulate multiple features of mesopic vision and scotopic vision,including the chromaticity change,luminance change,and visual acuity loss.The system uses a source image under bright illumination as input.Then assuming that the viewer has already adapted to the new conditions,the color spectrum of the input image is reconstructed to replace the source with modifications of the chromaticity and the luminance of the relighted scene.A bilateral filter is used to simulate the visual acuity loss.The model parameters have clear physical meanings and can be obtained from experimental data to achieve realistic results.The algorithm can be used not only for visual perception simulation,but also as a day-for-night tool to produce realistic nighttime images from daytime images.

  8. Food Color and Its Impact on Taste/Flavor Perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spence, Charles; Piqueras-Fiszman, Betina

    2016-01-01

    Color is perhaps the single most important product-intrinsic sensory cue when it comes to setting our expectations regarding the likely taste and flavor of food and drink. To date, a large body of research has demonstrated that changing the hue or intensity/saturation of the color of a variety of

  9. Mood perception of interior colors in a gym

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Haruyo; Koizumi, Naoko

    2002-06-01

    When people enter a gym, they feel more like exercising in some cases than other cases. The interior color of the space may be a contributing factor. This paper discusses how the interior color of a gym affects female subjects in their twenties and forties to fifties both physiologically and psychologically.

  10. Color Vision and Hue Categorization in Young Human Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The main objective of the present investigations was to determine whether or not young human infants see the physical spectrum in a categorical fashion as human adults and animals who possess color vision regularly do. (Author)

  11. Visual attention to and perception of undamaged and damaged versions of natural and colored female hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Bernhard; Neuser, Frauke; Deloux, Gwenelle; Röder, Susanne; Matts, Paul J

    2013-03-01

    Female hair color is thought to influence physical attractiveness, and although there is some evidence for this assertion, research has yet not addressed the question if and how physical damaging affects the perception of female hair color. Here we investigate whether people are sensitive (in terms of visual attention and age, health and attractiveness perception) to subtle differences in hair images of natural and colored hair before and after physical damaging. We tracked the eye-gaze of 50 men and 50 women aged 31-50 years whilst they viewed randomized pairs of images of 20 natural and 20 colored hair tresses, each pair displaying the same tress before and after controlled cuticle damage. The hair images were then rated for perceived health, attractiveness, and age. Undamaged versions of natural and colored hair were perceived as significantly younger, healthier, and more attractive than corresponding damaged versions. Visual attention to images of undamaged colored hair was significantly higher compared with their damaged counterparts, while in natural hair, the opposite pattern was found. We argue that the divergence in visual attention to undamaged colored female hair and damaged natural female hair and associated ratings is due to differences in social perception and discuss the source of apparent visual difference between undamaged and damaged hair.

  12. Green love is ugly: emotions elicited by synesthetic grapheme-color perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejas, Alicia; Acosta, Alberto; Lupiáñez, Juan

    2007-01-05

    Synesthetes who experience grapheme-color synesthesia often report feeling uneasy when dealing with incongruently colored graphemes although no empirical data is available to confirm this phenomenon. We studied this affective reaction related to synesthetic perceptions by means of an evaluation task. We found that the perception of an incorrectly colored word affects the judgments of emotional valence. Furthermore, this effect competed with the word's emotional valence in a categorization task thus supporting the automatic nature of this synesthetically elicited affective reaction. When manipulating word valence and word color-photism congruence, we found that responses were slower (and less accurate) for inconsistent conditions than for consistent conditions. Inconsistent conditions were defined as those where semantics and color-photism congruence did not produce a similar assessment and therefore gave rise to a negative affective reaction (i.e., positive-valence words presented in a color different from the synesthete's photism or negative-valence words presented in the photism's color). We therefore observed a modulation of the congruency effect (i.e., faster reaction times to congruently colored words than incongruently colored words). Although this congruence effect has been taken as an index of the true experience of synesthesia, we observed that it can be reversed when the experimental manipulations turn an incongruently colored word into a consistent stimulus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an affective reaction elicited by the congruency between the synesthetically induced color of a word and the color in which the word is actually presented. The underlying neural mechanisms that might be involved in this phenomenon are discussed.

  13. Color-form meanings: interconnections between perception, association and symbolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Rachel

    2002-06-01

    Every form is as sensitive as a puff of smoke, the slightest breath will alter it completely. Kandinsky-- The interaction between form and color regarding this mutability of meaning is a subject that is ever elusive. At the same time, it remains a subject that merits objective and collective study, not so much to generate finite conclusions but to increase our visual awareness and sensitivity of the complex phenomena at work. Much has been accomplished but it still remains an all but unanswered question. Color effects need to be seen to be believed and, as Albers stated in his Interaction of Color, theory should follow practice. This paper presents recent developments in my painting practice by exploring the combined effects of color phenomena through systematic practical experiment with changing color forms. The work is systematic but embraces the intuitive, the sensual and the magical - closing the gap between intuition and formula. The wide range of meanings (associations, evocations, emotions) that Mark Rothko obtained from subtle changes of form and color in the rectangles- within- rectangles format of his mature paintings, is evidence of the scope of this line of research.

  14. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M; Swanbeck, Sonja N; Conway, Bevil R

    2014-07-15

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism.

  15. Correlation between three color coordinates of human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2014-11-01

    The objective was to determine whether there were significant correlations in the three color coordinates within each of two color coordinate systems, such as the Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) L*a*b* system, and the lightness, chroma, and hue angle system, of human vital teeth. The color of six maxillary and six mandibular anterior teeth was measured by the Shade Vision System. Pearson correlations between each pair of the color coordinates were determined (α=0.01 ). The influence of two color coordinates on the other color coordinate was determined with a multiple regression analysis (α=0.01 ). Based on correlation analyses, all the color coordinate pairs showed significant correlations except for the chroma and hue angle pair. The CIE L* was negatively correlated with the CIE a*,b*, and chroma, but positively correlated with the hue angle. The CIE a* was positively correlated with the CIE b* and chroma. Tooth color coordinates were correlated each other. Lighter teeth were less chromatic both in the CIE a* and b* coordinates. Therefore, it was postulated that the three color coordinates of human teeth were harmonized within certain color attribute ranges, and a lack of correlations in these coordinates might indicate external/internal discolorations and/or anomalies of teeth.

  16. Race and Color: Two Sides of One Story? Development of Biases in Categorical Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timeo, Susanna; Farroni, Teresa; Maass, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Categorical perception is a phenomenon that leads people to group stimuli into categories instead of perceiving their natural continua. This article reviews the literature of two biases connected with categorical perception: categorical color perception and the other-race effect. Although these two phenomena concern distant targets (colors and faces) and imply different biases (one attentional, one mnemonic), they share at least three commonalities. First, they both involve the chunking of continuous dimensions into categories. Second, adult categories are shaped by cultural processes. Third, infants' discrimination performance seems universal and guided by perception. In this article, it is proposed to look for a common developmental mechanism that clarifies the shift from a perceptual to a sociocognitive knowledge of the environment. New perspectives are discussed. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  17. Attention to color sharpens neural population tuning via feedback processing in the human visual cortex hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Mandy V; Loewe, Kristian; Merkel, Christian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schoenfeld, Mircea A; Tsotsos, John K; Hopf, Jens-Max

    2017-09-25

    Attention can facilitate the selection of elementary object features like color, orientation, or motion. This is referred to as feature-based attention and commonly attributed to a modulation of the gain and tuning of feature-selective units in visual cortex. While gain mechanisms are well characterized, little is known about the cortical processes underlying the sharpening of feature selectivity. Here, we show with high-resolution magnetoencephalography in human observers (men and women) that sharpened selectivity for a particular color arises from feedback processing in the human visual cortex hierarchy. To assess color selectivity, we analyze the response to a color probe that varies in color-distance from an attended color target. We find that attention causes an initial gain enhancement in anterior ventral extrastriate cortex that is coarsely selective for the target color and transitions within ∼100 ms into a sharper tuned profile in more posterior ventral occipital cortex (VO-1/hV4). We conclude that attention sharpens selectivity over time by attenuating the response at lower levels of the cortical hierarchy to color values neighboring the target in color space. These observations support computational models proposing that attention tunes feature selectivity in visual cortex through backward-propagating attenuation of units less tuned to the target.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTWhether searching for your car, a particular item of clothing, or just obeying traffic lights, in everyday life we must select items based on color. But how does attention allow us to select a specific color? Here, we use high spatiotemporal resolution neuromagnetic recordings to examine how color selectivity emerges in the human brain. We find that color selectivity evolves as a coarse-to-fine process from higher to lower levels within the visual cortex hierarchy. Our observations support computational models proposing that feature selectivity increases over time, by attenuating the

  18. "Shades of beauty": examining the relationship of skin color to perceptions of physical attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Cynthia M

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this research project was to investigate the relationship between skin color and level of perceived physical attractiveness. Previous research suggested that skin color plays an important role in how we perceive an individual's physical attractiveness. The current study was conducted to determine how influential the role of race is on perceptions of physical attractiveness. In this study, 79 subjects were asked to evaluate images of potential endorsers to be used in an upcoming advertising campaign. The images were those of females of varying skin tones. Data were then collected and analyzed to determine whether skin tone and level of skin color can in fact influence the physical attractiveness stereotype.

  19. Theoretical aspects of color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbarsht, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    The three color receptors of Young-Helmholtz and the opponent colors type of information processing postulated by Hering are both present in the human visual system. This mixture accounts for both the phenomena of color matching or hue discrimination and such perceptual qualities of color as the division of the spectrum into color bands. The functioning of the cells in the visual system, especially within the retina, and the relation of this function to color perception are discussed.

  20. See no evil: color blindness and perceptions of subtle racial discrimination in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offermann, Lynn R; Basford, Tessa E; Graebner, Raluca; Jaffer, Salman; De Graaf, Sumona Basu; Kaminsky, Samuel E

    2014-10-01

    Workplace discrimination has grown more ambiguous, with interracial interactions often perceived differently by different people. The present study adds to the literature by examining a key individual difference variable in the perception of discrimination at work, namely individual color-blind attitudes. We examined relationships between 3 dimensions of color-blind attitudes (Racial Privilege, Institutional Discrimination, and Blatant Racial Issues) and perceptions of racial microaggressions in the workplace as enacted by a White supervisor toward a Black employee (i.e., discriminatory actions ranging from subtle to overt). Findings showed that observer views on institutional discrimination fully mediated, and blatant racial issues partially mediated, the relationships between racial group membership and the perception of workplace microaggressions. Non-Hispanic Whites endorsed color blindness as institutional discrimination and blatant racial issues significantly more than members of racioethnic minority groups, and higher levels of color-blind worldviews were associated with lower likelihoods of perceiving microaggressions. Views on racial privilege did not differ significantly between members of different racial groups or affect microaggression perceptions. Implications for organizations concerned about promoting more inclusive workplaces are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Perceptions of Symmetry and Color in Environmental Logos

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, Sarah Lucile

    2014-01-01

    Logos are an important visual representation of an organization or brand. Therefore they need to be processed quickly and produce positive responses toward the product or service being offered. One emerging brand category whose logo characteristics may generate a unique class of consumer responses is environmental organizations, which may rely on logo characteristics to best portray environmentally friendly connotations and associations. Color and symmetry may also have unique effects on resp...

  2. Color reproduction system based on color appearance model and gamut mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang-Hsuan; Yang, Chih-Yuan

    2000-06-01

    By the progress of computer, computer peripherals such as color monitor and printer are often used to generate color image. However, cross media color reproduction by human perception is usually different. Basically, the influence factors are device calibration and characterization, viewing condition, device gamut and human psychology. In this thesis, a color reproduction system based on color appearance model and gamut mapping is proposed. It consists of four parts; device characterization, color management technique, color appearance model and gamut mapping.

  3. Color blindness and contrast perception in cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) determined by a visual sensorimotor assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Barbosa, Alexandra; Miner, Simon; Hanlon, Roger T

    2006-05-01

    We tested color perception based upon a robust behavioral response in which cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) respond to visual stimuli (a black and white checkerboard) with a quantifiable, neurally controlled motor response (a body pattern). In the first experiment, we created 16 checkerboard substrates in which 16 grey shades (from white to black) were paired with one green shade (matched to the maximum absorption wavelength of S. officinalis' sole visual pigment, 492 nm), assuming that one of the grey shades would give a similar achromatic signal to the tested green. In the second experiment, we created a checkerboard using one blue and one yellow shade whose intensities were matched to the cuttlefish's visual system. In both assays it was tested whether cuttlefish would show disruptive coloration on these checkerboards, indicating their ability to distinguish checkers based solely on wavelength (i.e., color). Here, we show clearly that cuttlefish must be color blind, as they showed non-disruptive coloration on the checkerboards whose color intensities were matched to the Sepia visual system, suggesting that the substrates appeared to their eyes as uniform backgrounds. Furthermore, we show that cuttlefish are able to perceive objects in their background that differ in contrast by approximately 15%. This study adds support to previous reports that S. officinalis is color blind, yet the question of how cuttlefish achieve "color-blind camouflage" in chromatically rich environments still remains.

  4. Understanding human perception by human-made illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2014-01-01

    IT MAY BE FUN TO PERCEIVE ILLUSIONS, BUT THE UNDERSTANDING OF HOW THEY WORK IS EVEN MORE STIMULATING AND SUSTAINABLE: They can tell us where the limits and capacity of our perceptual apparatus are found-they can specify how the constraints of perception are set. Furthermore, they let us analyze the cognitive sub-processes underlying our perception. Illusions in a scientific context are not mainly created to reveal the failures of our perception or the dysfunctions of our apparatus, but instead point to the specific power of human perception. The main task of human perception is to amplify and strengthen sensory inputs to be able to perceive, orientate and act very quickly, specifically and efficiently. The present paper strengthens this line of argument, strongly put forth by perceptual pioneer Richard L. Gregory (e.g., Gregory, 2009), by discussing specific visual illusions and how they can help us to understand the magic of perception.

  5. Melanoma Perception in People of Color: A Targeted Educational Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lucy X; Patterson, Stavonnie S L; Rademaker, Alfred W; Liu, Dachao; Kundu, Roopal V

    2017-06-01

    Although melanoma is more common in non-Hispanic Whites, ethnic minorities face a greater risk of melanoma-related mortality, which may be partially attributed to presentation at atypical sites and a lack of awareness. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of a melanoma educational intervention targeted towards people of color. Participants received one of two scripted melanoma educational interventions in the summer of 2015. They completed surveys before the intervention, immediately post-intervention, and 2 months post-intervention. Dermatology clinic at an academic hospital. A consecutive sample of 100 participants who self-identified as African American, Asian, or Hispanic were recruited following their dermatology visit. In total, 70 participants completed the 2-month follow-up questionnaire. The comparison intervention group received an educational intervention using a conventional pamphlet on the 'ABCDEs' (Asymmetry, Borders, Color, Diameter, Evolution) of melanoma. The targeted intervention group received a modified pamphlet that included a skin of color section, the nomenclature "melanoma skin cancer", and an image of an individual performing a skin self-examination with the help of a friend. Melanoma knowledge, perceived risk for developing melanoma, and skin self-examination practices were assessed through self-reported questionnaires. Among the 100 participants, 78% self-identified as African American, 11% as Asian, and 11% as Hispanic. Both groups experienced a similar increase in melanoma knowledge that was retained at 2 months. Perceived personal risk for developing melanoma increased more in the targeted intervention group immediately post-intervention (p = 0.015), but this difference no longer existed between the groups at the 2-month follow-up. The targeted intervention group also demonstrated a greater increase in skin self-examinations (p = 0.048) and knowledge of warning signs to look for when examining the skin (p = 0.002) at

  6. Perceptions of racial confrontation: the role of color blindness and comment ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Linda X; Dickter, Cheryl L

    2013-01-01

    Because of its emphasis on diminishing race and avoiding racial discourse, color-blind racial ideology has been suggested to have negative consequences for modern day race relations. The current research examined the influence of color blindness and the ambiguity of a prejudiced remark on perceptions of a racial minority group member who confronts the remark. One hundred thirteen White participants responded to a vignette depicting a White character making a prejudiced comment of variable ambiguity, after which a Black target character confronted the comment. Results demonstrated that the target confronter was perceived more negatively and as responding less appropriately by participants high in color blindness, and that this effect was particularly pronounced when participants responded to the ambiguous comment. Implications for the ways in which color blindness, as an accepted norm that is endorsed across legal and educational settings, can facilitate Whites' complicity in racial inequality are discussed.

  7. A pseudoisochromatic test of color vision for human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Michele E; Drodge, Suzanne C; Courage, Mary L; Adams, Russell J

    2014-07-01

    Despite the development of experimental methods capable of measuring early human color vision, we still lack a procedure comparable to those used to diagnose the well-identified congenital and acquired color vision anomalies in older children, adults, and clinical patients. In this study, we modified a pseudoisochromatic test to make it more suitable for young infants. Using a forced choice preferential looking procedure, 216 3-to-23-mo-old babies were tested with pseudoisochromatic targets that fell on either a red/green or a blue/yellow dichromatic confusion axis. For comparison, 220 color-normal adults and 22 color-deficient adults were also tested. Results showed that all babies and adults passed the blue/yellow target but many of the younger infants failed the red/green target, likely due to the interaction of the lingering immaturities within the visual system and the small CIE vector distance within the red/green plate. However, older (17-23 mo) infants, color- normal adults and color-defective adults all performed according to expectation. Interestingly, performance on the red/green plate was better among female infants, well exceeding the expected rate of genetic dimorphism between genders. Overall, with some further modification, the test serves as a promising tool for the detection of early color vision anomalies in early human life.

  8. Rate-distortion theory and human perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Chris R

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental goal of perception is to aid in the achievement of behavioral objectives. This requires extracting and communicating useful information from noisy and uncertain sensory signals. At the same time, given the complexity of sensory information and the limitations of biological information processing, it is necessary that some information must be lost or discarded in the act of perception. Under these circumstances, what constitutes an 'optimal' perceptual system? This paper describes the mathematical framework of rate-distortion theory as the optimal solution to the problem of minimizing the costs of perceptual error subject to strong constraints on the ability to communicate or transmit information. Rate-distortion theory offers a general and principled theoretical framework for developing computational-level models of human perception (Marr, 1982). Models developed in this framework are capable of producing quantitatively precise explanations for human perceptual performance, while yielding new insights regarding the nature and goals of perception. This paper demonstrates the application of rate-distortion theory to two benchmark domains where capacity limits are especially salient in human perception: discrete categorization of stimuli (also known as absolute identification) and visual working memory. A software package written for the R statistical programming language is described that aids in the development of models based on rate-distortion theory.

  9. Public Perceptions of Human Trafficking in Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Robinson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Human trafficking is a widely studied phenomenon. Comparing public perceptions of trafficking to institutional (i.e. the academy, governmental and non-governmental organizations perceptions gives a richer understanding of the problem. The data for this study were collected in and around Chisinau, Moldova in the summer of 2004. Public discourse provides a more intimate "portraiture" of the issue, but the public also demonstrated a complex level of understanding of this social problem in this study. Its view is juxtaposed against an institutional view of human trafficking as explored through a literature review. Combining institutional and public perceptions and knowledge of a social problem is helpful in not only establishing a more thorough understanding of the social problem and guiding policy decisions, but in exploring the experiences victims may face at the community level.

  10. A novel color image compression algorithm using the human visual contrast sensitivity characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Juncai; Liu, Guizhong

    2017-03-01

    In order to achieve higher image compression ratio and improve visual perception of the decompressed image, a novel color image compression scheme based on the contrast sensitivity characteristics of the human visual system (HVS) is proposed. In the proposed scheme, firstly the image is converted into the YCrCb color space and divided into sub-blocks. Afterwards, the discrete cosine transform is carried out for each sub-block, and three quantization matrices are built to quantize the frequency spectrum coefficients of the images by combining the contrast sensitivity characteristics of HVS. The Huffman algorithm is used to encode the quantized data. The inverse process involves decompression and matching to reconstruct the decompressed color image. And simulations are carried out for two color images. The results show that the average structural similarity index measurement (SSIM) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) under the approximate compression ratio could be increased by 2.78% and 5.48%, respectively, compared with the joint photographic experts group (JPEG) compression. The results indicate that the proposed compression algorithm in the text is feasible and effective to achieve higher compression ratio under ensuring the encoding and image quality, which can fully meet the needs of storage and transmission of color images in daily life.

  11. A novel color image compression algorithm using the human visual contrast sensitivity characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Juncai; Liu, Guizhong

    2016-07-01

    In order to achieve higher image compression ratio and improve visual perception of the decompressed image, a novel color image compression scheme based on the contrast sensitivity characteristics of the human visual system (HVS) is proposed. In the proposed scheme, firstly the image is converted into the YCrCb color space and divided into sub-blocks. Afterwards, the discrete cosine transform is carried out for each sub-block, and three quantization matrices are built to quantize the frequency spectrum coefficients of the images by combining the contrast sensitivity characteristics of HVS. The Huffman algorithm is used to encode the quantized data. The inverse process involves decompression and matching to reconstruct the decompressed color image. And simulations are carried out for two color images. The results show that the average structural similarity index measurement (SSIM) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) under the approximate compression ratio could be increased by 2.78% and 5.48%, respectively, compared with the joint photographic experts group (JPEG) compression. The results indicate that the proposed compression algorithm in the text is feasible and effective to achieve higher compression ratio under ensuring the encoding and image quality, which can fully meet the needs of storage and transmission of color images in daily life.

  12. Color improves speed of processing but not perception in a motion illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn J Perry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available When two superimposed surfaces of dots move in different directions, the perceived directions are shifted away from each other. This perceptual illusion has been termed direction repulsion and is thought to be due to mutual inhibition between the representations of the two directions. It has further been shown that a speed difference between the two surfaces attenuates direction repulsion. As speed and direction are both necessary components of representing motion, the reduction in direction repulsion can be attributed to the additional motion information strengthening the representations of the two directions and thus reducing the mutual inhibition. We tested whether bottom-up attention and top-down task demands, in the form of color differences between the two surfaces, would also enhance motion processing, reducing direction repulsion. We found that the addition of color differences did not improve direction discrimination and reduce direction repulsion. However, we did find that adding a color difference improved performance on the task. We hypothesized that the performance differences were due to the limited presentation time of the stimuli. We tested this in a follow-up experiment where we varied the time of presentation to determine the duration needed to successfully perform the task with and without the color difference. As we expected, the addition of color reduced the amount of time needed to process and encode both directions of motion. Thus we find a dissociation between the effects of attention on the speed of processing and conscious perception. We propose 4 potential mechanisms wherein color speeds figure-ground segmentation of an object, attentional switching between objects, direction discrimination and/or the accumulation of motion information for decision-making, without affecting conscious perception. Potential neural bases are also explored.

  13. Grapheme-color synesthesia interferes with color perception in a standard Stroop task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, F M; Aben, H P; Smits, M; Röder, C H

    2014-01-31

    This study examined the proposed automatic and involuntary nature of synesthetic experiences in grapheme-color synesthetes by comparing behavioral and blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses in a synesthetic and a standard version of the Stroop task. Clear interference effects in terms of slower reaction times and stronger BOLD responses in the rostral cingulate zone (RCZ) were found in synesthetes performing the synesthetic version of the Stroop task. Surprisingly, less interference was found in synesthetes compared with controls performing the standard Stroop task. This smaller interference effect, expressed as the difference in reaction time between incongruent and neutral stimuli, was explained in terms of experienced interference during the neutral condition of the Stroop task in synesthetes. This was confirmed by stronger BOLD responses in the RCZ for synesthetes specifically in the neutral condition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show different performance of synesthetes in a standard Stroop task and the presented data can be seen as strong evidence for the automatic and involuntary nature of synesthetic experiences. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. What Can We Learn from Toddlers about Categorical Perception of Color? Comments on Goldstein, Davidoff, and Roberson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Anna; Wright, Oliver; Davies, Ian R. L.

    2009-01-01

    We comment on Goldstein, Davidoff, and Roberson's replication and extension ("Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 102", 219-238 [2009]) of our study of the effect of toddlers' color term knowledge on their categorical perception (CP) of color ("Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 90", 114-141 [2005]). First, we discuss how best to…

  15. What Can We Learn from Toddlers about Categorical Perception of Color? Comments on Goldstein, Davidoff, and Roberson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Anna; Wright, Oliver; Davies, Ian R. L.

    2009-01-01

    We comment on Goldstein, Davidoff, and Roberson's replication and extension ("Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 102", 219-238 [2009]) of our study of the effect of toddlers' color term knowledge on their categorical perception (CP) of color ("Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 90", 114-141 [2005]). First, we discuss how best to…

  16. Color perception is impaired in baseball batters while performing an interceptive action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasada, Manami; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ikudome, Sachi; Unenaka, Satoshi; Mori, Shiro

    2015-08-01

    In order to test the theoretical idea that experts rely more on the dorsal stream than the ventral stream during interceptive action for the interception of a moving target, the present study investigates the perception of color (dominant in ventral processing) during interceptive action in fast-ball sports. Twelve college baseball players and 12 non-baseball players performed a coincident-timing task with target color changes (from white to red, blue, or white) at various time points (at 100, 200, or 300 ms before target arrival). In this task, participants swung a bat and/or pressed a button in response to the target's arrival at a prespecified location. Participants were then asked to state the final color of the target. Baseball players, but not non-baseball players, were significantly less proficient at identifying color changes during the bat-swing condition relative to the button-press condition, irrespective of the time points of color change. These results are consistent with the idea that baseball players rely more on the dorsal stream during bat swinging for the interception of a moving target than do novices.

  17. Global integration of local color differences in transparency perception: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojat, Michel; Piettre, Loÿs; Delon-Martin, Chantal; Pachot-Clouard, Mathilde; Segebarth, Christoph; Knoblauch, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    In normal viewing, the visual system effortlessly assigns approximately constant attributes of color and shape to perceived objects. A fundamental component of this process is the compensation for illuminant variations and intervening media to recover reflectance properties of natural surfaces. We exploited the phenomenon of transparency perception to explore the cortical regions implicated in such processes, using fMRI. By manipulating the coherence of local color differences around a region in an image, we interfered with their global perceptual integration and thereby modified whether the region appeared transparent or not. We found the major cortical activation due to global integration of local color differences to be in the anterior part of the parahippocampal gyrus. Regions differentially activated by chromatic versus achromatic geometric patterns showed no significant differential response related to the coherence/incoherence of local color differences. The results link the integration of local color differences in the extraction of a transparent layer with sites activated by object-related properties of an image.

  18. Embedding Color Watermarks in Color Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Tung-Lin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust watermarking with oblivious detection is essential to practical copyright protection of digital images. Effective exploitation of the characteristics of human visual perception to color stimuli helps to develop the watermarking scheme that fills the requirement. In this paper, an oblivious watermarking scheme that embeds color watermarks in color images is proposed. Through color gamut analysis and quantizer design, color watermarks are embedded by modifying quantization indices of color pixels without resulting in perceivable distortion. Only a small amount of information including the specification of color gamut, quantizer stepsize, and color tables is required to extract the watermark. Experimental results show that the proposed watermarking scheme is computationally simple and quite robust in face of various attacks such as cropping, low-pass filtering, white-noise addition, scaling, and JPEG compression with high compression ratios.

  19. Does correlated color temperature affect the ability of humans to identify veins?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we provide empirical evidence and demonstrate statistically that white illumination settings can affect the human ability to identify veins in the inner hand vasculature. A special light-emitting diode lamp with high color rendering index (CRI 84–95) was developed and the eff......In the present study we provide empirical evidence and demonstrate statistically that white illumination settings can affect the human ability to identify veins in the inner hand vasculature. A special light-emitting diode lamp with high color rendering index (CRI 84–95) was developed...... and the effect of correlated color temperature was evaluated, in the range between 2600 and 5700 K at an illuminance of 40 9 lx on the ability of adult humans to identify veins. It is shown that the ability to identify veins can, on average, be increased up to 24% when white illumination settings that do...... not resemble incandescent light are applied. The illuminance reported together with the effect of white illumination settings on direct visual perception of biosamples are relevant for clinical investigations during the night. © 2015 Optical Society of America...

  20. Simulator of human visual perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzubik, Vitalii V.; Belashenkov, Nickolai R.

    2016-04-01

    Difference of Circs (DoC) model allowing to simulate the response of neurons - ganglion cells as a reaction to stimuli is represented and studied in relation with representation of receptive fields of human retina. According to this model the response of neurons is reduced to execution of simple arithmetic operations and the results of these calculations well correlate with experimental data in wide range of stimuli parameters. The simplicity of the model and reliability of reproducing of responses allow to propose the conception of a device which can simulate the signals generated by ganglion cells as a reaction to presented stimuli. The signals produced according to DoC model are considered as a result of primary processing of information received from receptors independently of their type and may be sent to higher levels of nervous system of living creatures for subsequent processing. Such device may be used as a prosthesis for disabled organ.

  1. Cartographic continuum rendering based on color and texture interpolation to enhance photo-realism perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarau, Charlotte; Christophe, Sidonie

    2017-05-01

    Graphic interfaces of geoportals allow visualizing and overlaying various (visually) heterogeneous geographical data, often by image blending: vector data, maps, aerial imagery, Digital Terrain Model, etc. Map design and geo-visualization may benefit from methods and tools to hybrid, i.e. visually integrate, heterogeneous geographical data and cartographic representations. In this paper, we aim at designing continuous hybrid visualizations between ortho-imagery and symbolized vector data, in order to control a particular visual property, i.e. the photo-realism perception. The natural appearance (colors, textures) and various texture effects are used to drive the control the photo-realism level of the visualization: color and texture interpolation blocks have been developed. We present a global design method that allows to manipulate the behavior of those interpolation blocks on each type of geographical layer, in various ways, in order to provide various cartographic continua.

  2. ENVIRONMENT IN THE HUMAN PERCEPTION: GEOGRAPHICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Dushkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work highlights the different aspects of human perception of environment, specific characteristics of the subjective estimation of its state and attitudes to environmental quality. The authors claim more scientific awareness for the understanding of the motivations determining human behavior during interaction with the environment and knowledge about the objective functional system “perception—action” as part of complex geoecological analyses. Furthermore the populations view on the further development of the landscape to improve its living conditions etc. is a crucial part of this concept.

  3. Effects of playing video games on perceptions of one's humanity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemeyer, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    According to self-perception theory, individuals infer their characteristics by observing their own behavior. In the present research, the hypothesis is examined whether helping behavior increases perceptions of one's own humanity even when help is given that does not benefit a real person. In fact, two studies revealed that playing a prosocial video game (where the goal is to help and care for other game characters) led to increased perceptions of the player's own humanity (in particular, for positive humanity traits). Results also revealed that playing a violent, relative to a neutral, video game decreased perceptions of humanity on positive humanity traits and increased perceptions of humanity on negative humanity traits. Taken together, it appears that being helpful while playing video games leads to the perception of being more human, whereas being harmful while playing video games leads players to perceive themselves negatively.

  4. Color-Removal by Microorganisms Isolated from Human Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Ito

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are essential for human life. Microorganisms decompose the carbon compounds in dead animals and plants and convert them into carbon dioxide. Intestinal bacteria assist in food digestion. Some vitamins are produced by bacteria that live in the intestines. Sewage and industrial wastewater are treated by activated sludge composed of microbial communities. All of these are due to the ability of microbes to produce many enzymes that can degrade chemicals. How do teachers make students understand that microorganisms are always associated with humans, and that microorganisms have the ability to degrade chemicals? The presence of microorganisms on humans can be shown by incubating agar plates after they are touched by the hands of students. The ability of microorganisms to degrade chemicals can be shown by an analytical measurement of the degradation of chemicals. When the chemicals are dyes (colorants in water, microbial activity on degradation of dyes can be demonstrated by observing a decreasing degree of color as a result of the enzymatic activity (e.g., azoreductase. Dyes are widely used in the textile, food, and cosmetic industries. They are generally resistant to conventional biological wastewater treatment systems such as the activated sludge process (4. The discharge of wastewater containing dye pollutes surface water. The ability of microorganisms to decolorize and degrade dyes has been widely investigated to use for bioremediation purposes (5. The goal of this tip is to understand the presence of bacteria on human skin and the ability of bacteria to degrade colorant chemicals (decolorization. In this tip, students first cultivate and isolate bacteria on their hands, and then examine potential decolorization activity of each bacterium by observing the degree of color of the liquid in tubes in which bacteria isolated from students’ hands were inoculated. Decolorization activity of bacterial isolates from human skin has been

  5. Anxiety affects the amplitudes of red and green color-elicited flash visual evoked potentials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Yuki; Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Urushihara, Ryo; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Kinouchi, Yohsuke

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that negative emotional changes and conditions affect the visual faculties of humans at the neural level. On the other hand, the effects of emotion on color perception in particular, which are based on evoked potentials, are unknown. In the present study, we investigated whether different anxiety levels affect the color information processing for each of 3 wavelengths by using flash visual evoked potentials (FVEPs) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. In results, significant positive correlations were observed between FVEP amplitudes and state or trait anxiety scores in the long (sensed as red) and middle (sensed as green) wavelengths. On the other hand, short-wavelength-evoked FVEPs were not correlated with anxiety level. Our results suggest that negative emotional conditions may affect color sense processing in humans.

  6. The role of scission in the perception of color and opacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Barton L; Khang, Byung-Geun

    2010-05-01

    Recent work has shown that the decomposition of textures into a layered representation can induce striking percepts of inhomogeneous transparency and modulate the perceived lightness of achromatic textures (B. L. Anderson & J. Winawer, 2005, 2008). It was argued that two photo-geometric principles of perceptual organization were responsible for the percepts that arise in these images: a polarity constraint that determines the relative lightness of the two layers and a transmittance anchoring principle, which is responsible for determining portions of the scene that are in plain view. Here, we show that similar principles of perceptual organization underlie the decomposition of textures that vary only in chromaticity. We show that the chromatic contrast relationships along contours play a critical role in determining when chromatic scission occurs and in determining the perceived color and opacity of the layers that emerge when such conditions prevail. These findings provide evidence that a similar set of computational principles is used to decompose images into layers along both chromatic and achromatic axes of color space.

  7. Inferred motion perception of light sources in 3D scenes is color-blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, Holly E; Maloney, Laurence T

    2013-01-01

    In everyday scenes, the illuminant can vary spatially in chromaticity and luminance, and change over time (e.g. sunset). Such variation generates dramatic image effects too complex for any contemporary machine vision system to overcome, yet human observers are remarkably successful at inferring object properties separately from lighting, an ability linked with estimation and tracking of light field parameters. Which information does the visual system use to infer light field dynamics? Here, we specifically ask whether color contributes to inferred light source motion. Observers viewed 3D surfaces illuminated by an out-of-view moving collimated source (sun) and a diffuse source (sky). In half of the trials, the two sources differed in chromaticity, thereby providing more information about motion direction. Observers discriminated light motion direction above chance, and only the least sensitive observer benefited slightly from the added color information, suggesting that color plays only a very minor role for inferring light field dynamics.

  8. Inferred Motion Perception of Light Sources in 3D Scenes is Color-Blind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly E. Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In everyday scenes, the illuminant can vary spatially in chromaticity and luminance, and change over time (e.g. sunset. Such variation generates dramatic image effects too complex for any contemporary machine vision system to overcome, yet human observers are remarkably successful at inferring object properties separately from lighting, an ability linked with estimation and tracking of light field parameters. Which information does the visual system use to infer light field dynamics? Here, we specifically ask whether color contributes to inferred light source motion. Observers viewed 3D surfaces illuminated by an out-of-view moving collimated source (sun and a diffuse source (sky. In half of the trials, the two sources differed in chromaticity, thereby providing more information about motion direction. Observers discriminated light motion direction above chance, and only the least sensitive observer benefited slightly from the added color information, suggesting that color plays only a very minor role for inferring light field dynamics.

  9. Extreme reaction times determine fluctuation scaling in human color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-11-01

    In modern mental chronometry, human reaction time defines the time elapsed from stimulus presentation until a response occurs and represents a reference paradigm for investigating stochastic latency mechanisms in color vision. Here we examine the statistical properties of extreme reaction times and whether they support fluctuation scaling in the skewness-kurtosis plane. Reaction times were measured for visual stimuli across the cardinal directions of the color space. For all subjects, the results show that very large reaction times deviate from the right tail of reaction time distributions suggesting the existence of dragon-kings events. The results also indicate that extreme reaction times are correlated and shape fluctuation scaling over a wide range of stimulus conditions. The scaling exponent was higher for achromatic than isoluminant stimuli, suggesting distinct generative mechanisms. Our findings open a new perspective for studying failure modes in sensory-motor communications and in complex networks.

  10. Cortical dynamics of three-dimensional form, color, and brightness perception. 1. Monocular theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossberg, S.

    1987-01-01

    A real-time visual-processing theory is developed to explain how three-dimensional form, color, and brightness percepts are coherently synthesized. The theory describes how several fundamental uncertainty principles that limit the computation of visual information at individual processing stages are resolved through parallel and hierarchical interactions among several processing stages. The theory provides unified analysis and many predictions of data about stereopsis, binocular rivalry, hyperacuity, McCollough effect, textural grouping, border distinctness, surface perception, monocular and binocular brightness percepts, filling-in, metacontrast, transparency, figural aftereffects, lateral inhibition within spatial frequency channels, proximity luminance covariance, tissue contrast, motion segmentation, and illusory figures, as well as about reciprocal interactions among the hypercolumns, blobs, and stripes of cortical areas V1, V2, and V4. Monocular and binocular interactions between a Boundary Contour (BC) System and a Feature Contour (FC) System are developed. The BC System, defined by a hierarchy of oriented interactions, synthesizes an emergent and coherent binocular boundary segmentation from combinations of unoriented and oriented scenic elements.

  11. Aggression, academic behaviors, and popularity perceptions among boys of color during the transition to middle school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongling; Dawes, Molly; Wurster, Tabitha J; Shi, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The transition to middle school often presents behavioral and academic challenges to youths. Boys of color (i.e., African American and Hispanic in this study) may be especially vulnerable. In this study, peer nominations of aggressive and academic behaviors as well as youths' perceptions of how these behaviors were related to popularity in peer networks were obtained from the spring semester of fifth grade through the spring semester of seventh grade, with the transition occurring as the students entered the sixth grade. The sample included 188 boys (71 Caucasian, 90 African American, and 27 Hispanic) from an urban school district in the northeastern United States. Trajectory analyses showed that African American boys scored lower in studentship and higher in rule-breaking and aggressive (both physical and social) behaviors prior to the transition, and such differences among ethnic groups were largely maintained during the transition. Hispanic boys displayed decreases in their studentship during the transition. African American boys' perception of how studentship affects popularity was more positive than other boys prior to the transition, but it decreased during the transition. African American boys also endorsed rule breaking and physical and social aggression more positively for popularity prior to the transition, whereas Caucasian and Hispanic boys' endorsement increased during the transition and eventually caught up with those of African American boys in seventh grade. A positive within-individual association was found between youths' popularity perception and their behavior for studentship, rule breaking, and physical aggression, which did not differ by ethnicity.

  12. Philosophies of Human Nature and Perception of Physical Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Examined effects of social perceptions of differential perception of beauty. Men and women (N=62) rated 10 passport pictures on five-point scale from very ugly to very beautiful. Subjects also completed Philosophies of Human Nature Scale. Positive correlations with perception of beauty were obtained for four of the six subscales. (Author)

  13. Auditory perception of a human walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, David; Campbell, Megan E J

    2014-01-01

    When one hears footsteps in the hall, one is able to instantly recognise it as a person: this is an everyday example of auditory biological motion perception. Despite the familiarity of this experience, research into this phenomenon is in its infancy compared with visual biological motion perception. Here, two experiments explored sensitivity to, and recognition of, auditory stimuli of biological and nonbiological origin. We hypothesised that the cadence of a walker gives rise to a temporal pattern of impact sounds that facilitates the recognition of human motion from auditory stimuli alone. First a series of detection tasks compared sensitivity with three carefully matched impact sounds: footsteps, a ball bouncing, and drumbeats. Unexpectedly, participants were no more sensitive to footsteps than to impact sounds of nonbiological origin. In the second experiment participants made discriminations between pairs of the same stimuli, in a series of recognition tasks in which the temporal pattern of impact sounds was manipulated to be either that of a walker or the pattern more typical of the source event (a ball bouncing or a drumbeat). Under these conditions, there was evidence that both temporal and nontemporal cues were important in recognising theses stimuli. It is proposed that the interval between footsteps, which reflects a walker's cadence, is a cue for the recognition of the sounds of a human walking.

  14. Neural correlates of human body perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleong, Rosanne; Paus, Tomás

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate potential sex differences in the neural response to human bodies using fMRI carried out in healthy young adults. We presented human bodies in a block-design experiment to identify body-responsive regions of the brain, namely, extrastriate body area (EBA) and fusiform body area (FBA). In a separate event-related "adaptation" experiment, carried out in the same group of subjects, we presented sets of four human bodies of varying body size and shape. Varying levels of body morphing were introduced to assess the degree of morphing required for adaptation release. Analysis of BOLD signal in the block-design experiment revealed significant Sex x Hemisphere interactions in the EBA and the FBA responses to human bodies. Only women showed greater BOLD response to bodies in the right hemisphere compared with the left hemisphere for both EBA and FBA. The BOLD response in right EBA was higher in women compared with men. In the adaptation experiment, greater right versus left hemisphere response for EBA and FBA was also identified among women but not men. These findings are particularly novel in that they address potential sex differences in the lateralization of EBA and FBA responses to human body images. Although previous studies have found some degree of right hemisphere dominance in body perception, our results suggest that such a functional lateralization may differ between men and women.

  15. Human Perception of Ambiguous Inertial Motion Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan-Lu

    2010-01-01

    Human daily activities on Earth involve motions that elicit both tilt and translation components of the head (i.e. gazing and locomotion). With otolith cues alone, tilt and translation can be ambiguous since both motions can potentially displace the otolithic membrane by the same magnitude and direction. Transitions between gravity environments (i.e. Earth, microgravity and lunar) have demonstrated to alter the functions of the vestibular system and exacerbate the ambiguity between tilt and translational motion cues. Symptoms of motion sickness and spatial disorientation can impair human performances during critical mission phases. Specifically, Space Shuttle landing records show that particular cases of tilt-translation illusions have impaired the performance of seasoned commanders. This sensorimotor condition is one of many operational risks that may have dire implications on future human space exploration missions. The neural strategy with which the human central nervous system distinguishes ambiguous inertial motion cues remains the subject of intense research. A prevailing theory in the neuroscience field proposes that the human brain is able to formulate a neural internal model of ambiguous motion cues such that tilt and translation components can be perceptually decomposed in order to elicit the appropriate bodily response. The present work uses this theory, known as the GIF resolution hypothesis, as the framework for experimental hypothesis. Specifically, two novel motion paradigms are employed to validate the neural capacity of ambiguous inertial motion decomposition in ground-based human subjects. The experimental setup involves the Tilt-Translation Sled at Neuroscience Laboratory of NASA JSC. This two degree-of-freedom motion system is able to tilt subjects in the pitch plane and translate the subject along the fore-aft axis. Perception data will be gathered through subject verbal reports. Preliminary analysis of perceptual data does not indicate that

  16. Exogenous attention and color perception: performance and appearance of saturation and hue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Stuart; Carrasco, Marisa

    2006-11-01

    Exogenous covert attention is an automatic, transient form of attention that can be triggered by sudden changes in the periphery. Here we test for the effects of attention on color perception. We used the methodology developed by Carrasco, Ling, and Read [Carrasco, M., Ling, S., & Read, S. (2004). Attention alters appearance. Nature Neuroscience, 7 (3) 308-313] to explore the effects of exogenous attention on appearance of saturation (Experiment 1) and of hue (Experiment 2). We also tested orientation discrimination performance for single stimuli defined by saturation or hue (Experiment 3). The results indicate that attention increases apparent saturation, but does not change apparent hue, notwithstanding the fact that it improves orientation discrimination for both saturation and hue stimuli.

  17. Modeling learned categorical perception in human vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Matthew C; Sowden, Paul T

    2012-09-01

    A long standing debate in cognitive neuroscience has been the extent to which perceptual processing is influenced by prior knowledge and experience with a task. A converging body of evidence now supports the view that a task does influence perceptual processing, leaving us with the challenge of understanding the locus of, and mechanisms underpinning, these influences. An exemplar of this influence is learned categorical perception (CP), in which there is superior perceptual discrimination of stimuli that are placed in different categories. Psychophysical experiments on humans have attempted to determine whether early cortical stages of visual analysis change as a result of learning a categorization task. However, while some results indicate that changes in visual analysis occur, the extent to which earlier stages of processing are changed is still unclear. To explore this issue, we develop a biologically motivated neural model of hierarchical vision processes consisting of a number of interconnected modules representing key stages of visual analysis, with each module learning to exhibit desired local properties through competition. With this system level model, we evaluate whether a CP effect can be generated with task influence to only the later stages of visual analysis. Our model demonstrates that task learning in just the later stages is sufficient for the model to exhibit the CP effect, demonstrating the existence of a mechanism that requires only a high-level of task influence. However, the effect generalizes more widely than is found with human participants, suggesting that changes to earlier stages of analysis may also be involved in the human CP effect, even if these are not fundamental to the development of CP. The model prompts a hybrid account of task-based influences on perception that involves both modifications to the use of the outputs from early perceptual analysis along with the possibility of changes to the nature of that early analysis itself

  18. [A case of late-onset schizophrenia with the predominant symptom of delusional perception of the color of food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Manabu; Hinohara, Kei; Yamaga, Kuniaki; Kato, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we report the case of a woman in her late 60s with late-onset schizophrenia in which the predominant symptom was delusional perception of the color of food based on a delusional "rule of colors" system constructed by the patient. This paranoid type schizophrenia is considered a core type of schizophrenia in which first-rank Schneiderian symptoms are initially exhibited. After approximately four years, the chronic phase, characterized by a poor social function, is reached. In this respect, the main psychopathological characteristics of the present case of late-onset schizophrenia are the same as those of typical cases of schizophrenia in young patients. In this study, the patient's delusional "rule of colors" system is analyzed according to Matussek's theory of delusional perception.

  19. Real Time Detection and Tracking of Human Face using Skin Color Segmentation and Region Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar G.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Real time faces detection and face tracking is one of the challenging problems in application like computer human interaction, video surveillance, biometrics etc. In this paper we are presenting an algorithm for real time face detection and tracking using skin color segmentation and region properties. First segmentation of skin regions from an image is done by using different color models. Skin regions are separated from the image by using thresholding. Then to decide whether these regions contain human face or not we used face features. Our procedure is based on skin color segmentation and human face features (knowledge-based approach. We have used RGB, YCbCr, and HSV color models for skin color segmentation. These color models with thresholds, help to remove non skin like pixel from an image. Each segmented skin regions are tested to know whether region is human face or not, by using human face features based on knowledge of geometrical properties of human face.

  20. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the human visual aesthetic perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela-Conde, Camilo J.; Marty, Gisèle; Maestú, Fernando; Ortiz, Tomás; Munar, Enric; Fernández, Alberto; Roca, Miquel; Rosselló, Jaume; Quesney, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    Visual aesthetic perception (“aesthetics”) or the capacity to visually perceive a particular attribute added to other features of objects, such as form, color, and movement, was fixed during human evolutionary lineage as a trait not shared with any great ape. Although prefrontal brain expansion is mentioned as responsible for the appearance of such human trait, no current knowledge exists on the role of prefrontal areas in the aesthetic perception. The visual brain consists of “several parallel multistage processing systems, each specialized in a given task such as, color or motion” [Bartels, A. & Zeki, S. (1999) Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. B 265, 2327–2332]. Here we report the results of an experiment carried out with magnetoencephalography which shows that the prefrontal area is selectively activated in humans during the perception of objects qualified as “beautiful” by the participants. Therefore, aesthetics can be hypothetically considered as an attribute perceived by means of a particular brain processing system, in which the prefrontal cortex seems to play a key role. PMID:15079079

  1. Color planner for designers based on color emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ka-Man; Xin, John H.; Taylor, Gail

    2002-06-01

    During the color perception process, an associated feeling or emotion is induced in our brains, and this kind of emotion is termed as 'color emotion.' The researchers in the field of color emotions have put many efforts in quantifying color emotions with the standard color specifications and evaluating the influence of hue, lightness and chroma to the color emotions of human beings. In this study, a color planner was derived according to these findings so that the correlation of color emotions and standard color specifications was clearly indicated. Since people of different nationalities usually have different color emotions as different cultural and traditional backgrounds, the subjects in this study were all native Hong Kong Chinese and the color emotion words were all written in Chinese language in the visual assessments. Through the color planner, the designers from different areas, no matter fashion, graphic, interior or web site etc., can select suitable colors for inducing target color emotions to the customers or product-users since different colors convey different meanings to them. In addition, the designers can enhance the functionality and increase the attractiveness of their designed products by selecting suitable colors.

  2. Multivoxel fMRI analysis of color tuning in human primary visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parkes, Laura M.; Marsman, Jan-Bernard C.; Oxley, David C.; Goulermas, John Y.; Wuerger, Sophie M.

    2009-01-01

    We use multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) to study the spatial clustering of color-selective neurons in the human brain. Our main objective was to investigate whether MVPA reveals the spatial arrangements of color-selective neurons in human primary visual cortex (V1). We measured the distributed fMR

  3. Human motion perception: Higher-order organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of higher-order motion perception and organization. It is argued that motion is sufficient to fully specify a number of environmental properties, including: depth order, three-dimensional form, object displacement, and dynamics. A grammar of motion perception is proposed; applications of this work for display design are discussed.

  4. Cortical dynamics of three-dimensional form, color, and brightness perception. 2. Binocular theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossberg, S.

    1987-01-01

    A real-time visual-processing theory is developed to explain how three-dimensional form, color, and brightness precepts are coherently synthesized. The theory describes how several fundamental uncertainty principles that limit the computation of visual information at individual processing stages are resolved through parallel and hierarchical interactions among several processing stages. The theory provides a unified analysis and many predictions of data about stereopsis, binocular, rivalry, hyperacuity, McCollough effect, textural grouping, border distinctness surface perception, monocular and binocular brightness precepts, filling-in, metacontrast, transparency, figural aftereffects, lateral inhibition within spatial frequency channels, proximity-luminance covariance, tissue contrast, motion segmentation, and illusory figures, as well as about reciprocal interactions among the hyper-columns, blobs, and stripes of cortical areas V1, V2, and V4. Monocular and binocular interactions between a Boundary Contour (BC) system and a Feature Contour (FC) System are developed. The BC System, defined by a hierarchy of oriented interactions, synthesizes an emergent and coherent binocular boundary segmentation from combinations of unoriented and oriented scenic elements.

