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Sample records for human colon mucosa

  1. Butyrate-induced transcriptional changes in human colonic mucosa.

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    Steven A L W Vanhoutvin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon results in the production of short chain fatty acids (mainly propionate, butyrate and acetate. Butyrate modulates a wide range of processes, but its mechanism of action is mostly unknown. This study aimed to determine the effects of butyrate on the transcriptional regulation of human colonic mucosa in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five hundred genes were found to be differentially expressed after a two week daily butyrate administration with enemas. Pathway analysis showed that the butyrate intervention mainly resulted in an increased transcriptional regulation of the pathways representing fatty acid oxidation, electron transport chain and oxidative stress. In addition, several genes associated with epithelial integrity and apoptosis, were found to be differentially expressed after the butyrate intervention. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Colonic administration of butyrate in concentrations that can be achieved by consumption of a high-fiber diet enhances the maintenance of colonic homeostasis in healthy subjects, by regulating fatty acid metabolism, electron transport and oxidative stress pathways on the transcriptional level and provide for the first time, detailed molecular insight in the transcriptional response of gut mucosa to butyrate.

  2. Butyrate-induced transcriptional changes in human colonic mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhoutvin, S.A.L.W.; Troost, F.J.; Hamer, H.M.; Lindsey, P.J.; Koek, G.H.; Jonkers, D.M.A.E.; Kodde, A.; Venema, K.; Brummer, R.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon results in the production of short chain fatty acids (mainly propionate, butyrate and acetate). Butyrate modulates a wide range of processes, but its mechanism of action is mostly unknown. This study aimed to determine the effects of butyrate on

  3. A comparison of linaclotide and lubiprostone dosing regimens on ion transport responses in human colonic mucosa.

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    Kang, Sang Bum; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Penrose, Harrison; Docherty, Michael J; McCole, Declan F

    2015-03-01

    Linaclotide, a synthetic guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) agonist, and the prostone analog, Lubiprostone, are approved to manage chronic idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Lubiprostone also protects intestinal mucosal barrier function in ischemia. GC-C signaling regulates local fluid balance and other components of intestinal mucosal homeostasis including epithelial barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare if select dosing regimens differentially affect linaclotide and lubiprostone modulation of ion transport and barrier properties of normal human colonic mucosa. Normal sigmoid colon biopsies from healthy subjects were mounted in Ussing chambers. Tissues were treated with linaclotide, lubiprostone, or vehicle to determine effects on short-circuit current (I sc). Subsequent I sc responses to the cAMP agonist, forskolin, and the calcium agonist, carbachol, were also measured to assess if either drug caused desensitization. Barrier properties were assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance. I sc responses to linaclotide and lubiprostone were significantly higher than vehicle control when administered bilaterally or to the mucosal side only. Single versus cumulative concentrations of linaclotide showed differences in efficacy while cumulative but not single dosing caused desensitization to forskolin. Lubiprostone reduced forskolin responses under all conditions. Linaclotide and lubiprostone exerted a positive effect on TER that was dependent on the dosing regimen. Linaclotide and lubiprostone increase ion transport responses across normal human colon but linaclotide displays increased sensitivity to the dosing regimen used. These findings may have implications for dosing protocols of these agents in patients with constipation.

  4. On the relationship between sialomucin and sulfomucin expression and hydrogenotrophic microbes in the human colonic mucosa.

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    Jennifer A Croix

    Full Text Available The colonic mucus layer is comprised primarily of acidomucins, which provide viscous properties and can be broadly classified into sialomucins or sulfomucins based on the presence of terminating sialic acid or sulfate groups. Differences in acidomucin chemotypes have been observed in diseases such as colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease, and variation in sialo- and sulfomucin content may influence microbial colonization. For example, sulfate derived from sulfomucin degradation may promote the colonization of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, which through sulfate respiration generate the genotoxic gas hydrogen sulfide. Here, paired biopsies from right colon, left colon, and rectum of 20 subjects undergoing routine screening colonoscopies were collected to enable parallel histochemical and microbiological studies. Goblet cell sialo- and sulfomucins in each biopsy were distinguished histochemically and quantified. Quantitative PCR and multivariate analyses were used to examine the abundance of hydrogenotrophic microbial groups and SRB genera relative to acidomucin profiles. Regional variation was observed in sialomucins and sulfomucins with the greatest abundance of each found in the rectum. Mucin composition did not appear to influence the abundance of SRB or other hydrogenotrophic microbiota but correlated with the composition of different SRB genera. A higher sulfomucin proportion correlated with higher quantities of Desulfobacter, Desulfobulbus and Desulfotomaculum, relative to the predominant Desulfovibrio genus. Thus, acidomucin composition may influence bacterial sulfate respiration in the human colon, which may in turn impact mucosal homeostasis. These results stress the need to consider mucus characteristics in the context of studies of the microbiome that target intestinal diseases.

  5. Distribution of cytochrome P450 2C, 2E1, 3A4, and 3A5 in human colon mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the fact that the alimentary tract is part of the body's first line of defense against orally ingested xenobiotica, little is known about the distribution and expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in human colon. Therefore, expression and protein levels of four...... representative CYPs (CYP2C(8), CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5) were determined in human colon mucosa biopsies obtained from ascending, descending and sigmoid colon. METHODS: Expression of CYP2C, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 mRNA in colon mucosa was determined by RT-PCR. Protein concentration of CYPs was determined...... to the descending colon. CONCLUSION: The current data suggest that the expression of CYP2C, CYP2E1, and CYP3A5 varies in different parts of the colon....

  6. Numerical ecology validates a biogeographical distribution and gender-based effect on mucosa-associated bacteria along the human colon.

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    Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; Cuív, Páraic O; Wang, Tingting; Kang, Seungha; Worthley, Daniel; Whitehall, Vicki; Gordon, Iain; McSweeney, Chris; Leggett, Barbara; Morrison, Mark

    2011-05-01

    We applied constrained ordination numerical ecology methods to data produced with a human intestinal tract-specific phylogenetic microarray (the Aus-HIT Chip) to examine the microbial diversity associated with matched biopsy tissue samples taken from the caecum, transverse colon, sigmoid colon and rectum of 10 healthy patients. Consistent with previous studies, the profiles revealed a marked intersubject variability; however, the numerical ecology methods of analysis allowed the subtraction of the subject effect from the data and revealed, for the first time, evidence of a longitudinal gradient for specific microbes along the colorectum. In particular, probes targeting Streptococcus and Enterococcus spp. produced strongest signals with caecal and transverse colon samples, with a gradual decline through to the rectum. Conversely, the analyses suggest that several members of the Enterobacteriaceae increase in relative abundance towards the rectum. These collective differences were substantiated by the multivariate analysis of quantitative PCR data. We were also able to identify differences in the microarray profiles, especially for the streptococci and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, on the basis of gender. The results derived by these multivariate analyses are biologically intuitive and suggest that the biogeography of the colonic mucosa can be monitored for changes through cross-sectional and/or inception cohort studies.

  7. Computer treatment of the contents of some elements in the normal and pathologically altered human colon mucosa tissues obtained by INAA

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    Draskovic, R.J.; Bozanic, M.; Bozanic, V.; Bohus, T. (Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

    1984-11-01

    Distribution of some elements (Cr, Fe, Co, Sb, Sc and Zn) in normal and pathologically altered human colon mucosa tissues were investigated by INAA. The following tissues were analyzed: normal colon mucosa, colitis chronica, colitis ulcerosa, adenoma tubulare and adenocarcinoma (diagnoses were previously confirmed clinically and histopathologically). The values of contents of the elements in these tissues (Csub(x) in nkg/g) are treated by specific computer functional programs. Regression functions of these parameters were found for the altered tissues in comparison to the normal, as well as specific functional correlations of the Csub(x)/Csub(y) relations for pairs of investigated elements. The functions which characterize these relations for the investigated colon mucosa tissue were also determined.

  8. Differentiation between human normal colon mucosa and colon cancer tissue using ToF-SIMS imaging technique and principal component analysis

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    Park, Ji-Won; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, In Hoo; Moon, Dae Won; Lee, Tae Geol

    2008-12-01

    Human normal colon mucosa and colon cancer tissue were studied using the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) and principal component analysis (PCA) techniques. The surfaces of the tissues were successfully cleaned by C 602+ cluster-ion beams before the ToF-SIMS images were obtained. A PCA on the spectra and images were performed to compare differences in the peaks and images of normal and cancer tissues. Significant differences in principal component 1 (PC 1) score values for normal and cancer tissues were observed, and each PC 1 loadings had a specific peak profile of proteins. In addition, the PC images obtained from the ToF-SIMS images for normal and cancer tissues were clearly distinguishable, and the amino acid fragments associated with normal and cancer tissues were found to have originated from the lamina propria region and the epithelium cells, respectively. Based on the PCA results, structural distortion of the crypts in the cancer colon tissue could be attributed to the proliferation of the cancerous epithelium cells. This work shows that the application of the ToF-SIMS imaging technique with PCA could be a useful method of obtaining valuable information for cancer analysis.

  9. Administration of different Lactobacillus strains in fermented oatmeal soup: in vivo colonization of human intestinal mucosa and effect on the indigenous flora.

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    Johansson, M L; Molin, G; Jeppsson, B; Nobaek, S; Ahrné, S; Bengmark, S

    1993-01-01

    In vivo colonization by different Lactobacillus strains on human intestinal mucosa of healthy volunteers was studied together with the effect of Lactobacillus administration on different groups of indigenous bacteria. A total of 19 test strains were administered in fermented oatmeal soup containing 5 x 10(6) CFU of each strain per ml by using a dose of 100 ml of soup per day for 10 days. Biopsies were taken from both the upper jejunum and the rectum 1 day before administration was started and 1 and 11 days after administration was terminated. The administration significantly increased the Lactobacillus counts on the jejunum mucosa, and high levels remained 11 days after administration was terminated. The levels of streptococci increased by 10- to 100-fold in two persons, and the levels of sulfite-reducing clostridia in the jejunum decreased by 10- to 100-fold in three of the volunteers 1 day after administration was terminated. In recta, the anaerobic bacterium counts and the gram-negative anaerobic bacterium counts decreased significantly by the end of administration. Furthermore, a decrease in the number of members of the Enterobacteriaceae by 1,000-fold was observed on the rectal mucosa of two persons. Randomly picked Lactobacillus isolates were identified phenotypically by API 50CH tests and genotypically by the plasmid profiles of strains and by restriction endonuclease analysis of chromosomal DNAs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. ToF-SIMS and principal component analysis of lipids and amino acids from inflamed and dysplastic human colonic mucosa.

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    Urbini, Marco; Petito, Valentina; de Notaristefani, Francesco; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Tortora, Luca

    2017-08-03

    Here, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and multivariate analysis were combined to study the role of ulcerative colitis (UC), a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in the colon cancer progression. ToF-SIMS was used to obtain mass spectra and chemical maps from the mucosal surface of human normal (NC), inflamed (IC), and dysplastic (DC) colon tissues. Chemical mapping with a lateral resolution of ≈ 1 μm allowed to evaluate zonation of fatty acids and amino acids as well as the morphological condition of the intestinal glands. High mass resolution ToF-SIMS spectra showed chemical differences in lipid and amino acid composition as a function of pathological state. In positive ion mode, mono- (MAG), di- (DAG), and triacylglycerol (TAG) signals were detected in NC tissues, while in IC and DC tissues, the only cholesterol was present as lipid class representative. Signals from fatty acids, collected in negative ion mode, were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA showed a strict correlation between IC and DC samples, due to an increase of stearic, arachidonic, and linoleic acid. In the same way, differences in the amino acid composition were highlighted through multivariate analysis. PCA revealed that glutamic acid, leucine/isoleucine, and valine fragments are related to IC tissues. On the other hand, tyrosine, methionine, and tryptophan peaks contributed highly to the separation of DC tissues. Finally, a classification of NC, IC, and DC patients was also achieved through hierarchical cluster analysis of amino acid fragments. In this case, human colonic inflammation showed a stronger relationship with normal than dysplastic condition. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. [Molecular Mechanisms for Adhesion and Colonization of Human Gastric Mucosa by Helicobacter pylori and its Clinical Implications].

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    Coelho, Elisabete; Magalhães, Ana; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Reis, Celso A

    2016-08-01

    Introdução: A infeção por Helicobacter pylori é muito prevalente mundialmente, e está associada à progressão da cascata de carcinogénese gástrica, sendo um dos principais fatores de risco para o desenvolvimento de carcinoma gástrico. São vários os fatores determinantes para a infeção e desenvolvimento de patologia gástrica, incluindo fatores ambientais, fatores genéticos do hospedeiro, e fatores de virulência da bactéria.Material e Métodos: Neste trabalho, é apresentada uma revisão do estado da arte sobre os fatores determinantes da infeção e sobre os mecanismos moleculares de adesão da Helicobacter pylori à mucosa gástrica recentemente descritos e a sua possível aplicação terapêutica.Resultados: A adesão da Helicobacter pylori ao epitélio gástrico é uma etapa fundamental da patogénese gástrica, permitindo o acesso da bactéria a nutrientes, e a ação de diversos fatores de virulência da bactéria, promovendo, desta forma, a recorrência da infeção e a progressão na cascata de carcinogénese gástrica.Discussão: A erradicação da infeção por Helicobacter pylori é a melhor estratégia preventiva disponível contra o carcinoma gástrico, principalmente quando feita antes do aparecimento de lesões pré-neoplásicas. O aumento da resistência aos antibacterianos e as taxas de erradicação, por vezes aquém do esperado, contribuem para a procura de alternativas de tratamento.Conclusão: O desenvolvimento de novas estratégias terapêuticas focadas nos mecanismos moleculares de adesão da Helicobacter pylori é muito promissor, no entanto são necessários estudos futuros sobre a sua eficácia in vivo e toxicidade.

  12. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa of cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer.

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    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of patients with colon cancer and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 patients with cancer and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of ten of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r = 0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy.

  13. Telomere length in non-neoplastic colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC) and its relationship to the severe clinical phenotypes.

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    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Sumi, Kazuya; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Masakatsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Hirata, Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Telomere shortening occurs with human aging in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by rapid cell turnover and oxidative injury. To clarify the clinical importance of telomere shortening in colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC), we measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in non-neoplastic colonic mucosa in UC patients and assessed its relationship to various clinical subtypes. Relative telomere length in genomic DNA was measured in colonic biopsies obtained from rectal inflammatory mucosa from 86 UC patients as well as paired non-inflammatory proximal colonic mucosae from 10 patients. Data were correlated with various clinical phenotypes. In paired samples, average relative telomere length of rectal inflammatory mucosa was shortened compared to normal appearing proximal colon in eight out of ten cases (p = 0.01). Telomere length shortening was significantly associated with more severe Mayo endoscopic subscore (p telomere length was significantly shortened in the same phenotypes than the others (p = 0.003). Telomere shortening is associated with more severe clinical phenotypes of UC, reflecting severe inflammatory state in the colonic mucosa.

  14. Irritable bowel syndrome: is the colonic mucosa to blame?

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    Hoffman, Jill M

    2012-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by chronic abdominal pain or discomfort and altered gastrointestinal function of unknown etiology. Studies of colonic mucosal biopsies from patients with IBS have suggested altered immune system function as a potential mechanism in the pathophysiology of IBS, but efforts to identify the mucosal mediators responsible for the manifestation of symptoms that define the disorder have been limited. In this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Buhner et al. and Balestra et al. report findings from studies linking increased excitability of the enteric nervous system with mucosal mediators released from biopsies of patients with IBS. These studies provide evidence for the concept that mediators present in the colonic mucosa may contribute to the manifestation of clinical symptoms present in IBS.

  15. Analysis of the depolarizing properties of normal and adenomatous polyps in colon mucosa for the early diagnosis of precancerous lesions

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    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; de Cos-Pérez, Jesús; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-09-01

    Optical characterization of biological tissues by means of polarimetric techniques is an area of growing interest. Polarized light can be used for malignant neoplasms detection. To our knowledge, few studies have so far focused on lesions that are prone to result in cancer. In this work we present a polarimetric study of depolarization in prepathological tissues. Specifically, we will focus on premalignant lesions in human colon due to their clinical relevance. Colonic adenoma, the potential precursor of malignant adenocarcinoma, provokes significant structural modifications in colon mucosa that affect light depolarization. The depolarizing properties of normal and adenomatous polyps mucosa are compared. The average linear degree of polarization is shown to present a strong dependence with the precancerous state of the colonic tissue. This method has the potential to enable an early diagnosis of colon cancer.

  16. Mast Cells in Adjacent Normal Colon Mucosa rather than Those in Invasive Margin are Related to Progression of Colon Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Xia; Xiao-shi Zhang; Ying-bo Chen; Ya Ding; Xiao-jun Wu; Rui-qing Peng; Qiang Zhou; Jing Zeng; Jing-hui Hou; Xing Zhang; Yi-xin Zeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective:Mast cells (MC) reside in the mucosa of the digestive tract as the first line against bacteria and toxins.Clinical evidence has implied that the infiltration of mast cells in colorectal cancers is related to malignant phenotypes and a poor prognosis.This study compared the role of mast cells in adjacent normal colon mucosa and in the invasive margin during the progression of colon cancer.Methods:Specimens were obtained from 39 patients with colon adenomas and 155 patients with colon cancers treated at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between January 1999 and July 2004.The density of mast cells was scored by an immunohistochemical assay.The pattern of mast cell distribution and its relationship with dinicopathologic parameters and 5-year survival were analyzed.Results:The majority of mast cells were located in the adjacent normal colon mucosa,followed by the invasive margin and least in the cancer stroma.Mast cell count in adjacent normal colon mucosa (MCCadjacent) was associated with pathologic classification,distant metastases and hepatic metastases,although it was not a prognostic factor.In contrast,mast cell count in the invasive margin (MCCinvasive) was associated with neither the clinicopathlogic parameters nor overall survival.Conclusion:Mast cells in the adjacent normal colon mucosa were related to the progression of colon cancer,suggesting that mast cells might modulate tumor progression via a long-distance mechanism.

  17. Characterization of the motor inhibitory role of colonic mucosa under chemical stimulation in mice.

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    Martín-Cano, Francisco E; Camello, Pedro J; Pozo, María J

    2014-04-01

    The main roles of the colonic mucosa are the absorption of water and electrolytes and the barrier function that preserves the integrity of the colonic wall. The mediators and mechanisms to accomplish these functions are under continuous investigation, but little attention has been paid to a possible control of colonic motility by the mucosa that would fine tune the relationship between absorption and motility. The purpose of this study was to establish the role of the mucosa in the control of induced colonic contractility. Young ICR-CD1 mice (3-5 mo old) were studied. Isometric tension transducers were used to record contractility in full-thickness (FT) and mucosa-free (MF) strips from proximal colon. Proximal FT strips showed lower KCl- and bethanechol-induced responses than MF strips. The difference was not due to mechanical artefacts since the contractile response of FT strips to electrical field stimulation was around 50% lower than in MF. The inhibitory effects of the mucosa on FT strips were mimicked by immersion of separate strips of mucosa in the organ bath but not by addition of mucosal extract, suggesting gaseous molecules as mediators of this effect. Incubation of MF strips with synthase inhibitors of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide abolished the inhibition caused by addition of the mucosal strip, indicating that mucosal gasotransmitters are the mediators of these effects. This suggests that the control of colonic motility exerted by the mucosa could fine tune the balance between transit and absorption.

  18. HLA-A, -B, -C expression in colon carcinoma mimics that of the normal colonic mucosa and is prognostically relevant.

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    Benevolo, Maria; Mottolese, Marcella; Piperno, Giulia; Sperduti, Isabella; Cione, Antonio; Sibilio, Leonardo; Martayan, Aline; Donnorso, Raffaele Perrone; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2007-01-01

    Whether human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, -C expression has any predictive value on the prognosis of human malignancies remains controversial. Herein, monoclonal antibodies with preferential reactivity for HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C (HCA2, HC10, and L31) were used to stain an archival collection of 291 formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded tissues, comprising neoplastic lesions from stages II and III colon carcinoma patients (n=165), and the uninvolved, morphologically normal mucosae from a subset (n=126) of these patients. Marked staining variability was detected not only in the tumors as in previous studies, but also in the normal paired mucosae. HLA-A, -B, -C expression was similar in approximately two thirds of the available 126 normal/neoplastic pairs, confirming in vivo our previous observation that most tumor cells mimic the HLA phenotypes of their normal counterparts. Both up and down-regulation occurred in the remaining third of the pairs, but did not coincide with high and low expression, respectively, conventionally evaluated on the tumor lesion only. Remarkably, a "paired" evaluation, but not high or low expression in the tumor, was predictive of the clinical outcome. Deviations from the expression in the normal paired mucosa (both increases and decreases) of HCA2-reactive class I molecules (possibly HLA-A), and down-regulation of L31-reactive class I molecules (possibly HLA-C), particularly in tumors from stage II patients, correlated with poor 5-year overall and disease-free survival, hazard risk ranging from 2 to 6, approximately. Thus, a paired immunohistochemical comparison reveals a novel immune evasion strategy that may impact on the prognosis of colon carcinoma.

  19. Uropathogenic E. coli Exploit CEA to Promote Colonization of the Urogenital Tract Mucosa

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    Muenzner, Petra; Kengmo Tchoupa, Arnaud; Klauser, Benedikt; Brunner, Thomas; Putze, Johannes; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hauck, Christof R.

    2016-01-01

    Attachment to the host mucosa is a key step in bacterial pathogenesis. On the apical surface of epithelial cells, members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family are abundant glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion and modulation of cell signaling. Interestingly, several gram-negative bacterial pathogens target these receptors by specialized adhesins. The prototype of a CEACAM-binding pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, utilizes colony opacity associated (Opa) proteins to engage CEA, as well as the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 on human epithelial cells. By heterologous expression of neisserial Opa proteins in non-pathogenic E. coli we find that the Opa protein-CEA interaction is sufficient to alter gene expression, to increase integrin activity and to promote matrix adhesion of infected cervical carcinoma cells and immortalized vaginal epithelial cells in vitro. These CEA-triggered events translate in suppression of exfoliation and improved colonization of the urogenital tract by Opa protein-expressing E. coli in CEA-transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Interestingly, uropathogenic E. coli expressing an unrelated CEACAM-binding protein of the Afa/Dr adhesin family recapitulate the in vitro and in vivo phenotype. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking the CEACAM-binding adhesin shows reduced colonization and does not suppress epithelial exfoliation. These results demonstrate that engagement of human CEACAMs by distinct bacterial adhesins is sufficient to blunt exfoliation and to promote host infection. Our findings provide novel insight into mucosal colonization by a common UPEC pathotype and help to explain why human CEACAMs are a preferred epithelial target structure for diverse gram-negative bacteria to establish a foothold on the human mucosa. PMID:27171273

  20. Uropathogenic E. coli Exploit CEA to Promote Colonization of the Urogenital Tract Mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Muenzner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Attachment to the host mucosa is a key step in bacterial pathogenesis. On the apical surface of epithelial cells, members of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA family are abundant glycoproteins involved in cell-cell adhesion and modulation of cell signaling. Interestingly, several gram-negative bacterial pathogens target these receptors by specialized adhesins. The prototype of a CEACAM-binding pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, utilizes colony opacity associated (Opa proteins to engage CEA, as well as the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 on human epithelial cells. By heterologous expression of neisserial Opa proteins in non-pathogenic E. coli we find that the Opa protein-CEA interaction is sufficient to alter gene expression, to increase integrin activity and to promote matrix adhesion of infected cervical carcinoma cells and immortalized vaginal epithelial cells in vitro. These CEA-triggered events translate in suppression of exfoliation and improved colonization of the urogenital tract by Opa protein-expressing E. coli in CEA-transgenic compared to wildtype mice. Interestingly, uropathogenic E. coli expressing an unrelated CEACAM-binding protein of the Afa/Dr adhesin family recapitulate the in vitro and in vivo phenotype. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking the CEACAM-binding adhesin shows reduced colonization and does not suppress epithelial exfoliation. These results demonstrate that engagement of human CEACAMs by distinct bacterial adhesins is sufficient to blunt exfoliation and to promote host infection. Our findings provide novel insight into mucosal colonization by a common UPEC pathotype and help to explain why human CEACAMs are a preferred epithelial target structure for diverse gram-negative bacteria to establish a foothold on the human mucosa.

  1. Effect of ginger root on cyclooxygenase-1 and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression in colonic mucosa of humans at normal and increased risk for colorectal cancer.

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    Jiang, Yan; Turgeon, Danielle K; Wright, Benjamin D; Sidahmed, Elkhansa; Ruffin, Mack T; Brenner, Dean E; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M

    2013-09-01

    Elevated tissue levels of prostaglandin E2, produced by cyclooxygenase (COX), are an early event in colorectal cancer (CRC). Data suggest the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as cancer preventives, in the inhibition of COX activity; however, side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pose unacceptable limitations. Ginger has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities with significant CRC preventive potential. We investigated whether consumption of 2.0 g ginger daily regulated the level of two key enzymes that control prostaglandin E2 production, COX-1 and NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). Thirty participants at normal and 20 participants at increased risk for CRC were randomized and given 2.0 g/day ginger or placebo for 28 days. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies at baseline and the end of the study. Tissue levels of COX-1 and 15-PGDH were assessed using western blotting. After ginger consumption, participants at increased risk for CRC had a significantly reduced colonic COX-1 protein level (23.8±41%) compared with the placebo group (18.9±52%; P=0.03). Protein levels of 15-PGDH in the colon were unchanged. In participants who were at normal risk for CRC, neither protein levels of COX-1 nor 15-PGDH in the colon were altered by ginger consumption. Ginger significantly lowered COX-1 protein expression in participants at increased risk for CRC but not in those at normal risk for CRC. Ginger did not alter 15-PGDH protein expression in either increased or normal-risk participants. Further investigation, in larger studies with a longer ginger intervention, is needed to examine the ability of ginger to impact tissue levels of prostaglandin.

  2. One-stage urethral reconstruction using colonic mucosa graft:an experimental and clinical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Min Xu; Yong Qiao; Ying-Long Sa; Jiong Zhang; Hui-Zhen Zhang; Xin-Ru Zhang; Deng-Long Wu; Rong Chen

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possibility of urethral reconstructionwith a free colonic mucosa graft and to present ourpreliminary experience with urethral substitution using a freegraft of colonic mucosa for treatment of 7 patients withcomplex urethral stricture of a long segment.METHODS: Ten female dogs underwent a procedure inwhich the urethral mucosa was totally removed andreplaced with a free graft of colonic mucosa. A urodynamicstudy was performed before the operation and sacrifice.The dogs were sacrificed 8 to 16 weeks after the operationfor histological examination of urethra. Besides, 7 patientswith complex urethral stricture of a long segment weretreated by urethroplasty with the use of a colonic mucosalgraft. The cases had undergone an average of 3 previousunsuccessful repairs. Urethral reconstruction with a freegraft of colonic mucosa ranged from 10 to 17 cm (mean13.1 cm). Follow-up included urethrography, urethroscopyand uroflowmetry.RESULTS: Urethral stricture developed in 1 dog. The resultsof urodynamic studies showed that the difference in themaximum urethral pressure between the pre-operation andpre-sacrifice in the remaining 9 dogs was not of significance(P>0.05). Histological examination revealed that the colonicfree mucosa survived inside the urethral lumen of the 10experimental dogs. Plicae surface and unilaminar cylindricepithelium of the colonic mucosa was observed in dogssacrificed 8 weeks after the operation. The plicae surfaceand unilaminar cylindric epithelium of the colonic mucosawas not observed, and metaplastic transitional epitheliumcovered a large proportion of the urethral mucosa in dogssacrificed 12 weeks after the operation. Clinically, the patientswere followed up for 3-18 months postoperatively (mean8.5 months). Meetal stenosis was developed in 1 patient 3months postoperatively and needed reoperation. The patientwas voiding very well with urinary peak flow 28.7 ml/s duringthe follow-up of 9 months after reoperation. The

  3. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase in the colonic mucosa of children with inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kriszta Molnár; (A)dám Vannay; Beáta Szebeni; Nóra Fanni Bánki; Erna Sziksz; (A)ron Cseh; Hajnalka Gy(o)rffy

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate intestinal alkaline phosphatase (iAP) in the intestinal mucosa of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS:Colonic biopsy samples were taken from 15 newly diagnosed IBD patients and from 10 healthy controls.In IBD patients,specimens were obtained both from inflamed and non-inflamed areas.The iAP mRNA and protein expression was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis,respectively.Tissue localization of iAP and Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 was investigated by immunofluorescent staining.RESULTS:The iAP protein level in the inflamed mucosa of children with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) was significantly decreased when compared with controls (both P < 0.05).Similarly,we found a significantly decreased level of iAP protein in the inflamed mucosa in CD compared with non-inflamed mucosa in CD (P < 0.05).In addition,the iAP protein level in inflamed colonic mucosa in patients with UC was decreased compared with non-inflamed mucosa in patients with CD (P < 0.05).iAP protein levels in the non-inflamed mucosa of patients with CD were similar to controls.iAP mRNA expression in inflamed colonic mucosa of children with CD and UC was not significantly different from that in non-inflamed colonic mucosa with CD.Expression of iAP mRNA in patients with non-inflamed mucosa and in controls were similar.Co-localization of iAP with TLR4 showed intense staining with a dotted-like pattern.iAP was present in the inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa of patients with CD,UC,and in control biopsy specimens,irrespective of whether it was present in the terminal ileum or in the colon.However,the fluorescent signal of TLR4 was more pronounced in the colon compared with the terminal ileum in all groups studied.CONCLUSION:Lower than normal iAP protein levels in inflamed mucosa of IBD patients may indicate a role for iAP in inflammatory lesions in IBD.Based on our results,administration of exogenous

  4. Histopathological changes of free buccal mucosa and colonic mucosa grafts after translation to dog bladder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yue-min; LI Tai; SA Ying-long; QIAO Yong; ZHANG Hui-zhen; ZHANG Xin-ru; ZHANG Jiong; CHEN Zhong; XIE Hong; SI Jie-min

    2005-01-01

    @@ Over the past years, more cases using buccal mucosa for urethral reconstruction have been reported.1-4 The excellent early results with this tissue led some authors to extend their indications for its use. However, patients with complex, long-segment urethral strictures and significant scar tissue formation after the failure of previous urethroplasty, still present an operative challenge. The buccal mucosa may not be useful for the treatment of the complicated lengthy urethral strictures because of limited material.

  5. Detection of a mucin marker for the adenoma-carcinoma sequence inhuman colonic mucosa by monoclonal antibody AM-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanski, C; Bornhoeft, G; Topf, N; Hermann, U; Stein, H; Riecken, E O

    1990-05-01

    The monoclonal antibody AM-3 was raised against mucins extracted from human colorectal carcinomas. It reacted strongly with sections of paraffin wax embedded colorectal carcinoma. In colonic adenoma tissue the percentage of cells expressing the epitope detected by AM-3 correlated with the degree of dysplasia. In contrast to immunohistochemical staining, which did not show the presence of the antigen in histologically normal mucosa, the more sensitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot assays showed that it was weakly expressed in this tissue. AM-3 reacted with variable frequency with several normal and malignant human tissues, indicating that the detected epitope is not restricted to colonic tissue. In colonic carcinomas it is present on a sialomucin of apparent relative molecular mass of more than 440,000. These data suggest that the antigen detectable with AM-3 may be useful in the assessment of premalignant changes in colonic adenomas.

  6. Gene expression profiles of colonic mucosa in healthy young adult and senior dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yong Kil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously reported the effects of age and diet on nutrient digestibility, intestinal morphology, and large intestinal fermentation patterns in healthy young adult and senior dogs. However, a genome-wide molecular analysis of colonic mucosa as a function of age and diet has not yet been performed in dogs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Colonic mucosa samples were collected from six senior (12-year old and six young adult (1-year old female beagles fed one of two diets (animal protein-based vs. plant protein-based for 12 months. Total RNA in colonic mucosa was extracted and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip® Canine Genome Arrays. Results indicated that the majority of gene expression changes were due to age (212 genes rather than diet (66 genes. In particular, the colonic mucosa of senior dogs had increased expression of genes associated with cell proliferation, inflammation, stress response, and cellular metabolism, whereas the expression of genes associated with apoptosis and defensive mechanisms were decreased in senior vs. young adult dogs. No consistent diet-induced alterations in gene expression existed in both age groups, with the effects of diet being more pronounced in senior dogs than in young adult dogs. CONCLUSION: Our results provide molecular insight pertaining to the aged canine colon and its predisposition to dysfunction and disease. Therefore, our data may aid in future research pertaining to age-associated gastrointestinal physiological changes and highlight potential targets for dietary intervention to limit their progression.

  7. Effects of flunixin meglumine on the recovery of ischaemic equine colonic mucosa in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, A J; Grosche, A; Matyjaszek, S A; Polyak, M M R; Freeman, D E

    2011-08-01

    The effects of prostaglandins and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on repair of equine intestinal mucosa are important since most horses with gastrointestinal diseases are routinely treated with NSAIDs, such as flunixin meglumine (FM), and these drugs can be toxic to equine gastrointestinal mucosa. Flunixin meglumine would not affect recovery of equine colonic mucosa in vitro, 18 h after a reversible ischaemic injury. In 14 anaesthetised horses, a segment of pelvic flexure was subjected to 2 h of ischaemia and the horses were allowed to recover for 18 h. Seven horses received normal saline and 7 received FM, 1.1 mg/kg bwt i.v., at the end of ischaemia and 12 h later. Colonic mucosa was harvested during a second anaesthesia, 18 h after recovery from ischaemia and then horses were subjected to euthanasia. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and transepithelial flux of tritiated mannitol were used to measure mucosal permeability during 4 h of incubation in Ussing chambers, with the following in vitro treatments: 1) no addition, 2) FM 14 µmol/l as powder, 3) FM 14 µmol/l in injectable form and 4) diluent for injectable FM. Histomorphological changes were assessed by light microscopy. There were no significant differences in any of the measurements between saline and FM treated horses. The mucosal height of the ischaemic FM tissues incubated in diluent was significantly decreased compared to the nonischaemic tissues. Flunixin meglumine did not adversely affect barrier integrity in ischaemic equine colonic mucosa. © 2011 EVJ Ltd.

  8. Persistence of gene expression changes in noninflamed and inflamed colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis and their presence in colonic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuji Toiyama; Akira Mizoguchi; Kazushi Kimura; Toshimitsu Araki; Shigeyuki Yoshiyama; Kouhei Sakaguchi; Chikao Miki; Masato Kusunoki

    2005-01-01

    AIM: A few studies have applied genomic-wide gene expression analysis in inflamed colon tissue sample in ulcerative colitis (UC). We reported the first study of non-inflamed mucosal gene expression in UC and explored its clinical implication.METHODS: Non-inflamed mucosa was obtained from 6 UC patients who received total colectomy. The gene expression of UC in noninfliamed mucosa was monitored with a microarray. For a selected gene, RT-PCR was performed to verify array results and to further examine expression pattern in inflamed mucosa of UC, colorectal cancer tissue and normal mucosa using additional matched pairs.RESULTS: Two genes showing 2.5-fold decreased expression with significance set at in UC samples were bomeo box a4 (HOXa4) and mads box transcription enhancer factor 2, polypeptide B (MEF2b). RT-PCR showed that MEF2b expression in non-inflamed mucosa was significantly downregulated, whereas the expression of MEF2b increased in accordance with the severity of mucosal inflammation. HOXa4 expression both in inflamed and non-inflamed mucosa in UC was consistently downregulated, and the downregulation of HOXa4 was also found in colorectal carcinoma.CONCLUSION: It is suggested that the MEF2b expression in UC which increase in accordance with inflammation may be induced by the inflammatory mediator. In contrast the downregulation of HOXa4 may be partly involved in the pathogenesis of disease including UC and UC-related carcinogenesis.

  9. Importance of the surrounding colonic mucosa in distinguishing between hyperplastic and adenomatous polyps during acetic acid chromoendoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong Hwan Kim; Sun-Young Lee; Byung Kook Kim; Won Hyeok Choe; So Young Kwon; In-Kyung Sung; Hyung-Seok Park; Choon-Jo Jin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the characteristics of colonic polyps, where it is difficult to distinguish adenomatous polyps from hyperplastic polyps, with the aid of acetic acid chromoendoscopy.METHODS: Acetic acid spray was applied to colonic polyps smaller than 10 mm before complete excision. Endoscopic images were taken before and 15-30 s after the acetic acid spray. Both pre- and post-sprayed images were shown to 16 examiners, who were asked to interpret the lesions as either hyperplastic or adenomatous polyps. Regression analysis was performed to determine which factors were most likely related to diagnostic accuracy.RESULTS: In 50 cases tested by the 16 examiners, the overall accuracy was 62.4% (499/800). Regression analysis demonstrated that surrounding colonic mucosa was the only factor that was significantly related to accuracy in discriminating adenomatous from hyperplastic polyps (P < 0.001). Accuracy was higher for polyps with linear surrounding colonic mucosa than for those with nodular surrounding colonic mucosa (P < 0.001), but was not related to the shape, location, or size of the polyp.CONCLUSION: The accuracy of predicting histology is significantly related to the pattern of colonic mucosa surrounding the polyp. Making a histological diagnosis of colon polyps merely by acetic acid spray is helpful for colon polyps with linear, regularly patterned surrounding colonic mucosa, and less so for those with nodular, irregularly patterned surrounding colonic mucosa.

  10. Effects of flunixin meglumine on recovery of colonic mucosa from ischemia in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyjaszek, Sarah A; Morton, Alison J; Freeman, David E; Grosche, Astrid; Polyak, Maximilian M R; Kuck, Hilken

    2009-02-01

    To examine the effects of flunixin meglumine (FM) on recovery of colonic mucosa from experimentally induced ischemia in horses. 14 research horses. Ischemia was induced in the colons of anesthetized horses for 2 hours. Afterward, horses received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (12 mL, IV, q 12 h; n = 7) or FM (1.1 mg/kg, IV, q 12 h; 7) and were allowed to recover for 18 hours after termination of the ischemic event. Postoperative pain scores were recorded every 4 hours throughout the recovery period. At the end of the recovery period, horses were anesthetized, and ischemic and nonischemic segments of colonic mucosa were harvested for histologic evaluation, western blot analysis, and in vitro assessment of transepithelial electric resistance (TER) and transmucosal flux of tritium-labeled (3H-) mannitol. Horses were then euthanatized. Flunixin meglumine significantly lowered pain scores at the first postoperative recording. There were no significant differences between treatment with saline solution and FM in any of the measurements for TER, 3H-mannitol flux, histomorphometric variables, neutrophil infiltration (detected via calprotectin immunostaining), and expressions of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2. After both treatments, TER declined significantly in nonischemic tissues in vitro, whereas it increased significantly in ischemic-injured tissues. Flunixin meglumine did not affect recovery of equine colonic mucosa from ischemic injury, and continued use in horses with colonic ischemia is therefore justified.

  11. In vivo genotoxic effects of dietary heme iron on rat colon mucosa and ex vivo effects on colon cells monitored by an optimized alkaline comet assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Océane, C Martin

    2015-04-01

    In conclusion, our results offer a suitable protocol to evaluate genotoxicity on in vivo cryopreserved colon mucosa and on in vitro murine colonic cells, with a middle throughput capacity. This protocol confirms the increase of genotoxicity in rat colon mucosa after an heme-iron diet. Moreover, this protocol enables the demonstration that aldehydes from heme-induced lipoperoxidation are responsible for this increase of genotoxicity.

  12. Altered Interactions between the Gut Microbiome and Colonic Mucosa Precede Polyposis in APCMin/+ Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua S Son

    Full Text Available Mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene, an early event in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, is present in 70-80% of sporadic human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. To test the hypothesis that mutation of the APC gene alters microbial interactions with host intestinal mucosa prior to the development of polyposis, culture-independent methods (targeted qPCR assays and Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V1V2 hypervariable region were used to compare the intestinal microbial composition of 30 six-week old C57BL/6 APCMin/+ and 30 congenic wild type (WT mice. The results demonstrate that similar to 12-14 week old APCMin/+ mice with intestinal neoplasia, 6 week old APCMin/+ mice with no detectable neoplasia, exhibit an increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes spp in the colon. Parallel mouse RNA sequence analysis, conducted on a subset of proximal colonic RNA samples (6 APCMin/+, 6 WT revealed 130 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, fold change ≥ 2, FDR <0.05. Hierarchical clustering of the DEGs was carried out by using 1-r dissimilarity measurement, where r stands for the Pearson correlation, and Ward minimum variance linkage, in order to reduce the number of input variables. When the cluster centroids (medians were included along with APC genotype as input variables in a negative binomial (NB regression model, four of seven mouse gene clusters, in addition to APC genotype, were significantly associated with the increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes spp. Three of the four clusters include several downregulated genes encoding immunoglobulin variable regions and non-protein coding RNAs. These results support the concept that mutation of the APC gene alters colonic-microbial interactions prior to polyposis. It remains to be determined whether interventions directed at ameliorating dysbiosis in APCMin/+mice, such as through probiotics, prebiotics or antibiotics, could reduce tumor formation.

  13. An ex vivo porcine nasal mucosa explants model to study MRSA colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Tulinski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the upper respiratory tract and skin surfaces in mammals. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. However, the mechanism of successful pig colonization by MRSA ST398 is poorly understood. To study MRSA colonization in pigs, an ex vivo model consisting of porcine nasal mucosa explants cultured at an air-liquid interface was evaluated. In cultured mucosa explants from the surfaces of the ventral turbinates and septum of the pig nose no changes in cell morphology and viability were observed up to 72 h. MRSA colonization on the explants was evaluated followed for three MRSA ST398 isolates for 180 minutes. The explants were incubated with 3×10(8 CFU/ml in PBS for 2 h to allow bacteria to adhere to the explants surface. Next the explants were washed and in the first 30 minutes post adhering time, a decline in the number of CFU was observed for all MRSA. Subsequently, the isolates showed either: bacterial growth, no growth, or a further reduction in bacterial numbers. The MRSA were either localized as clusters between the cilia or as single bacteria on the cilia surface. No morphological changes in the epithelium layer were observed during the incubation with MRSA. We conclude that porcine nasal mucosa explants are a valuable ex vivo model to unravel the interaction of MRSA with nasal tissue.

  14. Effects of moxibustion on heat-shock protein 70 expression in the spinal cord and colonic mucosa in a rat model of ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qi; Yin Shi; Luyi Wu; Jingping Mu; Linying Tan; Xiaopeng Ma; Huirong Liu; Shifen Xu; Huangan Wu

    2010-01-01

    Pathological changes in the colon are closely associated with the spinal cord, and innervation of spinal cord can regulate cellular functions. Our previous studies verified that moxibustion protects and restores the colonic mucosa, but the mechanisms of action remain unknown. The present study observed the effects of moxibustion and salicylazosulfapyridine on expression of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) and its mRNA in the spinal cord and colonic mucosa of ulcerative colitis rats. Results demonstrated that moxibustion and salicylazosulfapyridine increased HSP70 mRNA expression in the spinal cord and colonic mucosa of ulcerative colitis rats. The decreased transcriptional activity of HSP70 in the spinal cord and colonic mucosa might participate in damage to the colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis rats. Moxibustion exerted protective effects on colonic mucosa by up-regulating HSP70 transcriptional activity in the spinal cord and colonic mucosa.

  15. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in the Study of Colonic Mucosa in IBD Patients: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Salvatori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE is one of several novel methods that provide real-time, high-resolution imaging at a micronscale via endoscopes. CLE and related technologies are often termed “virtual biopsy” as they simulate the images seen in traditional histology. Recently, the use of CLE was reported in the study of colonic mucosa in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and in particular in patients affected by ulcerative colitis. CLE has the potential to have an important role in management of IBD patients as it can be used to assess the grading of colitis and in detection of microscopic colitis in endoscopically silent segments. Moreover, CLE can be used in surveillance programs especially in high-risk patients. This report aims to evaluate the current data on the application of confocal endomicroscopy in clinical gastroenterology and particularly in the study of colonic mucosa in UC patients.

  16. Colonic adenocarcinoma, mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and tuberculosis in a segment of colon: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ambedkar; Raj; Kulandai; Velu; Banushree; C; Srinivasamurthy; Krishnan; Nagarajan; Ilavarasi; Sinduja

    2014-01-01

    Synchronous occurrence of adenocarcinoma and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue(MALT) lymphoma of colon is rare, and its presence with coexisting tuberculosis is still rarer. To our knowledge, this may be the first case report. In the present report, we describe a 43-year-old female who presented with a history of abdominal pain, fever, loss of weight and loss of appetite. Colonoscopy showed a large ulceroproliferative mass arising from the caecum, biopsy of which showed it to be adenocarcinoma of the colon. A right hemicolectomy was performed and microscopic study of the colon revealed tuberculosis and synchronous adenocarcinoma with lymphoma. Eight of sixteen lymph nodes showed tuberculosis and three of sixteenpericoloniclymphnodes showed metastatic deposits. Immunostains further confirmed the tumour to be adenocarcinoma with MALT lymphoma. We would like to highlight the diagnostic challenges arising from the multi-faceted presentations of these three conditions.

  17. VISUAL ASSESSMENT OF THE MUCOSA OF THE COLON IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME IN THE DYNAMICS OF TREATMENT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. E. Shklyaev; A. S. Pantyukhina; A. A. Sapegin; E. L. Bazhenov

    2016-01-01

    .... The difficulty of its diagnosis related to the lack of specific markers of the disease. This article describes the visual changes of the mucosa of the colon in irritable bowel syndrome in the dynamics of medical and physiotherapy treatment...

  18. Dietary heme alters microbiota and mucosa of mouse colon without functional changes in host-microbe cross-talk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noortje IJssennagger

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a major cause of cancer deaths in Western countries and is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the iron-porphyrin pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of gut contents which injures surface cells leading to compensatory hyperproliferation of crypt cells. This hyperproliferation results in epithelial hyperplasia which increases the risk of colon cancer. In humans, a high red-meat diet increases Bacteroides spp in feces. Therefore, we simultaneously investigated the effects of dietary heme on colonic microbiota and on the host mucosa of mice. Whole genome microarrays showed that heme injured the colonic surface epithelium and induced hyperproliferation by changing the surface to crypt signaling. Using 16S rRNA phylogenetic microarrays, we investigated whether bacteria play a role in this changed signaling. Heme increased Bacteroidetes and decreased Firmicutes in colonic contents. This shift was most likely caused by a selective susceptibility of gram-positive bacteria to heme cytotoxic fecal water, which is not observed for gram-negative bacteria, allowing expansion of the gram-negative community. The increased amount of gram-negative bacteria most probably increased LPS exposure to colonocytes, however, there is no appreciable immune response detected in the heme-fed mice. There was no functional change in the sensing of the bacteria by the mucosa, as changes in inflammation pathways and Toll-like receptor signaling were not detected. This unaltered host-microbe cross-talk indicates that the changes in microbiota did not play a causal role in the observed hyperproliferation and hyperplasia.