  5. Does green mean healthy? Nutrition label color affects perceptions of healthfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldt, Jonathon P

    2013-01-01

    The food industry has recently implemented numerous front-of-package nutrition labels to readily convey key aspects a food product's nutritional profile to consumers (e.g., calories and fat content). Although seemingly well-intentioned, such labels might lead consumers to perceive relatively poor nutrition foods in a healthier light. The present research explores whether one underresearched aspect of nutrition labels-namely, their color-might influence perceptions of a product's healthfulness. In Study 1, participants perceived a candy bar as healthier when it bore a green rather than a red calorie label, despite the fact that the labels conveyed the same calorie content. Study 2 examined the perceived healthfulness of a candy bar bearing a green versus white calorie label and assessed individual differences in the importance of healthy eating. Overall, results suggest that green labels increase perceived healthfulness, especially among consumers who place high importance on healthy eating. Discussion focuses on implications for health-related judgment and nutrition labeling.

  6. Universal and uniquely human factors in spontaneous number perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, Stephen; Jara-Ettinger, Julian; Piantadosi, Steven T.; Cantlon, Jessica F.

    2017-01-01

    A capacity for nonverbal numerical estimation is widespread among humans and animals. However, it is currently unclear whether numerical percepts are spontaneously extracted from the environment and whether nonverbal perception is influenced by human exposure to formal mathematics. We tested US adults and children, non-human primates, and numerate and innumerate Tsimane' adults on a quantity task in which they could choose to categorize sets of dots on the basis of number alone, surface area alone or a combination of the two. Despite differences in age, species and education, subjects are universally biased to base their judgments on number as opposed to the alternatives. Numerical biases are uniquely enhanced in humans compared to non-human primates, and correlated with degree of mathematics experience in both the US and Tsimane' groups. We conclude that humans universally and spontaneously extract numerical information, and that human nonverbal numerical perception is enhanced by symbolic numeracy. PMID:28091519

  7. What can we learn from toddlers about categorical perception of color? Comments on Goldstein, Davidoff, and Roberson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Anna; Wright, Oliver; Davies, Ian R L

    2009-02-01

    We comment on Goldstein, Davidoff, and Roberson's replication and extension (Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 102, 219-238 [2009]) of our study of the effect of toddlers' color term knowledge on their categorical perception (CP) of color (Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 90, 114-141 [2005]). First, we discuss how best to assess color term knowledge when concerned with the effects of language on color CP. A reanalysis of our data indicates that even toddlers who do not know the terms for the relevant focal colors still show CP. Second, we comment on Goldstein and colleagues' finding of blue-purple CP, as we did, but not of blue-green CP in Himba toddlers. We present contrasting data from Wright (unpublished PhD thesis, University of Surrey, 2006) that demonstrates blue-green CP in Himba toddlers. Finally, we discuss the limitations of the approach taken by all of these investigations and discuss theoretical accounts of the origin and nature of color CP.

  8. Evolution of neural computations: Mantis shrimp and human color decoding

    OpenAIRE

    Qasim Zaidi; Justin Marshall; Hanne Thoen; Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Mantis shrimp and primates both possess good color vision, but the neural implementation in the two species is very different, a reflection of the largely unrelated evolutionary lineages of these creatures. Mantis shrimp have scanning compound eyes with 12 classes of photoreceptors, and have evolved a system to decode color information at the front-end of the sensory stream. Primates have image-focusing eyes with three classes of cones, and decode color further along the visual-processing hie...

  9. From humans to computers cognition through visual perception

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Viktor Vasilievitch

    1991-01-01

    This book considers computer vision to be an integral part of the artificial intelligence system. The core of the book is an analysis of possible approaches to the creation of artificial vision systems, which simulate human visual perception. Much attention is paid to the latest achievements in visual psychology and physiology, the description of the functional and structural organization of the human perception mechanism, the peculiarities of artistic perception and the expression of reality. Computer vision models based on these data are investigated. They include the processes of external d

  10. A Neuroelectrical Brain Imaging Study on the Perception of Figurative Paintings against Only their Color or Shape Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton G. Maglione

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the cortical activity correlated with the perception and appreciation of different set of pictures was estimated by using neuroelectric brain activity and graph theory methodologies in a group of artistic educated persons. The pictures shown to the subjects consisted of original pictures of Titian's and a contemporary artist's paintings (Orig dataset plus two sets of additional pictures. These additional datasets were obtained from the previous paintings by removing all but the colors or the shapes employed (Color and Style dataset, respectively. Results suggest that the verbal appreciation of Orig dataset when compared to Color and Style ones was mainly correlated to the neuroelectric indexes estimated during the first 10 s of observation of the pictures. Always in the first 10 s of observation: (1 Orig dataset induced more emotion and is perceived with more appreciation than the other two Color and Style datasets; (2 Style dataset is perceived with more attentional effort than the other investigated datasets. During the whole period of observation of 30 s: (1 emotion induced by Color and Style datasets increased across the time while that induced of the Orig dataset remain stable; (2 Color and Style dataset were perceived with more attentional effort than the Orig dataset. During the entire experience, there is evidence of a cortical flow of activity from the parietal and central areas toward the prefrontal and frontal areas during the observation of the images of all the datasets. This is coherent from the notion that active perception of the images with sustained cognitive attention in parietal and central areas caused the generation of the judgment about their aesthetic appreciation in frontal areas.

  11. A Neuroelectrical Brain Imaging Study on the Perception of Figurative Paintings against Only their Color or Shape Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Anton G.; Brizi, Ambra; Vecchiato, Giovanni; Rossi, Dario; Trettel, Arianna; Modica, Enrica; Babiloni, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the cortical activity correlated with the perception and appreciation of different set of pictures was estimated by using neuroelectric brain activity and graph theory methodologies in a group of artistic educated persons. The pictures shown to the subjects consisted of original pictures of Titian's and a contemporary artist's paintings (Orig dataset) plus two sets of additional pictures. These additional datasets were obtained from the previous paintings by removing all but the colors or the shapes employed (Color and Style dataset, respectively). Results suggest that the verbal appreciation of Orig dataset when compared to Color and Style ones was mainly correlated to the neuroelectric indexes estimated during the first 10 s of observation of the pictures. Always in the first 10 s of observation: (1) Orig dataset induced more emotion and is perceived with more appreciation than the other two Color and Style datasets; (2) Style dataset is perceived with more attentional effort than the other investigated datasets. During the whole period of observation of 30 s: (1) emotion induced by Color and Style datasets increased across the time while that induced of the Orig dataset remain stable; (2) Color and Style dataset were perceived with more attentional effort than the Orig dataset. During the entire experience, there is evidence of a cortical flow of activity from the parietal and central areas toward the prefrontal and frontal areas during the observation of the images of all the datasets. This is coherent from the notion that active perception of the images with sustained cognitive attention in parietal and central areas caused the generation of the judgment about their aesthetic appreciation in frontal areas. PMID:28790907

  12. Evolution of Neural Computations: Mantis Shrimp and Human Color Decoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qasim Zaidi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mantis shrimp and primates both possess good color vision, but the neural implementation in the two species is very different, a reflection of the largely unrelated evolutionary lineages of these creatures. Mantis shrimp have scanning compound eyes with 12 classes of photoreceptors, and have evolved a system to decode color information at the front-end of the sensory stream. Primates have image-focusing eyes with three classes of cones, and decode color further along the visual-processing hierarchy. Despite these differences, we report a fascinating parallel between the computational strategies at the color-decoding stage in the brains of stomatopods and primates. Both species appear to use narrowly tuned cells that support interval decoding color identification.

  13. Evolution of neural computations: Mantis shrimp and human color decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Qasim; Marshall, Justin; Thoen, Hanne; Conway, Bevil R

    2014-01-01

    Mantis shrimp and primates both possess good color vision, but the neural implementation in the two species is very different, a reflection of the largely unrelated evolutionary lineages of these creatures. Mantis shrimp have scanning compound eyes with 12 classes of photoreceptors, and have evolved a system to decode color information at the front-end of the sensory stream. Primates have image-focusing eyes with three classes of cones, and decode color further along the visual-processing hierarchy. Despite these differences, we report a fascinating parallel between the computational strategies at the color-decoding stage in the brains of stomatopods and primates. Both species appear to use narrowly tuned cells that support interval decoding color identification.

  14. Quantifying Human Visible Color Variation from High Definition Digital Images of Orb Web Spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuria Ibarra, Helena; Rao, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Digital processing and analysis of high resolution images of 30 individuals of the orb web spider Verrucosa arenata were performed to extract and quantify human visible colors present on the dorsal abdomen of this species. Color extraction was performed with minimal user intervention using an unsupervised algorithm to determine groups of colors on each individual spider, which was then analyzed in order to quantify and classify the colors obtained, both spatially and using energy and entropy measures of the digital images. Analysis shows that the colors cover a small region of the visible spectrum, are not spatially homogeneously distributed over the patterns and from an entropic point of view, colors that cover a smaller region on the whole pattern carry more information than colors covering a larger region. This study demonstrates the use of processing tools to create automatic systems to extract valuable information from digital images that are precise, efficient and helpful for the understanding of the underlying biology. PMID:27902724

  15. Skin Color and Self-Perceptions of Immigrant and U.S.-Born Latinas: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization and Ethnic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzer, Eva H.; Vazquez Garcia, Heidie A.

    2009-01-01

    Research has increasingly identified race as a salient characteristic that affects one's life experiences and psychological well-being. However, little is known about how skin color affects the emotional health of Latinos. The present study examined how skin color relates to the self-perceptions of immigrant (N = 26) and U.S.-born (N = 55) Latina…

  16. Skin Color and Self-Perceptions of Immigrant and U.S.-Born Latinas: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization and Ethnic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzer, Eva H.; Vazquez Garcia, Heidie A.

    2009-01-01

    Research has increasingly identified race as a salient characteristic that affects one's life experiences and psychological well-being. However, little is known about how skin color affects the emotional health of Latinos. The present study examined how skin color relates to the self-perceptions of immigrant (N = 26) and U.S.-born (N = 55) Latina…

  17. Human engineering design considerations for the use of signal color enhancement in ASW displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W.W.

    1990-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was requested to examine and define man-machine limits as part of the Office of Naval Technology's High Gain Initiative program (HGI). As an initial investigative area, LLNL's Systems and Human Performance effort focused upon color display interfaces and the use of color enhancement techniques to define human and system interface limits in signal detection and discrimination tasks. The knowledgeable and prudent use of color in different types of display is believed to facilitate human visual detection, discrimination and recognition in complex visual tasks. The consideration and understanding of the complex set of interacting variables associated with the prudent use of color is essential to optimize human performance, especially in the ASW community. The designers of advanced display technology and signal processing algorithms may be eventually called upon to present pre-processed information to ASW operators and researchers using the latest color enhancement techniques. These techniques, however, may be limited if one does not understand the complexity and limits of human information processing which reflects the assessed state of knowledge relevant to the use of color in displays. The initial sections of this report discuss various aspects of color presentation and the problems typically encountered, while the last section deals with a specific research proposal required to further our understanding and proper use of color enhancement methods.

  18. Evolution of Neural Computations: Mantis Shrimp and Human Color Decoding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaidi, Qasim; Marshall, Justin; Thoen, Hanne; Conway, Bevil R

    2014-01-01

    Mantis shrimp and primates both possess good color vision, but the neural implementation in the two species is very different, a reflection of the largely unrelated evolutionary lineages of these creatures...

  19. Digital quantification of human eye color highlights genetic association of three new loci.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Liu (Fan); A. Wollstein (Andreas); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); G.A. Ankra-Badu (Georgina); T.D. Spector (Timothy); D.J. Park (Daniel); G. Zhu; M. Larsson (Mats); D.L. Duffy (David); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); D.A. Mackey (David); S. Walsh (Susan); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies have successfully identified genetic variants in several genes associated with human iris (eye) color; however, they all used simplified categorical trait information. Here, we quantified continuous eye color variation into hue and saturation values using high-resolution

  20. The Discourse of Humanness at the Intersection of Color-Blindness and Race Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    Color blind discourse often draws on sentiments such as, "When I look at you, I do not see color," or race should not matter since we are all human, we are all the same underneath. In other words, the desire to view others as individuals is often constituted on the back of the desire to understand the notion of the individual as one who…

  1. Human and machine perception communication, interaction, and integration

    CERN Document Server

    Cantoni, Virginio; Setti, Alessandra

    2005-01-01

    The theme of this book on human and machine perception is communication, interaction, and integration. For each basic topic there are invited lectures, corresponding to approaches in nature and machines, and a panel discussion. The lectures present the state of the art, outlining open questions and stressing synergies among the disciplines related to perception. The panel discussions are forums for open debate. The wide spectrum of topics allows comparison and synergy and can stimulate new approaches.

  2. Experimental and theoretical studies of perceptible color fading of decorative paints consisting of mixed pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Jean-Claude; McLoughlin, Daragh

    2017-01-01

    We study the color fading of paints films composed of mixtures of white rutile titanium dioxide and yellow arylide pigments dispersed in two polymer binders at different volume concentrations. The samples were exposed to ultraviolet radiations in an accelerated weathering tester during three weeks. The measured patterns in color variations appeared to be independent of the chemistry of the binders. We then developed a theoretical framework, based on the Radiative transfer Equation of light and the One Particle T-Matrix formalism to simulate the color fading process. The loss of color is correlated to the progressive decrease of the original colored pigment volume-filling fraction as the destructive UV radiations penetrate deeper into the films. The calculated patterns of color variations of paints film composed by mixtures of white pigments with yellow Cadmium Sulfate (CdS) and red Cerium Sulfide (Ce2S3) pigments showed the same trend as that seen experimentally.

  3. Tetrachromacy of human vision: spectral channels and primary colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrik, Vitali V.

    2002-06-01

    Full-color imaging requires four channels as, in contrast to a colorimeter, can add no primary to matched scene colors themselves. An ideal imaging channel should have the same spectral sensitivity of scene recording as a retinal receptor and evoke the same primary color sensation. The alternating matching functions of a triad of real primaries are inconsistent with the three cones but explicable of two pairs of independent opponent receptors with their alternating blue-yellow and green-red chromatic axes in the color space. Much other controversy of trichromatic approach can also be explained with the recently proposed intra- receptor processes in the photopic rod and cone, respectively. Each of their four primary sensations, unmixed around 465, 495, 575, and 650 nm, is evoked within a different spectral region. The current trichromatic photographic systems have been found separately to approximate the blue and red receptors, as well as their spectral opponency against the respective yellow and blue- green receptors simulated with a single middle-wave imaging channel. The channel sensitivities are delimited by the neutral points of rod and cone and cannot simulate the necessary overlap of non-opponent channels for properly to render some mixed colors. The yellow and cyan positive dyes closely control the brightness of blue and red sensations, respectively. Those red and blue respectively to control the yellow and blue-green sensations on brightness scales are replaced by magenta dye, controlling them together. Accurate rendering of natural saturation metameric colors, problematic blue-green, purple-red, and low-illumination colors requires to replace the hybrid 'green' channel with the blue-green and yellow channels.

  4. Blobs versus bars: psychophysical evidence supports two types of orientation response in human color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheiratmand, Mina; Meese, Tim S; Mullen, Kathy T

    2013-01-02

    The classic hypothesis of Livingstone and Hubel (1984, 1987) proposed two types of color pathways in primate visual cortex based on recordings from single cells: a segregated, modular pathway that signals color but provides little information about shape or form and a second pathway that signals color differences and so defines forms without the need to specify their colors. A major problem has been to reconcile this neurophysiological hypothesis with the behavioral data. A wealth of psychophysical studies has demonstrated that color vision has orientation-tuned responses and little impairment on form related tasks, but these have not revealed any direct evidence for nonoriented mechanisms. Here we use a psychophysical method of subthreshold summation across orthogonal orientations for isoluminant red-green gratings in monocular and dichoptic viewing conditions to differentiate between nonoriented and orientation-tuned responses to color contrast. We reveal nonoriented color responses at low spatial frequencies (0.25-0.375 c/deg) under monocular conditions changing to orientation-tuned responses at higher spatial frequencies (1.5 c/deg) and under binocular conditions. We suggest that two distinct pathways coexist in color vision at the behavioral level, revealed at different spatial scales: one is isotropic, monocular, and best equipped for the representation of surface color, and the other is orientation-tuned, binocular, and selective for shape and form. This advances our understanding of the organization of the neural pathways involved in human color vision and provides a strong link between neurophysiological and behavioral data.

  5. The neurological basis of conscious color perception in a blind patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki, S.; Aglioti, S.; McKeefry, D.; Berlucchi, G.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied patient PB, who, after an electric shock that led to vascular insufficiency, became virtually blind, although he retained a capacity to see colors consciously. For our psychophysical studies, we used a simplified version of the Land experiments [Land, E. (1974) Proc. R. Inst. G. B. 47, 23–58] to learn whether color constancy mechanisms are intact in him, which amounts to learning whether he can assign a constant color to a surface in spite of changes in the precise wavelength composition of the light reflected from that surface. We supplemented our psychophysical studies with imaging ones, using functional magnetic resonance, to learn something about the location of areas that are active in his brain when he perceives colors. The psychophysical results suggested that color constancy mechanisms are severely defective in PB and that his color vision is wavelength-based. The imaging results showed that, when he viewed and recognized colors, significant increases in activity were restricted mainly to V1-V2. We conclude that a partly defective color system operating on its own in a severely damaged brain is able to mediate a conscious experience of color in the virtually total absence of other visual abilities. PMID:10570209

  6. O uso de cores em cilindros contendo gás: uma análise sobre a percepção visual sob diferentes iluminantes Color use in gas cylinders: a visual perception analysis under different lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Rodrigues Leta

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta uma análise sobre a percepção visual humana das cores adotadas na indústria. Para tanto, foi desenvolvido um ambiente experimental no qual objetos, simulando cilindros contendo gases, com cores variadas foram submetidos a diferentes fontes de iluminação. Um grupo de observadores foi submetido ao experimento respondendo a um questionário. Os resultados deste experimento demonstram que a percepção de cores no ambiente industrial exerce influência direta na qualidade dos serviços e na segurança dos indivíduos que freqüentam tais instalações. A confusão observada na detecção das cores e associação das mesmas a características de periculosidade demonstra a necessidade de se analisar com cautela a adoção de determinadas cores na indústria. Os resultados mostram que a evolução das tecnologias de iluminação e de pigmentos deve ser acompanhada por normas e leis, especialmente em ambientes industriais envolvendo riscos.This article presents a methodology to study how the human being perceives and express the risk characteristic of gas cylinders colors in common conditions. This work deals with different color hues, submitted to different lighting. We present a discussion about risk factors involving changes of color perception depending on lighting source. It is based on empirical study of color perception in industrial environments. It influences the quality of the services and the employees' safety. We have as main goal start a discussion about the principal concepts involving color perception and lighting. The obtained results demonstrate the necessity of standardization concerning the color use, considering the appropriate lighting in industrial situations involving risks.

  7. Predictive dynamics of human pain perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo A Cecchi

    Full Text Available While the static magnitude of thermal pain perception has been shown to follow a power-law function of the temperature, its dynamical features have been largely overlooked. Due to the slow temporal experience of pain, multiple studies now show that the time evolution of its magnitude can be captured with continuous online ratings. Here we use such ratings to model quantitatively the temporal dynamics of thermal pain perception. We show that a differential equation captures the details of the temporal evolution in pain ratings in individual subjects for different stimulus pattern complexities, and also demonstrates strong predictive power to infer pain ratings, including readouts based only on brain functional images.

  8. S3-3: Misbinding of Color and Motion in Human V2 Revealed by Color-Contingent Motion Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Wu, Kanai, & Shimojo (2004 Nature 429 262 described a compelling illusion demonstrating a steady-state misbinding of color and motion. Here, we took advantage of the illusion and performed psychophysical and fMRI adaptation experiments to explore the neural mechanism of color-motion misbinding. The stimulus subtended 20 deg by 14 deg of visual angle and contained two sheets of random dots, one sheet moving up and the other moving down. On the upward-moving sheet, dots in the right-end area (4 deg by 14 deg were red, and the rest of the dots were green. On the downward-moving sheet, dots in the right-end area were green, and the rest of the dots were red. When subjects fixated at the center of the stimulus, they bound the color and motion of the dots in the right-end area erroneously–the red dots appeared to move downwards and the green dots appeared to move upwards. In the psychophysical experiment, we measured the color-contingent motion aftereffect in the right-end area after adaptation to the illusory stimulus. A significant aftereffect was observed as if subjects had adapted to the perceived binding of color and motion, rather than the physical binding. For example, after adaptation, stationary red dots appeared to move upwards, and stationary green dots appeared to move downwards. In the fMRI experiment, we measured direction-selective motion adaptation effects in V1, V2, V3, V4, V3A/B, and V5. Relative to other cortical areas, V2 showed a much stronger adaptation effect to the perceived motion direction (rather than the physical direction for both the red and green dots. Significantly, the fMRI adaptation effect in V2 correlated with the color-contingent motion aftereffect across twelve subjects. This study provides the first human evidence that color and motion could be misbound at a very early stage of visual processing.

  9. Improving information perception from digital images for users with dichromatic color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayeghpour, Omid; Nyström, Daniel; Gooran, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    Color vision deficiency (CVD) is the inability, or limited ability, to recognize colors and discriminate between them. A person with this condition perceives a narrower range of colors compared to a person with normal color vision. In this study we concentrate on recoloring digital images in such a way that users with CVD, especially dichromats, perceive more details from the recolored images compared to the original ones. During this color transformation process, the goal is to keep the overall contrast of the image constant, while adjusting the colors that might cause confusion for the CVD user. In this method, RGB values at each pixel of the image are first converted into HSV values and, based on pre-defined rules, the problematic colors are adjusted into colors that are perceived better by the user. Comparing the simulation of the original image, as it would be perceived by a dichromat, with the same dichromatic simulation on the recolored image, clearly shows that our method can eliminate a lot of confusion for the user and convey more details. Moreover, an online questionnaire was created and a group of 39 CVD users confirmed that the transformed images allow them to perceive more information compared to the original images.

  10. Connecting Language with Perception and Action for Human-robot Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Pin-gui; YANG Yi-ping

    2006-01-01

    To build robots that engage in intuitive communication with people by natural language, we are developing a new knowledge representation called conceptual network model.The conceptual network connects natural language concepts with visual perception including color perception, shape perception, size perception, and spatial perception. In the implementation of spatial perception, we present a computational model based on spatial template theory to interpret qualitative spatial expressions. Based on the conceptual network model, our mobile robot can understand user's instructions and recognize the object referred to by the user and perform appropriate action. Experimental results show our approach promising.

  11. Pain perception and its genesis in the human brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew CN CHEN

    2008-01-01

    In the past two decades, pain perception in the human brain has been studied with EEG/MEG brain topography and PET/ fMRI neuroimaging techniques. A host of cortical and subeortical loci can be activated by various nociceptive conditions. The activation in pain perception can be induced by physical (electrical, thermal, mechanical), chemical (capsacin, ascoric acid), psychological (anxiety, stress, nocebo) means, and pathological (e.g. migraine, neuropathic) diseases. This article deals mainly on the activation, but not modulation, of human pain in the brain. The brain areas identified are named pain representation, matrix, neuraxis, or signature. The sites are not uniformly isolated across various studies, but largely include a set of cores sites: thalamus and primary somatic area (SI), second somatic area (SII), insular cortex (IC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), cingnlate, and parietal cortices. Other areas less reported and considered important in pain perception include brainstem, hippocampus, amygdala and supplementary motor area (SMA). The issues of pain perception basically encompass both the site and the mode of brain function. Although the site issue is delineared to a large degree, the mode issue has been much less explored. From the temporal dynamics, IC can be considered as the initial stage in genesis of pain perception as conscious suffering, the unique aversion in the human brain.

  12. Pain perception and its genesis in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C N Chen, Andrew

    2008-10-25

    In the past two decades, pain perception in the human brain has been studied with EEG/MEG brain topography and PET/fMRI neuroimaging techniques. A host of cortical and subcortical loci can be activated by various nociceptive conditions. The activation in pain perception can be induced by physical (electrical, thermal, mechanical), chemical (capsacin, ascoric acid), psychological (anxiety, stress, nocebo) means, and pathological (e.g. migraine, neuropathic) diseases. This article deals mainly on the activation, but not modulation, of human pain in the brain. The brain areas identified are named pain representation, matrix, neuraxis, or signature. The sites are not uniformly isolated across various studies, but largely include a set of cores sites: thalamus and primary somatic area (SI), second somatic area (SII), insular cortex (IC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), cingulate, and parietal cortices. Other areas less reported and considered important in pain perception include brainstem, hippocampus, amygdala and supplementary motor area (SMA). The issues of pain perception basically encompass both the site and the mode of brain function. Although the site issue is delineared to a large degree, the mode issue has been much less explored. From the temporal dynamics, IC can be considered as the initial stage in genesis of pain perception as conscious suffering, the unique aversion in the human brain.

  13. A ciosed-loop algorithm to detect human face using color and reinforcement learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴东晖; 叶秀清; 顾伟康

    2002-01-01

    A closed-loop algorithm to detect human face using color information and reinforcement learning is presented in this paper. By using a skin-color selector, the regions with color "like" that of human skin are selected as candidates for human face. In the next stage, the candidates are matched with a face model and given an evaluation of the match degree by the matching module. And if the evaluation of the match result is too low, a reinforcement learning stage will start to search the best parameters of the skin-color selector. It has been tested using many photos of various ethnic groups under various lighting conditions, such as different light source, high light and shadow. And the experiment result proved that this algorithm is robust to the vary-ing lighting conditions and personal conditions.

  14. A closed-loop algorithm to detect human face using color and reinforcement learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A closed-loop algorithm to detect human face using color information and reinforcement learning is presented in this paper. By using a skin-color selector, the regions with color “like" that of human skin are selected as candidates for human face. In the next stage, the candidates are matched with a face model and given an evaluation of the match degree by the matching module. And if the evaluation of the match result is too low, a reinforcement learning stage will start to search the best parameters of the skin-color selector. It has been tested using many photos of various ethnic groups under various lighting conditions, such as different light source, high light and shadow. And the experiment result proved that this algorithm is robust to the varying lighting conditions and personal conditions.

  15. Corresponding-pair procedure: a new approach to simulation of dichromatic color perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilla, Pascual; Diéz-Ajenjo, María Amparo; Luque, María José; Malo, Jesús

    2004-02-01

    The dichromatic color appearance of a chromatic stimulus T can be described if a stimulus S is found that verifies that a normal observer experiences the same sensation viewing S as a dichromat viewing T. If dichromatic and normal versions of the same color vision model are available, S can be computed by applying the inverse of the normal model to the descriptors of T obtained with the dichromatic model. We give analytical form to this algorithm, which we call the corresponding-pair procedure. The analytical form highlights the requisites that a color vision model must verify for this procedure to be used. To show the capabilities of the method, we apply the algorithm to different color vision models that verify such requisites. This algorithm avoids the need to introduce empirical information alien to the color model used, as was the case with previous methods. The relative simplicity of the procedure and its generality makes the prediction of dichromatic color appearance an additional test of the validity of color vision models.

  16. Role-play facilitates children’s mindreading of those with atypical color perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumikazu eFurumi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of role-play experience on children’s mindreading ability. Forty-one primary school children (20 boys, 21 girls, mean age: 9.37 years, range: 8–11 years were introduced to a communication task in which the use of mindreading was essential. During each trial, participants viewed a shelf, presented on a laptop, which contained several familiar objects, and they were instructed to touch an object on the shelf following an order issued by a manager who stood at the opposite side of the shelf. There were two managers: one was a monkey manager with normal color vision, and the other was a dog manager with restricted color vision. The monkey manager could see all the objects in the same colors as the participants, whereas the dog manager saw some objects in different colors. Participants were required to respond according to the manager's instruction. In the restricted color vision condition, the dog manager saw the colors of objects differently; thus, participants had to work out his intentions, according to his different perspective. In the normal color vision condition, all objects were in the same colors as those seen by the monkey manager. Before the test phase, participants in the role-play group were provided a role-play experience in which they assumed the role of the dog manager with restricted color vision. The experimental data were analyzed using a 2 x 2 mixed-design ANOVA (role-play condition x communication partner condition to examine differences in the error rate. Both main effects and its interaction were significant. According to the post-hoc analyses, participants in the no-role-play condition made significantly more errors in the restricted color vision condition than in the normal color vision condition, whereas no such difference was found among participants in the role-play condition. These results suggest that role-play experience could facilitate mindreading of characters with

  17. INTEGRATED EXPRESSIONAL AND COLOR INVARIANT FACIAL RECOGNITION SCHEME FOR HUMAN BIOMETRIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Punithavalli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In many practical applications like biometrics, video surveillance and human computer interaction, face recognition plays a major role. The previous works focused on recognizing and enhancing the biometric systems based on the facial components of the system. In this work, we are going to build Integrated Expressional and Color Invariant Facial Recognition scheme for human biometric recognition suited to different security provisioning public participation areas.At first, the features of the face are identified and processed using bayes classifier with RGB and HSV color bands. Second, psychological emotional variance are identified and linked with the respective human facial expression based on the facial action code system. Finally, an integrated expressional and color invariant facial recognition is proposed for varied conditions of illumination, pose, transformation, etc. These conditions on color invariant model are suited to easy and more efficient biometric recognition system in public domain and high confidential security zones. The integration is made derived genetic operation on the color and expression components of the facial feature system. Experimental evaluation is planned to done with public face databases (DBs such as CMU-PIE, Color FERET, XM2VTSDB, SCface, and FRGC 2.0 to estimate the performance of the proposed integrated expressional facial and color invariant recognition scheme [IEFCIRS]. Performance evaluation is done based on the constraints like recognition rate, security and evalaution time.

  18. A new measurement method for color discrimination thresholds of human eyes based on PWM light-mixing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiyan; Dong, Jinxin

    2016-09-01

    The color discrimination is a powerful tool for detection of eye diseases, and it is is necessary to produce different kinds of color rapidly and precisely for testing color discrimination thresholds of human eyes. Three channels' pulse-width modulation (PWM) and light-mixing technology is a new way to mixing color, and a new measurement method for color discrimination thresholds of human eyes based on PWM light-mix technology can generate kinds of color stimuli. In this study, 5 youth volunteers were measured via this equipment after the test for the stability of the device's illumination and chrominance. Though the theory of Macadam ellipses and the interleaved staircase method, a psychophysical experiment was made to study the color discrimination threshold of the human eyes around a basic color center. By analyzing the data of the chromatic ellipse and the color discrimination threshold, the result shows that each color is not uniform in a single color region and the color difference threshold of normal human is around the third Macadam ellipses. The experimental results show that the repeatability and accuracy of the observer can meet the accuracy requirements of the relevant experiments, and the data is reliable and effective, which means the measurement method is an effective way to measure the color discrimination thresholds of human visual system.

  19. [Effect of Light Color Temperature on Human Concentration and Creativity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitbrecht, W U; Bärwolff, H; Lischke, A; Jünger, S

    2015-06-01

    Light has different biological effects depending on the color temperature and intensity. This may be the reason for its differing effects. We investigated the influence of color temperature (3000 K, 4500 K, 6000 K) under constant high intensity (1000 Lux) on concentration and creativity of 50 students and employees of the Cologne University of Applied Sciences, Campus Gummersbach (age: 30.9 +/- 10.8y.). As test method we used d2-bq-test, creativity test (mean of the number of ideas on 5 themes), word test and logic test. In addition, test subjects were asked to evaluate their impression of light by means of a questionnaire. To exclude the circadian influence and learning effects on the result, we performed tests at the same time of the day using a random order of color temperature. We found that creativity was better under warm light (3000 K) than under colder light (4500 K, 6000 K). Concentration was best under cold light (6000 K). Under the same light intensity conditions, subjects judged blue light (6000 K) to be brighter than red light (3000 K).

  20. The perception of humanness from the movements of synthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James C; Trafton, J Gregory; McKnight, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    As technology develops, social robots and synthetic avatars might begin to play more of a role in our lives. An influential theory of the perception of synthetic agents states that as they begin to look and move in a more human-like way, they elicit profound discomfort in the observer--an effect known as the Uncanny Valley. Previous attempts to examine the existence of the Uncanny Valley have not adequately manipulated movement parameters that contribute to perceptions of the humanness or eeriness. Here we parametrically manipulated three different kinematic features of two walking avatars and found that, contrary to the Uncanny Valley hypothesis, ratings of the humanness, familiarity, and eeriness of these avatars changed monotonically. Our results indicate that, when a full gradient of motion parameter changes is examined, ratings of synthetic agents by human observers do not show an Uncanny Valley.

  1. Human Brain Activity Related to the Tactile Perception of Stickiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jiwon; Kim, Junsuk; Ryu, Jaekyun; Park, Jang-Yeon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2017-01-01

    While the perception of stickiness serves as one of the fundamental dimensions for tactile sensation, little has been elucidated about the stickiness sensation and its neural correlates. The present study investigated how the human brain responds to perceived tactile sticky stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To evoke tactile perception of stickiness with multiple intensities, we generated silicone stimuli with varying catalyst ratios. Also, an acrylic sham stimulus was prepared to present a condition with no sticky sensation. From the two psychophysics experiments-the methods of constant stimuli and the magnitude estimation-we could classify the silicone stimuli into two groups according to whether a sticky perception was evoked: the Supra-threshold group that evoked sticky perception and the Infra-threshold group that did not. In the Supra-threshold vs. Sham contrast analysis of the fMRI data using the general linear model (GLM), the contralateral primary somatosensory area (S1) and ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed significant activations in subjects, whereas no significant result was found in the Infra-threshold vs. Sham contrast. This result indicates that the perception of stickiness not only activates the somatosensory cortex, but also possibly induces higher cognitive processes. Also, the Supra- vs. Infra-threshold contrast analysis revealed significant activations in several subcortical regions, including the pallidum, putamen, caudate and thalamus, as well as in another region spanning the insula and temporal cortices. These brain regions, previously known to be related to tactile discrimination, may subserve the discrimination of different intensities of tactile stickiness. The present study unveils the human neural correlates of the tactile perception of stickiness and may contribute to broadening the understanding of neural mechanisms associated with tactile perception.

  2. Human Brain Activity Related to the Tactile Perception of Stickiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jiwon; Kim, Junsuk; Ryu, Jaekyun; Park, Jang-Yeon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2017-01-01

    While the perception of stickiness serves as one of the fundamental dimensions for tactile sensation, little has been elucidated about the stickiness sensation and its neural correlates. The present study investigated how the human brain responds to perceived tactile sticky stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To evoke tactile perception of stickiness with multiple intensities, we generated silicone stimuli with varying catalyst ratios. Also, an acrylic sham stimulus was prepared to present a condition with no sticky sensation. From the two psychophysics experiments–the methods of constant stimuli and the magnitude estimation—we could classify the silicone stimuli into two groups according to whether a sticky perception was evoked: the Supra-threshold group that evoked sticky perception and the Infra-threshold group that did not. In the Supra-threshold vs. Sham contrast analysis of the fMRI data using the general linear model (GLM), the contralateral primary somatosensory area (S1) and ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed significant activations in subjects, whereas no significant result was found in the Infra-threshold vs. Sham contrast. This result indicates that the perception of stickiness not only activates the somatosensory cortex, but also possibly induces higher cognitive processes. Also, the Supra- vs. Infra-threshold contrast analysis revealed significant activations in several subcortical regions, including the pallidum, putamen, caudate and thalamus, as well as in another region spanning the insula and temporal cortices. These brain regions, previously known to be related to tactile discrimination, may subserve the discrimination of different intensities of tactile stickiness. The present study unveils the human neural correlates of the tactile perception of stickiness and may contribute to broadening the understanding of neural mechanisms associated with tactile perception. PMID:28163677

  3. On the Morphology of Uncertainty in Human Perception and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Madan M.; Solo, Ashu M. G.

    Human cognitive and perception processes have a great tolerance for imprecision or uncertainty. For this reason, the notions of perception and cognition have great importance in solving many decision making problems in engineering, medicine, science, and social science as there are innumerable uncertainties in real-world phenomena. These uncertainties can be broadly classified as either uncertainties arising from the random behavior of physical processes or uncertainties arising from human perception and cognition processes. Statistical theory can be used to model the former, but lacks the sophistication to process the latter. The theory of fuzzy logic has proven to be very effective in processing the latter. The methodology of computing with words and the computational theory of perceptions are branches of fuzzy logic that deal with the manipulation of words that act as labels for perceptions expressed in natural language propositions. New computing methods based on fuzzy logic can lead to greater adaptability, tractability, robustness, a lower cost solution, and better rapport with reality in the development of intelligent systems.

  4. Human capital measures, strategy and performance: HR managers' perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Stephen; Langevin, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a survey and interviews with human resource (HR) professionals to identify and better understand their perceptions and expectations of human capital measures' (HCM) content, links to strategy, and impact on performance. This paper relies on a quantitative analysis of survey questionnaires collected from 104 HR executives, as well as on a qualitative investigation using six interviews. Two types of HCM are derived using principal component ...

  5. Modeling Human Visual Perception for Target Detection in Military Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Human Visual Perception, Visual Attention, Eye Movements, Eye Tracking , Human Behavior Modeling, Target Detection, Visual Search, Semantic Relevance...pertaining my eye - tracking experiment, and also for understand- ing that I considered their eye-tracker to be mine, Tim Chung for the excellent...is through the target, and top-down processing is solely engaged through pre-specifying the target features. Eye - tracking data captured in previous

  6. Features of human skin in HSV color space and new recognition parameter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Features of human skin in HSV color space are widely applied in the area of image retrieval based on content. H is selected as the basic recognition parameter because its value has a narrow range for the skin color and can keep stable while the illumination intensity or the curvature of skin surface is changing. Rules of parameters with the change of illumination in HSV color space are studied. It is firstly found that the mean of saturation and value (S+V)/2 can keep stable when the illumination intensity is changed or the skin surface is inflected, and (S+V)/2 changes with skin color, but the tendency of change is contrary to that of H. Therefore, (S+V)/H can be used as a new recognition parameter which can enhance HSV ability to recognize human skin.

  7. Objective color harmony assessment for visible and infrared color fusion images of typical scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shaoshu; Jin, Weiqi; Wang, Lingxue

    2012-11-01

    For visible and infrared color fusion images of three typical scenes, color harmony computational models are proposed to evaluate the color quality of fusion images without reference images. The models are established based on the color-combination harmony model and focus on the influence of the color characteristics of typical scenes and the color region sizes in the fusion image. For the influence of the color characteristics of typical scenes, color harmony adjusting factors for natural scene images (green plants, sea, and sky) are defined by measuring the similarity between image colors and corresponding memory colors, and that for town and building images are presented based on the optimum colorfulness range suited for a human. Simultaneously, considering the influence of color region sizes, the weight coefficients are established using areas of the color regions to optimize the color harmony model. Experimental results show that the proposed harmony models are consistent with human perception and that they are suitable to evaluate the color harmony for color fusion images of typical scenes.

  8. Human walking in virtual environments perception, technology, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Visell, Yon; Campos, Jennifer; Lécuyer, Anatole

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a survey of past and recent developments on human walking in virtual environments with an emphasis on human self-motion perception, the multisensory nature of experiences of walking, conceptual design approaches, current technologies, and applications. The use of virtual reality and movement simulation systems is becoming increasingly popular and more accessible to a wide variety of research fields and applications. While, in the past, simulation technologies have focused on developing realistic, interactive visual environments, it is becoming increasingly obvious that our everyday interactions are highly multisensory. Therefore, investigators are beginning to understand the critical importance of developing and validating locomotor interfaces that can allow for realistic, natural behaviours. The book aims to present an overview of what is currently understood about human perception and performance when moving in virtual environments and to situate it relative to the broader scientific and ...

  9. Color perception influences microhabitat selection of refugia and affects monitoring success for a cryptic anuran species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bradley S; MacKenzie, Michelle L; Maerz, John C; Farrell, Christopher B; Castleberry, Steven B

    2016-10-01

    Perceptual-biases are important for understanding an animal's natural history, identifying potential ecological traps, and for developing effective means to monitor individuals and populations. Despite research demonstrating anurans having a positive phototactic response towards blue colors, we do not yet understand if color cues are used functionally beyond sexual selection. The aim of our study was to determine if color cues are used in selecting microhabitat, and if anuran's blue-positive phototactic response could increase selection of artificial PVC refugia used to monitor cryptic camouflaging anuran species. We captured 32 Cope's Gray Treefrogs and placed them in mesh enclosures with three PVC tubes painted blue, brown, and white. Concurrently, we placed blue, brown, or unpainted white PVC tubes in stratified arrays around a treefrog breeding pond, and counted the number of occasions treefrogs occupied different colored PVC tubes. In the confined choice experiment, treefrogs selected blue tubes (48.3%) significantly more often than brown (28.5%) or white (23.2%) tubes. Our field experiment mirrored these findings (52.0% of capture events in blue, 29.0% in brown, and 19.0% in unpainted white tubes). Our results suggest color influences Cope's Gray Treefrog microhabitat selection, and they utilize color vision when choosing refugia. We demonstrate simple, small changes based on perceptual-biases can induce behaviors that may in turn have large impacts on sampling techniques used in monitoring and inventorying. Incorporating non-traditional physiological measures into animal inventorying and monitoring programs can be used in the future to improve conservation efforts.

  10. La cuestión del colorido en la pintura: Hegel frente a Goethe y Diderot/In The Matter Of Colorful Painting: From Hegel Goethe And Diderot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marco Aurélio Werle; Carlos Enrique Restrepo

    2012-01-01

    .... Hegel approaches the Conceptions of Color of Goethe and Diderot to be able to grasp the subjective character of these, where Color is given in the Realm of Human Perception independently of any other...

  11. “Review on Human Face Detection based on Skin Color and Edge Information”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyesh S. Gondaliya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human face detection system is gradually used for the tracking a human face. Face detection system is mainly used in face reorganization system for detecting human face. Here in this review paper we have describe how face detection system works and where it is useful in real world environment. We have describes different technique like template matching, skin color and edge information based on face detection from skin region, symmetry based face detection and etc.

  12. Human-friendly stylization of video content using simulated colored paper mosaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seulbeom; Kang, Dongwann; Yoon, Kyunghyun

    2016-07-01

    Video content is used extensively in many fields. However, in some fields, video manipulation techniques are required to improve the human-friendliness of such content. In this paper, we propose a method that automatically generates animations in the style of colored paper mosaics, to create human-friendly, artistic imagery. To enhance temporal coherence while maintaining the characteristics of colored paper mosaics, we also propose a particle video-based method that determines coherent locations for tiles in animations. The proposed method generates evenly distributed particles, which are used to produce animated tiles via our tile modeling process.

  13. Does correlated color temperature affect the ability of humans to identify veins?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we provide empirical evidence and demonstrate statistically that white illumination settings can affect the human ability to identify veins in the inner hand vasculature. A special light-emitting diode lamp with high color rendering index (CRI 84–95) was developed...... and the effect of correlated color temperature was evaluated, in the range between 2600 and 5700 K at an illuminance of 40 9 lx on the ability of adult humans to identify veins. It is shown that the ability to identify veins can, on average, be increased up to 24% when white illumination settings that do...

  14. The effects of perceiving color in living environment on QEEG, oxygen saturation, pulse rate, and emotion regulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroykham, Watchara; Wongsathikun, J; Wongsawat, Y

    2014-01-01

    Light and color have been shown to have substantial physical, psychological and sociological effects on humans. Hence, an investigation on the effect of changes in light and color to the biological signals is a challenging problem. Five participants were measured the oxygen saturation (SpO2), pulse rate, and quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG) in six colors (white, blue, green, yellow, red and black) of living environment for 5 minutes per color. Then all participants were asked to answer the emotional questionnaire of BRUMS and color performance for each color environment. The results showed brain activity of high beta wave (25-30 Hz) that associated with alertness, agitation, mental activity, and general activation of mind and body functions (at frontal lobes and temporal lobes) in red and yellow colored rooms were higher than blue, green, white and black colored rooms, respectively. It also had the relationship with the psychological effect (BRUMS). The amplitude asymmetry of beta wave (12-25 Hz) was highly attenuated in warm color (red and yellow colored rooms), moderately attenuated in cool color (green and blue colored room) and little attenuated in white and black colored rooms. The BRUMS showed that red and yellow yielded significant effect on anger (F = 4.966, p = 0.002) and confusion (F=3.853, p=0.008). Red and green color yielded high effect on vigor. Green color did not affect the depression. Blue color yielded moderate effect on confusion, tension and fatigue. White and black colors yielded low effect on any mood, but black color had no effect on vigor. In addition, we cannot observe any significant changes of pulse rate and blood oxygen saturation in each color. The results can possibly be used as the recommendation to design the room for either normal people or patients.

  15. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates human color discrimination in a pathway specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Leiros eCosta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous research showed that Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS can modulate visual cortex excitability. However, there is no experiment on the effects of tDCS on color perception to date. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of tDCS on color discrimination tasks. 15 healthy subjects (mean age of 25.6 ± 4.4 years were tested with Cambridge Color Test 2.0 (Trivector and Ellipses protocols and a Forced-choice Spatial Color Contrast Sensitivity task (vertical red-green sinusoidal grating while receiving tDCS. Anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS were delivered at Oz for 22 minutes using two square electrodes (25cm2 with a current of 1.5mA in sessions separated by 7 days. Anodal tDCS significantly increased tritan sensitivity (p<0.01 and had no significant effect on protan, deutan or red-green grating discrimination. The effects on the tritan discrimination returned to baseline after 15 minutes (p<0.01. Cathodal tDCS reduced the sensitivity in the deutan axis and increased sensitivity in the tritan axis (p<0.05. The lack of anodal tDCS effects in the protan, deutan and red-green grating sensitivities could be explained by a ceiling effect since adults in this age range tend to have optimal color discrimination performance for these hues. The differential effects of cathodal tDCS on tritan and deutan sensitivities and the absence of the proposed ceiling effects for the tritan axes might be explained by Parvocellular (P and Koniocellular (K systems with regard to their functional, physiological and anatomical differences. The results also support the existence of a systematic segregation of P and K color-coding cells in V1. Future research and possible clinical implications are discussed.

  16. A new vision for the science of human flavor perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon M Shepherd

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The conference was organized and welcomed by Lisa Sasson, representing the NYU Steinhardt School and its Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Public Health in cooperation with the NYU School of Dentistry. As a co-organizer, I added my welcome, and explained how the many disciplines brought together in the conference constituted a new vision for the science of human flavor perception, which can be summarized by the term “neurogastronomy” (1. The speakers and the disciplines they represent were bound together by several principles. First, "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution." This is understood to apply to most research in biology; here we wished to show that it applies especially to the human behavior of choosing foods to eat, a view put forward most prominently by Richard Wrangham based on his book "Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human". We also wished to show that the sensory and motor apparatus of the mouth and nose need to be understood as adaptations through human evolution, as carefully documented by Daniel Lieberman, based on his recent "Evolution of the Human Head". Many of the speakers picked up this theme in their presentations. It is clear that an evolutionary framework must be part of understanding flavor and healthy eating. A second principle was that "Flavor is not in the food; it is created by the brain". Just as color is created out of different wavelengths of light by neural processing mechanisms in our brains, so is flavor created by neural processing mechanisms out of different molecules emitted by the food and drink in our mouths. This requires understanding neural mechanisms at all levels of organization of the brain, a vast field that our conference only began to address, starting with the sensory receptors and sensory systems as discussed by Gary Beauchamp for taste and Stuart Firestein for olfaction. Current research reported by Ivan De Araujo on sugars is dissociating their sweet

  17. Human Detection Using Random Color Similarity Feature and Random Ferns Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miaohui; Xin, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We explore a novel approach for human detection based on random color similarity feature (RCS) and random ferns classifier which is also known as semi-naive Bayesian classifier. In contrast to other existing features employed by human detection, color-based features are rarely used in vision-based human detection because of large intra-class variations. In this paper, we propose a novel color-based feature, RCS feature, which is yielded by simple color similarity computation between image cells randomly picked in still images, and can effectively characterize human appearances. In addition, a histogram of oriented gradient based local binary feature (HOG-LBF) is also introduced to enrich the human descriptor set. Furthermore, random ferns classifier is used in the proposed approach because of its faster speed in training and testing than traditional classifiers such as Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier, without a loss in performance. Finally, the proposed method is conducted in public datasets and achieves competitive detection results.

  18. Color appearance in stereoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadia, Davide; Rizzi, Alessandro; Bonanomi, Cristian; Marini, Daniele; Galmonte, Alessandra; Agostini, Tiziano

    2011-03-01

    The relationship between color and lightness appearance and the perception of depth has been studied since a while in the field of perceptual psychology and psycho-physiology. It has been found that depth perception affects the final object color and lightness appearance. In the stereoscopy research field, many studies have been proposed on human physiological effects, considering e.g. geometry, motion sickness, etc., but few has been done considering lightness and color information. Goal of this paper is to realize some preliminar experiments in Virtual Reality in order to determine the effects of depth perception on object color and lightness appearance. We have created a virtual test scene with a simple 3D simultaneous contrast configuration. We have created three different versions of this scene, each with different choices of relative positions and apparent size of the objects. We have collected the perceptual responses of several users after the observation of the test scene in the Virtual Theater of the University of Milan, a VR immersive installation characterized by a semi-cylindrical screen that covers 120° of horizontal field of view from an observation distance of 3.5 m. We present a description of the experiments setup and procedure, and we discuss the obtained results.

  19. Color Image Quality Assessment Based on CIEDE2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining the color difference formula of CIEDE2000 and the printing industry standard for visual verification, we present an objective color image quality assessment method correlated with subjective vision perception. An objective score conformed to subjective perception (OSCSP Q was proposed to directly reflect the subjective visual perception. In addition, we present a general method to calibrate correction factors of color difference formula under real experimental conditions. Our experiment results show that the present DE2000-based metric can be consistent with human visual system in general application environment.

  20. Robot perception errors and human resolution strategies in situated human-robot dialogue

    OpenAIRE

    Schutte, Niels; Kelleher, John; MacNamee, Brian

    2017-01-01

    We performed an experiment in which human participants interacted through a natural language dialogue interface with a simulated robot to fulfil a series of object manipulation tasks. We introduced errors into the robot’s perception, and observed the resulting problems in the dialogues and their resolutions. We then introduced different methods for the user to request information about the robot’s understanding of the environment. We quantify the impact of perception errors on the dialogues, ...