  19. Precision of pyrosequencing assay to measure LINE-1 methylation in colon cancer, normal colonic mucosa, and peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irahara, Natsumi; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Baba, Yoshifumi; Shima, Kaori; Lindeman, Neal I; Hazra, Aditi; Schernhammer, Eva S; Hunter, David J; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji

    2010-03-01

    Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation plays an important role in epigenomic and genomic instability and colorectal carcinogenesis. DNA methylation in the long interspersed nucleotide element-1, L1 (LINE-1) repetitive element is a good indicator of global DNA methylation level. In addition, LINE-1 hypomethylation in blood cells has been associated with colorectal adenoma risk, and LINE-1 hypomethylation in colorectal cancer is related with prognosis and linearly predicts shorter patient survival. However, no study has comprehensively evaluated the precision of sodium bisulfite conversion and PCR-pyrosequencing to measure LINE-1 methylation. Using 10 paraffin-embedded colon cancers, 5 matched normal colon mucosa, and 5 unrelated peripheral blood buffy coat leukocyte specimens, we enriched tumor DNA by macrodissection and laser capture microdissection. LINE-1 methylation was calculated as an average of 100 * C/(C + T) at 4 CpG sites after bisulfite-PCR-pyrosequencing. The LINE-1 methylation value in colon cancers varied, ranging approximately from 30 to 80. To measure assay precision, we performed bisulfite conversion on seven different DNA specimen aliquots and repeated PCR-pyrosequencing seven times. Run-to-run (between-run) SD ranged from 1.3 to 4.4 (median, 3.0) in macrodissected colon cancers; 1.1 to 10.5 (median, 3.8) in laser capture microdissection specimens; 1.3 to 2.5 (median, 1.9) in normal colon; and 1.5 to 3.4 (median, 1.9) in leukocyte DNA. In conclusion, bisulfite conversion and PCR-pyrosequencing assay can measure LINE-1 methylation in macrodissected colon cancer, normal colon, and blood DNA, and may be useful in clinical and research settings.

  20. Muscularis mucosae contraction evokes colonic secretion via prostaglandin synthesis and nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, W H; Fromm, T H; Wangsness, C E

    2003-02-01

    This in vitro study tested the hypothesis that muscularis mucosae contractile activity contributes to rabbit colonic mucosal function by mechanisms other than simple mechanical deformation of the epithelium. Experiments were performed by using a technique that allows simultaneous recording of muscle activity and transmucosal potential difference, a measure of epithelial ion transport. ATP, bradykinin, histamine, PGE(2), PGF(1alpha), and PGF(2alpha) elicited muscularis mucosae contractions that were resistant to atropine and TTX. Only ATP-induced contractions were indomethacin sensitive, and only those to dimethylphenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) were reduced by atropine. All agonist-evoked increases in transmucosal potential difference were atropine resistant, and, with the exception of those to PGE(2), PGF(2alpha), and VIP, they were also TTX sensitive. Mucosal responses to ATP, bradykinin, and histamine were indomethacin sensitive, whereas those to DMPP, the prostaglandins, and VIP were not. When cyclooxygenase activity or the mucosal innervation was compromised, even maximal muscularis mucosae contractions did not produce large secretory responses. It is concluded that contraction-related prostaglandin synthesis and noncholinergic secretomotor neuron stimulation represent the physiological transduction mechanism through which muscularis mucosae motor activity is translated into mucosal secretion.

  1. Explant cultures of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Barrett, L.A.; Jackson, F.E.

    1978-01-01

    Human colonic epithelium has been cultured as explants in a chemically defined medium for periods of 1 to 20 days. The viability of the explants was shown by the preservation of the ultrastructural features of the colonic epithelial cells and by active incorporation of radioactive precursors into...

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and mice gastric mucosa colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori drug-resistant strains and non-compliance to therapy are the major causes of H. pylori eradication failure. For some bacterial species it has been demonstrated that fatty acids have a growth inhibitory effect. Our main aim was to assess the ability of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA to inhibit H. pylori growth both in vitro and in a mouse model. The effectiveness of standard therapy (ST in combination with DHA on H. pylori eradication and recurrence prevention success was also investigated. The effects of DHA on H. pylori growth were analyzed in an in vitro dose-response study and n in vivo model. We analized the ability of H. pylori to colonize mice gastric mucosa following DHA, ST or a combination of both treatments. Our data demonstrate that DHA decreases H. pylori growth in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DHA inhibits H. pylori gastric colonization in vivo as well as decreases mouse gastric mucosa inflammation. Addition of DHA to ST was also associated with lower H. pylori infection recurrence in the mouse model. In conclusion, DHA is an inhibitor of H. pylori growth and its ability to colonize mouse stomach. DHA treatment is also associated with a lower recurrence of H. pylori infection in combination with ST. These observations pave the way to consider DHA as an adjunct agent in H. pylori eradication treatment.

  3. The colon mucosa is a potential site for the initial triggering of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Ellingsen, Torkell Juulsgaad; Glerup, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage damage and ultimately impaired joint function. To gain new insight into the systemic immune manifestations of RA, we characterized the colon mucosa proteome from 11 RA-patients and 10 healthy controls. The biopsies were...... extracted by colonoscopy and analyzed by label-free quantitative proteomics, enabling the quantitation of 5366 proteins. The abundance of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) was statistically significantly increased in RA-patient biopsies compared with controls and correlated with the administered dosage...

  4. [C. pylori colonization of the mucosa in patients with chronic ulcerative and non-ulcerative gastropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschiavo, F; Ventura-Spagnolo, T; Broccio, G

    1990-05-01

    C. pyloridis colonization was investigated in a selected group of 58 patients with upper gastrointestinal disorders submitted to endoscopy and biopsy. The following results were registered. C. pyloridis was isolated in 14 out of 18 cases of active chronic gastritis, in 15 out of 24 cases of non active chronic gastritis, and 7 out of 8 cases of antral ulceration. A negative finding was registered in 8 patients whose gastric mucosa was normal. Therefore, the Authors consider as valid the etiopathogenetic correlation between C. pyloridis and ulcerative or non-ulcerative chronic gastric diseases, suggested by others.

  5. Cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer Cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Kędra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of malignant gastrointestinal cancers in Poland has been constantly growing, which has
    led to an intensification of the search for new markers of the early clinical stage of this disease. The oral cavity,
    as the first part of the gastrointestinal tract, has a very important role. The oral cavity presents symptoms of both
    typically stomatological and systemic diseases. Oral cancers, benign or malignant, may originate and grow in any
    of the tissues of the mouth, and within this small area they may be of varied clinical, histological and biological
    features. These can be lesions typically observed in the oral cavity, but also characteristic of cases where the
    symptoms occur both in the mouth and in other body parts. The aim of this study was to present a cytological
    picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer and to compare the cytological picture with
    that obtained from a group of patients with no cancer, using the Papanicolaou classification and the Bethesda
    system. The study was conducted in 126 patients treated surgically in the II General and Gastroenterological
    Surgery Clinic between 2006 and 2008. All patients were divided into two groups based on the type of lesions. In
    both of the studied groups, more than half of the patients did not present any abnormalities in the mucosa of the
    mouth, lips and cheeks in the physical examination. None of the patients had erosion, ulceration or lesions
    typical of leukoplakia or lichen planus. No malignant cells were detected in either of the studied groups, and
    there were no well-defined lesions found in the oral cavity that would distinguish the patients with gastrointestinal
    cancer. (The incidence of malignant gastrointestinal cancers in Poland has been constantly growing, which has
    led to an intensification of the search for new markers of the early clinical stage of this disease. The

  6. Grain-rich diets altered the colonic fermentation and mucosa-associated bacterial communities and induced mucosal injuries in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Huimin; Liu, Junhua; Feng, Panfei; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2016-02-04

    Remarkably little information is available about the impact of high-grain (HG) feeding on colonic mucosa-associated bacteria and mucosal morphology. In the present study, 12 male goats were randomly assigned to either a hay diet (n = 6) or an HG diet (65% grain; n = 6) to characterise the changes in the composition of the bacterial community in colonic mucosa and the mucosal morphology of the colon. The results showed that HG feeding decreased the colonic pH and increased the concentrations of total short chain fatty acids and lipopolysaccharides in colonic digesta. The principal coordinate analysis results showed that the HG diet altered the colonic mucosal bacterial communities, with an increase in the abundance of genus Blautia and a decrease in the abundance of genera Bacillus, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus. The HG-fed goats showed sloughing of the surface layer epithelium, intercellular tight junction erosion, cell mitochondrial damage, and upregulation of the relative mRNA expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ in colonic mucosa. Collectively, our data indicate that HG feeding induced changes in colonic mucosal morphology and cytokines expression that might be caused by excessive fermentation and dramatic shifts in the bacterial populations in the colon.

  7. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma of the transverse colon: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shigetoshi Matsuo; Yohei Mizuta; Tomayoshi Hayashi; Seiya Susumu; Ryuji Tsutsumi; Takashi Azuma; Satoshi Yamaguchi

    2006-01-01

    We herein present a case of a 75-year-old female with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma of the transverse colon with the stage IE (Ann Arbor classification). Colonoscopy revealed the tumor's appearance as a Ⅱa plus Ⅱc-like early colon cancer as defined ac cording to the macroscopic classification of the Japanese Research Society for Cancer of Colon, Rectum and Anus, measuring less than 2 cm in diameter. Histologically, the tumor was diagnosed as MALT lymphoma because of the presence of lymphoepithelial lesions consisting of diffuse proliferation of atypical lymphocytes and glandular destruction. The majority of these lymphocytes immunohistochemically stained for the B-lymphocyte marker. The patient first utderwent H pylori eradication therapy with Lansap(R). However, the tumor size gradually increased over the next 4 mo and the patient eventually underwent surgical resection. The operative procedure included a partial colectomy with dissection of the paracolic lymph nodes. The tumor measured 45 mm × 30 mm in diam eter and histological examination showed that the lymphoma cells had infiltrated the muscle layer of the colon without nodal involvement. The patient has had no recurrence postoperatively without any chemotherapy.

  8. Gut microbial colonization orchestrates TLR2 expression, signaling and epithelial proliferation in the small intestinal mucosa.

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    Nives Hörmann

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is an environmental factor that determines renewal of the intestinal epithelium and remodeling of the intestinal mucosa. At present, it is not resolved if components of the gut microbiota can augment innate immune sensing in the intestinal epithelium via the up-regulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Here, we report that colonization of germ-free (GF Swiss Webster mice with a complex gut microbiota augments expression of TLR2. The microbiota-dependent up-regulation of components of the TLR2 signaling complex could be reversed by a 7 day broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. TLR2 downstream signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 and protein-kinase B (AKT induced by bacterial TLR2 agonists resulted in increased proliferation of the small intestinal epithelial cell line MODE-K. Mice that were colonized from birth with a normal gut microbiota (conventionally-raised; CONV-R showed signs of increased small intestinal renewal and apoptosis compared with GF controls as indicated by elevated mRNA levels of the proliferation markers Ki67 and Cyclin D1, elevated transcripts of the apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells per intestinal villus structure. In accordance, TLR2-deficient mice showed reduced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that a tuned proliferation response of epithelial cells following microbial colonization could aid to protect the host from its microbial colonizers and increase intestinal surface area.

  9. [Bioinformatic analysis of adenoma-normal mucosa SSH library of colon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Bing-Jian; Cui, Jing; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Luo, Min-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Min; Lai, Mao-De

    2006-04-01

    We established a colonic adenoma-normal mucosa suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) library in 1999. In this study, we wanted to explore the expression profile of all candidate genes in this library. We developed an EST pipeline which contained two in-house software packages, nucleic acid analytical software and GetUni. The nucleic acid analytical software, an integrator of the universal bioinformatics tools including phred, phd2fasta, cross_match, repeatmasker and blast2.0, can blast sequences of differential clones with the downloaded non-redundant nucleotide (NR) database. GetUni can cluster these NR sequences into Unigene via matching with the downloaded Homo Sapiens UniGene database. Sixty-two candidate genes in A-N library were obtained via the high throughput automatic gene expression bioinformatics pipeline. Gene Ontology online analysis revealed that ribosome genes and immunity-regulating genes were the two most common categories in the KEGG or Biocarta Pathway. We also detected the expression of 2 genes with highest hits, Reg4 and FAM46A, by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Both genes were up-regulated in 10 or 9 out of 10 adenomas in comparison with the paired normal mucosa, respectively. The candidate genes in A-N library would be of great significance in disclosing the molecular mechanism underlying in colonic adenoma initiation and progression.

  10. Proteome analysis of the macroscopically affected colonic mucosa of Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukmangadachar, Lokesh A.; Makharia, Govind K.; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Ahuja, Vineet; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn’s disease (CD) is challenging in geographical regions where both these diseases are prevalent. There is a need of biomarkers for differentiation between these two disorders. Colonic biopsies from inflamed mucosa of treatment-naive patients with ITB, CD and controls were used for analysis. Protein extracted from biopsies was digested with trypsin and resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents. The peptides were subsequently analyzed using LC-MS/MS for identification and quantification. Gene ontology annotation for proteins was analyzed in PANTHER. Validation experiments were done for six differentially expressed proteins using immunohistochemistry. 533 proteins were identified and 241 proteins were quantified from 5 sets of iTRAQ experiments. While 63 were differentially expressed in colonic mucosa of patients with CD and ITB in at least one set of iTRAQ experiment, 11 proteins were differentially expressed in more than one set of experiments. Six proteins used for validation using immunohistochemistry in a larger cohort of patients; none of them however was differentially expressed in patients with ITB and CD. There are differentially expressed proteins in tissue proteome of CD and ITB. Further experiments are required using a larger cohort of homogeneous tissue samples. PMID:26988818

  11. Expression of human β-defensin 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α in colonic mucosae of ulcerative colitis and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome%溃疡性结肠炎和肠易激综合征患者结肠黏膜HBD-2和TNF-α的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慕然; 姜葵; 张庆瑜

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究β-防御素2(HBD-2)和肿瘤坏死因子α(TNF-α)在溃疡性结肠炎和肠易激综合征(腹泻型)患者结肠黏膜中的表达,及其在发病中的作用和相互关系.方法 收集30例溃疡性结肠炎患者、20例肠易激综合征(腹泻型)患者和10名健康对照的结肠黏膜组织,免疫组织化学法检测各组HBD-2和TNF-α蛋白表达.结果 免疫组织化学分析显示溃疡性结肠炎组HBD-2和TNF-α表达强度均高于肠易激综合征(腹泻型)组(z=-4.856,z=-3.987,均P<0.01)和正常结肠黏膜组(z=-3.611,z=-3.248,均P<0.01),肠易激综合征(腹泻型)组和正常结肠黏膜组HBD-2和TNF-α表达强度比较差异无统计学意义(z=-0.373,z=-0.032,均P>0.05).轻、中、重度3组溃疡性结肠炎之间HBD-2和TNF-α的表达强度比较差异无统计学意义(x2=1.190、P>0.05,X2=1.672、P>0.05).结论 HBD-2和TNF-α的表达水平在溃疡性结肠炎结肠黏膜组织中明显升高,与肠易激综合征(腹泻型)关系不密切,与溃疡性结肠炎病情轻重关系不密切.%Objective To detect the expression of human β-defensin 2(HBD-2)and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)in the colonic mucosae of ulcerative colitis(UC)patients and diarrheapredominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D)patients and to evaluate the roles of HBD-2 and TNF-α in the pathogenesis and the relationship between them. Methods Immunohistochemistry was conducted on the biopsy samples of colonic mucosa from 30 UC patients, 20 IBS-D patients, and 10 normal persons to measure the expression of HBD-2 and TNF-α. Results The expression levels of HBD-2 and TNF-α in the colonic mncosa of UC were both significantly higher than those in the colonic mucosa of IBS-D (z=-4. 856, z=-3. 987, all P<0. 01)and in the normal colonic mucosa(z=-3. 611, z=-3. 248, all P<0. 01). But no significant differences were found between the colonic mucosa of IBS-D and the normal colonic mucosa in the intensity of the expressions of HBD-2

  12. Results of a phase I pilot clinical trial examining the effect of plant-derived resveratrol and grape powder on Wnt pathway target gene expression in colonic mucosa and colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony V Nguyen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthony V Nguyen1, Micaela Martinez1, Michael J Stamos2, Mary P Moyer3, Kestutis Planutis1, Christopher Hope1 Randall F Holcombe11Division of Hematology/Oncology and Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 2Department of Surgery, University of California, Irvine CA, USA; 3Incell Corporation, San Antonio, TX USAContext: Resveratrol exhibits colon cancer prevention activity in animal models; it is purported to have this activity in humans and inhibit a key signaling pathway involved in colon cancer initiation, the Wnt pathway, in vitro.Design: A phase I pilot study in patients with colon cancer was performed to evaluate the effects of a low dose of plant-derived resveratrol formulation and resveratrol-containing freeze-dried grape powder (GP on Wnt signaling in the colon. Eight patients were enrolled and normal colonic mucosa and colon cancer tissue were evaluated by Wnt pathway-specific microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR pre- and post-exposure to resveratrol/GP.Results: Based on the expression of a panel of Wnt target genes, resveratrol/GP did not inhibit the Wnt pathway in colon cancer but had significant (p < 0.03 activity in inhibiting Wnt target gene expression in normal colonic mucosa. The greatest effect on Wnt target gene expression was seen following ingestion of 80 g of GP per day (p < 0.001. These results were confirmed with qRT-PCR of cyclinD1 and axinII. The inhibitory effect of GP on Wnt signal throughput was confirmed in vitro with a normal colonic mucosa-derived cell line.Conclusions: These data suggest that GP, which contains low dosages of resveratrol in combination with other bioactive components, can inhibit the Wnt pathway in vivo and that this effect is confined to the normal colonic mucosa. Further study of dietary supplementation with resveratrol-containing foods such as whole grapes or GP as a potential colon cancer preventive strategy is warranted.Trial registration: NCT00256334

  13. Systemically administered IgG anti-toxin antibodies protect the colonic mucosa during infection with Clostridium difficile in the piglet model.

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    Ocean R Cohen

    Full Text Available The use of anti-toxin human monoclonal antibodies (HMab as treatment for C. difficile infection has been investigated in animal models and human clinical trials as an alternative to or in combination with traditional antibiotic therapy. While HMab therapy appears to be a promising option, how systemically administered IgG antibodies protect the colonic mucosa during Clostridium difficile infection is unknown. Using the gnotobiotic piglet model of Clostridium difficile infection, we administered a mixture of anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB HMabs systemically to piglets infected with either pathogenic or non-pathogenic C. difficile strains. The HMabs were present throughout the small and large intestinal tissue of both groups, but significant HMabs were present in the lumen of the large intestines only in the pathogenic strain-infected group. Similarly, HMabs measured in the large intestine over a period of 2-4 days following antibody administration were not significantly different over time in the gut mucosa among the groups, but concentrations in the lumen of the large intestine were again consistently higher in the pathogenic strain-infected group. These results indicate that systemically administered HMab IgG reaches the gut mucosa during the course of CDI, protecting the host against systemic intoxication, and that leakage through the damaged colon likely protects the mucosa from further damage, allowing initiation of repair and recovery.

  14. Colonic luminal ammonia and portal blood L-glutamine and L-arginine concentrations: a possible link between colon mucosa and liver ureagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklou-Lawson, Mamy; Bernard, Françoise; Neveux, Nathalie; Chaumontet, Catherine; Bos, Cécile; Davila-Gay, Anne-Marie; Tomé, Daniel; Cynober, Luc; Blachier, François

    2009-10-01

    The highest ammonia concentration in the body is found in the colon lumen and although there is evidence that this metabolite can be absorbed through the colonic epithelium, there is little information on the capacity of the colonic mucosa to transfer and metabolize this compound. In the present study, we used a model of conscious pig with a canula implanted into the proximal colon to inject endoluminally increasing amounts of ammonium chloride and to measure during 5 h the kinetics of ammonia and amino acid concentration changes in the portal and arterial blood. By injecting as a single dose from 1 to 5 g ammonia into the colonic lumen, a dose-related increase in ammonia concentration in the portal blood was recorded. Ammonia concentration remained unchanged in the arterial blood except for the highest dose tested, i.e. 5 g which thus apparently exceeds the hepatic ureagenesis capacity. By calculating the apparent net ammonia absorption, it was determined that the pig colonic epithelium has the capacity to absorb 4 g ammonia. Ammonia absorption through the colonic epithelium was concomitant with increase of L-glutamine and L-arginine concentrations in the portal blood. This coincided with the expression of both glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase in isolated colonic epithelial cells. Since L-glutamine and L-arginine are known to represent activators for liver ureagenesis, we propose that increased portal concentrations of these amino acids following increased ammonia colonic luminal concentration represent a metabolic link between colon mucosa and liver urea biosynthesis.

  15. High prevalence of mucosa-associated E. coli producing cyclomodulin and genotoxin in colon cancer.

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    Emmanuel Buc

    Full Text Available Some Escherichia coli strains produce toxins designated cyclomodulins (CMs which interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle of host cells, suggesting a possible link between these bacteria and cancers. There are relatively few data available concerning the colonization of colon tumors by cyclomodulin- and genotoxic-producing E. coli. We did a qualitative and phylogenetic analysis of mucosa-associated E. coli harboring cyclomodulin-encoding genes from 38 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC and 31 with diverticulosis. The functionality of these genes was investigated on cell cultures and the genotoxic activity of strains devoid of known CM-encoding gene was investigated. Results showed a higher prevalence of B2 phylogroup E. coli harboring the colibatin-producing genes in biopsies of patients with CRC (55.3% than in those of patients with diverticulosis (19.3%, (p<0.01. Likewise, a higher prevalence of B2 E. coli harboring the CNF1-encoding genes in biopsies of patients with CRC (39.5% than in those of patients with diverticulosis (12.9%, (p = 0.01. Functional analysis revealed that the majority of these genes were functional. Analysis of the ability of E. coli to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells Int-407 indicated that highly adherent E. coli strains mostly belonged to A and D phylogroups, whatever the origin of the strains (CRC or diverticulosis, and that most E. coli strains belonging to B2 phylogroup displayed very low levels of adhesion. In addition, 27.6% (n = 21/76 E. coli strains devoid of known cyclomodulin-encoding genes induced DNA damage in vitro, as assessed by the comet assay. In contrast to cyclomodulin-producing E. coli, these strains mainly belonged to A or D E. coli phylogroups, and exhibited a non significant difference in the distribution of CRC and diverticulosis specimens (22% versus 32.5%, p = 0.91. In conclusion, cyclomodulin-producing E. coli belonging mostly to B2 phylogroup colonize the colonic mucosa of

  16. Food restriction beginning at lactation interferes with the cellular dynamics of the mucosa and colonic myenteric innervation in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOÃO PAULO F. SCHOFFEN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of food restriction (FR on the morphoquantitative aspects of the wall and myenteric neurons of the proximal colon in adult rats were analysed. FR was imposed by duplication of the experimental brood size in relation to the control brood during lactation. The FR group received a 50% reduction of food from weaning until 90 days of age. Samples of the colon underwent histological processing to morphometrically analyze the crypts, muscularis mucosae, tunica mucosa, and muscularis externa. We determined the number of goblet cells and serotoninergic enteroendocrine cells, and morphoquantitatively studied the myenteric neuronal population. FR caused hypertrophy in the tunica mucosa, increase in crypt depth and in the muscular layer of the mucosa, a decrease in the thickness of the tunica muscularis and in the number of goblet cells and an increase in serotoninergic cells. A higher neuronal density in the ganglia and a reduction of the cell profile area were observed in the FR group. FR imposed since lactation led to hypertrophy of the tunica mucosa, a reduction of neutral mucin production, atrophy of the tunica muscularis, and an increase in the survival neuronal in adult rats, attributable to an increase in the number of serotoninergic enteroendocrine cells in mucosa.

  17. Activation of nuclear factor kappaB in colonic mucosa from patients with collagenous and ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, V.L.; Perner, A.; Hansen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is greatly upregulated in the colonic mucosa of patients with collagenous and ulcerative colitis. As the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) is a major inducer of iNOS gene expression, we compared activation and transcriptional...

  18. VISUAL ASSESSMENT OF THE MUCOSA OF THE COLON IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME IN THE DYNAMICS OF TREATMENT

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    A. E. Shklyaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. The difficulty of its diagnosis related to the lack of specific markers of the disease. This article describes the visual changes of the mucosa of the colon in irritable bowel syndrome in the dynamics of medical and physiotherapy treatment. Materials and methods. Examined and treated 100 patients with endoscopically confirmed diagnosis of IBS. Of which 50 people were receiving pharmacotherapy and 50 –sinusoidal modulated currents — phoresis natural brine. Given the morphological evaluation of the mucosa of the intestine in the dynamics of treatment. Results. In IBS morpho-endoscopically detected dyskinetic disorders, minimal signs of nonspecific inflammation of the mucosa of the colon and primary degenerative manifestations. These changes are reversible and can be used to assess the quality of treatment. The high efficiency of SMC-phoresis natural brine in IBS.

  19. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral squamous cell carcinomas and normal oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansky, A A; Poljak, M; Seme, K; Kocjan, B J; Gale, N; Luzar, B; Golouh, R

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the putative etiologic role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in oral carcinogenesis, a comparative study was carried out on 62 tissue specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and on 62 specimens of histologically normal oral mucosa obtained from the individuals who matched the subjects with OSCC in age, gender, localization of obtained tissue specimens, drinking and smoking habits. Internal control amplification showed that amplifiable DNA was recovered from 59/62 and 61/62 tissue samples of OSCC and normal oral mucosa, respectively. The amplification with two different HPV L1 and one HPV E6 consensus primer sets showed the presence of the HPV DNA genotypes 16, 33, 58 in 5/59 (8.4%) OSCC specimens and HPV genotypes 11, 16, 31, 68 in 4/61 (6.6%) tissue samples of normal oral mucosa tested. In the study in which a comparative examination of the presence of HPV DNA was for the first time performed on the tissue samples of the patients with OSCC and the age- and gender-matched control subjects there was no significant difference in the prevalence of HPV DNA among both study groups. Our results suggest that occasional findings of HPV DNA in OSCC tissue specimens may be the result of an incidental HPV colonization of oral mucosa, rather than of viral infection, and that HPVs play a limited role in the etiopathogenesis of the majority of OSCC.

  20. Corticotropin releasing hormone in colonic mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Y; Sano, H; Mukai, S; Asai, K; Kimura, S; Yamamura, Y; Kato, H; Chrousos, G P; Wilder, R L; Kondo, M

    1995-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is a key hormone in integrated response to stress, acting as the major regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Recently, local production of CRH has been detected in normal human colonic enterochromaffin cells. CRH is locally secreted in granulomatous and arthritic tissues in rats and humans, where it seems to act as a local proinflammatory agent. To find out if CRH is present in colonic tissues of patients with ulcerative colitis, this study examined the expression of this peptide in the large bowel of patients with ulcerative colitis. Colonic tissues of patients with ulcerative colitis obtained by endoscopic biopsy were immunostained with anti-CRH antibody. CRH messenger (m) RNA was also examined in biopsy specimens of ulcerative colitis by the reverse transcribed polymerase chain reaction method and by in situ hybridisation. Considerably enhanced expression of immunoreactive CRH was found in mucosal inflammatory cells. Intense staining with anti-CRH antibody was also shown in mucosal macrophages. CRH mRNA was expressed in mucosal epithelial cells. The expression of immunoreactive CRH in colonic mucosal epithelial cells of ulcerative colitis slightly increased, but not significantly, compared with normal colonic mucosal epithelial cells. These results suggest that CRH may play a part in the modulation of intestinal immune and inflammatory system, and as a modulator in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4A Figure 4B-4C Figure 5 PMID:7489943

  1. IGF-1 Gene Expression in Rat Colonic Mucosa After Different Exercise Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehlmeyer, Katja; Doering, Frank; Daniel, Hannelore; Petridou, Anatoli; Mougios, Vassilis; Schulz, Thorsten; Michna, Horst

    2007-01-01

    The evidence is increasing for a close link between the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and colon cancer prevention by physical exercise. To reveal exercise-induced alterations in colon mucosa, gene expression of IGF-1 and related genes and serum IGF-1 were investigated. Twenty male Wistar rats performed a 12 week voluntary exercise program. Nine rats served as the control group. Gene expression of IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and IGF-binding protein 3 (IGF-BP3) were quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Circulating IGF-1 was analyzed exercise volume-dependent. Based on 3 distinguished groups with low (L-EX, 8314 m·night-1), we observed lower serum IGF-1 levels (P < 0.05) in all exercise groups as compared to the control group and IGF-1 levels declined proportional to the increase in exercise volume. A significant (p < 0.05) positive correlation was found between IGF-1 concentration and body mass (r = 0.50) and a significant negative correlation exists between body mass and exercise volume (r = -0.50). Significant differences in colonic mRNA levels of IGF-1, IGF-1R and IGF-BP3 could not be observed. Based on our data we propose that the exercise as well as the body mass reduction leads to a decrease in circulating IGF-1 and this might represent a prime link to colon cancer prevention. Key pointsThere were significantly lower serum IGF-1 levels in all exercise groups as compared to the control group.GF-1 levels declined proportional to the increase in exercise volume.A significant positive correlation was found between IGF-1 concentration and body mass and a significant negative correlation was found between body mass and exercise volume.Significant differences in colonic mRNA levels of IGF-1, IGF-1R and IGF-BP3 could not be observed. PMID:24149475

  2. Cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kędra, Bożena; Chomczyk, Monika; Złotkowski, Marcin; Stokowska, Wanda; Borsuk, Agnieszka; Bicz, Mieczysław; Pietruska, Małgorzata; Tokajuk, Grażyna; Charkiewicz, Radosław; Czajka, Piotr; Chyczewski, Lech; Zimnoch, Lech; Kędra, Bogusław

    2012-10-08

    The incidence of malignant gastrointestinal cancers in Poland has been constantly growing, which has led to an intensification of the search for new markers of the early clinical stage of this disease. The oral cavity,as the first part of the gastrointestinal tract, has a very important role. The oral cavity presents symptoms of both typically stomatological and systemic diseases. Oral cancers, benign or malignant, may originate and grow in any of the tissues of the mouth, and within this small area they may be of varied clinical, histological and biological features. These can be lesions typically observed in the oral cavity, but also characteristic of cases where the symptoms occur both in the mouth and in other body parts. The aim of this study was to present a cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer and to compare the cytological picture with that obtained from a group of patients with no cancer, using the Papanicolaou classification and the Bethesda system. The study was conducted in 126 patients treated surgically in the II General and Gastroenterological Surgery Clinic between 2006 and 2008. All patients were divided into two groups based on the type of lesions. In both of the studied groups, more than half of the patients did not present any abnormalities in the mucosa of the mouth, lips and cheeks in the physical examination. None of the patients had erosion, ulceration or lesions typical of leukoplakia or lichen planus. No malignant cells were detected in either of the studied groups, and there were no well-defined lesions found in the oral cavity that would distinguish the patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

  3. Association of Serpulina hyodysenteriae with the colonic mucosa in experimental swine dysentery studied by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre; Boye, Mette; Møller, Kristian;

    1998-01-01

    in huge numbers were found colonizing the mucus layer, the luminal epithelium and the crypts of the large intestinal mucosa. The orientation of the spirochaetes to the epithelium appeared to be random. Spirochaetes in clusters or as single cells were invading the epithelium and were occasionally detected...... in the adjacent lamina propria. The distribution of spirochaetes in the mucosa provides further evidence that S. hyodysenteriae is intimately associated with the mucus layer and the epithelium in a random pattern. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the applicability of FISH for specific detection of S....... hyodysenteriae cells in clusters or as single cells in formalin-fixed tissue samples....

  4. In vitro effects of reactive oxygen metabolites, with and without flunixin meglumine, on equine colonic mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Olivia J; Freeman, David E; Wallig, Matthew A; Clarkson, Robert B

    2007-03-01

    To determine effects of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), with and without flunixin meglumine, on equine right ventral colon (RVC) in vitro. 18 healthy horses and ponies. In 3 groups of 6 animals each, short-circuit current and conductance were measured in RVC mucosa in Ussing chambers. The 3 groups received physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, IV, 10 minutes before euthanasia and tissue incubation in Krebs-Ringer-bicarbonate (KRB) solution; flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg, IV) 10 minutes before euthanasia and tissue incubation in KRB solution; or physiologic saline solution, IV, 10 minutes before euthanasia and incubation in KRB solution with 2.7 x 10(5)M flunixin meglumine. Incubation conditions included control (no addition) and ROM systems, including addition of 1 mM xanthine and 80 mU of xanthine oxidase (to produce the superoxide radical), 1 mM H(2)O(2), and 1 mM H(2)O(2) and 0.5 mM ferrous sulfate (to produce the hydroxyl radical). All ROMs that were added or generated significantly increased the short-circuit current except in tissues coincubated with flunixin meglumine, and they induced mild epithelial vacuolation and apoptosis, but did not disrupt the epithelium nor change conductance, lactate dehydrogenase release, or [(3)H]mannitol flux. Responses to ROMs could be attributed to increased chloride secretion and inhibited neutral NaCl absorption in equine RVC, possibly by stimulating prostaglandin production. The ROMs examined under conditions of this study could play a role in prostaglandin-mediated colonic secretion in horses with enterocolitis without causing direct mucosal injury.

  5. Characterization and significance of ACE2 and Mas receptor in human colon adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Stella; Zennaro, Cristina; Palmisano, Silvia; Velkoska, Elena; Sabato, Nicoletta; Toffoli, Barbara; Giacomel, Greta; Buri, Luigi; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Bellini, Giuseppe; Burrell, Louise M; De Manzini, Nicolò; Fabris, Bruno

    2012-03-01

    A new arm of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been recently characterized; this includes angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)2 and angiotensin (Ang)1-7, a heptapeptide acting through the Mas receptor (MasR). Recent studies show that Ang1-7 has an antiproliferative action on lung adenocarcinoma cells. The aim of this study was to characterize RAS expression in human colon adenocarcinoma and to investigate whether Ang1-7 exerts an antiproliferative effect on human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Gene, protein expression and enzymatic activity of the main components of the RAS were determined on non-neoplastic colon mucosa as well as on the tumor mass and the mucosa taken 5 cm distant from it, both collected from patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Two different human colon cancer cell lines were treated with AngII and Ang1-7. The novel finding of this study was that MasR was significantly upregulated in colon adenocarcinoma compared with non-neoplastic colon mucosa, which showed little or no expression of it. ACE gene expression and enzymatic activity were also increased in the tumors. However, AngII and Ang1-7 did not have any pro-/antiproliferative effects in the cell lines studied. The data suggest that upregulation of the MasR could be used as a diagnostic marker of colon adenocarcinoma.

  6. Effect of Inulin on Proteome Changes Induced by Pathogenic Lipopolysaccharide in Human Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Barera, Simone; Locato, Vittoria; Cocca, Silvia; Franchin, Cinzia; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Vannini, Candida; Grossi, Sarah; Campomenosi, Paola; Pasqualetti, Valentina; Bracale, Marcella; Alloni, Rossana; De Gara, Laura; Cicala, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the protective role of inulin against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress was evaluated on human colonic mucosa using a proteomic approach. Human colonic mucosa and submucosa were sealed between two chambers, with the luminal side facing upwards and overlaid with Krebs (control), LPS or LPS+ inulin IQ solution. The solutions on the submucosal side (undernatants) were collected following 30 min of mucosal exposure. iTRAQ based analysis was used to analyze the total soluble proteomes from human colonic mucosa and submucosa treated with different undernatants. Human colonic muscle strips were exposed to the undernatants to evaluate the response to acetylcholine. Inulin exposure was able to counteract, in human colonic mucosa, the LPS-dependent alteration of some proteins involved in the intestinal contraction (myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), myosin regulatory subunit (MYL)), to reduce the up-regulation of two proteins involved in the radical-mediated oxidative stress (the DNA-apurinic or apyrimidinic site) lyase) APEX1 and the T-complex protein 1 subunit eta (CCT7) and to entail a higher level of some detoxification enzymes (the metallothionein-2 MT2A, the glutathione–S-transferase K GSTk, and two UDP- glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B4, UGT2B17). Inulin exposure was also able to prevent the LPS-dependent intestinal muscle strips contraction impairment and the mucosa glutathione level alterations. Exposure of colonic mucosa to inulin seems to prevent LPS-induced alteration in expression of some key proteins, which promote intestinal motility and inflammation, reducing the radical-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:28068390

  7. Effects of Intestinal Trefoil Factor on Colonic Mucosa in Experimental Colitis of Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tian; ZOU Kaifang; QIAN Wei

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the protective effects of intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) on colonic mucosa in experimental colitis of rats, ITF was detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry at different time points. Three days after colitis induction, rats were treated with either 0.9 % saline solution or rhITF. Pathological changes and the expression of iNOS mRNA, NO, MDA and SOD were measured respectively. It was found that ITF was mainly located in goblet cells, significantly higher in model group than in normal group (P<0.05). rhITF could increase the iNOS mRNA expression and NO contents, and there was statistically significant difference between rhITF group and model group (P<0.05). rhITF also caused an increase of MDA and a decrease of SOD, but there was no significant difference between two groups. These results indicated that ITF has apparent therapeutic effects in ulcerative colitis, which may be associated with iNOS and NO.

  8. Molecular cross-talk between Helicobacter pylori and human gastric mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vittorio Ricci; Marco Romano; Patrice Boquet

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) has co-evolved with humans to be transmitted from person to person and to colonize the stomach persistently. A well-choreographed equilibrium between the bacterial effectors and host responses permits microbial persistence and health of the host, but confers a risk for serious diseases including gastric cancer. During its long coexistence with humans, H. pylori has developed complex strategies to limit the degree and extent of gastric mucosal damage and inflammation, as well as immune effector activity. The present editorial thus aims to introduce and comment on major advances in the rapidly developing area of H. pylori /human gastric mucosa interaction (and its pathological sequelae), which is the result of millennia of co-evolution of, and thus of reciprocal knowledge between, the pathogen and its human host.

  9. Discriminating adenocarcinoma from normal colonic mucosa through deconvolution of Raman spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambraia Lopes, Patricia; Moreira, Joaquim Agostinho; Almeida, Abilio; Esteves, Artur; Gregora, Ivan; Ledinsky, Martin; Lopes, Jose Machado; Henrique, Rui; Oliveira, Albino

    2011-12-01

    In this work, we considered the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy for discriminating between adenocarcinomatous and normal mucosal formalin-fixed colonic tissues. Unlike earlier studies in colorectal cancer, a spectral deconvolution model was implemented to derive spectral information. Eleven samples of human colon were used, and 55 spectra were analyzed. Each spectrum was resolved into 25 bands from 975 to 1720 cm-1, where modes of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids are observed. From a comparative study of band intensities, those presenting higher differences between tissue types were correlated to biochemical assignments. Results from fitting procedure were further used as inputs for linear discriminant analysis, where combinations of band intensities and intensity ratios were tested, yielding accuracies up to 81%. This analysis yields objective discriminating parameters after fitting optimization. The bands with higher diagnosis relevance detected by spectra deconvolution enable to confine the study to some spectral regions instead of broader ranges. A critical view upon limitations of this approach is presented, along with a comparison of our results to earlier ones obtained in fresh colonic tissues. This enabled to assess the effect of formalin fixation in colonic tissues, and determine its relevance in the present analysis.

  10. Adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to the ileal and colonic mucosa: an in vitro study utilizing the scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacy Alves Braga de Andrade

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strains have been associated with persistent diarrhea in several developing countries. In vivo procedures with animal models, in vitro assays with cellular lines and in vitro organ culture with intestinal fragments have been utilized to study these bacteria and their pathogenicity. OBJECTIVE: The present experimental research assessed the pathogenic interactions of three enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strains, using the in vitro organ culture, in order to show the adherence to different regions of both, the ileal and the colonic mucosa and demonstrate possible mechanisms that could have the participation in the prolongation of diarrheiogenic process. METHODS: This study used intestinal fragments from terminal ileum and colon that were excised from pediatric patients undergoing intestinal surgeries and from adult patients that underwent to colonoscopic procedures. Each strain was tested with three intestinal fragments for each region. Tissue was fixed for scanning electron microscopic analysis. RESULTS: These bacteria colonized ileal and colonic mucosa in the typical stacked-brick configuration in the ileum and colon. In both regions, the strains were seen over a great amount of mucus and sometimes over the intact epithelium. In some regions, there is a probable evidence of effacement of the microvilli. It was possible to see adhered to the intestinal surface, bacteria fimbrial structures that could be responsible for the adherence process. CONCLUSION: In order to cause diarrhea, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strains adhere to the intestinal mucosa, create a mucoid biofilm on the small bowel surface that could justify the digestive-absorptive abnormalities and consequently, prolonging the diarrhea.

  11. Determination of optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro using integrating sphere techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Jiang Wei; Da Xing; Jian-Jun Lu; Huai-Min Gu; Guo-Yong Wu; Ying Jin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of the present study is to compare the optical properties of normal human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion, and adenomatous human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion in vitro at 476.5, 488, 496.5, 514.5 and 532 nm. We believe these differences in optical properties should help differential diagnosis of human colon tissues by using optical methods.METHODS: In vitro optical properties were investigated for four kinds of tissues: normal human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion, and adenomatous human colon mucosa/submucosa and muscle layer/chorion. Tissue samples were taken from 13 human colons (13 adenomatous, 13 normal). From the normal human colons a total of 26 tissue samples, with a mean thickness of 0.40 mm, were used (13 from mucosa/submucosa and 13 from muscle layer/chorion), and from the adenomatous human bladders a total of 26 tissue samples, with a mean thickness of 0.40 mm, were used (13 from mucosa/submucosa and 13 from muscle layer/chorion). The measurements were performed using a double-integratingsphere setup and the optical properties were assessed from these measurements using the adding-doubling method that was considered reliable.RESULTS: The results of measurement showed that there were significant differences in the absorption coefficients and scattering coefficients between normal and adenomatous human colon mucosa/submucosa at the same wavelength,and there were also significant differences in the two optical parameters between both colon muscle layer/chorion at the same wavelength. And there were large differences in the anisotropy factors between both colon mucosa/submucosa at the same wavelength, there were also large differences in the anisotropy factors between both colon muscle layer/chorion at the same wavelength.There were large differences in the value ranges of the absorption coefficients, scattering coefficients and anisotropy factors between both colon mucosa/submucosa,and there

  12. MicroRNA profiles in colorectal carcinomas, adenomas and normal colonic mucosa: variations in miRNA expression and disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Mullany, Lila E; Wolff, Erica; Hoffman, Michael D; Samowitz, Wade S; Wolff, Roger K

    2016-03-01

    MiRNAs are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression either by post-transcriptionally suppressing mRNA translation or by mRNA degradation. We examine differentially expressed miRNAs in colorectal carcinomas, adenomas and normal colonic mucosa. Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. A total of 1893 carcinoma/normal-paired samples and 290 adenoma tissue samples were run on the Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V19.0 which contained 2006 miRNAs. We tested for significant differences in miRNA expression between paired carcinoma/adenoma/normal colonic tissue samples. Fewer than 600 miRNAs were expressed in >80% of people for colonic tissue; of these 86.5% were statistically differentially expressed between carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa using a false discovery rate of 0.05. Roughly half of these differentially expressed miRNAs showed a progression in levels of expression from normal to adenoma to carcinoma tissue. Other miRNAs appeared to be altered at the normal to adenoma stage, while others were only altered at the adenoma to carcinoma stage or only at the normal to carcinoma stage. Evaluation of the Agilent platform showed a high degree of repeatability (r = 0.98) and reasonable agreement with the NanoString platform. Our data suggest that miRNAs are highly dysregulated in colorectal tissue among individuals with colorectal cancer; the pattern of disruption varies by miRNA as tissue progresses from normal to adenoma to carcinoma.

  13. An Assessment of Database-Validated microRNA Target Genes in Normal Colonic Mucosa: Implications for Pathway Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E

    2017-01-01

    Determination of functional pathways regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs), while an essential step in developing therapeutics, is challenging. Some miRNAs have been studied extensively; others have limited information. In this study, we focus on 254 miRNAs previously identified as being associated with colorectal cancer and their database-identified validated target genes. We use RNA-Seq data to evaluate messenger RNA (mRNA) expression for 157 subjects who also had miRNA expression data. In the replication phase of the study, we replicated associations between 254 miRNAs associated with colorectal cancer and mRNA expression of database-identified target genes in normal colonic mucosa. In the discovery phase of the study, we evaluated expression of 18 miR-NAs (those with 20 or fewer database-identified target genes along with miR-21-5p, miR-215-5p, and miR-124-3p which have more than 500 database-identified target genes) with expression of 17 434 mRNAs to identify new targets in colon tissue. Seed region matches between miRNA and newly identified targeted mRNA were used to help determine direct miRNA-mRNA associations. From the replication of the 121 miRNAs that had at least 1 database-identified target gene using mRNA expression methods, 97.9% were expressed in normal colonic mucosa. Of the 8622 target miRNA-mRNA associations identified in the database, 2658 (30.2%) were associated with gene expression in normal colonic mucosa after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Of the 133 miRNAs with database-identified target genes by non-mRNA expression methods, 97.2% were expressed in normal colonic mucosa. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, 2416 miRNA-mRNA associations remained significant (19.8%). Results from the discovery phase based on detailed examination of 18 miRNAs identified more than 80 000 miRNA-mRNA associations that had not previously linked to the miRNA. Of these miRNA-mRNA associations, 15.6% and 14.8% had seed matches for CRCh38 and CRCh37

  14. Myogenic potential of human alveolar mucosa derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorin, Vadim L; Pulin, Andrey A; Eremin, Ilya I; Korsakov, Ivan N; Zorina, Alla I; Khromova, Natalia V; Sokova, Olga I; Kotenko, Konstantin V; Kopnin, Pavel B

    2017-03-19

    Difficulties related to the obtainment of stem/progenitor cells from skeletal muscle tissue make the search for new sources of myogenic cells highly relevant. Alveolar mucosa might be considered as a perspective candidate due to availability and high proliferative capacity of its cells. Human alveolar mucosa cells (AMC) were obtained from gingival biopsy samples collected from 10 healthy donors and cultured up to 10 passages. AMC matched the generally accepted multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells criteria and possess population doubling time, caryotype and immunophenotype stability during long-term cultivation. The single myogenic induction of primary cell cultures resulted in differentiation of AMC into multinucleated myotubes. The myogenic differentiation was associated with expression of skeletal muscle markers: skeletal myosin, skeletal actin, myogenin and MyoD1. Efficiency of myogenic differentiation in AMC cultures was similar to that in skeletal muscle cells. Furthermore, some of differentiated myotubes exhibited contractions in vitro. Our data confirms the sufficiently high myogenic potential and proliferative capacity of AMC and their ability to maintain in vitro proliferation-competent myogenic precursor cells regardless of the passage number.