  1. Combination of Accumulated Motion and Color Segmentation for Human Activity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Kompatsiaris

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The automated analysis of activity in digital multimedia, and especially video, is gaining more and more importance due to the evolution of higher-level video processing systems and the development of relevant applications such as surveillance and sports. This paper presents a novel algorithm for the recognition and classification of human activities, which employs motion and color characteristics in a complementary manner, so as to extract the most information from both sources, and overcome their individual limitations. The proposed method accumulates the flow estimates in a video, and extracts “regions of activity” by processing their higher-order statistics. The shape of these activity areas can be used for the classification of the human activities and events taking place in a video and the subsequent extraction of higher-level semantics. Color segmentation of the active and static areas of each video frame is performed to complement this information. The color layers in the activity and background areas are compared using the earth mover's distance, in order to achieve accurate object segmentation. Thus, unlike much existing work on human activity analysis, the proposed approach is based on general color and motion processing methods, and not on specific models of the human body and its kinematics. The combined use of color and motion information increases the method robustness to illumination variations and measurement noise. Consequently, the proposed approach can lead to higher-level information about human activities, but its applicability is not limited to specific human actions. We present experiments with various real video sequences, from sports and surveillance domains, to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  2. FUSION OF COLOR AND MODIFIED WEBER’S LAW DESCRIPTOR BASED HUMAN SKIN DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Prema

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin detection in images or videos plays a vital role in a wide range of image processing applications like face detection, face tracking, gesture analysis, human-computer interaction etc. Due to its high processing speed and invariant against rotation, it has received significant interest in pattern recognition and computer vision. The robustness of skin detection using color information depends on real world conditions such as background, noise, change of intensity and lightening effects. This situation can be improved by using texture as a descriptor to extract skin pixels in images. This study proposes color based skin detection algorithm (fusion of Cheddad’s approach with Cr of YCbCr color space with a texture based skin location algorithm called Modified Weber’s Law Descriptions (MWLD to evaluate region features. MWLD is based on the fact that the Human Visual System (HVS is more sensitive in lumens contrast than absolute luminance values. In MWLD, the differential excitation and gradient orientation of the current pixel are considered to extract the texture features. For differential excitation, Just Noticeable Distortion (JND is also used. Due to the absence of red component in Cheddad’s new color space for skin detection, the detection rate is not good for real time applications. To improve this situation, the Cr component of YCbCr color space is included to obtain the color features. According to experimental results, the proposed method exhibits satisfactory performance in terms of True Positive Rate (TPR, False Positive Rate (FPR and Accuracy with wide variations in size, color and orientation. Different window sizes for differential excitation such as 3×3, 5×5 and 7×7 are also taken to check the performance.

  3. FUSION OF COLOR AND MODIFIED WEBER’S LAW DESCRIPTOR BASED HUMAN SKIN DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Prema

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin detection in images or videos plays a vital role in a wide range of image processing applications like face detection, face tracking, gesture analysis, human-computer interaction etc. Due to its high processing speed and invariant against rotation, it has received significant interest in pattern recognition and computer vision. The robustness of skin detection using color information depends on real world conditions such as background, noise, change of intensity and lightening effects. This situation can be improved by using texture as a descriptor to extract skin pixels in images. This study proposes color based skin detection algorithm (fusion of Cheddad’s approach with Cr of YCbCr color space with a texture based skin location algorithm called Modified Weber’s Law Descriptions (MWLD to evaluate region features. MWLD is based on the fact that the Human Visual System (HVS is more sensitive in lumens contrast than absolute luminance values. In MWLD, the differential excitation and gradient orientation of the current pixel are considered to extract the texture features. For differential excitation, Just Noticeable Distortion (JND is also used. Due to the absence of red component in Cheddad’s new color space for skin detection, the detection rate is not good for real time applications. To improve this situation, the Cr component of YCbCr color space is included to obtain the color features. According to experimental results, the proposed method exhibits satisfactory performance in terms of True Positive Rate (TPR, False Positive Rate (FPR and Accuracy with wide variations in size, color and orientation. Different window sizes for differential excitation such as 3×3, 5×5 and 7×7 are also taken to check the performance.

  4. A color-communication scheme for digital imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Alex

    1987-01-01

    Color pictures generated from digital images are frequently used by geologists, foresters, range managers, and others. These color products are preferred over black and white pictures because the human eye is more sensitive to color differences than to various shades of gray. Color discrimination is a function of perception, and therefore colors in these color composites are generally described subjectively, which can lead to ambiguous color communication. Numerous color-coordinate systems are available that quantitively relate digital triplets representing amounts of red, free, and blue to the parameters of hue, saturation, and intensity perceived by the eye. Most of these systems implement a complex transformation of the primary colors to a color space that is hard to visualize, thus making it difficult to relate digital triplets to perception parameters. This paper presents a color-communcation scheme that relates colors on a color triangle to corresponding values of "hue" (H), "saturation" (S), and chromaticity coordinates (x,y,z). The scheme simplifies the relation between red, green, and blue (RGB) digital triplets and the color generated by these triplets. Some examples of the use of the color-communication scheme in digital image processing are presented.

  5. Comparing biological motion perception in two distinct human societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Pica

    Full Text Available Cross cultural studies have played a pivotal role in elucidating the extent to which behavioral and mental characteristics depend on specific environmental influences. Surprisingly, little field research has been carried out on a fundamentally important perceptual ability, namely the perception of biological motion. In this report, we present details of studies carried out with the help of volunteers from the Mundurucu indigene, a group of people native to Amazonian territories in Brazil. We employed standard biological motion perception tasks inspired by over 30 years of laboratory research, in which observers attempt to decipher the walking direction of point-light (PL humans and animals. Do our effortless skills at perceiving biological activity from PL animations, as revealed in laboratory settings, generalize to people who have never before seen representational depictions of human and animal activity? The results of our studies provide a clear answer to this important, previously unanswered question. Mundurucu observers readily perceived the coherent, global shape depicted in PL walkers, and experienced the classic inversion effects that are typically found when such stimuli are turned upside down. In addition, their performance was in accord with important recent findings in the literature, in the abundant ease with which they extracted direction information from local motion invariants alone. We conclude that the effortless, veridical perception of PL biological motion is a spontaneous and universal perceptual ability, occurring both inside and outside traditional laboratory environments.

  6. Modeling and percept of transcorneal electrical stimulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, John; Wang, Gene-Jack; Yow, Lindy; J Cela, Carlos; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lazzi, Gianluca; Jadvar, Hossein

    2011-07-01

    Retinal activation via transcorneal electrical stimulation (TcES) in normal humans was investigated by comparing subject perception, model predictions, and brain activation patterns. The preferential location of retinal stimulation was predicted from 3-D admittance modeling. Visual cortex activation was measured using positron emission tomography (PET) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Two different corneal electrodes were investigated: DTL-Plus and ERG-Jet. Modeling results predicted preferential stimulation of the peripheral, inferior, nasal retina during right eye TcES using DTL-Plus, but more extensive activation of peripheral, nasal hemiretina using ERG-Jet. The results from human FDG PET study using both corneal electrodes showed areas of visual cortex activation that consistently corresponded with the reported phosphene percept and modeling predictions. ERG-Jet was able to generate brighter phosphene percept than DTL-Plus and elicited retinotopically mapped primary visual cortex activation. This study demonstrates that admittance modeling and PET imaging consistently predict the perceived location of electrically elicited phosphenes produced during TcES.

  7. Human Action Perception is Consistent, Flexible, and Orientation Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Jeff; Pechey, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has found that observers of object-directed human action pay more attention to information regarding hand contact over information regarding spatial trajectories in action, and that processing of trajectory information is disrupted by inversion. However, observers can also flexibly modulate their attention to spatial trajectory depending on the goal or context of the actor. In Experiments 1(a) and 1b of the current research, we directly compared attention with hand and trajectory information across placing and dropping actions in order to determine whether the hand bias is always present or whether flexibility in action perception can attenuate this bias. Results demonstrated that observers attend more to hand information for placing, but attend equally to hand and trajectory information for dropping. Experiment 2 explored the role of the actor's goal in processing spatial trajectory for mimed dropping actions and non-human control stimuli, and the role of goals in the inversion effect. Results indicated that goal relevance increases processing of trajectory information, and that processing of all spatial trajectories in human action is disrupted by inversion, regardless of the actor's goal. The present findings highlight the role of prediction in action perception, and suggest that human action is processed with expertise.

  8. Essential role of RAB27A in determining constitutive human skin color.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Yoshida-Amano

    Full Text Available Human skin color is predominantly determined by melanin produced in melanosomes within melanocytes and subsequently distributed to keratinocytes. There are many studies that have proposed mechanisms underlying ethnic skin color variations, whereas the processes involved from melanin synthesis in melanocytes to the transfer of melanosomes to keratinocytes are common among humans. Apart from the activities in the melanogenic rate-limiting enzyme, tyrosinase, in melanocytes and the amounts and distribution patterns of melanosomes in keratinocytes, the abilities of the actin-associated factors in charge of melanosome transport within melanocytes also regulate pigmentation. Mutations in genes encoding melanosome transport-related molecules, such as MYO5A, RAB27A and SLAC-2A, have been reported to cause a human pigmentary disease known as Griscelli syndrome, which is associated with diluted skin and hair color. Thus we hypothesized that process might play a role in modulating skin color variations. To address that hypothesis, the correlations of expression of RAB27A and its specific effector, SLAC2-A, to melanogenic ability were evaluated in comparison with tyrosinase, using human melanocytes derived from 19 individuals of varying skin types. Following the finding of the highest correlation in RAB27A expression to the melanogenic ability, darkly-pigmented melanocytes with significantly higher RAB27A expression were found to transfer significantly more melanosomes to keratinocytes than lightly-pigmented melanocytes in co-culture and in human skin substitutes (HSSs in vivo, resulting in darker skin color in concert with the difference observed in African-descent and Caucasian skins. Additionally, RAB27A knockdown by a lentivirus-derived shRNA in melanocytes concomitantly demonstrated a significantly reduced number of transferred melanosomes to keratinocytes in co-culture and a significantly diminished epidermal melanin content skin color intensity (

  9. Perceptual issues for color helmet-mounted displays: luminance and color contrast requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Thomas H.; Rash, Clarence E.; Lattimore, Morris R.; Statz, Jonathan; Martin, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Color is one of the latest design characteristics of helmet-mounted displays (HMDs). It's inclusion in design specifications is based on two suppositions: 1) color provides an additional method of encoding information, and 2) color provides a more realistic, and hence more intuitive, presentation of information, especially pilotage imagery. To some degree, these two perceived advantages have been validated with head-down panel-mounted displays, although not without a few problems associated with visual physiology and perception. These problems become more prevalent when the user population expands beyond military aviators to a general user population, of which a significant portion may have color vision deficiencies. When color is implemented in HMDs, which are eyes-out, see-through displays, visual perception issues become an increased concern. A major confound with HMDs is their inherent see-through (transparent) property. The result is color in the displayed image combines with color from the outside (or in-cockpit) world, possibly producing a false perception of either or both images. While human-factors derived guidelines based on trial and error have been developed, color HMD systems still place more emphasis on colorimetric than perceptual standards. This paper identifies the luminance and color contrast requirements for see-through HMDs. Also included is a discussion of ambient scene metrics and the choice of symbology color.

  10. Neurolinguistic Relativity: How Language Flexes Human Perception and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    The time has come, perhaps, to go beyond merely acknowledging that language is a core manifestation of the workings of the human mind and that it relates interactively to all aspects of thinking. The issue, thus, is not to decide whether language and human thought may be ineluctably linked (they just are), but rather to determine what the characteristics of this relationship may be and to understand how language influences-and may be influenced by-nonverbal information processing. In an attempt to demystify linguistic relativity, I review neurolinguistic studies from our research group showing a link between linguistic distinctions and perceptual or conceptual processing. On the basis of empirical evidence showing effects of terminology on perception, language-idiosyncratic relationships in semantic memory, grammatical skewing of event conceptualization, and unconscious modulation of executive functioning by verbal input, I advocate a neurofunctional approach through which we can systematically explore how languages shape human thought.

  11. Perception of mind and dehumanization: Human, animal, or machine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, María D; Quiles, María N; Correa, Ana D; Delgado, Naira; Leyens, Jacques-Philippe

    2016-08-02

    Dehumanization is reached through several approaches, including the attribute-based model of mind perception and the metaphor-based model of dehumanization. We performed two studies to find different (de)humanized images for three targets: Professional people, Evil people, and Lowest of the low. In Study 1, we examined dimensions of mind, expecting the last two categories to be dehumanized through denial of agency (Lowest of the low) or experience (Evil people), compared with humanized targets (Professional people). Study 2 aimed to distinguish these targets using metaphors. We predicted that Evil and Lowest of the low targets would suffer mechanistic and animalistic dehumanization, respectively; our predictions were confirmed, but the metaphor-based model nuanced these results: animalistic and mechanistic dehumanization were shown as overlapping rather than independent. Evil persons were perceived as "killing machines" and "predators." Finally, Lowest of the low were not animalized but considered human beings. We discuss possible interpretations.

  12. Markerless human motion capture by Markov random field and dynamic graph cuts with color constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia; WAN ChengKai; ZHANG DianYong; MIAO ZhenJiang; YUAN BaoZong

    2009-01-01

    Currently, many vision-based motion capture systems require passive markers attached to key lca-tions on the human body. However, such systems are intrusive with limited application. The algorithm that we use for human motion capture in this paper is based on Markov random field (MRF) and dynamic graph cuts. It takes full account of the impact of 3D reconstruction error and integrates human motion capture and 3D reconstruction into MRF-MAP framework. For more accurate and robust performance, we extend our algorithm by incorporating color constraints Into the pose estimation process. The ad-vantages of incorporating color constraints are demonstrated by experimental results on several video sequences.

  13. Diferencias de género en percepción visual de rango de color y profundidad Genre Differences on Visual Perception of Color Range and Depth of Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinosa Paola

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available La percepción visual es el resultado de la integración de varios aspectos relacionados con el objeto observado y su entorno. En este estudio se valoró, el impacto de la forma tridimensional sobre la percepción de color y el ángulo con respecto al plano horizontal de varios objetos similares sobre la percepción de profundidad en hombres y mujeres jóvenes. Para determinar el impacto de la forma sobre la percepción del color se utilizaron dos cajas negras, en cada una de las cuales se dispuso un panel coloreado la mitad de fucsia y la otra de blanco, plegado de manera cóncava o convexa para alterar el efecto cromático percibido. Para determinar el impacto de la distribución espacial de palillos de madera sobre la capacidad de determinar la profundidad de dicho espacio, se hicieron cuatro experimentos diferentes en los cuales se variaba el ángulo de los palillos con respecto al plano horizontal y se valoró la profundidad percibida. Las variables tenidas en cuenta fueron edad, género y presencia/ausencia de defectos visuales para cada observador. Los resultados obtenidos muestran que hay aspectos de la percepción visual que dependen del género. Si bien la forma tridimensional del objeto afectó la percepción de color en ambos grupos, las mujeres percibieron estas diferencias en un rango de color mayor, mientras que la variación del ángulo de varios objetos produce diferencias en la percepción de la profundidad que se asocian con el género.Visual perception is the result of the integration of various related factors of the observed object and its environment. In this study we evaluated the impact of tridimensional form on color perception and the angle from the horizontal plane of a set of similar objets on the depth of field perception between young men and women. A panel half magenta and half white placed at the end of a black box, folded either concaved or convexed to alter the chromatic effect perceived were used to determine

  14. Latitudinal Clines of the Human Vitamin D Receptor and Skin Color Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dov Tiosano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The well-documented latitudinal clines of genes affecting human skin color presumably arise from the need for protection from intense ultraviolet radiation (UVR vs. the need to use UVR for vitamin D synthesis. Sampling 751 subjects from a broad range of latitudes and skin colors, we investigated possible multilocus correlated adaptation of skin color genes with the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR, using a vector correlation metric and network method called BlocBuster. We discovered two multilocus networks involving VDR promoter and skin color genes that display strong latitudinal clines as multilocus networks, even though many of their single gene components do not. Considered one by one, the VDR components of these networks show diverse patterns: no cline, a weak declining latitudinal cline outside of Africa, and a strong in- vs. out-of-Africa frequency pattern. We confirmed these results with independent data from HapMap. Standard linkage disequilibrium analyses did not detect these networks. We applied BlocBuster across the entire genome, showing that our networks are significant outliers for interchromosomal disequilibrium that overlap with environmental variation relevant to the genes’ functions. These results suggest that these multilocus correlations most likely arose from a combination of parallel selective responses to a common environmental variable and coadaptation, given the known Mendelian epistasis among VDR and the skin color genes.

  15. Latitudinal Clines of the Human Vitamin D Receptor and Skin Color Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiosano, Dov; Audi, Laura; Climer, Sharlee; Zhang, Weixiong; Templeton, Alan R; Fernández-Cancio, Monica; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Sánchez-Muro, José Miguel; El Kholy, Mohamed; Hochberg, Zèev

    2016-05-03

    The well-documented latitudinal clines of genes affecting human skin color presumably arise from the need for protection from intense ultraviolet radiation (UVR) vs. the need to use UVR for vitamin D synthesis. Sampling 751 subjects from a broad range of latitudes and skin colors, we investigated possible multilocus correlated adaptation of skin color genes with the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR), using a vector correlation metric and network method called BlocBuster. We discovered two multilocus networks involving VDR promoter and skin color genes that display strong latitudinal clines as multilocus networks, even though many of their single gene components do not. Considered one by one, the VDR components of these networks show diverse patterns: no cline, a weak declining latitudinal cline outside of Africa, and a strong in- vs. out-of-Africa frequency pattern. We confirmed these results with independent data from HapMap. Standard linkage disequilibrium analyses did not detect these networks. We applied BlocBuster across the entire genome, showing that our networks are significant outliers for interchromosomal disequilibrium that overlap with environmental variation relevant to the genes' functions. These results suggest that these multilocus correlations most likely arose from a combination of parallel selective responses to a common environmental variable and coadaptation, given the known Mendelian epistasis among VDR and the skin color genes.

  16. Quantum theory and human perception of the macro-world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the question of 'why customary macroscopic entities appear to us humans as they do, i.e., as bounded entities occupying space and persisting through time', starting from our knowledge of quantum theory, how it affects the behavior of such customary macroscopic entities, and how it influences our perception of them. For this purpose, we approach the question from three perspectives. Firstly, we look at the situation from the standard quantum angle, more specifically the de Broglie wavelength analysis of the behavior of macroscopic entities, indicate how a problem with spin and identity arises, and illustrate how both play a fundamental role in well-established experimental quantum-macroscopical phenomena, such as Bose-Einstein condensates. Secondly, we analyze how the question is influenced by our result in axiomatic quantum theory, which proves that standard quantum theory is structurally incapable of describing separated entities. Thirdly, we put forward our new 'conceptual quantum interpretation', including a highly detailed reformulation of the question to confront the new insights and views that arise with the foregoing analysis. At the end of the final section, a nuanced answer is given that can be summarized as follows. The specific and very classical perception of human seeing-light as a geometric theory-and human touching-only ruled by Pauli's exclusion principle-plays a role in our perception of macroscopic entities as ontologically stable entities in space. To ascertain quantum behavior in such macroscopic entities, we will need measuring apparatuses capable of its detection. Future experimental research will have to show if sharp quantum effects-as they occur in smaller entities-appear to be ontological aspects of customary macroscopic entities. It remains a possibility that standard quantum theory is an incomplete theory, and hence incapable of coping ultimately with separated entities, meaning that a more general theory will be needed.

  17. Quantum Theory and Human Perception of the Macro-World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diederik eAerts

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the question of 'why customary macroscopic entities appear to us humans as they do, i.e. as bounded entities occupying space and persisting through time', starting from our knowledge of quantum theory, how it affects the behavior of such customary macroscopic entities, and how it influences our perception of them. For this purpose, we approach the question from three perspectives. Firstly, we look at the situation from the standard quantum angle, more specifically the de Broglie wavelength analysis of the behavior of macroscopic entities, indicate how a problem with spin and identity arises, and illustrate how both play a fundamental role in well-established experimental quantum-macroscopical phenomena, such as Bose-Einstein condensates. Secondly, we analyze how the question is influenced by our result in axiomatic quantum theory, which proves that standard quantum theory is structurally incapable of describing separated entities. Thirdly, we put forward our new `conceptual quantum interpretation', including a highly detailed reformulation of the question to confront the new insights and views that arise with the foregoing analysis. At the end of the final section, a nuanced answer is given that can be summarized as follows. The specific and very classical perception of human seeing -- light as a geometric theory -- and human touching -- only ruled by Pauli's exclusion principle -- plays a role in our perception of macroscopic entities as ontologically stable objects in space. To ascertain quantum behavior in such macroscopic entities, we will need measuring apparatuses capable of its detection. Future experimental research will have to show if sharp quantum effects -- as they occur in smaller entities -- appear to be ontological aspects of customary macroscopic entities. It remains a possibility that standard quantum theory is an incomplete theory, and hence incapable of coping with separated entities, meaning that a more general

  18. A biologically plausible model of human shape symmetry perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Frédéric J A M; Wilson, Hugh R

    2010-01-19

    Symmetry is usually computationally expensive to encode reliably, and yet it is relatively effortless to perceive. Here, we extend F. J. A. M. Poirier and H. R. Wilson's (2006) model for shape perception to account for H. R. Wilson and F. Wilkinson's (2002) data on shape symmetry. Because the model already accounts for shape perception, only minimal neural circuitry is required to enable it to encode shape symmetry as well. The model is composed of three main parts: (1) recovery of object position using large-scale non-Fourier V4-like concentric units that respond at the center of concentric contour segments across orientations, (2) around that recovered object center, curvature mechanisms combine multiplicatively the responses of oriented filters to encode object-centric local shape information, with a preference for convexities, and (3) object-centric symmetry mechanisms. Model and human performances are comparable for symmetry perception of shapes. Moreover, with some improvement of edge recovery, the model can encode symmetry axes in natural images such as faces.

  19. Linking person perception and person knowledge in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greven, Inez M; Downing, Paul E; Ramsey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Neuroscience research has examined separately how we detect human agents on the basis of their face and body (person perception) and how we reason about their thoughts, traits or intentions (person knowledge). Neuroanatomically distinct networks have been associated with person perception and person knowledge, but it remains unknown how multiple features of a person (e.g. thin and kind) are linked to form a holistic identity representation. In this fMRI experiment, we investigated the hypothesis that when encountering another person specialised person perception circuits would be functionally coupled with circuits involved in person knowledge. In a factorial design, we paired bodies or names with trait-based or neutral statements, and independent localiser scans identified body-selective and mentalising networks. When observing a body paired with a trait-implying statement, functional connectivity analyses demonstrated that body-selective patches in bilateral fusiform gyri were functionally coupled with nodes of the mentalising network. We demonstrate that when forming a representation of a person circuits for representing another person's physical appearance are linked to circuits that are engaged when reasoning about trait-based character. These data support the view that a 'who' system for social cognition involves communication between perceptual and inferential mechanisms when forming a representation of another's identity.

  20. Binding 3-D object perception in the human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yang; Boehler, C N; Nönnig, Nina; Düzel, Emrah; Hopf, Jens-Max; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2008-04-01

    How do visual luminance, shape, motion, and depth bind together in the brain to represent the coherent percept of a 3-D object within hundreds of milliseconds (msec)? We provide evidence from simultaneous magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) data that perception of 3-D objects defined by luminance or motion elicits sequential activity in human visual cortices within 500 msec. Following activation of the primary visual cortex around 100 msec, 3-D objects elicited sequential activity with only little overlap (dynamic 3-D shapes: MT-LO-Temp; stationary 3-D shapes: LO-Temp). A delay of 80 msec, both in MEG/EEG responses and in reaction times (RTs), was found when additional motion information was processed. We also found significant positive correlations between RT, and MEG and EEG responses in the right temporal location. After about 400 msec, long-lasting activity was observed in the parietal cortex and concurrently in previously activated regions. Novel time-frequency analyses indicate that the activity in the lateral occipital (LO) complex is associated with an increase of induced power in the gamma band, a hallmark of binding. The close correspondence of an induced gamma response with concurrent sources located in the LO in both experimental conditions at different points in time ( approximately 200 msec for luminance and approximately 300 msec for dynamic cues) strongly suggests that the LO is the key region for the assembly of object features. The assembly is fed forward to achieve coherent perception of a 3-D object within 500 msec.

  1. Shape perception in human and computer vision an interdisciplinary perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, Sven J

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensive and authoritative text/reference presents a unique, multidisciplinary perspective on Shape Perception in Human and Computer Vision. Rather than focusing purely on the state of the art, the book provides viewpoints from world-class researchers reflecting broadly on the issues that have shaped the field. Drawing upon many years of experience, each contributor discusses the trends followed and the progress made, in addition to identifying the major challenges that still lie ahead. Topics and features: examines each topic from a range of viewpoints, rather than promoting a speci

  2. A computational model of human auditory signal processing and perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Ewert, Stephan D.; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    A model of computational auditory signal-processing and perception that accounts for various aspects of simultaneous and nonsimultaneous masking in human listeners is presented. The model is based on the modulation filterbank model described by Dau et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2892 (1997......)] but includes major changes at the peripheral and more central stages of processing. The model contains outer- and middle-ear transformations, a nonlinear basilar-membrane processing stage, a hair-cell transduction stage, a squaring expansion, an adaptation stage, a 150-Hz lowpass modulation filter, a bandpass...

  3. Moving in a crowd: human perception as a multiscale process

    CERN Document Server

    Colombi, Annachiara; Tosin, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The strategic behavior of pedestrians is largely determined by how they perceive and consequently react to neighboring people. Such interpersonal interactions may be dictated by the emotional state of the individuals, the purpose of their trip, the local crowding, the quality of the environment to mention but a few common examples. This issue is addressed in this paper by a mathematical model which combines, in an evolutionary time- and space-dependent way, discrete and continuous effects of pedestrian interactions. Numerical simulations and qualitative analysis suggest that human perception, and its impact on crowd dynamics, can be effectively modeled as a multiscale process based on such a dual representation of groups of agents.

  4. Science versus (?) Art: Human Perception of Other Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William K.

    1998-09-01

    At the time of the Renaissance, science and art were mixed together as a way to understand the human relation to the larger cosmos. Leonardo da Vinci exemplifies this approach. In modern times, the two have become separate, and even antagonistic, ``two cultures." Scientists have increasingly been satisfied to present quantitative measures of phenomena, without ever asking what the measures mean in human terms. Examples include the nature of the lunar surface, asteroid colors and brightness of the Io aurora, as will be discussed. However, in presenting the "big picture" to the public, and even to other working scientists, it is useful to revisit the Renaissance paradigm. Artists are increasingly working with scientists to translate the understanding of other worlds to the public, and this creates many opportunities for education projects in schools, and for careers in public outreach and science journalism.

  5. Simple perceptual color space for color specification and real-time processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsarenko, Yuriy; Ramos, Fernando

    2011-08-01

    In this work an alternative color space is described that defines the color elements in terms of approximated brightness, hue and saturation, similar to other color spaces commonly used in computer applications. The classical color spaces such as HSL and HSV in the form that is widely used are made for convenience, and do not model colors based on human perception. Other classical color spaces such as CIELAB, DIN99 and even more recent CIECAM-based color spaces are too cumbersome and difficult to work with. The proposed alternative, on the other hand, is simple to work with and has its "lightness" component tuned up to represent the perceived brightness closer to the reality. It is based on how luma is calculated in color spaces such as YUV and YIQ among others, but instead of using constant coefficients, it uses Euclidean distance formula with weighting coefficients. Several experiments are described that illustrate the proposed color space visualized in 3D and compared to other color spaces in perceptual terms and performance benchmarks. This is aided by a novel technique that allows normalizing the chroma of existing color spaces within a fixed interval. The experiments show that the proposed color space is a viable alternative for applications that already use HSV and HSL. A practical application is described, where the color space is used for 3D illumination with specular reflections running on dedicated graphics processor unit using shaders. This resolves visual defects present in the classical approaches that use RGB color space.

  6. Sensory Drive, Color, and Color Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Trevor D

    2017-08-01

    Colors often appear to differ in arbitrary ways among related species. However, a fraction of color diversity may be explained because some signals are more easily perceived in one environment rather than another. Models show that not only signals but also the perception of signals should regularly evolve in response to different environments, whether these primarily involve detection of conspecifics or detection of predators and prey. Thus, a deeper understanding of how perception of color correlates with environmental attributes should help generate more predictive models of color divergence. Here, I briefly review our understanding of color vision in vertebrates. Then I focus on opsin spectral tuning and opsin expression, two traits involved in color perception that have become amenable to study. I ask how opsin tuning is correlated with ecological differences, notably the light environment, and how this potentially affects perception of conspecific colors. Although opsin tuning appears to evolve slowly, opsin expression levels are more evolutionarily labile but have been difficult to connect to color perception. The challenge going forward will be to identify how physiological differences involved in color vision, such as opsin expression levels, translate into perceptual differences, the selection pressures that have driven those differences, and ultimately how this may drive evolution of conspecific colors.

  7. Understanding Students Prior Knowledge On The Process Of Seeing And Perception Of Colors Using The Grounded Theory Implications To Science Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Phil Canlas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The foregoing is a part of a developmental study that attempted to investigate the prior knowledge of students on the process of seeing and perception of colors using the Grounded theory approach. One hundred twenty-two 122 university students in their first year taking programs under the College of Education and College of Arts and Sciences enrolled in a course on biological sciences took part in the study. Explanations of the students related to light absorption in photosynthesis were analyzed to establish an illustration on how they understand the process of seeing and perception of colors. Results revealed that a gap in their understanding of these concepts existed despite its introduction during their basic education. The use of common phenomena and daily context as a form of diagnostic assessment and the importance of integrated lessons were also discussed in this paper.

  8. Visible skin condition and perception of human facial appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, N; Fink, B; Matts, P J

    2010-06-01

    Evolutionary psychology suggests that certain human beauty standards have evolved to provide reliable cues of fertility and health. Hence, preferences for some physical characteristics of the face and body are thought to reflect adaptations for the promotion of mate choice. Studies that have investigated facial attractiveness have concentrated mainly on features such as symmetry, averageness and sex-typical traits, which are developed under the influence of sex steroids. Few studies, however, have addressed the effect of human skin condition on perception of facial appearance in this context, and possible implications for sexual selection. There is now accumulating evidence that skin pigmentation and skin surface topography cues, particularly in women, have a significant influence on attractiveness judgements, as they seem primarily to signal aspects of age and health. This article (i) reviews briefly some of the main determinants of visible skin condition, (ii) presents recent evidence on its signalling value in face perception and (iii) suggests areas for future research with reference to an evolutionary psychology framework.

  9. The neurocognitive bases of human multimodal food perception: consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Justus V

    2007-02-01

    This review explores how we become aware of the (integrated) flavor of food. In recent years, progress has been made understanding the neural correlates of consciousness. Experimental and computational data have been largely based on the visual system. Contemporary neurobiological frameworks of consciousness are reviewed, concluding that neural reverberation among forward- and back-projecting neural ensembles across brain areas is a common theme. In an attempt to extrapolate these concepts to the oral-sensory and olfactory systems involved with multimodal flavor perception, the integration of the sensory information of which into a flavor gestalt has been reviewed elsewhere (Verhagen, J.V., Engelen, L., 2006. The neurocognitive bases of human multimodal food perception: Sensory integration. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 30(5): 613_650), I reconceptualize the flavor-sensory system by integrating it into a larger neural system termed the Homeostatic Interoceptive System (HIS). This system consists of an oral (taste, oral touch, etc.) and non-oral part (non oral-thermosensation, pain, etc.) which are anatomically and functionally highly similar. Consistent with this new concept and with a large volume of experimental data, I propose that awareness of intraoral food is related to the concomitant reverberant self-sustained activation of a coalition of neuronal subsets in agranular insula and orbitofrontal cortex (affect, hedonics) and agranular insula and perirhinal cortex (food identity), as well as the amygdala (affect and identity) in humans. I further discuss the functional anatomy in relation essential nodes. These formulations are by necessity to some extent speculative.

  10. Perception of complex motion in humans and pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankoo, Jean-François; Madan, Christopher R; Spetch, Marcia L; Wylie, Douglas R

    2014-06-01

    In the primate visual system, local motion signals are pooled to create a global motion percept. Like primates, many birds are highly dependent on vision for their survival, yet relatively little is known about motion perception in birds. We used random-dot stimuli to investigate pigeons' ability to detect complex motion (radial, rotation, and spiral) compared to humans. Our human participants had a significantly lower threshold for rotational and radial motion when compared to spiral motion. The data from the pigeons, however, showed that the pigeons were most sensitive to rotational motion and least sensitive to radial motion, while sensitivity for spiral motion was intermediate. We followed up the pigeon results with an investigation of the effect of display aperture shape for rotational motion and velocity gradient for radial motion. We found no effect of shape of the aperture on thresholds, but did observe that radial motion containing accelerating dots improved thresholds. However, this improvement did not reach the thresholds levels observed for rotational motion. In sum, our experiments demonstrate that the pooling mechanism in the pigeon motion system is most efficient for rotation.

  11. Quantification of color alteration in human teeth with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-11-01

    It is necessary to develop a laboratory model to evaluate tooth discoloration, because there are several limitations to assessment methods at present stage. Therefore, in this letter, we report the results from a pilot study on using optical coherence tomography imaging method to quantify color alteration in the human teeth treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching in vitro. Quantitative comparison of chromogens reduction in dental tissue showed that near infrared attenuation coefficient (μ) increased for enamel with the bleaching passage time and diminution for dentine. Therefore, the precise detection of the change in attenuation coefficient is can accurate quantitative chromogens alteration in tooth. OCT has a potential to become a useful tool for the assessment color alteration in human teeth.

  12. An Illumination Invariant Face Detection Based on Human Shape Analysis and Skin Color Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibakar Chakraborty

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a novel approach towards face area localization through analyzing the shape characteristics of human body. The face region is extracted by determining the sharp increase in body pixels in the shoulder area from neck region. For ensuring face area skin color information is also analyzed. The experimental analysis shows that the proposed algorithm detects the face area effectively and it’s performance is found to be quite satisfactory

  13. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-09-02

    Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers.

  14. Color Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    2017-01-01

    A color algebra refers to a system for computing sums and products of colors, analogous to additive and subtractive color mixtures. We would like it to match the well-defined algebra of spectral functions describing lights and surface reflectances, but an exact correspondence is impossible after the spectra have been projected to a three-dimensional color space, because of metamerism physically different spectra can produce the same color sensation. Metameric spectra are interchangeable for the purposes of addition, but not multiplication, so any color algebra is necessarily an approximation to physical reality. Nevertheless, because the majority of naturally-occurring spectra are well-behaved (e.g., continuous and slowly-varying), color algebras can be formulated that are largely accurate and agree well with human intuition. Here we explore the family of algebras that result from associating each color with a member of a three-dimensional manifold of spectra. This association can be used to construct a color product, defined as the color of the spectrum of the wavelength-wise product of the spectra associated with the two input colors. The choice of the spectral manifold determines the behavior of the resulting system, and certain special subspaces allow computational efficiencies. The resulting systems can be used to improve computer graphic rendering techniques, and to model various perceptual phenomena such as color constancy.

  15. Human Capital Questionnaire: Assessment of European nurses' perceptions as indicators of human capital quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes-Baldó, Montserrat; Romeo, Marina; Berger, Rita

    2013-06-01

    Healthcare accreditation models generally include indicators related to healthcare employees' perceptions (e.g. satisfaction, career development, and health safety). During the accreditation process, organizations are asked to demonstrate the methods with which assessments are made. However, none of the models provide standardized systems for the assessment of employees. In this study, we analyzed the psychometric properties of an instrument for the assessment of nurses' perceptions as indicators of human capital quality in healthcare organizations. The Human Capital Questionnaire was applied to a sample of 902 nurses in four European countries (Spain, Portugal, Poland, and the UK). Exploratory factor analysis identified six factors: satisfaction with leadership, identification and commitment, satisfaction with participation, staff well-being, career development opportunities, and motivation. The results showed the validity and reliability of the questionnaire, which when applied to healthcare organizations, provide a better understanding of nurses' perceptions, and is a parsimonious instrument for assessment and organizational accreditation. From a practical point of view, improving the quality of human capital, by analyzing nurses and other healthcare employees' perceptions, is related to workforce empowerment.

  16. Neural correlates of induced motion perception in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Hiromasa; Ashida, Hiroshi; Amano, Kaoru; Kitaoka, Akiyoshi; Murakami, Ikuya

    2012-10-10

    A physically stationary stimulus surrounded by a moving stimulus appears to move in the opposite direction. There are similarities between the characteristics of this phenomenon of induced motion and surround suppression of directionally selective neurons in the brain. Here, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate the link between the subjective perception of induced motion and cortical activity. The visual stimuli consisted of a central drifting sinusoid surrounded by a moving random-dot pattern. The change in cortical activity in response to changes in speed and direction of the central stimulus was measured. The human cortical area hMT+ showed the greatest activation when the central stimulus moved at a fast speed in the direction opposite to that of the surround. More importantly, the activity in this area was the lowest when the central stimulus moved in the same direction as the surround and at a speed such that the central stimulus appeared to be stationary. The results indicate that the activity in hMT+ is related to perceived speed modulated by induced motion rather than to physical speed or a kinetic boundary. Early visual areas (V1, V2, V3, and V3A) showed a similar pattern; however, the relationship to perceived speed was not as clear as that in hMT+. These results suggest that hMT+ may be a neural correlate of induced motion perception and play an important role in contrasting motion signals in relation to their surrounding context and adaptively modulating our motion perception depending on the spatial context.

  17. Color Measurement and Color Spaces Analysis for TV Using the (Commission International D’Éclairage CIE System Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riad Mitieb Mahmod

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Color is a perceived phenomenon and not a physical dimension like length ortemperature, although the electromagnetic radiation of the visible wavelength spectrum is measurable as a physical quantity. A suitable form of representation must be found for storing, displaying, and processing color images. This representation must be well suited to the mathematical demands of a color image processing algorithm, to the technical conditions of a camera, printer, or television, and to human color perception as well. These various demands cannot be met equally well simultaneously. For this reason, differing representations are used in color image processing according to the processing goal. Color spaces indicate color coordinate systems in which the image values of a color image are represented. The standard color system, established by the International Lighting Commission CIE (Commission Internationale de I ’Eclairage, will be described. This system represents the international reference system of color measurement. The contribution deals with the Matlab application used for television and color spaces analysis. All of the color spaces can be derived from the RGB information supplied by devices such as cameras and scanners. There is a list of common color spaces. The application allows selection of input color image, direct and backward transformation into the selected space including CIE diagram picture analysis and NTSC system. The additional functions of this research are evaluation of histogram of colors. The Color Spaces application outputs are introduced on various test pictures.

  18. Humanly space objects-Perception and connection with the observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Hall, Ashley

    2015-05-01

    Expanding humanity into space is an inevitable step in our quest to explore our world. Yet space exploration is costly, and the awaiting environment challenges us with extreme cold, heat, vacuum and radiation, unlike anything encountered on Earth. Thus, the few pioneers who experience it needed to be well protected throughout their spaceflight. The resulting isolation heightens the senses and increases the desire to make humanly connections with any other perceived manifestation of life. Such connections may occur via sensory inputs, namely vision, touch, sound, smell, and taste. This then follows the process of sensing, interpreting, and recognizing familiar patterns, or learning from new experiences. The desire to connect could even transfer to observed objects, if their movements and characteristics trigger the appropriate desires from the observer. When ordered in a familiar way, for example visual stimuli from lights and movements of an object, it may create a perceived real bond with an observer, and evoke the feeling of surprise when the expected behavior changes to something no longer predictable or recognizable. These behavior patterns can be designed into an object and performed autonomously in front of an observer, in our case an astronaut. The experience may introduce multiple responses, including communication, connection, empathy, order, and disorder. While emotions are clearly evoked in the observer and may seem one sided, in effect the object itself provides a decoupled bond, connectivity and communication between the observer and the artist-designer of the object. In this paper we will discuss examples from the field of arts and other domains, including robotics, where human perception through object interaction was explored, and investigate the starting point for new innovative design concepts and future prototype designs, that extend these experiences beyond the boundaries of Earth, while taking advantage of remoteness and the zero gravity

  19. Color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, Karl R; Kiper, Daniel C

    2003-01-01

    Color vision starts with the absorption of light in the retinal cone photoreceptors, which transduce electromagnetic energy into electrical voltages. These voltages are transformed into action potentials by a complicated network of cells in the retina. The information is sent to the visual cortex via the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in three separate color-opponent channels that have been characterized psychophysically, physiologically, and computationally. The properties of cells in the retina and LGN account for a surprisingly large body of psychophysical literature. This suggests that several fundamental computations involved in color perception occur at early levels of processing. In the cortex, information from the three retino-geniculate channels is combined to enable perception of a large variety of different hues. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that color analysis and coding cannot be separated from the analysis and coding of other visual attributes such as form and motion. Though there are some brain areas that are more sensitive to color than others, color vision emerges through the combined activity of neurons in many different areas.

  20. [Research on developping the spectral dataset for Dunhuang typical colors based on color constancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Wan, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Zhen; Li, Chan; Liang, Jin-Xing

    2013-11-01

    The present paper aims at developping a method to reasonably set up the typical spectral color dataset for different kinds of Chinese cultural heritage in color rendering process. The world famous wall paintings dating from more than 1700 years ago in Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes was taken as typical case in this research. In order to maintain the color constancy during the color rendering workflow of Dunhuang culture relics, a chromatic adaptation based method for developping the spectral dataset of typical colors for those wall paintings was proposed from the view point of human vision perception ability. Under the help and guidance of researchers in the art-research institution and protection-research institution of Dunhuang Academy and according to the existing research achievement of Dunhuang Research in the past years, 48 typical known Dunhuang pigments were chosen and 240 representative color samples were made with reflective spectral ranging from 360 to 750 nm was acquired by a spectrometer. In order to find the typical colors of the above mentioned color samples, the original dataset was devided into several subgroups by clustering analysis. The grouping number, together with the most typical samples for each subgroup which made up the firstly built typical color dataset, was determined by wilcoxon signed rank test according to the color inconstancy index comprehensively calculated under 6 typical illuminating conditions. Considering the completeness of gamut of Dunhuang wall paintings, 8 complementary colors was determined and finally the typical spectral color dataset was built up which contains 100 representative spectral colors. The analytical calculating results show that the median color inconstancy index of the built dataset in 99% confidence level by wilcoxon signed rank test was 3.28 and the 100 colors are distributing in the whole gamut uniformly, which ensures that this dataset can provide reasonable reference for choosing the color with highest

  1. Human roughness perception and possible factors effecting roughness sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktar, Tugba; Chen, Jianshe; Ettelaie, Rammile; Holmes, Melvin; Henson, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Surface texture sensation is significant for business success, in particular for solid surfaces for most of the materials; including foods. Mechanisms of roughness perception are still unknown, especially under different conditions such as lubricants with varying viscosities, different temperatures, or under different force loads during the observation of the surface. This work aims to determine the effect of those unknown factors, with applied sensory tests on 62 healthy participants. Roughness sensation of fingertip was tested under different lubricants including water and diluted syrup solutions at room temperature (25C) and body temperature (37C) by using simple pair-wise comparison to observe the just noticeable difference threshold and perception levels. Additionally, in this research applied force load during roughness observation was tested with pair-wise ranking method to illustrate its possible effect on human sensation. Obtained results showed that human's capability of roughness discrimination reduces with increased viscosity of the lubricant, where the influence of the temperature was not found to be significant. Moreover, the increase in the applied force load showed an increase in the sensitivity of roughness discrimination. Observed effects of the applied factors were also used for estimating the oral sensation of texture during eating. These findings are significant for our fundamental understanding to texture perception, and for the development of new food products with controlled textural features. Texture discrimination ability, more specifically roughness discrimination capability, is a significant factor for preference and appreciation for a wide range of materials, including food, furniture, or fabric. To explore the mechanism of sensation capability through tactile senses, it is necessary to identify the relevant factors and define characteristics that dominate the process involved. The results that will be obtained under these principles

  2. Technical note: comparing von Luschan skin color tiles and modern spectrophotometry for measuring human skin pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatoniowski, Anna K; Quillen, Ellen E; Shriver, Mark D; Jablonski, Nina G

    2013-06-01

    Prior to the introduction of reflectance spectrophotometry into anthropological field research during the 1950s, human skin color was most commonly classified by visual skin color matching using the von Luschan tiles, a set of 36 standardized, opaque glass tiles arranged in a chromatic scale. Our goal was to establish a conversion formula between the tile-based color matching method and modern reflectance spectrophotometry to make historical and contemporary data comparable. Skin pigmentation measurements were taken on the forehead, inner upper arms, and backs of the hands using both the tiles and a spectrophotometer on 246 participants showing a broad range of skin pigmentation. From these data, a second-order polynomial conversion formula was derived by jackknife analysis to estimate melanin index (M-index) based on tile values. This conversion formula provides a means for comparing modern data to von Luschan tile measurements recorded in historical reports. This is particularly important for populations now extinct, extirpated, or admixed for which tile-based measures of skin pigmentation are the only data available.

  3. Color segmentation in the HSI color space using the K-means algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Arthur R.; Hague, G. Eric

    1997-04-01

    Segmentation of images is an important aspect of image recognition. While grayscale image segmentation has become quite a mature field, much less work has been done with regard to color image segmentation. Until recently, this was predominantly due to the lack of available computing power and color display hardware that is required to manipulate true color images (24-bit). TOday, it is not uncommon to find a standard desktop computer system with a true-color 24-bit display, at least 8 million bytes of memory, and 2 gigabytes of hard disk storage. Segmentation of color images is not as simple as segmenting each of the three RGB color components separately. The difficulty of using the RGB color space is that it doesn't closely model the psychological understanding of color. A better color model, which closely follows that of human visual perception is the hue, saturation, intensity model. This color model separates the color components in terms of chromatic and achromatic information. Strickland et al. was able to show the importance of color in the extraction of edge features form an image. His method enhances the edges that are detectable in the luminance image with information from the saturation image. Segmentation of both the saturation and intensity components is easily accomplished with any gray scale segmentation algorithm, since these spaces are linear. The modulus 2(pi) nature of the hue color component makes its segmentation difficult. For example, a hue of 0 and 2(pi) yields the same color tint. Instead of applying separate image segmentation to each of the hue, saturation, and intensity components, a better method is to segment the chromatic component separately from the intensity component because of the importance that the chromatic information plays in the segmentation of color images. This paper presents a method of using the gray scale K-means algorithm to segment 24-bit color images. Additionally, this paper will show the importance the hue

  4. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of human MT+ reduces apparent motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyoshi, Daisuke; Hirose, Nobuyuki; Mima, Tatsuya; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2007-12-18

    We investigated the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the human cerebral cortex on apparent motion perception. Previous studies have shown that human extrastriate visual area MT+ (V5) processes not only real but also apparent motion. However, the functional relevance of MT+ on long-range apparent motion perception remains unclear. Here, we show direct evidence for the involvement of MT+ in apparent motion perception using rTMS, which is known to temporarily inhibit a localized region in the cerebral cortex. The results showed that apparent motion perception decreased after applying rTMS over MT+, but not after applying rTMS over the control region (inferior temporal gyrus). The decrease in performance caused by applying rTMS to MT+ suggests that MT+ is a causally responsible region for apparent motion perception, and thus, further supports the idea that MT+ plays a major role in the perception of motion.

  5. Beauty and the teeth: perception of tooth color and its influence on the overall judgment of facial attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfel, Lea; Lange, Matthias; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of changes in tooth color on judgments of facial attractiveness. Standardized photographs were presented, and teeth were digitally manipulated (main categories: original, whitened, colored; filler category: impaired). Participants were instructed to evaluate the faces for attractiveness. Additionally, they were asked to name facial features they found either positive or negative with regard to attractiveness. Whitened teeth were mentioned more often in a positive way but did not improve participants' assessment of attractiveness. A colored tooth did not attract attention, and the attractiveness judgment did not worsen. Tooth color is thus not necessarily perceived and does not have a major impact on facial attractiveness.

  6. Phylogenetic approach to the evolution of color term systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, Hannah J; Bowern, Claire

    2016-11-29

    The naming of colors has long been a topic of interest in the study of human culture and cognition. Color term research has asked diverse questions about thought and communication, but no previous research has used an evolutionary framework. We show that there is broad support for the most influential theory of color term development (that most strongly represented by Berlin and Kay [Berlin B, Kay P (1969) (Univ of California Press, Berkeley, CA)]); however, we find extensive evidence for the loss (as well as gain) of color terms. We find alternative trajectories of color term evolution beyond those considered in the standard theories. These results not only refine our knowledge of how humans lexicalize the color space and how the systems change over time; they illustrate the promise of phylogenetic methods within the domain of cognitive science, and they show how language change interacts with human perception.

  7. Cosmetics as a feature of the extended human phenotype: modulation of the perception of biologically important facial signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy L Etcoff

    Full Text Available Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural, to moderate (professional, to dramatic (glamorous. Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important

  8. Cosmetics as a feature of the extended human phenotype: modulation of the perception of biologically important facial signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcoff, Nancy L; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E; Vickery, Sarah A; House, David M

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  9. Cosmetics as a Feature of the Extended Human Phenotype: Modulation of the Perception of Biologically Important Facial Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcoff, Nancy L.; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E.; Vickery, Sarah A.; House, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  10. LGB of Color and White Individuals' Perceptions of Heterosexist Stigma, Internalized Homophobia, and Outness: Comparisons of Levels and Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Bonnie; Wiseman, Marcie C.; DeBlaere, Cirleen; Goodman, Melinda B.; Sarkees, Anthony; Brewster, Melanie E.; Huang, Yu-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Conceptual discussions about LGB people of color suggest that, compared with White LGB individuals, LGB people of color may be exposed to greater levels of heterosexist stigma and its deleterious correlates (greater risk) or may be more resilient to such stigma (resilience). This study tested tenets of these two perspectives with a sample of 178…

  11. Assessing the influence of the color of the plate on the perception of a complex food in a restaurant setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piqueras Fiszman, B.; Giboreau, A.; Spence, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nowadays, more and more importance is given to how restaurant dishes are visually presented. With regard to the color of the plate, several recent studies have demonstrated that identical foods served on plates (or in containers) of different colors are often perceived differently at both

  12. Assessing the influence of the color of the plate on the perception of a complex food in a restaurant setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piqueras Fiszman, B.; Giboreau, A.; Spence, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nowadays, more and more importance is given to how restaurant dishes are visually presented. With regard to the color of the plate, several recent studies have demonstrated that identical foods served on plates (or in containers) of different colors are often perceived differently at both

  13. The role of human ventral visual cortex in motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Saygin, Ayse P; Lorenzi, Lauren J; Egan, Ryan; Rees, Geraint; Behrmann, Marlene

    2013-09-01

    Visual motion perception is fundamental to many aspects of visual perception. Visual motion perception has long been associated with the dorsal (parietal) pathway and the involvement of the ventral 'form' (temporal) visual pathway has not been considered critical for normal motion perception. Here, we evaluated this view by examining whether circumscribed damage to ventral visual cortex impaired motion perception. The perception of motion in basic, non-form tasks (motion coherence and motion detection) and complex structure-from-motion, for a wide range of motion speeds, all centrally displayed, was assessed in five patients with a circumscribed lesion to either the right or left ventral visual pathway. Patients with a right, but not with a left, ventral visual lesion displayed widespread impairments in central motion perception even for non-form motion, for both slow and for fast speeds, and this held true independent of the integrity of areas MT/V5, V3A or parietal regions. In contrast with the traditional view in which only the dorsal visual stream is critical for motion perception, these novel findings implicate a more distributed circuit in which the integrity of the right ventral visual pathway is also necessary even for the perception of non-form motion.