  15. Accidental endoscopic finding of Anisakis simplex in human colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia Aloia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anisakidosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the ingestion of nematodes belonging to the family of Anisakidae. Human infection is caused by intake of raw or undercooked sea fish and cephalopods infested by Anisakis larvae. We present a case of accidental endoscopic finding of an alive nematode adhering to distal ascending colon in a 32 years old man, submitted to colonoscopy owing to recent onsets of rectal bleeding of likely hemorrhoidal origin. The nematode, removed from colon by means of biopsy forceps, has been identified as L3 larvae of A. simplex by a light microscope. Histological examination of intestinal mucosa showed a mild fibrosis of lamina propria, characterized by focal lymphocytic inflammation and scattered infiltration of eosinophils. The patient reported the intake of marinated anchovies 3 days before endoscopic examination.

  16. EXPRESSION OF FLIP IN HUMAN COLON CARCINOMAS:A NEW MECHANISM OF IMMUNE EVASION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Bao-cai; S. Wimmenauer; EH. Farthmann

    2005-01-01

    Objective: It has been proposed that Fas ligand (FasL) may play an important role in immune escape of tumors and FLIP is an important mediator of Fas/FasL pathway. In this study, the expression of FLIP was determined in human colon carcinoma cell lines and tissue to investigate the new mechanism of immune evasion of human colon carcinomas. Methods:RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed to investigate the expression of FLIP in human colon carcinoma cell lines SW480, LS174 and twenty human primary colon carcinoma specimens. Results: It was shown that SW480 cells,LS174 cells and primary colon carcinoma specimen constitutively expressed FLIP at the mRNA and protein level. The expression of FLIP was not found in the epithelial cells of normal colon mucosa. Conclusion: FLIP was expressed in human primary colon carcinoma specimens but not in the normal counterpart. It suggested that the expression of FLIP may occur during the malignant transformation from normal colon epithelial cells to colon carcinoma cells. Tumor cells might obtain the ability to resist the Fas-mediated apoptosis by expressing FLIP. The expression of FLIP might contribute to the formation of colon carcinomas.

  17. Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Intraoral Grafting of Human Tissue-Engineered Oral Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Engineered Oral Mucosa   PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stephen E. Feinberg DDS, MS, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 4810...September 29, 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Phase II Clinical Trial of Intraoral Grafting of Human Tissue-Engineered Oral Mucosa   5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...human EVPOME for soft tissue intraoral grafting procedures compared to the “gold standard” palatal oral mucosa (POM) graft. The study will determine

  18. Effect of fermented oatmeal soup on the cholesterol level and the Lactobacillus colonization of rat intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, G; Andersson, R; Ahrné, S; Lönner, C; Marklinder, I; Johansson, M L; Jeppsson, B; Bengmark, S

    1992-04-01

    Rats were fed with freeze-dried oatmeal soup fermented by six different Lactobacillus strains from rat and man; the formula is intended for enteral feeding. The serum cholesterol levels after 10 d were lower for rats eating oatmeal as compared to a commercial product, Biosorb Sond. Colonizing ability of the administered strains were evaluated in vivo. Only Lactobacillus reuteri R21c were able to, effectively, colonizing the mucosa; it represented about 30% of the Lactobacillus population 24 d after termination of the administration. L. reuteri R21c was easily recognized by the ability to produce a yellow pigment on agar plates. The identity was confirmed by carbohydrate fermentations (API 50CH), plasmid pattern and endonuclease restriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA.

  19. Cytokeratin expression in human fetal tongue and buccal mucosa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M M Vaidya; Sharda S Sawant; Anita M Borges; N K Naresh; Manda C Purandare; A N Bhisey

    2000-09-01

    Expression of cytokeratins (CK), a subset of intermediate filament (IF) proteins in epithelia, is developmentally regulated. CK expression may also change after malignant transformation. Our earlier studies on CK expression in human oral tumours and pre-cancerous lesions have shown specific changes in CK expression. We analysed CK expression in human tongue and buccal mucosa (BM) in fetuses in the embryonic age group of 16 to 27 weeks using biochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to find out whether there is any similarity in CK expression in human oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and fetal oral tissues. CK 1, 8 and 18 were detected in a majority of samples using both techniques. Our earlier studies had shown aberrant expression of CK 1 and 18 in many of the oral SCC and leukoplakias. Studies by immunohistochemistry showed that these different CK antigens were expressed in different cell layers. CK 1(2) were present in the stratified epithelial layers whereas CK 8 and 18 were restricted to glandular epithelium. Till 27 weeks of gestation, both tongue and BM expressed CK 1, 8 and 18 along with CK 6 and 16. Thus, fetal tissues showed some similarities in CK pattern with their respective SCC.

  20. A lyophilized red grape pomace containing proanthocyanidin-rich dietary fiber induces genetic and metabolic alterations in colon mucosa of female C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Daneida; Vinardell, M Pilar; Noé, Véronique; van Delft, Joost H; Alcarraz-Vizán, Gema; van Breda, Simone G; Staal, Yvonne; Günther, Ulrich L; Carrigan, John B; Reed, Michelle A; Ciudad, Carlos J; Torres, Josep L; Cascante, Marta

    2011-09-01

    Diet plays a decisive role in promoting or preventing colon cancer. However, the specific effects of some nutrients remain unclear. The capacity of fruit and vegetables to prevent cancer has been associated with their fiber and antioxidant composition. We investigated whether consumption of a lyophilized red grape pomace containing proanthocyanidin-rich dietary fiber (grape antioxidant dietary fiber, GADF) by female C57BL/6J mice would affect the serum metabolic profile or colon mucosa gene expression using NMR techniques and DNA microarray, respectively. The mice were randomly assigned to 2 groups that for 2 wk consumed a standard rodent diet and were gavaged with 100 mg/kg body weight GADF suspended in water or an equivalent volume of plain tap water (10 mL/kg body weight). The amount of fiber supplemented was calculated to equal the current recommended daily levels of fiber consumption for humans. The inclusion of dietary GADF induced alterations in the expression of tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes as well as the modulation of genes from pathways, including lipid biosynthesis, energy metabolism, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Overexpression of enzymes pertaining to the xenobiotic detoxifying system and endogenous antioxidant cell defenses was also observed. In summary, the genetic and metabolic profiles induced by GADF were consistent with the preventive effects of fiber and polyphenols. On the basis of these observations, we propose that GADF may contribute to reducing the risk of colon cancer.

  1. Nano-TiO2 penetration of oral mucosa: in vitro analysis using 3D organotypic human buccal mucosa models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinova, Victoria; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Lie, Stein A; Birkeland, Eivind Salmorin; Neppelberg, Evelyn; Marthinussen, Mihaela Cuida; Costea, Daniela Elena; Cimpan, Mihaela R

    2017-03-01

    Oral cavity is a doorway for a variety of products containing titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanoparticles (NPs) (nano-TiO2 ) such as food additives, oral healthcare products and dental materials. Their potential to penetrate and affect normal human oral mucosa is not yet determined. To evaluate the ability of nano-TiO2 to penetrate the in vitro reconstructed normal human buccal mucosa (RNHBM). RNHBM was generated from primary normal human oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts isolated from buccal oral mucosa of healthy patients (n = 6). The reconstructed tissues were exposed after 10 days to clinically relevant concentrations of spherical or spindle rutile nano-TiO2 in suspension for short (20 min) and longer time (24 h). Ultrahigh-resolution imaging (URI) microscopy (CytoViva(™) , Auburn, AL, USA) was used to assess the depth of penetration into reconstructed tissues. Ultrahigh-resolution imaging microscopy demonstrated the presence of nano-TiO2 mostly in the epithelium of RNHBM at both 20 min and 24-h exposure, and this was shape and doze dependent at 24 h of exposure. The depth of penetration diminished in time at higher concentrations. The exposed epithelium showed increased desquamation but preserved thickness. Nano-TiO2 is able to penetrate RNHBM and to activate its barrier function in a doze- and time-dependent manner. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. In vitro cytokeratin expression profiling of human oral mucosa substitutes developed by tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon, Ingrid; Serrato, Deyanira; Roda, Olga; Del Carmen Sanchez-Quevedo, Maria; Gonzales-Jaranay, Maximino; Moreu, Gerardo; Nieto-Aguilar, Renato; Alaminos, Miguel; Campos, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    In this work we performed a study of cytokeratin (CK) expression profiling on human artificial oral mucosa developed in vitro by tissue engineering at different stages of maturation (from immature to well-developed stages) at the protein and mRNA levels. Human artificial oral mucosa was generated in the laboratory using fibrin-agarose biomaterials. As controls, we used human native normal oral mucosa and embryonic oral tissues. Our results demonstrated that human embryonic oral tissues tended to express CK8 and CK19. In contrast, monolayered bioengineered oral mucosa did not show any CK expression by immunohistochemistry, whereas bilayered and multilayered artificial oral mucosa showed several markers of stratified epithelia, but did not express CK10. These results suggest that the CK expression pattern is strongly dependent on the maturation state of the artificial tissues and that the CK expression profile of our model of artificial oral mucosa was partially similar to that of the non-keratinized human adult oral mucosa. However, the expression of CK8 by the artificial oral mucosa suggests that these samples correspond to an early stage of development while kept in vitro.

  3. Immune Homeostasis of Human Gastric Mucosa in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, I V; Yamamoto, T; Vershinina, S S; Reva, G V

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of electron microscopic, microbiological, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic studies of gastric biopsy specimens taken for diagnostic purposes according by clinical indications during examination of patients with gastrointestinal pathology. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa against the background of infection with various pathogen strains of Helicobacter pylori was studied in patients of different age groups with peptic ulcer, gastritis, metaplasia, and cancer. Some peculiarities of Helicobacter pylori contamination in the gastric mucosa were demonstrated. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa in different pathologies was analyzed depending on the Helicobacter pylori genotype.

  4. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the bifidobacterial microbiota in the colonic mucosa of patients with colorectal cancer, diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the bifidobacterial microbiota of the colonic mucosa in patients with colon cancer,inflammatory bowel disease or diverticulitis.METHODS: A sample of the distal colonic mucosa was taken during surgery from a total of 34 patients,twenty-one with diagnosed colorectal cancer, nine with diverticulitis and four with inflammatory bowel disease, requiring surgery for their condition. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the resected mucosal samples and bifidobacterial mucosa-associated microbiota was qualitatively and quantitatively determined by means of qualitative and quantitative PCR.RESULTS: Bifidobacteria were found in 100% of the samples from patients with diverticulitis or IBD and a 76% of those suffering colon cancer. The species B. longum and B. bifidum were the most widely found, followed by B. animalis, B. catenulatum and B.adolescentis. B. breve, B. dentium and B. angulatum were not detected in any sample. A significantly higher occurrence of B. longum was observed in patients with diverticulitis than in those with colon cancer or IBD (100%, 62% and 75%, respectively, P < 0.05).Similar results were obtained for B. animalis (56%, 0%and 25%, P < 0.05), while B. adolescentis was only found in the mucosa from patients with colon cancer (5 out of 21, 24%). At the quantitative level, patients with colon cancer or IBD showed lower counts of total Bifidobacterium (4.94 and 5.91 vs 6.96 log Cells/sample,respectively, P < 0.05) and of the species B.longum (4.05 and 4.79 vs 6.76, P < 0.05) than those with diverticulitis.CONCLUSION: Aberrancies in mucosa associated microbiota are present in different intestinal diseases.This may indicate a role of the microbiota in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  5. In vitro anaerobic biofilms of human colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule-Willoughby, K M; Stanton, M Mark; Rioux, K P; McKay, D M; Buret, A G; Ceri, H

    2010-12-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complex community of microorganisms that grow as biofilms on the intestinal mucosa. These bacterial communities are not well characterized, although they are known to play an important role in human health. This study aimed to develop a model for culturing biofilms (surface-adherent communities) of intestinal microbiota. The model utilizes adherent mucosal bacteria recovered from colonic biopsies to create multi-species biofilms. Culture on selective media and confocal microscopy indicated the biofilms were composed of a diverse community of bacteria. Molecular analyses confirmed that several phyla were represented in the model, and demonstrated stability of the community over 96 h when cultured in the device. This model is novel in its use of a multi-species community of mucosal bacteria grown in a biofilm mode of growth. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ex Vivo Correlation of the Permeability of Metoprolol Across Human and Porcine Buccal Mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng-Lund, Emil; Marxen, Eva; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge;

    2014-01-01

    .0. In addition, hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue-van Gieson were used as tissue stains to evaluate the histology and the presence of acidic polysaccharides (e.g., mucins), respectively. The permeability of metoprolol was decreased in human buccal mucosa by almost twofold when compared with porcine buccal mucosa...

  7. Prehistoric human colonization of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, V N

    2001-11-01

    Human colonization in India encompasses a span of at least half-a-million years and is divided into two broad periods, namely the prehistoric (before the emergence of writing) and the historic (after writing). The prehistoric period is divided into stone, bronze and iron ages. The stone age is further divided into palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic periods. As the name suggests, the technology in these periods was primarily based on stone. Economically, the palaeolithic and mesolithic periods represented a nomadic, hunting-gathering way of life, while the neolithic period represented a settled, food-producing way of life. Subsequently copper was introduced as a new material and this period was designated as the chalcolithic period. The invention of agriculture, which took place about 8000 years ago, brought about dramatic changes in the economy, technology and demography of human societies. Human habitat in the hunting-gathering stage was essentially on hilly, rocky and forested regions, which had ample wild plant and animal food resources. The introduction of agriculture saw it shifting to the alluvial plains which had fertile soil and perennial availability of water. Hills and forests, which had so far been areas of attraction, now turned into areas of isolation. Agriculture led to the emergence of villages and towns and brought with it the division of society into occupational groups. The first urbanization took place during the bronze age in the arid and semi-arid region of northwest India in the valleys of the Indus and the Saraswati rivers, the latter represented by the now dry Ghaggar-Hakra bed. This urbanization is known as the Indus or Harappan civilization which flourished during 3500-1500 B.C. The rest of India during this period was inhabited by neolithic and chalcolithic farmers and mesolithic hunter-gatherers. With the introduction of iron technology about 3000 years ago, the focus of development shifted eastward into the Indo-Gangetic divide and

  8. Prehistoric human colonization of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V N Misra

    2001-11-01

    Human colonization in India encompasses a span of at least half-a-million years and is divided into two broad periods, namely the prehistoric (before the emergence of writing) and the historic (after writing). The prehistoric period is divided into stone, bronze and iron ages. The stone age is further divided into palaeolithic, mesolithic and neolithic periods. As the name suggests, the technology in these periods was primarily based on stone. Economically, the palaeolithic and mesolithic periods represented a nomadic, hunting-gathering way of life, while the neolithic period represented a settled, food-producing way of life. Subsequently copper was introduced as a new material and this period was designated as the chalcolithic period. The invention of agriculture, which took place about 8000 years ago, brought about dramatic changes in the economy, technology and demography of human societies. Human habitat in the hunting-gathering stage was essentially on hilly, rocky and forested regions, which had ample wild plant and animal food resources. The introduction of agriculture saw it shifting to the alluvial plains which had fertile soil and perennial availability of water. Hills and forests, which had so far been areas of attraction, now turned into areas of isolation. Agriculture led to the emergence of villages and towns and brought with it the division of society into occupational groups. The first urbanization took place during the bronze age in the arid and semi-arid region of northwest India in the valleys of the Indus and the Saraswati rivers, the latter represented by the now dry Ghaggar–Hakra bed. This urbanization is known as the Indus or Harappan civilization which flourished during 3500–1500 B.C. The rest of India during this period was inhabited by neolithic and chalcolithic farmers and mesolithic hunter-gatherers. With the introduction of iron technology about 3000 years ago, the focus of development shifted eastward into the Indo-Gangetic divide

  9. Dietary selenomethionine increases exon-specific DNA methylation of the p53 gene in rat liver and colon mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Yan, Lin; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Uthus, Eric O

    2011-08-01

    The regulation of site-specific DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes has been considered as a leading mechanism by which certain nutrients exert their anticancer property. This study was to investigate whether selenium (Se) affects the methylation of globe genomic DNA and the exon-specific p53 gene. Three groups of rats (n = 6-7/group) were fed the AIN-93G basal diet supplemented with 0 [Se deficient (D)], 0.15 [Se adequate (A)], or 4 mg [Se supranutritional (S)] (Se as l-selenomethionine)/kg diet for 104 d, respectively. Rats fed the A or S diet had greater plasma and liver glutathione peroxidase activity, liver thioredoxin reductase activity, and plasma homocysteine concentration than those fed the D diet. However, compared with the A diet, rats fed the S diet did not further increase these Se-dependent enzyme activities or homocysteine concentration. In contrast, Se concentrations in kidney, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and plasma were increased in a Se-dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, rats fed the S diet had significantly less global liver genomic DNA methylation than those fed the D diet. However, the S diet significantly increased the methylation of the p53 gene (exons 5-8) but not the β-actin gene (exons 2-3) DNA in liver and colon mucosa compared with those fed the D diet. Taken together, long-term Se consumption not only affects selenoprotein enzyme activities, homocysteine, tissue Se concentrations, and global genomic DNA methylation but also increases exon-specific DNA methylation of the p53 gene in a Se-dose-dependent manner in rat liver and colon mucosa.

  10. Calcium, calcium-sensing receptor and growth control in the colonic mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    A role for calcium in epithelial growth control is well-established in the colon and other tissues. In the colon, Ca2+ “drives” the differentiation process. This results in sequestration of ß-catenin in the cell surface / cytoskeletal complex, leaving ß-catenin unavailable to serve as a growth-promoting transcription enhancer in the nucleus. The signaling events that lead from Ca2+ stimulation to differentiation are not fully understood. A critical role for the extracellular calcium-sensing r...

  11. Transcriptome and proteonome profiling of colon mucosa from quercetin fed F344 rats point to tumor preventive mechanisms, increased mitochondrial fatty acid degradation and decreased glycolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dihal, A.A.; Hendriksen, P.J.M.; Charif, H.; Dekker, L.J.; IJsselstijn, L.; Boer, de V.C.J.; Alink, G.M.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Stierum, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Quercetin has been shown to act as an anticarcinogen in experimental colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to characterize transcriptome and proteome changes occurring in the distal colon mucosa of rats supplemented with 10 g quercetin/kg diet for 11 wk. Transcriptome data analyz

  12. Transcriptome and proteome profiling of colon mucosa from quercetin fed F344 rats point to tumor preventive mechanisms, increased mitochondrial fatty acid degradation and decreased glycolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dihal, A.A.; Woude, H. van der; Hendriksen, P.J.M.; Charif, H.; Dekker, L.J.; IJsselstijn, L.; Boer, V.C.J. de; Alink, G.M.; Burgers, P.C.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Stierum, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Quercetin has been shown to act as an anticarcinogen in experimental colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of the present study was to characterize transcriptome and proteome changes occurring in the distal colon mucosa of rats supplemented with 10 g quercetin/kg diet for 11 wk. Transcriptome data analyz

  13. [THE INFLUENCE OF NANODISPERSE CERIUM DIOXIDE ON ONTOGENETIC CHANGES OF ANTIOXIDANT SYSTEM IN THE MUCOSA OF THE STOMACH AND COLON IN RATS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iefimenko, O Yu; Savchenko, I O; Falalyeyeva, T M; Beregova, T V; Zholobak, N M; Shcherbakov, O B; Malyukin, Yu V; Spivak, M Ya

    2015-01-01

    It was established that with age the content of lipid peroxidation products increased in the mucosa of the stomach: Diene conjugates by 30%, products which react to thiobarbituric acid by 285% and Schif bases by 181%. Nanodisperse cerium dioxide (NCD) reduced the content of lipid peroxidation in the gastric mucosa in old rats: Diene conjugates by 43 %, products which react to thiobarbituric acid by 51% and Schif bases by 44% relative to the control group of rats given age. Similarly, it was established that the content of Diene conjugates increased by 40%, products which react to thiobarbituric acid by 114% and Schif bases by 132% in the mucosa of the colon of old rats. NDC significant reduced the content of products which react to thiobarbituric acid by 69% and Schyf basics by 132%. In the stomach superoxide dismutase (by 43%) and catalase activity (by 24%) decreases with age, while in the colon superoxide dismutase activity increases (by 43%). In the colon NCD significant decreased superoxide dismutase (by 34%) and catalase activity (by 21%) relative to controls. Thus, the NDC restores lipid peroxidation in the gastric mucosa and colon, in which develops oxidative stress with age.

  14. NH4+ secretion in the avian colon. An actively regulated barrier to ammonium permeation of the colon mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtug, K.; Laverty, G.; Arnason, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were designed to characterize an active, electrogenic transport of NH(4)(+) ions across the colonic epithelium of the domestic fowl (Gallus gallus). Colonic segments were isolated and stripped of underlying muscle. The mucosal epithelia were mounted in Ussing chambers and voltage......-clamped to measure the short-circuit currents (I(SC)) associated with transport. Bilateral addition of NH(4)(+) caused a dose-dependent outward current (negative I(SC)), with a Km of 34+/-8 mM and a maximal current response of 311+/-47 microA cm(-2) (12+/-2 microEq cm(-2) h(-1)). A similar effect was seen...... with unilateral addition of NH(4)(+) to the serosal (s) side, but not with mucosal (m) addition. Pre-treatment with 10(-4) M amiloride exposed a net outward (negative) I(SC), and serosal NH(4)(+) addition further increased this outward current with a Km of 53+/-24 mM. Decreasing the bath pH from 7.3 to 6.0 did...

  15. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-08-02

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhanced expression of resistin-like molecule beta in human colon cancer and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Duan; Tong, Qiang-Song; Weng, Mi-Xia; He, Jun; Lv, Qing; Pu, Jia-Rui; Jiang, Guo-Song; Cai, Jia-Bin; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Xiao-Hua

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated that resistin-like molecule beta (RELM beta), an intestinal goblet cell-specific protein, is markedly increased in the intestinal tumors of min mice and over-expressed in a human colon cancer cell line. We hypothesized that RELM beta might be enhanced in human colon cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical importance of RELM beta expression in colon cancer patients and to correlate its expression with various clinicopathological parameters, upstream regulatory molecule expression, tumor proliferative capacity, and patients' survival. Of the 80 colon cancer patients studied, 65 (81.25%) tested positive for RELM beta, mainly in the cytoplasm of colon mucosa. Contrasting sharply with the strongly RELM beta-positive tumors, normal colon mucous membrane was negative or weakly positive. RELM beta positivity in colon cancer was correlated with histological grade of differentiation and lymph node metastasis, but not with age, gender, tumor location and size, tumor infiltration, Dukes' stage, liver metastasis, and venous invasion. RELM beta expression was significantly correlated with the expression of transcription factor CDX-2 (P 0.05). The mean postoperative survival time (2.76 years) of RELM beta-positive patients was significantly longer than that (1.26 years) of RELM beta-negative patients (P = 0.032). These findings support evidence of the enhanced RELM beta expression in colon cancer patients and suggest that further investigation is warranted to explore the role of RELM beta in colon cancer.

  17. Ex vivo correlation of the permeability of metoprolol across human and porcine buccal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng-Lund, Emil; Marxen, Eva; Pedersen, Anne Marie L; Müllertz, Anette; Hyrup, Birgitte; Holm, Rene; Jacobsen, Jette

    2014-07-01

    The pH partition theory proposes a correlation between fraction of unionized drug substance and permeability. The aim of this study was to compare the permeability of metoprolol and mannitol in ex vivo human and porcine buccal mucosa models at varying pH to validate whether the porcine permeability model is predictive for human buccal absorption. Human (n = 9-10) and porcine (n = 6-7) buccal mucosa were mounted in a modified Ussing chamber, and the kinetics of metoprolol and mannitol transport was assessed for a period of 5.5 h with the pH values of donor medium set at 7.4, 8.5, and 9.0. In addition, hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue-van Gieson were used as tissue stains to evaluate the histology and the presence of acidic polysaccharides (e.g., mucins), respectively. The permeability of metoprolol was decreased in human buccal mucosa by almost twofold when compared with porcine buccal mucosa with a positive correlation (r(2) = 0.96) between the permeability assessed in porcine and human buccal mucosa. There was no change in the degree of either epithelial swelling or desquamation when treating with the pH 9.0 donor medium for 5.5 h. These data suggest that buccal mucosa from pigs can be used to predict human buccal absorption.

  18. Differential protein abundance and function of UT-B urea transporters in human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, D; Winter, D C; Hogan, A M; Schirmer, L; Baird, A W; Stewart, G S

    2010-03-01

    Facilitative UT-B urea transporters enable the passage of urea across cell membranes. Gastrointestinal urea transporters are thought to play a significant role in the urea nitrogen salvaging process that occurs between mammalian hosts and their gut bacteria. This study investigated the expression of UT-B urea transporters in different segments of human colon. Immunoblot analysis showed that human colon expressed a 35-kDa glycosylated UT-B protein in the colonic mucosa. The 35-kDa UT-B transporter was predominantly located in plasma membrane-enriched samples (P UT-B transporters were located throughout colonocytes situated in the upper portion of the colonic crypts. Bidirectional trans-epithelial urea transport was significantly greater in the ascending colon than the descending colon (P UT-B protein in different sections of the human colon, strongly correlating to regions that contain the largest populations of intestinal bacteria. This study suggests an important role for UT-B urea transporters in maintaining the symbiotic relationship between humans and their gut bacteria.

  19. Identification of differentially expressed genes in normal mucosa, adenoma and adenocarcinoma of colon by SSH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-Jie Luo; Mao-De Lai

    2001-01-01

    AIM To construct subtracted cDNA libraries and further identify differentially expressed genes that are related to the development of colorectal carcinoma (CRC).``METHODS Suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH)was done on cDNAs of normal mucosa, adenoma and adenocarcinoma tissues from the same patient. Three subtracted cDNA libraries were constructed and then hybridized with forward and backward subtracted probes for differential screening. Positive clones from each subtracted cDNA library were selected for sequencing and BLAST analysis. Finally, virtual Northern Blot confirmed such differential expression.``RESULTS By this way, there were about 3 -4× l02clones identified in each subtracted cDNA library, in which about 85% positive clones were differentially screened. Sequencing and BLAST homology search revealed some clones containing sequences of known gene fragments and several possibly novel genes showing few or no sequence homologies with any known sequences in the database.``CONCLUSION All results confirmed the effectiveness and sensitivity of SSH. The differentially expressed genes during the development of CRC can be used to shed light on the pathogenesis of CRC and be useful genetic markers for early diagnosis and therapy.``

  20. In vivo optical virtual biopsy of human oral mucosa with harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chen, Szu-Yu; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Lou, Pei-Jen; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2011-01-01

    Recent clinical studies on human skin indicated that in vivo multi-harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) can achieve sub-micron resolution for histopathological analysis with a high penetration depth and leave no energy or photodamages in the interacted tissues. It is thus highly desired to apply HGM for in vivo mucosa histopathological diagnosis. In this paper, the first in vivo optical virtual biopsy of human oral mucosa by using epi-HGM is demonstrated. We modified an upright microscope to rotate the angle of objective for in vivo observation. Our clinical study reveals the capability of HGM to in vivo image cell distributions in human oral mucosa, including epithelium and lamina propria with a high penetration depth greater than 280 μm and a high spatial resolution better than 500 nm. We also found that the third-harmonic-generation (THG) contrast on nucleus depends strongly on its thicknesses, in agreement with a numerical simulation. Besides, 4% acetic acid was found to be able to enhance the THG contrast of nucleus in oral mucosa, while such enhancement was found to decay due to the metabolic clearance of the contrast enhancer by the oral mucosa. Our clinical study indicated that, the combined epi-THG and epi-second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy is a promising imaging tool for in vivo noninvasive optical virtual biopsy and disease diagnosis in human mucosa. PMID:21833368

  1. Adhesion of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to human intestinal enterocytes and cultured human intestinal mucosa.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The adhesion of classic enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains of human origin to isolated human small intestinal enterocytes and cultured small intestinal mucosa was investigated. An adhesion assay with isolated human enterocytes prepared from duodenal biopsy samples was developed and tested with EPEC strains known to cause diarrhea in healthy adult volunteers. In the assay a mean of 53 and 55% of enterocytes had brush border-adherent E. coli E2348 (O127;H6) and E851 (O142:H6), res...

  2. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. A unique manifestation of human papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, E A M; Arani, S Fallah; Hegt, V Noordhoek; van Praag, M C G

    2009-03-01

    A 34-year old Creole woman appeared at the dermatology department with white-pink spots on the oral mucosa, which had been there for some time. Histology showed lesions characteristic of focal epithelial hyperplasia. The patient was treated with a CO2 laser. Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare benign lesion and is caused by human papillomavirus subtypes 13 or 32; it only appears on the oral mucosa.

  3. [Effects of shugan jianpi recipe on the ion transport of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome rat colon mucosa induced by 5-HT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng-Sheng; Wang, Zheng-Fang; Guo, Qian-Kun

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the mechanism of Shugan Jianpi Recipe (SJR) on the ion transportation of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) colon mucosa induced by 5-HT. Totally 36 male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups, i. e., the normal group, the model group, and the SJR group, 12 in each group. IBS-D Rat model was induced by intracolonic instillation of acetic acid and restraint stress. After successful modeling, normal saline was given to rats in the normal group and the model group, while SJR was given to those in the SJR group by gastrogavage for 14 days. The short circuit current (lsc) technology was used to measure 5-HT induced lsc changes of the colon mucosa under the actions of drugs and specific blocking agents. There was no difference in basal current (BC), the potential difference (PD), and transmembrane resistance (TR) of the distal colon among the 3 groups (all P > 0.05). The 5-HT induced short circuit current change (delta lsc) was lower in the model group than in the normal group (P colonic mucosa, the 5-HT induced delta lsc was lower in the model group than in the normal group (P colonic mucosa, an epithelial Na+ channel blocker, the 5-HT induced delta lsc was lower in the model group than in the normal group (P < 0.05), and it was higher in the SJR group than in the model group (P < 0.05). SJR could affect the transmembrane electrolyte transportation of IBS-D rat induced by 5-HT through regulating the secretion of Cl- and HCO3-. The effects might be achieved by the coordination of apical Cl- channel CFTR, basolateral Na(+)-K+ ATPase, sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter, sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter, Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, as well as K+ channel.

  4. Expression of epithelial cell-derived cytokine genes in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with chronic enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Hironari; Ogawa, Misato; Hasegawa, Ayana; Nagai, Makoto; Shirai, Junsuke; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Minoru; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kondo, Hirotaka; Ohmori, Keitaro

    2017-02-28

    It remains unclear whether epithelial cell-derived cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), contribute to development of canine chronic enteropathy (CE), which includes antibiotic-responsive enteropathy (ARE), food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, we examined mRNA expression of il-25, il-33 and tslp in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with ARE, FRE and IBD. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of il-33 was significantly lower in the duodenum in dogs with FRE than in healthy dogs. The results suggest that epithelial cell-derived cytokines may not be an inducer of Th2-type immunity in the gut of dogs with CE, and decreased expression of IL-33 may be involved in induction of FRE. Further studies are required to clarify roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines, especially IL-33, in the pathogenesis of canine CE.

  5. Human colon tissue in organ culture: calcium and multi-mineral-induced mucosal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dame, Michael K; Veerapaneni, Indiradevi; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Naik, Madhav; Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    We have recently shown that a multi-mineral extract from the marine red algae, Lithothamnion calcareum, suppresses colon polyp formation and inflammation in mice. In the present study, we used intact human colon tissue in organ culture to compare responses initiated by Ca(2+) supplementation versus the multi-mineral extract. Normal human colon tissue was treated for 2 d in culture with various concentrations of calcium or the mineral-rich extract. The tissue was then prepared for histology/immunohistochemistry, and the culture supernatants were assayed for levels of type I procollagen and type I collagen. At higher Ca(2+) concentrations or with the mineral-rich extract, proliferation of epithelial cells at the base and walls of the mucosal crypts was suppressed, as visualized by reduced Ki67 staining. E-cadherin, a marker of differentiation, was more strongly expressed at the upper third of the crypt and at the luminal surface. Treatment with Ca(2+) or with the multi-mineral extract influenced collagen turnover, with decreased procollagen and increased type I collagen. These data suggest that calcium or mineral-rich extract has the capacity to (1) promote differentiation in human colon tissue in organ culture and (2) modulate stromal function as assessed by increased levels of type I collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that human colon tissue in organ culture (supporting in vivo finding in mice) will provide a valuable model for the preclinical assessment of agents that regulate growth and differentiation in the colonic mucosa.

  6. Transient and Prolonged Response of Chicken Cecum Mucosa to Colonization with Different Gut Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volf, Jiri; Polansky, Ondrej; Varmuzova, Karolina; Gerzova, Lenka; Sekelova, Zuzana; Faldynova, Marcela; Babak, Vladimir; Medvecky, Matej; Smith, Adrian L.; Kaspers, Bernd; Velge, Philippe; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In this study we determined protein and gene expression in the caeca of newly hatched chickens inoculated with cecal contents sourced from hens of different ages. Over 250 proteins exhibited modified expression levels in response to microbiota inoculation. The most significant inductions were observed for ISG12-2, OASL, ES1, LYG2, DMBT1-L, CDD, ANGPTL6, B2M, CUZD1, IgM and Ig lambda chain. Of these, ISG12-2, ES1 and both immunoglobulins were expressed at lower levels in germ-free chickens compared to conventional chickens. In contrast, CELA2A, BRT-2, ALDH1A1, ADH1C, AKR1B1L, HEXB, ALDH2, ALDOB, CALB1 and TTR were expressed at lower levels following inoculation of microbiota. When chicks were given microbiota preparations from different age donors, the recipients mounted differential responses to the inoculation which also differed from the response profile in naturally colonised birds. For example, B2M, CUZD1 and CELA2A responded differently to the inoculation with microbiota of 4- or 40-week-old hens. The increased or decreased gene expression could be recorded 6 weeks after the inoculation of newly hatched chickens. To characterise the proteins that may directly interact with the microbiota we characterised chicken proteins that co-purified with the microbiota and identified a range of host proteins including CDD, ANGPTL6, DMBT1-L, MEP1A and Ig lambda. We propose that induction of ISG12-2 results in reduced apoptosis of host cells exposed to the colonizing commensal microbiota and that CDD, ANGPTL6, DMBT1-L, MEP1A and Ig lambda reduce contact of luminal microbiota with the gut epithelium thereby reducing the inflammatory response. PMID:27685470

  7. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  8. Expression of connexins 26, 32 and 43 in the human colon--an immunohistochemical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sobaniec-Lotowska

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC is a mechanism for direct cell-to-cell signalling and is mediated by gap junctions (GJs, which consist of proteins called connexins (Cxs. GJIC plays a critical role in tissue development and differentiation and is important in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the expression of Cx26, Cx32 and Cx43 in the human colon. Surgical specimens were obtained from patients who underwent surgical resection of colorectal tumours. Tissue samples (50 cases were collected from normal colon, at the maximum distance from the tumor. Using antibodies for Cx26, Cx32 and Cx43, immunohistochemical detection was made. In epithelial cells, strong Cx26 immunoreactivity was found, whereas Cx32 and Cx43 were sparsely distributed. Strong Cx43 immunostaining in muscularis mucosae was observed. In the circular layer of muscularis externa, expression of Cx43 and Cx26 was seen, but only in the portion closest to the submucosa. No immunoreactivity was found in the longitudinal muscle layer. Small vessels stained positively only for Cx43. Furthermore, there was no difference in staining between samples derived from various sections of the colon. This study showed immunohistochemically for the first time the expression of Cx26 in human colon mucosa.

  9. Expression of connexins 26, 32 and 43 in the human colon--an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanczuga-Koda, Luiza; Sulkowski, Stanislaw; Koda, Mariusz; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria; Sulkowska, Mariola

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is a mechanism for direct cell-to-cell signalling and is mediated by gap junctions (GJs), which consist of proteins called connexins (Cxs). GJIC plays a critical role in tissue development and differentiation and is important in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the expression of Cx26, Cx32 and Cx43 in the human colon. Surgical specimens were obtained from patients who underwent surgical resection of colorectal tumours. Tissue samples (50 cases) were collected from normal colon, at the maximum distance from the tumor. Using antibodies for Cx26, Cx32 and Cx43, immunohistochemical detection was made. In epithelial cells, strong Cx26 immunoreactivity was found, whereas Cx32 and Cx43 were sparsely distributed. Strong Cx43 immunostaining in muscularis mucosae was observed. In the circular layer of muscularis externa, expression of Cx43 and Cx26 was seen, but only in the portion closest to the submucosa. No immunoreactivity was found in the longitudinal muscle layer. Small vessels stained positively only for Cx43. Furthermore, there was no difference in staining between samples derived from various sections of the colon. This study showed immunohistochemically for the first time the expression of Cx26 in human colon mucosa.

  10. Identification of dominant bacteria in feces and colonic mucosa from healthy Spanish adults by culturing and by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Susana; Suárez, Adolfo; Mayo, Baltasar

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this work was to examine by culturing the changes in the total and indicator populations of the feces of two individuals over 1 year and to identify the dominant microbial components of a single sample of feces from each donor. Populations and dominant bacteria from a sample of colonic mucosa from a further individual were also assessed. The culture results were then compared to those obtained with the same samples by 16S rDNA cloning and sequencing. High interindividual variation in representative microbial populations of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was revealed by both the culture and the culture-independent techniques. Species belonging to Clostridium clusters (XIVa, IV, and XVIII) predominated in both the fecal and the mucosal samples (except in the mucose cultured isolates), members of Clostridium coccoides cluster XIVa being the most numerous microorganisms. Species of gamma-proteobacteria (Escherichia coli and Shigella spp.), bifidobacteria, and actinobacteria appeared in lower numbers than those of clostridia. From the mucosal cultured sample, only facultative anaerobes and bifidobacteria were recovered, suggesting destruction of the anaerobe population during processing. In accordance with this, the microbial diversity revealed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis was greater than that revealed by culturing. Despite large interindividual differences, distinct human communities may have group-associated GIT microbiota characteristics, such as the low number of Bacteroides seen in the subjects in this study.

  11. Expression of pim-1 in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa co-determines the prognosis of colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yong-hai; Li, Jian-jun; Xie, Fang-wei; Chen, Jian-fang; Yu, Ying-hao; Ouyang, Xue-nong; Liang, Hou-jie

    2013-01-01

    Provirus integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (pim-1) is a proto-oncogene that is linked to the development and progression of several cancers. In this study, we evaluated pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa together as an independent prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. The study included 343 colon cancer patients. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect pim-1. Multivariate cox regression for disease-free survival (DFS) were used to identify independent prognostic factors. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was used to calculate the weight of pim-1 in tumors, tumor stroma and tumor-adjacent mucosa in order to obtain a Pim-1 total score (PTS) for recurrence and survival. Kaplan-Meier DFS curves and OS curves for patients with different pim-1 expression levels were compared using the log-rank test. In this study, four independent prognostic factors were identified for colon cancer patients: pim-1 expression in tumors, tumor stroma, tumor-adjacent mucosa, as well as tumor stage. It has been established that clinical stage is an important prognostic factor for colon cancer patients. However, PTS can identify the patients who are likely to recur not only in the whole radical excision group but also within each stage of this group. Based on the results of this study we can conclude that the PTS combined with clinical staging system may be a better predictor of colon cancer patients' prognosis than using the clinical stage system alone. ClinicalTrials.gov Number: ChiCTR-PRCH-12002842.

  12. Effects of budesonide and probiotics enemas on the colonic mucosa of rats with experimental colitis Efeito de enemas contendo budesonida e probióticos na mucosa colonica de ratos com colite experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardem Machado de Souza

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of enemas containing probiotics and budesonide on the colonic mucosa in experimental colitis. METHODS: Fifty male Wistar rats with experimental colitis induced by 10% acetic acid enema were randomized to five groups (10 rats each according to the treatment: group 1 - saline solution, group 2 - budesonide (0.75 mg/kg/day, group 3 - probiotics (1mg/day, group 4 - probiotics plus budesonide, and group 5 - control, with not-treated rats. The following variables were studied: body weight, macroscopic and microscopic score of the colonic mucosa, and DNA content of the mucosa. RESULTS: All animals lost weight between the beginning and the end of the experiment (280+ 16 mg versus 249+21 mg, pOBJETIVO: Investigar o efeito da administração retal de probióticos e budesonida na mucosa colônica de ratos com colite experimental. MÉTODOS: Cinquenta ratos Wistar com colite experimental induzida pelo ácido acético à 10% foram randomizados em 5 grupos (n=10 por grupo para diferentes tratamentos: grupo 1 - solução fisiológica; grupo 2 - budesonida (0,75mg/kg/dia; grupo 3 - probióticos (1 g/dia; grupo 4 - probióticos associados a budesonida; e finalmente grupo 5 - controle, composto por ratos sem tratamento. As seguintes variáveis foram estudadas: peso corporal, aspecto macroscópico e microscópico da mucosa e conteúdo de DNA da mucosa colônica. RESULTADOS: Todos os animais perderam peso entre o início e o fim do experimento (280±16 vs 249±21g; p<0.001. Não houve diferença estatística significativa entre os grupos em relação a macroscopia e histologia. O grupo budesonida + probiótico apresentou conteúdo de DNA maior que o grupo controle (1,24±0,15 versus 0,92±0,30 g/100g de tecido; p=0,01. CONCLUSÃO: A associação de budesonida com probióticos acelera o trofismo mucoso na colite experimental.

  13. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Modulates TLR4/NF-κB Signaling Pathway Targeting TNF-α and Nitric Oxide Synthase 2 Expression in Colonic Mucosa during Ulcerative Colitis and Colitis Associated Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafa, Hayet; Benkhelifa, Sarra; AitYounes, Sonia; Saoula, Houria; Belhadef, Said; Belkhelfa, Mourad; Boukercha, Aziza; Toumi, Ryma; Soufli, Imene; de Launoit, Yvan; Mahfouf, Hassen; Nakmouche, M'hamed

    2017-01-01

    Colitis associated cancer (CAC) is the colorectal cancer (CRC) subtype that is associated with bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis (UC). The data on role of NF-κB signaling in development and progression of CAC were derived from preclinical studies, whereas data from human are rare. The aim of this work was to study the contribution of NF-κB pathway during UC and CAC, as well as the immunomodulatory effect of all-trans retinoic acid (AtRA). We analyzed the expression of NOS2, TNF-α, TLR4, and NF-κB, in colonic mucosa. We also studied NO/TNF-α modulation by LPS in colonic mucosa pretreated with AtRA. A marked increase in TLR4, NF-κB, TNF-α, and NOS2 expression was reported in colonic mucosa. The relationship between LPS/TLR4 and TNF-α/NO production, as well as the role of NF-κB signaling, was confirmed by ex vivo experiments and the role of LPS/TLR4 in NOS2/TNF-α induction through NF-κB pathway was suggested. AtRA downregulates NOS2 and TNF-α expression. Collectively, our study indicates that AtRA modulates in situ LPS/TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway targeting NOS2 and TNF-α expression. Therefore, we suggest that AtRA has a potential value in new strategies to improve the current therapy, as well as in the clinical prevention of CAC development and progression.

  14. Overlapping expression of microRNAs in human embryonic colon and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are essential for regulating cell differentiation and maintaining the pluripotent state of stem cells. Although dysregulation of specific miRNAs has been associated with certain types of cancer, to date no evidence has linked miRNA expression in embryonic and tumor tissues. We assessed the expression of mature miRNAs in human embryonic colon tissue, and in colorectal cancer and paired normal colon tissue. Overlapping miRNA expression was detected between embryonic colonic mucosa and colorectal cancer. We have found that the miR-17-92 cluster and its target, E2F1, exhibit a similar pattern of expression in human colon development and colonic carcinogenesis, regulating cell proliferation in both cases. In situ hybridization confirmed the high level of expression of miR-17-5p in the crypt progenitor compartment. We conclude that miRNA pathways play a major role in both embryonic development and neoplastic transformation of the colonic epithelium.

  15. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleberg Karen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Methods Cyclic nucleotides were used as model substrates shared by some OATP- and ABC-transporters, which in part are responsible for clearance of metabolites and xenobiotics from the colonic epithelium. On colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia, molecular transport was electrophysiologically registered in Ussing-chamber set-ups, mRNA level of selected transporters was quantified by rt-PCR, and subcellular location of transporters was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Of four cyclic nucleotides, dibuturyl-cAMP induced the largest short circuit current in both patient groups. The induced short circuit current was significantly lower in neoplasia-patients (p = 0.024. The observed altered transport of dibuturyl-cAMP in neoplasia-patients could not be directly translated to an observed increased mRNA expression of OATP4A1 and OATP2B1 in neoplasia patients. All other examined transporters were expressed to similar extents in both patient groups. Conclusions OATP1C1, OATP4A1, OATP4C1 seem to be involved in the excretory system of human colon. ABCC4 is likely to be involved from an endoplasmic-Golgi complex and basolateral location in goblet cells. ABCC5 might be directly involved in the turnover of intracellular cAMP at the basolateral membrane of columnar epithelial cells, while OATP2B1 is indirectly related to the excretory system. Colorectal neoplasia is associated with lower transport or sensitivity to cyclic nucleotides and increased expression of OATP2B1 and OATP4A1 transporters, known to transport PGE2.

  16. Regional quantitative histological variations in human oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciano, Joseph; Beatty, Brian Lee

    2015-03-01

    Oral mucosa demonstrates regional variations that reflect contact with food during mastication. Though known qualitatively, our aim was to quantitatively assess regions to establish a measurable baseline from which one could compare in pathological and comparative studies, in which the abrasiveness of diets may differ. We assessed variations in the epithelial-connective tissue junction (rete ridges counts), collagen organization within the lamina propria, and elastin composition of the lamina propria of 15 regions of the labial (buccal) gingiva, lingual gingiva, vestibule, and palate. All characteristics varied more between regions within the same individual than between individuals. Lingual gingiva had high rete ridges counts, high level of collagen organization, and moderate elastin composition compared to other regions. The labial gingiva had few rete ridges, high collagen organization, and low elastin. The vestibule had the fewest average of rete ridges, least organized collagen, and high elastin. The hard palate had the highest average of rete ridges, high collagen organization, and the lowest elastin content. The soft palate conversely had the smallest average of rete ridges, moderate collagen organization, and the highest elastin composition. Our results indicate that comparison of these quantitative histological differences is warranted only for collagen organization and elastin composition. Differences in rete ridges counts were not statistically significant. Most histological characteristics observed were not significantly different between dentulous and edentulous cadavers, and the group containing all individuals. An exception was the level of collagen fiber organization within the lamina propria, which was higher in most regions when teeth were present.

  17. Identification of restricted subsets of mature microRNA abnormally expressed in inactive colonic mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Magali Fasseu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ulcerative Colitis (UC and Crohn's Disease (CD are two chronic Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD affecting the intestinal mucosa. Current understanding of IBD pathogenesis points out the interplay of genetic events and environmental cues in the dysregulated immune response. We hypothesized that dysregulated microRNA (miRNA expression may contribute to IBD pathogenesis. miRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs which prevent protein synthesis through translational suppression or mRNAs degradation, and regulate several physiological processes. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Expression of mature miRNAs was studied by Q-PCR in inactive colonic mucosa of patients with UC (8, CD (8 and expressed relative to that observed in healthy controls (10. Only miRNAs with highly altered expression (>5 or 100 -fold and 0.05-0.19 -fold for over- and under- expression, respectively; 0.001colonic mucosa, 8 being commonly dysregulated in non-inflamed UC and CD (mir-26a,-29a,-29b,-30c,-126*,-127-3p,-196a,-324-3p. Several miRNA genes with dysregulated expression co-localize with acknowledged IBD-susceptibility loci while others, (eg. clustered on 14q32.31, map on chromosomal regions not previously recognized as IBD-susceptibility loci. In addition, in silico clustering analysis identified 5 miRNAs (mir-26a,-29b,-126*,-127-3p,-324-3p that share coordinated dysregulation of expression both in quiescent and in inflamed colonic mucosa of IBD patients. Six miRNAs displayed significantly distinct alteration of expression in non-inflamed colonic biopsies of UC and CD patients (mir-196b,-199a-3p,-199b-5p,-320a,-150,-223. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study supports miRNAs as crucial players in the onset and/or relapse of inflammation from quiescent mucosal tissues in IBD patients. It allows speculating a role for miRNAs as contributors to IBD susceptibility and suggests that some of the miRNA with altered expression in the quiescent mucosa of

  18. Activation of histamine H3 receptors in human nasal mucosa inhibits sympathetic vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varty, LoriAnn M; Gustafson, Eric; Laverty, Maureen; Hey, John A

    2004-01-19

    The peripheral histamine H3 receptor is a presynaptic heterologous receptor located on postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers innervating sympathetic effector systems such as blood vessels and the heart. An extensive body of evidence shows that activation of the histamine H3 receptor attenuates sympathetic tone by presynaptic inhibition of noradrenaline release. It is proposed that this sympathoinhibitory action, in vivo, leads to reduced vasoconstriction, thereby eliciting a vasodilatory effect. In humans, the peripheral histamine H3 receptor has also been shown to exert a sympathoinhibitory function on specific peripheral autonomic effector systems. For example, human saphenous vein and heart possess functional presynaptic histamine H3 receptors on the sympathetic nerve terminals that upon activation decrease the sympathetic tone to these respective organs. The present studies were conducted to define the role of histamine H3 receptors on neurogenic sympathetic vasoconstrictor responses in human nasal turbinate mucosa. Contractility studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of histamine H3 receptor activation on sympathetic vasoconstriction in surgically isolated human nasal turbinate mucosa. We found that the histamine H3 receptor agonist, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (30 and 300 nM), inhibited electrical field stimulation-induced (neurogenic) sympathetic vasoconstriction in a concentration-dependent fashion. Pretreatment with the selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit (100 nM), blocked the sympathoinhibitory effect of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine on the neurogenic sympathetic vasoconstriction. In addition, analysis of Taqman mRNA expression studies showed a specific, high level of distribution of the histamine H3 receptor localized in the human nasal mucosa. Taken together, these studies indicate that histamine H3 receptors modulate vascular contractile responses in human nasal mucosa most likely by inhibiting noradrenaline release from

  19. [Generation of a substitute for human oral mucosa and verification of its viability by tissue-engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañés Gálvez, C; Liceras Liceras, E; Alaminos, M; Fernández Valadés, R; Ruiz Montes, A M; Garzón, I; Sánchez-Quevedo, M C; Campos, A

    2011-01-01

    Reconstruction of large oral mucosa defects is often challenging, since the shortage of healthy oral mucosa to replace the excised tissues. This way, tissue ingineering techniques may provide a source of autologous tissues available for transplant in these patients. In this work, we have developed a new model for artificial oral mucosa generated by tissue engineering using a fibrin-agarosa scaffold. For that purpose, we have generated primary cultures of human oral mucosa fibroblasts and keratinocytes from small biopsies of normal mucosa oral using enzymatic treatments. Then, we have determined the viability of cultured cells by electron probe quantitative X-ray microanalysis, and we have demonstrated that most of the cells in the primary cultures were alive and hd high K/Na ratios. Once cell viability was determined, we used cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes to develop an artificial oral mucosa construct by using a fibrin-agarosa extracellular matrix and a sequential culture technique using porous culture inserts. Histological analysis of the artificial tissues showed high similarities with normal oral mucosa controls. The epithelium of the oral substitutes had several layers, with desmosomes and apical microvilli and microplicae. Both the controls and de oral mucosa substitutes showed high suprabasal expression of cytokeratin 13 and low expression of cytokeratin 10. All these results suggest that our model of oral mucosa using fibrin-agarose scaffolds show several similarities with native human oral mucosa.

  20. Toll-like receptor mRNA expression is selectively increased in the colonic mucosa of two animal models relevant to irritable bowel syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Declan P McKernan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is largely viewed as a stress-related disorder caused by aberrant brain-gut-immune communication and altered gastrointestinal (GI homeostasis. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that stress modulates innate immune responses; however, very little is known on the immunological effects of stress on the GI tract. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are critical pattern recognition molecules of the innate immune system. Activation of TLRs by bacterial and viral molecules leads to activation of NF-kB and an increase in inflammatory cytokine expression. It was our hypothesis that innate immune receptor expression may be changed in the gastrointestinal tract of animals with stress-induced IBS-like symptoms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, our objective was to evaluate the TLR expression profile in the colonic mucosa of two rat strains that display colonic visceral hypersensitivity; the stress-sensitive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rat and the maternally separated (MS rat. Quantitative PCR of TLR2-10 mRNA in both the proximal and distal colonic mucosae was carried out in adulthood. Significant increases are seen in the mRNA levels of TLR3, 4 & 5 in both the distal and proximal colonic mucosa of MS rats compared with controls. No significant differences were noted for TLR 2, 7, 9 & 10 while TLR 6 could not be detected in any samples in both rat strains. The WKY strain have increased levels of mRNA expression of TLR3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9 & 10 in both the distal and proximal colonic mucosa compared to the control Sprague-Dawley strain. No significant differences in expression were found for TLR2 while as before TLR6 could not be detected in all samples in both strains. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that both early life stress (MS and a genetic predisposition (WKY to stress affect the expression of key sentinels of the innate immune system which may have direct relevance for the molecular pathophysiology of IBS.

  1. Reduced expression of aquaporins in human intestinal mucosa in early stage inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricanek P

    2015-01-01

    -dimensional structures of AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 were modeled. Results: AQP1, 3, 7, and 8 mRNAs were detected in all parts of the intestinal mucosa. Notably, AQP1 and AQP3 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum of patients with Crohn's disease, and AQP7 and AQP8 mRNA levels were reduced in the ileum and the colon of patients with ulcerative colitis. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed localization of AQP3, 7, and 8 at the mucosal epithelium, whereas the expression of AQP1 was mainly confined to the endothelial cells and erythrocytes. The reduction in the level of AQP3, 7, and 8 mRNA was confirmed by immunofluorescence, which also indicated a reduction of apical immunolabeling for AQP8 in the colonic surface epithelium and crypts of the IBD samples. This could indicate loss of epithelial polarity in IBD, leading to disrupted barrier function. Conclusion: AQPs 1 and 8 and the aquaglyceroporins AQPs 3 and 7 are the AQPs predominantly expressed in the lower intestinal tract of humans. Their expression is significantly reduced in patients with IBD, and they are differentially expressed in specific bowel segments in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The data present a link between gut inflammation and water/solute homeostasis, suggesting that AQPs may play a significant role in IBD pathophysiology. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, aquaporins, aquaglyceroporins

  2. Oropharyngeal perinatal colonization by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Torices, María Soledad; Corrales-Millan, Rocío; Hijona-Elosegui, Jesús J

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common human sexually transmitted disease. It is clinically relevant because this condition is necessary for the development of epithelial cervical cancer, and it is also a factor closely associated with the occurrence of diverse tumours and various benign and malignant lesions of the head and neck area. The infective mechanism in most of these cases is associated with sexual intercourse, but there is recent scientific evidence suggesting that HPV infection may also be acquired by other routes of infection not necessarily linked to sexual contact. One of them is vertical transmission from mother to child, either during pregnancy or at the time of delivery. The aim of our research was to study maternal-foetal HPV transmission during childbirth in detail, establishing the rate of oropharyngeal neonatal HPV in vaginal deliveries. The presence and type of HPV viral DNA at the time of delivery in samples of maternal cervical secretions, amniotic fluid, venous cord blood samples and neonatal oropharynx in pregnant women (and their babies) were determined. The rate of oropharyngeal neonatal HPV colonization in vaginal deliveries was 58.24%. The maternal and neonatal HPV colonization mechanism is essentially, but not exclusively, transvaginal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  3. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis interacts with dermal dendritic cells and keratinocytes in human skin and oral mucosa lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Wellington Luiz Ferreira da; Pagliari, Carla; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Sotto, Mirian N

    2016-05-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic disease caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii. In PCM the skin and oral mucosa are often affected. Dendritic cells and keratinocytes of the integument play a role in innate and adaptive immune response against pathogens, due to their function as antigen presenting cells. Aiming to verify the interaction of P. brasiliensis with these cell populations, we studied 52 skin and 47 oral mucosa samples taken from patients with proven diagnosis of PCM. The biopsies were subjected to immunohistochemical and/or immunofluorescence staining with anti-factor XIIIa (marker of dermal dendrocytes), anti-CD207 (marker of mature Langerhans cells), anti-pan cytokeratins (AE1-AE3) and anti-P. brasiliensis antibodies. Analyses with confocal laser microscopy were also performed for better visualization of the interaction between keratinocytes and the fungi. In sum, 42% of oral mucosa samples displayed yeast forms in Factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes cytoplasm. Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa samples did not show yeast cells in their cytoplasm. In sum, 54% of skin and 60% of mucosal samples displayed yeast cells in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. The parasitism of keratinocytes may represent a possible mechanism of evasion of the fungus to local immune mechanisms. Factor XIIIa dendrocytes and keratinocytes may be acting as antigen-presenting cells to fulfill the probably impaired function of Langerhans cells in skin and oral mucosa of human PCM. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Expression of differential nitric oxide synthase isoforms in human gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屠振兴; 龚燕芳; 丁华; 许国铭; 李兆申; 满晓华

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression in human gastric mucosa and Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection. Methods: Gastric mucosa samples were obtained from antrum of 33 patients received gastroendoscopy. H.pylori infection was confirmed by Giems staining and bacteria culture under microaerophilic conditions. Expression of iNOS, eNOS and nitrotyrosine were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: (1) The positive rate of H. pylori infection was 66.7%(22/33). (2) iNOS positive staining in inflammatory cells was detected in 77.3%(17/22) of samples with H.pylori and 27.3%(3/11) without H.pylori infection (P0.05). (5) Moderate and severe infiltrations of inflammatory cells were found in 86.4%(19/22) of gastric biopsies with H. pylori and 9.1%(1/11) of samples without H. pylori infection (P<0.01). Conclusion: H.pylori infection might promote infiltration of mononuclear cells and macrophages in gastric mucosa and induce iNOS expression in these cells. The accumulated nitric oxide in local area may result in gastric mucosa damage.

  5. Pathological implications of Cx43 down-regulation in human colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Rehana; Rashid, Rabiya; Andrabi, Khurshid; Parray, Fazl Q; Besina, Syed; Shah, Mohd Amin; Ul Hussain, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Connexin 43 is an important gap junction protein in vertebrates and is known for its tumor suppressive properties. Cx43 is abundantly expressed in the human intestinal epithelial cells and muscularis mucosae. To explore the role of Cx43 in the genesis of human colon cancer, we performed the expression analysis of Cx43 in 80 cases of histopathologically confirmed and clinically diagnosed human colon cancer samples and adjacent control tissue and assessed correlations with clinicopathological variables. Western blotting using anti-Cx43 antibody indicated that the expression of Cx43 was significantly down regulated (75%) in the cancer samples as compared to the adjacent control samples. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue samples confirmed the down regulation of the Cx43 in the intestinal epithelial cells. Cx43 down regulation showed significant association (pcancer. Our data demonstrated that loss of Cx43 may be an important event in colon carcinogenesis and tumor progression, providing significant insights about the tumor suppressive properties of the Cx43 and its potential as a diagnostic marker for colon cancer.

  6. Binding of chemical carcinogens to macromolecules in cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic activation of different chemical classes of carcinogens was studied in cultured human colon epithelia. Human colon epithelia were maintained in explant culture up to 4 days. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylnitrosamine, and 1,2- dimethylhydrazine was found in both cell DNA and protein....... 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine methylated DNA at both N·7 and 0-6 positions of guanin....

  7. The in vitro metabolism of ethinyloestradiol, mestranol and levonorgestrel by human jejunal mucosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Back, D J; Bates, M; Breckenridge, A M; Ellis, A.; Hall, J.M.; Maciver, M; Orme, M L; Rowe, P H

    1981-01-01

    1 Ethinyloestradiol was extensively metabolised in vitro by human jejunal mucosa to form ethinyloestradiol sulphate. 2 The amount of conjugation was directly related to the weight of biopsy tissue. 3 The degree of conjugation of mestranol and levonorgestrel was much lower than for ethinyloestradiol suggesting that the 17-position of the steroid nucleus is relatively inaccessible for conjugation. 4 No Phase I metabolism of ethinyloestradiol or levonorgestrel was apparent in the conditions used...

  8. FasL EXPRESSION IN HUMAN COLON CARCINOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective:The Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) play an important role in maintaining immune privilege on malignant tumors. In present study, we investigated the expression of FasL in SW480 and LS174 human colon carcinoma cell lines and twenty primary colon carcinoma specimens. Methods: The expression of FasL in human colon carcinoma cell lines and primary colon carcinomas specimens was detected by immunohistochemistry and Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Results: We found that all of detected human colon carcinoma cell lines and primary colon carcinoma specimens constitutively expressed FasL at the mRNA and protein level. However, the expression of FasL was not found in normal colon epithelial cells. Conclusion: The expression of FasL may occur during malignant transformation from normal colon epithelial cells to colon carcinoma cells. Our results suggest that tumor cells kill cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLS) and natural killer (NK) cells by expression of FasL. It may be a new mechanism for tumor cells to escape the host's immune surveillance. The expression of FasL may contribute to the formation of colon carcinomas.

  9. Squamous epitheliotropism of Enterovirus A71 in human epidermis and oral mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phyu, Win Kyaw; Ong, Kien Chai; Kong, Chee Kwan; Alizan, Abdul Khalil; Ramanujam, Tindivanam Muthurangam; Wong, Kum Thong

    2017-01-01

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is a self-limiting paediatric infectious disease commonly caused by Enterovirus A71 (Genus: Enterovirus, Family: Picornaviridae). Typical lesions in and around the hands, feet, oral cavity and other places may rarely be complicated by acute flaccid paralysis and acute encephalomyelitis. Although virus is readily cultured from skin vesicles and oral secretions, the cellular target/s of Enterovirus A71 in human skin and oral mucosa are unknown. In Enterovirus A71-infected human skin and oral mucosa organotypic cultures derived from the prepuce and lip biopsies, focal viral antigens and viral RNA were localized to cytoplasm of epidermal and mucosal squamous cells as early as 2 days post-infection. Viral antigens/RNA were associated with cytoplasmic vacuolation and cellular necrosis. Infected primary prepuce epidermal keratinocyte cultures showed cytopathic effects with concomitant detection of viral antigens from 2 days post-infection. Supernatant and/or tissue homogenates from prepuce skin organotypic cultures and primary prepuce keratinocyte cultures showed viral titres consistent with active viral replication. Our data strongly support Enterovirus A71 squamous epitheliotropism in the human epidermis and oral mucosa, and suggest that these organs are important primary and/or secondary viral replication sites that contribute significantly to oral and cutaneous viral shedding resulting in person-to-person transmission, and viraemia, which could lead to neuroinvasion. PMID:28322333

  10. Interactions between bacteria and the gut mucosa: Do enteric neurotransmitters acting on the mucosal epithelium influence intestinal colonization or infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These include ...

  11. Profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Verbeurgt

    Full Text Available Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems, containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men. Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were

  12. Gene Signature of Human Oral Mucosa Fibroblasts: Comparison with Dermal Fibroblasts and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Miyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosa is a useful material for regeneration therapy with the advantages of its accessibility and versatility regardless of age and gender. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of oral mucosa. Here we report the first comparative profiles of the gene signatures of human oral mucosa fibroblasts (hOFs, human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs, and hOF-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (hOF-iPSCs, linking these with biological roles by functional annotation and pathway analyses. As a common feature of fibroblasts, both hOFs and hDFs expressed glycolipid metabolism-related genes at higher levels compared with hOF-iPSCs. Distinct characteristics of hOFs compared with hDFs included a high expression of glycoprotein genes, involved in signaling, extracellular matrix, membrane, and receptor proteins, besides a low expression of HOX genes, the hDFs-markers. The results of the pathway analyses indicated that tissue-reconstructive, proliferative, and signaling pathways are active, whereas senescence-related genes in p53 pathway are inactive in hOFs. Furthermore, more than half of hOF-specific genes were similarly expressed to those of hOF-iPSC genes and might be controlled by WNT signaling. Our findings demonstrated that hOFs have unique cellular characteristics in specificity and plasticity. These data may provide useful insight into application of oral fibroblasts for direct reprograming.

  13. Endoscopic OCT for in-vivo imaging of precancer and cancer states of human mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kuznetzova, Irina N.; Snopova, Ludmila; Denisenko, Arkady; Almasov, Valentin

    1998-01-01

    First results of endoscopic applications of optical coherence tomography for in vivo studies of human mucosa in gastrointestinal and genital tracts are presented. A novel endoscopic OCT system has ben created that is based on the integration of a sampling arm of an all-optical-fiber interferometer into standard endoscopic devices using their biopsy channel to transmit low-coherence radiation to investigated tissue. We have studied mucous membranes of esophagus, stomach and uterine cervix as typical localization for carcinomatous processes. Images of tumor tissues versus healthy tissues have been recorded and analyzed. Violations of well-defined stratified healthy mucosa structure in cancerous tissue is distinctly seen by EOCT, thus making this technique promising for early diagnosis of tumors and precise guiding of excisional biopsy.

  14. In vivo endoscopic OCT imaging of precancer and cancer states of human mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gelikonov, V. M.; Gelikonov, G. V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Kuranov, R. V.; Gladkova, N. D.; Shakhova, N. M.; Snopova, L. B.; Shakhov, A. V.; Kuznetzova, I. A.; Denisenko, A. N.; Pochinko, V. V.; Chumakov, Yu P.; Streltzova, O. S.

    1997-12-01

    First results of endoscopic applications of optical coherence tomography for in vivo studies of human mucosa in respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary and genital tracts are presented. A novel endoscopic OCT (EOCT) system has been created that is based on the integration of a sampling arm of an all-optical-fiber interferometer into standard endoscopic devices using their biopsy channel to transmit low-coherence radiation to investigated tissue. We have studied mucous membranes of esophagus, larynx, stomach, urinary bladder, uterine cervix and body as typical localization for carcinomatous processes. Images of tumor tissues versus healthy tissues have been recorded and analyzed. Violations of well-defined stratified healthy mucosa structure in cancered tissue are distinctly seen by EOCT, thus making this technique promising for early diagnosis of tumors and precise guiding of excisional biopsy.

  15. Colonic Fermentation: A Neglected Topic in Human Physiology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeur, Jorgen; Berstad, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Human physiology textbooks tend to limit their discussion of colonic functions to those of absorbing water and electrolytes and storing waste material. However, the colon is a highly active metabolic organ, containing an exceedingly complex society of microbes. By means of fermentation, gastrointestinal microbes break down nutrients that cannot be…

  16. Colonic Fermentation: A Neglected Topic in Human Physiology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeur, Jorgen; Berstad, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Human physiology textbooks tend to limit their discussion of colonic functions to those of absorbing water and electrolytes and storing waste material. However, the colon is a highly active metabolic organ, containing an exceedingly complex society of microbes. By means of fermentation, gastrointestinal microbes break down nutrients that cannot be…

  17. Si Shen Wan Regulates Phospholipase Cγ-1 and PI3K/Akt Signal in Colonic Mucosa from Rats with Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan-yong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored the feasible pathway of Si Shen Wan (SSW in inhibiting apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs by observing activation of phospholipase Cγ-1 (PLC-γ1 and PI3K/Akt signal in colonic mucosa from rats with colitis. Experimental colitis was induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS in the Sprague-Dawley rats. After SSW was administrated for 7 days after TNBS infusion, western blot showed an increment in levels of PI3K, p-Akt, and IL-23 and a decrement in levels of PLC-γ1 and HSP70 in colonic mucosal injury induced by TNBS. Meanwhile, assessments by ELISA revealed an increment in concentrations of IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17 and a reduction in level of TGF-β after TNBS challenge. Impressively, treatment with SSW for 7 days significantly attenuated the expressions of PI3K and p-Akt and the secretion of IL-2, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-23 and promoted the activation of PLC-γ1, HSP70, and TGF-β. Our previous studies had demonstrated that SSW restored colonic mucosal ulcers by inhibiting apoptosis of IECs. The present study demonstrated that the effect of SSW on inhibiting apoptosis of IECs was realized probably by activation of PLC-γ1 and suppression of PI3K/Akt signal pathway.

  18. Computer-aided detection of colonic polyps with level set-based adaptive convolution in volumetric mucosa to advance CT colonography toward a screening modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongbin; Duan, Chaijie; Pickhardt, Perry; Wang, Su; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-01-01

    As a promising second reader of computed tomographic colonography (CTC) screening, the computer-aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyps has earned fast growing research interest. In this paper, we present a CAD scheme to automatically detect colonic polyps in CTC images. First, a thick colon wall representation, ie, a volumetric mucosa (VM) with several voxels wide in general, was segmented from CTC images by a partial-volume image segmentation algorithm. Based on the VM, we employed a level set-based adaptive convolution method for calculating the first- and second-order spatial derivatives more accurately to start the geometric analysis. Furthermore, to emphasize the correspondence among different layers in the VM, we introduced a middle-layer enhanced integration along the image gradient direction inside the VM to improve the operation of extracting the geometric information, like the principal curvatures. Initial polyp candidates (IPCs) were then determined by thresholding the geometric measurements. Based on IPCs, several features were extracted for each IPC, and fed into a support vector machine to reduce false positives (FPs). The final detections were displayed in a commercial system to provide second opinions for radiologists. The CAD scheme was applied to 26 patient CTC studies with 32 confirmed polyps by both optical and virtual colonoscopies. Compared to our previous work, all the polyps can be detected successfully with less FPs. At the 100% by polyp sensitivity, the new method yielded 3.5 FPs/dataset. PMID:20428331

  19. EXPRESSION OF Fas LIGAND IN HUMAN COLON CANCER CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建军; 丁尔迅; 王强; 陈学云; 付志仁

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the expression of Fas ligand in human colon carcinoma cell lines. Methods: A total of six human colon cancer cell lines were examined for the expression of Fas ligand mRNA and cell surface protein by using RT-PCR and flow cytometry respectively. Results: The results showed that Fas ligand mRNA was expressed in all of the six cancer cell lines and Fas ligand cell surface protein was expressed in part of them. Conclusion: These data suggest that Fas ligand was expressed, at least in part, in human colon cancer cell lines and might facilitate to escape from immune surveillance of the host.

  20. Crohn's disease adherent-invasive Escherichia coli colonize and induce strong gut inflammation in transgenic mice expressing human CEACAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Frédéric A; Barnich, Nicolas; Sivignon, Adeline; Darcha, Claude; Chan, Carlos H F; Stanners, Clifford P; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2009-09-28

    Abnormal expression of CEACAM6 is observed at the apical surface of the ileal epithelium in Crohn's disease (CD) patients, and CD ileal lesions are colonized by pathogenic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC). We investigated the ability of AIEC reference strain LF82 to colonize the intestinal mucosa and to induce inflammation in CEABAC10 transgenic mice expressing human CEACAMs. AIEC LF82 virulent bacteria, but not nonpathogenic E. coli K-12, were able to persist in the gut of CEABAC10 transgenic mice and to induce severe colitis with reduced survival rate, marked weight loss, increased rectal bleeding, presence of erosive lesions, mucosal inflammation, and increased proinflammatory cytokine expression. The colitis depended on type 1 pili expression by AIEC bacteria and on intestinal CEACAM expression because no sign of colitis was observed in transgenic mice infected with type 1 pili-negative LF82-Delta fimH isogenic mutant or in wild-type mice infected with AIEC LF82 bacteria. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that in CD patients having an abnormal intestinal expression of CEACAM6, AIEC bacteria via type 1 pili expression can colonize the intestinal mucosa and induce gut inflammation. Thus, targeting AIEC adhesion to gut mucosa represents a new strategy for clinicians to prevent and/or to treat ileal CD.

  1. The Helicobacter heilmannii hofE and hofF Genes are Essential for Colonization of the Gastric Mucosa and Play a Role in IL-1β-Induced Gastric MUC13 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liu; Mirko, Rossi; Sara, Lindén; Medea, Padra; Caroline, Blaecher; Eva, Bauwens; Myrthe, Joosten; Bram, Flahou; Wim, Van den Broeck; Richard, Ducatelle; Freddy, Haesebrouck; Annemieke, Smet

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter heilmannii is a zoonotic bacterium associated with gastric disease in humans. We recently showed that H. heilmannii binds to human gastric mucins and epithelial cells and highlighted a potential role for the murine Muc13 mucin in gastric Helicobacter colonization. The aims of this study were to investigate the role of the H. heilmannii hof gene locus encoding HofH/F/E/G/C/D in adhesion to the gastric mucosa and induction of increased gastric Muc13 expression. Bacterial hof gene and host gene expression experiments, Helicobacter binding assays and experimental infection studies in mice were performed. H. pylori and its ΔhofF mutant were included for comparison. Helicobacter heilmannii strains lacking HofE or HofF showed a clear decrease in binding to gastric mucins and epithelial cells as well as a lower gastric colonization level in the stomach of Balb/c mice at 4 and 9 weeks post-infection compared to the H. heilmannii wildtype strain. Interestingly, H. heilmannii ΔhofE and ΔhofF and H. pylori ΔhofF did not induce an increased expression of MUC13 in human gastric epithelial cells and of Muc13 in the stomach of mice. Finally, we demonstrated that IL-1β is induced in the stomach as a response to Helicobacter colonization which on its turn is involved in the expression of MUC13/Muc13 in the gastric epithelium. These novel results in Helicobacter research identified H. heilmannii HofE and HofF as adhesins and suggest an important role of H. heilmannii HofE and HofF and H. pylori HofF in IL-1β-induced gastric MUC13/Muc13 expression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Strategies For Human Exploration Leading To Human Colonization of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitherman, David; Everett, Harmon

    2009-01-01

    Enabling the commercial development of space is key to the future colonization of space and key to a viable space exploration program. Without commercial development following in the footsteps of exploration it is difficult to justify and maintain public interest in the efforts. NASA's exploration program has suffered from the lack of a good commercial economic strategy for decades. Only small advances in commercial space have moved forward, and only up to Earth orbit with the commercial satellite industry. A way to move beyond this phase is to begin the establishment of human commercial activities in space in partnership with the human exploration program. In 2007 and 2008, the authors researched scenarios to make space exploration and commercial space development more feasible as part of their graduate work in the Space Architecture Program at the Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture at the University of Houston, Houston, Texas. Through this research it became apparent that the problems facing future colonization are much larger than the technology being developed or the international missions that our space agencies are pursuing. These issues are addressed in this paper with recommendations for space exploration, commercial development, and space policy that are needed to form a strategic plan for human expansion into space. In conclusion, the authors found that the current direction in space as carried out by our space agencies around the world is definitely needed, but is inadequate and incapable of resolving all of the issues that inhibit commercial space development. A bolder vision with strategic planning designed to grow infrastructures and set up a legal framework for commercial markets will go a long way toward enabling the future colonization of space.

  3. Geno- and cytotoxicity of salinomycin in human nasal mucosa and peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzad, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Schramm, Carolin; Froelich, Katrin; Ginzkey, Christian; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2015-06-01

    Salinomycin is usually applied in stock breading but has also been described as a promising agent against cancer stem cells (CSC). However, knowledge about the toxicity of this ionophor substance is incomplete. The aim of this study was to investigate cyto- and genotoxic effects of salinomycin in human non-malignant cells. Primary human nasal mucosa cells (monolayer and mini organ cultures) and peripheral blood lymphocytes from 10 individuals were used to study the cytotoxic effects of salinomycin (0.1-175 μM) by annexin-propidiumiodide- and MTT-test. The comet assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Additionally, the secretion of interleukin-8 was analyzed by ELISA. Flow cytometry and MTT assay revealed significant cytotoxic effects in nasal mucosa cells and lymphocytes at low salinomycin concentrations of 10-20 μM. No genotoxic effects could be observed. IL-8 secretion was elevated at 5 μM. Salinomycin-induced cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory effects were seen at concentrations relevant for anti-cancer treatment. Concurrent to the evaluation of salinomycin application in experimental oncology, adverse effects in non-malignant cells need to be monitored and reduced as much as possible. Further studies are also warranted to evaluate the toxic effects in a variety of human cell systems, e.g., liver, kidney and muscle cells.

  4. Dietary heme alters microbiota and mucosa of mouse colon without functional changes in host-microbe cross-talk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssenagger, N.; Derrien, M.; Doorn, van G.M.; Rijnierse, A.; Bogert, van den B.; Muller, M.R.; Dekker, J.; Kleerebezem, M.; Meer, van der R.

    2012-01-01

    Colon cancer is a major cause of cancer deaths in Western countries and is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the iron-porphyrin pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of gut contents which injures surface cells leading to compensatory hyperproliferation of crypt cells. This hyperproli

  5. Dietary heme alters microbiota and mucosa of mouse colon without functional changes in host-microbe cross-talk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssenagger, N.; Derrien, M.; Doorn, van G.M.; Rijnierse, A.; Bogert, van den B.; Muller, M.R.; Dekker, J.; Kleerebezem, M.; Meer, van der R.

    2012-01-01

    Colon cancer is a major cause of cancer deaths in Western countries and is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the iron-porphyrin pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of gut contents which injures surface cells leading to compensatory hyperproliferation of crypt cells. This hyperproli

  6. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleberg, Karen; Jensen, Gerda Majgaard; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients w...

  7. Decreased Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Content Contributes to Increased Survival in Human Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Oraldi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Among diet components, some fatty acids are known to affect several stages of colon carcinogenesis, whereas others are probably helpful in preventing tumors. In light of this, our aim was to determine the composition of fatty acids and the possible correlation with apoptosis in human colon carcinoma specimens at different Duke's stages and to evaluate the effect of enriching human colon cancer cell line with the possible reduced fatty acid(s. Specimens of carcinoma were compared with the corresponding non-neoplastic mucosa: a significant decrease of arachidonic acid, PPARα, Bad, and Bax and a significant increase of COX-2, Bcl-2, and pBad were found. The importance of arachidonic acid in apoptosis was demonstrated by enriching a Caco-2 cell line with this fatty acid. It induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner via induction of PPARα that, in turn, decreased COX-2. In conclusion, the reduced content of arachidonic acid is likely related to carcinogenic process decreasing the susceptibility of cancer cells to apoptosis.

  8. Two-photon imaging and spectroscopy of fresh human colon biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchi, R.; Sturiale, A.; Nesi, G.; Tonelli, F.; Pavone, F. S.

    2012-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy is a powerful tool to image human tissues up to 200 microns depth without any exogenously added probe. TPEF can take advantage of the autofluorescence of molecules intrinsically contained in a biological tissue, as such NADH, elastin, collagen, and flavins. Two-photon microscopy has been already successfully used to image several types of tissues, including skin, muscles, tendons, bladder. Nevertheless, its usefulness in imaging colon tissue has not been deeply investigated yet. In this work we have used combined two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), second harmonic generation microscopy (SHG), fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), and multispectral two-photon emission detection (MTPE) to investigate different kinds of human ex-vivo fresh biopsies of colon. Morphological and spectroscopic analyses allowed to characterize both healthy mucosa, polyp, and colon samples in a good agreement with common routine histology. Even if further analysis, as well as a more significant statistics on a large number of samples would be helpful to discriminate between low, mild, and high grade cancer, our method is a promising tool to be used as diagnostic confirmation of histological results, as well as a diagnostic tool in a multiphoton endoscope or colonoscope to be used in in-vivo imaging applications.

  9. Communication—Microelectrode Detection of Cholesterol Efflux from the Human Buccel Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaochun; Kelley, Thomas J.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Burgess, James D.

    2016-01-01

    It has previously demonstrated that cholesterol efflux from the cell plasma membrane is increased in a mouse model of cystic fibrosis (CF) compared to a wild-type control. A noninvasive means of characterizing plasma membrane cholesterol efflux at the surface of airway tissue of CF patients is needed to extend the trends found in animal models of CF to the human disease state. Microelectrode-induced cholesterol efflux from the plasma membrane of cells at the surface of tissue is proposed as a strategy to demonstrate increased cholesterol efflux for CF in human subjects. Data demonstrating detection of cholesterol efflux from the human buccal mucosa is reported as proof-of-concept for an in vivo diagnostic assay. PMID:27546897

  10. Fibronectin-related substance located in the chief cells of human and rat gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, S; Yabana, T; Ichiyanagi, S; Chen, J; Yachi, A

    1990-01-01

    A novel substance located in the chief cells of human and rat gastric mucosa, which was detected immunologically by either polyclonal or monoclonal antihuman fibronectin (FN) antibodies, is reported. All three polyclonal antihuman FN antibodies used in this study reacted immunohistologically exclusively with the chief cells. Monoclonal antibody against C-terminal peptide or cell binding peptide reacted clearly with the human chief cells, but monoclonal antibodies against FN N-terminal and midmolecule failed to react with the cells. Western blot analysis of the rat gastric mucosal extract with polyclonal antihuman FN antibody showed that this substance has a molecular weight of about 70,000 Da. Therefore, this substance appears to be a fragment containing the C-terminal peptide of whole molecule FN and thus in the present study is named FN-related substance (FNRS). In a further study with ethanol-induced ulcer model of the rat, the physiological significance of FNRS was examined. The FNRS decreased remarkably, in a dose-dependent manner, in the fundic mucosa of the rats that ingested ethanol. The FNRS appeared to be associated with development of mucosal damage and repair, subsequently playing, in part, an important role in the gastric mucosal protection mechanism.

  11. Investigation of 5-HT3 receptor-triggered serotonin release from guinea-pig isolated colonic mucosa: a role of PYY-containing endocrine cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Shu-Ichi; Kojima, Ken; Fujita, Tomoe

    2017-03-15

    The effect of a 5-HT3 receptor-selective agonist SR57227A was investigated on the outflow of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from isolated muscle layer-free mucosal preparations of guinea-pig colon. The mucosal preparations were incubated in vitro and the outflow of 5-HT from these preparations was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. SR57227A (100μM) produced a tetrodotoxin-resistant and sustained increase in the outflow of 5-HT from the mucosal preparations. The SR57227A-evoked sustained 5-HT outflow was completely inhibited by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ramosetron (1μM). The neuropeptide Y1 receptor antagonist BIBO3304 (100nM) partially inhibited the SR57227A-evoked sustained 5-HT outflow, but the Y2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246 (1μM) or the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (1μM), showed a minimal effect on the SR57227A-evoked sustained 5-HT outflow. In the presence of BIBO3304 (100nM) and exendin-(9-39) (1μM), SR57227A (100μM) failed to produce a sustained increase in the outflow of 5-HT. The Y1 receptor agonist [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-neuropeptide Y (10nM), but not GLP-1-(7-36) amide (100nM), produced a sustained increase in the outflow of 5-HT. We found that 5-HT3 receptor-triggered 5-HT release from guinea-pig colonic mucosa is mediated by the activation of 5-HT3 receptors located at endocrine cells (enterochromaffin cells and peptide YY (PYY)-containing endocrine cells). The activation of both Y1 and GLP-1 receptors appears to be required for the maintenance of 5-HT3 receptor-triggered 5-HT release. It is therefore considered that 5-HT3 receptors located at colonic mucosa play a crucial role in paracrine signaling between enterochromaffin cells and PYY-containing endocrine cells.

  12. Phase II Clinical Trial of Intraoral Grafting of Human Tissue-Engineered Oral Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    in need of additional keratinized oral mucosa for dental rehabilitation with dental implants. This trial has started recruitment. 15. SUBJECT TERMS... surgeons is to regenerate oral mucosa. The free mucosal graft neither reliably restores aesthetic and functional competence, nor prevents microbial...high velocity battlefield injuries (BI). The development of an oral mucosa equivalent is necessary to fulfill this clinical need . The environment of

  13. Dispersal time for ancient human migrations: Americas and Europe colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. C.

    2007-07-01

    I apply the recently proposed intermittence strategy to investigate the ancient human migrations in the world. That is, the Americas colonization (Bering-bridge and Pacific-coast theories) and Neanderthal replacement in Europe around 45000 years before the present. Using a mathematical equation related to diffusion and ballistic motion, I calculate the colonization time in all these cases in good agreement with archeological data (including Neolithic transition in Europe). Moreover, to support these calculations, I obtain analytically the effective speed of colonization in Europe veff=0.62 [km/yr] and related to the Aurignacian culture propagation.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus in oral mucosa from human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the detection rate of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is higher in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. In an attempt to contribute to our epidemiological understanding of this coinfection and to investigate the activity of EBV in normal oral mucosa, we performed a cross-sectional study with HIV-positive patients. Methods: oral smears from 145 HIV-positive patients were collected between March 2010 and March 2011. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR and reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR were used to genotype EBV and to detect EBNA-2 expression, respectively. Results: EBV DNA was detected in 48.3% of the study participants, of whom 32.85% were EBV-1 and 45.71% were EBV-2 carriers. Additionally, 14.28% were coinfected with both types. EBNA-2 mRNA was expressed in 45.7% of the EBV -positive samples, including 20.0% with EBV-1 only, 20.0% with EBV-2 only and 1.4% with both genotypes. Immune status affected the overall EBV infection, and EBV-2 positivity was significantly correlated with sexual lifestyle of the participants. EBV co-infection with both viral types was dependent upon HIV viral load and the activity of the EBNA-2 gene. Conclusion: we report a high prevalence of active EBV in the oral mucosa of asymptomatic HIV-seropositive individuals. This study addresses the need for monitoring and treatment of HIV-infected patients with EBV reactivation.

  15. Theoretical Considerations and a Mathematical Model for the Analysis of the Biomechanical Response of Human Keratinized Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Tsaira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Removable complete and partial dentures are supported by the residual alveolar ridges consisting of mucosa, submucosa, periosteum and bone. An understanding of the biomechanical behavior of the oral mucosa is essential in order to improve the denture-bearing foundations for complete and partially edentulous patients. The purpose of this paper was to examine the biomechanical behavior of the soft tissues supporting a removable denture and develop a model for that reason. Keratinized oral mucosa blocks with their underlying bone were harvested from the maxillary palatal area adjacent to the edentulous ridges of a cadaver. The compressive response of the oral mucosa was tested by using atomic force microscopy. The specimens were first scanned in order their topography to be obtained. The mechanical properties of the specimens were tested using a single crystal silicon pyramidal tip, which traversed towards the keratinized oral mucosa specimens. Loading-unloading cycles were registered and four mathematical models were tested using MATLAB to note which one approximates the force-displacement curve as close as possible: a. spherical, b. conical, c. third order polynomial, d. Murphy (fourth order polynomial, non-linear Hertzian based. The third order polynomial model showed the best accuracy in representing the force-displacement data of the tested specimens. A model was developed in order to analyze the biomechanical behavior of the human oral keratinized mucosa and obtain information about its mechanical properties.

  16. Effect of human isolated probiotic bacteria on preventing Campylobacter jejuni colonization of poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cean, Ada; Stef, Lavinia; Simiz, Eliza; Julean, Calin; Dumitrescu, Gabi; Vasile, Aida; Pet, Elena; Drinceanu, Dan; Corcionivoschi, Nicolae

    2015-02-01

    This study was performed in order to determine whether human isolated probiotic bacteria can be effective in reducing Campylobacter jejuni infection of chicken intestinal cells, in vitro, and in decreasing its colonization abilities within the chicken gut. Our results show that the probiotic strains Lactobacillus paracasei J. R, L. rhamnosus 15b, L. lactis Y, and L. lactis FOa had a significant effect on C. jejuni invasion of chicken primary cells, with the strongest inhibitory effect detected when a combination of four was administered. In regard to the in vivo effect, using all four strains in one combination prevented mucus colonization in the duodenum and cecum. Moreover, the pathogen load in the lumen of these two compartments was significantly reduced. When probiotics were introduced during the early growth period, the presence of the pathogen in feces was increased (p>0.05), but when they were given during the last week of growth, there was no significant effect. In conclusion, our data indicate that these four new probiotic strains are able to cause modifications in the chicken intestinal mucosa and can reduce the ability of C. jejuni to invade, in vitro, and to colonize, in vivo. These probiotics are now proven to be effective even when introduced in broiler's feed 7 days before slaughter, which makes them cost-effective for the producers.

  17. Ex vivo and in vivo modulatory effects of umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells on human oral mucosa stroma substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Rodríguez, C A; González-Andrades, E; Jaimes-Parra, B D; Fernández-Valadés, R; Campos, A; Sánchez-Quevedo, M C; Alaminos, M; Garzón, I

    2015-11-01

    Novel oral mucosa substitutes have been developed in the laboratory using human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells -HWJSC- as an alternative cell source. In the present work, we have generated human oral mucosa substitutes with oral mucosa keratinocytes and HWJSC to determine the influence of these cell sources on stromal differentiation. First, acellular and cellular stroma substitutes and bilayered oral mucosa substitutes with an epithelial layer consisting of oral mucosa keratinocytes -OM samples- or HWJSC -hOM- were generated. Then, tissues were analyzed by light and electron microscopy, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry to quantify all major extracellular matrix components after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of ex vivo development, and OM and hOM were also analyzed after in vivo grafting. The results showed that bioengineered oral mucosa stromas displayed an adequate fibrillar mesh. Synthesis of abundant collagen fibers was detected in OM and hOM after 3 weeks, and in vivo grafting resulted in an increased collagen synthesis. No elastic or reticular fibers were found. Glycoprotein synthesis was found at the epithelial-stromal layer when samples were grafted in vivo. Finally, proteoglycans, decorin, versican and aggrecan were strongly dependent on the in vivo environment and the presence of a well-structured epithelium on top. The use of HWJSC was associated to an increased synthesis of versican. These results confirm the usefulness of fibrin-agarose biomaterials for the generation of an efficient human oral mucosa stroma substitute and the importance of the in vivo environment and the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction for the adequate differentiation of the bioengineered stroma.

  18. A novel method for the culture and polarized stimulation of human intestinal mucosa explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilingiri, Katerina; Sonzogni, Angelica; Caprioli, Flavio; Rescigno, Maria

    2013-05-01

    Few models currently exist to realistically simulate the complex human intestine's micro-environment, where a variety of interactions take place. Proper homeostasis directly depends on these interactions, as they shape an entire immunological response inducing tolerance against food antigens while at the same time mounting effective immune responses against pathogenic microbes accidentally ingested with food. Intestinal homeostasis is preserved also through various complex interactions between the microbiota (including food-associated beneficial bacterial strains) and the host, that regulate the attachment/degradation of mucus, the production of antimicrobial peptides by the epithelial barrier, and the "education" of epithelial cells' that controls the tolerogenic or immunogenic phenotype of unique, gut-resident lymphoid cells' populations. These interactions have been so far very difficult to reproduce with in vitro assays using either cultured cell lines or peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, mouse models differ substantially in components of the intestinal mucosa (mucus layer organization, commensal bacteria community) with respect to the human gut. Thus, studies of a variety of treatments to be brought in the clinics for important stress-related or pathological conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease or colorectal cancer have been difficult to carry out. To address these issues, we developed a novel system that enables us to stimulate explants of human intestinal mucosa that retain their in situ conditioning by the host microbiota and immune response, in a polarized fashion. Polarized apical stimulation is of great importance for the outcome of the elicited immune response. It has been repeatedly shown that the same stimuli can produce completely different responses when they bypass the apical face of the intestinal epithelium, stimulating epithelial cells basolaterally or coming into direct contact with lamina

  19. Dietary Protein and Amino Acid Supplementation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Course: What Impact on the Colonic Mucosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Lletjós, Sandra; Beaumont, Martin; Tomé, Daniel; Benamouzig, Robert; Blachier, François; Lan, Annaïg

    2017-03-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), after disease onset, typically progress in two cyclically repeated phases, namely inflammatory flare and remission, with possible nutritional status impairment. Some evidence, either from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies indicate that the quantity and the quality of dietary protein consumption and amino acid supplementation may differently influence the IBD course according to the disease phases. For instance, although the dietary protein needs for mucosal healing after an inflammatory episode remain undetermined, there is evidence that amino acids derived from dietary proteins display beneficial effects on this process, serving as building blocks for macromolecule synthesis in the wounded mucosal area, energy substrates, and/or precursors of bioactive metabolites. However, an excessive amount of dietary proteins may result in an increased intestinal production of potentially deleterious bacterial metabolites. This could possibly affect epithelial repair as several of these bacterial metabolites are known to inhibit colonic epithelial cell respiration, cell proliferation, and/or to affect barrier function. In this review, we present the available evidence about the impact of the amount of dietary proteins and supplementary amino acids on IBD onset and progression, with a focus on the effects reported in the colon.