  14. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of human blastocysts andcytotrophoblasts by multi-color FISH and Spectra Imaging analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jung,Christine J.; Nguyen, Ha-Nam; Chu, Lisa W.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fisher,Susan J.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-02-08

    Numerical chromosome aberrations in gametes typically lead to failed fertilization, spontaneous abortion or a chromosomally abnormal fetus. By means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we now can screen human embryos in vitro for aneuploidy before transferring the embryos to the uterus. PGD allows us to select unaffected embryos for transfer and increases the implantation rate in in vitro fertilization programs. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of blastomeres have become the major tool for preimplantation genetic screening of aneuploidy. However, current FISH technology can test for only a small number of chromosome abnormalities and hitherto failed to increase the pregnancy rates as expected. We are in the process of developing technologies to score all 24 chromosomes in single cells within a 3 day time limit, which we believe is vital to the clinical setting. Also, human placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) at the fetal-maternal interface acquire aneuploidies as they differentiate to an invasive phenotype. About 20-50% of invasive CTB cells from uncomplicated pregnancies were found aneuploidy, suggesting that the acquisition of aneuploidy is an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of CTBs. Since most invasive CTBs are interphase cells and possess extreme heterogeneity, we applied multi-color FISH and repeated hybridizations to investigate individual CTBs. In summary, this study demonstrates the strength of Spectral Imaging analysis and repeated hybridizations, which provides a basis for full karyotype analysis of single interphase cells.

  15. Enrolment Purposes, Instructional Activities, and Perceptions of Attitudinal Learning in a Human Trafficking MOOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sunnie Lee; Kim, Woori

    2016-01-01

    This study examines learner enrolment purposes, perceptions on instructional activities and their relationship to learning gains in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) for attitudinal change regarding human trafficking. Using an author-developed survey, learners reported their perceptions on instructional activities and learning gains within the…

  16. Examining Social Perceptions between Arab and Jewish Children through Human Figure Drawings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidia, Tova; Lipschitz-Elchawi, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined social perceptions among 191 Arab and Jewish children who live in mixed neighborhoods in Israel. Human Figure Drawing assessment was used to examine the children's social perceptions. The drawings that the Jewish Israeli children created portrayed Arabs as the enemy, whereas the Arab Israeli children expressed a more positive…

  17. Men's Perceptions and Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, Tara S.; Weaver, Bethany A.; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors assessed young men's knowledge and perceptions of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to identify factors that predict intention to make positive behavioral changes. Male university students aged 18 to 25 years completed a self-report instrument to assess knowledge and perceptions of genital HPV infection. If diagnosed with…

  18. Men's Perceptions and Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, Tara S.; Weaver, Bethany A.; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors assessed young men's knowledge and perceptions of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to identify factors that predict intention to make positive behavioral changes. Male university students aged 18 to 25 years completed a self-report instrument to assess knowledge and perceptions of genital HPV infection. If diagnosed with…

  19. Color Reproduction System Based on Color Appearance Model and Gamut Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    perception is usually different. Basically, the influence factors are device calibration and characterization, viewing condition, device gamut and human...Halftone Reproduction", TAGA Proceedings, 65-76 [7] R. W. G. Hunt, "The Reproduction of Color in Photography, Printing, & Televison ". FOUNTAIN PRESS, 4 ed

  20. COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Lafon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present specific capabilities and limitations of the use of color digital images in a characterization process. The whole process is investigated, from the acquisition of digital color images to the analysis of the information relevant to various applications in the field of material characterization. A digital color image can be considered as a matrix of pixels with values expressed in a vector-space (commonly 3 dimensional space whose specificity, compared to grey-scale images, is to ensure a coding and a representation of the output image (visualisation printing that fits the human visual reality. In a characterization process, it is interesting to regard color image attnbutes as a set of visual aspect measurements on a material surface. Color measurement systems (spectrocolorimeters, colorimeters and radiometers and cameras use the same type of light detectors: most of them use Charge Coupled Devices sensors. The difference between the two types of color data acquisition systems is that color measurement systems provide a global information of the observed surface (average aspect of the surface: the color texture is not taken into account. Thus, it seems interesting to use imaging systems as measuring instruments for the quantitative characterization of the color texture.

  1. Lecture classes in human anatomy: the students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Maitreyee; Roy, Hironmoy; Ghosh, Anasuya; Tapadar, Arunabha; Chowdhury, Subhramoy; Mukherjee, Pranab; Jana, Tapan Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The human anatomy, or in brief, the body structure has fascinated man for ages. Due to the information explosion and the increase in specializations, this knowledge is available in a very sketchy manner in high school biology courses. The first comprehensive course on the human anatomy is taught to the first year medical students in medical colleges. This is in keeping with the regulations of the Medical Council of India. The anatomy lecture classes occupy a considerable time of the course, to provide the students with an effective knowledge of the gross anatomy, histology, embryology and the clinical anatomy. On the other hand, the students' feedback regarding the lecture methods and the teaching environment is crucial in judging the efficacy of the present curriculum. To obtain the students' feedback about the environment of the lecture classes, as regards the venue, the teaching and learning aids which are used, the lecture class schedule of the university (the number of classes per week, the durations of the lecture classes, etc.) and the existing departmental practices (display of the class routine in advance, synchronization between the lecture and the practical classes), so that their suggestions could help the faculty in planning the most effective teaching procedures. A semi structured questionnaire was supplied to the students to get their feedback. Most of the students found the air conditioned seminar room's environment to be more comfortable and they supported the existing durations of the lecture hours with the combined use of chalk and a board and overhead projectors (OHPs). The perceptions of the learners helped in modifying the departmental practice in the desired way.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of impedance perception characteristics of humans in the man-machine interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onish, Keiichi [Yamaha Motor Co., Shizuoka (Japan); Kim, Young Woo [Daegu Techno Park R and D Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Obinata, Goro [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Hase, Kazunori [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-05-15

    We investigated impedance perception characteristics of humans in the man-machine interface. Sensibility or operational feel about physical properties of machine dynamics is obtained through perception process. We evaluated the impedance perception characteristics of humans who are operating a mechanical system, based on extended Scheffe's subjective evaluation method in full consideration of the influence of impedance level, impedance difference, experiment order, individual difference and so on. Constant method based quantitative evaluation was adopted to investigate the influence of motion frequency and change of the impedance on human impedance perception characteristics. Experimental results indicate that humans perceive impedance of mechanical systems based on comparison process of the dynamical characteristics of the systems. The proposed method can be applied to quantify the design requirement of man-machine interface. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through experimental results.

  3. Risk perception, risk evaluation and human values: cognitive bases of acceptability of a radioactive waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earle, T.C.; Lindell, M.K.; Rankin, W.L.

    1981-07-01

    Public acceptance of radioactive waste management alternatives depends in part on public perception of the associated risks. Three aspects of those perceived risks were explored in this study: (1) synthetic measures of risk perception based on judgments of probability and consequences; (2) acceptability of hypothetical radioactive waste policies, and (3) effects of human values on risk perception. Both the work on synthetic measures of risk perception and on the acceptability of hypothetical policies included investigations of three categories of risk: (1) Short-term public risk (affecting persons living when the wastes are created), (2) Long-term public risk (affecting persons living after the time the wastes were created), and (3) Occupational risk (affecting persons working with the radioactive wastes). The human values work related to public risk perception in general, across categories of persons affected. Respondents were selected according to a purposive sampling strategy.

  4. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng, E-mail: qschen@ujs.edu.cn

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers.

  5. Realistic Facial Expression of Virtual Human Based on Color, Sweat, and Tears Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hazim Alkawaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generating extreme appearances such as scared awaiting sweating while happy fit for tears (cry and blushing (anger and happiness is the key issue in achieving the high quality facial animation. The effects of sweat, tears, and colors are integrated into a single animation model to create realistic facial expressions of 3D avatar. The physical properties of muscles, emotions, or the fluid properties with sweating and tears initiators are incorporated. The action units (AUs of facial action coding system are merged with autonomous AUs to create expressions including sadness, anger with blushing, happiness with blushing, and fear. Fluid effects such as sweat and tears are simulated using the particle system and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH methods which are combined with facial animation technique to produce complex facial expressions. The effects of oxygenation of the facial skin color appearance are measured using the pulse oximeter system and the 3D skin analyzer. The result shows that virtual human facial expression is enhanced by mimicking actual sweating and tears simulations for all extreme expressions. The proposed method has contribution towards the development of facial animation industry and game as well as computer graphics.

  6. Realistic facial expression of virtual human based on color, sweat, and tears effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Mohamed, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    Generating extreme appearances such as scared awaiting sweating while happy fit for tears (cry) and blushing (anger and happiness) is the key issue in achieving the high quality facial animation. The effects of sweat, tears, and colors are integrated into a single animation model to create realistic facial expressions of 3D avatar. The physical properties of muscles, emotions, or the fluid properties with sweating and tears initiators are incorporated. The action units (AUs) of facial action coding system are merged with autonomous AUs to create expressions including sadness, anger with blushing, happiness with blushing, and fear. Fluid effects such as sweat and tears are simulated using the particle system and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods which are combined with facial animation technique to produce complex facial expressions. The effects of oxygenation of the facial skin color appearance are measured using the pulse oximeter system and the 3D skin analyzer. The result shows that virtual human facial expression is enhanced by mimicking actual sweating and tears simulations for all extreme expressions. The proposed method has contribution towards the development of facial animation industry and game as well as computer graphics.

  7. As cores no ambiente de terapia intensiva: percepções de pacientes e profissionais Los colores en el ambiente de cuidados intensivos: percepciones de pacientes y profesionales Colors in the intensive therapy environment: perceptions of patients and professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio Barbosa Boccanera

    2006-09-01

    sentido de mejorar el clima de la UCI.The use of colors in the environment of an Intensive Care Unit (ICU may interfere in the welfare of both professionals and patients. This study is aimed at analyzing the perceptions of professionals and patients regarding the colors used in the intensive care environment, identifying those considered pleasant and unpleasant. This is a descriptive-exploratory research with a quantitative-qualitative focus. The sample was comprised of hospitalized patients and professionals at three public hospitals ICUs in the city of Goiânia, State of Goiás. The colors considered most pleasant for ICUs were light blue and light green. Light yellow, beige, gray, pink and guava were also pointed out as pleasing. Red and black were appointed as the most unpleasant. Professionals and patients demonstrated preference for varied colors, something that can be used as a way of improving the atmosphere of ICUs.

  8. Numerical simulation of human orientation perception during lunar landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Torin K.; Young, Laurence R.; Stimpson, Alexander J.; Duda, Kevin R.; Oman, Charles M.

    2011-09-01

    In lunar landing it is necessary to select a suitable landing point and then control a stable descent to the surface. In manned landings, astronauts will play a critical role in monitoring systems and adjusting the descent trajectory through either supervisory control and landing point designations, or by direct manual control. For the astronauts to ensure vehicle performance and safety, they will have to accurately perceive vehicle orientation. A numerical model for human spatial orientation perception was simulated using input motions from lunar landing trajectories to predict the potential for misperceptions. Three representative trajectories were studied: an automated trajectory, a landing point designation trajectory, and a challenging manual control trajectory. These trajectories were studied under three cases with different cues activated in the model to study the importance of vestibular cues, visual cues, and the effect of the descent engine thruster creating dust blowback. The model predicts that spatial misperceptions are likely to occur as a result of the lunar landing motions, particularly with limited or incomplete visual cues. The powered descent acceleration profile creates a somatogravic illusion causing the astronauts to falsely perceive themselves and the vehicle as upright, even when the vehicle has a large pitch or roll angle. When visual pathways were activated within the model these illusions were mostly suppressed. Dust blowback, obscuring the visual scene out the window, was also found to create disorientation. These orientation illusions are likely to interfere with the astronauts' ability to effectively control the vehicle, potentially degrading performance and safety. Therefore suitable countermeasures, including disorientation training and advanced displays, are recommended.

  9. Hierarchical organization of speech perception in human auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin eHumphries

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human speech consists of a variety of articulated sounds that vary dynamically in spectral composition. We investigated the neural activity associated with the perception of two types of speech segments: (a the period of rapid spectral transition occurring at the beginning of a stop-consonant vowel (CV syllable and (b the subsequent spectral steady-state period occurring during the vowel segment of the syllable. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was recorded while subjects listened to series of synthesized CV syllables and non-phonemic control sounds. Adaptation to specific sound features was measured by varying either the transition or steady-state periods of the synthesized sounds. Two spatially distinct brain areas in the superior temporal cortex were found that were sensitive to either the type of adaptation or the type of stimulus. In a relatively large section of the bilateral dorsal superior temporal gyrus (STG, activity varied as a function of adaptation type regardless of whether the stimuli were phonemic or non-phonemic. Immediately adjacent to this region in a more limited area of the ventral STG, increased activity was observed for phonemic trials compared to non-phonemic trials, however, no adaptation effects were found. In addition, a third area in the bilateral medial superior temporal plane showed increased activity to non-phonemic compared to phonemic sounds. The results suggest a multi-stage hierarchical stream for speech sound processing extending ventrolaterally from the superior temporal plane to the superior temporal sulcus. At successive stages in this hierarchy, neurons code for increasingly more complex spectrotemporal features. At the same time, these representations become more abstracted from the original acoustic form of the sound.

  10. Spatially Resolved Two-Color Diffusion Measurements in Human Skin Applied to Transdermal Liposome Penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained...... of the liposome composition (phospholipids or transfersomes), our results show a clear lack of cross-correlation below the skin surface, indicating that the penetration of intact liposomes is highly compromised by the skin barrier.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 6 December 2012...... is very heterogeneous on a microscopic scale. This diffusion-based strategy was further exploited to investigate the integrity of liposomes during transdermal penetration. Specifically, the diffusion of dual-color fluorescently labeled liposomes-containing an amphiphilic fluorophore in the lipid bilayer...

  11. Age, Health and Attractiveness Perception of Virtual (Rendered) Human Hair

    OpenAIRE

    Fink, Bernhard; Hufschmidt, Carla; Hirn, Thomas; Will, Susanne; McKelvey, Graham; Lankhof, John

    2016-01-01

    The social significance of physical appearance and beauty has been documented in many studies. It is known that even subtle manipulations of facial morphology and skin condition can alter people’s perception of a person’s age, health and attractiveness. While the variation in facial morphology and skin condition cues has been studied quite extensively, comparably little is known on the effect of hair on social perception. This has been partly caused by the technical difficulty of creating app...

  12. 24/7 security system: 60-FPS color EMCCD camera with integral human recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsong, T. L.; Boult, T. E.; Gardner, D. W.; Woodworth, R.; Johnson, R. C.; Heflin, B.

    2007-04-01

    An advanced surveillance/security system is being developed for unattended 24/7 image acquisition and automated detection, discrimination, and tracking of humans and vehicles. The low-light video camera incorporates an electron multiplying CCD sensor with a programmable on-chip gain of up to 1000:1, providing effective noise levels of less than 1 electron. The EMCCD camera operates in full color mode under sunlit and moonlit conditions, and monochrome under quarter-moonlight to overcast starlight illumination. Sixty frame per second operation and progressive scanning minimizes motion artifacts. The acquired image sequences are processed with FPGA-compatible real-time algorithms, to detect/localize/track targets and reject non-targets due to clutter under a broad range of illumination conditions and viewing angles. The object detectors that are used are trained from actual image data. Detectors have been developed and demonstrated for faces, upright humans, crawling humans, large animals, cars and trucks. Detection and tracking of targets too small for template-based detection is achieved. For face and vehicle targets the results of the detection are passed to secondary processing to extract recognition templates, which are then compared with a database for identification. When combined with pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) optics, the resulting system provides a reliable wide-area 24/7 surveillance system that avoids the high life-cycle cost of infrared cameras and image intensifiers.

  13. Facts About Color Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... perception of its employees, such as graphic design, photography, and food quality inspection. The Farnsworth Lantern Test ... a green chalkboard when yellow chalk is used. Art classes, which require selecting appropriate colors of paint ...

  14. Modeling Human Perception of Orientation in Altered Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torin K. Clark

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Altered gravity environments, such as those experienced by astronauts, impact spatial orientation perception and can lead to spatial disorientation and sensorimotor impairment. To more fully understand and quantify the impact of altered gravity on orientation perception, several mathematical models have been proposed. The utricular shear, tangent, and the idiotropic vector models aim to predict static perception of tilt in hyper-gravity. Predictions from these prior models are compared to the available data, but are found to systematically err from the perceptions experimentally observed. Alternatively, we propose a modified utricular shear model for static tilt perception in hyper-gravity. Previous dynamic models of vestibular function and orientation perception are limited to 1 G. Specifically, they fail to predict the characteristic overestimation of roll tilt observed in hyper-gravity environments. To address this, we have proposed a modification to a previous observer-type canal otolith interaction model based upon the hypothesis that the central nervous system treats otolith stimulation in the utricular plane differently than stimulation out of the utricular plane. Here we evaluate our modified utricular shear and modified observer models in four altered gravity motion paradigms: a static roll tilt in hyper-gravity, b static pitch tilt in hyper-gravity, c static roll tilt in hypo-gravity, and d static pitch tilt in hypo-gravity. The modified models match available data in each of the conditions considered. Our static modified utricular shear model and dynamic modified observer model may be used to help quantitatively predict astronaut perception of orientation in altered gravity environments.

  15. Race relations and racism in the LGBTQ community of Toronto: perceptions of gay and queer social service providers of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giwa, Sulaimon; Greensmith, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    This article explores race relations and racism within the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) community of Toronto, Ontario, from the perspective of seven gay/queer social service providers of color. Social constructions of race, race relations, and racism were placed at the centre of analysis. Employing interpretive phenomenological analysis, findings indicated that intergroup and broader systemic racism infiltrates the LGBTQ community, rendering invisible the lived experiences of many LGBTQ people of color. The study contributes to a growing body of research concerning our understanding of factors underpinning social discrimination in a contemporary Canadian LGBTQ context.

  16. Human perception of the conservation and biodiversity state of forest remnants under different levels of urbanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thallita Oliveira de Grande

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human perception of local environmental biodiversity and conservation may provide another dimension to understanding the ecology of urban ecosystems. This perception can vary according to the environmental urbanization level and may contribute towards its conservation. We investigated the relationship between the human perception of the conservation and state of animal richness in urban remnants and level of landscape urbanization, and between the human perception of animal richness and the remnants’ area. In addition, we tested the effectiveness of interviews as the means for evaluating animal richness. The subjects' perception of the conservation of remnants did not correlate with the level of urbanization. Richness was reported as high and varied with the remnant’s area - indicating maintenance of a possible species-area relationship in the studied landscape - but did not correlate with the level of urbanization. Urbanization can standardize the popular knowledge about conservation. Interviews with local residents proved to bring efficient insights into urban animal richness, especially for primates, and can be supplemented by camera-trapping. Human perception, obtained through interviews, is relevant and useful for the description of ecological aspects of urban regions and supports environmental awareness, actions, research projects, and management for conservation purposes.

  17. A global simulation approach to optics, lighting, rendering, and human perception for the improvement of safety in automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, Jacques; Fournier, Laurent; Menu, Jean-Pierre

    2005-02-01

    In order to provide optimum comfort and safety conditions, information must be seen as clearly as possible by the driver and in all lighting conditions, by day and by night. Therefore, it is becoming fundamental to anticipate in order to predict what the driver will see in a vehicle, in various configurations of scene and observation conditions, so as to optimize the lighting, the ergonomics of the interfaces and the choice of surrounding materials which can be a source of reflection. This information and choices which will depend on it, make it necessary to call upon simulation techniques capable of modeling, globally and simultaneously, the entire light phenomena: surrounding lighting, display technologies, the inside lighting, taking into consideration the multiple reflections caused by the reflection of this light inside the vehicle. This has been the object of an important development, which results in the solution SPEOS Visual Ergonomics, led by company OPTIS. A unique human vision model was developed in collaboration with worldwide specialists in visual perception to transform spectral luminance information into perceived visual information. This model, based on physiological aspects, takes into account the response of the eye to light levels, to color, to contrast, and to ambient lighting, as well as to rapid changes in surrounding luminosity, in accordance with the response of the retina. This unique tool, and information now accessible, enable ergonomists and designers of on board systems to improve the conditions of global visibility, and in so doing the global perception of the environment that the driver will have.

  18. School Engagement among Urban Adolescents of Color: Does Perception of Social Support and Neighborhood Safety Really Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Brian P.; Shin, Richard Q.; Thakral, Charu; Selders, Michael; Vera, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    In this study we examined the effects of risk factors (perceived neighborhood crime/delinquency problems, neighborhood incivilities) and protective factors (teacher support, family support, peer support) on the school engagement of 123 urban adolescents of color. Age and gender were also examined to determine if different ages (younger or older)…

  19. Priming Letters by Colors: Evidence for the Bidirectionality of Grapheme-Color Synesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Peter H.; Kalckert, Andreas; Fink, Gereon R.

    2009-01-01

    In synesthesia, stimulation of one sensory modality leads to a percept in another nonstimulated modality, for example, graphemes trigger an additional color percept in grapheme-color synesthesia, which encompasses the variants letter-color and digit-color synesthesia. Until recently, it was assumed that synesthesia occurs strictly unidirectional:…

  20. Priming Letters by Colors: Evidence for the Bidirectionality of Grapheme-Color Synesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Peter H.; Kalckert, Andreas; Fink, Gereon R.

    2009-01-01

    In synesthesia, stimulation of one sensory modality leads to a percept in another nonstimulated modality, for example, graphemes trigger an additional color percept in grapheme-color synesthesia, which encompasses the variants letter-color and digit-color synesthesia. Until recently, it was assumed that synesthesia occurs strictly unidirectional:…

  1. Neural coding and perception of pitch in the normal and impaired human auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Pitch is an important attribute of hearing that allows us to perceive the musical quality of sounds. Besides music perception, pitch contributes to speech communication, auditory grouping, and perceptual segregation of sound sources. In this work, several aspects of pitch perception in humans were...... investigated using psychophysical methods. First, hearing loss was found to affect the perception of binaural pitch, a pitch sensation created by the binaural interaction of noise stimuli. Specifically, listeners without binaural pitch sensation showed signs of retrocochlear disorders. Despite adverse effects...

  2. The Translation Of Colors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冰

    2012-01-01

    Different nations have different or even opposite perception of color, which results in non-equivalence of color words in mutual translation between Chinese and English. This paper is to discuss non-equivalence of color words between Chinese and English on the two aspects and emphasizes the importance of transmitting cultural message accurately in the mutual translation between Chinese and English. Studying the cultural connotations of the words is of great importance for successful communication.

  3. Modeling human perceptual thresholds in self-motion perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valente Pais, A.R.; Mulder, M.; Paassen, M.M. van; Wentink, M.; Groen, E.L.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of thresholds for perception of inertial motion is needed for the design of simulator motion filters. Experiments have generally been done to measure these thresholds in isolation, one motion at the time. In vehicle simulation however, several motions occur concurrently. In a flight

  4. Advances in low-level color image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Smolka, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Color perception plays an important role in object recognition and scene understanding both for humans and intelligent vision systems. Recent advances in digital color imaging and computer hardware technology have led to an explosion in the use of color images in a variety of applications including medical imaging, content-based image retrieval, biometrics, watermarking, digital inpainting, remote sensing, visual quality inspection, among many others. As a result, automated processing and analysis of color images has become an active area of research, to which the large number of publications of the past two decades bears witness. The multivariate nature of color image data presents new challenges for researchers and practitioners as the numerous methods developed for single channel images are often not directly applicable to multichannel  ones. The goal of this volume is to summarize the state-of-the-art in the early stages of the color image processing pipeline.

  5. Prestimulus functional connectivity determines pain perception in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploner, Markus; Lee, Michael C; Wiech, Katja; Bingel, Ulrike; Tracey, Irene

    2010-01-05

    Pain is a highly subjective experience that can be substantially influenced by differences in individual susceptibility as well as personality. How susceptibility to pain and personality translate to brain activity is largely unknown. Here, we report that the functional connectivity of two key brain areas before a sensory event reflects the susceptibility to a subsequent noxious stimulus being perceived as painful. Specifically, the prestimulus connectivity among brain areas related to the subjective perception of the body and to the modulation of pain (anterior insular cortex and brainstem, respectively) determines whether a noxious event is perceived as painful. Further, these effects of prestimulus connectivity on pain perception covary with pain-relevant personality traits. More anxious and pain-attentive individuals display weaker descending connectivity to pain modulatory brain areas. We conclude that variations in functional connectivity underlie personality-related differences in individual susceptibility to pain.

  6. Human flavor perception: Application of information integration theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Lawrence E.; Elgart, Benjamin Z.; Burger, Kelly; Chakwin, Emily M.

    2008-01-01

    The perception of flavor arises from the combination of inputs from several sensory modalities, especially gustation (taste proper) and olfaction (the primary source of flavor qualities). Both the perception of intensity of suprathreshold flavorants and, notably, the detection of weak flavorants are consistent with a rule of additivity. Thus, the detectability, d′, of mixtures of the gustatory flavorant sucrose and the olfactory flavorant vanillin approximates the additive sum of detectabilities of the two components, within a model that assumes pooled noise in the flavor system that derives from both modalities. When gustatory and olfactory flavorants are presented in isolation, however, under conditions that encourage or permit selective attention to one modality or the other, it may be possible to filter out the noise associated with the unattended modality, and leading thereby to a rule of vector summation. PMID:19079746

  7. Modeling Power-Constrained Optimal Backlight Dimming for Color Displays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burini, Nino; Nadernejad, Ehsan; Korhonen, Jari

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for modeling color liquid crystal displays (LCDs) having local light-emitting diode (LED) backlight with dimming capability. The proposed framework includes critical aspects like leakage, clipping, light diffusion and human perception of luminance and allows...

  8. The Genetics and Evolution of Human Skin Color: The Case of Desiree's Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    This case explores the genetics and evolution of skin color, using a short story by Kate Chopin called "Desiree's Baby" as a starting point. Students read the story and discuss a series of questions probing the genetics of the family in the tale. Students then read an article about the evolution of skin color and write an essay analyzing the…

  9. The Genetics and Evolution of Human Skin Color: The Case of Desiree's Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    This case explores the genetics and evolution of skin color, using a short story by Kate Chopin called "Desiree's Baby" as a starting point. Students read the story and discuss a series of questions probing the genetics of the family in the tale. Students then read an article about the evolution of skin color and write an essay analyzing the…

  10. Prior knowledge about objects determines neural color representation in human visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenbroucke, A.R.E.; Fahrenfort, J.J.; Meuwese, J.D.I.; Scholte, H.S.; Lamme, V.A.F.

    2016-01-01

    To create subjective experience, our brain must translate physical stimulus input by incorporating prior knowledge and expectations. For example, we perceive color and not wavelength information, and this in part depends on our past experience with colored objects ( Hansen et al. 2006; Mitterer and

  11. Spatially resolved two-color diffusion measurements in human skin applied to transdermal liposome penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2013-05-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy imaging, the acquired diffusion information was processed to construct spatially resolved diffusion maps at different depths of the stratum corneum (SC). Experiments using amphiphilic and hydrophilic fluorescently labeled molecules show that their diffusion in SC is very heterogeneous on a microscopic scale. This diffusion-based strategy was further exploited to investigate the integrity of liposomes during transdermal penetration. Specifically, the diffusion of dual-color fluorescently labeled liposomes--containing an amphiphilic fluorophore in the lipid bilayer and a hydrophilic fluorophore encapsulated in the liposome lumen--was measured using cross-correlation RICS. This type of experiment allows discrimination between separate (uncorrelated) and joint (correlated) diffusion of the two different fluorescent probes, giving information about liposome integrity. Independent of the liposome composition (phospholipids or transfersomes), our results show a clear lack of cross-correlation below the skin surface, indicating that the penetration of intact liposomes is highly compromised by the skin barrier.

  12. Multispectroscopic and calorimetric studies on the binding of the food colorant tartrazine with human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-11-15

    Interaction of the food colorant tartrazine with human hemoglobin was studied using multispectroscopic and microcalorimetric techniques to gain insights into the binding mechanism and thereby the toxicity aspects. Hemoglobin spectrum showed hypochromic changes in the presence of tartrazine. Quenching of the fluorescence of hemoglobin occurred and the quenching mechanism was through a static mode as revealed from temperature dependent and time-resolved fluorescence studies. According to the FRET theory the distance between β-Trp37 of hemoglobin and bound tartrazine was evaluated to be 3.44nm. Synchronous fluorescence studies showed that tartrazine binding led to alteration of the microenvironment around the tryptophans more in comparison to tyrosines. 3D fluorescence and FTIR data provided evidence for conformational changes in the protein on binding. Circular dichroism studies revealed that the binding led to significant loss in the helicity of hemoglobin. The esterase activity assay further complemented the circular dichroism data. Microcalorimetric study using isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the binding to be exothermic and driven largely by positive entropic contribution. Dissection of the Gibbs energy change proposed the protein-dye complexation to be dominated by non-polyelectrolytic forces. Negative heat capacity change also corroborated the involvement of hydrophobic forces in the binding process.

  13. Changes in health perceptions after exposure to human suffering: using discrete emotions to understand underlying processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia A Paschali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine whether exposure to human suffering is associated with negative changes in perceptions about personal health. We further examined the relation of possible health perception changes, to changes in five discrete emotions (i.e., fear, guilt, hostility/anger, and joviality, as a guide to understand the processes underlying health perception changes, provided that each emotion conveys information regarding triggering conditions. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: An experimental group (N = 47 was exposed to images of human affliction, whereas a control group (N = 47 was exposed to relaxing images. Participants in the experimental group reported more health anxiety and health value, as well as lower health-related optimism and internal health locus of control, in comparison to participants exposed to relaxing images. They also reported more fear, guilt, hostility and sadness, as well as less joviality. Changes in each health perception were related to changes in particular emotions. CONCLUSION: These findings imply that health perceptions are shaped in a constant dialogue with the representations about the broader world. Furthermore, it seems that the core of health perception changes lies in the acceptance that personal well-being is subject to several potential threats, as well as that people cannot fully control many of the factors the determine their own well-being.

  14. Influence of different types of trams on human perception of vibrations in buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska-Koczwara Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In an increasingly urbanized areas transport vibration source are closer and closer to the receiver which is a building. At the same time residents requirements for comfort in rooms are higher. In this paper influence of transport vibrations from various types of trams on human perception was tested and analysed. Measurements were made in Cracow on 11 buildings located near tramway. Human perception were investigated according to ISO and Polish standard. Basic RMS method and additional VDV method were applied because of high crest factor of recorded signal. Results of both methods were compared.

  15. Brain response to a humanoid robot in areas implicated in the perception of human emotional gestures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Chaminade

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The humanoid robot WE4-RII was designed to express human emotions in order to improve human-robot interaction. We can read the emotions depicted in its gestures, yet might utilize different neural processes than those used for reading the emotions in human agents. METHODOLOGY: Here, fMRI was used to assess how brain areas activated by the perception of human basic emotions (facial expression of Anger, Joy, Disgust and silent speech respond to a humanoid robot impersonating the same emotions, while participants were instructed to attend either to the emotion or to the motion depicted. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Increased responses to robot compared to human stimuli in the occipital and posterior temporal cortices suggest additional visual processing when perceiving a mechanical anthropomorphic agent. In contrast, activity in cortical areas endowed with mirror properties, like left Broca's area for the perception of speech, and in the processing of emotions like the left anterior insula for the perception of disgust and the orbitofrontal cortex for the perception of anger, is reduced for robot stimuli, suggesting lesser resonance with the mechanical agent. Finally, instructions to explicitly attend to the emotion significantly increased response to robot, but not human facial expressions in the anterior part of the left inferior frontal gyrus, a neural marker of motor resonance. CONCLUSIONS: Motor resonance towards a humanoid robot, but not a human, display of facial emotion is increased when attention is directed towards judging emotions. SIGNIFICANCE: Artificial agents can be used to assess how factors like anthropomorphism affect neural response to the perception of human actions.

  16. Study on the interaction of artificial and natural food colorants with human serum albumin: A computational point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masone, Diego; Chanforan, Céline

    2015-06-01

    Due to the high amount of artificial food colorants present in infants' diets, their adverse effects have been of major concern among the literature. Artificial food colorants have been suggested to affect children's behavior, being hyperactivity the most common disorder. In this study we compare binding affinities of a group of artificial colorants (sunset yellow, quinoline yellow, carmoisine, allura red and tartrazine) and their natural industrial equivalents (carminic acid, curcumin, peonidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside) to human serum albumin (HSA) by a docking approach and further refinement through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Due to the protein-ligand conformational interface complexity, we used collective variable driven molecular dynamics to refine docking predictions and to score them according to a hydrogen-bond criterion. With this protocol, we were able to rank ligand affinities to HSA and to compare between the studied natural and artificial food additives. Our results show that the five artificial colorants studied bind better to HSA than their equivalent natural options, in terms of their H-bonding network, supporting the hypothesis of their potential risk to human health.

  17. A simple principled approach for modeling and understanding uniform color metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Kevin A G; Webster, Michael A; Whitehead, Lorne A

    2016-03-01

    An important goal in characterizing human color vision is to order color percepts in a way that captures their similarities and differences. This has resulted in the continuing evolution of "uniform color spaces," in which the distances within the space represent the perceptual differences between the stimuli. While these metrics are now very successful in predicting how color percepts are scaled, they do so in largely empirical, ad hoc ways, with limited reference to actual mechanisms of color vision. In this article our aim is to instead begin with general and plausible assumptions about color coding, and then develop a model of color appearance that explicitly incorporates them. We show that many of the features of empirically defined color order systems (those of Munsell, Pantone, NCS, and others) as well as many of the basic phenomena of color perception, emerge naturally from fairly simple principles of color information encoding in the visual system and how it can be optimized for the spectral characteristics of the environment.

  18. Is it the real deal? Perception of virtual characters versus humans: an affective cognitive neuroscience perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline W. ede Borst

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in neuroimaging research support the increased use of naturalistic stimulus material such as film, animations, or androids. These stimuli allow for a better understanding of how the brain processes information in complex situations while maintaining experimental control. While avatars and androids are well suited to study human cognition, they should not be equated to human stimuli. For example, the Uncanny Valley hypothesis theorizes that artificial agents with high human-likeness may evoke feelings of eeriness in the human observer. Here we review if, when, and how the perception of human-like avatars and androids differs from the perception of humans and consider how this influences their utilization as stimulus material in social and affective neuroimaging studies. First, we discuss how the appearance of virtual characters affects perception. When stimuli are morphed across categories from non-human to human, the most ambiguous stimuli, rather than the most human-like stimuli, show prolonged classification times and increased eeriness. Human-like to human stimuli show a positive linear relationship with familiarity. Secondly, we show that expressions of emotions in human-like avatars can be perceived similarly to human emotions, with corresponding behavioral, physiological and neuronal activations, with exception of physical dissimilarities. Subsequently, we consider if and when one perceives differences in action representation by artificial agents versus humans. Motor resonance and predictive coding models may account for empirical findings, such as an interference effect on action for observed human-like, natural moving characters. However, the expansion of these models to explain more complex behavior, such as empathy, still needs to be investigated in more detail. Finally, we broaden our outlook to social interaction, where virtual reality stimuli can be utilized to imitate complex social situations.

  19. Is it the real deal? Perception of virtual characters versus humans: an affective cognitive neuroscience perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Borst, Aline W; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in neuroimaging research support the increased use of naturalistic stimulus material such as film, avatars, or androids. These stimuli allow for a better understanding of how the brain processes information in complex situations while maintaining experimental control. While avatars and androids are well suited to study human cognition, they should not be equated to human stimuli. For example, the uncanny valley hypothesis theorizes that artificial agents with high human-likeness may evoke feelings of eeriness in the human observer. Here we review if, when, and how the perception of human-like avatars and androids differs from the perception of humans and consider how this influences their utilization as stimulus material in social and affective neuroimaging studies. First, we discuss how the appearance of virtual characters affects perception. When stimuli are morphed across categories from non-human to human, the most ambiguous stimuli, rather than the most human-like stimuli, show prolonged classification times and increased eeriness. Human-like to human stimuli show a positive linear relationship with familiarity. Secondly, we show that expressions of emotions in human-like avatars can be perceived similarly to human emotions, with corresponding behavioral, physiological and neuronal activations, with exception of physical dissimilarities. Subsequently, we consider if and when one perceives differences in action representation by artificial agents versus humans. Motor resonance and predictive coding models may account for empirical findings, such as an interference effect on action for observed human-like, natural moving characters. However, the expansion of these models to explain more complex behavior, such as empathy, still needs to be investigated in more detail. Finally, we broaden our outlook to social interaction, where virtual reality stimuli can be utilized to imitate complex social situations.

  20. Tracing the emergence of categorical speech perception in the human auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Moreno, Sylvain; Alain, Claude

    2013-10-01

    Speech perception requires the effortless mapping from smooth, seemingly continuous changes in sound features into discrete perceptual units, a conversion exemplified in the phenomenon of categorical perception. Explaining how/when the human brain performs this acoustic-phonetic transformation remains an elusive problem in current models and theories of speech perception. In previous attempts to decipher the neural basis of speech perception, it is often unclear whether the alleged brain correlates reflect an underlying percept or merely changes in neural activity that covary with parameters of the stimulus. Here, we recorded neuroelectric activity generated at both cortical and subcortical levels of the auditory pathway elicited by a speech vowel continuum whose percept varied categorically from /u/ to /a/. This integrative approach allows us to characterize how various auditory structures code, transform, and ultimately render the perception of speech material as well as dissociate brain responses reflecting changes in stimulus acoustics from those that index true internalized percepts. We find that activity from the brainstem mirrors properties of the speech waveform with remarkable fidelity, reflecting progressive changes in speech acoustics but not the discrete phonetic classes reported behaviorally. In comparison, patterns of late cortical evoked activity contain information reflecting distinct perceptual categories and predict the abstract phonetic speech boundaries heard by listeners. Our findings demonstrate a critical transformation in neural speech representations between brainstem and early auditory cortex analogous to an acoustic-phonetic mapping necessary to generate categorical speech percepts. Analytic modeling demonstrates that a simple nonlinearity accounts for the transformation between early (subcortical) brain activity and subsequent cortical/behavioral responses to speech (>150-200 ms) thereby describing a plausible mechanism by which the

  1. Reinforcement as a mediator of the perception of humans by horses (Equus caballus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Carol; Richard-Yris, Marie-Annick; Henry, Séverine; Fureix, Carole; Nassur, Fouad; Hausberger, Martine

    2010-09-01

    A central question in the interspecific human/animal relationship is how domestic animals perceive humans as a significant element of their environment. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the use of positive or negative reinforcement in horse training may have consequences on the animals' perception of humans, as a positive, negative or neutral element. Two groups of ponies were trained to walk backwards in response to a vocal order using either positive or negative reinforcement. Heart rate monitors and behavioural observations were used to assess the animals' perception of humans on the short (just after training) and long (5 months later) terms. The results showed that the type of reinforcement had a major effect on the subsequent animals' perception of familiar and unfamiliar humans. Negative reinforcement was rapidly associated with an increased emotional state, as revealed by heart rate measurements and behavioural observations (head movements and ears laid back position). Its use led the ponies to seek less contact with humans. On the contrary, ponies trained with positive reinforcement showed an increased interest in humans and sought contact after training. This is especially remarkable as it was reached in a maximum of 5 sessions of 1 to 3 min (i.e. 5 to 15 min) and had lasting effects (visible after 5 months). Even learning was positively influenced by positive reinforcement. Overall, horses seem capable of associating humans to particular experiences and display extended long-term memory abilities.

  2. Higher cortical modulation of pain perception in the human brain: Psychological determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew Cn

    2009-10-01

    Pain perception and its genesis in the human brain have been reviewed recently. In the current article, the reports on pain modulation in the human brain were reviewed from higher cortical regulation, i.e. top-down effect, particularly studied in psychological determinants. Pain modulation can be examined by gene therapy, physical modulation, pharmacological modulation, psychological modulation, and pathophysiological modulation. In psychological modulation, this article examined (a) willed determination, (b) distraction, (c) placebo, (d) hypnosis, (e) meditation, (f) qi-gong, (g) belief, and (h) emotions, respectively, in the brain function for pain modulation. In each, the operational definition, cortical processing, neuroimaging, and pain modulation were systematically deliberated. However, not all studies had featured the brain modulation processing but rather demonstrated potential effects on human pain. In our own studies on the emotional modulation on human pain, we observed that emotions could be induced from music melodies or pictures perception for reduction of tonic human pain, mainly in potentiation of the posterior alpha EEG fields, likely resulted from underneath activities of precuneous in regulation of consciousness, including pain perception. To sum, higher brain functions become the leading edge research in all sciences. How to solve the information bit of thinking and feeling in the brain can be the greatest challenge of human intelligence. Application of higher cortical modulation of human pain and suffering can lead to the progress of social humanity and civilization.

  3. Consumer perception of beneficial effects of probiotics for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers, G T; Bimmel, D; Grevers, D; den Haan, N; Hristova, Y

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, perception and buying behaviour of probiotics. 72 participants in Middelburg, the Netherlands, filled out a detailed questionnaire regarding probiotics and their customer and consumer behaviour. It can be concluded from this study that the concept of probiotics is generally poorly understood. Health-conscious consumers seem to be the group most aware of the correct meaning of the term probiotics. Almost 50% of the participants did not believe that probiotics had any health effect. Independent organisations and/or government agencies appeared to be the preferred source of information on the functionality of probiotics.

  4. The nature and perception of fluctuations in human musical rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Holger; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Fredebohm, Anneke; Hagmayer, York; Nagler, Jan; Witt, Annette; Theis, Fabian; Geisel, Theo

    2012-02-01

    Although human musical performances represent one of the most valuable achievements of mankind, the best musicians perform imperfectly. Musical rhythms are not entirely accurate and thus inevitably deviate from the ideal beat pattern. Nevertheless, computer generated perfect beat patterns are frequently devalued by listeners due to a perceived lack of human touch. Professional audio editing software therefore offers a humanizing feature which artificially generates rhythmic fluctuations. However, the built-in humanizing units are essentially random number generators producing only simple uncorrelated fluctuations. Here, for the first time, we establish long-range fluctuations as an inevitable natural companion of both simple and complex human rhythmic performances [1]. Moreover, we demonstrate that listeners strongly prefer long-range correlated fluctuations in musical rhythms. Thus, the favorable fluctuation type for humanizing interbeat intervals coincides with the one generically inherent in human musical performances. [1] HH et al., PLoS ONE,6,e26457 (2011)

  5. The nature and perception of fluctuations in human musical rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Hennig

    Full Text Available Although human musical performances represent one of the most valuable achievements of mankind, the best musicians perform imperfectly. Musical rhythms are not entirely accurate and thus inevitably deviate from the ideal beat pattern. Nevertheless, computer generated perfect beat patterns are frequently devalued by listeners due to a perceived lack of human touch. Professional audio editing software therefore offers a humanizing feature which artificially generates rhythmic fluctuations. However, the built-in humanizing units are essentially random number generators producing only simple uncorrelated fluctuations. Here, for the first time, we establish long-range fluctuations as an inevitable natural companion of both simple and complex human rhythmic performances. Moreover, we demonstrate that listeners strongly prefer long-range correlated fluctuations in musical rhythms. Thus, the favorable fluctuation type for humanizing interbeat intervals coincides with the one generically inherent in human musical performances.

  6. Color sensing under microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Debesh

    2013-09-01

    Inspired by recent results of artificial color due to Caulfield, we carry out intuitive experimental investigations on color sensing under microwave illumination. Experiemnts have been carried out using a Gunn diode as the microwave source and a microwave diode as a detector. More precise experimental studies have also been carried out utilizing a vector network analyzer. Preliminary results of the experiments validate the feasibility of sensing and discriminating otherwise visual colors under microwave illumination. Caulfield's presumption possibly paves the way for artificial color perception using microwaves.

  7. Color-induced graph colorings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive treatment of color-induced graph colorings is presented in this book, emphasizing vertex colorings induced by edge colorings. The coloring concepts described in this book depend not only on the property required of the initial edge coloring and the kind of objects serving as colors, but also on the property demanded of the vertex coloring produced. For each edge coloring introduced, background for the concept is provided, followed by a presentation of results and open questions dealing with this topic. While the edge colorings discussed can be either proper or unrestricted, the resulting vertex colorings are either proper colorings or rainbow colorings. This gives rise to a discussion of irregular colorings, strong colorings, modular colorings, edge-graceful colorings, twin edge colorings and binomial colorings. Since many of the concepts described in this book are relatively recent, the audience for this book is primarily mathematicians interested in learning some new areas of graph colorings...

  8. The Nature and Perception of Fluctuations in Human Musical Rhythms

    OpenAIRE

    Holger Hennig; Ragnar Fleischmann; Anneke Fredebohm; York Hagmayer; Jan Nagler; Annette Witt; Theis, Fabian J.; Theo Geisel

    2011-01-01

    Although human musical performances represent one of the most valuable achievements of mankind, the best musicians perform imperfectly. Musical rhythms are not entirely accurate and thus inevitably deviate from the ideal beat pattern. Nevertheless, computer generated perfect beat patterns are frequently devalued by listeners due to a perceived lack of human touch. Professional audio editing software therefore offers a humanizing feature which artificially generates rhythmic fluctuations. Howe...

  9. An integrative framework for the appraisal of coloration in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Darrell J; Herberstein, Marie E; Fleishman, Leo J; Endler, John A; Bennett, Andrew T D; Dyer, Adrian G; Hart, Nathan S; Marshall, Justin; Whiting, Martin J

    2015-06-01

    The world in color presents a dazzling dimension of phenotypic variation. Biological interest in this variation has burgeoned, due to both increased means for quantifying spectral information and heightened appreciation for how animals view the world differently than humans. Effective study of color traits is challenged by how to best quantify visual perception in nonhuman species. This requires consideration of at least visual physiology but ultimately also the neural processes underlying perception. Our knowledge of color perception is founded largely on the principles gained from human psychophysics that have proven generalizable based on comparative studies in select animal models. Appreciation of these principles, their empirical foundation, and the reasonable limits to their applicability is crucial to reaching informed conclusions in color research. In this article, we seek a common intellectual basis for the study of color in nature. We first discuss the key perceptual principles, namely, retinal photoreception, sensory channels, opponent processing, color constancy, and receptor noise. We then draw on this basis to inform an analytical framework driven by the research question in relation to identifiable viewers and visual tasks of interest. Consideration of the limits to perceptual inference guides two primary decisions: first, whether a sensory-based approach is necessary and justified and, second, whether the visual task refers to perceptual distance or discriminability. We outline informed approaches in each situation and discuss key challenges for future progress, focusing particularly on how animals perceive color. Given that animal behavior serves as both the basic unit of psychophysics and the ultimate driver of color ecology/evolution, behavioral data are critical to reconciling knowledge across the schools of color research.

  10. Perceptual evaluation of colorized nighttime imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toet, Alexander; de Jong, Michael J.; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Hooge, Ignace T. C.

    2014-02-01

    We recently presented a color transform that produces fused nighttime imagery with a realistic color appearance (Hogervorst and Toet, 2010, Information Fusion, 11-2, 69-77). To assess the practical value of this transform we performed two experiments in which we compared human scene recognition for monochrome intensified (II) and longwave infrared (IR) imagery, and color daylight (REF) and fused multispectral (CF) imagery. First we investigated the amount of detail observers can perceive in a short time span (the gist of the scene). Participants watched brief image presentations and provided a full report of what they had seen. Our results show that REF and CF imagery yielded the highest precision and recall measures, while both II and IR imagery yielded significantly lower values. This suggests that observers have more difficulty extracting information from monochrome than from color imagery. Next, we measured eye fixations of participants who freely explored the images. Although the overall fixation behavior was similar across image modalities, the order in which certain details were fixated varied. Persons and vehicles were typically fixated first in REF, CF and IR imagery, while they were fixated later in II imagery. In some cases, color remapping II imagery and fusion with IR imagery restored the fixation order of these image details. We conclude that color remapping can yield enhanced scene perception compared to conventional monochrome nighttime imagery, and may be deployed to tune multispectral image representation such that the resulting fixation behavior resembles the fixation behavior for daylight color imagery.

  11. Gamma oscillations in human primary somatosensory cortex reflect pain perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Gross

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Successful behavior requires selection and preferred processing of relevant sensory information. The cortical representation of relevant sensory information has been related to neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency band. Pain is of invariably high behavioral relevance and, thus, nociceptive stimuli receive preferred processing. Here, by using magnetoencephalography, we show that selective nociceptive stimuli induce gamma oscillations between 60 and 95 Hz in primary somatosensory cortex. Amplitudes of pain-induced gamma oscillations vary with objective stimulus intensity and subjective pain intensity. However, around pain threshold, perceived stimuli yielded stronger gamma oscillations than unperceived stimuli of equal stimulus intensity. These results show that pain induces gamma oscillations in primary somatosensory cortex that are particularly related to the subjective perception of pain. Our findings support the hypothesis that gamma oscillations are related to the internal representation of behaviorally relevant stimuli that should receive preferred processing.

  12. The chemical history of color

    CERN Document Server

    Orna, Mary Virginia

    2014-01-01

    In this brief, Mary Virginia Orna details the history of color from the chemical point of view. Beginning with the first recorded uses of color and ending in the development of our modern chemical industry, this rich, yet concise exposition shows us how color pervades every aspect of our lives. Our consciousness, our perceptions, our useful appliances and tools, our playthings, our entertainment, our health, and our diagnostic apparatus - all involve color and are based in no small part on chemistry.

  13. Students conceptions of Basic General Education (14 – 15 years old about the nature and perception of color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina M. Bravo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The ideas of a group of ninth grade Basic General Education students are analized. (14 – 15 years old. The mentioned ideas are related to nature and perception of colour. This was possible after having – the students – participated in didactic proposals that approached the referred theme, once they achieved the entrance to Second Cycle. These ideas are characterized according to underlying ontological, conceptual and epistemological principles, as well as in relation to reasoning schemes associated with them. The consistence and coherence of the responses given by these students to a multiple choice test, and a questionnaire containing open problems, are evaluated. Most of the students present ideas about colour coherent with science, being able to develop explanations that relate an important number of variables, properly.