  20. Dietary Protein and Amino Acid Supplementation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Course: What Impact on the Colonic Mucosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Lletjós, Sandra; Beaumont, Martin; Tomé, Daniel; Benamouzig, Robert; Blachier, François; Lan, Annaïg

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), after disease onset, typically progress in two cyclically repeated phases, namely inflammatory flare and remission, with possible nutritional status impairment. Some evidence, either from epidemiological, clinical, and experimental studies indicate that the quantity and the quality of dietary protein consumption and amino acid supplementation may differently influence the IBD course according to the disease phases. For instance, although the dietary protein needs for mucosal healing after an inflammatory episode remain undetermined, there is evidence that amino acids derived from dietary proteins display beneficial effects on this process, serving as building blocks for macromolecule synthesis in the wounded mucosal area, energy substrates, and/or precursors of bioactive metabolites. However, an excessive amount of dietary proteins may result in an increased intestinal production of potentially deleterious bacterial metabolites. This could possibly affect epithelial repair as several of these bacterial metabolites are known to inhibit colonic epithelial cell respiration, cell proliferation, and/or to affect barrier function. In this review, we present the available evidence about the impact of the amount of dietary proteins and supplementary amino acids on IBD onset and progression, with a focus on the effects reported in the colon. PMID:28335546

  1. Actions of Angeli's salt, a nitroxyl (HNO) donor, on ion transport across mucosa-submucosa preparations from rat distal colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouokam, Ervice; Bell, Anna; Diener, Martin

    2013-09-05

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether nitroxyl (HNO), a redox variant of the radical gasotransmitter nitric oxide (NO) with therapeutically promising properties, affects colonic ion transport. Changes in short-circuit current (Isc) induced by the HNO donor Angeli's salt were recorded in Ussing chambers. Cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was measured with fura-2. The nitroxyl donor induced a concentration-dependent increase in Isc across rat distal colon which was due to a stimulation of chloride secretion. The secretion induced by Angeli's salt (5×10(-4)mol/l) was not altered by the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1H-imidazolyl-1-oxy-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO), but was abolished by the HNO scavenger l-cysteine. The response was not dependent on the activity of soluble guanylate cyclase or enteric neurons, but was inhibited by indomethacin. Experiments with apically permeabilized epithelia revealed the activation of basolateral K(+) channels and a stimulation of the current carried by the basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-pump by Angeli's salt. The secretion induced by Angeli's salt was reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). A prominent increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration was evoked by Angeli's salt predominantly in subepithelial cells within the submucosa, which had the same dependence on extracellular Ca(2+) as the Angeli's salt-induced Cl(-) secretion. Consequently, Angeli's salt induces a soluble guanylate cyclase-independent, Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion via activation of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and of basolateral K(+) channels. Cyclooxygenase metabolites produced within the submucosa seem to be involved in this response.

  2. Cytokine changes in colonic mucosa associated with Blastocystis spp. subtypes 1 and 3 in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoob, Javed; Abbas, Zaigham; Usman, Muhammad Waqas; Sultana, Aisha; Islam, Muhammad; Awan, Safia; Ahmad, Zubair; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2014-06-01

    We determined cytokines (e.g. interleukin-8, 10, 12 and TNF-α) expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in rectal mucosa in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (D-IBS) with Blastocystis spp. Eighty patients with D-IBS and Blastocystis spp. infection were classified as 'cases' and 80 with D-IBS without Blastocystis spp. infection were classified as 'control'. Cases were subdivided into D-IBS and Blastocystis sp. defined type 1 (subtype-specific primer SB83) and type 3 (SB227). Stool microscopy and culture were performed. Rectal biopsies were obtained for histology and cytokines by real-time PCR for mRNA expression of cytokines. PBMCs IL-8 was similar in different groups but in type 1, IL-8mRNA was increased compared with type 3 (P = 0·001) and control (P = 0·001). In type 1, IL-10 by PBMCs had a low mean value (14·5±1·6) compared with (16·7±1·5) type 3 and (16±2·3) in controls (P<0·001 and P<0·001, respectively). In Blastocystis sp. type 1, low IL-10 was associated with lymphocyte and plasma cell infiltration (P = 0·015 and P = 0·002, respectively). In Blastocystis sp. type 1 and type 3, IL-12 was associated with goblet cell depletion 23 (85%) (P<0·001) and 8 (29%) (P = 0·037), respectively. In Blastocystis sp. type 1, low IL-10 was associated with a proinflammatory response characterized by IL-8.

  3. Phase II study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colon mucosa in people at normal risk for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Suzanna M; Turgeon, D Kim; Vareed, Shaiju K; Ruffin, Mack T; Litzinger, Amie J; Wright, Benjamin D; Alrawi, Sara; Normolle, Daniel P; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E

    2011-11-01

    Inhibitors of COX indicate that upregulation of inflammatory eicosanoids produced by COX, and in particular prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), are early events in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Ginger has shown downregulation of COX in vitro and decreased incidence/multiplicity of adenomas in rats. This study was conducted to determine if 2.0 g/d of ginger could decrease the levels of PGE(2), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-, 12-, and 15-HETE), in the colon mucosa of healthy volunteers. To investigate this aim, we randomized 30 subjects to 2.0 g/d ginger or placebo for 28 days. Flexible sigmoidoscopy at baseline and day 28 was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per protein or per free arachidonic acid. There were no significant differences in mean percent change between baseline and day 28 for any of the eicosanoids, when normalized to protein. There was a significant decrease in mean percent change in PGE(2) (P = 0.05) and 5-HETE (P = 0.04), and a trend toward significant decreases in 12-HETE (P = 0.09) and 15-HETE (P = 0.06) normalized to free arachidonic acid. There was no difference between the groups in terms of total adverse events P = 0.55). On the basis of these results, it seems that ginger has the potential to decrease eicosanoid levels, perhaps by inhibiting their synthesis from arachidonic acid. Ginger also seemed to be tolerable and safe. Further investigation in people at high risk for CRC seems warranted.

  4. Pilot clinical study of the effects of ginger root extract on eicosanoids in colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Suzanna M; Turgeon, D Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Ruffin, Mack T; Wright, Benjamin D; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a significant cause of mortality. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) and thus prostaglandin E2, are promising CRC preventives, but have significant toxicities. Ginger has been shown to inhibit COX, to decrease the incidence and multiplicity of adenomas, and decrease PGE2 concentrations in subjects at normal risk for CRC. This study was conducted to determine the effects of 2.0 g/d of ginger given orally on the levels of PGE2, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids, and 5-, 12-, & 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, in the colonic mucosa of subjects at increased risk for CRC. We randomized 20 subjects to 2.0 g/d ginger or placebo for 28 d. At baseline and Day 28, a flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies. A liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method was used to determine eicosanoid levels in the biopsies, and levels were expressed per amount of protein or free arachidonic acid (AA). There was a significant decrease in AA between baseline and Day 28 (P = 0.05) and significant increase in LTB4 (P = 0.04) when normalized to protein, in subjects treated with ginger versus placebo. No other changes in eicosanoids were observed. There was no difference between the groups in total adverse events (AE; P = 0.06). Ginger lacks the ability to decrease eicosanoid levels in people at increased risk for CRC. Ginger did appear to be both tolerable and safe; and could have chemopreventive effects through other mechanisms. Further investigation should focus on other markers of CRC risk in those at increased CRC risk.

  5. Relationships between body mass index and short-circuit current in human duodenal and colonic mucosal biopsies. Osbak PS, Bindslev N, Hansen MB. Acta Physiol (Oxf). 2011 Jan;201(1):47-53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip Samuel; Bindslev, Niels; Berner-Hansen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Retrospectively, to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and basal electrogenic transport as measured by short-circuit current (SCC) in human duodenal and colonic mucosal biopsies. Methods: The study included biopsies from mucosa of normal appearance in the sigmoid colo...

  6. Diagnose human colonic tissues by terahertz near-field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Ma, Shihua; Wu, Xiumei; Yang, Wenxing; Zhao, Tian

    2015-03-01

    Based on a terahertz (THz) pipe-based near-field imaging system, we demonstrate the capability of THz imaging to diagnose freshly surgically excised human colonic tissues. Through THz near-field scanning the absorbance of the colonic tissues, the acquired images can clearly distinguish cancerous tissues from healthy tissues fast and automatically without pathological hematoxylin and eosin stain diagnosis. A statistical study on 58 specimens (20 healthy tissues and 38 tissues with tumor) from 31 patients (mean age: 59 years; range: 46 to 79 years) shows that the corresponding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity on colonic tissues are both 100%. Due to its capability to perform quantitative analysis, our study indicates the potential of the THz pipe-based near-field imaging for future automation on human tumor pathological examinations.

  7. Human commensals producing a novel antibiotic impair pathogen colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipperer, Alexander; Konnerth, Martin C; Laux, Claudia; Berscheid, Anne; Janek, Daniela; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Burian, Marc; Schilling, Nadine A; Slavetinsky, Christoph; Marschal, Matthias; Willmann, Matthias; Kalbacher, Hubert; Schittek, Birgit; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Grond, Stephanie; Peschel, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard

    2016-07-28

    The vast majority of systemic bacterial infections are caused by facultative, often antibiotic-resistant, pathogens colonizing human body surfaces. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus predisposes to invasive infection, but the mechanisms that permit or interfere with pathogen colonization are largely unknown. Whereas soil microbes are known to compete by production of antibiotics, such processes have rarely been reported for human microbiota. We show that nasal Staphylococcus lugdunensis strains produce lugdunin, a novel thiazolidine-containing cyclic peptide antibiotic that prohibits colonization by S. aureus, and a rare example of a non-ribosomally synthesized bioactive compound from human-associated bacteria. Lugdunin is bactericidal against major pathogens, effective in animal models, and not prone to causing development of resistance in S. aureus. Notably, human nasal colonization by S. lugdunensis was associated with a significantly reduced S. aureus carriage rate, suggesting that lugdunin or lugdunin-producing commensal bacteria could be valuable for preventing staphylococcal infections. Moreover, human microbiota should be considered as a source for new antibiotics.

  8. Fesoterodine, its active metabolite, and tolterodine bind selectively to muscarinic receptors in human bladder mucosa and detrusor muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akira; Fuchihata, Yusuke; Kuraoka, Shiori; Osano, Ayaka; Otsuka, Atsushi; Ozono, Seiichiro; Takeda, Masayuki; Masuyama, Keisuke; Araki, Isao; Yamada, Shizuo

    2013-04-01

    To comparatively characterize the binding activity of fesoterodine, its active metabolite (5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine [5-HMT]), and tolterodine in the human bladder mucosa, detrusor muscle, and parotid gland. Muscarinic receptors in the homogenates of human bladder mucosa, detrusor muscle, and parotid gland were measured by a radioligand binding assay using [N-methyl-(3)H] scopolamine methyl chloride. Fesoterodine, 5-HMT, and tolterodine competed with [N-methyl-(3)H] scopolamine methyl chloride for binding sites in the bladder mucosa, detrusor muscle, and parotid gland in a concentration-dependent manner. The affinity for muscarinic receptors of these agents was significantly greater in the bladder than in the parotid gland, suggesting pharmacologic selectivity for the bladder over the parotid gland. The bladder selectivity was larger for fesoterodine and 5-HMT than for tolterodine. Fesoterodine, 5-HMT, and tolterodine resulted in significantly increased (two- to five-fold) values of the apparent dissociation constant for specific [N-methyl-(3)H] scopolamine methyl chloride binding in the detrusor muscle and parotid gland, with little effect on the corresponding values of the maximal number of binding sites. This finding indicates that these agents bind to the human muscarinic receptors in a competitive and reversible manner. Fesoterodine and 5-HMT bind to the muscarinic receptors with greater affinity in the human bladder mucosa and detrusor muscle than in the parotid gland in a competitive and reversible manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hyperspectral hybrid method classification for detecting altered mucosa of the human larynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ron

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of earth observation, hyperspectral detector systems allow precise target detections of surface components from remote sensing platforms. This enables specific land covers to be identified without the need to physically travel to the areas examined. In the medical field, efforts are underway to develop optical technologies that detect altering tissue surfaces without the necessity to perform an excisional biopsy. With the establishment of expedient classification procedures, hyperspectral imaging may provide a non-invasive diagnostic method that allows determination of pathological tissue with high reliability. In this study, we examined the performance of a hyperspectral hybrid method classification for the automatic detection of altered mucosa of the human larynx. Materials and methods Hyperspectral Imaging was performed in vivo and 30 bands from 390 to 680 nm for 5 cases of laryngeal disorders (2x hemorrhagic polyp, 3x leukoplakia were obtained. Image stacks were processed with unsupervised clustering (linear spectral unmixing, spectral signatures were extracted from unlabeled cluster maps and subsequently applied as end-members for supervised classification (spectral angle mapper of further medical cases with identical diagnosis. Results Linear spectral unmixing clearly highlighted altered mucosa as single spectral clusters in all cases. Matching classes were identified, and extracted spectral signatures could readily be applied for supervised classifications. Automatic target detection performed well, as the considered classes showed notable correspondence with pathological tissue locations. Conclusions Using hyperspectral classification procedures derived from remote sensing applications for diagnostic purposes can create concrete benefits for the medical field. The approach shows that it would be rewarding to collect spectral signatures from histologically different lesions of laryngeal disorders in

  10. Trefoil factor-3 expression in human colon cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babyatsky, Mark; Lin, Jing; Yio, Xianyang; Chen, Anli; Zhang, Jie-yu; Zheng, Yan; Twyman, Christina; Bao, Xiuliang; Schwartz, Myron; Thung, Swan; Lawrence Werther, J; Itzkowitz, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Deaths from colorectal cancer are often due to liver metastasis. Trefoil factor-3 (TFF3) is expressed by normal intestinal epithelial cells and its expression is maintained throughout the colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Our previous work demonstrated a correlation between TFF3 expression and metastatic potential in an animal model of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether TFF3 is expressed in human colon cancer liver metastasis (CCLM) and whether inhibiting TFF3 expression in colon cancer cells would alter their invasive potential in vitro. Human CCLMs were analyzed at the mRNA and protein level for TFF3 expression. Two highly metastatic rat colon cancer cell lines that either natively express TFF3 (LN cells) or were transfected with TFF3 (LPCRI-2 cells), were treated with two rat TFF3 siRNA constructs (si78 and si365), and analyzed in an in vitro invasion assay. At the mRNA and protein level, TFF3 was expressed in 17/17 (100%) CCLMs and 10/11 (91%) primary colon cancers, but not in normal liver tissue. By real time PCR, TFF3 expression was markedly inhibited by both siRNA constructs in LN and LPCRI-2 cells. The si365 and si78 constructs inhibited invasion by 44% and 53%, respectively, in LN cells, and by 74% and 50%, respectively, in LPCRI-2 cells. These results provide further evidence that TFF3 contributes to the malignant behavior of colon cancer cells. These observations may have relevance for designing new diagnostic and treatment approaches to colorectal cancer.

  11. Dynamics of thymus organogenesis and colonization in early human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Alison M; Morris, Lucy X; Vroegindeweij, Eric; Depreter, Marianne L G; Vaidya, Harsh; Stenhouse, Frances H; Tomlinson, Simon R; Anderson, Richard A; Cupedo, Tom; Cornelissen, Jan J; Blackburn, C Clare

    2013-05-01

    The thymus is the central site of T-cell development and thus is of fundamental importance to the immune system, but little information exists regarding molecular regulation of thymus development in humans. Here we demonstrate, via spatial and temporal expression analyses, that the genetic mechanisms known to regulate mouse thymus organogenesis are conserved in humans. In addition, we provide molecular evidence that the human thymic epithelium derives solely from the third pharyngeal pouch, as in the mouse, in contrast to previous suggestions. Finally, we define the timing of onset of hematopoietic cell colonization and epithelial cell differentiation in the human thymic primordium, showing, unexpectedly, that the first colonizing hematopoietic cells are CD45(+)CD34(int/-). Collectively, our data provide essential information for translation of principles established in the mouse to the human, and are of particular relevance to development of improved strategies for enhancing immune reconstitution in patients.

  12. Cultivo in vitro con colágeno y fibroblastos humanos de un equivalente de mucosa oral de espesor total In vitro culture with collagen and human fibroblasts of a full-thickness oral mucosa equivalent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. González Mendez

    2009-04-01

    free skin grafts or autologous oral mucosa grafts by this technique in certain cases. Material and Method. Primary keratinocyte cultures were prepared from small biopsy samples of oral mucosa. Secondary cultures were prepared from these primary cultures on an artificial submucosa constituted by collagen and human fibroblasts. The cell cultures were analyzed histologically in vitro and then used for graft implants in athymic mice to study their behavior in vivo. Results. The primary cultures were confluent within a minimum period of 10 days and maximum of 12 days, which is similar to the period that the secondary cultures required to reach confluence. The time from sampling to achieving a complete artificial mucosa ranged from 20 to 22 days. The artificial mucosa showed histologic characteristics of a normal mucosa. After 17 days of graft implantation in immunoincompetent mice without any clinical contingency, histologic and immunohistochemical characterization (cytokeratins 19 and 13, collagen IV, and laminin confirmed the similarity of the mucosa in vitro to healthy oral mucosa. Conclusion. A complete oral mucosa equivalent can be prepared with collagen and fibroblasts using in vitro culture techniques. Although this mucosa shows considerable retraction, its clinical handling is very favorable.

  13. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells in subserosa of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johannes; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Hansen, Alastair;

    2013-01-01

    We studied the ultrastructure of interstitial cells in the subserosal/adventitial layer in human colon. An interstitial cell type with an ultrastructure intermediate between fibroblast-like cells (FLC) and interstitial cells of Cajal was identified (IC-SS). IC-SS had thin and flattened branching...

  14. TTYH2, a human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster gene tweety, is up-regulated in colon carcinoma and involved in cell proliferation and cell aggregation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuji Toiyama; Akira Mizoguchi; Kazushi Kimura; Junichirou Hiro; Yasuhiro Inoue; Tomonari Tutumi; Chikao Miki; Masato Kusunoki

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression patterns of TTYH2 in the human colon cancer and colon cancer cell lines and to evaluate the inhibitory effect of small interfering RNA (siRIMA) on the expression of TTYH2 in colon cancer cell lines.METHODS: We investigated the expression patterns of TTYH2 in colon cancer, adjacent non-tumorous colon mucosa, and cancer cell lines (DLD-1, caco-2, and Lovo) by RT-PCR. Furthermore, a siRNA plasmid expression vector against TTYH2 was constructed and transfected into DLD-1 and Caco-2 with LipofectamineTM 2000. The down regulation of TTYH2 expression was detected by RT-PCR and the role of siRNA in inducing cell proliferation and cell aggregation was evaluated by MTT and aggregation assay.RESULTS: TTYH2 gene expression in colon cancer tissue was significantly up-regulated compared with normal colonic mucosa (1.23 ± 0.404 vs 0.655 ± 0.373, P=0.0103). Colon cancer derived cell lines including DLD-1, Caco-2, and Lovo also expressed high levels of TTYH2. In contrast, transfection with siRNA-TTYH2 significantly inhibited both proliferation and scattering of these cancer cell lines.CONCLUSION: The present work demonstrates, for the first time, that the TTYH2 gene expression is significantly up-regulated in colon cancer. The TTYH2 gene may play an important role in regulating both proliferating and metastatic potentials of colorectal cancer.

  15. Quantitative electron microscopic analysis of the epithelium of normal human alveolar mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernimoulin, J P; Schroeder, H E

    1977-05-31

    The epithelium of normal human alveolar mucosa originating from the anterior vestibulum was subjected to stereologic analysis. Eight biopsies were collected half-way between the muco gingival junction and the vestibular fornix from 20 to 50 year-old females, and processed for light and electron microscopy. At two levels of magnification, electron micrographs were sampled from four artificially selected strata in regions of epithelial ridges. Stereologic point counting based on a computer-aided system for analyzing stratified epithelia served for examining a total of about 860 electron micrographs. The alveolar epithelium was 0.26 mm thick, occasionally interdigitated by short, slender connective tissue papillae, and consisted of (1) a narrow basal and suprabasal, and (2) a broad spinous and surface compartment. It displayed a differentiation pattern which, in most subjects studied, was similar to that of normal human buccal epithelium, however, on the average, produced less mature surface cells. This pattern was expressed mainly by a density increase of cytoplasmic filaments (98 A in diameter), a concomitant decrease of the cytoplasmic ground substance, the formation of dark-cored membrane coating granules, and invividually variable amounts of glycogen deposition. In some subjects, a mixed differentiation pattern was found. The structural organization of alveolar epithelium, in analogy to cheek epithelium, was compatible with the function of distensibility.

  16. EMT is the dominant program in human colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tollenaar Rob AEM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer has been classically described by clinicopathologic features that permit the prediction of outcome only after surgical resection and staging. Methods We performed an unsupervised analysis of microarray data from 326 colon cancers to identify the first principal component (PC1 of the most variable set of genes. PC1 deciphered two primary, intrinsic molecular subtypes of colon cancer that predicted disease progression and recurrence. Results Here we report that the most dominant pattern of intrinsic gene expression in colon cancer (PC1 was tightly correlated (Pearson R = 0.92, P -135 with the EMT signature-- both in gene identity and directionality. In a global micro-RNA screen, we further identified the most anti-correlated microRNA with PC1 as MiR200, known to regulate EMT. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the biology underpinning the native, molecular classification of human colon cancer--previously thought to be highly heterogeneous-- was clarified through the lens of comprehensive transcriptome analysis.

  17. Escherichia albertii, a novel human enteropathogen, colonizes rat enterocytes and translocates to extra-intestinal sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Denise; Hernandes, Rodrigo T.; Liberatore, Ana Maria A.; Abe, Cecilia M.; de Souza, Rodrigo B.; Romão, Fabiano T.; Sperandio, Vanessa; Koh, Ivan H.

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death of children up to five years old in the developing countries. Among the etiological diarrheal agents are atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC), one of the diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes that affects children and adults, even in developed countries. Currently, genotypic and biochemical approaches have helped to demonstrate that some strains classified as aEPEC are actually E. albertii, a recently recognized human enteropathogen. Studies on particular strains are necessary to explore their virulence potential in order to further understand the underlying mechanisms of E. albertii infections. Here we demonstrated for the first time that infection of fragments of rat intestinal mucosa is a useful tool to study the initial steps of E. albertii colonization. We also observed that an E. albertii strain can translocate from the intestinal lumen to Mesenteric Lymph Nodes and liver in a rat model. Based on our finding of bacterial translocation, we investigated how E. albertii might cross the intestinal epithelium by performing infections of M-like cells in vitro to identify the potential in vivo translocation route. Altogether, our approaches allowed us to draft a general E. albertii infection route from the colonization till the bacterial spreading in vivo. PMID:28178312

  18. Catabolism of coffee chlorogenic acids by human colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Iziar A; Paz de Peña, Maria; Concepción, Cid; Alan, Crozier

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have indicated potential health benefits associated with coffee consumption. These benefits might be ascribed in part to the chlorogenic acids (CGAs), the main (poly)phenols in coffee. The impact of these dietary (poly)phenols on health depends on their bioavailability. As they pass along the gastrointestinal tract, CGAs are metabolized extensively and it is their metabolites rather than the parent compounds that predominate in the circulatory system. This article reports on a study in which after incubation of espresso coffee with human fecal samples, high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to monitor CGA breakdown and identify and quantify the catabolites produced by the colonic microflora. The CGAs were rapidly degraded by the colonic microflora and over the 6-h incubation period, 11 catabolites were identified and quantified. The appearance of the initial degradation products, caffeic and ferulic acids, was transient, with maximum quantities at 1 h. Dihydrocaffeic acid, dihydroferulic acid, and 3-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid were the major end products, comprising 75-83% of the total catabolites, whereas the remaining 17-25% consisted of six minor catabolites. The rate and extent of the degradation showed a clear influence of the composition of the gut microbiota of individual volunteers. Pathways involved in colonic catabolism of CGAs are proposed and comparison with studies on the bioavailability of coffee CGAs ingested by humans helped distinguish between colonic catabolites and phase II metabolites of CGAs.

  19. Humans, water, and the colonization of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Michael I; O'Grady, Damien; Ulm, Sean

    2016-10-11

    The Pleistocene global dispersal of modern humans required the transit of arid and semiarid regions where the distribution of potable water provided a primary constraint on dispersal pathways. Here, we provide a spatially explicit continental-scale assessment of the opportunities for Pleistocene human occupation of Australia, the driest inhabited continent on Earth. We establish the location and connectedness of persistent water in the landscape using the Australian Water Observations from Space dataset combined with the distribution of small permanent water bodies (springs, gnammas, native wells, waterholes, and rockholes). Results demonstrate a high degree of directed landscape connectivity during wet periods and a high density of permanent water points widely but unevenly distributed across the continental interior. A connected network representing the least-cost distance between water bodies and graded according to terrain cost shows that 84% of archaeological sites >30,000 y old are within 20 km of modern permanent water. We further show that multiple, well-watered routes into the semiarid and arid continental interior were available throughout the period of early human occupation. Depletion of high-ranked resources over time in these paleohydrological corridors potentially drove a wave of dispersal farther along well-watered routes to patches with higher foraging returns.

  20. Viscoelastic shear properties of human vocal fold mucosa: theoretical characterization based on constitutive modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, R W; Titze, I R

    2000-01-01

    The viscoelastic shear properties of human vocal fold mucosa (cover) were previously measured as a function of frequency [Chan and Titze, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 106, 2008-2021 (1999)], but data were obtained only in a frequency range of 0.01-15 Hz, an order of magnitude below typical frequencies of vocal fold oscillation (on the order of 100 Hz). This study represents an attempt to extrapolate the data to higher frequencies based on two viscoelastic theories, (1) a quasilinear viscoelastic theory widely used for the constitutive modeling of the viscoelastic properties of biological tissues [Fung, Biomechanics (Springer-Verlag, New York, 1993), pp. 277-292], and (2) a molecular (statistical network) theory commonly used for the rheological modeling of polymeric materials [Zhu et al., J. Biomech. 24, 1007-1018 (1991)]. Analytical expressions of elastic and viscous shear moduli, dynamic viscosity, and damping ratio based on the two theories with specific model parameters were applied to curve-fit the empirical data. Results showed that the theoretical predictions matched the empirical data reasonably well, allowing for parametric descriptions of the data and their extrapolations to frequencies of phonation.

  1. High-risk human papilloma virus in archival tissues of oral pathosis and normal oral mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Dhanapal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Oral cancer ranks third among all cancers in the Indian population. Human papilloma virus (HPV plays a significant role in oral carcinogenesis. Population-based subtype variations are present in the HPV prevalence. This study gives an emphasis on the parameters to be considered in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues for polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based research work. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study on archival paraffin-embedded tissue samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, epithelial dysplasia, and normal oral mucosa surrounding impacted tooth was amplified by PCR for the E6 gene of HPV type 16 and E1 gene of HPV type 18. Results: HPV 18 was positive in three OSCC cases. There was no statistically significant association of the positivity of HPV with the age, gender or habit. The HPV positive patients had a tobacco habit and were of a younger age group. Conclusion: The presence of HPV in carcinomatous tissue highlights the possible role of HPV in carcinogenesis and archival paraffin embedded tissue specimen can be used for this analysis. Recent studies on genomic analyses have highlighted that the HPV positive tumors are a separate subgroup based on genomic sequencing. The results of a larger retrospective study will help further in our understanding of the role of HPV in carcinogenesis, this study could form the baseline for such follow-up studies.

  2. Emigrating Beyond Earth Human Adaptation and Space Colonization

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Cameron M

    2012-01-01

    For four million years humankind has been actively expanding geographically and in doing so has adapted to a wide variety of hostile environments. Now we are looking towards the ultimate adaptation - the colonization of space. Emigrating Beyond Earth illustrates that this is not a technocratic endeavor, but a natural continuation of human evolution; a journey not just for the engineer and rocket scientist, but for everyman. Based on the most current understanding of our universe, human adaptation and evolution, the authors explain why space colonization must be planned as an adaptation to, rather than the conquest of, space. Emigrating Beyond Earth argues that space colonization is an insurance policy for our species, and that it isn't about rockets and robots, it's about humans doing what we've been doing for four million years: finding new places and new ways to live. Applying a unique anthropological approach, the authors outline a framework for continued human space exploration and offer a glimpse of a po...

  3. Fibroblasts isolated from human middle turbinate mucosa cause neural progenitor cells to differentiate into glial lineage cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjia Wu

    Full Text Available Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs is a potential therapy for repair of spinal cord injury (SCI. Autologous transplantation of OECs has been reported in clinical trials. However, it is still controversial whether purified OECs or olfactory mucosa containing OECs, fibroblasts and other cells should be used for transplantation. OECs and fibroblasts were isolated from olfactory mucosa of the middle turbinate from seven patients. The percentage of OECs with p75(NTR+ and GFAP(+ ranged from 9.2% to 73.2%. Fibroblasts were purified and co-cultured with normal human neural progenitors (NHNPs. Based on immunocytochemical labeling, NHNPs were induced into glial lineage cells when they were co-cultured with the mucosal fibroblasts. These results demonstrate that OECs can be isolated from the mucosa of the middle turbinate bone as well as from the dorsal nasal septum and superior turbinates, which are the typical sites for harvesting OECs. Transplantation of olfactory mucosa containing fibroblasts into the central nervous system (CNS needs to be further investigated before translation to clinical application.

  4. The Vibrio cholerae cytolysin promotes chloride secretion from intact human intestinal mucosa.

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    Lucantonio Debellis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathogenicity of the Vibrio cholerae strains belonging to serogroup O1 and O139 is due to the production of virulence factors such as cholera toxin (CT and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP. The remaining serogroups, which mostly lack CT and TCP, are more frequently isolated from aquatic environmental sources than from clinical samples; nevertheless, these strains have been reported to cause human disease, such as sporadic outbreaks of watery diarrhoea and inflammatory enterocolitis. This evidence suggested the possibility that other virulence factor(s than cholera toxin might be crucial in the pathogenesis of Vibrio cholerae-induced diarrhoea, but their nature remains unknown. VCC, the hemolysin produced by virtually all Vibrio cholerae strains, has been proposed as a possible candidate, though a clear-cut demonstration attesting VCC as crucial in the pathogenesis of Vibrio cholerae-induced diarrhoea is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Electrophysiological parameters and paracellular permeability of stripped human healthy colon tissues, obtained at subtotal colectomy, mounted in Ussing chamber were studied in the presence or absence of VCC purified from culture supernatants of V. cholerae O1 El Tor strain. Short circuit current (I(SC and transepithelial resistance (R(T were measured by a computerized voltage clamp system. The exposure of sigmoid colon specimens to 1 nM VCC resulted in an increase of I(SC by 20.7%, with respect to the basal values, while R(T was reduced by 12.3%. Moreover, increase in I(SC was abolished by bilateral Cl(- reduction. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that VCC, by forming anion channels on the apical membrane of enterocytes, triggers an outward transcellular flux of chloride. Such an ion movement, associated with the outward movement of Na(+ and water, might be responsible for the diarrhoea caused by the non-toxigenic strains of Vibrio cholerae.

  5. Expression of the glutathione enzyme system of human colon mucosa by localisation, gender and age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoensch, H.; Peters, W.H.M.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Kirch, W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The glutathione S-transferases (GST) can metabolise endogenous and exogenous toxins and carcinogens by catalysing the conjugation of diverse electrophiles with reduced glutathione (GSH). Variations of GST enzyme activity could influence the susceptibility of developing cancers in certain

  6. Cloning and expression of human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang-Quan Chen; Shao-Heng He

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone and express the human colon mast cell METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from colon tissue, and the cDNA encoding human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase was amplified by reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The product cDNA was subcloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pMAL-c2x and eukaryotic expression vector pPIC9K to conrtruct prokaryotic expression vector pMAL/human MC-CP (hMC-CP) and eukaryotic pPIC9K/hMC-CP. The recombinant fusion protein expressed in E.coli was induced with IPTG and purified by amylose affinity chromatography. After digestion with factor Xa, recombinant hMC-CP was purified by heparin agarose chromatography. The recombinant hMC-CP expressed in Pichia pastoris (P.pastoris) was induced with methanol and analyzed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot, N-terminal amino acid RESULTS: The cDNA encoding the human colon mast cell carboxypeptidase was cloned, which had five nucleotide variations compared with skin MC-CP cDNA. The recombinant hMC-CP protein expressed in E.coli was purified with amylose affinity chromatography and heparin agarose chromatogphy.SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant protein expressed by E. coli had a molecular weight of 36 kDa and reacted to the anti-native hMC-CP monoclonal antibody (CA5). The N-terminal amino acid sequence confirmed further the product was hMC-CP. E. coli generated hMC-CP showed a very low level of enzymatic activity, but P. pastoris produced hMC-CP had a relatively high enzymatic activity towards a synthetic substrate hippuryl-L-phenylalanine.carboxypeptidase can be successfully cloned and expressed in E.coli and P. pastoris, which will contribute greatly to the fonctional study on hMC-CP.

  7. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in upper respiratory tract mucosa in a group of pre-school children

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroslaw Szydłowski; Katarzyna Jonczyk-Potoczna; Beata Pucher; Beata Buraczyńska-Andrzejewska; Magdalena Prauzińska; Jagoda Kolasińska-Lipńska; Hanna Krauss; Jacek Piątek; Wioletta Żukiewicz-Sobczak

    2014-01-01

    [b]introduction[/b]. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a group of DNA viruses which is an etiological factor of many benign and malignant diseases of the upper respiratory tract mucosa, female genital tract and the skin. HPV infection is considered a sexually-transmitted infection, but can also be transmitted by non-sexual routes, including perinatal vertical transmission, physical contact, iatrogenic infection and autoinoculation. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP) in children is connect...

  8. The parasite Entamoeba histolytica exploits the activities of human matrix metalloproteinases to invade colonic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeaux, Roman; Avé, Patrick; Bernier, Michèle; Morcelet, Marie; Frileux, Pascal; Guillén, Nancy; Labruyère, Elisabeth

    2014-10-07

    Intestinal invasion by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is characterized by remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The parasite cysteine proteinase A5 (CP-A5) is thought to cooperate with human matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) involved in ECM degradation. Here, we investigate the role CP-A5 plays in the regulation of MMPs upon mucosal invasion. We use human colon explants to determine whether CP-A5 activates human MMPs. Inhibition of the MMPs' proteolytic activities abolishes remodelling of the fibrillar collagen structure and prevents trophozoite invasion of the mucosa. In the presence of trophozoites, MMPs-1 and -3 are overexpressed and are associated with fibrillar collagen remodelling. In vitro, CP-A5 performs the catalytic cleavage needed to activate pro-MMP-3, which in turn activates pro-MMP-1. Ex vivo, incubation with recombinant CP-A5 was enough to rescue CP-A5-defective trophozoites. Our results suggest that MMP-3 and/or CP-A5 inhibitors may be of value in further studies aiming to treat intestinal amoebiasis.

  9. Characterization of human and Staphylococcus aureus proteins in respiratory mucosa by in vivo- and immunoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frank; Meyer, Tanja; Sundaramoorthy, Nandakumar; Michalik, Stephan; Surmann, Kristin; Depke, Maren; Dhople, Vishnu; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Holtappels, Gabriele; Zhang, Nan; Bröker, Barbara M; Bachert, Claus; Völker, Uwe

    2017-02-23

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive opportunistic bacterium which can be found as a commensal in the nares of about 50% of the human population. Besides asymptomatic carriage, S. aureus has also been found to colonize nasal polyps, a subform of chronic rhinosinusitis, in 60 to 100% of cases, and even reside intracellularly in nasal polyp tissue. The aim of this study was to shed light on the behavior of S. aureus in the human airways by analyzing S. aureus-specific proteins in nasal polyp tissue from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and to characterize the immunogenic potential of the identified (mainly secreted) proteins. As a result, in total >600 S. aureus proteins were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry or multiple reaction monitoring. Of those roughly 180 are typically localized in the membrane, surface exposed or secreted. For 115 S. aureus proteins, partially also detected in vivo by mass spectrometry, IgA- and IgG-specific antibody signals were profiled. Strong antibody signals were predominantly found for surface expose or secreted proteins.

  10. Microbiological toxicity of tilmicosin on human colonic microflora in chemostats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haihong; Yao, Junping; Wu, Qinghua; Wei, Yajing; Dai, Menghong; Iqbal, Zahid; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Huang, Lingli; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the microbiological safety of tilmicosin on human intestinal microflora, four chemostat models of healthy human colonic ecosystems were exposed to tilmicosin (0, 0.436, 4.36, and 43.6 μg/mL) for 7 days. Prior to and during drug exposure, three microbiological endpoints were monitored daily including short-chain fatty acids, bacterial counts and macrolide susceptibility. Colonization resistance of each community was determined by 3 successive daily challenges of Salmonella typhimurium. Genes associated with virulence and macrolide resistance in Enterococcus faecalis were determined by PCR. Transcriptional expression of the virulence gene (gelE) in E. faecalis was determined by real-time RT-PCR. Our results showed that different concentrations of tilmicosin did not disrupt the colonization resistance in each chemostat. During exposure to 4.36 and 43.6 μg/mL tilmicosin, the Bacteroides fragilis population was significantly decreased while the proportion of resistant Enterococci increased. After long-term exposure to the highest concentration (43.6 μg/mL) of tilmicosin, the gelE gene was significantly up-regulated in the high-level macrolide resistant strains that also contained the ermB resistance gene. This study was the first of its kind to evaluate the microbiological toxicity of tilmicosin using a chemostat model. These findings also provide new insight into the co-occurrence of macrolide resistance and virulence in E. faecalis under tilmicosin selective pressure.

  11. In vitro tolerability of human nasal mucosa: histopathological and scanning electron-microscopic evaluation of nasal forms containing Sandostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fraissinette, A; Kolopp, M; Schiller, I; Fricker, G; Gammert, C; Pospischil, A; Vonderscher, J; Richter, F

    1995-10-01

    An in vitro human nasal model was developed as a tool to study the local tolerability of nasal powder forms using excised nasal mucosa in a diffusion chamber. The suitability of this model was tested using Sandostatin (SMS) an octapeptide analog of somatostatin, as a reference drug enhanced by Avicel (microcrystalline cellulose) or lactose (100 mesh). The standard nasal spray vehicle was taken as a harmless control and 1% chenodeoxycholate (CDC) as a harmful control in terms of local tolerability. The extent of peptide permeation was determined by measuring SMS concentration in the receiving chamber. The labeling of SMS was detected by immunoperoxidase staining on cross sections. The local tolerability for all tested forms was assessed by histopathological examination and scanning electron microscopy. The apparent permeation coefficient allowed us to rank the absorption of the tested drug forms as Avicel > spray = lactose > 1%CDC. For all formulations, SMS was detected in the epithelium. No changes of the nasal mucosa could be observed with Avicel, lactose or nasal spray vehicle in the presence or absence of SMS. 1%CDC with or without drug showed an immediate destruction of the nasal epithelium. The validation of this in vitro model using human nasal mucosa will be further discussed as a tool for assessing the local tolerability of intranasally applied test substances.

  12. Human intestinal mucosa-associated Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains with probiotic properties modulate IL-10, IL-6 and IL-12 gene expression in THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čitar, M; Hacin, B; Tompa, G; Štempelj, M; Rogelj, I; Dolinšek, J; Narat, M; Matijašić, B Bogovič

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are considered one of the permanent genera of the physiological human intestinal microbiota and represent an enormous pool of potential probiotic candidates. Approximately 450 isolates of presumptive Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium strains were obtained from bioptic samples of colonic and ileal mucosa from 15 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years. On the basis of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR analysis, 20 strains were selected for further taxonomic classification and characterisation, as well as assessment of probiotic properties and safety. Importantly, selected strains showed the capability of colonising different parts of the intestine. The most frequently isolated species was Lactobacillus paracasei followed by Lactobacillus fermentum. The majority of isolates were susceptible to antimicrobials of human and veterinary importance, however, tetracycline and/or erythromycin resistance was observed in Lactobacillus plantarum and L. fermentum strains. Thirteen strains were able to ferment more than 19 different carbon sources and three out of five tested strains exerted antagonistic activity against several different indicator strains. Two Lactobacillus isolates (L. paracasei L350 and L. fermentum L930 bb) and one Bifidobacterium isolate (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. animalis IM386) fulfilled in vitro selection criteria for probiotic strains and exhibited strong downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12 and upregulation of anti-inflammatory IL-10. The selected strains represent suitable candidates for further studies regarding their positive influence on host health and could play an important role in ameliorating the symptoms of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. Distinct afferent innervation patterns within the human proximal and distal esophageal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Philip; Aktar, Rubina; Mthunzi, Engelbert; Lee, Chung; Peiris, Madusha; Preston, Sean L; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Sifrim, Daniel

    2015-03-15

    Little is known about the mucosal phenotype of the proximal human esophagus. There is evidence to suggest that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to chemical and mechanical stimulation compared with the distal. This may have physiological relevance (e.g., in prevention of aspiration of gastroesophageal refluxate), but also pathological relevance (e.g., in reflux perception or dysphagia). Reasons for this increased sensitivity are unclear but may include impairment in mucosal barrier integrity or changes in sensory innervation. We assessed mucosal barrier integrity and afferent nerve distribution in the proximal and distal esophagus of healthy human volunteers. In 10 healthy volunteers baseline proximal and distal esophageal impedance was measured in vivo. Esophageal mucosal biopsies from the distal and proximal esophagus were taken, and baseline transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was measured in Ussing chambers. Biopsies were examined immunohistochemically for presence and location of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers. In a further four healthy volunteers we investigated for colocalization of CGRP and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 immunoreactivity in nerve fibers. Baseline impedance was higher in the proximal than in the distal esophagus [2,936 Ω (SD578) vs. 2,229 Ω (SD821); P = 0.03], however, baseline TER was not significantly different between them. Mucosal CGRP-immunoreactive nerves were found in the epithelium of both proximal and distal esophagus, but were located more superficially in the proximal mucosa compared with the distal [11.5 (SD7) vs. 21.7 (SD5) cell layers from lumen, P = 0.002] 19% of proximal, and 10% of distal mucosal PGP-immunoreactive fibers colocalized with CGRP. PGP-immunoreactive fibers were also significantly closer to the luminal surface in the proximal compared with the distal esophagus (P integrity is similar in proximal and distal esophagus, but proximal mucosal afferent nerves are in

  14. The expression of aldolase A in colonic mucosa from the IBS%醛缩酶A在肠易激综合征患者结肠黏膜的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春燕; 杨云生; 郭旭; 孙刚; 王巍峰

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究醛缩酶A(ALDOA)在肠易激综合征(IBS)患者结肠黏膜的表达情况,探讨IBS发病的新机制,为未来研究提供新的思路.方法 应用Western blot和免疫组织化学等方法,观察ALDOA在腹泻型肠易激综合征(IBS-D)及便秘型肠易激综合征(IBS-C)患者结肠黏膜的表达情况.结果 ALDOA在IBS-D组乙状结肠、IBS-C组乙状结肠及IBS-D组盲肠表达量明显少于健康对照组的相应部位,差异有统计学意义.结论 ALDOA在IBS患者结肠的表达异常提示着IBS-D、IBS-C患者结肠存在能量代谢异常.%Objective The expression of aldolase A(ALDOA)was detected in colonic mucosa from the IBS with diarrea(IBS-D) group,IBS with constipation (IBS-C) group and normal control group. All these researchs may provide new clues to further research on the molecular mechisms of IBS . Methods Western blot and IHC were also performed for observing the level of ALDOA. Results The results showed that ALDOA were markedly decreased in mucosa of cecum and sigmoid colon from IBS -D and IBS-C groups than that of normal controls. Conclusions ALDOA were metabolism enzymes. The abnormal expression of ALDOA showed that colonic mucosa from IBS patients may involve in dysregulation of energy metabolism .

  15. Simulated colon fiber metabolome regulates genes involved in cell cycle, apoptosis, and energy metabolism in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putaala, Heli; Mäkivuokko, Harri; Tiihonen, Kirsti; Rautonen, Nina

    2011-11-01

    High level of dietary fiber has been epidemiologically linked to protection against the risk for developing colon cancer. The mechanisms of this protection are not clear. Fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon results in production of for example butyrate that has drawn attention as a chemopreventive agent. Polydextrose, a soluble fiber that is only partially fermented in colon, was fermented in an in vitro colon simulator, in which the conditions mimic the human proximal, ascending, transverse, and distal colon in sequence. The subsequent fermentation metabolomes were applied on colon cancer cells, and the gene expression changes studied. Polydextrose fermentation down-regulated gene ontology classes linked with cell cycle, and affected number of metabolically active cells. Furthermore, up-regulated effects on classes linked with apoptosis, with increased caspase 2 and 3 activity, implicate that polydextrose fermentation plays a role in induction of apoptosis in colon cancer cells. The up-regulated genes involved also key regulators of lipid metabolism, such as PPARα and PGC-1α. These results offer hypotheses for the mechanisms of two health benefits linked with consumption of dietary fiber, reducing risk of development of colon cancer, and dyslipidemia.

  16. [Localization and distribution of human olfactory mucosa in the nasal cavities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escada, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A distribuição da mucosa olfactiva humana só pode ser determinada em estudos que avaliem a totalidade da região olfactiva. O objectivo deste trabalho é determinar a distribuição da mucosa olfactiva humana a partir do estudo histológico, por microscopia óptica, de peças anatómicas da região olfactiva obtidas do cadáver.Material e Métodos: Utilizaram-se peças anatómicas da região olfactiva colhidas durante a autópsia de cadáveres recentes. Em cada uma das peças foi determinada a distância entre a lâmina crivosa e o limite inferior da região olfactiva em três localizações diferentes da parede septal e da parede lateral.Resultados: das 230 peças anatómicas disponíveis, 217 foram excluídas por razões clínicas ou técnicas. Realizaram-se estudosmorfométricos em 13 peças num total de 156 medições. O limite inferior da mucosa olfactiva no septo nasal estava a 15,9 ± 3,2 mm, a 15,3 ± 3 mm e a 16 ± 2,8 mm nas porções anterior, média e posterior da região olfactiva. O limite inferior da mucosa olfactiva na parede turbinal estava a 15,3 ± 2,4 mm, a 14,8 ± 2,3 mm e a 12,3 ± 1,9 mm nas mesmas localizações. O valor mínimo observado foi de 12 mm.Conclusões: A mucosa olfactiva estende-se pelo corneto superior e médio e pelo septo nasal confrontante numa distância que nunca é inferior a 12 mm e que pode ultrapassar os 16 mm. O conhecimento da distribuição exacta da mucosa olfactiva nas fossas nasais pode ser útil para orientar a colheita em seres humanos, com propósitos diagnósticos ou terapêuticos.

  17. Organization of the enteric nervous system in the human colon demonstrated by wholemount immunohistochemistry with special reference to the submucous plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, T; Roblick, U; Gleiss, J; Schiedeck, T; Bruch, H P; Kühnel, W; Krammer, H J

    1999-07-01

    To demonstrate the normal topography and structure of the enteric nervous system (ENS) in the human colon, the colonic wall of patients (n = 10, mean age 66.3 years), who underwent abdominal surgery unrelated to intestinal motility disorders, was submitted to wholemount immunohistochemistry. The specimens were stretched out and separated into the tunica muscularis, the outer and inner portion of the tela submucosa and the tunica mucosa. Prior to the application of the neuronal marker Protein Gene Product (PGP) 9.5, the laminar preparations were pretreated with the maceration agent KOH. The plexus myentericus was composed of prominent ganglia and interconnecting nerve fiber strands (NFS) forming a polygonal network, which was denser in the descending than in the ascending colon. Nerve cells were observed within the ganglia as well as in primary, secondary and tertiary NFS. The latter ramified into the adjacent smooth muscle layers, which contained the aganglionated plexus muscularis longitudinalis and circularis. The submucous plexus comprised three nerve networks of different topography and architecture: the delicate plexus submucosus extremus consisted of parallel orientated NFS with isolated nerve cells and small ganglia and was located at the outermost border of the tela submucosa adjacent to the circular muscle layer. The plexus submucosus externus was closely associated with the plexus submucosus extremus and composed of larger ganglia and thicker NFS. The plexus submucosus internus was situated adjacent to the lamina muscularis mucosae and formed a network with denser meshes but smaller ganglia and NFS than the plexus submucosus externus. The NFS of the aganglionated plexus muscularis mucosae followed the course of the smooth muscle cells of the lamina muscularis mucosae. The honeycomb-like network of the plexus mucosus was located within the lamina propria mucosae and divided into a subglandular and a periglandular portion. Single and accumulated nerve cells

  18. Hypoxic regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in human buccal mucosa fibroblasts stimulated with arecoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Hung; Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2015-10-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is regarded as a pre-cancerous condition with fibrosis in oral subepithelial connective tissue. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α regulates a wide variety of profibrogenic genes, which are closely associated with tissue fibrosis. The aim of this study was to compare HIF-1α expression in normal buccal mucosa tissues and OSF specimens and further explore the potential mechanisms that may lead to the induction of HIF-1α expression. Twenty-five OSF specimens and six normal buccal mucosa were examined by immunohistochemistry. The expression of HIF-1α from fibroblasts cultured from OSF and normal buccal mucosa was measured by Western blot. Arecoline, a major areca nut alkaloid, was challenged to normal buccal mucosa fibroblasts (BMFs) to elucidate whether HIF-1α expression could affect by arecoline. In addition, the effects of arecoline on plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 expression were evaluated in environmental hypoxia. HIF-1α expression was significantly higher in OSF specimens and expressed mainly by fibroblasts, epithelial cells, and inflammatory cells. Fibroblasts derived from OSF were found to exhibit higher HIF-1α protein expression than BMFs (P Arecoline was found to upregulate HIF-1α protein in a dose-dependent manner (P arecoline-induced PAI-1 protein expression than normoxic conditions (P < 0.05). These results suggest that HIF-1α expression is significantly upregulated in OSF tissues from areca quid chewers, implying a potential role as a biomarker for local tissue hypoxia. The activation of HIF-1α may promote fibrogenesis by an increase of PAI-1 expression and a subsequent elevation of extracellular matrix production in oral submucosa leading to fibrosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Potential of Smoke Crack Cocaine on the Epithelium of the Human Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela Cássia de Lima

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crack cocaine is an illicit drug derived from cocaine. It can produce some damages to the lungs and oral cavity. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of micronuclei and some nuclear alterations in epithelial cells of crack cocaine users. Methods: Oral smears were collected from clinically normal-appearing buccal mucosa exfoliative cytology of 30 individuals (15 crack cocaine users and 15 controls. Results: Crack cocaine users consumed about 3.8 grams per day and the time consumption of the drug was of 6.4 (+3.3 years. The prevalence of micronuclei, binucleated cells, broken egg cells, budding cells, picnosis, karyolysis, and karyorrhexis was determined. The frequencies of micronuclei for case and control groups were, respectively, 2.87 + 3.46 and 0.57 + 1.6 (p=0.018. No statistical difference was observed for binucleated cells, broken egg cells, budding cells, picnosis, and karyolysis. The frequency of karyorrhexis was significantly increased on crack cocaine users than controls (54.07 + 38.58 and 24.87 + 23.97, p=0.001. Conclusion: Smoke crack might have a cytotoxic and genotoxic effects to the oral mucosa due to increased frequency of micronuclei and karyorrhexis. Thus, individuals who used crack cocaine in the long term need to be frequently examined in order to prevent neoplastic transformation.Keywords: Crack Cocaine; Micronucleus Tests; Mouth Mucosa; Cytological Techniques; Carcinogens.

  20. Immunohistochemical analysis of ras oncogene p21 product in human gastric carcinomas and their adjacent mucosas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, F; David, L; Sunkel, C; Lopes, C; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    1992-04-01

    In an attempt to clarify the relationship between ras oncogene expression and the clinico-pathological features of malignant and pre-malignant lesions of the stomach we undertook the immunohistochemical study of the expression of ras gene p21 product in a series of eighty gastric carcinomas and their respective adjacent mucosas. In two cases the mRNA of Ha-ras was also studied by in situ hybridization. The majority of gastric carcinomas as well as their adjacent non-neoplastic mucosas expressed ras gene product. There was a significant relationship between the expression of ras gene p21 product and the morphologic pattern of the tumours. An enhanced ras expression was found in several conditions regarded as precursor lesions of intestinal and/or diffuse types of gastric carcinoma (dysplasia, foveolar hyperplasia and even the neck zone of normal-appearing gastric glands, namely in the mucosa adjacent to diffuse carcinomas). Ras expression was actually more prominent in most of these conditions than in their respective adjacent carcinomas. No significant relationship was found between ras expression and invasiveness of the wall, nodal metastases and venous invasion.

  1. A simulation of microbial competition in the human colonic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M E; Dreesen, D W; Wiegert, R G

    1996-10-01

    Many investigations of the interactions of microbial competitors in the gastrointestinal tract used continuous-flow anaerobic cultures. The simulation reported here was a deterministic 11-compartment model coded by using the C programming language and based on parameters from published in vitro studies and assumptions were data were unavailable. The resource compartments were glucose, lactose and sucrose, starch, sorbose, and serine. Six microbial competitors included indigenous nonpathogenic colonizers of the human gastrointestinal tract (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacteroids ovatus, Fusobacterium varium, and Enterococcus faecalis) and the potential human enteropathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Flows of carbon from the resources to the microbes were modified by resource and space controls. Partitioning of resources to the competitors that could utilize them was calculated at each iteration on the basis of availability of all resources by feeding preference functions. Resources did not accumulate during iterations of the model. The results of the computer simulation of microbial competition model and for various modifications of the model. The results were based on few measured parameters but may be useful in the design of user-friendly software to aid researchers in defining and manipulating the microbial ecology of colonic ecosystems as relates to food-borne disease.

  2. Efeitos da injeção de solução bicarbonatada de ácido acetilsalicílico em mucosa colorretal de coelhos, com vistas a aplicação no preparo pré-operatório do cólon Local effects of rectal washout with acetylsalicylic acid solution on the colonic mucosa of rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Salomão Ioriatti

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A recidiva local no câncer colorretal tem como principal causa o implante de células tumorais nas anastomoses. 11-15 Dessa maneira, lavagem química do lúmen intestinal é preconizada para evitar tanto o implante quanto à recidiva local. 11-28 Em estudos prévios constatamos que a solução bicarbonatada de ácido acetilsalicílico tem efeitos citolíticos e anti-tumorais in-vitro.31 OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a toxicidade da solução de aspirina na mucosa colônica de coelhos com o objetivo de usá-la no preparo intestinal de portadores de câncer colorretal. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 20 coelhos. Um clampe vascular foi colocado acima do cólon sigmóide. Os animais foram submetidos a um enema com 50 ml da solução de aspirina ou soro fisiológico de acordo com o grupo. Os animais foram sacrificados ao término do procedimento ou tardiamente de acordo com o grupo. RESULTADOS: A solução de aspirina não altera a mucosa colônica de coelhos. CONCLUSÃO: O uso da solução bicarbonatada de ácido acetilsalicílico no preparo intestinal de portadores de câncer colorretal é clinicamente possível.BACKGROUND: The implantation of viable exfoliated intraluminal tumour cells is the major cause of local recurrence in colorectal cancer. 11-28 Therefore, the bowel lumen wash with a tumoricidal agent has been recommended. 11-28 In previous study we observe that acetylsalicylic acid solution cause neoplastic cell death in vitro.31 PURPOSE: Assess the local effect of acetylsalicylic acid solution on the colonic mucosa of rabbits, in order to use this agent in the bowel lumen wash. METHODS: 20 rabbits were used. A vascular clamp was placed on the distal colon, followed by the instillation per rectum of 50 ml of acetylsalicylic acid solution or saline solution, according to the group. The euthanasia was performed immediately or later according to the group. RESULTS: The acetylsalicylic acid solution doesn't cause any injury on the

  3. Efeitos do butirato nos níveis de peroxidação lipídica em células da mucosa cólica sem trânsito fecal: estudo experimental em ratos Effects of butyrate on levels of lipid peroxidation in cells of the colonic mucosa without fecal stream: experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Miguel do Monte Lameiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Os ácidos graxos de cadeia curta (AGCC representam o principal substrato energético para células da mucosa cólica. A derivação intestinal, reduzindo suprimento de AGCC, responsabiliza-se pela colite de exclusão (CE. Aplicação retal de butirato tem sido eficaz no tratamento da doença. Então, o objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar os níveis de lipoperoxidação na mucosa cólica, após aplicação de butirato, em modelo de CE. Vinte seis ratos Wistar foram submetidos à colostomia proximal e fístula mucosa distal. Os animais foram divididos em dois grupos segundo sacrifício ser realizado em duas ou quatro semanas. Cada grupo foi subdividido em dois subgrups segundo intervenção com soro fisiológico ou butirato. O diagnóstico de CE foi estabelecido por estudo histopatológico e os níveis de lipoperoxidação pelos níveis de malondialdeído (MDA. Utilizaram-se os testes de Mann-Whitney e Kruskal-Wallis (significantes quando pThe short-chain fatty acids (SCFA are the main energy substrate for the cells of the colonic mucosa. Diversion of the fecal stream reducing the supply of SCFA is responsible for diversion colitis (DC. Rectal application of butyrate has been demonstrated effective in the treatment of the disease. So the aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of lipid peroxidation in the colon mucosa after application of butyrate in model of DC. Twenty-six rats were submitted to proximal colostomy and distal mucous fistula. The animals were divided into two groups according sacrifice carried out in two or four weeks. Each group was divided into two subgroups according to intervention with saline solution or butyrate. The diagnosis of colitis was established by histopathology and the levels of lipid peroxidation by tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA. We used the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis, establishing a significance level of 5% (significant with p<0.05. After two weeks, the levels of MDA were lower in the segments

  4. Efecto citotóxico en colon humano de Escherichia coli enterohemorrágico aislado de terneros con diarrea sanguinolenta Cytotoxic effect in human colon of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli isolated from calves with bloody diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pistone Creydt

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli productor de toxina Shiga (STEC es el patógeno emergente en alimentos de mayor impacto, siendo su principal reservorio el ganado bovino. STEC puede causar diarrea, colitis hemorrágica y síndrome urémico hemolítico. El presente trabajo estudió la acción citotóxica de dos cepas de STEC aisladas de heces de terneros diarreicos en colon humano in vitro. Los fragmentos se montaron como un diafragma en una cámara de Ussing y se incubaron con las cepas patógenas. El flujo neto absortivo de agua (Jw disminuyó y la corriente de cortocircuito (Isc aumentó significativamente (P Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC is one of the most important emergent pathogen in foods, being its main reservoir bovine cattle. STEC can cause diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The present work have studied the cytotoxic action in human colon of cultures of two STEC strains isolated from faeces of calves with bloody diarrhea. Colonic mucosa was mounted as a diaphragm in a Ussing chamber and incubated with the cultures of pathogenic strains. Net water flow (Jw decreased and the short-circuit current (Isc increased significantly (p < 0,01 compared to negative control. Tissues showed an erosion of the mucose, epithelial exfoliation, and presence of pseudo-membranes in the lumen. Mild circulatory lesions were observed in the lamina propia. A moderate neutrophils infiltration was observed in the lumen and into the epithelial cells. Colonic crypts were not disrupted. Both experimental strains caused a similar lesion on colon tissues. This is the first study that shows that cultures of STEC strains isolated from bovine cattle produce cytotoxic effects in vitro in human colon.

  5. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in upper respiratory tract mucosa in a group of pre-school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Szydłowski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction[/b]. Human Papillomavirus (HPV is a group of DNA viruses which is an etiological factor of many benign and malignant diseases of the upper respiratory tract mucosa, female genital tract and the skin. HPV infection is considered a sexually-transmitted infection, but can also be transmitted by non-sexual routes, including perinatal vertical transmission, physical contact, iatrogenic infection and autoinoculation. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP in children is connected with HPV infection transmitted vertically from mother to child during the passage of the foetus through an infected birth canal. [b]objective. [/b]The aim of this study was to establish the level of Human Papillomaviruses carrier state in upper respiratory tract mucosa in healthy pre-school children, and to identify potential risk factors for HPV infection. [b]materials and method[/b]. After obtaining consent from their parents, 97 pre-school children were examined – 51 girls and 46 boys between the ages of 3 – 5 years; average age – 4 years and 5 months. 68 children were urban dwellers and 29 came from a rural environment. A questionnaire with detailed history was taken including parents’ and child`s personal data, as well as perinatal risk factors in pregnancy. Socio-demographic information was also obtained, including the standard of living, and chosen environmental factors. Routine ENT examination was performed. Exfoliated oral squamous cells were collected from swabs and analysed for the presence of DNA papillomaviruses by polymerase chain reaction. [b]results.[/b] The presence of HPV in the respiratory tract in children was detected in 19.6% cases. ‘High oncogenic potential’ HPVs, such as HPV-16 and HPV-18, were not observed in squamous cell mucosa of the respiratory tract in the children. No significant differences were observed between the HPV carrier state in urban and rural inhabitants.

  6. Colonic transit time relates to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencingand their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based......Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... on correlation analyses,we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gutmicrobial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolismfrom carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  7. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencing and their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based......Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... on correlation analyses, we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  8. Structure of the gut microbiome following colonization with human feces determines colonic tumor burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Nielson T; Zackular, Joseph P; Chen, Grace Y; Schloss, Patrick D

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that the gut microbiome plays a role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients with CRC harbor gut microbiomes that are structurally distinct from those of healthy individuals; however, without the ability to track individuals during disease progression, it has not been possible to observe changes in the microbiome over the course of tumorigenesis. Mouse models have demonstrated that these changes can further promote colonic tumorigenesis. However, these models have relied upon mouse-adapted bacterial populations and so it remains unclear which human-adapted bacterial populations are responsible for modulating tumorigenesis. We transplanted fecal microbiota from three CRC patients and three healthy individuals into germ-free mice, resulting in six structurally distinct microbial communities. Subjecting these mice to a chemically induced model of CRC resulted in different levels of tumorigenesis between mice. Differences in the number of tumors were strongly associated with the baseline microbiome structure in mice, but not with the cancer status of the human donors. Partitioning of baseline communities into enterotypes by Dirichlet multinomial mixture modeling resulted in three enterotypes that corresponded with tumor burden. The taxa most strongly positively correlated with increased tumor burden were members of the Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Alistipes, and Akkermansia, all of which are Gram-negative. Members of the Gram-positive Clostridiales, including multiple members of Clostridium Group XIVa, were strongly negatively correlated with tumors. Analysis of the inferred metagenome of each community revealed a negative correlation between tumor count and the potential for butyrate production, and a positive correlation between tumor count and the capacity for host glycan degradation. Despite harboring distinct gut communities, all mice underwent conserved structural changes over the course of the model. The

  9. Extravirgin olive oil up-regulates CB₁ tumor suppressor gene in human colon cancer cells and in rat colon via epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Andrea; Falconi, Anastasia; Di Germanio, Clara; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Costa, Antonio; Caramuta, Stefano; Del Carlo, Michele; Compagnone, Dario; Dainese, Enrico; Cifani, Carlo; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Extravirgin olive oil (EVOO) represents the typical lipid source of the Mediterranean diet, an eating habit pattern that has been associated with a significant reduction of cancer risk. Diet is the more studied environmental factor in epigenetics, and many evidences suggest dysregulation of epigenetic pathways in cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of EVOO and its phenolic compounds on endocannabinoid system (ECS) gene expression via epigenetic regulation in both human colon cancer cells (Caco-2) and rats exposed to short- and long-term dietary EVOO. We observed a selective and transient up-regulation of CNR1 gene - encoding for type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB₁) - that was evoked by exposure of Caco-2 cells to EVOO (100 ppm), its phenolic extracts (OPE, 50 μM) or authentic hydroxytyrosol (HT, 50 μM) for 24 h. None of the other major elements of the ECS (i.e., CB₂; GPR55 and TRPV1 receptors; and NAPE-PLD, DAGL, FAAH and MAGL enzymes) was affected at any time point. The stimulatory effect of OPE and HT on CB₁ expression was inversely correlated to DNA methylation at CNR1 promoter and was associated with reduced proliferation of Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, CNR1 gene was less expressed in Caco-2 cells when compared to normal colon mucosa cells, and again this effect was associated with higher level of DNA methylation at CNR1. Moreover, in agreement with the in vitro studies, we also observed a remarkable (~4-fold) and selective increase in CB₁ expression in the colon of rats receiving dietary EVOO supplementation for 10 days. Consistently, CpG methylation of rat Cnr1 promoter, miR23a and miR-301a, previously shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and predicted to target CB₁ mRNA, was reduced after EVOO administration down to ~50% of controls. Taken together, our findings demonstrating CB₁ gene expression modulation by EVOO or its phenolic compounds via epigenetic mechanism, both in vitro and in vivo, may

  10. Interactions between microsatellite instability and human gut colonization by Escherichia coli in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnière, Johan; Bonnin, Virginie; Jarrousse, Anne-Sophie; Cardamone, Emilie; Agus, Allison; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Sauvanet, Pierre; Déchelotte, Pierre; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2017-01-16

    Recent studies suggest that colonization of colonic mucosa by pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) could be involved in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), especially through the production of genotoxins such as colibactin and/or by interfering with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway which leads to microsatellite instability (MSI). This work, performed on 88 CRC patients, revealed a significant increase in E. coli colonization in the MSI CRC phenotype. In the same way, E. coli persistence and internalization were increased in vitro in MMR-deficient cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that colibactin-producing E. coli induce inhibition of the MLH1 MMR proteins, which could lead to genomic instability. However, colibactin-producing E. coli were more frequently identified in microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC. This work suggests differences in the involvement of colibactin-producing E. coli in colorectal carcinogenesis according to the CRC phenotype. Further host/pathogens interactions studies should take into account CRC phenotypes.

  11. Antimicrobial Human β-Defensins in the Colon and Their Role in Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo R. Cobo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available β-defensins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides secreted by diverse cell types including colonic epithelial cells. Human β-defensins form an essential component of the intestinal lumen in innate immunity. The defensive mechanisms of β-defensins include binding to negatively charged microbial membranes that cause cell death and chemoattraction of immune cells. The antimicrobial activity of β-defensin is well reported in vitro against several enteric pathogens and in non-infectious processes such as inflammatory bowel diseases, which alters β-defensin production. However, the role of β-defensin in vivo in its interaction with other immune components in host defense against bacteria, viruses and parasites with more complex membranes is still not well known. This review focuses on the latest findings regarding the role of β-defensin in relevant human infectious and non-infectious diseases of the colonic mucosa. In addition, we summarize the most significant aspects of β-defensin and its antimicrobial role in a variety of disease processes.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization: Modulation of Host Immune Response and Impact on Human Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Aisling F.; Leech, John M.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    In apparent contrast to its invasive potential Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the anterior nares of 20–80% of the human population. The relationship between host and microbe appears particularly individualized and colonization status seems somehow predetermined. After decolonization, persistent carriers often become re-colonized with their prior S. aureus strain, whereas non-carriers resist experimental colonization. Efforts to identify factors facilitating colonization have thus far largely focused on the microorganism rather than on the human host. The host responds to S. aureus nasal colonization via local expression of anti-microbial peptides, lipids, and cytokines. Interplay with the co-existing microbiota also influences colonization and immune regulation. Transient or persistent S. aureus colonization induces specific systemic immune responses. Humoral responses are the most studied of these and little is known of cellular responses induced by colonization. Intriguingly, colonized patients who develop bacteremia may have a lower S. aureus-attributable mortality than their non-colonized counterparts. This could imply a staphylococcal-specific immune “priming” or immunomodulation occurring as a consequence of colonization and impacting on the outcome of infection. This has yet to be fully explored. An effective vaccine remains elusive. Anti-S. aureus vaccine strategies may need to drive both humoral and cellular immune responses to confer efficient protection. Understanding the influence of colonization on adaptive response is essential to intelligent vaccine design, and may determine the efficacy of vaccine-mediated immunity. Clinical trials should consider colonization status and the resulting impact of this on individual patient responses. We urgently need an increased appreciation of colonization and its modulation of host immunity. PMID:24409186

  13. Induction of farnesoid X receptor signaling in germ-free mice colonized with a human microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlström, Annika; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Ståhlman, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota influences the development and progression of metabolic diseases partly by metabolism of bile acids (BAs) and modified signaling through the farnesoid X receptor (FXR). In this study, we aimed to determine how the human gut microbiota metabolizes murine BAs and affects FXR...... signaling in colonized mice. We colonized germ-free mice with cecal content from a mouse donor or feces from a human donor and euthanized the mice after short-term (2 weeks) or long-term (15 weeks) colonization. We analyzed the gut microbiota and BA composition and expression of FXR target genes in ileum...... of tauro-β-muricholic acid and induce expression of FXR target genes Fgf15 and Shp in ileum after long-term colonization. We show that a human microbiota can change BA composition and induce FXR signaling in colonized mice, but the levels of secondary BAs produced are lower than in mice colonized...

  14. Ornithine decarboxylase, mitogen-activated protein kinase and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expressions in human colon tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takahiro Nemoto; Shunichiro Kubota; Hideyuki Ishida; Nobuo Murata; Daijo Hashimoto

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expressions of omithine decarboxylase (ODC), MMP-2, and Erk, and their relationship in human colon tumors.METHODS: ODC activity, MMP-2 expression, and mitogenactivated protein (MAP) kinase activity (Erk phosphorylation) were determined in 58 surgically removed human colon tumors and their adjacent normal tissues, using [1-14C]-ornithine as a substrate, ELISA assay, and Western blotting, respectively.RESULTS: ODC activity, MMP-2 expression, and Erk phosphorylation were significantly elevated in colon tumors, compared to those in adjacent normal tissues. A significant correlation was observed between ODC activities and MMP-2 levels.CONCLUSION: This is the first report showing a significant correlation between ODC activities and MMP-2 levels in human colon tumors. As MMP-2 is involved in cancer invasion and metastasis, and colon cancer overexpresses ODC, suppression of ODC expression may be a rational approach to treat colon cancer which overexpresses ODC.

  15. Separation of water-soluble metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene formed by cultured human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1979-01-01

    A method has been developed to separate conjugated metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene into three major fractions: sulfate esters, glucuronides and glutathione conjugates. In cultured human colon, formation of sulfate esters and glutathione conjugates is the major conjugation pathway, while formation o......-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene were the major substrates for sulfotransferase in cultured human colon....

  16. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum affects the expression of genes involved in host defense functions and cholesterol absorption in colonic mucosa of db/db male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Zenta; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Mizushima, Katsura; Tokunaga, Makoto; Ishihara, Noriyuki; R Juneja, Lekh; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2012-07-01

    Biomedical evidence in the last 20 years has shown that the consumption of partially hydrolyzed guar gum may influence lipid and/or carbohydrate metabolism at many levels. Since intestine represents the first interface to interact with dietary partially hydrolyzed guar gum in vivo, we evaluated gene expression profiles in small intestinal mucosa of db/db mice fed with partially hydrolyzed guar gum in an effort to delineate its effect on the small intestine. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses were performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles in mice small intestinal mucosa. Among the 28,853 transcripts represented on the GeneChip® microarray, no more than 20 genes exhibited up- or down-regulation by 1.5-fold or more after four weeks following partially hydrolyzed guar gum consumption. No adverse effects were apparent. We detected up- or down-regulation of some genes known to be involved in host defense functions and cholesterol absorption.

  17. A comparison of Helicobacter pylori and non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter spp. Binding to canine gastric mucosa with defined gastric glycophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Irina; Freitas, Daniela P; Magalhães, Ana; Faria, Fátima; Lopes, Célia; Faustino, Augusto M; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2014-08-01

    The gastric mucosa of dogs is often colonized by non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH), while H. pylori is the predominant gastric Helicobacter species in humans. The colonization of the human gastric mucosa by H. pylori is highly dependent on the recognition of host glycan receptors. Our goal was to define the canine gastric mucosa glycophenotype and to evaluate the capacity of different gastric Helicobacter species to adhere to the canine gastric mucosa. The glycosylation profile in body and antral compartments of the canine gastric mucosa, with focus on the expression of histo-blood group antigens was evaluated. The in vitro binding capacity of FITC-labeled H. pylori and NHPH to the canine gastric mucosa was assessed in cases representative of the canine glycosylation pattern. The canine gastric mucosa lacks expression of type 1 Lewis antigens and presents a broad expression of type 2 structures and A antigen, both in the surface and glandular epithelium. Regarding the canine antral mucosa, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion score whereas in the body region the SabA-positive H. pylori strain was the strain that adhered more. The canine gastric mucosa showed a glycosylation profile different from the human gastric mucosa suggesting that alternative glycan receptors may be involved in Helicobacter spp. binding. Helicobacter pylori and NHPH strains differ in their ability to adhere to canine gastric mucosa. Among the NHPH, H. heilmannii s.s. presented the highest adhesion capacity in agreement with its reported colonization of the canine stomach. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Human papillomavirus-32-associated focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying HPV-16-positive papilloma-like lesions in oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Wang, Jiayi; Lei, Lei; Li, Yanzhong; Zhou, Min; Dan, Hongxia; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2013-05-01

    Human papillomavirus infection can cause a variety of benign or malignant oral lesions, and the various genotypes can cause distinct types of lesions. To our best knowledge, there has been no report of 2 different human papillomavirus-related oral lesions in different oral sites in the same patient before. This paper reported a patient with 2 different oral lesions which were clinically and histologically in accord with focal epithelial hyperplasia and oral papilloma, respectively. Using DNA extracted from these 2 different lesions, tissue blocks were tested for presence of human papillomavirus followed by specific polymerase chain reaction testing for 6, 11, 13, 16, 18, and 32 subtypes in order to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Finally, human papillomavirus-32-positive focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying human papillomavirus-16-positive oral papilloma-like lesions were detected in different sites of the oral mucosa. Nucleotide sequence sequencing further confirmed the results. So in our clinical work, if the simultaneous occurrences of different human papillomavirus associated lesions are suspected, the multiple biopsies from different lesions and detection of human papillomavirus genotype are needed to confirm the diagnosis.

  19. Characterization of Human Vaginal Mucosa Cells for Autologous In Vitro Cultured Vaginal Tissue Transplantation in Patients with MRKH Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Nodale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH is a rare syndrome characterized by congenital aplasia of the uterus and vagina. The most common procedure used for surgical reconstruction of the neovagina is the McIndoe vaginoplasty, which consists in creation of a vaginal canal covered with a full-thickness skin graft. Here we characterized the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue proposed as alternative material in our developed modified McIndoe vaginoplasty in order to underlie its importance in autologous total vaginal replacement. To this aim human vaginal mucosa cells (HVMs were isolated from vaginal mucosa of patients affected by MRKH syndrome and characterized with respect to growth kinetics, morphology, PAS staining, and expression of specific epithelial markers by immunofluorescence, Western blot, and qRT-PCR analyses. The presence of specific epithelial markers along with the morphology and the presence of mucified cells demonstrated the epithelial nature of HMVs, important for an efficient epithelialization of the neovagina walls and for creating a functional vaginal cavity. Moreover, these cells presented characteristics of effective proliferation as demonstrated by growth kinetics assay. Therefore, the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue might represent a highly promising and valid material for McIndoe vaginoplasty.

  20. Radiosensitivity of human colon cancer cell enhanced by immunoliposomal docetaxel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Wei Wang; Hui-Lan Lü; Chang-Cheng Song; Hong Liu; Cong-Gao Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To enhance the radiosensitivity of human colon cancer cells by docetaxel.METHODS: Immunoliposomal docetaxel was prepared by coupling monodonal antibody against carcinoembryonic antigen to cyanuric chloride at the PEG terminus of liposome. LoVo adenocarcinoma cell line was treated with immunoliposomal docetaxel or/and irradiation. MTT colorimetric assay was used to estimate cytotoxicity of immunoliposomal docetaxel and radiotoxicity. Cell cycle redistribution and apoptosis were determined with flow cytometry. Survivin expression in LoVo cells was verified by immunohistochemistry. D801 morphologic analysis system was used to semi-quantify immunohistochemical staining of survivin.RESULTS: Cytotoxicity was induced by immunoliposomal docetaxel alone in a dose-dependent manner. Immunoliposomal docetaxel yielded a cytotoxicity effect at a low dose of 2 nmol/L. With a single dose irradiation, the relative surviving fraction of LoVo cells showed a dosedependent response, but there were no significant changes as radiation delivered from 4 to 8 Gy. Compared with liposomal docetaxel or single dose irradiation,strongly radiopotentiating effects of immunoliposomal docetaxel on LoVo cells were observed. A low dose of immunoliposomal docetaxel could yield sufficient radiosensitivity. Immunoliposomal docetaxel were achieved both specificity of the conjugated antibody and drug radiosensitization. Combined with radiation,immunoliposomal docetaxel significantly increased the percentage of G2/M cells and induced apoptosis, but significantly decreased the percentage of cells in G2/G1 and S phase by comparison with liposomal docetaxel.Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the brown stained survivin was mainly in cytoplasm of LoVo cells.Semi-quantitative analysis of the survivin immunostaining showed that the expression of survivin in LoVo cells under irradiation with immunoliposomal docetaxel was significantly decreased.CONCLUSION: Immunoliposomal docetaxel is strongly effective

  1. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-19

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer initiation by performing gene set enrichment analysis on gene expression from human colon tissues. We find that KRASmut imposes the embryonic stem cell-like program during human colon cancer initiation from colon adenoma to stage I carcinoma. Expression of miR145, an embryonic SC program inhibitor, promotes cell lineage differentiation marker expression in KRASmut colon cancer cells and significantly suppresses their tumorigenicity. Our data support an in vivo plasticity model of human colon cancer initiation that merges the intrinsic stem cell properties of aberrant colon stem cells with the embryonic stem cell-like program induced by KRASmut to optimize malignant transformation. Inhibition of the embryonic SC-like program in KRASmut colon cancer cells reveals a novel therapeutic strategy to programmatically inhibit KRASmut tumors and prevent colon cancer.

  2. Proteome stability analysis of snap frozen, RNAlater preserved, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colon mucosal biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Kastaniegaard, Kenneth; Padurariu, Simona;

    2016-01-01

    . The comparative analysis was performed on 24 colon mucosa biopsies, extracted from the sigmoideum of two gastroenterologically healthy participants for the purpose of this study. A set of biopsies were additionally stored for 30 min at room temperature prior to formalin-fixation. The samples were analyzed by high...

  3. A frequência do HPV na mucosa oral normal de indivíduos sadios por meio da PCR The frequency of human papillomavirus findings in normal oral mucosa of healthy people by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Esquenazi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Os papilomavírus humanos (HPV são DNA vírus pertencentes à família papilomaviridae com grupos de baixo e alto risco que infectam a pele e a mucosa podendo induzir a formação de tumores epiteliais benignos e malignos. Na mucosa oral, estes vírus têm sido associados a papilomas orais, hiperplasias epiteliais focais, leucoplasias e neoplasias orais. OBJETIVO: Estudar a frequência do HPV em mucosa oral de indivíduos normais. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Trabalho prospectivo em coorte transversal. Participaram desse estudo 100 indivíduos voluntários, faixa etária de 20 a 31 anos, estudantes universitários, sem história, queixas ou lesões visíveis ao exame físico de cavidade oral e orofaringe. Foram submetidos a questionário com perguntas referentes à epidemiologia da infecção pelo HPV. Foi colhido material de mucosa oral por raspado com escova e analisado pelo PCR. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostraram ausência de HPV em todas as amostras. CONCLUSÃO: Parece ter havido participação do alto nível socioeconômico com alimentação rica em carotenoides e vitamina C, baixo consumo tabágico e etílico e comportamento heterossexual predominantemente monogâmico com uso regular de preservativos.The human papillomavirus (HPV is a DNA virus, which belongs to papillomaviridae family, being of low and high risk, which infect the skin and mucous membranes and can induce benign and malign tumor formation. In the oral mucosa they have been associated with oral papilloma, focal epithelial hyperplasia, leucoplakia and oral neoplasia. AIM: to study the frequency of HPV finding in oral mucosa of normal people. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective study, cross-sectional cohort. One hundred volunteers, young adults, healthy, aged between 20 and 31 years, university students with no history, no complains, without oral or oropharyngeal lesions. They were submitted to a questionnaire with questions regarding HPV infection epidemiology. The samples were

  4. Prevalence and genotype identification of human JC virus in colon cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Paul Yann; Fung, Chiung-Yau; Chang, Fang-Pei; Huang, Wen-Shih; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Jeng-Yi; Chang, Deching

    2008-10-01

    Although JC virus (JCV), a human polyomavirus, has been detected in colon cancers, the association between JCV and colon cancer remains controversial. In Taiwan, the prevalence of JCV infection in colon cancer patients has not been reported. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate JCV infection in colon cancers in Taiwan. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 22 colon cancer patients were examined in this study. Nested PCR was performed to detect viral genomic DNA. The product of the nested PCR flanking the JCV regulatory region was sequenced further. Viral large tumor protein, LT, and late capsid protein, VP1, were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nested PCR revealed JCV genomic DNA in 86.4% (19/22) of the colon cancer tissue samples. Both rearranged and archetypal genotypes of JCV were identified. Expression of JCV LT was positive in 63.6% (14/22) of the examined colon cancer tissue samples but not in any adjacent normal region. Expression of viral capsid protein VP1 was not detected in any of the tissues examined. The current study demonstrates that JCV genomic DNA was present in the examined colon cancer tissues. The genotypes of JCV in colon cancer tissues were also identified. Expression of viral early protein but not structural capsid protein was detected in the examined colon cancer tissues. Furthermore, a high prevalence of JCV infection in colon cancer tissues in Taiwan was also demonstrated.

  5. An In Vitro Model to Evaluate the Impact of the Soluble Factors from the Colonic Mucosa of Collagenous Colitis Patients on T Cells: Enhanced Production of IL-17A and IL-10 from Peripheral CD4+ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Kumawat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble factors from intestinal mucosal cells contribute to immune homeostasis in the gut. We have established an in vitro model to investigate the regulatory role of soluble factors from inflamed intestinal mucosa of collagenous colitis (CC patients in the differentiation of T cells. Peripheral blood CD4+ T cells from healthy donors were polyclonally activated in the presence of conditioned medium (CM generated from denuded biopsies (DNB or isolated lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs from mucosal biopsies from CC patients compared to noninflamed controls, to determine proliferation and secretion of cytokines involved in T-cell differentiation. Compared to controls, we observed significantly increased production of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-17A, IL-6, and IL-1β and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in the presence of CC-DNB-CM. The most pronounced effect of CC-LPMC-CM on peripheral CD4+ T cells was a trend towards increased production of IL-17A and IL-10. A trend towards reduced inhibition of T-cell proliferation was noted in the presence of CC-DNB-CM. In conclusion, our in vitro model reveals implications of soluble factors from CC colonic mucosa on peripheral T cells, enhancing their production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  6. Modeling of human colonic blood flow for a novel artificial anal sphincter system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng ZAN; Guo-zheng YAN; Hua LIU

    2008-01-01

    A novel artificial anal sphincter system has been developed to simulate the normal physiology of the human anorectum. With the goal of engineering a safe and reliable device, the model of human colonic blood flow has been built and the relationship between the colonic blood flow rate and the operating occlusion pressure of the anorectum is achieved. The tissue ischemia is analyzed based on constitutive relations for human anorectum. The results suggest that at the planned operating occlusion pressure of less than 4 kPa the artificial anal sphincter should not risk the vaseularity of the human colon.

  7. Interaction of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with mucin. A key component of the human mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Claudia; Barkleit, Astrid [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the potential health risks caused by the ingestion of lanthanides (Ln) and actinides (An), investigations into the chemical behavior of these metals in the human gastrointestinal tract are necessary. Mucin is an important part of the protective mucosa layer in the digestive system. We have recently reported that mucin interacts strongly with Eu(III) and Cm(III), representatives of Ln(III) and An(III), respectively, under in vivo conditions. In order to investigate the complexation behavior of this protein with Ln(III)/An(III), TRLFS measurements were performed on Eu(III)/Cm(III)-mucin solutions with different protein concentrations and at different pH. The results indicate the formation of at least two independent mucin species. At higher pH, the formation of hydroxide species was also observed.

  8. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of europium(III) and curium(III) with components of the human mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Claudia; Barkleit, Astrid [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the health risks of lanthanides (Ln) and radiotoxic actinides (An) in case of ingestion accidents etc., investigations into the chemical reactions of these metals in the human gastrointestinal tract are necessary. Our previous study revealed that mucin, an important part of the protective mucosa layer in the digestive system, shows a strong interaction with Eu(III). Based on these results, the present study focuses on the components of this glycoprotein and identified N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) as the dominant binding carbohydrate of mucin. TRLFS measurements suggest the formation of a 1: 1 complex with log β of 3.2 ± 0.1 for Eu(III) and 3.3 ± 0.1 for Cm(III), respectively.

  9. Probiotics modify human intestinal mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiguang; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Renyuan; Zhu, Qingchao; Wu, Wen; Qin, Huanlong

    2015-10-01

    Studies using animal models have demonstrated that probiotics may have a beneficial role in the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the underlying mechanism of the beneficial effects of interventional probiotic treatment on gut microbiota has remained elusive. In the present study, pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes was conducted in order to determine the extent to which probiotics alter the microbiota. The observations of the present study indicated that the microbial structure of cancerous tissue differed significantly from that of healthy individuals and that the CRC microbiota exhibited lower diversity. It was indicated that interventional treatment with probiotics increased the density and diversity of mucosal microbes, and altered the mucosa‑associated microbiota. Pyrosequencing demonstrated that probiotics significantly reduced (5‑fold) the abundance of a bacterial taxon assigned to the genus Fusobacterium, which had been previously suggested to be a contributing factor to increase tumorigenesis. Accordingly, interventional probiotic therapy is suggested to be able to improve the composition of the mucosal microbial flora and significantly reduce the abundance of mucosa-associated pathogens in patients with CRC.

  10. Analysis of the Distribution of Mucins in Adult Human Gastric Mucosa and Its Functional Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mucins are complex composition of carbohydrates seen in the epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Normal distribution of such mucins in different part of the GIT and its alteration in various inflammatory, benign and malignant lesions of GIT has aroused interest in the field of histochemistry. Aim By applying variety of histochemical techniques an attempt has been made to draw a map of mucin secretion by the different epithelial cell types in different parts of the stomach. Materials and Methods Fifty samples were taken each from different parts of the stomach like fundus, body and pylorus, from dissected fresh specimens (total of 150 specimens). Tissue samples were subjected for routine process and studied for histological and different histochemical staining. Results Mucin pattern in adult predominantly secretes neutral mucosubstances. Surface epithelium shows predominant neutral mucin while cardiac and gastric glands with foveolar cells show moderate amount. Sialomucin is present in a few cells of the surface epithelium, foveolar cells and in most of the mucous neck cells. Small amount of sialomucin and sulphomucin are found in surface epithelial foveolar cells while traces of sulphomucin are found in deep foveolar cells. Mucous neck cells secrete both sulphomucin and sialomucin. Conclusion Normal gastric mucosa adjacent to gastric ulcers and malignant tumours of stomach secretes mucins which differ histochemically and biochemically from that of normal. Early recognition of such changes could be useful in recognizing the different type of carcinomas and their prognosis. PMID:27042436

  11. Raman fiberoptic probe for monitoring human tissue engineered oral mucosa constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Okagbare, Paul; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-02-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, there is a need for tissue engineered constructs for dental implants, reconstructions due to trauma, oral cancer or congenital defects. A non-invasive quality monitoring of the fabrication of tissue engineered constructs during their production and implantation is a required component of any successful tissue engineering technique. We demonstrate the design and application of a Raman spectroscopic probe for rapid and noninvasive monitoring of Ex Vivo Produced Oral Mucosa Equivalent constructs (EVPOMEs). We conducted in vivo studies to identify Raman spectroscopic failure indicators for EVPOMEs (already developed in vitro), and found that Raman spectra of EVPOMEs exposed to thermal stress showed correlation of the band height ratio of CH2 deformation to phenylalanine ring breathing modes, providing a Raman metric to distinguish between viable and nonviable constructs. This is the first step towards the ultimate goal to design a stand-alone system, which will be usable in a clinical setting, as the data processing and analysis will be performed with minimal user intervention, based on already established and tested Raman spectroscopic indicators for EVPOMEs.

  12. Human oral mucosa tissue-engineered constructs monitored by Raman fiber-optic probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Kim, Roderick Y; Matthews, Robert V; Marcelo, Cynthia L; Feinberg, Stephen E; Morris, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    In maxillofacial and oral surgery, there is a need for the development of tissue-engineered constructs. They are used for reconstructions due to trauma, dental implants, congenital defects, or oral cancer. A noninvasive monitoring of the fabrication of tissue-engineered constructs at the production and implantation stages done in real time is extremely important for predicting the success of tissue-engineered grafts. We demonstrated a Raman spectroscopic probe system, its design and application, for real-time ex vivo produced oral mucosa equivalent (EVPOME) constructs noninvasive monitoring. We performed in vivo studies to find Raman spectroscopic indicators for postimplanted EVPOME failure and determined that Raman spectra of EVPOMEs preexposed to thermal stress during manufacturing procedures displayed correlation of the band height ratio of CH2 deformation to phenylalanine ring breathing modes, giving a Raman metric to distinguish between healthy and compromised postimplanted constructs. This study is the step toward our ultimate goal to develop a stand-alone system, to be used in a clinical setting, where the data collection and analysis are conducted on the basis of these spectroscopic indicators with minimal user intervention.

  13. Antioxidant activity of inulin and its role in the prevention of human colonic muscle cell impairment induced by lipopolysaccharide mucosal exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Pasqualetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fructans, such as inulin, are dietary fibers which stimulate gastro-intestinal (GI function acting as prebiotics. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS impairs GI motility, through production of reactive oxygen species. The antioxidant activity of various fructans was tested and the protective effect of inulin on colonic smooth muscle cell (SMC impairment, induced by exposure of human mucosa to LPS, was assessed in an ex vivo experimental model. METHODS: The antioxidant capacity of fructans was measured in an in vitro system that simulates cooking and digestion processes. Human colonic mucosa and submucosa, obtained from disease-free margins of resected segments for cancer, were sealed between two chambers, with the mucosal side facing upwards with Krebs solution with or without purified LPS from a pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli (O111:B4 and inulin (Frutafit IQ, and the submucosal side facing downwards into Krebs solution. The solutions on the submucosal side were collected following mucosal exposure to Krebs in the absence (N-undernatant or presence of LPS (LPS-undernatant or LPS+inulin (LPS+INU-undernatant. Undernatants were tested for their antioxidant activity and the effects on SMCs contractility. Inulin protective effects on mucosa and submucosa layers were assessed measuring the protein oxidation level in the experimental conditions analyzed. RESULTS: Antioxidant activity of inulin, which was significantly higher compared to simple sugars, remained unaltered despite cooking and digestion processes. Inulin protected the mucosal and submucosal layers against protein oxidation. Following exposure to LPS-undernatant, a significant decrease in maximal acetylcholine (Ach-induced contraction was observed when compared to the contraction induced in cells incubated with the N-undernatant (4±1% vs 25±5% respectively, P<0.005 and this effect was completely prevented by pre-incubation of LPS with Inulin (35±5%. CONCLUSIONS: Inulin protects

  14. CD4CD8αα lymphocytes, a novel human regulatory T cell subset induced by colonic bacteria and deficient in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Sarrabayrouse

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available How the microbiota affects health and disease is a crucial question. In mice, gut Clostridium bacteria are potent inducers of colonic interleukin (IL-10-producing Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Treg, which play key roles in the prevention of colitis and in systemic immunity. In humans, although gut microbiota dysbiosis is associated with immune disorders, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In contrast with mice, the contribution of Foxp3 Treg in colitis prevention has been questioned, suggesting that other compensatory regulatory cells or mechanisms may exist. Here we addressed the regulatory role of the CD4CD8 T cells whose presence had been reported in the intestinal mucosa and blood. Using colonic lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL from healthy individuals, and those with colon cancer and irritable bowel disease (IBD, we demonstrated that CD4CD8αα (DP8α T lymphocytes expressed most of the regulatory markers and functions of Foxp3 Treg and secreted IL-10. Strikingly, DP8α LPL and PBL exhibited a highly skewed repertoire toward the recognition of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major Clostridium species of the human gut microbiota, which is decreased in patients with IBD. Furthermore, the frequencies of DP8α PBL and colonic LPL were lower in patients with IBD than in healthy donors and in the healthy mucosa of patients with colon cancer, respectively. Moreover, PBL and LPL from most patients with active IBD failed to respond to F. prausnitzii in contrast to PBL and LPL from patients in remission and/or healthy donors. These data (i uncover a Clostridium-specific IL-10-secreting Treg subset present in the human colonic LP and blood, (ii identify F. prausnitzii as a major inducer of these Treg, (iii argue that these cells contribute to the control or prevention of colitis, opening new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IBD, and (iv provide new tools to address the systemic impact of both these Treg

  15. Effects of a grape-supplemented diet on proliferation and Wnt signaling in the colonic mucosa are greatest for those over age 50 and with high arginine consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Randall F; Martinez, Micaela; Planutis, Kestutis; Planutiene, Marina

    2015-06-19

    A diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and a grape-derived compound, resveratrol, have been linked to a reduced incidence of colon cancer. In vitro and in vivo, resveratrol suppresses Wnt signaling, a pathway constitutively activated in over 85 % of colon cancers.Thirty participants were placed on a low resveratrol diet and subsequently allocated to one of three groups ingesting 1/3-to-1 lb (0.15-0.45 kg) of grapes per day for 2 weeks. Dietary information was collected via 24-h recall. Colon biopsies for biomarker analysis were obtained pre- and post-grape and evaluated for the expression of Wnt pathway target genes and for markers of proliferation by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.Participants lost an average of 2 · 6 lb (1.2 kg, p = 0 · 0018) during the period of grape ingestion. The expression of CyclinD1 (p grape ingestion. Individuals over 50 years of age and those with high dietary arginine consumption had increased basal expression of CyclinD1, AXIN2, cMYC and CD133 (p value range 0 · 04 to grape ingestion, were reduced to levels seen in younger participants.The reduction in Wnt signaling and mucosal proliferation seen following short-term ingestion of 1/3-1 lb (0.15-0.45 kg) of grapes per day may reduce the risk of mutational events that can facilitate colon carcinogenesis. The potential benefit is most marked for high-risk older individuals and individuals whose diet is high in arginine intake. Dietary grape supplementation may play a role in colon cancer prevention for high-risk individuals.