  14. Perceptual Dominant Color Extraction by Multidimensional Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiranyaz, Serkan; Uhlmann (Eurasip Member), Stefan; Ince, Turker; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2010-12-01

    Color is the major source of information widely used in image analysis and content-based retrieval. Extracting dominant colors that are prominent in a visual scenery is of utmost importance since the human visual system primarily uses them for perception and similarity judgment. In this paper, we address dominant color extraction as a dynamic clustering problem and use techniques based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for finding optimal (number of) dominant colors in a given color space, distance metric and a proper validity index function. The first technique, so-called Multidimensional (MD) PSO can seek both positional and dimensional optima. Nevertheless, MD PSO is still susceptible to premature convergence due to lack of divergence. To address this problem we then apply Fractional Global Best Formation (FGBF) technique. In order to extract perceptually important colors and to further improve the discrimination factor for a better clustering performance, an efficient color distance metric, which uses a fuzzy model for computing color (dis-) similarities over HSV (or HSL) color space is proposed. The comparative evaluations against MPEG-7 dominant color descriptor show the superiority of the proposed technique.

  15. Perceptual Dominant Color Extraction by Multidimensional Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncef Gabbouj

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Color is the major source of information widely used in image analysis and content-based retrieval. Extracting dominant colors that are prominent in a visual scenery is of utmost importance since the human visual system primarily uses them for perception and similarity judgment. In this paper, we address dominant color extraction as a dynamic clustering problem and use techniques based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO for finding optimal (number of dominant colors in a given color space, distance metric and a proper validity index function. The first technique, so-called Multidimensional (MD PSO can seek both positional and dimensional optima. Nevertheless, MD PSO is still susceptible to premature convergence due to lack of divergence. To address this problem we then apply Fractional Global Best Formation (FGBF technique. In order to extract perceptually important colors and to further improve the discrimination factor for a better clustering performance, an efficient color distance metric, which uses a fuzzy model for computing color (dis- similarities over HSV (or HSL color space is proposed. The comparative evaluations against MPEG-7 dominant color descriptor show the superiority of the proposed technique.

  16. The shaping of social perception by stimulus and knowledge cues to human animacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Emily S; Ramsey, Richard; Liepelt, Roman; Prinz, Wolfgang; de C Hamilton, Antonia F

    2016-01-19

    Although robots are becoming an ever-growing presence in society, we do not hold the same expectations for robots as we do for humans, nor do we treat them the same. As such, the ability to recognize cues to human animacy is fundamental for guiding social interactions. We review literature that demonstrates cortical networks associated with person perception, action observation and mentalizing are sensitive to human animacy information. In addition, we show that most prior research has explored stimulus properties of artificial agents (humanness of appearance or motion), with less investigation into knowledge cues (whether an agent is believed to have human or artificial origins). Therefore, currently little is known about the relationship between stimulus and knowledge cues to human animacy in terms of cognitive and brain mechanisms. Using fMRI, an elaborate belief manipulation, and human and robot avatars, we found that knowledge cues to human animacy modulate engagement of person perception and mentalizing networks, while stimulus cues to human animacy had less impact on social brain networks. These findings demonstrate that self-other similarities are not only grounded in physical features but are also shaped by prior knowledge. More broadly, as artificial agents fulfil increasingly social roles, a challenge for roboticists will be to manage the impact of pre-conceived beliefs while optimizing human-like design.

  17. Lecture Classes in Human Anatomy: The Students’ Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Maitreyee; Roy, Hironmoy; Ghosh, Anasuya; Tapadar, Arunabha; Chowdhury, Subhramoy; Mukherjee, Pranab; Jana, Tapan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The human anatomy, or in brief, the body structure has fascinated man for ages. Due to the information explosion and the increase in specializations, this knowledge is available in a very sketchy manner in high school biology courses. The first comprehensive course on the human anatomy is taught to the first year medical students in medical colleges. This is in keeping with the regulations of the Medical Council of India. The anatomy lecture classes occupy a considerable time of...

  18. Explicit encoding of multimodal percepts by single neurons in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Kraskov, Alexander; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2009-08-11

    Different pictures of Marilyn Monroe can evoke the same percept, even if greatly modified as in Andy Warhol's famous portraits. But how does the brain recognize highly variable pictures as the same percept? Various studies have provided insights into how visual information is processed along the "ventral pathway," via both single-cell recordings in monkeys and functional imaging in humans. Interestingly, in humans, the same "concept" of Marilyn Monroe can be evoked with other stimulus modalities, for instance by hearing or reading her name. Brain imaging studies have identified cortical areas selective to voices and visual word forms. However, how visual, text, and sound information can elicit a unique percept is still largely unknown. By using presentations of pictures and of spoken and written names, we show that (1) single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond selectively to representations of the same individual across different sensory modalities; (2) the degree of multimodal invariance increases along the hierarchical structure within the MTL; and (3) such neuronal representations can be generated within less than a day or two. These results demonstrate that single neurons can encode percepts in an explicit, selective, and invariant manner, even if evoked by different sensory modalities.

  19. Color-coordinate system from a 13th-century account of rainbows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Hannah E; Anderson, Philip S; Dinkova-Bruun, Greti; Fosbury, Robert A E; Gasper, Giles E M; Laven, Philip; McLeish, Tom C B; Panti, Cecilia; Tanner, Brian K

    2014-04-01

    We present a new analysis of Robert Grosseteste's account of color in his treatise De iride (On the Rainbow), dating from the early 13th century. The work explores color within the 3D framework set out in Grosseteste's De colore [see J. Opt. Soc. Am. A29, A346 (2012)], but now links the axes of variation to observable properties of rainbows. We combine a modern understanding of the physics of rainbows and of human color perception to resolve the linguistic ambiguities of the medieval text and to interpret Grosseteste's key terms.

  20. Blue eye color in humans may be caused by a perfectly associated founder mutation in a regulatory element located within the HERC2 gene inhibiting OCA2 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, Hans; Troelsen, Jesper; Boyd, Mette

    2008-01-01

    The human eye color is a quantitative trait displaying multifactorial inheritance. Several studies have shown that the OCA2 locus is the major contributor to the human eye color variation. By linkage analysis of a large Danish family, we finemapped the blue eye color locus to a 166 Kbp region...... within the HERC2 gene. By association analyses, we identified two SNPs within this region that were perfectly associated with the blue and brown eye colors: rs12913832 and rs1129038. Of these, rs12913832 is located 21.152 bp upstream from the OCA2 promoter in a highly conserved sequence in intron 86...... of HERC2. The brown eye color allele of rs12913832 is highly conserved throughout a number of species. As shown by a Luciferase assays in cell cultures, the element significantly reduces the activity of the OCA2 promoter and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrate that the two alleles bind...

  1. Color signal integration for color discrimination along a long-range apparent motion trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takehiro; Kimura, Hiroto; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to the classical view that fundamental visual attributes such as color and motion are independently processed in the visual system (e.g. Livingstone and Hubel, 1987; Marr, 1982), recent studies have revealed various forms of cross-attribute interactions, such as averaging of color appearance along the motion trajectory of an object (Nishida et al., 2007). In this study, we investigated whether such color signal integration along a motion trajectory can be induced only by motion mechanisms having large receptive fields, without simple integration within direction-selective neurons with small receptive fields, like those in V1. The stimulus consisted of discs with long-range apparent motion along a circular trajectory. The stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between disc presentations controlled the strength of the apparent motion perception. We measured observers' sensitivity in detecting color modulation on the discs. The results showed that the measured sensitivity was lowest at SOAs corresponding to the strongest motion perception. This can be interpreted as follows: color signals were integrated along an apparent motion path, and this integration reduced chromatic sensitivity by averaging color signals. Another experiment that controlled apparent motion perception in a different way also supported this idea. However, this integration effect seemed to be linked to responses of motion detectors for the apparent motion stimuli, not directly to perceptual motion representation in the visual system. These results suggest that the human visual system handles color information from retinal inputs regarding moving objects based not only on a retinotopic coordinate but also on object-based coordinates, even when the moving object yields only long-range apparent motion.

  2. Human wound photogrammetry with low-cost hardware based on automatic calibration of geometry and color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Abin; Haak, Daniel; Jonas, Stephan; Brandenburg, Vincent; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    Photographic documentation and image-based wound assessment is frequently performed in medical diagnostics, patient care, and clinical research. To support quantitative assessment, photographic imaging is based on expensive and high-quality hardware and still needs appropriate registration and calibration. Using inexpensive consumer hardware such as smartphone-integrated cameras, calibration of geometry, color, and contrast is challenging. Some methods involve color calibration using a reference pattern such as a standard color card, which is located manually in the photographs. In this paper, we adopt the lattice detection algorithm by Park et al. from real world to medicine. At first, the algorithm extracts and clusters feature points according to their local intensity patterns. Groups of similar points are fed into a selection process, which tests for suitability as a lattice grid. The group which describes the largest probability of the meshes of a lattice is selected and from it a template for an initial lattice cell is extracted. Then, a Markov random field is modeled. Using the mean-shift belief propagation, the detection of the 2D lattice is solved iteratively as a spatial tracking problem. Least-squares geometric calibration of projective distortions and non-linear color calibration in RGB space is supported by 35 corner points of 24 color patches, respectively. The method is tested on 37 photographs taken from the German Calciphylaxis registry, where non-standardized photographic documentation is collected nationwide from all contributing trial sites. In all images, the reference card location is correctly identified. At least, 28 out of 35 lattice points were detected, outperforming the SIFT-based approach previously applied. Based on these coordinates, robust geometry and color registration is performed making the photographs comparable for quantitative analysis.

  3. Factors Associated With Body Image Perception Among Brazilian Students From Low Human Development Index Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Thábyta Silva; Barbosa Filho, Valter Cordeiro; Gubert, Fabiane do Amaral; de Almeida, Paulo César; Martins, Mariana Cavalcante; Carvalho, Queliane Gomes da Silva; Costa, Ana Cristina Pereira de Jesus; Vieira, Neiva Francenely Cunha

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate sociodemographic, behavioral, and individual factors associated with body image perception in a sample of adolescents from schools in low Human Development Index areas in Brazil. This cross-sectional study included 609 boys and 573 girls (aged 11-17 years). Body image perception (nine-silhouettes scale) and sociodemographic, behavioral, and individual variables were included. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used. Most boys (76.9%) and girls (77.5%) were dissatisfied with their body image. Body mass index status and healthy body image evaluation were significantly associated with body image dissatisfaction in both boys and girls ( p body image dissatisfaction only in boys ( p = .035). Education and health care focused on body image can pay special attention to young people from vulnerable areas with unhealthy nutritional status and focus on strategies that enable improving the perception of a healthy body and a healthy diet.

  4. The extreme relativity of perception: A new contextual effect modulates human resolving power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdar, Gal; Ganel, Tzvi; Algom, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The authors report the discovery of a new effect of context that modulates human resolving power with respect to an individual stimulus. They show that the size of the difference threshold or the just noticeable difference around a standard stimulus depends on the range of the other standards tested simultaneously for resolution within the same experimental session. The larger this range, the poorer the resolving power for a given standard. The authors term this effect the range of standards effect (RSE). They establish this result both in the visual domain for the perception of linear extent, and in the somatosensory domain for the perception of weight. They discuss the contingent nature of stimulus resolution in perception and psychophysics and contrast it with the immunity to contextual influences of visually guided action. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Color Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rose in full bloom. If you have a color vision defect, you may see these colors differently than most people. There are three main kinds of color vision defects. Red-green color vision defects are the most ...

  6. The color "fruit": object memories defined by color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David E; Pearson, Joel; Khuu, Sieu K

    2013-01-01

    Most fruits and other highly color-diagnostic objects have color as a central aspect of their identity, which can facilitate detection and visual recognition. It has been theorized that there may be a large amount of overlap between the neural representations of these objects and processing involved in color perception. In accordance with this theory we sought to determine if the recognition of highly color diagnostic fruit objects could be facilitated by the visual presentation of their known color associates. In two experiments we show that color associate priming is possible, but contingent upon multiple factors. Color priming was found to be maximally effective for the most highly color diagnostic fruits, when low spatial-frequency information was present in the image, and when determination of the object's specific identity, not merely its category, was required. These data illustrate the importance of color for determining the identity of certain objects, and support the theory that object knowledge involves sensory specific systems.

  7. Energy landscape and dynamics of brain activity during human bistable perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Masuda, Naoki; Megumi, Fukuda; Kanai, Ryota; Rees, Geraint

    2014-08-28

    Individual differences in the structure of parietal and prefrontal cortex predict the stability of bistable visual perception. However, the mechanisms linking such individual differences in brain structures to behaviour remain elusive. Here we demonstrate a systematic relationship between the dynamics of brain activity, cortical structure and behaviour underpinning bistable perception. Using fMRI in humans, we find that the activity dynamics during bistable perception are well described as fluctuating between three spatially distributed energy minimums: visual-area-dominant, frontal-area-dominant and intermediate states. Transitions between these energy minimums predicted behaviour, with participants whose brain activity tend to reflect the visual-area-dominant state exhibiting more stable perception and those whose activity transits to frontal-area-dominant states reporting more frequent perceptual switches. Critically, these brain activity dynamics are correlated with individual differences in grey matter volume of the corresponding brain areas. Thus, individual differences in the large-scale dynamics of brain activity link focal brain structure with bistable perception.

  8. Dorsal striatal dopamine, food preference and health perception in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallace, D.L.; Aarts, E.; Dang, L.C.; Greer, S.M.; Jagust, W.J.; D'Esposito, M.

    2014-01-01

    To date, few studies have explored the neurochemical mechanisms supporting individual differences in food preference in humans. Here we investigate how dorsal striatal dopamine, as measured by the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [(18)F]fluorometatyrosine (FMT), correlates with food-related

  9. Beginning Teachers' Perceptions of School Human Resource Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Human resource (HR) management is defined as the sum of activities employed by an organization to attract, develop, and retain people with the appropriate knowledge and skills for effectively and efficiently achieving organizational goals. An understanding of the HR practices in schools is important, as the assembly of a team of qualified and…

  10. Beginning Teachers' Perceptions of School Human Resource Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Human resource (HR) management is defined as the sum of activities employed by an organization to attract, develop, and retain people with the appropriate knowledge and skills for effectively and efficiently achieving organizational goals. An understanding of the HR practices in schools is important, as the assembly of a team of qualified and…

  11. Engineering Data Compendium. Human Perception and Performance. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Breitmeyer, B. G. (1975). Sim- cies to sinusoidal gratings. Vision human observers: A probabilistic pie reaction time as a measure of Research. 16...oscilloscope; viewed at optical infinity through a plano - convex lens (153 mm diameter, 340 mm focal length) one focal length from display • Patch wom

  12. An approach to integrate the human vision psychology and perception knowledge into image enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Huang, Xifeng; Ping, Jiang

    2009-07-01

    Image enhancement is very important image preprocessing technology especially when the image is captured in the poor imaging condition or dealing with the high bits image. The benefactor of image enhancement either may be a human observer or a computer vision process performing some kind of higher-level image analysis, such as target detection or scene understanding. One of the main objects of the image enhancement is getting a high dynamic range image and a high contrast degree image for human perception or interpretation. So, it is very necessary to integrate either empirical or statistical human vision psychology and perception knowledge into image enhancement. The human vision psychology and perception claims that humans' perception and response to the intensity fluctuation δu of visual signals are weighted by the background stimulus u, instead of being plainly uniform. There are three main laws: Weber's law, Weber- Fechner's law and Stevens's Law that describe this phenomenon in the psychology and psychophysics. This paper will integrate these three laws of the human vision psychology and perception into a very popular image enhancement algorithm named Adaptive Plateau Equalization (APE). The experiments were done on the high bits star image captured in night scene and the infrared-red image both the static image and the video stream. For the jitter problem in the video stream, this algorithm reduces this problem using the difference between the current frame's plateau value and the previous frame's plateau value to correct the current frame's plateau value. Considering the random noise impacts, the pixel value mapping process is not only depending on the current pixel but the pixels in the window surround the current pixel. The window size is usually 3×3. The process results of this improved algorithms is evaluated by the entropy analysis and visual perception analysis. The experiments' result showed the improved APE algorithms improved the quality of the

  13. A chamber-experiment investigation of the interaction between perceptions of noise and odor in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhiwei; Kjaergaard, Søren K; Mølhave, Lars

    2003-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate human comfort and health effects following exposure to noise and odor and to explore the interaction between perceptions of noise and odor in humans. Nine healthy subjects were randomly exposed to noise, odor, and their combination, in a 3 x 3 Latin square design for 80 min in an exposure chamber. Continuous noise was broadcast at an average level of 75 dBA by a loudspeaker, and odor was provided by furfurylmercaptan (a coffee-aroma constituent). A standardized 28-item questionnaire, together with mood-scale ratings, nasal dimensions by acoustic rhinometry, addition tests for distraction, and skin humidity, were performed before and at the end of exposure. In the questionnaire investigation, the perceived "sound level" was significantly affected by noise and the combined exposures, while "odor intensity", "air quality", and "need more ventilation" was significantly affected by odor and the combined exposures. Perceptions of symptoms became worse with increasing exposure time, such as perceived "dry nose" and "sleepiness" by odor and combined exposures, "headache" by noise, "concentration difficulty", "general well being", and "stressed by being in the chamber" by noise, odor and combined exposures. In addition, the occurrence of interactions was analyzed by comparison of the ratings of perceived "sound level", "odor intensity", "air quality", and "need more ventilation" during the combined exposure with two single exposures. Insignificant interaction was found but it indicated a decreased tendency to perceptions of discomfort from "odor intensity", "air quality", and "need for more ventilation" when noise was added to odor exposure. It may be concluded that noise and odor cause discomfort in humans. Moreover, the study might indicate that additions of noise reduce (mask) the perception of discomfort from odor, and additions of odor have no or little affect on the perception of noise.

  14. The nature of colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Pos, Osvaldo

    2002-06-01

    Color is a visible aspect of objects and lights, and as such is an objective characteristic of our phenomenal world. Correspondingly also objects and lights are objective, although their subjectivity cannot be disregarded since they belong to our phenomenal world. The distinction between perception and sensation deals with colors seen either in complex displays or in isolation. Reality of colors is apparently challenged by virtual reality, while virtual reality is a good example of what colors are. It seems difficult to combine that aspect of reality colors have in our experience and the concept that colors represent something in the external environment: the distinction between stimulation and perceived object is crucial for understanding the relationships between phenomenal world and physical reality. A modern concept of isomorphism seems useful in interpreting the role of colors. The relationship between the psychological structure of colors and the physical stimulation is enlightened by the analysis of pseudocolors. The perceptual, subjective characteristics of colors go along with the subjectivity of scientific concepts. Colors, emotions, and concepts are all in some people's mind: none of them is independent of the subject mind. Nevertheless they can be communicated from person to person by an appropriate scientific terminology.

  15. Comparison of two metrological approaches for the prediction of human haptic perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Annika; Frank, Daniel; Vondenhoff, Thomas; Schmitt, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Haptic perception is regarded as a key component of customer appreciation and acceptance for various products. The prediction of customers’ haptic perception is of interest both during product development and production phases. This paper presents the results of a multivariate analysis between perceived roughness and texture related surface measurements, to examine whether perceived roughness can be accurately predicted using technical measurements. Studies have shown that standardized measurement parameters, such as the roughness coefficients (e.g. Rz or Ra), do not show a one-dimensional linear correlation with the human perception (of roughness). Thus, an alternative measurement method was compared to standard measurements of roughness, in regard to its capability of predicting perceived roughness through technical measurements. To estimate perceived roughness, an experimental study was conducted in which 102 subjects evaluated four sets of 12 different geometrical surface structures regarding their relative perceived roughness. The two different metrological procedures were examined in relation to their capability to predict the perceived roughness of the subjects stated within the study. The standardized measurements of the surface roughness were made using a structured light 3D-scanner. As an alternative method, surface induced vibrations were measured by a finger-like sensor during robot-controlled traverse over a surface. The presented findings provide a better understanding of the predictability of human haptic perception using technical measurements.

  16. Human Perceptions Mirror Realities of Carnivore Attack Risk for Livestock: Implications for Mitigating Human-Carnivore Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer R B; Jhala, Yadvendradev V; Schmitz, Oswald J

    2016-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflict is challenging to quantify because it is shaped by both the realities and people's perceptions of carnivore threats. Whether perceptions align with realities can have implications for conflict mitigation: misalignments can lead to heightened and indiscriminant persecution of carnivores whereas alignments can offer deeper insights into human-carnivore interactions. We applied a landscape-scale spatial analysis of livestock killed by tigers and leopards in India to model and map observed attack risk, and surveyed owners of livestock killed by tigers and leopards for their rankings of threats across habitats to map perceived attack risk. Observed tiger risk to livestock was greatest near dense forests and at moderate distances from human activity while leopard risk was greatest near open vegetation. People accurately perceived spatial differences between tiger and leopard hunting patterns, expected greater threat in areas with high values of observed risk for both carnivores. Owners' perception of threats largely did not depend on environmental conditions surrounding their village (spatial location, dominant land-use or observed carnivore risk). Surveys revealed that owners who previously lost livestock to carnivores used more livestock protection methods than those who had no prior losses, and that owners who had recently lost livestock for the first time expressed greater interest in changing their protection methods than those who experienced prior losses. Our findings suggest that in systems where realities and perceptions of carnivore risk align, conservation programs and policies can optimize conservation outcomes by (1) improving the effectiveness of livestock protection methods and (2) working with owners who have recently lost livestock and are most willing to invest effort in adapting protection strategies to mitigate human-carnivore conflict.

  17. Tactile perception and working memory in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassihi, Arash; Akrami, Athena; Esmaeili, Vahid; Diamond, Mathew E

    2014-02-11

    Primates can store sensory stimulus parameters in working memory for subsequent manipulation, but until now, there has been no demonstration of this capacity in rodents. Here we report tactile working memory in rats. Each stimulus is a vibration, generated as a series of velocity values sampled from a normal distribution. To perform the task, the rat positions its whiskers to receive two such stimuli, "base" and "comparison," separated by a variable delay. It then judges which stimulus had greater velocity SD. In analogous experiments, humans compare two vibratory stimuli on the fingertip. We demonstrate that the ability of rats to hold base stimulus information (for up to 8 s) and their acuity in assessing stimulus differences overlap the performance demonstrated by humans. This experiment highlights the ability of rats to perceive the statistical structure of vibrations and reveals their previously unknown capacity to store sensory information in working memory.

  18. Tactile perception and working memory in rats and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassihi, Arash; Akrami, Athena; Esmaeili, Vahid; Diamond, Mathew E.

    2014-01-01

    Primates can store sensory stimulus parameters in working memory for subsequent manipulation, but until now, there has been no demonstration of this capacity in rodents. Here we report tactile working memory in rats. Each stimulus is a vibration, generated as a series of velocity values sampled from a normal distribution. To perform the task, the rat positions its whiskers to receive two such stimuli, “base” and “comparison,” separated by a variable delay. It then judges which stimulus had greater velocity SD. In analogous experiments, humans compare two vibratory stimuli on the fingertip. We demonstrate that the ability of rats to hold base stimulus information (for up to 8 s) and their acuity in assessing stimulus differences overlap the performance demonstrated by humans. This experiment highlights the ability of rats to perceive the statistical structure of vibrations and reveals their previously unknown capacity to store sensory information in working memory. PMID:24449850

  19. Brain imaging reveals neuronal circuitry underlying the crow's perception of human faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzluff, John M; Miyaoka, Robert; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2012-09-25

    Crows pay close attention to people and can remember specific faces for several years after a single encounter. In mammals, including humans, faces are evaluated by an integrated neural system involving the sensory cortex, limbic system, and striatum. Here we test the hypothesis that birds use a similar system by providing an imaging analysis of an awake, wild animal's brain as it performs an adaptive, complex cognitive task. We show that in vivo imaging of crow brain activity during exposure to familiar human faces previously associated with either capture (threatening) or caretaking (caring) activated several brain regions that allow birds to discriminate, associate, and remember visual stimuli, including the rostral hyperpallium, nidopallium, mesopallium, and lateral striatum. Perception of threatening faces activated circuitry including amygdalar, thalamic, and brainstem regions, known in humans and other vertebrates to be related to emotion, motivation, and conditioned fear learning. In contrast, perception of caring faces activated motivation and striatal regions. In our experiments and in nature, when perceiving a threatening face, crows froze and fixed their gaze (decreased blink rate), which was associated with activation of brain regions known in birds to regulate perception, attention, fear, and escape behavior. These findings indicate that, similar to humans, crows use sophisticated visual sensory systems to recognize faces and modulate behavioral responses by integrating visual information with expectation and emotion. Our approach has wide applicability and potential to improve our understanding of the neural basis for animal behavior.

  20. Brain imaging reveals neuronal circuitry underlying the crow’s perception of human faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzluff, John M.; Miyaoka, Robert; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J.

    2012-01-01

    Crows pay close attention to people and can remember specific faces for several years after a single encounter. In mammals, including humans, faces are evaluated by an integrated neural system involving the sensory cortex, limbic system, and striatum. Here we test the hypothesis that birds use a similar system by providing an imaging analysis of an awake, wild animal’s brain as it performs an adaptive, complex cognitive task. We show that in vivo imaging of crow brain activity during exposure to familiar human faces previously associated with either capture (threatening) or caretaking (caring) activated several brain regions that allow birds to discriminate, associate, and remember visual stimuli, including the rostral hyperpallium, nidopallium, mesopallium, and lateral striatum. Perception of threatening faces activated circuitry including amygdalar, thalamic, and brainstem regions, known in humans and other vertebrates to be related to emotion, motivation, and conditioned fear learning. In contrast, perception of caring faces activated motivation and striatal regions. In our experiments and in nature, when perceiving a threatening face, crows froze and fixed their gaze (decreased blink rate), which was associated with activation of brain regions known in birds to regulate perception, attention, fear, and escape behavior. These findings indicate that, similar to humans, crows use sophisticated visual sensory systems to recognize faces and modulate behavioral responses by integrating visual information with expectation and emotion. Our approach has wide applicability and potential to improve our understanding of the neural basis for animal behavior. PMID:22984177

  1. Temporal sensitivity. [time dependent human perception of visual stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1986-01-01

    Human visual temporal sensitivity is examined. The stimuli used to measure temporal sensitivity are described and the linear systems theory is reviewed in terms of temporal sensitivity. A working model which represents temporal sensitivity is proposed. The visibility of a number of temporal wave forms, sinusoids, rectangular pulses, and pulse pairs, is analyzed. The relation between spatial and temporal effects is studied. Temporal variations induced by image motion and the effects of light adaptation on temporal sensitivity are considered.

  2. Understanding Human Perception of Building Categories in Virtual 3d Cities - a User Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutzauer, P.; Becker, S.; Niese, T.; Deussen, O.; Fritsch, D.

    2016-06-01

    Virtual 3D cities are becoming increasingly important as a means of visually communicating diverse urban-related information. To get a deeper understanding of a human's cognitive experience of virtual 3D cities, this paper presents a user study on the human ability to perceive building categories (e.g. residential home, office building, building with shops etc.) from geometric 3D building representations. The study reveals various dependencies between geometric properties of the 3D representations and the perceptibility of the building categories. Knowledge about which geometries are relevant, helpful or obstructive for perceiving a specific building category is derived. The importance and usability of such knowledge is demonstrated based on a perception-guided 3D building abstraction process.

  3. Characterizing noise in nonhuman vocalizations: Acoustic analysis and human perception of barks by coyotes and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riede, Tobias; Mitchell, Brian R.; Tokuda, Isao; Owren, Michael J.

    2005-07-01

    Measuring noise as a component of mammalian vocalizations is of interest because of its potential relevance to the communicative function. However, methods for characterizing and quantifying noise are less well established than methods applicable to harmonically structured aspects of signals. Using barks of coyotes and domestic dogs, we compared six acoustic measures and studied how they are related to human perception of noisiness. Measures of harmonic-to-noise-ratio (HNR), percent voicing, and shimmer were found to be the best predictors of perceptual rating by human listeners. Both acoustics and perception indicated that noisiness was similar across coyote and dog barks, but within each species there was significant variation among the individual vocalizers. The advantages and disadvantages of the various measures are discussed.

  4. Community perceptions of human excreta as fertilizer in peri-urban agriculture in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariwah, Simon; Drangert, Jan-Olof

    2011-08-01

    Although human excreta contain the necessary nutrients for plant growth, local authorities in Ghana spend huge sums of money to dispose them as waste. Reusing excreta for agricultural purposes saves expenditure for chemical fertilizers, improves soil fertility, reduces poverty and ensures food security. People's attitudes and perceptions about excreta vary between cultures and even within specific cultures. This study aimed to explore attitudes and perceptions among a peri-urban agricultural community towards sanitized human excreta and its use. The study adopted an exploratory design and collected data from 154 randomly selected households using questionnaires and focus group discussions. It was found that there is a general negative attitude to fresh excreta and the handling of it. However, the residents accept that excreta can be used as fertilizer, but they are not willing to use it on their own crops or consume crops fertilized with excreta. The study recommends open discussions in the community for a successful implementation of ecological sanitation.

  5. Demonstration of brain noise on human EEG signals in perception of bistable images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Kurovskaya, Maria K.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2016-03-01

    In this report we studied human brain activity in the case of bistable visual perception. We proposed a new approach for quantitative characterization of this activity based on analysis of EEG oscillatory patterns and evoked potentials. Accordingly to theoretical background, obtained experimental EEG data and results of its analysis we studied a characteristics of brain activity during decision-making. Also we have shown that decisionmaking process has the special patterns on the EEG data.

  6. Dorsal striatal dopamine, food preference and health perception in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Deanna L; Aarts, Esther; Dang, Linh C; Greer, Stephanie M; Jagust, William J; D'Esposito, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To date, few studies have explored the neurochemical mechanisms supporting individual differences in food preference in humans. Here we investigate how dorsal striatal dopamine, as measured by the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [(18)F]fluorometatyrosine (FMT), correlates with food-related decision-making, as well as body mass index (BMI) in 16 healthy-weight to moderately obese individuals. We find that lower PET FMT dopamine synthesis binding potential correlates with higher BMI, greater preference for perceived "healthy" foods, but also greater healthiness ratings for food items. These findings further substantiate the role of dorsal striatal dopamine in food-related behaviors and shed light on the complexity of individual differences in food preference.

  7. Neural Activity Patterns in the Human Brain Reflect Tactile Stickiness Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junsuk; Yeon, Jiwon; Ryu, Jaekyun; Park, Jang-Yeon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2017-01-01

    Our previous human fMRI study found brain activations correlated with tactile stickiness perception using the uni-variate general linear model (GLM) (Yeon et al., 2017). Here, we conducted an in-depth investigation on neural correlates of sticky sensations by employing a multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) on the same dataset. In particular, we statistically compared multi-variate neural activities in response to the three groups of sticky stimuli: A supra-threshold group including a set of sticky stimuli that evoked vivid sticky perception; an infra-threshold group including another set of sticky stimuli that barely evoked sticky perception; and a sham group including acrylic stimuli with no physically sticky property. Searchlight MVPAs were performed to search for local activity patterns carrying neural information of stickiness perception. Similar to the uni-variate GLM results, significant multi-variate neural activity patterns were identified in postcentral gyrus, subcortical (basal ganglia and thalamus), and insula areas (insula and adjacent areas). Moreover, MVPAs revealed that activity patterns in posterior parietal cortex discriminated the perceptual intensities of stickiness, which was not present in the uni-variate analysis. Next, we applied a principal component analysis (PCA) to the voxel response patterns within identified clusters so as to find low-dimensional neural representations of stickiness intensities. Follow-up clustering analyses clearly showed separate neural grouping configurations between the Supra- and Infra-threshold groups. Interestingly, this neural categorization was in line with the perceptual grouping pattern obtained from the psychophysical data. Our findings thus suggest that different stickiness intensities would elicit distinct neural activity patterns in the human brain and may provide a neural basis for the perception and categorization of tactile stickiness. PMID:28936171

  8. Human reaction and risk perception to catastrophic events: a psycho-social and cultural perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthakur, M. [Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Social Science and Technology Management, Trondheim (Norway)

    1998-07-01

    Catastrophes of various kinds occur worldwide inflicting major human suffering, more so in the less privileged regions of the world. Human beings react differently to different traumatic situations and to the threat of an event in spite of man common underlying factors. Psychological reactions to catastrophic natural events like flooding on the perception of risk of flooding across various communities thus becomes an interesting study. Economic situation, lack of knowledge and resources are assumed to give a totally different perspective to reactions and perception of risk and its interpretation specially in an underprivileged country like India, compared to other developed countries. For the proposed session, the results of a study carried out in India will be presented. This includes reactions and responses of individuals and general public affected by flooding and their perceptions of risk of flooding. The study also focuses on a comparison between the people affected and at risk of flooding. Socio-cultural values, religion and superstitions, common beliefs and expectations from authorities will be studied as underlying variables, to what extent they might have an impact on the behavioral pattern of an individual in a situation and the perception of oncoming risk. A sizeable number of the Indian population resides in areas, which are generally affected by flooding or highly prone to flooding. Could perceptions vary among individuals within the society or is it simply poverty and unaffordability that drive these people info such hazardous areas? Lack of consciousness may seem to be an important variable, but what really matters and needs to be looked into is how threatened they actually feel. (author)

  9. Brain regions involved in human movement perception: a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Beaton, Susan; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2012-02-01

    Face, hands, and body movements are powerful signals essential for social interactions. In the last 2 decades, a large number of brain imaging studies have explored the neural correlates of the perception of these signals. Formal synthesis is crucially needed, however, to extract the key circuits involved in human motion perception across the variety of paradigms and stimuli that have been used. Here, we used the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis approach with random effect analysis. We performed meta-analyses on three classes of biological motion: movement of the whole body, hands, and face. Additional analyses of studies of static faces or body stimuli and sub-analyses grouping experiments as a function of their control stimuli or task employed allowed us to identify main effects of movements and forms perception, as well as effects of task demand. In addition to specific features, all conditions showed convergence in occipito-temporal and fronto-parietal regions, but with different peak location and extent. The conjunction of the three ALE maps revealed convergence in all categories in a region of the right posterior superior temporal sulcus as well as in a bilateral region at the junction between middle temporal and lateral occipital gyri. Activation in these regions was not a function of attentional demand and was significant also when controlling for non-specific motion perception. This quantitative synthesis points towards a special role for posterior superior temporal sulcus for integrating human movement percept, and supports a specific representation for body parts in middle temporal, fusiform, precentral, and parietal areas.

  10. Frequency correlates in grapheme-color synaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeli, Gian; Esslen, Michaela; Jäncke, Lutz

    2007-09-01

    Individuals with synaesthesia experience certain stimuli in more than one sensory modality. Most common is the linkage of letters and digits (graphemes) to colors. Whereas synaesthesia might be partly genetically determined, the linkages to specific colors are assumed to be learned. We present a systematic statistical analysis of synaesthetic color perception based on subjects' reproduction of individual colors for each grapheme, instead of simple verbal categorizations. The statistical analysis revealed that the color perceptions, measured with the HSL (hue, saturation, and luminance) scale, varied systematically among the different digits and letters. The frequencies of the digits and letters (in the German language) partly explained these systematic variations. However, digit frequency was more strongly related to color perception in the synaesthetes than was letter frequency. The results for digit and letter frequency indicate that experience with graphemes may shape synaesthetic color perception.

  11. Vehicle Real-time Location Based on Visual Perception Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Vehicle recognition system (VRS) plays a very important role in the field of intelligent transportation systems.A novel and intuitive method is proposed for vehicle location.The method we provide for vehicle location is based on human visual perception model technique. The perception color space HSI in this algorithm is adopted.Three color components of a color image and more potential edge patterns are integrated for solving the feature extraction problem.A fast and automatic threshold technique based on human visual perception model is also developed.The vertical edge projection and horizontal edge projection are adopted for locating left-right boundary of vehicle and top-bottom boundary of vehicle, respectively. Very promising experimental results are obtained using real-time vehicle image sequences, which have confirmed that this proposed location vehicle method is efficient and reliable, and its calculation speed meets the needs of the VRS.

  12. Are mirror neurons the basis of speech perception? Evidence from five cases with damage to the purported human mirror system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalsky, Corianne; Love, Tracy; Driscoll, David; Anderson, Steven W; Hickok, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons in macaque has led to a resurrection of motor theories of speech perception. Although the majority of lesion and functional imaging studies have associated perception with the temporal lobes, it has also been proposed that the 'human mirror system', which prominently includes Broca's area, is the neurophysiological substrate of speech perception. Although numerous studies have demonstrated a tight link between sensory and motor speech processes, few have directly assessed the critical prediction of mirror neuron theories of speech perception, namely that damage to the human mirror system should cause severe deficits in speech perception. The present study measured speech perception abilities of patients with lesions involving motor regions in the left posterior frontal lobe and/or inferior parietal lobule (i.e., the proposed human 'mirror system'). Performance was at or near ceiling in patients with fronto-parietal lesions. It is only when the lesion encroaches on auditory regions in the temporal lobe that perceptual deficits are evident. This suggests that 'mirror system' damage does not disrupt speech perception, but rather that auditory systems are the primary substrate for speech perception.

  13. Expanding Dimensionality in Cinema Color: Impacting Observer Metamerism through Multiprimary Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David L.

    Television and cinema display are both trending towards greater ranges and saturation of reproduced colors made possible by near-monochromatic RGB illumination technologies. Through current broadcast and digital cinema standards work, system designs employing laser light sources, narrow-band LED, quantum dots and others are being actively endorsed in promotion of Wide Color Gamut (WCG). Despite artistic benefits brought to creative content producers, spectrally selective excitations of naturally different human color response functions exacerbate variability of observer experience. An exaggerated variation in color-sensing is explicitly counter to the exhaustive controls and calibrations employed in modern motion picture pipelines. Further, singular standard observer summaries of human color vision such as found in the CIE's 1931 and 1964 color matching functions and used extensively in motion picture color management are deficient in recognizing expected human vision variability. Many researchers have confirmed the magnitude of observer metamerism in color matching in both uniform colors and imagery but few have shown explicit color management with an aim of minimized difference in observer perception variability. This research shows that not only can observer metamerism influences be quantitatively predicted and confirmed psychophysically but that intentionally engineered multiprimary displays employing more than three primaries can offer increased color gamut with drastically improved consistency of experience. To this end, a seven-channel prototype display has been constructed based on observer metamerism models and color difference indices derived from the latest color vision demographic research. This display has been further proven in forced-choice paired comparison tests to deliver superior color matching to reference stimuli versus both contemporary standard RGB cinema projection and recently ratified standard laser projection across a large population of

  14. Behind the Looking-Glass: A Review on Human Symmetry Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Sebastian Treder

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The human visual system is highly proficient in extracting bilateral symmetry from visual input. This paper reviews empirical and theoretical work on human symmetry perception with a focus on recent issues such as its neural underpinnings. Symmetry detection is shown to be a versatile, ongoing visual process that interacts with other visual processes. Evidence seems to converge towards the idea that  symmetry detection is subserved by a preprocessing stage involving spatial filters followed by information integration across the visual field in higher-tier cortical areas.

  15. Rhythmic Cognition in Humans and Animals: Distinguishing Meter and Pulse Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Tecumseh eFitch

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a cognitive and comparative perspective on human rhythmic cognition that emphasizes a key distinction between pulse perception and meter perception. Pulse perception involves the extraction of a regular pulse or 'tactus' from a stream of events. Meter perception involves grouping of events into hierarchical trees with differing levels of 'strength', or perceptual prominence. I argue that metrically-structured rhythms are required to either perform or move appropriately to music (e.g. to dance. Rhythms, from this metrical perspective, constitute 'trees in time'. Rhythmic syntax represents a neglected form of musical syntax, and warrants more thorough neuroscientific investigation. The recent literature on animal entrainment clearly demonstrates the capacity to extract the pulse from rhythmic music, and to entrain periodic movements to this pulse, in several parrot species and a California sea lion, and a more limited ability to do so in one chimpanzee. However, the ability of these or other species to infer hierarchical rhythmic trees remains, for the most part, unexplored (with some apparent negative results from macaques. The results from this new animal comparative research, combined with new methods to explore rhythmic cognition neurally, provide exciting new routes for understanding not just rhythmic cognition, but hierarchical cognition more generally, from a biological and neural perspective.

  16. Human-biometeorological conditions and thermal perception in a Mediterranean coastal park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaroni, Hadas; Pearlmutter, David; Hatuka, Tali

    2015-10-01

    This study looks at the interrelation of human-biometeorological conditions, physiological thermal stress and subjective thermal perception in the design and use of a new waterfront park in Tel-Aviv, Israel. Our initial assumption was that the park's design would embody a comprehensive response to the area's ever-increasing heat stress and water shortage. However, almost half of it is covered by grass lawns, irrigated with fresh water, while the remaining area is mainly covered with concrete paving, with minimal shading and sparse trees. We hypothesized that stressful thermal conditions would prevail in the park in the summer season and would be expressed in a high discomfort perception of its users. Thermo-physiological stress conditions in a typical summer month were compared with the subjective comfort perceptions of pedestrians surveyed in the park. It was found that even during mid-day hours, the level of thermal stress tends to be relatively mild, owing largely to the strong sea breeze and despite the high intensity of solar radiation. Moreover, it appears that the largely favorable perception of comfort among individuals may also result from socio-cultural aspects related to their satisfaction with the park's aesthetic attractiveness and in fact its very existence. Adaptive planning is proposed for such vulnerable regions, which are expected to experience further aggravation in thermal comfort due to global as well as localized warming trends.

  17. Ageing effects on the diameter, nanomechanical properties and tactile perception of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W; Zhang, S G; Zhang, J K; Chen, S; Zhu, H; Ge, S R

    2016-04-01

    The typical changes to hair associated with ageing are greying, thinning, dryness and brittleness. Research on the influence of ageing on hair properties will enable a detailed understanding of the natural ageing process. The studies were carried out using an SEM (scanning electron microscope), a TriboIndenter and an artificial finger. Three characteristic features of tactile perception that could reflect the perceptual dimensions of the fineness, roughness and slipperiness of hair were extracted. The influences of ageing on the diameter, surface topography, nanomechanical properties and tactile perception of hair were determined. In the three age group hair samples, the children's group hair samples have the smallest diameter. The hair cuticles in the children and young adult groups were relatively complete and less damaged than in the elderly group. The hardness and elastic modulus of the young adult group's hair samples were higher than those in the elderly and children's groups. For all groups, loss modulus E" was smaller than storage modulus E'. Vertical deviations (R) and coefficient of friction (μ) increased, and spectral centroid (SC) decreased, with the increase in age. Ageing decreased the tactile perception of hair. Ageing influences the diameter, surface topography, hardness, loss modulus, storage modulus and tactile perception of human hair. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  18. Perception of color and space in virtual reality: a comparison between a real room and virtual reality models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billger, Monica; Heldal, Ilona; Stahre, Beata; Renstrom, Kristian

    2004-06-01

    Virtual Reality has great potential to become a usable design tool for the planning of light and colour in buildings. The technical development has provided us with better computer graphics and faster rendering techniques. However, the reliability and usability is delimited by lack of knowledge about how humans perceive spatial colour phenomena. The setting up of parameters for material properties in light calculation software is done arbitrarily. We present a comparison between a real room and a digital model evaluated on a desktop PC and in an Immersive Projection Technology (IPT) type system. Data were collected from video recorded interviews and questionnaires. The participants assessed the appearance of light, colours and space. They also evaluated their involvement in solving this task, and their presence in each environment. Our results highlight the benefits and disadvantages of the real and virtual models. The participants had difficulties in estimating the size of both the desktop room and the room in the ITP system. The comparison of real and virtual rooms revealed unsatisfying differences in shadowing and colour appearance. We defined the magnitude of perceived colour reflections in the real room, and elaborated with some of the parameters in Lightscape/3dsmax6.

  19. Human haptic perception is interrupted by explorative stops of milliseconds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Martin; Muniyandi, Manivannan; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Jung; Krause, Frank; Mueller, Stephanie; Srinivasan, Mandayam A

    2014-01-01

    The explorative scanning movements of the hands have been compared to those of the eyes. The visual process is known to be composed of alternating phases of saccadic eye movements and fixation pauses. Descriptive results suggest that during the haptic exploration of objects short movement pauses occur as well. The goal of the present study was to detect these "explorative stops" (ES) during one-handed and two-handed haptic explorations of various objects and patterns, and to measure their duration. Additionally, the associations between the following variables were analyzed: (a) between mean exploration time and duration of ES, (b) between certain stimulus features and ES frequency, and (c) the duration of ES during the course of exploration. Five different Experiments were used. The first two Experiments were classical recognition tasks of unknown haptic stimuli (A) and of common objects (B). In Experiment C space-position information of angle legs had to be perceived and reproduced. For Experiments D and E the PHANToM haptic device was used for the exploration of virtual (D) and real (E) sunken reliefs. In each Experiment we observed explorative stops of different average durations. For Experiment A: 329.50 ms, Experiment B: 67.47 ms, Experiment C: 189.92 ms, Experiment D: 186.17 ms and Experiment E: 140.02 ms. Significant correlations were observed between exploration time and the duration of the ES. Also, ES occurred more frequently, but not exclusively, at defined stimulus features like corners, curves and the endpoints of lines. However, explorative stops do not occur every time a stimulus feature is explored. We assume that ES are a general aspect of human haptic exploration processes. We have tried to interpret the occurrence and duration of ES with respect to the Hypotheses-Rebuild-Model and the Limited Capacity Control System theory.

  20. Human haptic perception is interrupted by explorative stops of milliseconds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eGrunwald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The explorative scanning movements of the hands have been compared to those of the eyes. The visual process is known to be composed of alternating phases of saccadic eye movements and fixation pauses. Descriptive results suggest that during the haptic exploration of objects short movement pauses occur as well. The goal of the present study was to detect these explorative stops (ES during one-handed and two-handed haptic explorations of various objects and patterns, and to measure their duration. Additionally, the associations between the following variables were analyzed: a between mean exploration time and duration of ES, b between certain stimulus features and ES frequency, and c the duration of ES during the course of exploration. Methods: Five different experiments were used. The first two experiments were classical recognition tasks of unknown haptic stimuli (A and of common objects (B. In experiment C space-position information of angle legs had to be perceived and reproduced. For experiments D and E the PHANToM haptic device was used for the exploration of virtual (D and real (E sunken reliefs. Results: In each experiment we observed explorative stops of different average durations. For experiment A: 329.50 ms, experiment B: 67.47 ms, experiment C: 189.92 ms, experiment D: 186.17 ms and experiment E: 140.02 ms. Significant correlations were observed between exploration time and the duration of the ES. Also, ES occurred more frequently, but not exclusively, at defined stimulus features like corners, curves and the endpoints of lines. However, explorative stops do not occur every time a stimulus feature is explored. Conclusions: We assume that ES are a general aspect of human haptic exploration processes. We have tried to interpret the occurrence and duration of ES with respect to the Hypotheses-Rebuild-Model and the Limited Capacity Control System theory.

  1. Color calibration and fusion of lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-resolution and accurate color reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-06-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy can achieve wide-field imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable setup, making it a promising technique for point-of-care and telepathology applications. However, due to relatively narrow-band sources used in holographic microscopy, conventional colorization methods that use images reconstructed at discrete wavelengths, corresponding to e.g., red (R), green (G) and blue (B) channels, are subject to color artifacts. Furthermore, these existing RGB colorization methods do not match the chromatic perception of human vision. Here we present a high-color-fidelity and high-resolution imaging method, termed “digital color fusion microscopy” (DCFM), which fuses a holographic image acquired at a single wavelength with a color-calibrated image taken by a low-magnification lens-based microscope using a wavelet transform-based colorization method. We demonstrate accurate color reproduction of DCFM by imaging stained tissue sections. In particular we show that a lens-free holographic microscope in combination with a cost-effective mobile-phone-based microscope can generate color images of specimens, performing very close to a high numerical-aperture (NA) benchtop microscope that is corrected for color distortions and chromatic aberrations, also matching the chromatic response of human vision. This method can be useful for wide-field imaging needs in telepathology applications and in resource-limited settings, where whole-slide scanning microscopy systems are not available.

  2. Baby schema in human and animal faces induces cuteness perception and gaze allocation in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eBorgi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The baby schema concept was originally proposed as a set of infantile traits with high appeal for humans, subsequently shown to elicit caretaking behavior and to affect cuteness perception and attentional processes. However, it is unclear whether the response to the baby schema may be extended to the human-animal bond context. Moreover, questions remain as to whether the cute response is constant and persistent or whether it changes with development. In the present study we parametrically manipulated the baby schema in images of humans, dogs and cats. We analyzed responses of 3-6-year-old children, using both explicit (i.e. cuteness ratings and implicit (i.e. eye gaze patterns measures. By means of eye-tracking, we assessed children’s preferential attention to images varying only for the degree of baby schema and explored participants’ fixation patterns during a cuteness task. For comparative purposes, cuteness ratings were also obtained in a sample of adults. Overall our results show that the response to an infantile facial configuration emerges early during development. In children, the baby schema affects both cuteness perception and gaze allocation to infantile stimuli and to specific facial features, an effect not simply limited to human faces. In line with previous research, results confirm human positive appraisal towards animals and inform both educational and therapeutic interventions involving pets, helping to minimize risk factors (e.g. dog bites.

  3. The Chemistry of Color Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Wayne C.; Raber, Douglas J.

    1975-01-01

    Presents several topics in color photography which can serve as an introduction of scientific concepts into the classroom, such as: photochemistry (energy transport), organic chemistry (dye formation), physics (nature of light), psychology (color perception), and engineering (isolation of different chemical processes within layers of the film).…

  4. Perceptions of Medical Students and Professors Regarding the Free Informed Consent Form and Humanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Moreira Canuto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to gather information on the perception of the free informed consent form (FICF and humanization among a population of medical students and professors of medicine. A total of 35 professors of medicine and 56 medical students took part in this study by answering an electronic survey. The collected data were subjected to content analysis using ALCESTE software. The analysis revealed the existence of three different classes: Class 1 designated the “FICF as a guarantee of rights in research”; Class 2 designated the “FICF as informative regarding research procedures”; and Class 3 designated “humanization as a necessary process.” The results show a preferential association of the FICF with research, rather than medical care. There was a consensus regarding the importance of humanization; however, a need to increase knowledge of and the possibilities for implementing both the FICF and humanization was also indicated

  5. Immigrants’ perception of business opportunities in Spain: the impact of general and specific human capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Aliaga Isla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Perceiving business opportunities is an important part of entrepreneurship. This study analyzes how immigrants’ general and specific human capital influences their likelihood of perceiving business opportunities. Analysis focuses on comparison between a group of immigrants and a group of Spanish citizens. Data from the 2008 Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM was used. Logistic regression was used to analyze data. Results revealed that both immigrants’ and Spanish citizens’ human capital such as education is not significant to perceiving opportunities. Much to the contrary: the impact of specific human capital on perceiving opportunities is in general significant to both groups. This research reveals which specific types of human capital are relevant in the process of perceiving opportunities amongst immigrants. This paper is a novelty because it introduces a theoretical approach to the perception of opportunities within the universe of new businesses established by immigrants in Spain.