  16. Polo-like kinase 1 expression is a prognostic factor in human colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wilko Weichert; Glen Kristiansen; Mathias Schmidt; Volker Gekeler; Aurelia Noske; Silvia Niesporek; Manfred Dietel; Carsten Denkert

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the expression patterns and prognostic implications of the mitotic regulator Polo-like kinase 1(PLK1) in colon cancer.METHODS: Expression of PLK1 was investigated by immunohistochemistry (158 cases) and immunoblotting in tissue of colon adenomas and adenocarcinomas. PLK1expression patterns were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and patient prognosis. In addition, expression of PLK1 was evaluated by immunoblot and PCR in colon carcinoma cell lines, and coexpression of PLK1 with the proliferation marker Ki-67 was investigated.RESULTS: Weak PLK1 expression was observed in normal colon mucosa and adenomas. In contrast, 66.7% of carcinomas showed strong expression of PLK1.Overexpression of PLK1 correlated positively with Dukes stage (P<0.001), tumor stage (P = 0.001) and nodal status (P<0.05). Additionally, PLK1 expression was a prognostic marker in univariate survival analysis (P<0.01) and had independent prognostic significance (RR = 3.3, P = 0.02)in patients with locoregional disease. Expression of PLK1 mRNA and protein was detected in all cell lines investigated. Coexpression of PLK1 and Ki-67 was observed in the majority of colon cancer cells, but a considerable proportion of cells showed PLK1 positivity without Ki-67expression.CONCLUSION: PLK1 is a new prognostic marker for colon carcinoma patients and may be involved in tumorigenesis and progression of colon cancer. Strategies focusing on PLK1 inhibition in vivo might therefore represent a promising new therapeutic approach for this tumor entity.

  17. Constitutive expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the normal human colonic epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Andresen, L; Normark, M

    2002-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the human colon is considered expressed only in inflammatory states such as ulcerative or collagenous colitis. As subtle iNOS labelling was previously observed in some colonic mucosal biopsies from a heterogeneous group of controls with non-inflamed bowel...

  18. Constitutive expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the normal human colonic epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Andresen, Lars; Normark, M;

    2002-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the human colon is considered expressed only in inflammatory states such as ulcerative or collagenous colitis. As subtle iNOS labelling was previously observed in some colonic mucosal biopsies from a heterogeneous group of controls with non-inflamed bowel...

  19. Gene expression profiling in human gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Véronique J; Moreilhon, Chimène; Brest, Patrick D; Lassalle, Sandra; Le Brigand, Kevin; Sicard, Dominique; Raymond, Josette; Lamarque, Dominique; Hébuterne, Xavier A; Mari, Bernard; Barbry, Pascal Jp; Hofman, Paul M

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms associated with Helicobacter pylori infection enhance susceptibility of the gastric epithelium to carcinogenic conversion. We have characterized the gene expression profiles of gastric biopsies from 69 French Caucasian patients, of which 43 (62%) were infected with H. pylori. The bacterium was detected in 27 of the 42 antral biopsies examined and in 16 of the 27 fundic biopsies. Infected biopsies were selected for the presence of chronic active gastritis, in absence of metaplasia and dysplasia of the gastric mucosa. Infected antral and fundic biopsies exhibited distinct transcriptional responses. Altered responses were linked with: (1) the extent of polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, (2) bacterial density, and (3) the presence of the virulence factors vacA, babA2, and cagA. Robust modulation of transcripts associated with Toll-like receptors, signal transduction, the immune response, apoptosis, and the cell cycle was consistent with expected responses to Gram-negative bacterial infection. Altered expression of interferon-regulated genes (IFITM1, IRF4, STAT6), indicative of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II-mediated and Th1-specific responses, as well as altered expression of GATA6, have previously been described in precancerous states. Upregulation of genes abundantly expressed in cancer tissues (UBD, CXCL13, LY96, MAPK8, MMP7, RANKL, CCL18) or in stem cells (IFITM1 and WFDC2) may reveal a molecular switch towards a premalignant state in infected tissues. Tissue microarray analysis of a large number of biopsies, which were either positive or negative for the cag-A virulence factor, when compared to each other and to noninfected controls, confirmed observed gene alterations at the protein level, for eight key transcripts. This study provides 'proof-of-principle' data for identifying molecular mechanisms driving H. pylori-associated carcinogenesis before morphological evidence of changes along the neoplastic progression pathway.

  20. Proteome of human colon cancer stem cells: A comparative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zou; Xiao-Feng Yu; Zhi-Jun Bao; Jie Dong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To isolate and identify the biological characteristics of human colon cancer stem cells (SW1116 cells) and further study their proteome. METHODS: SW1116 cells were isolated and cultured with a serum-free medium (SFM). Sphere formation was assayed to observe the formation of colon cancer stem cell spheres. SW1116 cells were inoculated into a serum-containing medium for observing their differentiation characteristics. Proliferation curve and cross-resistance of SW1116 cells to different drugs were detected by MTT. Percentage of SP cells in SW1116 cells was detected with Hoechst33342 staining. Telomerase activity in SW1116cells was checked by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Expressions of stem cell relevant genes and proteins were detected by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Total protein was isolated from SW1116 cells by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and differentially expressed proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). RESULTS: The isolated SW1116 cells presented as spheroid and suspension growths in SFM with a strong self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation and drug-resistance ability. The percentage of SP cells in SW1116 cells was 38.9%. The SW1116 cells co-expressed the CD133 and CD29 proteins. The telomerase activity in SW1116 cells was increased. The expressions of different stem cell relevant genes and proteins were detected. The proteomic analysis showed that the 26 protein spots were differently expressed in SW1116 cells and 10 protein spots were identified as ubiquitin fusiondegradation 1-like protein, nuclear chloride channel protein, tubulin b, Raichu404X, stratifin, F-actin capping protein a-1 subunit, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 delta isoform 2, hypothetical protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and guanine nucleotide binding protein b polypeptide 2-like 1, respectively. CONCLUSION: SW1116 cells are biologically

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Fragments Released upon Bacterial Contact with the Human Lung Mucosa Alter the Neutrophil Response to Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordo, Julia M.; Arcos, Jesús; Kelley, Holden V.; Diangelo, Lauren; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Youngmin, Ellie; Wewers, Mark D.; Wang, Shu-Hua; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the World Health Organization reported that one person dies of tuberculosis (TB) every 21 s. A host environment that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) finds during its route of infection is the lung mucosa bathing the alveolar space located in the deepest regions of the lungs. We published that human lung mucosa, or alveolar lining fluid (ALF), contains an array of hydrolytic enzymes that can significantly alter the M.tb surface during infection by cleaving off parts of its cell wall. This interaction results in two different outcomes: modifications on the M.tb cell wall surface and release of M.tb cell wall fragments into the environment. Typically, one of the first host immune cells at the site of M.tb infection is the neutrophil. Neutrophils can mount an extracellular and intracellular innate immune response to M.tb during infection. We hypothesized that exposure of neutrophils to ALF-induced M.tb released cell wall fragments would prime neutrophils to control M.tb infection better. Our results show that ALF fragments activate neutrophils leading to an increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative radicals. However, neutrophil exposure to these fragments reduces production of chemoattractants (i.e., interleukin-8), and degranulation, with the subsequent reduction of myeloperoxidase release, and does not induce cytotoxicity. Unexpectedly, these ALF fragment-derived modulations in neutrophil activity do not further, either positively or negatively, contribute to the intracellular control of M.tb growth during infection. However, secreted products from neutrophils primed with ALF fragments are capable of regulating the activity of resting macrophages. These results indicate that ALF-induced M.tb fragments could further contribute to the control of M.tb growth and local killing by resident neutrophils by switching on the total oxidative response and limiting migration of neutrophils to the infection site. PMID:28373877

  2. Single Exposure of Human Oral Mucosa Fibroblasts to Ultraviolet B Radiation Reduces Proliferation and Induces COX-2 Expression and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Boza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The lip vermillion constitutes a transition tissue, between oral mucosa and skin, where oral mucosal cells from epithelial and connective tissue compartments are exposed to ultraviolet (UV sunlight. Fibroblasts are abundant resident cells of the connective tissue which are key regulators of extracellular matrix composition, as well as, epithelial and endothelial cell function. UVB light, an inherent component of sunlight, causes several alterations in skin fibroblasts, including premature senescence and increased cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expression. To assess if UVB irradiation had similar effects on fibroblasts derived from human oral mucosa (HOM, primary cultures of HOM fibroblasts were irradiated with a single dose of 30 or 60 mJ/cm²of UVB light or sham-irradiated. Fibroblast proliferation was assessed from 3 to 48 hrs after UVB-irradiation utilizing [³H]-thymidine incorporation and MTT assays. In addition, COX-2 mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR, and PGE2 production was assessed using enzyme immunoassay from 0.5 to 24 hrs after UVB-irradiation. The results showed a significant decrease in proliferation of UVB-irradiated HOM fibroblasts as compared to controls as measured by both [³H]-thymidine incorporation and MTT assays (p<0.001. HOM fibroblasts had increased COX-2 mRNA expression at 0.5 and 12 hrs after irradiation, and PGE2 production was elevated at 12 and 24 hrs post-irradiation as compared to controls (p<0.05. The results showed an inhibitory effect of a single dose of UVB irradiation on HOM fibroblast proliferation with an increase in COX-2 expression and activation. Therefore, photodamaged fibroblasts may play and important role in the pathogenesis of UV-induced lesions of the lip.

  3. A Controlled Challenge Study on Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate (DEHP) in House Dust and the Immune Response in Human Nasal Mucosa of Allergic Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Deutschle, Tom; Reiter, Rudolf; Butte, Werner; Heinzow, Birger; Keck, Tilman; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    Background Few studies have yet addressed the effects of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in house dust on human nasal mucosa. Objectives We investigated the effects of house dust containing DEHP on nasal mucosa of healthy and house dust mite (HDM)–allergic subjects in a short-term exposure setting. Methods We challenged 16 healthy and 16 HDM-allergic subjects for 3 hr with house dust at a concentration of 300 μg/m3 containing either low (0.41 mg/g) or high (2.09 mg/g) levels of DEHP. Exposu...

  4. In vivo analysis of tissue by Raman microprobe: examination of human skin lesions and esophagus Barrett's mucosa on an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfayli, Ali; Piot, Olivier; Derancourt, Sylvie; Cadiot, Guillaume; Diebold, Marie D.; Bernard, Philippe; Manfait, Michel

    2006-02-01

    In the last few years, Raman spectroscopy has been increasingly used for the characterization of normal and pathological tissues. A new Raman system, constituted of optic fibers bundle coupled to an axial Raman spectrometer (Horiba Jobin Yvon SAS), was developed for in vivo investigations. Here, we present in vivo analysis on two tissues: human skin and esophagus mucosa on a rat model. The skin is a directly accessible organ, representing a high diversity of lesions and cancers. Including malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma, skin cancer is the cancer with the highest incidence worldwide. Several Raman investigations were performed to discriminate and classify different types of skin lesions, on thin sections of biopsies. Here, we try to characterize in vivo the different types of skin cancers in order to be able to detect them in their early stages of development and to define precisely the exeresis limits. Barrett's mucosa was also studied by in vivo examination of rat's esophagus. Barrett's mucosa, induced by gastro-esophageal reflux, is a pretumoral state that has to be carefully monitored due to its high risk of evolution in adenocarcinoma. A better knowledge of the histological transformation of esophagus epithelium in a Barrett's type will lead to a more efficient detection of the pathology for its early diagnosis. To study these changes, an animal model (rats developing Barrett's mucosa after duodenum - esophagus anastomosis) was used. Potential of vibrational spectroscopy for Barrett's mucosa identification is assessed on this model.

  5. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  6. Changes of the ultrastructure of colon mucosa after partial hepatectomy in rats%部分肝切除后大鼠结肠黏膜层超微结构的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐超智; 张文学; 高道文; 张新胜; 傅山岗; 徐存拴

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of partial hepatectomy (PH) on the ultrastructure of colon mucosa in rats. Methods Thirty-five healthy SD rats were divided into one normal control group, three sham-operation (SO) control groups and three operation (2/3 PH) groups. The rats in the SO and PH groups were sacrificed at the 6th, 12th and 24th hour after speration). The colon was collected and prepared as ultrathin sections. Samples were observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Results Compared with that in the normal control group rats, the ultrastructure of colon mucosa did not show distinct changes in the SO groups. However, significant changes were observed in PH 6- and 12- hour groups rats, for example, the microvilli became short, enterocyte interspace was greatly increased, mitochondria of goblet cells was impaired, endocrine cells were stimulated, degranulation of mast cells was marked, macrophages were filled with phagosomes, neutrophilic granulocytes were gathered to lamina propna. In PH 24-hour groups, endocrine cells were still active, but other changes were not evident. Conclusion After PH, colon mucosa barrier is acutely damaged which leads a rising rate of infection. However, stimulation of endocrine cells and mast cells may be helpful to liver regeneration and recovery%目的 探讨部分肝切除(PH)对大鼠结肠黏膜层超微结构的影响.方法 选取健康SD大鼠35只,分为1个正常对照组、3个假手术(SO)对照组和3个2/3 PH组,正常对照组大鼠直接处死,SO组和PH组大鼠分别于术后6、12和24 h处死,均取结肠固定后超薄切片,透射电镜下观察结肠黏膜层超微结构的变化.结果 与正常对照组相比,SO组大鼠结肠黏膜层超微结构无明显变化.PH 6和12 h组结肠黏膜层超微结构发生了较明显变化:微绒毛萎缩,上皮细胞间隙增大,杯形细胞线粒体损伤,内分泌细胞分泌增强,肥大细胞脱颗粒明显,巨噬细胞吞噬

  7. FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells with regulatory properties can be cultured from colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Johanne Lade

    2005-01-01

    /winged helix transcription factor FoxP3 is a master gene for T(reg) function and defects in the FoxP3 gene lead to a clinical picture similar to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Murine colitis can be cured by adoptive transfer of T(regs) and ex vivo-generated gut-specific T(regs) represent an attractive......(+) T cells. Thus, we demonstrate that FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells with regulatory properties can be propagated in vitro from inflamed mucosa of CD patients, which may be of interest in adoptive immunotherapy.......Summary CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (T(regs)) are involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance and ensure a balanced immune response competent of fighting pathogens and at the same time recognizing commensals as harmless. This feature is lost in Crohn's disease (CD). The forkhead...

  8. Prosecretory effect of loperamide in ileal and colonic mucosae of mice displaying high or low swim stress-induced analgesia associated with high and low endogenous opioid system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, A; Misicka, A; Sacharczuk, M; Fichna, J

    2017-07-26

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel habit. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of loperamide hydrochloride (LOP) and naloxone hydrochloride (NLX), an opioid agonist and antagonist, respectively, on electrolyte equilibrium in ileal and colonic mucosae and to estimate the possible influence of divergent activity of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) on IBS therapy. Two mouse lines bidirectionally selected for high (HA) and low (LA) swim stress-induced analgesia associated with high and low EOS activity were used in this study. To assess the effect of LOP and NLX on HA/LA lines in vivo, we used the castor oil-induced diarrhea model. Changes in electrolyte equilibrium were determined on the basis of short-circuit current (ΔIsc ) in isolated mouse ileum and colon exposed to LOP and NLX and stimulated by forskolin (FSK), veratridine (VER), and bethanechol (BET). In vivo, we found that LOP significantly prolonged time to appearance of diarrhea in HA and LA lines. In vitro, LOP and NLX increased ΔIsc in FSK- and VER-stimulated colonic tissue, respectively, in HA line. In the ileum, LOP increased ΔIsc in FSK- and VER-stimulated tissue and decreased ΔIsc in BET-stimulated tissues in HA line. Individual differences in EOS activity may play a crucial role in the response to the IBS-D therapy, thus some patients may be at an increased risk of side effects such as constipation or diarrhea. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. ATP-ase positive cells in human oral mucosa transplanted to nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, E; Kirkeby, S

    1981-01-01

    A model to study the differentiation of human oral epithelium in vivo utilizing transplantation of human tissue to nude mice has been described. Previous studies have described the epithelial cells in this model. In this study we demonstrate that 8 d after transplantation, Langerhans cells, ident...

  10. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-03-31

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis.

  11. Methanolic extract of white asparagus shoots activates TRAIL apoptotic death pathway in human cancer cells and inhibits colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousserouel, Souad; Le Grandois, Julie; Gossé, Francine; Werner, Dalal; Barth, Stephan W; Marchioni, Eric; Marescaux, Jacques; Raul, Francis

    2013-08-01

    Shoots of white asparagus are a popular vegetable dish, known to be rich in many bioactive phytochemicals reported to possess antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities. We evaluated the anticancer mechanisms of a methanolic extract of Asparagus officinalis L. shoots (Asp) on human colon carcinoma cells (SW480) and their derived metastatic cells (SW620), and Asp chemopreventive properties were also assessed in a model of colon carcinogenesis. SW480 and SW620 cell proliferation was inhibited by 80% after exposure to Asp (80 µg/ml). We demonstrated that Asp induced cell death through the activation of TRAIL DR4/DR5 death receptors leading to the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 and to cell apoptosis. By specific blocking agents of DR4/DR5 receptors we were able to prevent Asp-triggered cell death confirming the key role of DR4/DR5 receptors. We found also that Asp (80 µg/ml) was able to potentiate the effects of the cytokine TRAIL on cell death even in the TRAIL-resistant metastatic SW620 cells. Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM), once a week for two weeks. One week after (post-initiation) rats received daily Asp (0.01%, 14 mg/kg body weight) in drinking water. After 7 weeks of Asp-treatment the colon of rats exhibited a 50% reduction of the number of preneoplastic lesions (aberrant crypt foci). In addition Asp induced inhibition of several pro-inflammatory mediators, in association with an increased expression of host-defense mediators. In the colonic mucosa of Asp-treated rats we also confirmed the pro-apoptotic effects observed in vitro including the activation of the TRAIL death‑receptor signaling pathway. Taken together, our data highlight the chemopreventive effects of Asp on colon carcinogenesis and its ability to promote normal cellular homeostasis.

  12. Galangin induces human colon cancer cell death via the mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae Kwun; Kim, Mi Eun; Yoon, Ju Hwa; Bae, Sung Jin; Yeom, Jihye; Lee, Jun Sik

    2013-09-01

    Galangin is a member of flavonols and found in Alpinia officinarum, galangal root, and propolis. Previous studies have demonstrated that galangin has anti-cancer effects on several cancers, including melanoma, hepatoma, and leukaemia cells. However, anti-cancer activity of galangin on human colon cancer has not been established yet. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effects of galangin on two types of human colon cancer cells (HCT-15 and HT-29). We found that galangin induced apoptosis and DNA condensation of human colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. We also determined that galangin increased the activation of caspase-3 and -9, and release of apoptosis inducing factor from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm by Western blot analysis. In addition, galangin induced human colon cancer cell death through the alteration of mitochondria membrane potential and dysfunction. These results suggest that galangin induces apoptosis of HCT-15 and HT-29 human colon cancer cells and may prove useful in the development of therapeutic agents for human colon cancer.

  13. Functional characterization and localization of AQP3 in the human colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silberstein C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Water channels or aquaporins (AQPs have been identified in a large variety of tissues. Nevertheless, their role in the human gastrointestinal tract, where their action is essential for the reabsorption and secretion of water and electrolytes, is still unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the structure and function of water channels expressed in the human colon. A cDNA fragment of about 420 bp with a 98% identity to human AQP3 was amplified from human stomach, small intestine and colon by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and a transcript of 2.2 kb was expressed more abundantly in colon than in jejunum, ileum and stomach as indicated by Northern blots. Expression of mRNA from the colon of adults and children but not from other gastrointestinal regions in Xenopus oocytes enhanced the osmotic water permeability, and the urea and glycerol transport in a manner sensitive to an antisense AQP3 oligonucleotide, indicating the presence of functional AQP3. Immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence studies in human colon revealed that the AQP3 protein is restricted to the villus epithelial cells. The immunostaining within these cells was more intense in the apical than in the basolateral membranes. The presence of AQP3 in villus epithelial cells suggests that AQP3 is implicated in water absorption across human colonic surface cells.

  14. Passage from normal mucosa to adenoma and colon cancer: alteration of normal sCD30 mechanisms regulating TH1/TH2 cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contasta, Ida; Berghella, Anna Maria; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Adorno, Domenico

    2003-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is currently under intensive investigation to identify reliable prognostic indices for the early detection of disease. Adenomas have been identified as precursors of colorectal cancer and tumor establishment, and disease progression has been found to reflect a malfunction of the immune system. On the basis of the role of the CD30 molecule in the regulation of TH1/TH2 functions and our previous results, strongly suggesting the validity of serum TH1/TH2 cytokines in the study of tumor progression, we studied network interaction between the production of soluble (s) CD30/sBCl2 in whole blood culture [in basic conditions and after PHA, LPS, and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) stimulation] and levels of TH1/TH2 cytokines (IL2, IFN gamma, IL12, IL4, IL5, IL10). Peripheral blood from a group of healthy subjects, as well as from patients with adenoma and colorectal cancer was used. Our objective was to gain a better insight into the role of the CD30 molecule in the passage from normal mucosa to adenoma and tumor and identify specific disease markers. Our results suggest that the decrease in CD30 expression and the abnormal increase in Bcl2 expression, observed in the peripheral cells of both adenoma and tumor groups determine an imbalance between TH1/TH2 functions. Consequently, changes in sCD30/sBcl2 culture production and TH1/TH2 cytokine serum levels may be reliable markers for tumor progression. In fact, our overall data show that a decrease of sCD30 levels in basic and PHA conditions and an increase of IFN gamma, IL4, IL5, and IL12 serum levels and sBcl2 in all activation condition are indicative of the passage from normal mucosa to adenoma; whilst a decrease of sBcl2 level in basic, LPS and anti-CD3 conditions and of IL2, IFN gamma serum levels, together with an increase of IL5 are indicative of the passage from adenoma to tumor.

  15. Pathogenesis of Human Enterovirulent Bacteria: Lessons from Cultured, Fully Differentiated Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts are protected from attack by potentially harmful enteric microorganisms, viruses, and parasites by the polarized fully differentiated epithelial cells that make up the epithelium, providing a physical and functional barrier. Enterovirulent bacteria interact with the epithelial polarized cells lining the intestinal barrier, and some invade the cells. A better understanding of the cross talk between enterovirulent bacteria and the polarized intestinal cells has resulted in the identification of essential enterovirulent bacterial structures and virulence gene products playing pivotal roles in pathogenesis. Cultured animal cell lines and cultured human nonintestinal, undifferentiated epithelial cells have been extensively used for understanding the mechanisms by which some human enterovirulent bacteria induce intestinal disorders. Human colon carcinoma cell lines which are able to express in culture the functional and structural characteristics of mature enterocytes and goblet cells have been established, mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal epithelial barrier. Moreover, Caco-2-derived M-like cells have been established, mimicking the bacterial capture property of M cells of Peyer's patches. This review intends to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of human enterovirulent bacteria observed in infected cultured human colon carcinoma enterocyte-like HT-29 subpopulations, enterocyte-like Caco-2 and clone cells, the colonic T84 cell line, HT-29 mucus-secreting cell subpopulations, and Caco-2-derived M-like cells, including cell association, cell entry, intracellular lifestyle, structural lesions at the brush border, functional lesions in enterocytes and goblet cells, functional and structural lesions at the junctional domain, and host cellular defense responses. PMID:24006470

  16. Gene Expression Profile of Colon Mucosa after Cytotoxic Insult in wt and Apc-Mutated Pirc Rats: Possible Relation to Resistance to Apoptosis during Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Pietro Femia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Apc-mutated Pirc rats, spontaneously developing intestinal tumours, are resistant to 1,2-dimethylhydrazine- (DMH- induced colon apoptosis. To understand this phenomenon, we analyzed the expression of genotoxic stress-related genes Mgmt, Gsta1, and Gstp1 in the colon of wt and Pirc rats in basal conditions and 24 h after DMH; plasmatic oxidant/antioxidant status was also evaluated. After DMH, Mgmt expression was increased in both genotypes but significantly only in wt rats; Gsta1 expression was significantly increased in both genotypes. Gstp1 expression did not vary after DMH but was lower in Pirc rats. Moreover, for each genotype, we studied by microarray technique whole gene expression profile after DMH. By unsupervised cluster analysis, 28 genes were differentially modulated between the two genotypes. Among them were interferon-induced genes Irf7, Oas1a, Oasl2, and Isg15 and the transcription factor Taf6l, overexpressed in DMH-treated wt rats and unchanged in Pirc rats. RT-PCR confirmed their overexpression in DMH-treated wt rats and showed a slighter variation in DMH-treated Pirc rats. Taken together, despite a blunted induction of Irf7, Oas1a, and Mgmt, defective apoptosis in Pirc rats 24 h after DMH is not mirrored by major differences in gene expression compared with wt rats.

  17. [Morphometric characteristics of human colon wall as anatomic basis for microsurgical anastomoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, D Iu

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the morphometric characteristics and some peculiarities of microsurgical anatomy of human colon wall. The thickness of colon wall varied from 495 to 3501 microm in the areas between teniae and from 1103 to 4007 microm in the areas of teniae, the average values were equal to 1693+93.3 and 2602+85 microm, respectively. The width of teniae was 3.5-10.3 mm (6.2+0.3 mm on the average). The thickness of tunica muscularis along the colon prevailed over the thickness of other tunics and increased caudally, while the thickness of submucosa diminished. Marked variability and small thickness of both the colon wall and its layers, differences of these characteristics in the areas of teniae musculares and between them support the expediency of the application of microsurgical operative technique in the operations performed on the colon.

  18. Steady state and time-resolved autofluorescence studies of human colonic tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Buhong Li; Zhenxi Zhang; Shusen Xie

    2006-01-01

    Steady state and time-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopies are employed to study the autofluorescence characteristics of human colonic tissues in vitro. The excitation wavelength varies from 260 to 540 nm, and the corresponding fluorescence emission spectra are acquired from 280 to 800 nm. Significant difference in fluorescence intensity of excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) is observed between normal and tumor colonic tissues. Compared with normal colonic tissue, low nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and high amino acids and protoporphyrin Ⅸ (PpⅨ) fluorescences characterize high-grade malignant tissue. Moreover, the autofluorescence lifetimes of normal and carcinomatous colonic tissues at 635 nm under 397-nm excitation are about 4.32±0.12 and 18.45±0.05 ns, respectively. The high accumulation of endogenous PpⅨ in colonic cancers is demonstrated in both steady state and time-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopies.

  19. Comparison of divided and full pupil configurations for line-scanning confocal microscopy in human skin and oral mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Bjorg; Abeytunge, Sanjeewa; Glazowski, Chris; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-02-01

    Confocal point-scanning microscopy has been showing promise in the detection, diagnosing and mapping of skin lesions in clinical settings. The noninvasive technique allows provides optical sectioning and cellular resolution for in vivo diagnosis of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma and pre-operative and intra-operative mapping of margins. The imaging has also enabled more accurate "guided" biopsies while minimizing the otherwise large number of "blind" biopsies. Despite these translational advances, however, point-scanning technology remains relatively complex and expensive. Line-scanning technology may offer an alternative approach to accelerate translation to the clinic. Line-scanning, using fewer optical components, inexpensive linear-array detectors and custom electronics, may enable smaller, simpler and lower-cost confocal microscopes. A line is formed using a cylindrical lens and scanned through the back focal plane of the objective with a galvanometric scanner. A linear CCD is used for detection. Two pupil configurations were compared for performance in imaging human tissue. In the full-pupil configuration, illumination and detection is made through the full objective pupil. In the divided pupil approach, half the pupil is illuminated and the other half is used for detection. The divided pupil configuration loses spatial and axial resolution due to a diminished NA, but the sectioning capability and rejection of background is improved. Imaging in skin and oral mucosa illustrate the performance of the two configurations.

  20. Tip-alpha (hp0596 gene product) is a highly immunogenic Helicobacter pylori protein involved in colonization of mouse gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Renata; Pawlowski, Marcin; Dzwonek, Artur; Mikula, Michal; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Drela, Nadzieja; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2008-03-01

    A product of the Helicobacter pylori hp0596 gene (Tip-alpha) is a highly immunogenic homodimeric protein, unique for this bacterium. Cell fractionation experiments indicate that Tip-alpha is anchored to the inner membrane. In contrast, the three-dimensional model of the protein suggests that Tip-alpha is soluble or, at least, largely exposed to the solvent. hp0596 gene knockout resulted in a significant decrease in the level of H. pylori colonization as measured by real-time PCR assay. In addition, the Tip-alpha recombinant protein was determined to stimulate macrophage to produce IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha. Both results imply that Tip-alpha is rather loosely connected to the inner membrane and potentially released during infection.

  1. A novel protocol allowing oral delivery of a protein complement inhibitor that subsequently targets to inflamed colon mucosa and ameliorates murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvington, M; Blichmann, P; Qiao, F; Scheiber, M; Wadsworth, C; Luzinov, I; Lucero, J; Vertegel, A; Tomlinson, S

    2014-08-01

    While there is evidence of a pathogenic role for complement in inflammatory bowel disease, there is also evidence for a protective role that relates to host defence and protection from endotoxaemia. There is thus concern regarding the use of systemic complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. Local delivery of a complement inhibitor to the colon by oral administration would ameliorate such concerns, but while formulations exist for oral delivery of low molecular weight drugs to the colon, they have not been used successfully for oral delivery of proteins. We describe a novel pellet formulation consisting of cross-linked dextran coated with an acrylic co-polymer that protects the complement inhibitor CR2-Crry from destruction in the gastrointestinal tract. CR2-Crry containing pellets administered by gavage, were characterized using a therapeutic protocol in a mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Oral treatment of established colitis over a 5-day period significantly reduced mucosal inflammation and injury, with similar therapeutic benefit whether or not the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, was co-administered. Reduction in injury was associated with the targeting of CR2-Crry to the mucosal surface and reduced local complement activation. Treatment had no effect on systemic complement activity. This novel method for oral delivery of a targeted protein complement inhibitor will reduce systemic effects, thereby decreasing the risk of opportunistic infection, as well as lowering the required dose and treatment cost and improving patient compliance. Furthermore, the novel delivery system described here may provide similar benefits for administration of other protein-based drugs, such as anti-tumour necrosis factor-α antibodies.

  2. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain;

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism and its importance for host health, although a firm stool consistency, a proxy for a long colonic transit time, has recently been positively associated with gut microbial richness. Here, we show that colonic transit...... time in humans, assessed using radio-opaque markers, is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. We find that a long colonic transit time associates with high microbial richness and is accompanied by a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation...... to protein catabolism as reflected by higher urinary levels of potentially deleterious protein-derived metabolites. Additionally, shorter colonic transit time correlates with metabolites possibly reflecting increased renewal of the colonic mucosa. Together, this suggests that a high gut microbial richness...

  3. Deficiency in the 15 kDa Selenoprotein Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Tobe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals, and is thought to provide protection against some forms of cancer. These protective effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, through selenium-containing proteins (selenoproteins. Recent studies in a mouse colon cancer cell line have shown that the 15 kDa selenoprotein (Sep15 may also play a role in promoting colon cancer. The current study investigated whether the effects of reversing the cancer phenotype observed when Sep15 was removed in mouse colon cancer cells, were recapitulated in HCT116 and HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. Targeted down-regulation of Sep15 using RNAi technology in these human colon cancer cell lines resulted in similarly decreased growth under anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent conditions. However, the magnitude of reduction in cell growth was much less than in the mouse colon cancer cell line investigated previously. Furthermore, changes in cell cycle distribution were observed, indicating a delayed release of Sep15 deficient cells from the G0/G1 phase after synchronization. The potential mechanism by which human colon cancer cells lacking Sep15 revert their cancer phenotype will need to be explored further.

  4. Classification of human colonic tissues using FTIR spectra and advanced statistical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwielly, A.; Argov, S.; Salman, A.; Bogomolny, E.; Mordechai, S.

    2010-04-01

    One of the major public health hazards is colon cancer. There is a great necessity to develop new methods for early detection of cancer. If colon cancer is detected and treated early, cure rate of more than 90% can be achieved. In this study we used FTIR microscopy (MSP), which has shown a good potential in the last 20 years in the fields of medical diagnostic and early detection of abnormal tissues. Large database of FTIR microscopic spectra was acquired from 230 human colonic biopsies. Five different subgroups were included in our database, normal and cancer tissues as well as three stages of benign colonic polyps, namely, mild, moderate and severe polyps which are precursors of carcinoma. In this study we applied advanced mathematical and statistical techniques including principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), on human colonic FTIR spectra in order to differentiate among the mentioned subgroups' tissues. Good classification accuracy between normal, polyps and cancer groups was achieved with approximately 85% success rate. Our results showed that there is a great potential of developing FTIR-micro spectroscopy as a simple, reagent-free viable tool for early detection of colon cancer in particular the early stages of premalignancy among the benign colonic polyps.

  5. Secreted Human Adipose Leptin Decreases Mitochondrial Respiration in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, prespiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24073224

  6. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in myenteric plexus of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johannes; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Rasmussen, Helle

    2009-01-01

    The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) as regulators of the motility of the colonic external muscle remains unclear. Ultrastructural studies of myenteric interstitial cells are lacking in human colon. We therefore characterized the distinct......The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) as regulators of the motility of the colonic external muscle remains unclear. Ultrastructural studies of myenteric interstitial cells are lacking in human colon. We therefore characterized...... and had myoid features such as scattered caveolae, prominent intermediate filaments, and cytoplasmic dense bodies. We found characteristic dense membrane-associated bands with a patchy basal lamina, invaginating cellular protrusions (peg and socket junctions) between ICC and between ICC and muscle cells...

  7. Aberrant DNA methylation occurs in colon neoplasms arising in the azoxymethane colon cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borinstein, Scott C.; Conerly, Melissa; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Biswas, Swati; Washington, M. Kay; Trobridge, Patty; Henikoff, Steve; Grady, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Mouse models of intestinal tumors have advanced our understanding of the role of gene mutations in colorectal malignancy. However, the utility of these systems for studying the role of epigenetic alterations in intestinal neoplasms remains to be defined. Consequently, we assessed the role of aberrant DNA methylation in the azoxymethane (AOM) rodent model of colon cancer. AOM induced tumors display global DNA hypomethylation, which is similar to human colorectal cancer. We next assessed the methylation status of a panel of candidate genes previously shown to be aberrantly methylated in human cancer or in mouse models of malignant neoplasms. This analysis revealed different patterns of DNA methylation that were gene specific. Zik1 and Gja9 demonstrated cancer-specific aberrant DNA methylation, whereas, Cdkn2a/p16, Igfbp3, Mgmt, Id4, and Cxcr4 were methylated in both the AOM tumors and normal colon mucosa. No aberrant methylation of Dapk1 or Mlt1 was detected in the neoplasms, but normal colon mucosa samples displayed methylation of these genes. Finally, p19Arf, Tslc1, Hltf, and Mlh1 were unmethylated in both the AOM tumors and normal colon mucosa. Thus, aberrant DNA methylation does occur in AOM tumors, although the frequency of aberrantly methylated genes appears to be less common than in human colorectal cancer. Additional studies are necessary to further characterize the patterns of aberrantly methylated genes in AOM tumors. PMID:19777566

  8. Aberrant DNA methylation occurs in colon neoplasms arising in the azoxymethane colon cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borinstein, Scott C; Conerly, Melissa; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Biswas, Swati; Washington, M Kay; Trobridge, Patty; Henikoff, Steve; Grady, William M

    2010-01-01

    Mouse models of intestinal tumors have advanced our understanding of the role of gene mutations in colorectal malignancy. However, the utility of these systems for studying the role of epigenetic alterations in intestinal neoplasms remains to be defined. Consequently, we assessed the role of aberrant DNA methylation in the azoxymethane (AOM) rodent model of colon cancer. AOM induced tumors display global DNA hypomethylation, which is similar to human colorectal cancer. We next assessed the methylation status of a panel of candidate genes previously shown to be aberrantly methylated in human cancer or in mouse models of malignant neoplasms. This analysis revealed different patterns of DNA methylation that were gene specific. Zik1 and Gja9 demonstrated cancer-specific aberrant DNA methylation, whereas, Cdkn2a/p16, Igfbp3, Mgmt, Id4, and Cxcr4 were methylated in both the AOM tumors and normal colon mucosa. No aberrant methylation of Dapk1 or Mlt1 was detected in the neoplasms, but normal colon mucosa samples displayed methylation of these genes. Finally, p19(Arf), Tslc1, Hltf, and Mlh1 were unmethylated in both the AOM tumors and normal colon mucosa. Thus, aberrant DNA methylation does occur in AOM tumors, although the frequency of aberrantly methylated genes appears to be less common than in human colorectal cancer. Additional studies are necessary to further characterize the patterns of aberrantly methylated genes in AOM tumors.

  9. Nanoproteomic analysis of extracellular receptor kinase-1/2 post-translational activation in microdissected human hyperplastic colon lesions

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic activation resulting in hyperproliferative lesions within the colonic mucosa has been identified in putative precancerous lesions, aberrant crypt foci (ACF). KRAS and BRAF mutation status was determined in 172 ACF identified in the colorectum of screening subjects by in situ high-definition, magnifying chromoendoscopy. Lesions were stratified according to histology (serrated vs. distended) as previously described [1]. Due to their limiting size, however, it was not technically feasi...

  10. Src activity increases and Yes activity decreases during mitosis of human colon carcinoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, J.; Cartwright, C A

    1995-01-01

    Src and Yes protein-tyrosine kinase activities are elevated in malignant and premalignant tumors of the colon. To determine whether Src activity is elevated throughout the human colon carcinoma cell cycle as it is in polyomavirus middle T antigen- or F527 Src-transformed cells, and whether Yes activity, which is lower than that of Src in the carcinoma cells, is regulated differently, we measured their activities in cycling cells. We observed that the activities of both kinases were higher thr...

  11. The ellagic acid-derived gut microbiota metabolite, urolithin A, potentiates the anticancer effects of 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy on human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Tomé-Carneiro, Joao; Bellesia, Andrea; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Chemotherapy increases the overall survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) remains as a drug of first choice in CRC therapy over the last four decades. However, only 10-15% of patients with advanced CRC respond positively to 5-FU monotherapy. Therefore, new strategies to enhance the 5-FU effectiveness, overcome the tumor cell resistance and decrease the unspecific toxicity are critically needed. Urolithin A (Uro-A) is the main metabolite produced by the human gut microbiota from the dietary polyphenol ellagic acid. Uro-A targets the colonic mucosa of CRC patients, and preclinical studies have shown the anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive activities of this metabolite. We evaluated here whether Uro-A, at concentrations achievable in the human colorectum, could sensitize colon cancer cells to 5-FU and 5'DFUR (a pro-drug intermediate of 5-FU). We found that both 5-FU and 5'DFUR arrested the cell cycle at the S phase by regulating cyclins A and B1 in the human colon cancer cells Caco-2, SW-480 and HT-29, and also triggered apoptosis through the activation of caspases 8 and 9. Co-treatments with Uro-A decreased IC50 values for both 5-FU and 5'DFUR and additionally arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase together with a slight increase in caspases 8 and 9 activation. Overall, we show that Uro-A potentiated the effects of both 5-FU and 5'DFUR on colon cancer cells. This suggests the need for lower 5-FU doses to achieve similar effects, which could reduce possible adverse effects. Further in vivo investigations are warranted to explore the possible role of Uro-A as a chemotherapy adjuvant.

  12. Analysis of bacterial flora in faeces and mucosa of sigmoid colon in patients with ulcerative colitis%溃疡性结肠炎患者粪便菌群和乙状结肠黏膜菌群分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚源; 王巧民

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the difference in bacterial flora between faeces and mucosa of sigmoid colon,the possible role and significance of microbiota alteration in the genesis of ulcerative colitis (UC).Methods Fusobacterium, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides and Escherichia were selected as target bacteria colonies.The content of six target bacteria colonies in faeces and mucosa of sigmoid colon of 35 UC patients (20 active UC, and 15 UC in remission) and 20 health controls were detected by real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Two independent samples t-test was performed to compare the differences in bacterial flora between faeces and mucosa of sigmoid colon.Variance analysis was used to compare the differences in bacterial flora among health controls group,active stage group and remission stage group.Results In health control group, the contents of Fusobacterium, Bacteroides, Enterococcus and Lactobacillus in faeces ((10.94 ± 0.29),(12.42±0.39), (8.73±0.84), (9.05±0.35), respectively) were higher than those in the mucosa of sigmoid colon ((9.36±0.66), (9.88±0.82), (7.70±1.17) and (7.96±0.68), respectively, t=9.83, 12.51, 3.20 and 6.35, all P<0.05).However, the content of Escherichia was lower in faeces than that in the mucosa of sigmoid colon ((8.03±1.02) lg copy/g vs (8.91±0.52) lg copy/g, t=-3.44, P<0.05).There was no difference in the content of Bifidobacterium between faeces and mucosa of sigmoid colon ((9.54±0.79) lg copy/g vs (9.42±0.98) lg copy/g, P>0.05).For UC patients, the contents of Fusobacterium, Bacteroides, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium in faeces ((9.62 ±± 1.13),(11.31±0.71), (9.33±0.65), (8.42±0.80) and (8.85±0.73) lg copy/g, respectively) were higher than those in the mucosa of sigmoid colon ((9.00±0.79), (8.80±0.66), (7.46±0.82), (6.82±1.07) and (8.40±0.72) lg copy/g, respectively, t=2.66, 15.28, 10.58, 7.12 and 2.56, all P<0.05).The content of

  13. FXR silencing in human colon cancer by DNA methylation and KRAS signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ann M; Zhan, Le; Maru, Dipen; Shureiqi, Imad; Pickering, Curtis R; Kiriakova, Galina; Izzo, Julie; He, Nan; Wei, Caimiao; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Liang, Han; Kopetz, Scott; Powis, Garth; Guo, Grace L

    2014-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid nuclear receptor described through mouse knockout studies as a tumor suppressor for the development of colon adenocarcinomas. This study investigates the regulation of FXR in the development of human colon cancer. We used immunohistochemistry of FXR in normal tissue (n = 238), polyps (n = 32), and adenocarcinomas, staged I-IV (n = 43, 39, 68, and 9), of the colon; RT-quantitative PCR, reverse-phase protein array, and Western blot analysis in 15 colon cancer cell lines; NR1H4 promoter methylation and mRNA expression in colon cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas; DNA methyltransferase inhibition; methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP); bisulfite sequencing; and V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) knockdown assessment to investigate FXR regulation in colon cancer development. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that expression and function of FXR was reduced in precancerous lesions and silenced in a majority of stage I-IV tumors. FXR expression negatively correlated with phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate 3 kinase signaling and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The NR1H4 promoter is methylated in ~12% colon cancer The Cancer Genome Atlas samples, and methylation patterns segregate with tumor subtypes. Inhibition of DNA methylation and KRAS silencing both increased FXR expression. FXR expression is decreased early in human colon cancer progression, and both DNA methylation and KRAS signaling may be contributing factors to FXR silencing. FXR potentially suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and other oncogenic signaling cascades, and restoration of FXR activity, by blocking silencing mechanisms or increasing residual FXR activity, represents promising therapeutic options for the treatment of colon cancer.

  14. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy A. Irving

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer.

  15. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Amy A.; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hart, Marcia L.; Parker, Taybor; Clipson, Linda; Ford, Madeline R.; Kuramoto, Takashi; Dove, William F.; Amos-Landgraf, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc) and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer. PMID:25288683

  16. Indoors forensic entomology: colonization of human remains in closed environments by specific species of sarcosaprophagous flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L O; Karhunen, Pekka J; Goebeler, Sirkka; Saukko, Pekka; Sääksjärvi, Ilari E

    2010-06-15

    Fly species that are commonly recovered on human corpses concealed in houses or other dwellings are often dependent on human created environments and might have special features in their biology that allow them to colonize indoor cadavers. In this study we describe nine typical cases involving forensically relevant flies on human remains found indoors in southern Finland. Eggs, larvae and puparia were reared to adult stage and determined to species. Of the five species found the most common were Lucilia sericata Meigen, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Protophormia terraenovae Robineau-Desvoidy. The flesh fly Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt is reported for the first time to colonize human cadavers inside houses and a COI gene sequence based DNA barcode is provided for it to help facilitate identification in the future. Fly biology, colonization speed and the significance of indoors forensic entomological evidence are discussed.

  17. Inhibition of in vitro growth and arrest in the G0/G1 phase of HCT8 line human colon cancer cells by kaempferide triglycoside from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineti, Valentina; Tognarini, Isabella; Azzari, Chiara; Carbonell Sala, Silvia; Clematis, Francesca; Dolci, Marcello; Lanzotti, Virginia; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Curir, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    The effects of phytoestrogens have been studied in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in various non-gonadal targets. Epidemiologic and experimental evidence indicates a protective effect of phytoestrogens also in colorectal cancer. The mechanism through which estrogenic molecules control colorectal cancer tumorigenesis could possibly involve estrogen receptor beta, the predominantly expressed estrogen receptor subtype in colon mucosa.To validate this hypothesis, we therefore used an engineered human colon cancer cell line induced to overexpress estrogen receptor beta, beside its native cell line, expressing very low levels of ERbeta and not expressing ERalpha; as a phytoestrogenic molecule, we used kaempferide triglycoside, a glycosylated flavonol from a Dianthus caryophyllus cultivar. The inhibitory properties of this molecule toward vegetal cell growth have been previously demonstrated: however, no data on its activity on animal cell or information about the mechanism of this activity are available. Kaempferide triglycoside proved to inhibit the proliferation of native and estrogen receptor beta overexpressing colon cancer cells through a mechanism not mediated by ligand binding dependent estrogen receptor activation. It affected HCT8 cell cycle progression by increasing the G(0)/G(1) cell fraction and in estrogen receptor beta overexpressing cells increased two antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, the biological effects of this kaempferide triglycoside were strengthened by the presence of high levels of estrogen receptor beta.Pleiotropic molecular effects of phytoestrogens may explain their protective activity against colorectal cancer and may represent an interesting area for future investigation with potential clinical applications.