  6. Polystyrene microspheres enable 10‐color compensation for immunophenotyping of primary human leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Karen D.; Norman, John C.; Huye, Leslie; Hegde, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Compensation is a critical process for the unbiased analysis of flow cytometry data. Numerous compensation strategies exist, including the use of bead‐based products. The purpose of this study was to determine whether beads, specifically polystyrene microspheres (PSMS) compare to the use of primary leukocytes for single color based compensation when conducting polychromatic flow cytometry. To do so, we stained individual tubes of both PSMS and leukocytes with panel specific antibodies conjugated to fluorochromes corresponding to fluorescent channels FL1‐FL10. We compared the matrix generated by PSMS to that generated using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Ideal for compensation is a sample with both a discrete negative population and a bright positive population. We demonstrate that PSMS display autofluorescence properties similar to PBMC. When comparing PSMS to PBMC for compensation PSMS yielded more evenly distributed and discrete negative and positive populations to use for compensation. We analyzed three donors' PBMC stained with our 10‐color T cell subpopulation panel using compensation generated by PSMS vs.PBMC and detected no significant differences in the population distribution. Panel specific antibodies bound to PSMS represent an invaluable valid tool to generate suitable compensation matrices especially when sample material is limited and/or the sample requires analysis of dynamically modulated or rare events. © 2015 The Authors. Cytometry Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26202733

  7. Elephants and Human Color-Blind Deuteranopes Have Identical Sets of Visual Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Takenaka, Naomi; Agnew, Dalen W.; Shoshani, Jeheskel

    2005-01-01

    Being the largest land mammals, elephants have very few natural enemies and are active during both day and night. Compared with those of diurnal and nocturnal animals, the eyes of elephants and other arrhythmic species, such as many ungulates and large carnivores, must function in both the bright light of day and dim light of night. Despite their fundamental importance, the roles of photosensitive molecules, visual pigments, in arrhythmic vision are not well understood. Here we report that elephants (Loxodonta africana and Elephas maximus) use RH1, SWS1, and LWS pigments, which are maximally sensitive to 496, 419, and 552 nm, respectively. These light sensitivities are virtually identical to those of certain “color-blind” people who lack MWS pigments, which are maximally sensitive to 530 nm. During the day, therefore, elephants seem to have the dichromatic color vision of deuteranopes. During the night, however, they are likely to use RH1 and SWS1 pigments and detect light at 420–490 nm. PMID:15781694

  8. Integrating Color and Spatial Feature for Content-Based Image Retrieval

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and efficient scheme for extracting, indexing and retrieving color images. Our motivation was to reduce the space overhead of partition-based approaches taking advantage of the fact that only a relatively low number of distinct values of a particular visual feature is present in most images. To extract color feature and build indices into our image database we take into consideration factors such as human color perception and perceptual range, and the image is partitioned into a set of regions by using a simple classifying scheme. The compact color feature vector and the spatial color histogram, which are extracted from the seqmented image region, are used for representing the color and spatial information in the image. We have also developed the region-based distance measures to compare the similarity of two images. Extensive tests on a large image collection were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  9. The color of night: surface color categorization by color defective observers under dim illuminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Joel; Lutze, Margaret; Cao, Dingcai; Zele, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    People with normal trichromatic color vision experience variegated hue percepts under dim illuminations where only rod photoreceptors mediate vision. Here, hue perceptions were determined for persons with congenital color vision deficiencies over a wide range of light levels, including very low light levels where rods alone mediate vision. Deuteranomalous trichromats, deuteranopes and protanopes served as observers. The appearances of 24 paper color samples from the OSA Uniform Color Scales were gauged under successively dimmer illuminations from 10 to 0.0003 Lux (1.0 to -3.5 log Lux). Triads of samples were chosen representing each of eight basic color categories; "red," "pink," "orange," "yellow," "green," "blue," "purple," and "gray." Samples within each triad varied in lightness. Observers sorted samples into groups that they could categorize with specific color names. Above -0.5 log Lux, the dichromatic and anomalous trichromatic observers sorted the samples into the original representative color groups, with some exceptions. At light levels where rods alone mediate vision, the color names assigned by the deuteranomalous trichromats were similar to the color names used by color normals; higher scotopic reflectance samples were classified as blue-green-grey and lower reflectance samples as red-orange. Color names reported by the dichromats at the dimmest light levels had extensive overlap in their sample scotopic lightness distributions. Dichromats did not assign scotopic color names based on the sample scotopic lightness, as did deuteranomalous trichromats and colour-normals. We reasoned that the reduction in color gamut that a dichromat experiences at photopic light levels leads to a limited association of rod color perception with objects differing in scotopic reflectance.

  10. Assessment of human thermal perception in the hot-humid climate of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndetto, Emmanuel L.; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, is a typical African city along the Indian Ocean coast, and therefore an important urban area to examine human thermal perception in the hot-humid tropical climate. Earlier research on human bioclimate at Dar es Salaam indicated that heat stress prevails during the hot season from October to March, peaking between December and February, particularly the early afternoons. In order to assess the human thermal perception and adaptation, two popular places, one at an urban park and another at a beach environment, were selected and questionnaire surveys were conducted in August-September 2013 and January 2014, concurrently with local micro-meteorological measurements at survey locations. The thermal conditions were quantified in terms of the thermal index of the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) using the micro-scale climate model RayMan. The thermal comfort range of human thermal comfort and the local thermal adaptive capacity were determined in respect to the thermal index by binning thermal sensation votes. The thermal comfort range was found to be well above that in temperate climates at about 23-31 °C of PET. The study could significantly contribute to urban planning in Dar es Salaam and other coastal cities in the tropics.

  11. Comparison of perceptual color spaces for natural image segmentation tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Tome, Fernando E.; Sanchez-Yanez, Raul E.; Ayala-Ramirez, Victor

    2011-11-01

    Color image segmentation largely depends on the color space chosen. Furthermore, spaces that show perceptual uniformity seem to outperform others due to their emulation of the human perception of color. We evaluate three perceptual color spaces, CIELAB, CIELUV, and RLAB, in order to determine their contribution to natural image segmentation and to identify the space that obtains the best results over a test set of images. The nonperceptual color space RGB is also included for reference purposes. In order to quantify the quality of resulting segmentations, an empirical discrepancy evaluation methodology is discussed. The Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and Benchmark is used in test series, and two approaches are taken to perform the experiments: supervised pixelwise classification using reference colors, and unsupervised clustering using k-means. A majority filter is used as a postprocessing stage, in order to determine its contribution to the result. Furthermore, a comparison of elapsed times taken by the required transformations is included. The main finding of our study is that the CIELUV color space outperforms the other color spaces in both discriminatory performance and computational speed, for the average case.

  12. COLOR DIFFERENCES OF PINE AND EUCALYPT WOODS MEASURED BY MICROFLASH-200®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisdianto Krisdianto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available It is not easy to define color because it refers to psychological response of human. As a result, perception of color achieved by people is relatively different.  Wood color plays an important role in timber processing and it is an important consideration in wood identification. Each wood species has specific color and it becomes the species characteristic. Colors in wood are highly variable and unique features. Characteristics of wood color are influenced by extractive materials and moisture contents present on it. A standard of color measurement has been developed and it is called CIE model. The standard was developed to be completely independent of any devices and was based as closely as possible on human observation in color. CIELAB system is one of the simplest and most practical color measurement methods. The system has been used in one of the color measurement devices developed by Data Color International that is Microflash-200®. This research was aimed at translating interpretation of wood color by human eye into mathematical values so that scientific measurement of wood color can be studied. The measured wood color were 10 species of pines and 10 species of eucalypts woods in dry condition. The results showed that the two groups had different average of L*, a* and b* values. The average of L* for pine was 70.77, while eucalypt group made up to 52.40. It means that eucalypt group is darker than pine group. For a* value, pine group mean value is 20.23, whereas eucalypt group touches 19.11. In other words, pine and eucalypt group have an approximately similar redness. The b* value average for pine and eucalypt groups are 43.40 and 29.07, respectively. This value means that pine group is more yellow than eucalypt group.

  13. Complexity in Human Perception of Brightness: A Historical Review on the Evolution of the Philosophy of Visual Perception

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    Kuntal Ghosh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The “eye-brain” complex, which contributes maximally to visual perception, is no doubt a very interesting object for complexity study. In this review we shall try to present some of its aspects in perceiving brightness. It is a well-known fact that the perceived brightness of any surface depends on the brightness of the surfaces that surround it, a phenomenon termed as brightness induction. Several studies reveal that brightness contrast and brightness assimilation are two opposite phenomena in brightness induction. The former can be explained through the microscopic neural circuits that emanate from the retinal ganglion cells and converge on to primary visual cortex i.e. through a bottom-up approach, something which however fails till date to account for the later. In search of a unified theory of brightness induction, a top-down approach has often been suggested. However, the mechanism of brightness induction evident in several optical illusions, is not yet understood even after 200 years of intense research that saw George Berkeley, Maxwell, Helmholtz and the modern Gestalt school, that include both the intrinsic image theorists as well as the anchoring model theorists, following the “top-down” approach on one hand and Weber, Fechner, Mach, succeeded by the modern contrast theorists following the “bottom-up” approach on the other. Approach: In this review, we presented a historical perspective of the evolution of human concepts about the perception of brightness. We tried to capture the two essential philosophical trends among the scientists in understanding the phenomenon of brightness induction. The problems with idealist approach as well as the limitations of the mechanical materialist approach, have been pointed out in the light of the facts that, nature in general and complex systems in particular, are intrinsically dialectic in nature. Results: A proposal had been put forward that the path of dialectical

  14. Improvement in appearance of colors for elderly persons using lightness transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Chiaki; Azetsu, Tadahiro; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    The color of an object appears to be different for elderly and young persons. This is because human visual features vary with on age. In general, the spectral transmittance of the crystalline lens of an elderly person is lower than that of a young person. The low spectral transmittance decreases the brightness of the visual field. This phenomenon affects the color appearance of an image in human visual perception. In this paper, a lightness transform method is proposed to improve the color appearance of images for elderly persons. In the proposed method, colors that are difficult for an elderly person to see are transformed into colors that are easy to see by adding lightness contrast. The performance of the proposed method is confirmed in experiments using digital images.

  15. Improvement in appearance of colors for elderly persons using lightness transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Chiaki; Azetsu, Tadahiro; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2016-12-01

    The color of an object appears to be different for elderly and young persons. This is because human visual features vary with on age. In general, the spectral transmittance of the crystalline lens of an elderly person is lower than that of a young person. The low spectral transmittance decreases the brightness of the visual field. This phenomenon affects the color appearance of an image in human visual perception. In this paper, a lightness transform method is proposed to improve the color appearance of images for elderly persons. In the proposed method, colors that are difficult for an elderly person to see are transformed into colors that are easy to see by adding lightness contrast. The performance of the proposed method is confirmed in experiments using digital images.

  16. Revisiting vocal perception in non-human animals: a review of vowel discrimination, speaker voice recognition, and speaker normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhamas eKriengwatana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which human speech perception evolved by taking advantage of predispositions and pre-existing features of vertebrate auditory and cognitive systems remains a central question in the evolution of speech. This paper reviews asymmetries in vowel perception, speaker voice recognition, and speaker normalization in non-human animals – topics that have not been thoroughly discussed in relation to the abilities of non-human animals, but are nonetheless important aspects of vocal perception. Throughout this paper we demonstrate that addressing these issues in non-human animals is relevant and worthwhile because many non-human animals must deal with similar issues in their natural environment. That is, they must also discriminate between similar-sounding vocalizations, determine signaler identity from vocalizations, and resolve signaler-dependent variation in vocalizations from conspecifics. Overall, we find that, although plausible, the current evidence is insufficiently strong to conclude that directional asymmetries in vowel perception are specific to humans, or that non-human animals can use voice characteristics to recognize human individuals. However, we do find some indication that non-human animals can normalize speaker differences. Accordingly, we identify avenues for future research that would greatly improve and advance our understanding of these topics.

  17. VISUAL PERCEPTION BASED AUTOMATIC RECOGNITION OF CELL MOSAICS IN HUMAN CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUMMICROSCOPY IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Gavet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The human corneal endothelium can be observed with two types of microscopes: classical optical microscope for ex-vivo imaging, and specular optical microscope for in-vivo imaging. The quality of the cornea is correlated to the endothelial cell density and morphometry. Automatic methods to analyze the human corneal endothelium images are still not totally efficient. Image analysis methods that focus only on cell contours do not give good results in presence of noise and of bad conditions of acquisition. More elaborated methods introduce regional informations in order to performthe cell contours completion, thus implementing the duality contour-region. Their good performance can be explained by their connections with several basic principles of human visual perception (Gestalt Theory and Marr's computational theory.

  18. Human vision, visual processing, and digital display; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 18-20, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogowitz, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on human vision, visual processing, and digital display are presented. The general topics considered include: physics and psychophysics of displayed information; visual performance and image quality; vision-based algorithms for image processing; visual sampling, compression, and representation; texture, pattern, and motion; color perception, coding, and representation. Some individual topics discussed are: respective fields and visual representations; psychophysical rating of image compression techniques; new paradigm for testing human and machine motion perception; motion perception model with interactions between spatial frequency channels; application of visual psychophysics to the design of video systems for use in space; unified model for human color perception and visual adaptation.

  19. Parts-based stereoscopic image assessment by learning binocular manifold color visual properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiyong; Yu, Mei; Luo, Ting; Zhang, Yun; Jiang, Gangyi

    2016-11-01

    Existing stereoscopic image quality assessment (SIQA) methods are mostly based on the luminance information, in which color information is not sufficiently considered. Actually, color is part of the important factors that affect human visual perception, and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) and manifold learning are in line with human visual perception. We propose an SIQA method based on learning binocular manifold color visual properties. To be more specific, in the training phase, a feature detector is created based on NMF with manifold regularization by considering color information, which not only allows parts-based manifold representation of an image, but also manifests localized color visual properties. In the quality estimation phase, visually important regions are selected by considering different human visual attention, and feature vectors are extracted by using the feature detector. Then the feature similarity index is calculated and the parts-based manifold color feature energy (PMCFE) for each view is defined based on the color feature vectors. The final quality score is obtained by considering a binocular combination based on PMCFE. The experimental results on LIVE I and LIVE Π 3-D IQA databases demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve much higher consistency with subjective evaluations than the state-of-the-art SIQA methods.

  20. Human perception of fear in dogs varies according to experience with dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Michele; Bolger, Niall; Champagne, Frances A

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of experience in humans' perception of emotion using canine visual signals, we asked adults with various levels of dog experience to interpret the emotions of dogs displayed in videos. The video stimuli had been pre-categorized by an expert panel of dog behavior professionals as showing examples of happy or fearful dog behavior. In a sample of 2,163 participants, the level of dog experience strongly predicted identification of fearful, but not of happy, emotional examples. The probability of selecting the "fearful" category to describe fearful examples increased with experience and ranged from.30 among those who had never lived with a dog to greater than.70 among dog professionals. In contrast, the probability of selecting the "happy" category to describe happy emotional examples varied little by experience, ranging from.90 to.93. In addition, the number of physical features of the dog that participants reported using for emotional interpretations increased with experience, and in particular, more-experienced respondents were more likely to attend to the ears. Lastly, more-experienced respondents provided lower difficulty and higher accuracy self-ratings than less-experienced respondents when interpreting both happy and fearful emotional examples. The human perception of emotion in other humans has previously been shown to be sensitive to individual differences in social experience, and the results of the current study extend the notion of experience-dependent processes from the intraspecific to the interspecific domain.

  1. Human perception of fear in dogs varies according to experience with dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Wan

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of experience in humans' perception of emotion using canine visual signals, we asked adults with various levels of dog experience to interpret the emotions of dogs displayed in videos. The video stimuli had been pre-categorized by an expert panel of dog behavior professionals as showing examples of happy or fearful dog behavior. In a sample of 2,163 participants, the level of dog experience strongly predicted identification of fearful, but not of happy, emotional examples. The probability of selecting the "fearful" category to describe fearful examples increased with experience and ranged from.30 among those who had never lived with a dog to greater than.70 among dog professionals. In contrast, the probability of selecting the "happy" category to describe happy emotional examples varied little by experience, ranging from.90 to.93. In addition, the number of physical features of the dog that participants reported using for emotional interpretations increased with experience, and in particular, more-experienced respondents were more likely to attend to the ears. Lastly, more-experienced respondents provided lower difficulty and higher accuracy self-ratings than less-experienced respondents when interpreting both happy and fearful emotional examples. The human perception of emotion in other humans has previously been shown to be sensitive to individual differences in social experience, and the results of the current study extend the notion of experience-dependent processes from the intraspecific to the interspecific domain.

  2. Methodology for estimating human perception to tremors in high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenqi; Goh, Key Seng; Pan, Tso-Chien

    2016-12-01

    Human perception to tremors during earthquakes in high-rise buildings is usually associated with psychological discomfort such as fear and anxiety. This paper presents a methodology for estimating the level of perception to tremors for occupants living in high-rise buildings subjected to ground motion excitations. Unlike other approaches based on empirical or historical data, the proposed methodology performs a regression analysis using the analytical results of two generic models of 15 and 30 stories. The recorded ground motions in Singapore are collected and modified for structural response analyses. Simple predictive models are then developed to estimate the perception level to tremors based on a proposed ground motion intensity parameter—the average response spectrum intensity in the period range between 0.1 and 2.0 s. These models can be used to predict the percentage of occupants in high-rise buildings who may perceive the tremors at a given ground motion intensity. Furthermore, the models are validated with two recent tremor events reportedly felt in Singapore. It is found that the estimated results match reasonably well with the reports in the local newspapers and from the authorities. The proposed methodology is applicable to urban regions where people living in high-rise buildings might feel tremors during earthquakes.

  3. Methodology for estimating human perception to tremors in high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenqi; Goh, Key Seng; Pan, Tso-Chien

    2017-07-01

    Human perception to tremors during earthquakes in high-rise buildings is usually associated with psychological discomfort such as fear and anxiety. This paper presents a methodology for estimating the level of perception to tremors for occupants living in high-rise buildings subjected to ground motion excitations. Unlike other approaches based on empirical or historical data, the proposed methodology performs a regression analysis using the analytical results of two generic models of 15 and 30 stories. The recorded ground motions in Singapore are collected and modified for structural response analyses. Simple predictive models are then developed to estimate the perception level to tremors based on a proposed ground motion intensity parameter—the average response spectrum intensity in the period range between 0.1 and 2.0 s. These models can be used to predict the percentage of occupants in high-rise buildings who may perceive the tremors at a given ground motion intensity. Furthermore, the models are validated with two recent tremor events reportedly felt in Singapore. It is found that the estimated results match reasonably well with the reports in the local newspapers and from the authorities. The proposed methodology is applicable to urban regions where people living in high-rise buildings might feel tremors during earthquakes.

  4. Effects of exposure to noise and indoor air pollution on human perception and symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witterseh, Thomas; Wargocki, Pawel; Fang, Lei

    1999-01-01

    was modified by playing a recording of ventilation noise. Thirty female subjects, six at a time, occupied the office for 4.4 hours. The subjects assessed the air quality, the noise, and the indoor environment upon entering the office and on six occasions during occupation. Furthermore, SBS symptoms......The objective of the present study was to investigate human perception and SBS symptoms when people are exposed simultaneously to different levels of air pollution and ventilation noise. The air quality in an office was modified by placing or removing a carpet and the background noise level...

  5. Human perception of the measurement of a network attack taxonomy in near real-time

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    van Heerden, R

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available , Pretoria, South Africa malan747@gmail.com 3 University of Rhodes, Computer Science Department, Grahamstown, South Africa b.irwin@ru.ac.za Abstract. This paper investigates how the measurement of a network attack taxonomy can be related to human... perception. Network attacks do not have a time limitation, but the earlier its detected, the more damage can be prevented and the more preventative actions can be taken. This paper evaluate how ele- ments of network attacks can be measured in near real...

  6. Color Blindness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严双红

    2007-01-01

    About one in 12 boys is color-blind, and one in every 400 girls, so in each school class there are likely to be at least one or two people who are color-blind. Because they are color- blind from birth, most people do not know that they are color-

  7. In-vivo imaging of blood flow in human retinal vessels using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    1999-04-01

    Quantification of retinal blood flow may lead to a better understanding of the progression and treatment of several ocular disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age- related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Current techniques, such as fluorescein angiography and laser Doppler velocimetry are limited, failing to provide sufficient information to the clinician. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is a novel technique using coherent heterodyne detection for simultaneous cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure and blood flow. This technique is capable of high spatial and velocity resolution imaging in highly scattering media. We implemented CDOCT for retinal blood flow mapping in human subjects. No dilation of the pupil was necessary. CDOCT is demonstrated for determining bidirectional flow in sub- 100micrometers diameter vessels in the retina. Additionally, we calculated Doppler broadening using the variance of depth- resolved spectra to identify regions with large velocity gradients within the Xenopus heart. This technique may be useful in quantifying local tissue perfusion in highly vascular retinal tissue.

  8. The Color of Lobsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, Arjan van

    2005-01-01

    Synthesis of 13C-enriched carotenoids. Carotenoids are natural colorants, ranging in color from pale yellow to deep purple, with important biological functions. Carotenoids in the human diet have a beneficial health effect, playing a role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer. To ge

  9. The Color of Lobsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, Arjan van

    2005-01-01

    Synthesis of 13C-enriched carotenoids. Carotenoids are natural colorants, ranging in color from pale yellow to deep purple, with important biological functions. Carotenoids in the human diet have a beneficial health effect, playing a role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer. To ge

  10. Influence of educational status and other variables on human immunodeficiency virus risk perception among military personnel: a large cohort finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essien, E James; Ogungbade, Gbadebo O; Ward, Doriel; Ekong, Ernest; Ross, Michael W; Meshack, Angela; Holmes, Laurens

    2007-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk perception remains an effective determinant of HIV transmission. Although higher educational attainment has been associated with increased HIV risk perception, this predictor remains to be assessed among Nigerian military personnel (NMP). In a prospective cohort of 2,213 NMP, the effects of education and other factors on HIV risk perception were assessed at baseline by using the X2 statistic and unconditional logistic regression. There was an inverse correlation between higher educational attainment and HIV risk perception in the univariate model (prevalence odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.79). This association persisted after adjustment for relevant covariates in the multivariate model (prevalence odds ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.56-0.88). Similarly, there was a direct correlation between use of alcohol and marijuana and HIV risk perception (p 0.05). This study indicates an inverse correlation between educational attainment and HIV risk perception, as well as a direct correlation between alcohol and marijuana use and HIV risk perception, among NMP. Therefore, HIV prevention interventions targeted at NMP need to include multiple factors that may affect risk perception regardless of the educational status of the participants.

  11. Influence of bleaching and coloring on ethyl glucuronide content in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzel-Witt, Silvana; Pogoda, Werner; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Toennes, Stefan W

    2017-04-13

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is increasingly used in forensic toxicology as a marker for alcohol use in analyses of hair samples, especially in abstinence control. Some cosmetic treatments are considered to markedly reduce the EtG content. In view of especially many women with coloured hair the present study was performed to further investigate the effect of a variety of colouring procedures (bleaching, tinting, permanent and semi-permanent dyeing, henna) on the EtG content. Untreated hair samples (n = 12, EtG 13.9-64.7 pg/mg) were re-analyzed (gas chromatography- negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry, 0.8 pg/mg quantification limit) after different treatment procedures. A decrease of the EtG content of at least 10% occurred in every case. The reduction in comparison to the untreated hair was expectedly high for permanent dyeing and bleaching with 18.1% of the initial content (median, range 0.0-50.9%) and 18.4% (0.0-46.7%), respectively. For henna this was 38.3% (0.0-83.0%), for tinting 70.4% (29.0-90.8%), for semi-permanent dyeing 41.9% (0.0-77.4%). With permanent hair dye the EtG content was decreased to below 7 pg/mg in 10 of 12 cases, in 3 cases even below the LOD (0.2 pg/mg). Surprisingly henna treatment without oxidative component had a marked influence, EtG was below 2 pg/mg in 2 of 12 samples. The study showed that all tested coloration procedures markedly affected the deposited EtG content. Even temporary or henna coloration may have a marked effect. The present data support the recommendation to exclude hair samples with colour manipulations for analysis on the EtG content as a precaution in alcohol abstinence programs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Learning Race in a U.S. Context: An Emergent Framework on the Perceptions of Race among Foreign-Born Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries-Britt, Sharon; George Mwangi, Chrystal A.; Peralta, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    Foreign-born students of color arrive in the United States with racial and cultural orientations specific to their country of origin, which are often quite distinct from issues of race and racism within the U.S. context. This qualitative study examines the college experiences of 15 foreign-born students of color to address the research question:…

  13. Large-capacity blind steganography algorithm for color images based on visual perception mechanism%基于视觉感知机理的大容量彩色图像盲隐写算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康年锦; 陈昭炯

    2012-01-01

    Most existing steganography algorithms for color images are designed by directly applying steganography for gray-scale images to color channel without employing color visual perception mechanism. A large-capacity blind steganography algorithm for color images based on visual perception mechanism in YUV space was proposed. The main idea is to analyze the local complexity of the carrier image via standard deviation on the Y component, split the message into two parts using the color visual perception mechanism, and then hide them in Y and V components respectively. Being less flexible, the U component was simply used as an information indicator. A large number of experiments were carried out showing that the proposed algorithm still maintains good imperceptibility compared with other methods after embedding large-capacity information, and can resist both the histogram contrast and RS steganalysis. Thus, the proposed algorithm is reasonable, easy to implement, and effective.%针对现有彩色图像隐写算法大多将灰度图像的算法直接用于彩色通道,未能运用彩色视觉感知机理的问题,提出一种YUV空间上的、基于视觉感知机理的大容量彩色图像盲隐写算法.主要方法是在Y分量上通过标准差来分析载体图像的局部复杂性,利用视觉感知机理将信息分成两部分隐写于Y和V分量中,灵活性较差的U分量则作为隐写信息的通道指示器,无需大的改变.大量实验结果表明,所提算法与其他方法相比在嵌入大容量信息后依然能够保持很好的不可感知性,而且可以抵抗直方图对比和RS隐写分析方法,因而所提算法是合理、简洁、有效的.

  14. Two-color widefield fluorescence microendoscopy enables multiplexed molecular imaging in the alveolar space of human lung tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstajić, Nikola; Akram, Ahsan R.; Choudhary, Tushar R.; McDonald, Neil; Tanner, Michael G.; Pedretti, Ettore; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Scholefield, Emma; Girkin, John M.; Moore, Anne; Bradley, Mark; Dhaliwal, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a fast two-color widefield fluorescence microendoscopy system capable of simultaneously detecting several disease targets in intact human ex vivo lung tissue. We characterize the system for light throughput from the excitation light emitting diodes, fluorescence collection efficiency, and chromatic focal shifts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the instrument by imaging bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in ex vivo human lung tissue. We describe a mechanism of bacterial detection through the fiber bundle that uses blinking effects of bacteria as they move in front of the fiber core providing detection of objects smaller than the fiber core and cladding (˜3 μm). This effectively increases the measured spatial resolution of 4 μm. We show simultaneous imaging of neutrophils, monocytes, and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus) in ex vivo human lung tissue. The instrument has 10 nM and 50 nM sensitivity for fluorescein and Cy5 solutions, respectively. Lung tissue autofluorescence remains visible at up to 200 fps camera acquisition rate. The optical system lends itself to clinical translation due to high-fluorescence sensitivity, simplicity, and the ability to multiplex several pathological molecular imaging targets simultaneously.

  15. Deciphering protein signatures using color, morphological, and topological analysis of immunohistochemically stained human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerhouni, Erwan; Prisacari, Bogdan; Zhong, Qing; Wild, Peter; Gabrani, Maria

    2016-03-01

    Images of tissue specimens enable evidence-based study of disease susceptibility and stratification. Moreover, staining technologies empower the evidencing of molecular expression patterns by multicolor visualization, thus enabling personalized disease treatment and prevention. However, translating molecular expression imaging into direct health benefits has been slow. Two major factors contribute to that. On the one hand, disease susceptibility and progression is a complex, multifactorial molecular process. Diseases, such as cancer, exhibit cellular heterogeneity, impeding the differentiation between diverse grades or types of cell formations. On the other hand, the relative quantification of the stained tissue selected features is ambiguous, tedious and time consuming, prone to clerical error, leading to intra- and inter-observer variability and low throughput. Image analysis of digital histopathology images is a fast-developing and exciting area of disease research that aims to address the above limitations. We have developed a computational framework that extracts unique signatures using color, morphological and topological information and allows the combination thereof. The integration of the above information enables diagnosis of disease with AUC as high as 0.97. Multiple staining show significant improvement with respect to most proteins, and an AUC as high as 0.99.

  16. Perception of human-derived risk influences choice at top of the food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, Bogdan; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Boyce, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    On human-used landscapes, animal behavior is a trade-off between maximizing fitness and minimizing human-derived risk. Understanding risk perception in wildlife can allow mitigation of anthropogenic risk, with benefits to long-term animal fitness. Areas where animals choose to rest should minimize risk from predators, which for large carnivores typically equate to humans. We hypothesize that high human activity leads to selection for habitat security, whereas low activity enables trading security for forage. We investigated selection of resting (bedding) sites by GPS radiocollared adult grizzly bears (n = 10) in a low density population on a multiple-use landscape in Canada. We compared security and foods at resting and random locations while accounting for land use, season, and time of day. On reclaimed mines with low human access, bears selected high horizontal cover far from trails, but did not avoid open (herbaceous) areas, resting primarily at night. In protected areas bears also bedded at night, in areas with berry shrubs and Hedysarum spp., with horizontal cover selected in the summer, during high human access. On public lands with substantial human recreation, bears bedded at day, selected resting sites with high horizontal cover in the summer and habitat edges, with bedding associated with herbaceous foods. These spatial and temporal patterns of selection suggest that bears perceive human-related risk differentially in relation to human activity level, season and time of day, and employ a security-food trade-off strategy. Although grizzly bears are presently not hunted in Alberta, their perceived risks associated with humans influence resting-site selection.

  17. Perception of human-derived risk influences choice at top of the food chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Cristescu

    Full Text Available On human-used landscapes, animal behavior is a trade-off between maximizing fitness and minimizing human-derived risk. Understanding risk perception in wildlife can allow mitigation of anthropogenic risk, with benefits to long-term animal fitness. Areas where animals choose to rest should minimize risk from predators, which for large carnivores typically equate to humans. We hypothesize that high human activity leads to selection for habitat security, whereas low activity enables trading security for forage. We investigated selection of resting (bedding sites by GPS radiocollared adult grizzly bears (n = 10 in a low density population on a multiple-use landscape in Canada. We compared security and foods at resting and random locations while accounting for land use, season, and time of day. On reclaimed mines with low human access, bears selected high horizontal cover far from trails, but did not avoid open (herbaceous areas, resting primarily at night. In protected areas bears also bedded at night, in areas with berry shrubs and Hedysarum spp., with horizontal cover selected in the summer, during high human access. On public lands with substantial human recreation, bears bedded at day, selected resting sites with high horizontal cover in the summer and habitat edges, with bedding associated with herbaceous foods. These spatial and temporal patterns of selection suggest that bears perceive human-related risk differentially in relation to human activity level, season and time of day, and employ a security-food trade-off strategy. Although grizzly bears are presently not hunted in Alberta, their perceived risks associated with humans influence resting-site selection.

  18. Humanization in the Intensive Care: perception of family and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz, Flavia Feron; Caregnato, Rita Catalina Aquino; Costa, Márcia Rosa da

    2017-01-01

    Understanding perceptions of family members and healthcare professionals about humanization at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) to direct it to an educational action. Exploratory descriptive and qualitative study conducted in an ICU level 3 of a public hospital in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, with fourteen subjects, eight family members and six healthcare professionals. Data collection carried out through semi-structured interviews and focus group. Content Analysis was used. Emerged categories were: welcoming; communication; ethical and sensible professionalism; unfavorable aspects; perception on humanization; and religiosity/spirituality. Although the subjects have expressed their perceptions about humanization in different ways, both groups pointed out the same needs and priorities to improve humanization in Intensive Care. From the results, we created a reflective manual of humanizing assistance practices for professionals, a board to facilitate communication of these professionals with patients and a guideline book for family members. Compreender as percepções de familiares e profissionais de saúde sobre humanização na Unidade Terapia Intensiva (UTI) para direcionar a uma ação educativa. Estudo exploratório-descritivo qualitativo, realizado em uma UTI nível III de um hospital público de Porto Alegre/RS com 14 sujeitos, sendo oito familiares e seis profissionais de saúde. Coleta de dados realizada por meio de: entrevistas semiestruturadas e grupo focal. Utilizou-se Análise de Conteúdo. As categorias emergidas foram: acolhida; comunicação; profissionalismo ético e sensível; aspectos desfavoráveis; percepção sobre humanização; e religiosidade/espiritualidade. Apesar dos sujeitos expressarem de maneiras distintas suas percepções sobre humanização, os dois grupos comparados elencaram iguais necessidades e prioridades para o aprimoramento da humanização na Terapia Intensiva. A partir dos resultados, criou-se um Manual Reflexivo de pr

  19. [Short-term memory characteristics of vibration intensity tactile perception on human wrist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Fei; Chen, Li-Juan; Lu, Wei; Song, Ai-Guo

    2014-12-25

    In this study, a recall experiment and a recognition experiment were designed to assess the human wrist's short-term memory characteristics of tactile perception on vibration intensity, by using a novel homemade vibrotactile display device based on the spatiotemporal combination vibration of multiple micro vibration motors as a test device. Based on the obtained experimental data, the short-term memory span, recognition accuracy and reaction time of vibration intensity were analyzed. From the experimental results, some important conclusions can be made: (1) The average short-term memory span of tactile perception on vibration intensity is 3 ± 1 items; (2) The greater difference between two adjacent discrete intensities of vibrotactile stimulation is defined, the better average short-term memory span human wrist gets; (3) There is an obvious difference of the average short-term memory span on vibration intensity between the male and female; (4) The mechanism of information extraction in short-term memory of vibrotactile display is to traverse the scanning process by comparison; (5) The recognition accuracy and reaction time performance of vibrotactile display compares unfavourably with that of visual and auditory. The results from this study are important for designing vibrotactile display coding scheme.

  20. The use of interval ratios in consonance perception by rats (Rattus norvegicus) and humans (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Bojorque, Paola; Toro, Juan M

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, physical features in musical chords have been proposed to be at the root of consonance perception. Alternatively, recent studies suggest that different types of experience modulate some perceptual foundations for musical sounds. The present study tested whether the mechanisms involved in the perception of consonance are present in an animal with no extensive experience with harmonic stimuli and a relatively limited vocal repertoire. In Experiment 1, rats were trained to discriminate consonant from dissonant chords and tested to explore whether they could generalize such discrimination to novel chords. In Experiment 2, we tested if rats could discriminate between chords differing only in their interval ratios and generalize them to different octaves. To contrast the observed pattern of results, human adults were tested with the same stimuli in Experiment 3. Rats successfully discriminated across chords in both experiments, but they did not generalize to novel items in either Experiment 1 or Experiment 2. On the contrary, humans not only discriminated among both consonance-dissonance categories, and among sets of interval ratios, they also generalized their responses to novel items. These results suggest that experience with harmonic sounds may be required for the construction of categories among stimuli varying in frequency ratios. However, the discriminative capacity observed in rats suggests that at least some components of auditory processing needed to distinguish chords based on their interval ratios are shared across species.

  1. Human Perception of Physical Experiments and the Simplex Interpretation of Quantum Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaeva E. A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is argued that knowledge dividing the usual, unusual, transient and transcendental depends on human perception of the world (macro or micro and depends too on the inclusion of human consciousness in the system. For the analysis of this problem the idea of "Schrodinger’s cat" is employed. Transient and transcendental knowledge of the state of Schrodinger’s cat corresponds to the case when the observer’s consciousness is included in the system. Here it is possible to speak about the latent parameters of the sub quantum world of which Einstein was convinced. Knowledge of the unusual state of Schrodinger’s cat, simultaneously alive and dead, corresponds to a case of the open micro world. The usual knowledge of the state of Schrodinger’s cat (alive or dead corresponds to a case of the open macrocosm. Each world separately divides the objective and illusory.

  2. Human contact imagined during the production process increases food naturalness perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouab, Nathalie; Gomez, Pierrick

    2015-08-01

    It is well established that food processing and naturalness are not good friends, but is food processing always detrimental to naturalness? Building on the contagion principle, this research examines how production mode (handmade vs. machine-made) influences naturalness perceptions. In a pilot study (n = 69) and an experiment (n = 133), we found that compared with both a baseline condition and a condition in which the mode of production process was portrayed as machine-made, a handmade production mode increases naturalness ratings of a grape juice. A mediation analysis demonstrates that these effects result from higher perceived human contact suggesting that the production process may preserve food naturalness when humanized.

  3. A Colorful Equatorial Wonderland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Papua New Guinea (PNG) is one of the least visited countries in the world... a last frontier for international travelers. PNG is a colorful equatorial wonderland as well as a living example of human's culture 1000 years ago.

  4. Qualitative evaluations and comparisons of six night-vision colorization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Reese, Kristopher; Blasch, Erik; McManamon, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Current multispectral night vision (NV) colorization techniques can manipulate images to produce colorized images that closely resemble natural scenes. The colorized NV images can enhance human perception by improving observer object classification and reaction times especially for low light conditions. This paper focuses on the qualitative (subjective) evaluations and comparisons of six NV colorization methods. The multispectral images include visible (Red-Green- Blue), near infrared (NIR), and long wave infrared (LWIR) images. The six colorization methods are channel-based color fusion (CBCF), statistic matching (SM), histogram matching (HM), joint-histogram matching (JHM), statistic matching then joint-histogram matching (SM-JHM), and the lookup table (LUT). Four categries of quality measurements are used for the qualitative evaluations, which are contrast, detail, colorfulness, and overall quality. The score of each measurement is rated from 1 to 3 scale to represent low, average, and high quality, respectively. Specifically, high contrast (of rated score 3) means an adequate level of brightness and contrast. The high detail represents high clarity of detailed contents while maintaining low artifacts. The high colorfulness preserves more natural colors (i.e., closely resembles the daylight image). Overall quality is determined from the NV image compared to the reference image. Nine sets of multispectral NV images were used in our experiments. For each set, the six colorized NV images (produced from NIR and LWIR images) are concurrently presented to users along with the reference color (RGB) image (taken at daytime). A total of 67 subjects passed a screening test ("Ishihara Color Blindness Test") and were asked to evaluate the 9-set colorized images. The experimental results showed the quality order of colorization methods from the best to the worst: CBCF < SM < SM-JHM < LUT < JHM < HM. It is anticipated that this work will provide a benchmark for NV

  5. You are what you eat: within-subject increases in fruit and vegetable consumption confer beneficial skin-color changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D Whitehead

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fruit and vegetable consumption and ingestion of carotenoids have been found to be associated with human skin-color (yellowness in a recent cross-sectional study. This carotenoid-based coloration contributes beneficially to the appearance of health in humans and is held to be a sexually selected cue of condition in other species. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigate the effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin-color longitudinally to determine the magnitude and duration of diet change required to change skin-color perceptibly. Diet and skin-color were recorded at baseline and after three and six weeks, in a group of 35 individuals who were without makeup, self-tanning agents and/or recent intensive UV exposure. Six-week changes in fruit and vegetable consumption were significantly correlated with changes in skin redness and yellowness over this period, and diet-linked skin reflectance changes were significantly associated with the spectral absorption of carotenoids and not melanin. We also used psychophysical methods to investigate the minimum color change required to confer perceptibly healthier and more attractive skin-coloration. Modest dietary changes are required to enhance apparent health (2.91 portions per day and attractiveness (3.30 portions. CONCLUSIONS: Increased fruit and vegetable consumption confers measurable and perceptibly beneficial effects on Caucasian skin appearance within six weeks. This effect could potentially be used as a motivational tool in dietary intervention.

  6. The human factor: behavioral and neural correlates of humanized perception in moral decision making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasminka Majdandžić

    Full Text Available The extent to which people regard others as full-blown individuals with mental states ("humanization" seems crucial for their prosocial motivation towards them. Previous research has shown that decisions about moral dilemmas in which one person can be sacrificed to save multiple others do not consistently follow utilitarian principles. We hypothesized that this behavior can be explained by the potential victim's perceived humanness and an ensuing increase in vicarious emotions and emotional conflict during decision making. Using fMRI, we assessed neural activity underlying moral decisions that affected fictitious persons that had or had not been experimentally humanized. In implicit priming trials, participants either engaged in mentalizing about these persons (Humanized condition or not (Neutral condition. In subsequent moral dilemmas, participants had to decide about sacrificing these persons' lives in order to save the lives of numerous others. Humanized persons were sacrificed less often, and the activation pattern during decisions about them indicated increased negative affect, emotional conflict, vicarious emotions, and behavioral control (pgACC/mOFC, anterior insula/IFG, aMCC and precuneus/PCC. Besides, we found enhanced effective connectivity between aMCC and anterior insula, which suggests increased emotion regulation during decisions affecting humanized victims. These findings highlight the importance of others' perceived humanness for prosocial behavior - with aversive affect and other-related concern when imagining harming more "human-like" persons acting against purely utilitarian decisions.

  7. Model-based prediction of human hair color using DNA variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Branicki (Wojciech); F. Liu (Fan); K. van Duijn (Kate); J. Draus-Barini (Jolanta); E. Pośpiech (Ewelina); S. Walsh (Susan); T. Kupiec (Tomasz); A. Wojas-Pelc (Anna); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPredicting complex human phenotypes from genotypes is the central concept of widely advocated personalized medicine, but so far has rarely led to high accuracies limiting practical applications. One notable exception, although less relevant for medical but important for forensic purposes

  8. Model-based prediction of human hair color using DNA variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Branicki (Wojciech); F. Liu (Fan); K. van Duijn (Kate); J. Draus-Barini (Jolanta); E. Pośpiech (Ewelina); S. Walsh (Susan); T. Kupiec (Tomasz); A. Wojas-Pelc (Anna); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPredicting complex human phenotypes from genotypes is the central concept of widely advocated personalized medicine, but so far has rarely led to high accuracies limiting practical applications. One notable exception, although less relevant for medical but important for forensic

  9. Rural Dwellers’ Perception of Human Trafficking and its Implication for Agricultural Production in Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofuoku, A. U.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of rural dwellers on human trafficking in relation to its effect on agricultural production in the three Senatorial Districts of Edo State, Nigeria. A sample size of 120 household heads was used for the study. Structured questionnaire and interview schedule were used to collect data for the study. The data were analyzed using frequency counts, means and percentage while Chi-Square statistical model and Tobit regression analytical model were used to test the hypotheses. It was discovered that the household members were trafficked as a result of push and pull factors. The trafficked members of household were actively involved in farming practices before being trafficked. There is significant relationship between human trafficking and agriculture production. Shortage of farm labor, decreased farm size, reduced farm income, reduced farm output, extra expenditure on hired labor and storage of food supply by the community were perceived as effect of human trafficking on agriculture. Age of the household head and the household size had significant effect on the number of household member trafficked. Human trafficking has an adverse effect on agricultural production. Extension department should therefore integrate anti-human trafficking campaigns with their services to the farming population.

  10. Human tactile perception as a standard for artificial tactile sensing--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, J; Najarian, S

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the most important features of human skin tactile properties with special emphasis on the characteristics which are vital in the design of artificial systems. Contrary to the visual and auditory senses, the touch signal is not a well-defined quantity. As a result, the researchers of this field are still dealing with the basics of collecting the most relevant data. Following this, mimicking the sense of touch by producing artificial tactile skin is a challenging process. Although the sense of touch is widely distributed all over the human body, the tactile perception in the human hand is of great importance in terms of surgical and medical robotics applications. In this study, the role of various mechanoreceptors in the human hand, such as, RA, SA I, SA II, and PC units are discussed in relation to the stimuli like force, position, softness, and surface texture. Taking human hand as a suitable tactile model, the necessary engineering features of an artificial tactile sensor, such as, spatial and temporal resolutions, force sensitivity, and linearity, are being reviewed. In this work, we also report on the current and possible future applications of tactile sensors in various surgical procedures.

  11. Human Perception, SBS Sympsoms and Performance of Office Work during Exposure to Air Polluted by Building Materials and Personal Computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bako-Biro, Zsolt

    The present thesis deals with the impact of polluted air from building materials and personal computers on human perception, Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms and performance of office work. These effects have been studies in a series of experiments that are described in two different chapter......, each of them with one type of pollution source.......The present thesis deals with the impact of polluted air from building materials and personal computers on human perception, Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms and performance of office work. These effects have been studies in a series of experiments that are described in two different chapters...

  12. Watermarking spot colors in packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Alastair; Filler, TomáÅ.¡; Falkenstern, Kristyn; Bai, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In January 2014, Digimarc announced Digimarc® Barcode for the packaging industry to improve the check-out efficiency and customer experience for retailers. Digimarc Barcode is a machine readable code that carries the same information as a traditional Universal Product Code (UPC) and is introduced by adding a robust digital watermark to the package design. It is imperceptible to the human eye but can be read by a modern barcode scanner at the Point of Sale (POS) station. Compared to a traditional linear barcode, Digimarc Barcode covers the whole package with minimal impact on the graphic design. This significantly improves the Items per Minute (IPM) metric, which retailers use to track the checkout efficiency since it closely relates to their profitability. Increasing IPM by a few percent could lead to potential savings of millions of dollars for retailers, giving them a strong incentive to add the Digimarc Barcode to their packages. Testing performed by Digimarc showed increases in IPM of at least 33% using the Digimarc Barcode, compared to using a traditional barcode. A method of watermarking print ready image data used in the commercial packaging industry is described. A significant proportion of packages are printed using spot colors, therefore spot colors needs to be supported by an embedder for Digimarc Barcode. Digimarc Barcode supports the PANTONE spot color system, which is commonly used in the packaging industry. The Digimarc Barcode embedder allows a user to insert the UPC code in an image while minimizing perceptibility to the Human Visual System (HVS). The Digimarc Barcode is inserted in the printing ink domain, using an Adobe Photoshop plug-in as the last step before printing. Since Photoshop is an industry standard widely used by pre-press shops in the packaging industry, a Digimarc Barcode can be easily inserted and proofed.

  13. Ocean Color

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Satellite-derived Ocean Color Data sets from historical and currently operational NASA and International Satellite missions including the NASA Coastal Zone Color...

  14. Consequences of a human TRPA1 genetic variant on the perception of nociceptive and olfactory stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schütz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TRPA1 ion channels are involved in nociception and are also excited by pungent odorous substances. Based on reported associations of TRPA1 genetics with increased sensitivity to thermal pain stimuli, we therefore hypothesized that this association also exists for increased olfactory sensitivity. METHODS: Olfactory function and nociception was compared between carriers (n = 38 and non-carriers (n = 43 of TRPA1 variant rs11988795 G>A, a variant known to enhance cold pain perception. Olfactory function was quantified by assessing the odor threshold, odor discrimination and odor identification, and by applying 200-ms pulses of H2S intranasal. Nociception was assessed by measuring pain thresholds to experimental nociceptive stimuli (blunt pressure, electrical stimuli, cold and heat stimuli, and 200-ms intranasal pulses of CO2. RESULTS: Among the 11 subjects with moderate hyposmia, carriers of the minor A allele (n = 2 were underrepresented (34 carriers among the 70 normosmic subjects; p = 0.049. Moreover, carriers of the A allele discriminated odors significantly better than non-carriers (13.1±1.5 versus 12.3±1.6 correct discriminations and indicated a higher intensity of the H2S stimuli (29.2±13.2 versus 21±12.8 mm VAS, p = 0.006, which, however, could not be excluded to have involved a trigeminal component during stimulation. Finally, the increased sensitivity to thermal pain could be reproduced. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are in line with a previous association of a human TRPA1 variant with nociceptive parameters and extend the association to the perception of odorants. However, this addresses mainly those stimulants that involve a trigeminal component whereas a pure olfactory effect may remain disputable. Nevertheless, findings suggest that future TRPA1 modulating drugs may modify the perception of odorants.

  15. Entropy, color, and color rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Luke L A

    2012-12-01

    The Shannon entropy [Bell Syst. Tech J.27, 379 (1948)] of spectral distributions is applied to the problem of color rendering. With this novel approach, calculations for visual white entropy, spectral entropy, and color rendering are proposed, indices that are unreliant on the subjectivity inherent in reference spectra and color samples. The indices are tested against real lamp spectra, showing a simple and robust system for color rendering assessment. The discussion considers potential roles for white entropy in several areas of color theory and psychophysics and nonextensive entropy generalizations of the entropy indices in mathematical color spaces.

  16. Revisiting the importance of common body motion in human action perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Steven M; Lu, Hongjing

    2016-01-01

    Human actions are complex dynamic stimuli comprised of two principle motion components: 1) common body motion, which represents the translation of the body when a person moves through space, and 2) relative limb movements, resulting from articulation of limbs after factoring out common body motion. Historically, most research in biological motion has focused primarily on relative limb movements while discounting the role of common body motion in human action perception. The current study examined the relative contribution of posture change resulting from relative limb movements and translation of body position resulting from common body motion in discriminating human walking versus running actions. We found that faster translation speeds of common body motion evoked significantly more responses consistent with running when discriminating ambiguous actions morphed between walking and running. Furthermore, this influence was systematically modulated by the uncertainty associated with intrinsic cues as determined by the degree of limited-lifetime spatial sampling. The contribution of common body motion increased monotonically as the reliability of inferring posture changes on the basis of intrinsic cues decreased. These results highlight the importance of translational body movements and their interaction with posture change as a result of relative limb movements in discriminating human actions when visual input information is sparse and noisy.

  17. Modeling, Measuring, and Compensating Color Weak Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Satoshi; Mochizuki, Rika; Lenz, Reiner; Chao, Jinhui

    2016-06-01

    We use methods from Riemann geometry to investigate transformations between the color spaces of color-normal and color-weak observers. The two main applications are the simulation of the perception of a color weak observer for a color-normal observer, and the compensation of color images in a way that a color-weak observer has approximately the same perception as a color-normal observer. The metrics in the color spaces of interest are characterized with the help of ellipsoids defined by the just-noticeable-differences between the colors which are measured with the help of color-matching experiments. The constructed mappings are the isometries of Riemann spaces that preserve the perceived color differences for both observers. Among the two approaches to build such an isometry, we introduce normal coordinates in Riemann spaces as a tool to construct a global color-weak compensation map. Compared with the previously used methods, this method is free from approximation errors due to local linearizations, and it avoids the problem of shifting locations of the origin of the local coordinate system. We analyze the variations of the Riemann metrics for different observers obtained from new color-matching experiments and describe three variations of the basic method. The performance of the methods is evaluated with the help of semantic differential tests.

  18. Modelling, Measuring and Compensating Color Weak Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Satoshi; Mochizuki, Rika; Lenz, Reiner; Chao, Jinhui

    2016-03-08

    We use methods from Riemann geometry to investigate transformations between the color spaces of color-normal and color weak observers. The two main applications are the simulation of the perception of a color weak observer for a color normal observer and the compensation of color images in a way that a color weak observer has approximately the same perception as a color normal observer. The metrics in the color spaces of interest are characterized with the help of ellipsoids defined by the just-noticable-differences between color which are measured with the help of color-matching experiments. The constructed mappings are isometries of Riemann spaces that preserve the perceived color-differences for both observers. Among the two approaches to build such an isometry, we introduce normal coordinates in Riemann spaces as a tool to construct a global color-weak compensation map. Compared to previously used methods this method is free from approximation errors due to local linearizations and it avoids the problem of shifting locations of the origin of the local coordinate system. We analyse the variations of the Riemann metrics for different observers obtained from new color matching experiments and describe three variations of the basic method. The performance of the methods is evaluated with the help of semantic differential (SD) tests.

  19. Modeling, Measuring, and Compensating Color Weak Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Satoshi; Mochizuki, Rika; Lenz, Reiner; Chao, Jinhui

    2016-06-01

    We use methods from Riemann geometry to investigate transformations between the color spaces of color-normal and color weak observers. The two main applications are the simulation of the perception of a color weak observer for a color normal observer and the compensation of color images in a way that a color weak observer has approximately the same perception as a color normal observer. The metrics in the color spaces of interest are characterized with the help of ellipsoids defined by the just-noticable-differences between color which are measured with the help of color-matching experiments. The constructed mappings are isometries of Riemann spaces that preserve the perceived color-differences for both observers. Among the two approaches to build such an isometry, we introduce normal coordinates in Riemann spaces as a tool to construct a global color-weak compensation map. Compared to previously used methods this method is free from approximation errors due to local linearizations and it avoids the problem of shifting locations of the origin of the local coordinate system. We analyse the variations of the Riemann metrics for different observers obtained from new color matching experiments and describe three variations of the basic method. The performance of the methods is evaluated with the help of semantic differential (SD) tests.

  20. Segmentation of color images by chromaticity features using self-organizing maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid García-Lamont

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Usually, the segmentation of color images is performed using cluster-based methods and the RGB space to represent the colors. The drawback with these methods is the a priori knowledge of the number of groups, or colors, in the image; besides, the RGB space issensitive to the intensity of the colors. Humans can identify different sections within a scene by the chromaticity of its colors of, as this is the feature humans employ to tell them apart. In this paper, we propose to emulate the human perception of color by training a self-organizing map (SOM with samples of chromaticity of different colors. The image to process is mapped to the HSV space because in this space the chromaticity is decoupled from the intensity, while in the RGB space this is not possible. Our proposal does not require knowing a priori the number of colors within a scene, and non-uniform illumination does not significantly affect the image segmentation. We present experimental results using some images from the Berkeley segmentation database by employing SOMs with different sizes, which are segmented successfully using only chromaticity features.

  1. Attractive skin coloration: harnessing sexual selection to improve diet and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Ross D; Ozakinci, Gözde; Perrett, David I

    2012-12-20

    In this paper we review the mechanisms through which carotenoid coloration could provide a sexually selected cue to condition in species with elaborate color vision. Skin carotenoid pigmentation induced by fruit and vegetable consumption may provide a similar cue to health in humans (particularly light-skinned Asians and Caucasians). Evidence demonstrates that carotenoid-based skin coloration enhances apparent health, and that dietary change can perceptibly impact skin color within weeks. We find that the skin coloration associated with increased fruit and vegetable consumption benefits apparent health to a greater extent than melanin pigmentation. We argue that the benefits to appearance may motivate individuals to improve their diet and that this line of appearance research reveals a potentially powerful strategy for motivating a healthy lifestyle.

  2. Optimization of LED light spectrum to enhance colorfulness of illuminated objects with white light constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haining; Dong, Jianfei; Qi, Gaojin; Zhang, Guoqi

    2015-07-01

    Enhancing the colorfulness of illuminated objects is a promising application of LED lighting for commercial, exhibiting, and scientific purposes. This paper proposes a method to enhance the color of illuminated objects for a given polychromatic lamp. Meanwhile, the light color is restricted to white. We further relax the white light constraints by introducing soft margins. Based on the spectral and electrical characteristics of LEDs and object surface properties, we determine the optimal mixing of the LED light spectrum by solving a numerical optimization problem, which is a quadratic fractional programming problem by formulation. Simulation studies show that the trade-off between the white light constraint and the level of the color enhancement can be adjusted by tuning an upper limit value of the soft margin. Furthermore, visual evaluation experiments are performed to evaluate human perception of the color enhancement. The experiments have verified the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Attractive Skin Coloration: Harnessing Sexual Selection to Improve Diet and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D. Whitehead

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review the mechanisms through which carotenoid coloration could provide a sexually selected cue to condition in species with elaborate color vision. Skin carotenoid pigmentation induced by fruit and vegetable consumption may provide a similar cue to health in humans (particularly light-skinned Asians and Caucasians. Evidence demonstrates that carotenoid-based skin coloration enhances apparent health, and that dietary change can perceptibly impact skin color within weeks. We find that the skin coloration associated with increased fruit and vegetable consumption benefits apparent health to a greater extent than melanin pigmentation. We argue that the benefits to appearance may motivate individuals to improve their diet and that this line of appearance research reveals a potentially powerful strategy for motivating a healthy lifestyle.

  4. Food coloring agents and plant food supplements derived from Vitis vinifera: a new source of human exposure to ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solfrizzo, Michele; Piemontese, Luca; Gambacorta, Lucia; Zivoli, Rosanna; Longobardi, Francesco

    2015-04-08

    Grape pomaces are increasingly being used as starting material in the industrial production of plant food supplements (PFS), food coloring, and tartrates, but they are at risk of ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination, a mycotoxin with nephrotoxic and carcinogenic effects. We analyzed 24 commercial PFS and 13 food coloring samples derived from Vitis vinifera, mainly pomaces, using a HPLC-FLD method for OTA determination. OTA was found in 75% of PFS samples and 69% of food coloring samples at levels of food coloring agents derived from V. vinifera suggests that maximum permitted level(s) should be established for this mycotoxin in these products.

  5. Color invariance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geusebroek, J.M.; van den Boomgaard, R.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Geerts, H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the measurement of colored object reflectance, under different, general assumptions regarding the imaging conditions. We exploit the Gaussian scale-space paradigm for color images to define a framework for the robust measurement of object reflectance from color images. Object ref

  6. Human Resources Practitioners’ Perceptions Of Their Role And Responsibility In Managing HIV/Aids In Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. DE W. van Wyk

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The central question to be examined revolved around an analysis of the perceptions of Human Resources Practitioners regarding their role and responsibility in the management of HIV/AIDS in industry. A convenience sample of HR Practitioners was used in a cross-sectional design. A questionnaire measuring the constructs of managing HIV/AIDS in industry, as well as a biographical questionnaire was administered. The questionnaire proved to be reliable. A Cronbach alpha coefficient of 0,82 and 0,71 was obtained. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Results indicated that HR Practitioners experienced and perceived significant differences with regard to the implementation of their companies’ policy formation and -implementation, training needs of managers and employees, mentoring/ coaching -approaches and other AIDS-related issues in terms of their perceptions regarding the management of HIV/AIDS. The findings revealed a gap of knowledge on managing HIV/AIDS existing among HR Practitioners at all levels. While some HR Practitioners had a detailed knowledge of the disease and its prevention, others were ignorant about it, but agreed that the management of HIV/AIDS can be seen as an integral part of their daily role and responsibility in industry. Recommendations were proposed for future research, policy making and practice in the area of HIV/AIDS and the management thereof.

  7. Development and Validation of an Instrument to Assess Social Work Students' Perceptions, Knowledge, and Attitudes about Human Trafficking Questionnaire (PKA-HTQ): An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsonwu, Maura Busch; Welch-Brewer, Chiquitia; Heffron, Laurie Cook; Lemke, Melinda A.; Busch-Armendariz, Noel; Sulley, Caitlin; Cook, Sharon Warren; Lewis, Mary; Watson, Elizabeth; Moore, Wayne; Li, Jilan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of a tool designed to assess social work students' knowledge of and perceptions and attitudes toward human trafficking. To achieve this aim, the Perceptions, Knowledge, and Attitudes toward Human Trafficking Questionnaire (PKA-HTQ) was developed and its psychometric…

  8. Households' perception of climate change and human health risks: A community perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Md Aminul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bangladesh has been identified as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world concerning the adverse effects of climate change (CC. However, little is known about the perception of CC from the community, which is important for developing adaptation strategies. Methods The study was a cross-sectional survey of respondents from two villages--one from the northern part and the other from the southern part of Bangladesh. A total of 450 households were selected randomly through multistage sampling completed a semi-structure questionnaire. This was supplemented with 12 focus group discussions (FGDs and 15 key informant interviews (KIIs. Results Over 95 percent of the respondents reported that the heat during the summers had increased and 80.2 percent reported that rainfall had decreased, compared to their previous experiences. Approximately 65 percent reported that winters were warmer than in previous years but they still experienced very erratic and severe cold during the winter for about 5-7 days, which restricted their activities with very destructive effect on agricultural production, everyday life and the health of people. FGDs and KIIs also reported that overall winters were warmer. Eighty point two percent, 72.5 percent and 54.7 percent survey respondents perceived that the frequency of water, heat and cold related diseases/health problems, respectively, had increased compared to five to ten years ago. FGDs and KIIs respondents were also reported the same. Conclusions Respondents had clear perceptions about changes in heat, cold and rainfall that had occurred over the last five to ten years. Local perceptions of climate variability (CV included increased heat, overall warmer winters, reduced rainfall and fewer floods. The effects of CV were mostly negative in terms of means of living, human health, agriculture and overall livelihoods. Most local perceptions on CV are consistent with the evidence regarding the

  9. EEG Theta and Mu Oscillations during Perception of Human and Robot Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu A. Urgen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Perception of others’ actions supports important social skills, such as communication, intention understanding, and empathy. Are mechanisms of action processing in human brain specifically tuned to process biological agents? Humanoid robots can perform recognizable actions, but can look and move differently from humans so they can be used as stimuli to address such questions. Here, we recorded EEG during the observation of human and robot actions. Sensorimotor mu (8-13 Hz rhythm has been linked to the motor simulation aspect of action processing (and to human mirror neuron system, MNS and frontal theta (4-8 Hz rhythm to semantic and memory-related aspects. We explored whether these measures exhibit selectivity for biological entities: for whether the motion and/or the visual appearance of the observed agent is biological. Participants watched videos of three agents performing the same actions. The first was a Human, and had biological motion and appearance. The other two were a state-of-the-art robot in two different appearances: Android, which had biological appearance but mechanical motion, and Robot, which had mechanical motion and appearance. Observation of all agents induced significant attenuation in the power of mu oscillations that was equivalent for all agents. Thus, mu suppression, considered an index of the activity of the MNS, did not appear to be selective for biological agents. Observation of the Robot resulted in greater frontal theta activity compared to the Android and the Human, whereas the latter two did not differ from each other. Frontal theta activity thus appears to be sensitive to visual appearance, suggesting artificial agents that are not sufficiently biological in appearance may result in greater memory processing demands for the observer. Studies combining robotics and neuroscience thus can allow us to explore functional properties of action processing on the one hand, and help inform the design of social robots on

  10. Human perception of air movement. Impact of frequency and airflow direction on draught sensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genhong Zhou

    1999-08-01

    Draught is defined as an unwanted local cooling of the human body caused by air movement. Air velocity and temperature are the main characteristics of air movement in rooms. Characteristics of instantaneous air velocity and temperature records previously measured in ventilated indoor spaces were analyzed. Air velocity and temperature fluctuated randomly. The amplitude and frequency of the fluctuations changed over time. Air movements around the human body were measured with a three-dimensional laser Doppler amemometer. A new parameter, equivalent frequency, was defined as an integral single parameter for describing the frequency characteristics of air velocity. The equivalent frequency of a randomly fluctuating velocity is defined as the frequency of sinusoidal velocity fluctuations with the same ratio of the standard deviation of acceleration to the standard deviation of air velocity as in the random velocity fluctuations. The equivalent frequencies of numerous instantaneous air-velocity records measured in ventilated space were analysed. The equivalent frequency of an airflow in an indoor space was found to be 0.1 to 2 Hz. The equivalent frequencies of most of the airflows were between 0.2 and 0.6 Hz. The relation between equivalent frequency and mean air velocity and standard deviation was established. Experiments were performed to identify the impact of the equivalent frequency on the human perception of draught. Forty subjects (20 women and 20 men) were subjected to airflows from behind with mean air velocities of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 m/s, with equivalent frequencies from 0 to 1 Hz at an air temperature of 20 deg. C. In this human-subject experimental study the frequency was found to have a significant impact on draught sensation. Subjects were more sensitive to airflow at an equivalent frequency between 0.2 and 0.6 Hz. A mathematical model for the simulation of draught was established and a computer program was developed for simulating the draught. The program

  11. Using analogy to learn about phenomena at scales outside human perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Ilyse; Davatzes, Alexandra; Newcombe, Nora S; Shipley, Thomas F

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and reasoning about phenomena at scales outside human perception (for example, geologic time) is critical across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Thus, devising strong methods to support acquisition of reasoning at such scales is an important goal in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. In two experiments, we examine the use of analogical principles in learning about geologic time. Across both experiments we find that using a spatial analogy (for example, a time line) to make multiple alignments, and keeping all unrelated components of the analogy held constant (for example, keep the time line the same length), leads to better understanding of the magnitude of geologic time. Effective approaches also include hierarchically and progressively aligning scale information (Experiment 1) and active prediction in making alignments paired with immediate feedback (Experiments 1 and 2).

  12. Parenthetical Windows: A Project on How Artificial Light and Sound Architecture Affect Human Perception on Norms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemi, Esther; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    and darkness (activity and rest) are being measured. With the use of gesture recognition devices (e.g. Myo), visual and audio parameters are triggered in order for a chart of a “movement choreography”/ vocabulary to be analysed. The first draft of the research evaluates whether the user can distinguish...... (where artificial is in fashion) what we mostly attempt to value and evaluate within this research and installation is the enantiomorpous pattern of natural to artificial, aiming from the initial stage/ level to organize and manifest what the body perceives as real, and where it measures fatigue......Parenthetical Window is a project that engages scientific research in human perception providing a platform for users to experience their own limits and needs in their individual circadian rhythm. The presentation focuses on a case study in a community of dancers where the individual needs in light...

  13. Effects of exposure to noise and indoor air pollution on human perception and symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witterseh, Thomas; Wargocki, Pawel; Fang, Lei

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate human perception and SBS symptoms when people are exposed simultaneously to different levels of air pollution and ventilation noise. The air quality in an office was modified by placing or removing a carpet and the background noise level...... was modified by playing a recording of ventilation noise. Thirty female subjects, six at a time, occupied the office for 4.4 hours. The subjects assessed the air quality, the noise, and the indoor environment upon entering the office and on six occasions during occupation. Furthermore, SBS symptoms...... of the occupants were recorded throughout the exposure period. During occupation, the subjects performed simulated office work. The results show that elevated air pollution and noise in an office can interact and negatively affect office workers by increasing the prevalence of SBS symptoms. A moderate increase...

  14. The "Human Colour" Crayon: Investigating the Attitudes and Perceptions of Learners regarding Race and Skin Colour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeske Alexander

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Some coloured and black learners in South Africa use a light orange or pink crayon to represent themselves in art. Many learners name this colour “human colour” or “skin colour”. This is troublesome, because it could reflect exclusionary ways of representing race in images and language. This case study, conducted with two schools in the Western Cape, investigated Grade 3 learners’ attitudes and perceptions regarding race and skin colour through art processes and discussion. The aim was to promote critical engagement with race in Foundation Phase educational contexts. Suggestions include changing the language used to describe skin colour, just recognition and representation of races in educational resources and the promotion of critical citizenship education. This research indicates the need to create practical curriculum guidelines to discuss race issues in the South African classroom.

  15. The biology of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthill, Innes C; Allen, William L; Arbuckle, Kevin; Caspers, Barbara; Chaplin, George; Hauber, Mark E; Hill, Geoffrey E; Jablonski, Nina G; Jiggins, Chris D; Kelber, Almut; Mappes, Johanna; Marshall, Justin; Merrill, Richard; Osorio, Daniel; Prum, Richard; Roberts, Nicholas W; Roulin, Alexandre; Rowland, Hannah M; Sherratt, Thomas N; Skelhorn, John; Speed, Michael P; Stevens, Martin; Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Stuart-Fox, Devi; Talas, Laszlo; Tibbetts, Elizabeth; Caro, Tim

    2017-08-04

    Coloration mediates the relationship between an organism and its environment in important ways, including social signaling, antipredator defenses, parasitic exploitation, thermoregulation, and protection from ultraviolet light, microbes, and abrasion. Methodological breakthroughs are accelerating knowledge of the processes underlying both the production of animal coloration and its perception, experiments are advancing understanding of mechanism and function, and measurements of color collected noninvasively and at a global scale are opening windows to evolutionary dynamics more generally. Here we provide a roadmap of these advances and identify hitherto unrecognized challenges for this multi- and interdisciplinary field. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Color Categories and Color Appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Michael A.; Kay, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We examined categorical effects in color appearance in two tasks, which in part differed in the extent to which color naming was explicitly required for the response. In one, we measured the effects of color differences on perceptual grouping for hues that spanned the blue-green boundary, to test whether chromatic differences across the boundary…

  17. Color Categories and Color Appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Michael A.; Kay, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We examined categorical effects in color appearance in two tasks, which in part differed in the extent to which color naming was explicitly required for the response. In one, we measured the effects of color differences on perceptual grouping for hues that spanned the blue-green boundary, to test whether chromatic differences across the boundary…

  18. Extending human perception of electromagnetic radiation to the UV region through biologically inspired photochromic fuzzy logic (BIPFUL) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Pier Luigi; Rightler, Amanda L; Heron, B Mark; Gabbutt, Christopher D

    2016-01-25

    Photochromic fuzzy logic systems have been designed that extend human visual perception into the UV region. The systems are founded on a detailed knowledge of the activation wavelengths and quantum yields of a series of thermally reversible photochromic compounds. By appropriate matching of the photochromic behaviour unique colour signatures are generated in response differing UV activation frequencies.

  19. Interteaching within a Human Physiology Course: A Comparison of First- and Second-Year Students' Learning Skills and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Bruce; Guy, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This article describes student perceptions and outcomes in relation to the use of a novel interteaching approach. The study sample (n = 260) was taken from a large human physiology class, which included both first- and second-year students. However, unlike the first-year students, the second-year students had significant prior knowledge, having…

  20. Interteaching within a Human Physiology Course: A Comparison of First- and Second-Year Students' Learning Skills and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Bruce; Guy, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This article describes student perceptions and outcomes in relation to the use of a novel interteaching approach. The study sample (n = 260) was taken from a large human physiology class, which included both first- and second-year students. However, unlike the first-year students, the second-year students had significant prior knowledge, having…

  1. EEG theta and Mu oscillations during perception of human and robot actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgen, Burcu A; Plank, Markus; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Poizner, Howard; Saygin, Ayse P

    2013-01-01

    The perception of others' actions supports important skills such as communication, intention understanding, and empathy. Are mechanisms of action processing in the human brain specifically tuned to process biological agents? Humanoid robots can perform recognizable actions, but can look and move differently from humans, and as such, can be used in experiments to address such questions. Here, we recorded EEG as participants viewed actions performed by three agents. In the Human condition, the agent had biological appearance and motion. The other two conditions featured a state-of-the-art robot in two different appearances: Android, which had biological appearance but mechanical motion, and Robot, which had mechanical appearance and motion. We explored whether sensorimotor mu (8-13 Hz) and frontal theta (4-8 Hz) activity exhibited selectivity for biological entities, in particular for whether the visual appearance and/or the motion of the observed agent was biological. Sensorimotor mu suppression has been linked to the motor simulation aspect of action processing (and the human mirror neuron system, MNS), and frontal theta to semantic and memory-related aspects. For all three agents, action observation induced significant attenuation in the power of mu oscillations, with no difference between agents. Thus, mu suppression, considered an index of MNS activity, does not appear to be selective for biological agents. Observation of the Robot resulted in greater frontal theta activity compared to the Android and the Human, whereas the latter two did not differ from each other. Frontal theta thus appears to be sensitive to visual appearance, suggesting agents that are not sufficiently biological in appearance may result in greater memory processing demands for the observer. Studies combining robotics and neuroscience such as this one can allow us to explore neural basis of action processing on the one hand, and inform the design of social robots on the other.

  2. Object color affects identification and repetition priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttl, Bob; Graf, Peter; Santacruz, Pilar

    2006-10-01

    We investigated the influence of color on the identification of both non-studied and studied objects. Participants studied black and white and color photos of common objects and memory was assessed with an identification test. Consistent with our meta-analysis of prior research, we found that objects were easier to identify from color than from black and white photos. We also found substantial priming in all conditions, and study-to-test changes in an object's color reduced the magnitude of priming. Color-specific priming effects were large for color-complex objects, but minimal for color-simple objects. The pattern and magnitude of priming effects was not influenced either by the extent to which an object always appears in the same color (i.e., whether a color is symptomatic of an object) or by the object's origin (natural versus fabricated). We discuss the implications of our findings for theoretical accounts of object perception and repetition priming.

  3. Racial and Ethnic Group Knowledge, Perceptions and Behaviors about Human Papillomavirus, Human Papillomavirus Vaccination, and Cervical Cancer among Adolescent Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Sharon M; Cartmell, Kathleen B; Lopez, Cristina M; Ford, Marvella E; Brandt, Heather M; Gore, Elena I; Zapka, Jane G; Alberg, Anthony J

    2016-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provide an opportunity to greatly reduce the burden of cervical cancer. Although there has been improvement in uptake, there are notable ethnic/racial disparities. This qualitative study was conducted to better understand factors related to vaccine uptake among female adolescents from 3 racial/ethnic groups: African American (AA), Hispanic, and Caucasian. Findings can inform the development of optimal messages and strategies for clinical and population-based interventions. This mixed-methods descriptive study included completion of a brief structured survey and focus group discussion. Six focus groups were conducted with female adolescents, 2 each in the AA, Hispanic, and Caucasian groups. Brief structured survey questions and the focus group protocol addressed knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors related to HPV, HPV vaccination, and cervical cancer. Participants were 60 female adolescents (ages 13-19, mean age = 16.6 years) recruited from high schools, public health clinics, and churches. Themes across questions were remarkably similar among AA, Hispanic, and Caucasian participants. Each group had high awareness of the terms HPV, HPV vaccination, and cervical cancer, but with little in-depth knowledge about these topics. There was a high acceptance of HPV vaccination. Misperceptions about optimal cervical cancer prevention strategies such as simply knowing one's partner and good hygiene were most common among Hispanic adolescents. Awareness about Pap testing was most common among Caucasian adolescents. Predominantly uniform perceptions of HPV vaccines across racial/ethnic groups suggest a "one size fits all" approach will likely have greater reach with cervical cancer prevention messaging than culturally tailored interventions. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Color Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrolstad, Ronald E.; Smith, Daniel E.

    Color, flavor, and texture are the three principal quality attributes that determine food acceptance, and color has a far greater influence on our judgment than most of us appreciate. We use color to determine if a banana is at our preferred ripeness level, and a discolored meat product can warn us that the product may be spoiled. The marketing departments of our food corporations know that, for their customers, the color must be "right." The University of California Davis scorecard for wine quality designates four points out of 20, or 20% of the total score, for color and appearance (1). Food scientists who establish quality control specifications for their product are very aware of the importance of color and appearance. While subjective visual assessment and use of visual color standards are still used in the food industry, instrumental color measurements are extensively employed. Objective measurement of color is desirable for both research and industrial applications, and the ruggedness, stability, and ease of use of today's color measurement instruments have resulted in their widespread adoption.

  5. Processing of Color Words Activates Color Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tobias; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether color representations are routinely activated when color words are processed. Congruency effects of colors and color words were observed in both directions. Lexical decisions on color words were faster when preceding colors matched the color named by the word. Color-discrimination responses…

  6. 感知媒体--机器感知与人机交互%Perceptive Media: Machine Perception and Human Computer Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Computer hardware has always changed rapidly, but input/output devices, interaction techniques, and software for human-computer interaction have not experienced similar growth and improvement. The GUI-based style of interaction has made computers simpler and easier to use, especially for office productivity applications where computers are used as tools to accomplish specific tasks. However, as the way we use computers changes and computing becomes more pervasive and ubiquitous, largely due to advances in bandwidth and mobility, GUIs will not easily support the range of interactions necessary to meet users' needs. In order to accommodate a wider range of scenarios, tasks, users, and preferences, we need to move toward interfaces that are natural, intuitive, adaptive, and unobtrusive. "Perceptive media" is an interdisciplinary initiative to combine multimedia display and machine perception to create useful, adaptive, responsive interfaces between people and technology. This article describes and investigates aspects of perceptive media and gives examples of work in one particular sub-area, Vision Based Interfaces.

  7. How the unique configuration of the human head may enhance flavor perception capabilities: an evolutionary perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Lieberman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since flavor derives from the synthesis of taste, somatosensation and smell, one of the most important factors in the ability to perceive flavor is retronasal olfaction in which volatile compounds pass from the oral cavity through the pharynx to the olfactory epithelium. Retronasal olfaction has been documented in both humans and rodents, but appears less effective in rodents than orthonasal olfaction because expired air does not come into as much contact with the sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium as inspired air [1,2]. Detailed comparisons of retronasal airflow patterns among different species have not been conducted, but several lines of evidence lead to the hypothesis that retronasal airflow may be specially enhanced in humans because of four derived features of the human head and neck that evolved at different stages because of selection for functions other than olfaction [3]. If so, then human flavor perception capabilities may be more derived than is commonly appreciated, and perhaps played a role in selecting for the evolution of cooking. The first derived adaptation that aids human retronasal olfaction is the absence of the transverse lamina, a horizontal shelf of bone that partitions the olfactory chamber of the nasal fossa from the more inferior respiratory passage. This lamina, which is present in most mammals, was lost during the evolution of monkeys (haplorhines from more primitive primates (strepsirhines as part of a reorganization of the nasal cavity. The function of the transverse lamina has not been tested but it probably aids orthonasal olfaction by trapping inspired air in the olfactory region. Loss of the transverse lamina is commonly interpreted to be one of several trade-offs in primate evolution that favored vision over olfaction [4], but it likely benefits retronasal olfaction by permitting a direct pathway for expired air to flow towards the olfactory epithelium. A second derived adaptation present in humans is

  8. Color-Based Image Retrieval Using Perceptually Modified Hausdorff Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park BoGun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In most content-based image retrieval systems, the color information is extensively used for its simplicity and generality. Due to its compactness in characterizing the global information, a uniform quantization of colors, or a histogram, has been the most commonly used color descriptor. However, a cluster-based representation, or a signature, has been proven to be more compact and theoretically sound than a histogram for increasing the discriminatory power and reducing the gap between human perception and computer-aided retrieval system. Despite of these advantages, only few papers have broached dissimilarity measure based on the cluster-based nonuniform quantization of colors. In this paper, we extract the perceptual representation of an original color image, a statistical signature by modifying general color signature, which consists of a set of points with statistical volume. Also we present a novel dissimilarity measure for a statistical signature called Perceptually Modified Hausdorff Distance (PMHD that is based on the Hausdorff distance. In the result, the proposed retrieval system views an image as a statistical signature, and uses the PMHD as the metric between statistical signatures. The precision versus recall results show that the proposed dissimilarity measure generally outperforms all other dissimilarity measures on an unmodified commercial image database.

  9. A Robust Color Object Analysis Approach to Efficient Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruofei Zhang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel indexing and retrieval methodology integrating color, texture, and shape information for content-based image retrieval in image databases. This methodology, we call CLEAR, applies unsupervised image segmentation to partition an image into a set of objects. Fuzzy color histogram, fuzzy texture, and fuzzy shape properties of each object are then calculated to be its signature. The fuzzification procedures effectively resolve the recognition uncertainty stemming from color quantization and human perception of colors. At the same time, the fuzzy scheme incorporates segmentation-related uncertainties into the retrieval algorithm. An adaptive and effective measure for the overall similarity between images is developed by integrating properties of all the objects in every image. In an effort to further improve the retrieval efficiency, a secondary clustering technique is developed and employed, which significantly saves query processing time without compromising retrieval precision. A prototypical system of CLEAR, we developed, demonstrated the promising retrieval performance and robustness in color variations and segmentation-related uncertainties for a test database containing 10 000 general-purpose color images, as compared with its peer systems in the literature.

  10. Evolution of the circuitry for conscious color vision in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitz, J; Neitz, M

    2017-02-01

    There are many ganglion cell types and subtypes in our retina that carry color information. These have appeared at different times over the history of the evolution of the vertebrate visual system. They project to several different places in the brain and serve a variety of purposes allowing wavelength information to contribute to diverse visual functions. These include circadian photoentrainment, regulation of sleep and mood, guidance of orienting movements, detection and segmentation of objects. Predecessors to some of the circuits serving these purposes presumably arose before mammals evolved and different functions are represented by distinct ganglion cell types. However, while other animals use color information to elicit motor movements and regulate activity rhythms, as do humans, using phylogenetically ancient circuitry, the ability to appreciate color appearance may have been refined in ancestors to primates, mediated by a special set of ganglion cells that serve only that purpose. Understanding the circuitry for color vision has implications for the possibility of treating color blindness using gene therapy by recapitulating evolution. In addition, understanding how color is encoded, including how chromatic and achromatic percepts are separated is a step toward developing a complete picture of the diversity of ganglion cell types and their functions. Such knowledge could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies for blinding eye disorders that rely on stimulating elements in the retina, where more than 50 different neuron types are organized into circuits that transform signals from photoreceptors into specialized detectors many of which are not directly involved in conscious vision.

  11. Coupled nonlinear-diffusion color image sharpening based on the chromaticity-brightness model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takahiro; Nosaka, Reina; Komatsu, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Previously we have presented a selective image sharpening method based on the coupled nonlinear diffusion process composed of a nonlinear diffusion term, a fidelity term and an isotropic peaking term, and it can sharpen only blurred edges without increasing the noise visibility. Our previously presented prototypal color-image sharpening methods based on the coupled nonlinear-diffusion process have been formulated on the linear color models, namely, the channel-bychannel model and the 3D vectorial model. Our prototypal methods can sharpen blurred color step edges, but they do not necessarily enhance contrasts of signal variations in complex texture image regions so well as in simple step-edge regions. To remedy the drawback, this paper extends our coupled nonlinear-diffusion color-image sharpening method to the nonlinear non-flat color model, namely, the chromaticity-brightness model, which is known to be closely relating to human color perception. We modify our time-evolution PDE's for the non-flat space of the chromaticity vector and present its digital implementations. Through experimental simulations, we compare our new color-image sharpening method based on the chromaticity-brightness model with our prototypal color-image sharpening methods based on the linear color models.

  12. Colored operads

    CERN Document Server

    Yau, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this book is the theory of operads and colored operads, sometimes called symmetric multicategories. A (colored) operad is an abstract object which encodes operations with multiple inputs and one output and relations between such operations. The theory originated in the early 1970s in homotopy theory and quickly became very important in algebraic topology, algebra, algebraic geometry, and even theoretical physics (string theory). Topics covered include basic graph theory, basic category theory, colored operads, and algebras over colored operads. Free colored operads are discussed in complete detail and in full generality. The intended audience of this book includes students and researchers in mathematics and other sciences where operads and colored operads are used. The prerequisite for this book is minimal. Every major concept is thoroughly motivated. There are many graphical illustrations and about 150 exercises. This book can be used in a graduate course and for independent study.

  13. Infants' Recognition of Objects Using Canonical Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Wada, Yuji; Yang, Jiale; Otsuka, Yumiko; Dan, Ippeita; Masuda, Tomohiro; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.

    2010-01-01

    We explored infants' ability to recognize the canonical colors of daily objects, including two color-specific objects (human face and fruit) and a non-color-specific object (flower), by using a preferential looking technique. A total of 58 infants between 5 and 8 months of age were tested with a stimulus composed of two color pictures of an object…

  14. Perception and Processing of Faces in the Human Brain Is Tuned to Typical Feature Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Alvarez, Ivan; Lawson, Rebecca P.; Henriksson, Linda; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Rees, Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Faces are salient social stimuli whose features attract a stereotypical pattern of fixations. The implications of this gaze behavior for perception and brain activity are largely unknown. Here, we characterize and quantify a retinotopic bias implied by typical gaze behavior toward faces, which leads to eyes and mouth appearing most often in the upper and lower visual field, respectively. We found that the adult human visual system is tuned to these contingencies. In two recognition experiments, recognition performance for isolated face parts was better when they were presented at typical, rather than reversed, visual field locations. The recognition cost of reversed locations was equal to ∼60% of that for whole face inversion in the same sample. Similarly, an fMRI experiment showed that patterns of activity evoked by eye and mouth stimuli in the right inferior occipital gyrus could be separated with significantly higher accuracy when these features were presented at typical, rather than reversed, visual field locations. Our findings demonstrate that human face perception is determined not only by the local position of features within a face context, but by whether features appear at the typical retinotopic location given normal gaze behavior. Such location sensitivity may reflect fine-tuning of category-specific visual processing to retinal input statistics. Our findings further suggest that retinotopic heterogeneity might play a role for face inversion effects and for the understanding of conditions affecting gaze behavior toward faces, such as autism spectrum disorders and congenital prosopagnosia. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Faces attract our attention and trigger stereotypical patterns of visual fixations, concentrating on inner features, like eyes and mouth. Here we show that the visual system represents face features better when they are shown at retinal positions where they typically fall during natural vision. When facial features were shown at typical (rather

  15. Our Faces in the Dog's Brain: Functional Imaging Reveals Temporal Cortex Activation during Perception of Human Faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuaya, Laura V; Hernández-Pérez, Raúl; Concha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have a rich social relationship with humans. One fundamental aspect of it is how dogs pay close attention to human faces in order to guide their behavior, for example, by recognizing their owner and his/her emotional state using visual cues. It is well known that humans have specific brain regions for the processing of other human faces, yet it is unclear how dogs' brains process human faces. For this reason, our study focuses on describing the brain correlates of perception of human faces in dogs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We trained seven domestic dogs to remain awake, still and unrestrained inside an MRI scanner. We used a visual stimulation paradigm with block design to compare activity elicited by human faces against everyday objects. Brain activity related to the perception of faces changed significantly in several brain regions, but mainly in the bilateral temporal cortex. The opposite contrast (i.e., everyday objects against human faces) showed no significant brain activity change. The temporal cortex is part of the ventral visual pathway, and our results are consistent with reports in other species like primates and sheep, that suggest a high degree of evolutionary conservation of this pathway for face processing. This study introduces the temporal cortex as candidate to process human faces, a pillar of social cognition in dogs.

  16. Assessing human-dog conflicts in Todos Santos, Guatemala: bite incidences and public perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunney, Meg; Jones, Andria; Stiles, Enid; Waltner-Toews, David

    2011-12-15

    The issues surrounding dog bites are a major public health concern, particularly in areas of low income where accessibility to adequate health care, veterinary medicine and sufficient management of canine population control is low. An understanding of the risk factors associated with human-dog conflicts may be important when establishing dog bite and disease prevention strategies. In May 2008, a census of 12 consociated neighbourhoods in Todos Santos, Guatemala was conducted to investigate dog bite incidences and the public perception of free-roaming dog populations. Approximately 16.5% (78/472) of households reported at least one dog bite between May 2006 and May 2008. In total, 85 incidents occurred: 49.4% (42/85) with adults (≥18 years) and 50.6% (43/85) children (dog bites by victim gender or among age categories, there was a non-significant trend of higher cumulative incidence of dog bites in children aged six to 17 years compared to other age categories. The anatomical location of the bite varied, but bites to the legs were the most common (73/85; 85.9%). Of the 85 reported dog bites, 5.9% (5/85) were from dogs from the victims' own households, 48.2% (41/85) were from a neighbour's dog, 9.4% (8/85) were from dogs regularly seen in the community, and 15.3% (13/85) were from dogs not regularly seen in the community; the ownership status of the latter two categories of dogs could not be determined. Approximately 21% (18/85) of respondents did not know the type of dog that bit. Residents were asked for their opinions on potential problems associated with dogs in the community. The majority of respondents strongly agreed that dogs posed physical risks (78.8%; 372/472), could transmit infections to people (88.6%; 418/472), scared the family (82.4%; 389/472) and were too high in number (82.6%; 390/472). There were significant but weak correlations between owning a dog and expressing negative perceptions of community dogs (Spearman rhodog bite was not significantly

  17. Involvement of the calcium-sensing receptor in human taste perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsu, Takeaki; Amino, Yusuke; Nagasaki, Hiroaki; Yamanaka, Tomohiko; Takeshita, Sen; Hatanaka, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Yutaka; Miyamura, Naohiro; Eto, Yuzuru

    2010-01-08

    By human sensory analyses, we found that various extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) agonists enhance sweet, salty, and umami tastes, although they have no taste themselves. These characteristics are known as "kokumi taste" and often appear in traditional Japanese cuisine. Although GSH is a typical kokumi taste substance (taste enhancer), its mode of action is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate how the kokumi taste is enhanced by the CaSR, a close relative of the class C G-protein-coupled receptors T1R1, T1R2, and T1R3 (sweet and umami receptors). We identified a large number of CaSR agonist gamma-glutamyl peptides, including GSH (gamma-Glu-Cys-Gly) and gamma-Glu-Val-Gly, and showed that these peptides elicit the kokumi taste. Further analyses revealed that some known CaSR agonists such as Ca(2+), protamine, polylysine, L-histidine, and cinacalcet (a calcium-mimetic drug) also elicit the kokumi taste and that the CaSR-specific antagonist, NPS-2143, significantly suppresses the kokumi taste. This is the first report indicating a distinct function of the CaSR in human taste perception.

  18. Human Perception of Physical Experiments and the Simplex Interpretation of Quantum Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaeva E. A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is argued that knowledge dividing the usual, unusual, transient and transcendental depends on human perception of the world (macro or micro and depends too on the inclusion of human consciousness in the system. For the analysis of this problem the idea of “Schrödinger’s cat” is employed. Transient and transcendental knowledge of the state of Schrödinger’s cat corresponds to the case when the observer’s consciousness is included in the system. Here it is possible to speak about the latent parameters of the sub quantum world of which Einstein was convinced. Knowledge of the unusual state of Schrödinger’s cat, simultaneously alive and dead, corresponds to a case of the open micro world. The usual knowledge of the state of Schrödinger’s cat (alive or dead corresponds to a case of the open macrocosm. Each world separately divides the objective and illusory.

  19. The First Appearance of Symmetry in the Human Lineage: Where Perception Meets Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Hodgson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although symmetry may be important for understanding the selection of form in art over the historical period, this preference may have originally stemmed from certain basic perceptual mechanism that initially arose during prehistory. The first signs of an awareness to symmetry can be found in the archaeological record with the arrival of Acheulean handaxes, especially those dating from 500,000 years ago onwards, which are typified by a prodigious bilateral symmetry. As handaxes represent the earliest material record of an interest in symmetry by the human lineage, they provide a privileged means of understanding why this kind of form came to be valued by later human groups, particularly in relation to “art”. Although still controversial, the preference for symmetry at such an early date has been linked to various aspects of perception relating to enduring evolutionary factors. In this regard, it will be demonstrated how the preference for symmetrical Acheulean tools arose out of long standing perceptual correlates relating to ecological factors that predated the arrival of hominins.

  20. Perceptions and Experiences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Testing among Low-Income Mexican Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Maldonado, Leith; Wentzell, Emily; Brown, Brandon; Allen-Leigh, Betania; Torres-Ibarra, Leticia; Salmerón, Jorge; Billings, Deborah L; Thrasher, James F; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    HPV infection causes cervical cancer, a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among low-income Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing is now a primary screening strategy in Mexico's early cervical cancer detection program (ECDP). Research on Mexican women's perceptions of HPV and testing is necessary for establishing culturally appropriate protocols and educational materials. Here, we explore perceptions about HPV and HPV-related risk factors among low-income Mexican ECDP participants. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 ECDP participants from two primary care health clinics in Michoacán state, Mexico. Interviews addressed women's understandings of and experiences with HPV and HPV testing. Analysis was inductive and guided by the Health Belief Model with a focus on gender. Women's confusion about HPV and HPV screening caused emotional distress. They understood HPV to be a serious disease that would always cause severe symptoms, often characterizing it as analogous to HIV or inevitably carcinogenic. Women also attributed it to men's sexual behaviors, specifically infidelity and poor hygiene. Women described both sexes' desire for sex as natural but understood men's negative practices of masculinity, like infidelity, as the causes of women's HPV infection. Some women believed dirty public bathrooms or heredity could also cause HPV transmission. These results are consistent with prior findings that geographically and economically diverse populations lack clear understandings of the nature, causes, or symptoms of HPV, even among those receiving HPV testing. Our findings also reveal that local cultural discourse relating to masculinity, along with failure to provide sufficient education to low-income and indigenous-language speaking patients, exacerbate women's negative emotions surrounding HPV testing. While negative emotions did not deter women from seeking testing, they could be ameliorated with better health education and

  1. Perceptions and Experiences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV Infection and Testing among Low-Income Mexican Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leith León-Maldonado

    Full Text Available HPV infection causes cervical cancer, a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among low-income Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA testing is now a primary screening strategy in Mexico's early cervical cancer detection program (ECDP. Research on Mexican women's perceptions of HPV and testing is necessary for establishing culturally appropriate protocols and educational materials. Here, we explore perceptions about HPV and HPV-related risk factors among low-income Mexican ECDP participants.We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 ECDP participants from two primary care health clinics in Michoacán state, Mexico. Interviews addressed women's understandings of and experiences with HPV and HPV testing. Analysis was inductive and guided by the Health Belief Model with a focus on gender.Women's confusion about HPV and HPV screening caused emotional distress. They understood HPV to be a serious disease that would always cause severe symptoms, often characterizing it as analogous to HIV or inevitably carcinogenic. Women also attributed it to men's sexual behaviors, specifically infidelity and poor hygiene. Women described both sexes' desire for sex as natural but understood men's negative practices of masculinity, like infidelity, as the causes of women's HPV infection. Some women believed dirty public bathrooms or heredity could also cause HPV transmission.These results are consistent with prior findings that geographically and economically diverse populations lack clear understandings of the nature, causes, or symptoms of HPV, even among those receiving HPV testing. Our findings also reveal that local cultural discourse relating to masculinity, along with failure to provide sufficient education to low-income and indigenous-language speaking patients, exacerbate women's negative emotions surrounding HPV testing. While negative emotions did not deter women from seeking testing, they could be ameliorated with better health

  2. An innovative color LCD using three color bank scrolling backlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Chang; Lin, Jui-Lung

    2009-02-01

    In order to improve the approach of the conventional LCD colored image display that has been using color filter, this research is to lead a unique innovative design by using three colors bank scrolling backlight. The backlight scrolling uses Light-Emitting-Diodes (LEDs) to replace the conventional cold cathode fluorescent lamp for fleetly light alternating between Red, Green, and Blue. Images with bank segments can be displayed in terms of RGB colors in time series. According to the human persistence of vision effect, a colorful image can be demonstrated. The advantages of this three color bank scrolling can provide a cost saving because there is no color-filter of the display, resolution tripling with RGB on the same pixel, and abundant in color saturation for the selection of dedicating wavelength LEDs color mixture. Practically, this research contents the experiments of three color bank scrolling, a building up of the prototype for backlight system, optics adjustment for a proper color mixture. The results of this research show the system not only could displace the color filter but also triple the resolution. Consequently, the system is practicable and can be proposed as a new innovation to LCD industry.

  3. Sleep deprivation influences diurnal variation of human time perception with prefrontal activity change: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Soshi

    Full Text Available Human short-time perception shows diurnal variation. In general, short-time perception fluctuates in parallel with circadian clock parameters, while diurnal variation seems to be modulated by sleep deprivation per se. Functional imaging studies have reported that short-time perception recruits a neural network that includes subcortical structures, as well as cortical areas involving the prefrontal cortex (PFC. It has also been reported that the PFC is vulnerable to sleep deprivation, which has an influence on various cognitive functions. The present study is aimed at elucidating the influence of PFC vulnerability to sleep deprivation on short-time perception, using the optical imaging technique of functional near-infrared spectroscopy. Eighteen participants performed 10-s time production tasks before (at 21:00 and after (at 09:00 experimental nights both in sleep-controlled and sleep-deprived conditions in a 4-day laboratory-based crossover study. Compared to the sleep-controlled condition, one-night sleep deprivation induced a significant reduction in the produced time simultaneous with an increased hemodynamic response in the left PFC at 09:00. These results suggest that activation of the left PFC, which possibly reflects functional compensation under a sleep-deprived condition, is associated with alteration of short-time perception.

  4. Perceptual transparency in neon color spreading displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekroll, Vebjørn; Faul, Franz

    2002-08-01

    In neon color spreading displays, both a color illusion and perceptual transparency can be seen. In this study, we investigated the color conditions for the perception of transparency in such displays. It was found that the data are very well accounted for by a generalization of Metelli's (1970) episcotister model of balanced perceptual transparency to tristimulus values. This additive model correctly predicted which combinations of colors would lead to optimal impressions of transparency. Color combinations deviating slightly from the additive model also looked transparent, but less convincingly so.

  5. School Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, Perceptions of Role as Opinion Leader, and Professional Practice Regarding Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany L.; Goodson, Patricia; Thompson, Bruce; Wilson, Kelly L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Because human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rates remain low, we evaluated US school nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of their role as opinion leaders, and professional practice regarding HPV vaccine, and assessed whether knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of being an opinion leader influenced their professional…

  6. Some new aspects of color stereoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.J.

    1960-01-01

    By the term color stereoscopy we mean that the color of an object has an influence on its apparent distance in binocular perception. It is usually explained in terms of the chromatic aberration of the eye, together with the eccentric position of the fovea. In this paper we demonstrate that this theo

  7. Some new aspects of color stereoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.J.

    1960-01-01

    By the term color stereoscopy we mean that the color of an object has an influence on its apparent distance in binocular perception. It is usually explained in terms of the chromatic aberration of the eye, together with the eccentric position of the fovea. In this paper we demonstrate that this

  8. Biomimetic MEMS to assist, enhance, and expand human sensory perceptions: a survey on state-of-the-art developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarczuk, Teresa; Matin, Tina R.; Karman, Salmah B.; Diah, S. Zaleha M.; Davaji, Benyamin; Macqueen, Mark O.; Mueller, Jeanette; Schmid, Ulrich; Gebeshuber, Ille C.

    2011-06-01

    The human senses are of extraordinary value but we cannot change them even if this proves to be a disadvantage in modern times. However, we can assist, enhance and expand these senses via MEMS. Current MEMS cover the range of the human sensory system, and additionally provide data about signals that are too weak for the human sensory system (in terms of signal strength) and signal types that are not covered by the human sensory system. Biomimetics deals with knowledge transfer from biology to technology. In our interdisciplinary approach existing MEMS sensor designs shall be modified and adapted (to keep costs at bay), via biomimetic knowledge transfer of outstanding sensory perception in 'best practice' organisms (e.g. thermoreception, UV sensing, electromagnetic sense). The MEMS shall then be linked to the human body (mainly ex corpore to avoid ethics conflicts), to assist, enhance and expand human sensory perception. This paper gives an overview of senses in humans and animals, respective MEMS sensors that are already on the market and gives a list of possible applications of such devices including sensors that vibrate when a blind person approaches a kerb stone edge and devices that allow divers better orientation under water (echolocation, ultrasound).

  9. Getting the point across: exploring the effects of dynamic virtual humans in an interactive museum exhibit on user perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Gutierrez, Diego; Ferdig, Rick; Li, Jian; Lok, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    We have created “You, M.D.”, an interactive museum exhibit in which users learn about topics in public health literacy while interacting with virtual humans. You, M.D. is equipped with a weight sensor, a height sensor and a Microsoft Kinect that gather basic user information. Conceptually, You, M.D. could use this user information to dynamically select the appearance of the virtual humans in the interaction attempting to improve learning outcomes and user perception for each particular user. For this concept to be possible, a better understanding of how different elements of the visual appearance of a virtual human affects user perceptions is required. In this paper, we present the results of an initial user study with a large sample size (n =333) ran using You, M.D. The study measured users’ reactions based on the user’s gender and body-mass index (BMI) when facing virtual humans with BMI either concordant or discordant from the user’s BMI. The results of the study indicate that concordance between the users’ BMI and the virtual human’s BMI affects male and female users differently. The results also show that female users rate virtual humans as more knowledgeable than male users rate the same virtual humans.

  10. Evaluation of the Artificial Neural Network for Color Discrimination : Discrimination of Non-learned Colors

    OpenAIRE

    Tayagaki, Yasuko; Sekiya, Satoko; Sekine, Seishi; Ohkawa, Masashi

    2004-01-01

    Our research purpose is to build an artificial neural network with an excellent color discrimination capability like human being on a computer. In this study, we built the network, which was trained to learn 10 colors with different hues in the Munsell color system. Then, we examined the response of the trained network when the network was interrogated about 10 non-learned colors. The network showed a good color discrimination capability, close to that of human being.

  11. Dental and Medical Students' Use and Perceptions of Learning Resources in a Human Physiology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, Monica; Schwartzstein, Richard; Friedland, Bernard; Park, Sang E

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the use and perceived utility of various learning resources available during the first-year Integrated Human Physiology course at the dental and medical schools at Harvard University. Dental and medical students of the Class of 2018 were surveyed anonymously online in 2015 regarding their use of 29 learning resources in this combined course. The learning resources had been grouped into four categories to discern frequency of use and perceived usefulness among the categories. The survey was distributed to 169 students, and 73 responded for a response rate of 43.2%. There was no significant difference among the learning resource categories in frequency of use; however, there was a statistically significant difference among categories in students' perceptions of usefulness. No correlation was found between frequency of use and perceived usefulness of each category. Students seemingly were not choosing the most useful resources for them. These results suggest that, in the current educational environment, where new technologies and self-directed learning are highly sought after, there remains a need for instructor-guided learning.

  12. A Very Liquid Heaven: An exhibit exploring the human perception of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, M. M.

    2004-12-01

    This year the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College is showing an exhibit about the human perception of stars, accompanied by a catalog, a speaker series, and an outreach program. The exhibit includes historical documents and atlases as well as work by a variety of artists and scientists. A Very Liquid Heaven opened with a performance of George Crumb's musical piece Makrokosmos III surrounded by original dance, theater, and video art. The title of the exhibit is inspired by Rene Descartes' 1644 text Principles of Philosophy, where he describes the earth as "surrounded on all sides by a very liquid heaven." Although Isaac Newton's laws of mechanics and gravity later discredited his specific hypothesis, in a sense Descartes was correct: astronomy has indeed revealed stars not as hard, fixed objects, but as pulsing plasmas, and interstellar space not as a pure void, but as diffuse clouds of atoms and molecules. This exhibit is made possible with support from Beverly P. and R. Lawrence St. Clair, the Nathalie Potter Voorhees '45 Memorial fund, and the Friends of the Tang.

  13. Perceptions of Nigerian Women about Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanbi, Olusola Anuoluwapo; Iyanda, Abiodun; Osundare, Folakemi; Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) though preventable has claimed the lives of many women worldwide. This study was embarked upon to evaluate the general knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian women on HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Methods. Structured questionnaires were administered to a cross section of 737 women randomly selected from the general population in two southwestern States of Nigeria. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 16. A P value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. One hundred and seventy-six (23.9%) of the respondents had knowledge of HPV; 474 (64.3%) are aware of cervical cancer but only 136 (18.5%) know that HPV causes cervical cancer. 200 (27.1%) are aware that there is an HPV vaccine while 300 (40.7%) had knowledge of Pap smear test. Two hundred and sixty (35.3%) of the respondents know that early detection of HPV can prevent cervical cancer and in spite of this, only 110 (14.9%) have taken the Pap smear test before while 151 (20.5%) are not willing to go for the test at all. Conclusions. There is therefore the need to create proper awareness on the HPV and its possible consequence of cervical carcinoma.

  14. Categorical vowel perception enhances the effectiveness and generalization of auditory feedback in human-machine-interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Larson

    Full Text Available Human-machine interface (HMI designs offer the possibility of improving quality of life for patient populations as well as augmenting normal user function. Despite pragmatic benefits, utilizing auditory feedback for HMI control remains underutilized, in part due to observed limitations in effectiveness. The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which categorical speech perception could be used to improve an auditory HMI. Using surface electromyography, 24 healthy speakers of American English participated in 4 sessions to learn to control an HMI using auditory feedback (provided via vowel synthesis. Participants trained on 3 targets in sessions 1-3 and were tested on 3 novel targets in session 4. An "established categories with text cues" group of eight participants were trained and tested on auditory targets corresponding to standard American English vowels using auditory and text target cues. An "established categories without text cues" group of eight participants were trained and tested on the same targets using only auditory cuing of target vowel identity. A "new categories" group of eight participants were trained and tested on targets that corresponded to vowel-like sounds not part of American English. Analyses of user performance revealed significant effects of session and group (established categories groups and the new categories group, and a trend for an interaction between session and group. Results suggest that auditory feedback can be effectively used for HMI operation when paired with established categorical (native vowel targets with an unambiguous cue.

  15. Perceptions of Nigerian Women about Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola Anuoluwapo Akanbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus (HPV though preventable has claimed the lives of many women worldwide. This study was embarked upon to evaluate the general knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian women on HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Methods. Structured questionnaires were administered to a cross section of 737 women randomly selected from the general population in two southwestern States of Nigeria. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 16. A P value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. One hundred and seventy-six (23.9% of the respondents had knowledge of HPV; 474 (64.3% are aware of cervical cancer but only 136 (18.5% know that HPV causes cervical cancer. 200 (27.1% are aware that there is an HPV vaccine while 300 (40.7% had knowledge of Pap smear test. Two hundred and sixty (35.3% of the respondents know that early detection of HPV can prevent cervical cancer and in spite of this, only 110 (14.9% have taken the Pap smear test before while 151 (20.5% are not willing to go for the test at all. Conclusions. There is therefore the need to create proper awareness on the HPV and its possible consequence of cervical carcinoma.

  16. Near-infrared spectroscopy of image clarity perception in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, J. E.; Habak, C.; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2014-09-01

    The perception of blur in humans is intrinsic to our visual system, and dioptric power can improve clarity in many cases. This was evaluated experimentally to establish the best correction with dioptric power shifts. We used Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure Oxy-, Deoxy- and Total-hemoglobin concentration changes in the brain while viewing images and reading a Snellen chart. Participants were tested with their usual correction (no diopter power shift (0 D)), with a 0.25 diopter power shift (0.25 D), and with a 0.5 diopter power shift (0.5 D). The concept of Approximate Entropy (AE) was applied to quantify the regularity of these hemoglobin time series of finite length. AE computations are based on the likelihood that similar templates in a time series remain similar on the next incremental comparison, so that time series with large AE have high irregular fluctuation. We found that the dioptric power shift eliciting the highest AE indicates the clearest visual condition for subjects. This technique may impact the current way in which ophthalmic lenses are prescribed.

  17. Promoting women's human rights: A qualitative analysis of midwives' perceptions about virginity control and hymen 'reconstruction'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Monica; Eriksson, Carola

    2015-06-01

    To explore midwives' perceptions regarding virginity control and hymen 'reconstructions', and how these practices can be debated from a gender perspective. An international group of 266 midwives answered an open-ended question in a Web survey. The great majority came from the Western world, among them, the majority were from Europe. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes emerged: misogynistic practices that cement the gender order, which revealed how the respondents viewed virginity control and hymen 'reconstructions'; raising public awareness and combatting practices that demean women, which were suggested as strategies by which to combat these practices; and promoting agency in women and providing culturally sensitive care, which were considered to improve health care encounters. Virginity control and hymen 'reconstructions' are elements of patriarchy, whereby violence and control are employed to subordinate women. To counter these practices, macro and micro-level activities are needed to expand women's human rights in the private and the public spheres. Political activism, international debates, collaboration between sectors such as health care and law-makers may lead to increased gender equality. A women-centred approach whereby women are empowered with agency will make women more capable of combatting virginity control and hymen 'reconstruction'.

  18. A Model of the Perception of Facial Expressions of Emotion by Humans: Research Overview and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Aleix; Du, Shichuan

    2012-05-01

    aid in studies of human perception, social interactions and disorders.

  19. A model observer based on human perception to quantify the detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharian, Georges; Guyader, Nathalie; Vignolle, Jean-Michel; Jutten, Christian

    2014-03-01

    In medical imaging, model observers such as the "Hotelling observer" and the "Non Prewhitening Matched Filter" have been proposed to detect objects in X-ray images. These models, based on decision theory, are applied over the entire image. In this paper, we developed a model that mimics some processes of human visual perception. The proposed model is locally applied on some particular areas that correspond to the salient areas of the object. By doing this, the model mimics the sequence of eye fixations that we make when we explore an image for example in order to detect an object. The study is divided into three parts: a psychophysical experiment to obtain human's performance to detect various objects in noises, a theoretical part to develop the proposed model, and finally, a result part. During the experiment, several participants were asked to detect objects in noisy images using a free search task. The luminance contrast of objects was adaptively adjusted according to their responses to obtain a percentage of correct detection for each object of 50 %. The proposed model, based on decision theory, was applied locally on some areas of the image that has a size corresponding to the high visual acuity of foveal vision. Areas were chosen according to their high saliency values computed through a bio-inspired model of visual attention. For each area, our model returned a detectability index. By supposing statistical independence between areas, the local indexes are combined into a global detectability index. Results show that the proposed model fits the results of the psychophysical experiment and outperforms classical models of the literature.

  20. [The study of functional status in the perception of visual information depending on the method of technical color mixing on LCD and DLP projectors technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkulova, A G; Osokina, E S; Bukhtiiarov, I V

    2014-10-01

    The case of compare two ways of projection color visual images, characterized by different spatial-temporal characteristics of visual stimuli, presents the methodology and the set of techniques. Received comparative data, identifying risks of regulation disorder of the functional state and development general, mental and visual fatigue during prolonged strenuous visual activity, according to two types of test tasks, which are the most typical for the use of modern projectors to work with the audience, both inthe process of implementation of learning technologies and the collective take responsible decisions by expert groups that control of complex technological processes.

  1. Adaptation and perceptual norms in color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Michael A; Leonard, Deanne

    2008-11-01

    Many perceptual dimensions are thought to be represented relative to an average value or norm. Models of norm-based coding assume that the norm appears psychologically neutral because it reflects a neutral response in the underlying neural code. We tested this assumption in human color vision by asking how judgments of "white" are affected as neural responses are altered by adaptation. The adapting color was varied to determine the stimulus level that did not bias the observer's subjective white point. This level represents a response norm at the stages at which sensitivity is regulated by the adaptation, and we show that these response norms correspond to the perceptually neutral stimulus and that they can account for how the perception of white varies both across different observers and within the same observer at different locations in the visual field. We also show that individual differences in perceived white are reduced when observers are exposed to a common white adapting stimulus, suggesting that the perceptual differences are due in part to differences in how neural responses are normalized. These results suggest a close link between the norms for appearance and coding in color vision and illustrate a general paradigm for exploring this link in other perceptual domains.

  2. Behavioral and neuroimaging evidence for a contribution of color and texture information to scene classification in a patient with visual form agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Jennifer K E; Humphrey, G Keith; Culham, Jody C; Menon, Ravi S; Milner, A David; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2004-01-01

    A common notion is that object perception is a necessary precursor to scene perception. Behavioral evidence suggests, however, that scene perception can operate independently of object perception. Further, neuroimaging has revealed a specialized human cortical area for viewing scenes that is anatomically distinct from areas activated by viewing objects. Here we show that an individual with visual form agnosia, D.F., who has a profound deficit in object recognition but spared color and visual texture perception, could still classify scenes and that she was fastest when the scenes were presented in the appropriate color. When scenes were presented as black-and-white images, she made a large number of errors in classification. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed selective activation in the parahippocampal place area (PPA) when D.F. viewed scenes. Unlike control observers, D.F. demonstrated higher activation in the PPA for scenes presented in the appropriate color than for black-and-white versions. The results demonstrate that an individual with profound form vision deficits can still use visual texture and color to classify scenes-and that this intact ability is reflected in differential activation of the PPA with colored versions of scenes.

  3. Color enhancement and image defogging in HSI based on Retinex model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han; Wei, Ping; Ke, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Retinex is a luminance perceptual algorithm based on color consistency. It has a good performance in color enhancement. But in some cases, the traditional Retinex algorithms, both Single-Scale Retinex(SSR) and Multi-Scale Retinex(MSR) in RGB color space, do not work well and will cause color deviation. To solve this problem, we present improved SSR and MSR algorithms. Compared to other Retinex algorithms, we implement Retinex algorithms in HSI(Hue, Saturation, Intensity) color space, and use a parameter αto improve quality of the image. Moreover, the algorithms presented in this paper has a good performance in image defogging. Contrasted with traditional Retinex algorithms, we use intensity channel to obtain reflection information of an image. The intensity channel is processed using a Gaussian center-surround image filter to get light information, which should be removed from intensity channel. After that, we subtract the light information from intensity channel to obtain the reflection image, which only includes the attribute of the objects in image. Using the reflection image and a parameter α, which is an arbitrary scale factor set manually, we improve the intensity channel, and complete the color enhancement. Our experiments show that this approach works well compared with existing methods for color enhancement. Besides a better performance in color deviation problem and image defogging, a visible improvement in the image quality for human contrast perception is also observed.

  4. The impact of human perception of simultaneous exposure to thermal load, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Ole; Witterseh, Thomas; Clausen, Geo

    1999-01-01

    Human perception of simultaneous exposure to combinations of three different levels of operative temperature, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution (27 combinations) was studied in climate chambers. The operative temperatures studied were: 26.0 deg.C, 27.6 deg.C and 29.6 deg.......C, and the sound pressure levels were: 45 dB(A), 48 dB(A) and 51 dB(A). The air pollution corresponding to these three levels of perceived air quality (at 26 deg.C) was: 1.1 decipol (dp), 2.4 dp and 4.5 dp. A 1 deg.C change in operative temperature had the same impact on the human perception of the overall...... conditions as a change of 3.8 dB(A) in sound pressure level or a change of 7 dp in air pollution (at 26 deg.C). The percentage of dissatisfied with the perceived air quality increased with increasing temperature. An elevated temperature had a dominant impact on the human perception of the indoor environment...

  5. The impact of human perception of simultaneous exposure to thermal load, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Ole; Witterseh, Thomas; Clausen, Geo

    1999-01-01

    Human perception of simultaneous exposure to combinations of three different levels of operative temperature, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution (27 combinations) was studied in climate chambers. The operative temperatures studied were: 26.0 deg.C, 27.6 deg.C and 29.6 deg.......C, and the sound pressure levels were: 45 dB(A), 48 dB(A) and 51 dB(A). The air pollution corresponding to these three levels of perceived air quality (at 26 deg.C) was: 1.1 decipol (dp), 2.4 dp and 4.5 dp. A 1 deg.C change in operative temperature had the same impact on the human perception of the overall...... conditions as a change of 3.8 dB(A) in sound pressure level or a change of 7 dp in air pollution (at 26 deg.C). The percentage of dissatisfied with the perceived air quality increased with increasing temperature. An elevated temperature had a dominant impact on the human perception of the indoor environment...

  6. Farmers' perceptions of the impacts of human- wildlife conflict on their livelihood and natural resource management efforts in Cheha Woreda of Guraghe Zone, Ethiopia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dagne Mojo; Jessica Rothschuh; Mehari Alebachew

    2014-01-01

    ... sustainable land management practices among resident agrarian families. In 2011, a household survey was conducted to assess farmers' perceptions of human-wildlife conflicts and the effects of these conflicts on land management in Cheha Woreda...

  7. Can you see what you feel? Color and folding properties affect visual-tactile material discrimination of fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bei; Bi, Wenyan; Jia, Xiaodan; Wei, Hanhan; Adelson, Edward H

    2016-01-01

    Humans can often estimate tactile properties of objects from vision alone. For example, during online shopping, we can often infer material properties of clothing from images and judge how the material would feel against our skin. What visual information is important for tactile perception? Previous studies in material perception have focused on measuring surface appearance, such as gloss and roughness, and using verbal reports of material attributes and categories. However, in real life, predicting tactile properties of an object might not require accurate verbal descriptions of its surface attributes or categories. In this paper, we use tactile perception as ground truth to measure visual material perception. Using fabrics as our stimuli, we measure how observers match what they see (photographs of fabric samples) with what they feel (physical fabric samples). The data shows that color has a significant main effect in that removing color significantly reduces accuracy, especially when the images contain 3-D folds. We also find that images of draped fabrics, which revealed 3-D shape information, achieved better matching accuracy than images with flattened fabrics. The data shows a strong interaction between color and folding conditions on matching accuracy, suggesting that, in 3-D folding conditions, the visual system takes advantage of chromatic gradients to infer tactile properties but not in flattened conditions. Together, using a visual-tactile matching task, we show that humans use folding and color information in matching the visual and tactile properties of fabrics.

  8. Optimization of optical systems for LED spot lights concerning the color uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teupner, Anne; Bergenek, Krister; Wirth, Ralph; Miñano, Juan C.; Benítez, Pablo

    2014-09-01

    Spotlighting is one illumination field where the application of light emitting diodes (LED) creates many advantages. Commonly, the system for spot lights consists of a LED light engine and collimating secondary optics. Through angular or spatial separated emitted light from the source and imaging optical elements, a non uniform far field appears with colored rings, dots or patterns. Many feasible combinations result in very different spatial color distributions. Several combinations of three multi-chip light sources and secondary optical elements like reflectors and TIR lenses with additional facets or scattering elements were analyzed mainly regarding the color uniformity. They are assessed by the merit function Usl which was derived from human factor experiments and describes the color uniformity based on the visual perception of humans. Furthermore, the optical systems are compared concerning efficiency, peak candela and aspect ratio. Both types of optics differ in the relation between the color uniformity level and other properties. A plain reflector with a slightly color mixing light source performs adequate. The results for the TIR lenses indicate that they need additional elements for good color mixing or blended light source. The most convenient system depends on the requirements of the application.

  9. Color constancy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foster, David H

    2011-01-01

    ... despite changes in the spectrum of the illumination. At about the same time, new models of color constancy appeared, along with physiological data on cortical mechanisms and photographic colorimetric measurements of natural scenes...

  10. Color tejido

    OpenAIRE

    Rius Tormo, Palmira

    2010-01-01

    Póster presentado en el IX Congreso Nacional del Color, Alicante, 29-30 junio, 1-2 julio 2010. La exposición que se propone tiene como núcleo principal el color y muestra las posibilidades expresivas que aporta a los diferentes materiales. Las 7 obras presentadas buscan la armonía estética y la fuerza simbólica.

  11. Fear no colors? Observer clothing color influences lizard escape behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Breanna J; Drury, Jonathan P; Blumstein, Daniel T; Pauly, Gregory B

    2017-01-01

    Animals often view humans as predators, leading to alterations in their behavior. Even nuanced aspects of human activity like clothing color affect animal behavior, but we lack an understanding of when and where such effects will occur. The species confidence hypothesis posits that birds are attracted to colors found on their bodies and repelled by non-body colors. Here, we extend this hypothesis taxonomically and conceptually to test whether this pattern is applicable in a non-avian reptile and to suggest that species should respond less fearfully to their sexually-selected signaling color. Responses to clothing color could also be impacted by habituation to humans, so we examine whether behavior varied between areas with low and high human activity. We quantified the effects of four T-shirt colors on flight initiation distances (FID) and on the ease of capture in western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis), and we accounted for detectability against the background environment. We found no differences in lizard behavior between sites. However, lizards tolerated the closest approaches and were most likely to be captured when approached with the T-shirt that resembled their sexually-selected signaling color. Because changes in individual behavior affect fitness, choice of clothing color by people, including tourists, hikers, and researchers, could impact wildlife populations and research outcomes.

  12. Grounding context in face processing: color, emotion, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Sandrine; Le Bigot, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have become interested in the way that the affective quality of contextual information transfers to a perceived target. We therefore examined the effect of a red (vs. green, mixed red/green, and achromatic) background - known to be valenced - on the processing of stimuli that play a key role in human interactions, namely facial expressions. We also examined whether the valenced-color effect can be modulated by gender, which is also known to be valenced. Female and male adult participants performed a categorization task of facial expressions of emotion in which the faces of female and male posers expressing two ambiguous emotions (i.e., neutral and surprise) were presented against the four different colored backgrounds. Additionally, this task was completed by collecting subjective ratings for each colored background in the form of five semantic differential scales corresponding to both discrete and dimensional perspectives of emotion. We found that the red background resulted in more negative face perception than the green background, whether the poser was female or male. However, whereas this valenced-color effect was the only effect for female posers, for male posers, the effect was modulated by both the nature of the ambiguous emotion and the decoder's gender. Overall, our findings offer evidence that color and gender have a common valence-based dimension.

  13. Grounding Context in Face Processing: Color, Emotion and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine eGil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, researchers have become interested in the way that the affective quality of contextual information transfers to a perceived target. We therefore examined the effect of a red (versus green, mixed red/green and achromatic background–known to be valenced−on the processing of stimuli that play a key role in human interactions, namely facial expressions. We also examined whether the valenced-color effect can be modulated by gender, which is also known to be valenced. Female and male adult participants performed a categorization task of facial expressions of emotion in which the faces of female and male posers expressing two ambiguous emotions (i.e., neutral and surprise were presented against the four different colored backgrounds. Additionally, this task was completed by collecting subjective ratings for each colored background in the form of five semantic differential scales corresponding to both discrete and dimensional perspectives of emotion. We found that the red background resulted in more negative face perception than the green background, whether the poser was female or male. However, whereas this valenced-color effect was the only effect for female posers, for male posers, the effect was modulated by both the nature of the ambiguous emotion and the decoder’s gender. Overall, our findings offer evidence that color and gender have a common valence-based dimension.

  14. Tactile orientation perception: an ideal observer analysis of human psychophysical performance in relation to macaque area 3b receptive fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ryan M; Staibano, Phillip; Goldreich, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The ability to resolve the orientation of edges is crucial to daily tactile and sensorimotor function, yet the means by which edge perception occurs is not well understood. Primate cortical area 3b neurons have diverse receptive field (RF) spatial structures that may participate in edge orientation perception. We evaluated five candidate RF models for macaque area 3b neurons, previously recorded while an oriented bar contacted the monkey's fingertip. We used a Bayesian classifier to assign each neuron a best-fit RF structure. We generated predictions for human performance by implementing an ideal observer that optimally decoded stimulus-evoked spike counts in the model neurons. The ideal observer predicted a saturating reduction in bar orientation discrimination threshold with increasing bar length. We tested 24 humans on an automated, precision-controlled bar orientation discrimination task and observed performance consistent with that predicted. We next queried the ideal observer to discover the RF structure and number of cortical neurons that best matched each participant's performance. Human perception was matched with a median of 24 model neurons firing throughout a 1-s period. The 10 lowest-performing participants were fit with RFs lacking inhibitory sidebands, whereas 12 of the 14 higher-performing participants were fit with RFs containing inhibitory sidebands. Participants whose discrimination improved as bar length increased to 10 mm were fit with longer RFs; those who performed well on the 2-mm bar, with narrower RFs. These results suggest plausible RF features and computational strategies underlying tactile spatial perception and may have implications for perceptual learning.

  15. Perception of Fish Sentience, Welfare and Humane Slaughter by Highly Educated Citizens of Bogotá, Colombia and Curitiba, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Discussions on farm animal welfare have become frequent, especially in developed countries. The aim of this research was to study the perception of fish sentience, welfare and slaughter by highly educated citizens from Bogotá, Colombia, and Curitiba, Brazil. An online survey with 12 questions presented as open-ended, multiple choice and 5-point Likert-type scale formats was available to respondents. Answers from 395 participants in Bogotá and 387 in Curitiba were analyzed, and results are presented in the order Bogotá followed by Curitiba. The percentage of participants who perceived fish as sentient animals was 79.7% and 71.8%. The classification of sentience perception among taxonomic groups seems in accordance with the phylogenetic proximity to humans, suggesting participants were more likely to perceive sentience in mammals than in other animals. The descending order related to the highest perception of fish suffering in different scenarios was fishing with hook and line (75.6%, 70.6%); municipal live fish fair (68.7%—only in Curitiba); fish-and-pay ponds (59.7%, 54.4%); fish kept as laboratory animals (58.0, 48.1%); fish farming (35.7, 36.8%); fish in pet stores (35.5%, 26.1%); production of ornamental fish (19.3%, 21.8%); fish in aquarium exhibits (18.8%,16.9%); and fish kept as pets (12.4%,12.3%). Lack of knowledge about the conditions of capture, handling, transport and sale of ornamental fish may justify the perception of low level of suffering in the last scenarios. Regarding humane slaughter, 57.0% and 55.0% of respondents were unaware of the issue. After reflection induced by the questionnaire, 76.0% and 72% of participants believed that fish should be included in humane slaughter regulations. This study presents original data suggesting that respondents from Bogotá and Curitiba consider fish as sentient beings. The perception of suffering in specific scenarios challenges common activities. Recognition of suffering also endorses humane slaughter

  16. Perception of Fish Sentience, Welfare and Humane Slaughter by Highly Educated Citizens of Bogotá, Colombia and Curitiba, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinque, Daniel Santiago; Souza, Ana Paula Oliveira; Molento, Carla Forte Maiolino

    2017-01-01

    Discussions on farm animal welfare have become frequent, especially in developed countries. The aim of this research was to study the perception of fish sentience, welfare and slaughter by highly educated citizens from Bogotá, Colombia, and Curitiba, Brazil. An online survey with 12 questions presented as open-ended, multiple choice and 5-point Likert-type scale formats was available to respondents. Answers from 395 participants in Bogotá and 387 in Curitiba were analyzed, and results are presented in the order Bogotá followed by Curitiba. The percentage of participants who perceived fish as sentient animals was 79.7% and 71.8%. The classification of sentience perception among taxonomic groups seems in accordance with the phylogenetic proximity to humans, suggesting participants were more likely to perceive sentience in mammals than in other animals. The descending order related to the highest perception of fish suffering in different scenarios was fishing with hook and line (75.6%, 70.6%); municipal live fish fair (68.7%-only in Curitiba); fish-and-pay ponds (59.7%, 54.4%); fish kept as laboratory animals (58.0, 48.1%); fish farming (35.7, 36.8%); fish in pet stores (35.5%, 26.1%); production of ornamental fish (19.3%, 21.8%); fish in aquarium exhibits (18.8%,16.9%); and fish kept as pets (12.4%,12.3%). Lack of knowledge about the conditions of capture, handling, transport and sale of ornamental fish may justify the perception of low level of suffering in the last scenarios. Regarding humane slaughter, 57.0% and 55.0% of respondents were unaware of the issue. After reflection induced by the questionnaire, 76.0% and 72% of participants believed that fish should be included in humane slaughter regulations. This study presents original data suggesting that respondents from Bogotá and Curitiba consider fish as sentient beings. The perception of suffering in specific scenarios challenges common activities. Recognition of suffering also endorses humane slaughter

  17. Putative sex-specific human pheromones do not affect gender perception, attractiveness ratings or unfaithfulness judgements of opposite sex faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Robin M.; Schlatter, Sophie; Rhodes, Gillian

    2017-01-01

    Debate continues over the existence of human sex pheromones. Two substances, androstadienone (AND) and estratetraenol (EST), were recently reported to signal male and female gender, respectively, potentially qualifying them as human sex pheromones. If AND and EST truly signal gender, then they should affect reproductively relevant behaviours such as mate perception. To test this hypothesis, heterosexual, Caucasian human participants completed two computer-based tasks twice, on two consecutive days, exposed to a control scent on one day and a putative pheromone (AND or EST) on the other. In the first task, 46 participants (24 male, 22 female) indicated the gender (male or female) of five gender-neutral facial morphs. Exposure to AND or EST had no effect on gender perception. In the second task, 94 participants (43 male, 51 female) rated photographs of opposite-sex faces for attractiveness and probable sexual unfaithfulness. Exposure to the putative pheromones had no effect on either attractiveness or unfaithfulness ratings. These results are consistent with those of other experimental studies and reviews that suggest AND and EST are unlikely to be human pheromones. The double-blind nature of the current study lends increased support to this conclusion. If human sex pheromones affect our judgements of gender, attractiveness or unfaithfulness from faces, they are unlikely to be AND or EST.

  18. Human factors research applied: the development of a personal touch screen insulin pump and users' perceptions of actual use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Noel E

    2013-10-01

    A brief history of the field of human factors research is covered, along with how this discipline is leveraged within medical device companies, to eliminate design flaws in products, in order to make them safe and effective for human use. The way in which human factors research was used to develop the t:slim(®) insulin delivery system (Tandem Diabetes Care(®) Inc., San Diego, CA) is also discussed. Following the development of the t:slim pump, a product evaluation study was conducted to assess users' perceptions of the t:slim pump under actual use conditions versus their current pump system. A 30-day, within-subjects study with a total of 74 participants was conducted at four different investigator sites across the United States. Study participants used the t:slim insulin pump in their normal environment for 30 days. Participants were given the Insulin Delivery System Rating Questionnaire during their first visit to assess their current insulin pump and then at the end of the study to measure their perceptions of the t:slim pump. A paired-samples t test was completed to analyze the data. The results indicated that 16 of the questionnaire variables showed statistically significant differences in scores. It was found that the utilization of a systematic human factors process resulted in an insulin pump that was proved to be safe and effective for human use and was cleared by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States. In addition, the results of the product evaluation study showed that, after use of the t:slim pump for 30 days, participants' perceptions of several variables improved.

  19. Human fMRI reveals that delayed action re-recruits visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Anthony; Monaco, Simona; Kaufman, Liam D; Culham, Jody C

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral and neuropsychological research suggests that delayed actions rely on different neural substrates than immediate actions; however, the specific brain areas implicated in the two types of actions remain unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure human brain activation during delayed grasping and reaching. Specifically, we examined activation during visual stimulation and action execution separated by a 18-s delay interval in which subjects had to remember an intended action toward the remembered object. The long delay interval enabled us to unambiguously distinguish visual, memory-related, and action responses. Most strikingly, we observed reactivation of the lateral occipital complex (LOC), a ventral-stream area implicated in visual object recognition, and early visual cortex (EVC) at the time of action. Importantly this reactivation was observed even though participants remained in complete darkness with no visual stimulation at the time of the action. Moreover, within EVC, higher activation was observed for grasping than reaching during both vision and action execution. Areas in the dorsal visual stream were activated during action execution as expected and, for some, also during vision. Several areas, including the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS), dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), primary motor cortex (M1) and the supplementary motor area (SMA), showed sustained activation during the delay phase. We propose that during delayed actions, dorsal-stream areas plan and maintain coarse action goals; however, at the time of execution, motor programming requires re-recruitment of detailed visual information about the object through reactivation of (1) ventral-stream areas involved in object perception and (2) early visual areas that contain richly detailed visual representations, particularly for grasping.

  20. Human fMRI reveals that delayed action re-recruits visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Singhal

    Full Text Available Behavioral and neuropsychological research suggests that delayed actions rely on different neural substrates than immediate actions; however, the specific brain areas implicated in the two types of actions remain unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to measure human brain activation during delayed grasping and reaching. Specifically, we examined activation during visual stimulation and action execution separated by a 18-s delay interval in which subjects had to remember an intended action toward the remembered object. The long delay interval enabled us to unambiguously distinguish visual, memory-related, and action responses. Most strikingly, we observed reactivation of the lateral occipital complex (LOC, a ventral-stream area implicated in visual object recognition, and early visual cortex (EVC at the time of action. Importantly this reactivation was observed even though participants remained in complete darkness with no visual stimulation at the time of the action. Moreover, within EVC, higher activation was observed for grasping than reaching during both vision and action execution. Areas in the dorsal visual stream were activated during action execution as expected and, for some, also during vision. Several areas, including the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS, dorsal premotor cortex (PMd, primary motor cortex (M1 and the supplementary motor area (SMA, showed sustained activation during the delay phase. We propose that during delayed actions, dorsal-stream areas plan and maintain coarse action goals; however, at the time of execution, motor programming requires re-recruitment of detailed visual information about the object through reactivation of (1 ventral-stream areas involved in object perception and (2 early visual areas that contain richly detailed visual representations, particularly for grasping.

  1. Different Signal Enhancement Pathways of Attention and Consciousness Underlie Perception in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Jeroen J A

    2017-06-14

    It is not yet known whether attention and consciousness operate through similar or largely different mechanisms. Visual processing mechanisms are routinely characterized by measuring contrast response functions (CRFs). In this report, behavioral CRFs were obtained in humans (both males and females) by measuring afterimage durations over the entire range of inducer stimulus contrasts to reveal visual mechanisms behind attention and consciousness. Deviations relative to the standard CRF, i.e., gain functions, describe the strength of signal enhancement, which were assessed for both changes due to attentional task and conscious perception. It was found that attention displayed a response-gain function, whereas consciousness displayed a contrast-gain function. Through model comparisons, which only included contrast-gain modulations, both contrast-gain and response-gain effects can be explained with a two-level normalization model, in which consciousness affects only the first level and attention affects only the second level. These results demonstrate that attention and consciousness can effectively show different gain functions because they operate through different signal enhancement mechanisms.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The relationship between attention and consciousness is still debated. Mapping contrast response functions (CRFs) has allowed (neuro)scientists to gain important insights into the mechanistic underpinnings of visual processing. Here, the influence of both attention and consciousness on these functions were measured and they displayed a strong dissociation. First, attention lowered CRFs, whereas consciousness raised them. Second, attention manifests itself as a response-gain function, whereas consciousness manifests itself as a contrast-gain function. Extensive model comparisons show that these results are best explained in a two-level normalization model in which consciousness affects only the first level, whereas attention affects only the second level

  2. Human papillomavirus vaccines and cervical cancer: awareness, knowledge, and risk perception among Turkish undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathfisch, Gülay; Güngör, İlkay; Uzun, Ece; Keskin, Özlem; Tencere, Zeliha

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate awareness, knowledge, and risk perception about human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical cancer, and HPV vaccines among undergraduate students in Turkey. The convenience sample of this descriptive cross-sectional study consisted of 605 undergraduate students in Istanbul University during a semester. Demographic characteristics of students, their reproductive health and lifestyle behaviors, and knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccine were questioned using self-administered forms. The overall proportion of students who had heard about HPV infection was 48.8%, while the proportion of students who had heard of the HPV vaccine was 44.5%. Forty eight percent of females and 60% of males reported never having heard of the HPV. Only 45.7% of females had knowledge about HPV as a cause of genital warts, and 58.1% correctly indicated that HPV caused cervical cancer. The majority of students in both genders (>80%) knew that the infection is primarily transmitted through sexual intercourse. Females were more concerned than males about having cervical/penile cancer associated with HPV in the future. Only 46.4% of females and 39% of males reported having heard of the HPV vaccine. The majority of the female and male students did not know who should get the HPV vaccine and when to get vaccinated. Among males, 25.8% reported that they would consider getting vaccinated (if available) and 38.4% intended to vaccinate their children. Turkish undergraduate students had a low to moderate level of knowledge regarding HPV infection and HPV vaccine. In order to increase awareness about HPV and develop positive behaviors, young people should be provided with accurate information through educational activities in the community and health care services.

  3. The influence of head and body tilt on human fore-aft translation perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Benjamin T.

    2016-01-01

    The tilt-translation ambiguity occurs because acceleration due to translation cannot be differentiated from gravitational acceleration. Head tilt can occur independent of body tilt which further complicates the problem. The tilt-translation ambiguity is examined for fore-aft (surge) translation with head and/or body orientations that are tilted in pitch 10° forward or backward. Eleven human subjects (6 female), mean age 40 years participated. Conditions included no tilt (NT), head and body tilt (HBT), head only tilt (HOT), and body only tilt (BOT). The fore-aft stimulus consisted of a 2s (0.5 Hz) sine wave in acceleration which a maximum peak velocity of 10 cm/s. After each stimulus the subject reported the direction of motion as forward or backward. Subsequent stimuli were adjusted to determine the point at which subjects were equally likely to report motion in either direction. During the HBT responses were biased such that upward pitch caused a neutral stimulus to be more likely to be perceived as forward and downward pitch caused the stimulus to be more likely to be perceived as backward. The difference in the point of subjective equality based on the direction of tilt was 3.3 cm/s. During the BOT condition the bias with respect to the direction of body tilt was in a similar direction with a difference in PSE 1.6 cm/s. During HOT and NT there was no significant bias on fore-aft perception. These findings demonstrate that body tilt shifts the PSE of fore-aft direction discrimination while head tilt has no influence. PMID:25160866

  4. Effects of psilocybin on time perception and temporal control of behaviour in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Marc; Carter, Olivia; Hasler, Felix; Cahn, B Rael; Grimberg, Ulrike; Spring, Philipp; Hell, Daniel; Flohr, Hans; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2007-01-01

    Hallucinogenic psilocybin is known to alter the subjective experience of time. However, there is no study that systematically investigated objective measures of time perception under psilocybin. Therefore, we studied dose-dependent effects of the serotonin (5-HT)2A/1A receptor agonist psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N, N-dimethyltryptamine) on temporal processing, employing tasks of temporal reproduction, sensorimotor synchronization and tapping tempo. To control for cognitive and subjective changes, we assessed spatial working memory and conscious experience. Twelve healthy human volunteers were tested under placebo, medium (115 microg/kg), and high (250 microg/kg) dose conditions, in a double-blind experimental design. Psilocybin was found to significantly impair subjects' ability to (1) reproduce interval durations longer than 2.5 sec, (2) to synchronize to inter-beat intervals longer than 2 sec and (3) caused subjects to be slower in their preferred tapping rate. These objective effects on timing performance were accompanied by working-memory deficits and subjective changes in conscious state, namely increased reports of 'depersonalization' and 'derealization' phenomena including disturbances in subjective 'time sense.' Our study is the first to systematically assess the impact of psilocybin on timing performance on standardized measures of temporal processing. Results indicate that the serotonin system is selectively involved in duration processing of intervals longer than 2 to 3 seconds and in the voluntary control of the speed of movement. We speculate that psilocybin's selective disruption of longer intervals is likely to be a product of interactions with cognitive dimensions of temporal processing -presumably via 5-HT2A receptor stimulation.

  5. Evaluation of color mapping algorithms in different color spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Timothée.-Florian; Boitard, Ronan; Pourazad, Mahsa T.; Nasiopoulos, Panos; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2016-09-01

    The color gamut supported by current commercial displays is only a subset of the full spectrum of colors visible by the human eye. In High-Definition (HD) television technology, the scope of the supported colors covers 35.9% of the full visible gamut. For comparison, Ultra High-Definition (UHD) television, which is currently being deployed on the market, extends this range to 75.8%. However, when reproducing content with a wider color gamut than that of a television, typically UHD content on HD television, some original color information may lie outside the reproduction capabilities of the television. Efficient gamut mapping techniques are required in order to fit the colors of any source content into the gamut of a given display. The goal of gamut mapping is to minimize the distortion, in terms of perceptual quality, when converting video from one color gamut to another. It is assumed that the efficiency of gamut mapping depends on the color space in which it is computed. In this article, we evaluate 14 gamut mapping techniques, 12 combinations of two projection methods across six color spaces as well as R'G'B' Clipping and wrong gamut interpretation. Objective results, using the CIEDE2000 metric, show that the R'G'B' Clipping is slightly outperformed by only one combination of color space and projection method. However, analysis of images shows that R'G'B' Clipping can result in loss of contrast in highly saturated images, greatly impairing the quality of the mapped image.

  6. Visual aesthetics and human preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Stephen E; Schloss, Karen B; Sammartino, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Human aesthetic preference in the visual domain is reviewed from definitional, methodological, empirical, and theoretical perspectives. Aesthetic science is distinguished from the perception of art and from philosophical treatments of aesthetics. The strengths and weaknesses of important behavioral techniques are presented and discussed, including two-alternative forced-choice, rank order, subjective rating, production/adjustment, indirect, and other tasks. Major findings are reviewed about preferences for colors (single colors, color combinations, and color harmony), spatial structure (low-level spatial properties, shape properties, and spatial composition within a frame), and individual differences in both color and spatial structure. Major theoretical accounts of aesthetic response are outlined and evaluated, including explanations in terms of mere exposure effects, arousal dynamics, categorical prototypes, ecological factors, perceptual and conceptual fluency, and the interaction of multiple components. The results of the review support the conclusion that aesthetic response can be studied rigorously and meaningfully within the framework of scientific psychology.

  7. Color vision test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... present from birth) color vision problems: Achromatopsia -- complete color blindness , seeing only shades of gray Deuteranopia -- difficulty telling ... Vision test - color; Ishihara color vision test Images Color blindness tests References Bowling B. Hereditary fundus dystrophies. In: ...

  8. Category Selectivity of Human Visual Cortex in Perception of Rubin Face–Vase Illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available When viewing the Rubin face–vase illusion, our conscious perception spontaneously alternates between the face and the vase; this illusion has been widely used to explore bistable perception. Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies have studied the neural mechanisms underlying bistable perception through univariate and multivariate pattern analyses; however, no studies have investigated the issue of category selectivity. Here, we used fMRI to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the Rubin face–vase illusion by introducing univariate amplitude and multivariate pattern analyses. The results from the amplitude analysis suggested that the activity in the fusiform face area was likely related to the subjective face perception. Furthermore, the pattern analysis results showed that the early visual cortex (EVC and the face-selective cortex could discriminate the activity patterns of the face and vase perceptions. However, further analysis of the activity patterns showed that only the face-selective cortex contains the face information. These findings indicated that although the EVC and face-selective cortex activities could discriminate the visual information, only the activity and activity pattern in the face-selective areas contained the category information of face perception in the Rubin face–vase illusion.

  9. Public perceptions of snakes and snakebite management: implications for conservation and human health in southern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Deb Prasad; Subedi Pandey, Gita; Devkota, Kamal; Goode, Matt

    2016-06-02

    Venomous snakebite and its effects are a source of fear for people living in southern Nepal. As a result, people have developed a negative attitude towards snakes, which can lead to human-snake conflicts that result in killing of snakes. Attempting to kill snakes increases the risk of snakebite, and actual killing of snakes contributes to loss of biodiversity. Currently, snake populations in southern Nepal are thought to be declining, but more research is needed to evaluate the conservation status of snakes. Therefore, we assessed attitudes, knowledge, and awareness of snakes and snakebite by Chitwan National Park's (CNP) buffer zone (BZ) inhabitants in an effort to better understand challenges to snake conservation and snakebite management. The results of this study have the potential to promote biodiversity conservation and increase human health in southern Nepal and beyond. We carried out face-to-face interviews of 150 randomly selected CNP BZ inhabitants, adopting a cross-sectional mixed research design and structured and semi-structured questionnaires from January-February 2013. Results indicated that 43 % of respondents disliked snakes, 49 % would exterminate all venomous snakes, and 86 % feared snakes. Farmers were the most negative and teachers were the most ambivalent towards snakes. Respondents were generally unable to identify different snake species, and were almost completely unaware of the need of conserve snakes and how to prevent snakebites. Belief in a snake god, and the ability of snakes to absorb poisonous gases from the atmosphere were among many superstitions that appeared to predispose negativity towards snakes of BZ residents. People with predisposed negativity towards snakes were not proponents of snake conservation. Fear, negativity, ambivalence towards, and ignorance about, snakes and the need for snake conservation were strong indicators of the propensity to harm or kill snakes. It seems that if wanton killing of snakes continues

  10. Human Perception Test of Discontinuous Force and a Trial of Skill Transfer Using a Five-Fingered Haptic Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Endo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the transferring of expert skills, it takes a great deal of time and effort for beginners to obtain new skills, and it is difficult to teach the skills by using only words. For those reasons, a skill transfer system that uses virtual reality (VR and a haptic interface technique is very attractive. In this study, we investigated the human perception of fingertip force with respect to the following changes: (1 the spatial change of the presented force, and (2 the change of the time to present the force. Based on the results of the perception experiments, we considered the skill transfer to a person's five fingers by using a five-fingered haptic interface robot.

  11. Color superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilczek, F. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  12. Color Image Segmentation using Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Komang Ariana

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Color image segmentation using Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM, is proposed in this study. RGB color space is used as input in the process of clustering by SOM. Measurement of the distance between weight vector and input vector in learning and recognition stages in SOM method, uses Normalized Euclidean Distance. Then, the validity of clustering result is tested by Davies-Bouldin Index (DBI and Validity Measure (VM to determine the most optimal number of cluster. The clustering result, according to the most optimal number of cluster, then is processed with spatial operations. Spatial operations are used to eliminate noise and small regions which are formed from the clustering result. This system allows segmentation process become automatic and unsupervised. The segmentation results are close to human perception.

  13. Colored Preons

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelstein, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested complementary models of the elementary particles as (a) quantum knots and (b) preonic nuclei that are field and particle descriptions, respectively, of the same particles. This earlier work, carried out in the context of standard electroweak (SU(2) x U(1)) physics, is here extended to the strong interactions by the introduction of color (SU(3)) charges.

  14. Color Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Heidi S. S.; Maki, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a study conducted by members of the WellU Academic Integration Subcommittee of The College of St. Scholastica's College's Healthy Campus Initiative plan whose purpose was to determine whether changing color in the classroom could have a measurable effect on students. One simple improvement a school can make in a classroom is…

  15. Survey of attitudes and perceptions of urine-diverting toilets and human waste recycling in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamichhane, Krishna M., E-mail: lamichha@hawaii.edu [University of Hawaii, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2540 Dole Street, Holmes Hall 283, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Babcock, Roger W., E-mail: rbabcock@hawaii.edu [University of Hawaii, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Holmes Hall 383, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Urine constitutes only about 1% of domestic sewage but contains 50% or more of the excreted nutrients and chemicals like hormones and pharmaceutical residues. Urine diverting toilet (UDT) systems can be considered a more sustainable alternative to wastewater management because they allow nutrient recycling, reduce water use, and allow source-separation of hormones and chemicals that can harm the environment. An online survey was conducted to determine whether UDTs are acceptable to the general public in Hawaii and if attitudes and perceptions towards it and human waste (HW) recycling vary with age, sex, level of education, religious affiliation, ethnicity, and employment status. The survey was also intended to detect possible drivers and barriers for the UDTs. Variations on variables were tested at 5% significance (p = 0.05) level (Chi-squared test or ANOVA) and considered significantly different if the p-value was less than 0.05. The results were encouraging as more than 60% are willing to pay extra for the UDT, while only 22% knew that such systems existed. No statistically significant difference was found between males and females on all survey questions at the 5% level. However, females had higher willingness to pay (WTP) than males and WTP increased with age and income. The WTP of Caucasians was higher than Asians and differed significantly. Some respondents expressed concern about the legal provisions for recycling of HW. The survey results indicate that with a public education program, it is possible that most people would be willing to adopt UDTs and HW recycling with incurred societal benefits of reduced water and fertilizer use, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and collection of micropollutants at the source to prevent their entry into waterways. Because of the small sample size (N = 132, 13% response rate) the survey is not representative but may be indicative of the general attitude of Hawaiian people. - Highlights: ► Urine diverting toilets (UDTs

  16. Genotype-phenotype relationships in human red/green color-vision defects: Molecular and psychophysical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeb, S.S.; Motulsky, A.G.; Lindsey, D.T.; Hibiya, Y.; Sanocki, E.; Winderickx, J.; Teller, D.Y. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    The relationship between the molecular structure of the X-linked red and green visual pigment genes and color-vision phenotype as ascertained by anomaloscopy was studied in 64 color-defective males. The great majority of red-green defects were associated with either the deletion of the green-pigment gene or the formation of 5[prime] red-green hybrid genes or 5[prime] green-red hybrid genes. A rapid PCR-based method allowed detection of hybrid genes, including those undetectable by Southern blot analysis, as well as more precise localization of the fusion points in hybrid genes. Protan color-vision defects appeared always associated with 5[prime] red-green hybrid genes. Carriers of single red-green hybrid genes with fusion in introns 1-4 were protanopes. However, carriers of hybrid genes with red-green fusions in introns 2, 3, or 4 in the presence of additional normal green genes manifested as either protanopes or protanomalous trichromats, with the majority being protanomalous. Deutan defects were associated with green-pigment gene deletions, with 5[prime] green-red hybrid genes, or, rarely, with 5[prime] green-red-green hybrid genes. Complete green-pigment gene deletions or green-red fusions in intron 1 were usually associated with deuteranopia, although the authors unexpectedly found three carriers of a single red-pigment gene without any green-pigment genes to be deuteranomalous trichromats. All but one of the other deuteranomalous subjects had green-red hybrid genes with intron 1, 2, 3, or 4 fusions, as well as several normal green-pigment genes. The one exception had a grossly normal gene array, presumably with a more subtle mutation. Amino acid differences in exon 5 largely determine whether a hybrid gene will be more redlike or more greenlike in phenotype. Various discrepancies as to severity (dichromacy or trichromacy) remain unexplained but may arise because of variability of expression, postreceptoral variation, or both.

  17. Animal coloration research: why it matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Tim; Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Stuart-Fox, Devi

    2017-07-05

    While basic research on animal coloration is the theme of this special edition, here we highlight its applied significance for industry, innovation and society. Both the nanophotonic structures producing stunning optical effects and the colour perception mechanisms in animals are extremely diverse, having been honed over millions of years of evolution for many different purposes. Consequently, there is a wealth of opportunity for biomimetic and bioinspired applications of animal coloration research, spanning colour production, perception and function. Fundamental research on the production and perception of animal coloration is contributing to breakthroughs in the design of new materials (cosmetics, textiles, paints, optical coatings, security labels) and new technologies (cameras, sensors, optical devices, robots, biomedical implants). In addition, discoveries about the function of animal colour are influencing sport, fashion, the military and conservation. Understanding and applying knowledge of animal coloration is now a multidisciplinary exercise. Our goal here is to provide a catalyst for new ideas and collaborations between biologists studying animal coloration and researchers in other disciplines.This article is part of the themed issue 'Animal coloration: production, perception, function and application'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Edge integration and the perception of brightness and darkness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vladusich, T.; Lucassen, M.P.; Cornelissen, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    How do induced brightness and darkness signals from local and remote surfaces interact to determine the final achromatic color percept of a target surface? An emerging theory of achromatic color perception posits that brightness and darkness percepts are computed by weighting and summing the

  19. Does human perception of wetland aesthetics and healthiness relate to ecological functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Marylise; Piégay, Hervé; Bornette, Gudrun

    2013-10-15

    Wetland management usually aims at preserving or restoring desirable ecological characteristics or functions. It is now well-recognized that some social criteria should also be included. Involving lay-people in wetland preservation or restoration projects may mean broadening project objectives to fit various and potentially competing requirements that relate to ecology, aesthetics, recreation, etc. In addition, perceived value depends both upon expertise and objectives, both of which vary from one stakeholder population to another. Perceived value and ecological functioning have to be reconciled in order to make a project successful. Understanding the perceptions of lay-people as well as their opinions about ecological value is a critical part of the development of sustainable management plans. Characterizing the environment in a way that adequately describes ecological function while also being consistent with lay perception may help reach such objectives. This goal has been addressed in a case study relating to wetlands of the Ain River (France). A photo-questionnaire presenting a sample of photographs of riverine wetlands distributed along the Ain River was submitted to 403 lay-people and self-identified experts. Two objectives were defined: (1) to identify the different parameters, whether visual or ecological, influencing the perception regarding the value of these ecosystems; (2) to compare the perceptions of self-identified experts and lay-people. Four criteria appear to strongly influence peoples' perceptions of ecological and aesthetical values: water transparency and colour, the presence and appearance of aquatic vegetation, the presence of sediments, and finally, trophic status. In our study, we observed only a few differences in perception. The differences primarily related to the value assigned to oligotrophic wetlands but even here, the differences between lay and expert populations were minimal. These results support the idea that it is possible to

  20. First Steps in Understanding Texture Perception in the Human Mouth as an Inverse Bio-Fluid Mechanical Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbidge, Adam S.; Strassburg, Julia A.; Hartmann, Christoph

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the perception of grittiness in the human mouth from the perspective of continuum mechanics and draw some conclusions about the likely interactions between hydrodynamically arising stress fluctuations and stimulation of biological mechanoreceptor structures. Two classes of mechanoreceptors exist, responding to either static or dynamic stresses. It is apparent that the static stresses arising from inclusions are very small relative to the background stresses generated by the squeeze flow unless the inclusion is very close to either the palate, tongue or free surface. The situation for dynamical stress fluctuations in less clear.