  18. Depicting the inner and outer nose: the representation of the nose and the nasal mucosa on the human primary somatosensory cortex (SI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastl, Mareike; Brünner, Yvonne F; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The nose is important not only for breathing, filtering air, and perceiving olfactory stimuli. Although the face and hands have been mapped, the representation of the internal and external surface of the nose on the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is still poorly understood. To fill this gap functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to localize the nose and the nasal mucosa in the Brodman areas (BAs) 3b, 1, and 2 of the human postcentral gyrus (PG). Tactile stimulation during fMRI was applied via a customized pneumatically driven device to six stimulation sites: the alar wing of the nose, the lateral nasal mucosa, and the hand (serving as a reference area) on the left and right side of the body. Individual representations could be discriminated for the left and right hand, for the left nasal mucosa and left alar wing of the nose in BA 3b and BA 1 by comparing mean activation maxima and Euclidean distances. Right-sided nasal conditions and conditions in BA 2 could further be separated by different Euclidean distances. Regarding the alar wing of the nose, the results concurred with the classic sensory homunculus proposed by Penfield and colleagues. The nasal mucosa was not only determined an individual and bilateral representation, its position on the somatosensory cortex is also situated closer to the caudal end of the PG compared to that of the alar wing of the nose and the hand. As SI is commonly activated during the perception of odors, these findings underscore the importance of the knowledge of the representation of the nasal mucosa on the primary somatosensory cortex, especially for interpretation of results of functional imaging studies about the sense of smell.

  19. Activation of Intestinal Human Pregnane X Receptor Protects against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Jie; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Qu, Aijuan; Tanaka, Naoki; Kimura, Shioko; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of intestinal human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in colon cancer was determined through investigation of the chemopreventive role of rifaximin, a specific agonist of intestinal human PXR, toward azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)–induced colon cancer. Rifaximin treatment significantly decreased the number of colon tumors induced by AOM/DSS treatment in PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. Additionally, rifaximin treatment markedly increased the survival r...

  20. Rapid effects of phytoestrogens on human colonic smooth muscle are mediated by oestrogen receptor beta.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have correlated consumption of dietary phytoestrogens with beneficial effects on colon, breast and prostate cancers. Genomic and non-genomic mechanisms are responsible for anti-carcinogenic effects but, until now, the effect on human colon was assumed to be passive and remote. No direct effect on human colonic smooth muscle has previously been described. Institutional research board approval was granted. Histologically normal colon was obtained from the proximal resection margin of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended under 1g of tension in organ baths containing oxygenated Krebs solution at 37 degrees C. After an equilibration period, tissues were exposed to diarylpropionitrile (DPN) (ER beta agonist) and 1,3,5-tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole (PPT) (ER alpha agonist) or to the synthetic phytoestrogen compounds genistein (n=8), daidzein (n=8), fisetin (n=8) and quercetin (n=8) in the presence or absence of fulvestrant (oestrogen receptor antagonist). Mechanism of action was investigated by inhibition of downstream pathways. The cholinergic agonist carbachol was used to induce contractile activity. Tension was recorded isometrically. Phytoestrogens inhibit carbachol-induced colonic contractility. In keeping with a non-genomic, rapid onset direct action, the effect was within minutes, reversible and similar to previously described actions of 17 beta oestradiol. No effect was seen in the presence of fulvestrant indicating receptor modulation. While the DPN exerted inhibitory effects, PPT did not. The effect appears to be reliant on a p38\\/mitogen activated protein kinase mediated induction of nitric oxide production in colonic smooth muscle. The present data set provides the first description of a direct effect of genistein, daidzein, fisetin and quercetin on human colonic smooth muscle. The presence of ER in colonic smooth muscle has been functionally proven and the beta

  1. Observation of ultrastructure and absorption function of colon mucosa in rats with ultra-short bowel syndrome%超短肠大鼠结肠代偿的细胞超微结构变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜海平; 郭庆丰; 张海伟; 袁璐; 陈丹

    2010-01-01

    目的 观察超短肠大鼠结肠黏膜细胞超微结构和吸收功能的变化.方法 将30只雄性SD大鼠随机分为超短肠组(手术切除大鼠90%~95%的小肠)、假手术组和正常对照组,每组10只.给予肠内营养支持21 d后,采用扫描电镜观察结肠黏膜表画形态,透射电镜观察结肠黏膜上皮细胞超微结构变化.用D-木糖溶液和15N-甘氨酸对结肠进行封闭式连续循环灌注3 h,测定结肠对水、碳水化合物、氨基酸的吸收情况.结果 透视电镜观察结果显示,超短肠组大鼠较正常大鼠的结肠黏膜杯状细胞减少,吸收上皮细胞增多,微绒毛变长变密,细胞膜表面积增加,细胞间连接明显增多,桥粒、紧密连接和缝隙连接较多,内质网和高尔基体发达,线粒体数量明显增多.扫描电镜观察结果显示,超短肠组大鼠较正常大鼠的结肠皱襞深度增加,黏膜增厚,隐凹开口明显增多;隐凹内微绒毛样结构数目明显增多,长度增长且密度增加.超短肠组大鼠结肠对水的吸收能力明显高于假手术组和正常对照组(P均=0.000);1、2、3 h内木糖吸收率和15N-甘氨酸吸收率均明显高于假手术组和正常对照组(P均<0.01).结论 超短肠大鼠结肠吸收能力可代偿增强.结肠黏膜细胞凋亡减少、吸收细胞增多、微绒毛增生、细胞膜表面积增加和线粒体增多可能是其物质和能量基础.%Objective To observe the ultrastructure and absorption function of colon mucosa in rat with ultra-short bowel syndrome. Methods Totally 30 SD rats were randomly divided into three groups: ultra-short bowel group (90%-95% of the intestine was surgically resected, n = 10), sham group (n = 10), and normal control group (n = 10). All animals were given with enteral nutrition. Scanning electron microscopy was performed 21 days later to observe the morphology of mucosal surface, and transmission electron microscopy was performed to observe the ultrastructural

  2. Human colon carcinogenesis is associated with increased interleukin-17-driven inflammatory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhaohui Xie,1 Yine Qu,2 Yanli Leng,2 Wenxiu Sun,2 Siqi Ma,2 Jingbo Wei,2 Jiangong Hu,3 Xiaolan Zhang1 1Department of Gastroenterology, Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei United University School of Basic Medicine, Tangshan, Hebei, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pathology, the Second Hospital of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Inflammation is known to contribute to carcinogenesis in human colorectal cancer. Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-17 (IL-17 or IL-17A has been shown to play a critical role in colon carcinogenesis in mouse models. However, few studies have investigated IL-17A in human colon tissues. In the present study, we assessed IL-17-driven inflammatory responses in 17 cases of human colon adenocarcinomas, 16 cases of human normal colon tissues adjacent to the resected colon adenocarcinomas, ten cases of human ulcerative colitis tissues from biopsies, and eight cases of human colon polyps diagnosed as benign adenomas. We found that human colon adenocarcinomas contained the highest levels of IL-17A cytokine, which was significantly higher than the IL-17A levels in the adenomas, ulcerative colitis, and normal colon tissues (P<0.01. The levels of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA were also the highest in human colon adenocarcinomas, followed by adenomas and ulcerative colitis. The increased levels of IL-17A and IL-17RA were accompanied with increased IL-17-driven inflammatory responses, including activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathways, increase in expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP9, MMP7, MMP2, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2, and cyclin D1, decrease in Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX expression, and increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and VEGF receptor (VEGFR expression that

  3. Cat scratch colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rebollo, M Lourdes; Velayos-Jiménez, Benito; Prieto de Paula, José María; Alvarez Quiñones, María; González Hernández, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, we have read several publications regarding the term "cat scratch colon." This neologism was developed to define some bright red linear markings seen in the colonic mucosa that resemble scratches made by a cat. We would like to communicate a recent case attended at our institution.

  4. Cat Scratch Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lourdes Ruiz-Rebollo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, we have read several publications regarding the term “cat scratch colon.” This neologism was developed to define some bright red linear markings seen in the colonic mucosa that resemble scratches made by a cat. We would like to communicate a recent case attended at our institution.

  5. Pre-Analytical Determination of the Effect of Extended Warm or Cold Ischaemia on RNA Stability in the Human Ileum Mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serene M L Lee

    Full Text Available The use of banked human tissue, obtained with informed consent after elective surgical procedures, represents a powerful model for understanding underlying mechanisms of diseases or therapeutic interventions and for establishing prognostic markers. However, donated tissues typically have varying times of warm ischaemia in situ due to blood arrest or cold ischaemia due to procurement and transportation. Hence, before using these tissues, it is important to carry out pre-analytical studies to ensure that they are representative of the in vivo state. In particular, tissues of the gastrointestinal tract have been thought to have low RNA stability. Therefore, this study aimed to determine if extended warm or cold ischaemia times and snap-freezing or banking in RNA stabilization solution affects RNA integrity or gene expression in human ileum mucosa. In short, ileum mucosa was collected for up to 1.5 h and 6 h of simulated warm or cold ischaemia respectively. Subsequently, RNA integrity and gene expressions were determined. It was found that RNA integrity remained high over the course of warm and cold ischaemia examined and there were in general no significant differences between snap-freezing and banking in RNA stabilization solution. Following the same trend, there were in general no significant changes in gene expressions measured (MYC, HIF1α, CDX, HMOX1 and IL1β. In conclusion, RNA in the ileum mucosa is maintained at a high integrity and has stable gene expression over the examined time course of warm or cold ischaemia when banked in RNA stabilization solution or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen. As the average warm and cold ischaemia times imposed by surgery and the process of tissue banking are shorter than the time period examined in this study, human ileum mucosa samples collected after surgeries could be used for gene expression studies.

  6. Analysis of the expression of SDF-1 splicing variants in human colorectal cancer and normal mucosa tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allami, Risala Hussain; Graf, Claudine; Martchenko, Ksenia; Voss, Beatrice; Becker, Marc; Berger, Martin R; Galle, Peter R; Theobald, Matthias; Wehler, Thomas C; Schimanski, Carl C

    2016-03-01

    C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), also termed stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is a small protein 8-14 kDa in length that is expressed as six isoforms, consisting of SDF-1α, SDF-1β, SDF-1γ, SDF-1δ, SDF-1ε and SDF-1θ. All six isoforms are encoded by the single CXCL12 gene on chromosome 10. This gene regulates leukocyte trafficking and is variably expressed in a number of normal and cancer tissues. The potential role of the novel CXCL12 splice variants as components of the CXCR4 axis in cancer development is not fully understood. The present study aimed to analyze the expression profile of the various SDF-1 isoforms and SDF-1 polymorphisms, and the association with the clinicopathological features and overall survival of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). SDF-1 polymorphism analysis was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis in 73 histologically confirmed human CRC tissue samples at various stages of disease. The expression pattern of the SDF-1 isoforms was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in 40 histologically confirmed human CRC tissue samples obtained at various stages of disease, as well as in matched adjacent normal mucosa samples. The presence of the CXCL12 gene polymorphism rs1801157 demonstrated an association with local progression of the primary tumor, as indicated by the T stage. The frequency of the GG genotype was slightly increased in patients with stage 3 and 4 tumors (78.0%) compared with the incidence of the GA/AA genotype (69.5%; P=0.067). The expression of SDF-1β was associated with the presence of metastases (P=0.0656) and the expression of SDF-1γ was significantly associated with tumor size (P=0.0423). The present study is the first to analyze the association between the expression profile of the chemokine CXCL12 splice variants in human CRC tissues and their clinical relevance. The present results reveal that the CXCL12 G801A polymorphism is a low

  7. Inhibition of tryptase release from human colon mast cells by histamine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shao-Heng; Xie, Hua; Fu, Yi-Ling

    2005-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the ability of histamine receptor antagonists to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells induced by histamine. Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with histamine in the absence or presence of the histamine receptor antagonists, and the tryptase release was determined. It was found that histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 61.5% and 24% by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine and the H2 histamine receptor antagonist cimetidine, respectively, when histamine and its antagonists were added to cells at the same time. The H3 histamine receptor antagonist clobenpropit had no effect on histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells at all concentrations tested. Preincubation of terfenadine, cimetidine or clobenpropit with cells for 20 minutes before challenging with histamine did not enhance the ability of these antihistamines to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release. Apart from terfenadine at 100 microg/ml, the antagonists themselves did not stimulate tryptase release from colon mast cells following both 15 minutes and 35 minutes incubation periods. It was concluded that H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists were able to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells. This not only added some new data to our hypothesis of self-amplification mechanisms of mast cell degranulation, but also suggested that combining these two types of antihistamine drugs could be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  8. New Insights into the CD133 (Prominin-1) Expression in Mouse and Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgambato, Alessandro; Corbi, Maddalena; Svelto, Maria; Caredda, Emanuele; Cittadini, Achille

    2013-01-01

    Following its discovery as a cancer stem cell marker, CD133 has been widely studied for its role in colorectal tumorigenesis. Indeed, colon cancer remains one of the major causes of cancer-related disease and death worldwide, and there is a strong need for an improvement of current diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic strategies. Thus, efforts have been devoted to try to understand whether CD133 might play a role in human colorectal tumorigenesis and might contribute to a better management of colon cancer patients. This chapter reviews the current knowledge on CD133 expression in normal and cancer colon tissues, both in humans and mice, discussing apparently conflicting data reported in the two species. Moreover, a great attention is devoted to the available information regarding the functional role of CD133 in colon cancer cells. Finally, the proposed clinical applications of CD133, as a prognostic and/or predictive marker as well as a target for novel antineoplastic strategies in colorectal cancer, are discussed. Overall, the available data support a potential important role of CD133 as cancer stem cell marker in colon cancer cells and warrant future studies to verify its potential use in the routine clinical management of colon cancer patients.

  9. Toward an increased understanding of the barriers to colonic drug absorption in humans: implications for early controlled release candidate assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannergren, Christer; Bergendal, Anna; Lennernäs, Hans; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase the understanding of in vivo colonic drug absorption in humans by summarizing and evaluating all regional in vivo human absorption data with focus on the interpretation of the colonic absorption data in relation to intestinal permeability and solubility. In addition, the usefulness of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) in early assessment of the in vivo colonic absorption potential of controlled release drug candidates was investigated. Clinical regional absorption data (Cmax, Tmax, and AUC) of 42 drugs were collected from journal articles, abstracts, and internal reports, and the relative bioavailability in the colon (Frel(colon)) was obtained directly or calculated. Bioavailability, fraction dose absorbed, and information if the compounds were substrates for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) were also obtained. The BCS I drugs were well absorbed in the colon (Frel(colon) > 70%), although some drugs had lower values due to bacterial degradation in the colon. The low permeability drugs (BCS III/IV) had a lower degree of absorption in the colon (Frel(colon) colon), and atenolol and metoprolol may function as permeability markers for low and high colonic absorption, respectively. No obvious effect of P-gp on the colonic absorption of the drugs in this study was detected. There was insufficient data available to fully assess the impact of low solubility and slow dissolution rate. The estimated in vivo fractions dissolved of the only two compounds administered to the colon as both a solution and as solid particles were 55% and 92%, respectively. In conclusion, permeability and solubility are important barriers to colonic absorption in humans, and in vitro testing of these properties is recommended in early assessment of colonic absorption potential.

  10. Study on Invasion of Artesunate on Inhibiting Human Colon Cancer Cell SW620

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the invasive effect of Chinese extraction artesunate on human colon cancer cell SW620 and explore its possible mechanisms. Methods: Colon cancer cell SW620 was managed by different concentrations of artesunate, and soft agar colony-cultivating trial was applied to detect anchorage independent proliferation of cancer cells, Boyden chamber model method to detect the invasive capability of cancer cells and Western blot method to detect the change of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 proteins. Results: Artesunate can effectively inhibit malignant proliferation and invasive capability of colon cancer cell SW620, and was dose-dependent (P < 0.01. Artesunate can effectively inhibit the expression of cancer cell ICAM-1 gene proteins, and was time- and concentration-dependant (P <0.01. Conclusion: Artesunate can significantly inhibit the invasion of colon cancer cell SW620, which can be related to down-regulation of ICAM-1 protein level.

  11. Study on Invasion of Artesunate on Inhibiting Human Colon Cancer Cell SW620

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yu; Zhang Youli; Yao Guangtao; Li Yikui

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the invasive effect of Chinese extraction artesunate on human colon cancer cell SW620 and explore its possible mechanisms. Methods:Colon cancer cell SW620 was managed by different concentrations of artesunate, and soft agar colony-cultivating trial was applied to detect anchorage independent proliferation of cancer cells, Boyden chamber model method to detect the invasive capability of cancer cells and Western blot method to detect the change of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) proteins. Results:Artesunate can effectively inhibit malignant proliferation and invasive capability of colon cancer cell SW620, and was dose-dependent (P Conclusion:Artesunate can signiifcantly inhibit the invasion of colon cancer cell SW620, which can be related to down-regulation of ICAM-1 protein level.

  12. The inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in human colon cancer cells by sulindac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Wei-Ping; Hu, Pin-Jin; Wu, Jing; Lin, Xiang-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in the initial development of colon cancer. Sulindac is a commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. We demonstrated the effects of sulindac on growth inhibition, apoptosis induction, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling suppression in human colon cancer cells. Sulindac significantly inhibited proliferation of HT-29 colon cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Sulindac was found to induce the apoptosis of HT-29 cells and inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The inhibition was further confirmed by the decreased protein levels of β-catenin. The results indicate that sulindac may play a beneficial role in the comprehensive treatment of colon cancer.

  13. Abnormal colonic motility in mice overexpressing human wild-type alpha-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Fleming, Sheila M; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Taché, Yvette

    2008-05-28

    The presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein (alphaSyn) has been implicated in both familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease. We examined whether human alphaSyn-overexpressing mice under Thy1 promoter (Thy1-alphaSyn) display alterations of colonic function. Basal fecal output was decreased in Thy1-alphaSyn mice fed ad libitum. Fasted/refed Thy1-alphaSyn mice had a slower distal colonic transit than the wild-type mice, as monitored by 2.2-fold increase in time to expel an intracolonic bead and 2.9-fold higher colonic fecal content. By contrast, Thy1-alphaSyn mice had an increased fecal response to novelty stress and corticotropin releasing factor injected intraperipherally. These results indicate that Thy1-alphaSyn mice display altered basal and stress-stimulated propulsive colonic motility and will be a useful model to study gut dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease.

  14. Tissue quantification of neutral and acid mucins in the mucosa of the colon with and without fecal stream in rats Quantificação tecidual de mucinas neutras e ácidas na mucosa do cólon com e sem trânsito intestinal em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Nonose

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To quantify the intensity of the expression of neutral and acids mucins in mucosa of the colon with and without fecal stream and to correlate this with the duration of fecal transit diversion. METHODS: Thirty male Wistar rats were subjected to fecal transit deviation in the left colon by a proximal colostomy and a distal mucous fistula. The animals were divided into three experimental groups, according to whether sacrificing would be performed six, 12 or 18 weeks after surgery. The expression of neutral and acid mucins was evaluated using the histochemical techniques of Periodic Acid Schiff and Alcian Blue, respectively. The tissue mucins expression was quantified by computer-assisted image analysis software (NIS-Elements in the segments with and without fecal stream. Student's paired t test was used to compare the quantities of mucins in colon with or without fecal stream and variance between the experimental groups by ANOVA and Newman-Keuls post-test, establishing level of signification of 5% (pOBJETIVO: Quantificar a intensidade de expressão de mucinas neutras e ácidas na mucosa cólica provida e desprovida de trânsito intestinal relacionando-a ao tempo de exclusão fecal. MÉTODOS: Trinta ratos Wistar machos foram submetidos à derivação do trânsito no cólon esquerdo por colostomia proximal e fístula mucosa distal. Os animais foram divididos em três grupos experimentais segundo o sacrifício ter sido realizado seis, 12 e 18 semanas após a cirurgia. A avaliação da expressão de mucinas neutras e ácidas na mucosa cólica foi realizada com as técnicas histoquímicas do Periódico Ácido de Schiff e Azul de Alcian, respectivamente. A quantificação da expressão tecidual das mucinas foi com auxílio de programa de análise de imagem assistida por computador (NIS-Elements nos segmentos providos e desprovidos de trânsito fecal. Utilizou-se o teste t de Student pareado na comparação da expressão de mucinas nos segmentos

  15. Effect of sulindac sulfide on metallohydrolases in the human colon cancer cell line HT-29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen-Ahlers, Hector; Tan, Jiangning; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7), a metallohydrolase involved in the development of several cancers, is downregulated in the Apc(Min/+) colon cancer mouse model following sulindac treatment. To determine whether this effect is relevant to the human condition, HT-29 human colon cancer cells were treated with sulindac and its metabolites, and compared to results obtained from in vivo mouse studies. The expression of MMP7 was monitored. The results demonstrated that sulindac sulfide effectively downregulated both MMP7 expression and activity. Furthermore, activity-based proteomics demonstrated that sulindac sulfide dramatically decreased the activity of leukotriene A4 hydrolase in HT-29 cells as reflected by a decrease in the level of its product, leukotriene B4. This study demonstrates that the effect of sulindac treatment in a mouse model of colon cancer may be relevant to the human counterpart and highlights the effect of sulindac treatment on metallohydrolases.

  16. Characterization of AQPs in Mouse, Rat, and Human Colon and Their Selective Regulation by Bile Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Jonathan; Keely, Stephen; Wu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    epithelial cells from rats (AQP1, 3, 4, 7, 8) and mice (AQP1, 4, 8). Several AQPs were also detected in human colon (AQP1, 3, 4, 7-9). Immunohistochemistry localized AQP1 to the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells in the bottom of the crypts, whereas AQP3 (rat, human) and AQP4 (mice, human) were......In normal individuals, the epithelium of the colon absorbs 1.5-2 l of water a day to generate dehydrated feces. However, in the condition of bile acid malabsorption (BAM), an excess of bile acids in the colon results in diarrhea. Several studies have attempted to address the mechanisms contributing...... to BAM induced by various bile acids. However, none have addressed a potential dysregulation of aquaporin (AQP) water channels, which are responsible for the majority of transcellular water transport in epithelial cells, as a contributing factor to the onset of diarrhea and the pathogenesis of BAM...

  17. Effect of sulindac sulfide on metallohydrolases in the human colon cancer cell line HT-29.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Guillen-Ahlers

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7, a metallohydrolase involved in the development of several cancers, is downregulated in the Apc(Min/+ colon cancer mouse model following sulindac treatment. To determine whether this effect is relevant to the human condition, HT-29 human colon cancer cells were treated with sulindac and its metabolites, and compared to results obtained from in vivo mouse studies. The expression of MMP7 was monitored. The results demonstrated that sulindac sulfide effectively downregulated both MMP7 expression and activity. Furthermore, activity-based proteomics demonstrated that sulindac sulfide dramatically decreased the activity of leukotriene A4 hydrolase in HT-29 cells as reflected by a decrease in the level of its product, leukotriene B4. This study demonstrates that the effect of sulindac treatment in a mouse model of colon cancer may be relevant to the human counterpart and highlights the effect of sulindac treatment on metallohydrolases.

  18. Avaliação do dano oxidativo ao DNA de células normais e neoplásicas da mucosa cólica de doentes com câncer colorretal Evaluation of DNA oxidative damage in normal and neoplastic cells of colonic mucosa in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Lima Ribeiro

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O estresse oxidativo ao DNA de células da mucosa cólica decorrente de radicais livres de oxigênio presentes na luz intestinal, induz mutações de genes relacionados ao controle do ciclo celular, representando um dos fenômenos iniciais da carcinogênese colorretal. A quantificação do dano oxidativo ao DNA em portadores de câncer colorretal foi pouco estudada até o momento. OBJETIVO: O objetivo do presente estudo foi mensurar os níveis de dano oxidativo ao DNA de células isoladas da mucosa cólica de doentes com câncer colorretal comparando o tecido normal e o neoplásico e correlacionando-os a variáveis anatomopatológicas. MÉTODO: Estudou-se 32 enfermos (19 mulheres com média de idade de 60,6 ± 15,5 anos, portadores de adenocarcinoma colorretal operados consecutivamente, entre 2005 e 2006. A avaliação do dano oxidativo ao DNA foi realizada pela da versão alcalina do ensaio cometa (eletroforese e gel de célula única, a partir de fragmentos de tecido cólico normal e neoplásico obtidos imediatamente após a extirpação do espécime cirúrgico. Avaliou-se a extensão das rupturas das hélices do DNA com método de intensificação de imagem, em 200 células escolhidas aleatoriamente (100 de cada amostra de tecido com o programa Komet 5.5. A mensuração da cauda obtida de cada célula (Tail Moment representava, quantitativamente, a extensão do dano oxidativo ao DNA. A análise estatística das variáveis consideradas foi realizada pelos testes t de Student, qui-quadrado e Kruskal-Wallis, adotando-se nível de significância de 5% (pOxidative stress on mucosal cells of the colon, resulting from the action of free radicals present in the intestinal lumen, represents one of the initial phenomena in colorectal carcinogenesis, because it may induce gene mutations relating to cell cycle control. Quantification of the oxidative damage to the DNA in colorectal cancer patients has been little studied so far. OBJECTIVE: To measure the

  19. Negligible Colon Cancer Risk from Food-Borne Acrylamide Exposure in Male F344 Rats and Nude (nu/nu) Mice-Bearing Human Colon Tumor Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Jayadev; Roberts, Jennifer; Sondagar, Chandni; Kapal, Kamla; Aziz, Syed A.; Caldwell, Don; Mehta, Rekha

    2013-01-01

    Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, is formed in certain carbohydrate-rich foods processed at high temperature. We evaluated if dietary acrylamide, at doses (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg diet) reflecting upper levels found in human foods, modulated colon tumorigenesis in two rodent models. Male F344 rats were randomized to receive diets without (control) or with acrylamide. 2-weeks later, rats in each group received two weekly subcutaneous injections of either azoxymethane (AOM) or saline, and were killed 20 weeks post-injections; colons were assessed for tumors. Male athymic nude (nu/nu) mice bearing HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells-derived tumor xenografts received diets without (control) or with acrylamide; tumor growth was monitored and mice were killed 4 weeks later. In the F344 rat study, no tumors were found in the colons of the saline-injected rats. However, the colon tumor incidence was 54.2% and 66.7% in the control and the 2 mg/kg acrylamide-treated AOM-injected groups, respectively. While tumor multiplicity was similar across all diet groups, tumor size and burden were higher in the 2 mg/kg acrylamide group compared to the AOM control. These results suggest that acrylamide by itself is not a “complete carcinogen”, but acts as a “co-carcinogen” by exacerbating the effects of AOM. The nude mouse study indicated no differences in the growth of human colon tumor xenografts between acrylamide-treated and control mice, suggesting that acrylamide does not aid in the progression of established tumors. Hence, food-borne acrylamide at levels comparable to those found in human foods is neither an independent carcinogen nor a tumor promoter in the colon. However, our results characterize a potential hazard of acrylamide as a colon co-carcinogen in association with known and possibly other environmental tumor initiators/promoters. PMID:24040114

  20. Effect of soy saponin on the growth of human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Yu; Tsai; Yue-Hwa; Chen; Yi-Wen; Chien; Wen-Hsuan; Huang; Shyh-Hsiang; Lin

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of extracted soybean saponins on the growth of human colon cancer cells.METHODS:WiDr human colon cancer cells were treated with 150,300,600 or 1200 ppm of soy saponin to determine the effect on cell growth,cell morphology,alkaline phosphatase(AP) and protein kinase C(PKC) activities,and P53 protein,c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression.RESULTS:Soy saponin decreased the number of viable cells in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed 12-Otetradecanol-phorbol-13-acetate-stimulated PKC ...

  1. Anti-carcinogenic properties of omeprazole against human colon cancer cells and azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-01-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor, a widely used drug to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal refluxdisease. We have evaluated colon cancer chemopreventive properties of omeprazole using azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in male F344 rats and analyzed cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cells. Five-week-old male F344 rats were fed a control or experimental diet containing two doses of omeprazole (200 and 400 ppm). After one week, all animals were s.c. injected with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for two weeks). Rats continued on experimental diets for seven more weeks before being sacrificed. Colons were histopathologically evaluated for ACF. Human colon cancer HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells treated with omeprazole were evaluated for different markers associated with proliferation and apoptotic markers using Western blot technique. Rats fed with 200 and 400 ppm of omeprazole significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation (~30%, Pcancer cell lines HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells resulted in induction of p21waf1/cip1 and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and survivin in a dose-dependent manner. Anticancer properties observed in colon cancer cell lines suggest that omeprazole may induce key signaling molecules of antiproliferation and inhibition of anti-apoptotic proteins.

  2. Acrolein- and 4-Aminobiphenyl-DNA adducts in human bladder mucosa and tumor tissue and their mutagenicity in human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Weng, Mao-wen; Hu, Yu; Chen, Wei-sheng; Chou, David; Liu, Yan; Donin, Nicholas; Huang, William C; Lepor, Herbert; Wu, Xue-Ru; Wang, Hailin; Beland, Frederick A; Tang, Moon-shong

    2014-06-15

    Tobacco smoke (TS) is a major cause of human bladder cancer (BC). Two components in TS, 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) and acrolein, which also are environmental contaminants, can cause bladder tumor in rat models. Their role in TS related BC has not been forthcoming. To establish the relationship between acrolein and 4-ABP exposure and BC, we analyzed acrolein-deoxyguanosine (dG) and 4-ABP-DNA adducts in normal human urothelial mucosa (NHUM) and bladder tumor tissues (BTT), and measured their mutagenicity in human urothelial cells. We found that the acrolein-dG levels in NHUM and BTT are 10-30 fold higher than 4-ABP-DNA adduct levels and that the acrolein-dG levels in BTT are 2 fold higher than in NHUM. Both acrolein-dG and 4-ABP-DNA adducts are mutagenic; however, the former are 5 fold more mutagenic than the latter. These two types of DNA adducts induce different mutational signatures and spectra. We found that acrolein inhibits nucleotide excision and base excision repair and induces repair protein degradation in urothelial cells. Since acrolein is abundant in TS, inhaled acrolein is excreted into urine and accumulates in the bladder and because acrolein inhibits DNA repair and acrolein-dG DNA adducts are mutagenic, we propose that acrolein is a major bladder carcinogen in TS.

  3. Investigation of computer-aided colonic crypt pattern analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Pan, Yinsheng; Sivak, Michael V., Jr.; Olowe, Kayode; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2007-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Approximately 50% of these deaths could be prevented by earlier detection through screening. Magnification chromoendoscopy is a technique which utilizes tissue stains applied to the gastrointestinal mucosa and high-magnification endoscopy to better visualize and characterize lesions. Prior studies have shown that shapes of colonic crypts change with disease and show characteristic patterns. Current methods for assessing colonic crypt patterns are somewhat subjective and not standardized. Computerized algorithms could be used to standardize colonic crypt pattern assessment. We have imaged resected colonic mucosa in vitro (N = 70) using methylene blue dye and a surgical microscope to approximately simulate in vivo imaging with magnification chromoendoscopy. We have developed a method of computerized processing to analyze the crypt patterns in the images. The quantitative image analysis consists of three steps. First, the crypts within the region of interest of colonic tissue are semi-automatically segmented using watershed morphological processing. Second, crypt size and shape parameters are extracted from the segmented crypts. Third, each sample is assigned to a category according to the Kudo criteria. The computerized classification is validated by comparison with human classification using the Kudo classification criteria. The computerized colonic crypt pattern analysis algorithm will enable a study of in vivo magnification chromoendoscopy of colonic crypt pattern correlated with risk of colorectal cancer. This study will assess the feasibility of screening and surveillance of the colon using magnification chromoendoscopy.

  4. Terahertz pulsed imaging of freshly excised human colonic tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Caroline B; Gibson, Adam P [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Fitzgerald, Anthony; Wallace, Vincent P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009 (Australia); Reese, George; Tekkis, Paris [Division of Surgery, Chelsea and Westminster Campus, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Goldin, Robert [Centre for Pathology, Imperial College London, St Mary' s Campus, London (United Kingdom); O' Kelly, P S [TeraView Ltd, Platinum Building, St John' s Innovation Park, Cowley Road, Cambridge, CB4 0WS (United Kingdom); Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma, E-mail: c.reid@medphys.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong)

    2011-07-21

    We present the results from a feasibility study which measures properties in the terahertz frequency range of excised cancerous, dysplastic and healthy colonic tissues from 30 patients. We compare their absorption and refractive index spectra to identify trends which may enable different tissue types to be distinguished. In addition, we present statistical models based on variations between up to 17 parameters calculated from the reflected time and frequency domain signals of all the measured tissues. These models produce a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 77% in distinguishing between healthy and all diseased tissues and a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 71% in distinguishing between dysplastic and healthy tissues. The contrast between the tissue types was supported by histological staining studies which showed an increased vascularity in regions of increased terahertz absorption.

  5. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  6. Isolation and characterization of dendritic cells from normal human esophageal mucosa%食管黏膜树突状细胞表型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王存良; 宁寒冰; 王艳红; 张连峰; 李继昌

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究食管黏膜树突状细胞(DCs)表型特点.方法:内镜下收集健康人食管黏膜标本,Ficoll-Hypacque密度梯度离心法分离食管黏膜标本中的单个核细胞,采用磁珠分选技术分离DCs,流式细胞仪分析食管黏膜DCs表型.结果:健康人食管黏膜含3类单个核细胞:HLA-DRhtgh/CD13low,HLA-DRmed/CD13+和HLA-DR-/CD13+; HLA-DRhigh/CD13low细胞表达不同DCs亚群表面标志,是食管黏膜DCs;健康人食管黏膜DCsCD80、CD83、CD86表达水平低,是不成熟DCs.结论:成功分离了食管黏膜DCs,证实HLA-DRhigh/CD13low细胞是食管黏膜DCs.%AIM: To investigate the characteristics of dendritic cells (DCs) from normal human esophageal mucosa. METHODS: We collected normal esophageal mucosa samples from healthy individuals using endoscope and isolated mononuclear cells from the samples using Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation. DCs were further separated by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) to analyze DCs subsets by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Three mononuclear cell populations were detected in normal human esophageal mucosa: HLA-DRhigh/CD13low, HLA-DRmad/CD13 + and HLA-DR-/CD13+. HLA-DRhigh/CD13low cells expressed the DCs-associated molecules and were referred to as esophageal mucosal DCs. The DCs were immature since they expressed low levels of CD80, CD83 and CD86. CONCLUSION; HLA-DRhigh/CD13low cells isolated from the normal human esophageal mucosa were proved to be DCs. DCs can be successfully isolated from esophageal mucosa.

  7. Human-derived gut microbiota modulates colonic secretion in mice by regulating 5-HT3 receptor expression via acetate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Yogesh; Schmidt, Bradley A; Linden, David R; Larson, Eric D; Grover, Madhusudan; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico; Kashyap, Purna C

    2017-07-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)], an important neurotransmitter and a paracrine messenger in the gastrointestinal tract, regulates intestinal secretion by its action primarily on 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors. Recent studies highlight the role of gut microbiota in 5-HT biosynthesis. In this study, we determine whether human-derived gut microbiota affects host secretory response to 5-HT and 5-HT receptor expression. We used proximal colonic mucosa-submucosa preparation from age-matched Swiss Webster germ-free (GF) and humanized (HM; ex-GF colonized with human gut microbiota) mice. 5-HT evoked a significantly greater increase in short-circuit current (ΔIsc) in GF compared with HM mice. Additionally, 5-HT3 receptor mRNA and protein expression was significantly higher in GF compared with HM mice. Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, inhibited 5-HT-evoked ΔIsc in GF mice but not in HM mice. Furthermore, a 5-HT3 receptor-selective agonist, 2-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine hydrochloride, evoked a significantly higher ΔIsc in GF compared with HM mice. Immunohistochemistry in 5-HT3A-green fluorescent protein mice localized 5-HT3 receptor expression to enterochromaffin cells in addition to nerve fibers. The significant difference in 5-HT-evoked ΔIsc between GF and HM mice persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) but was lost after ondansetron application in the presence of TTX. Application of acetate (10 mM) significantly lowered 5-HT3 receptor mRNA in GF mouse colonoids. We conclude that host secretory response to 5-HT may be modulated by gut microbiota regulation of 5-HT3 receptor expression via acetate production. Epithelial 5-HT3 receptor may function as a mediator of gut microbiota-driven change in intestinal secretion.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We found that gut microbiota alters serotonin (5-HT)-evoked intestinal secretion in a 5-HT3 receptor-dependent mechanism and gut microbiota metabolite acetate alters 5-HT3 receptor expression in colonoids.View this article

  8. Human papilloma virus types in the oral and cervical mucosa of HIV-positive South African women prior to antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Karin L; van Rensburg, Estrelita Janse; van Heerden, Willie F P; Boy, Sonja C

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and types in the oral and cervix mucosa of treatment-naïve HIV-1-positive women with CD4 counts less than 300 cells per ml with no HPV-associated oral lesions. Oral epithelium was harvested from the buccal mucosa and lateral borders of the tongue and cervical samples were collected from the endocervical area of 30 women, 22-64 years old. Cytobrush Plus cell collectors were used for sampling both anatomical areas. Genital pathology, obstetric and gynaecological history, co-morbid disease, hormone therapy, sexual behavior and smoking history were assessed via physical examination and clinical interviews. Special investigations included cervical Papanicolau smears, CD4 counts and HIV-1 viral loads. The linear array HPV test was used to determine HPV genotypes present in the specimens. Oral HPV were identified in 20% (n = 6) of the patients, of which two had infection with two HPV types. Genital HPV was found in 96.7% (n = 29) of the women, of which only 14 had cytological abnormalities on Papanicolau smear. Infection with multiple HPV types were present in 93.1% (n = 27) of the patients, with an average of four HPV types per individual. South African HIV-positive women with CD4 counts less than 300 cells per ml have a significant risk of cervical HPV strains and multiple strain infection of the cervix. The prevalence of HPV in normal oral mucosa was low but high-risk types were present. Limited correlation between oral HPV types and those identified in the cervical mucosa was found.

  9. Goniothalamin prevents the development of chemically induced and spontaneous colitis in rodents and induces apoptosis in the HT-29 human colon tumor cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramini-Costa, Débora Barbosa; Alcaide, Antonio; Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; Talero, Elena; Ávila-Román, Javier; Garcia-Mauriño, Sofia; Pilli, Ronaldo Aloise; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Motilva, Virginia

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer is the third most incident type of cancer worldwide. One of the most important risk factors for colon cancer development are inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), thus therapies focusing on IBD treatment have great potential to be used in cancer prevention. Nature has been a source of new therapeutic and preventive agents and the racemic form of the styryl-lactone goniothalamin (GTN) has been shown to be a promising antiproliferative agent, with gastroprotective, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. As inflammation is a well-known tumor promoter, the major goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic and preventive potentials of GTN on chemically induced and spontaneous colitis, as well as the cytotoxic effects of GTN on a human colon tumor cell line (HT-29). GTN treatments inhibited TNBS-induced acute and chronic colitis development in Wistar rats, reducing myeloperoxidase levels and inflammatory cells infiltration in the mucosa. In spontaneous-colitis using IL-10 deficient mice (C57BL/6 background), GTN prevented colitis development through downregulation of TNF-α, upregulation of SIRT-1 and inhibition of proliferation (PCNA index), without signs of toxicity after three months of treatment. In HT-29 cells, treatment with 10μM of GTN induced apoptosis by increasing BAX/BCL2, p-JNK1/JNK1, p-P38/P38 ratios as well as through ROS generation. Caspase 8, 9 and 3 activation also occurred, suggesting caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway, culminating in PARP-1 cleavage. Together with previous data, these results show the importance of GTN as a pro-apoptotic, preventive and therapeutic agent for IBD and highlight its potential as a chemopreventive agent for colon cancer.

  10. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Safadi, Dima El; Certad, Gabriela; Delhaes, Laurence; Pereira, Bruno; Nourrisson, Céline; Poirier, Philippe; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Delbac, Frédéric; Morelle, Christelle; Bastien, Patrick; Lachaud, Laurence; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Botterel, Françoise; Candolfi, Ermanno; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Morio, Florent; Pomares, Christelle; Rabodonirina, Meja; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27147260

  11. Decorin in Human Colon Cancer: Localization In Vivo and Effect on Cancer Cell Behavior In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Marie C; Sainio, Annele O; Pennanen, Mirka M; Lund, Riikka J; Vuorikoski, Sanna; Sundström, Jari T T; Järveläinen, Hannu T

    2015-09-01

    Decorin is generally recognized as a tumor suppressing molecule. Nevertheless, although decorin has been shown to be differentially expressed in malignant tissues, it has often remained unclear whether, in addition to non-malignant stromal cells, cancer cells also express it. Here, we first used two publicly available databases to analyze the current information about decorin expression and immunoreactivity in normal and malignant human colorectal tissue samples. The analyses demonstrated that decorin expression and immunoreactivity may vary in cancer cells of human colorectal tissues. Therefore, we next examined decorin expression in normal, premalignant and malignant human colorectal tissues in more detail using both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for decorin. Our results invariably demonstrate that malignant cells within human colorectal cancer tissues are devoid of both decorin mRNA and immunoreactivity. Identical results were obtained for cells of neuroendocrine tumors of human colon. Using RT-qPCR, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines are also decorin negative, in accordance with the above in vivo results. Finally, we demonstrate that decorin transduction of human colon cancer cell lines causes a significant reduction in their colony forming capability. Thus, strategies to develop decorin-based adjuvant therapies for human colorectal malignancies are highly rational. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Hydrodynamic IL10 Gene Transfer in Human Colon: Results from an "EX VIVO" Study with Potential Clinical Application in Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, Matteo; Sendra, Luis; Miguel, Antonio; Herrero, Maria José; Montalvá, Eva; López-Andújar, Rafael; Martínez-Pastor, Juan; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Granero, Eduardo García; Aliño, Salvador

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the efficacy of hydrodynamic venous IL10 gene delivery to "ex vivo" human colon segments and to determine its potential interest in Crohn's disease treatment. Twenty human colon segments were obtained from surgical resections. Hydrodynamic transfection through the main vein of the pedicle with 50 mL of hIL10 plasmid (20 μg/mL) solution was performed on 13 of them. Tissue sections were cultured and DNA, RNA, and protein copies were determined after 1, 2, and 4 days. Data obtained were compared with 6 nontransfected specimens. Finally, 1 specimen was injected with gold nanoparticles, and their distribution was examined under electron microscope. IL10 DNA levels were higher in treated tissues than in controls (P < 0.001), decreasing along time. The amount of hIL10 RNA was significantly increased in treated tissues when compared with controls (P = 0.001). The indexes of protein IL10 translation in treated groups were much higher (P < 0.001) than the basal production. The protein expression was higher in transfected tissue (10-50-fold, with respect to control tissue); this difference being established during the first hours and maintained during, at least, 4 days. With electron microscopy, we hardly observed large (15 nm) gold nanoparticles within the tissue, always in the submucosa. However, multiple small (4 nm) nanoparticles were observed within the cytoplasm of enterocytes in mucosa. Hydrodynamic procedure efficiently delivers the IL10 gene to the human colon, achieving levels of tissue protein expression high enough to mediate pharmacological effects with interest in controlling immune response in patients with Crohn's disease.

  13. Dynamics of thymus organogenesis and colonization in early human development

    OpenAIRE

    Farley, Alison; Morris, Lucy; Vroegindeweij, Eric; Depreter, Marianne; Vaidya, Harsh; Stenhouse, Frances; Tomlinson, Simon; Anderson, Richard,; Cupedo, Tom; Cornelissen, Jan; Clare, Blackburn

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe thymus is the central site of T-cell development and thus is of fundamental importance to the immune system, but little information exists regarding molecular regulation of thymus development in humans. Here we demonstrate, via spatial and temporal expression analyses, that the genetic mechanisms known to regulate mouse thymus organogenesis are conserved in humans. In addition, we provide molecular evidence that the human thymic epithelium derives solely from the third pharyng...

  14. In vitro degradation and fermentation of three dietary fiber sources by human colonic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although clinical benefits of dietary fiber supplementation seem to depend in part on the extent of fiber degradation and fermentation by colonic bacteria, little is known about the effect of the type of supplemented fiber on bacterial metabolism. In an experiment using a non-adapted human bacterial...

  15. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby

    2010-01-01

    in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images revealed...

  16. Potent anti-cancer effect of 3'-hydroxypterostilbene in human colon xenograft tumors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Tzu-Chun; Lai, Ching-Shu; Chung, Min-Ching; Kalyanam, Nagabhushanam; Majeed, Muhammed; Ho, Chi-Tang; Ho, Yuan-Soon; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    ... (COLO 205, HCT-116, and HT-29) with measured IC50 values of 9.0, 40.2, and 70.9 µM, respectively. We found that HPSB effectively inhibited the growth of human colon cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and autophagy...

  17. Genetics of the pig tapeworm in Madagascar reveal a history of human dispersal and colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    An intricate history of human dispersal and geographic colonization has strongly affected the distribution of obligate parasites circulating among people. Among these parasites, the pig tapeworm Taenia solium occurs throughout the world as the causative agent of cysticercosis, one of the most serio...

  18. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby;

    2010-01-01

    in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images revealed...

  19. The role of human innate immune factors in nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Belkum, Alex; Emonts, Marieke; Wertheim, Heiman; Bartels, Hans; Cole, Alexander; Lemmens-den Toom, Nicole; Snijders, Susan Susan; Verbrugh, Henri; van Leeuwen, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Slaphylococcus aureus colonization of the human nares predisposes to sometimes severe auto-infection. To investigate whether genetic polymorphism affects the S. aureus carriage status, sequence variation in alpha-defensin and beta-defensin, and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) genes were determined for

  20. Cultivo in vitro con colágeno y fibroblastos humanos de un equivalente de mucosa oral de espesor total In vitro culture with collagen and human fibroblasts of a full-thickness oral mucosa equivalent

    OpenAIRE

    S. González Mendez; L.M. Junquera Gutiérrez; I. Peña González; V. García Díaz; L. Gallego López; García Pérez, E.; A. Meana Infiesta

    2009-01-01

    Objetivos. El presente trabajo tiene por objetivo obtener, mediante cultivo in vitro, láminas de tejido oral en las que se pueda identificar las estructuras de una mucosa oral completa. La aplicación clínica del presente estudio permitiría, en determinados casos, la sustitución del empleo de injertos libres de piel o autólogos de mucosa oral por esta técnica. Material y Método. A partir de pequeñas biopsias de mucosa oral se hicieron cultivos primarios de queratinocitos. A partir de estos cul...

  1. Proteomic expression analysis of colonic mucosa in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome%肠易激综合征大鼠结肠组织的蛋白质组学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁莺; 吕宾; 孟立娜; 范一宏; 郭赟; 沈雁; 陈硕

    2010-01-01

    conditions of physical restraint as a non-conditional stimulation in turn. The total proteins were extracted from colon mucosa of two different rat groups. After preparation of total proteins, selubilized proteins were separated by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis. Those differential protein spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry ( MALDI-TOF MS). The identified proteins were classified through an online web gene ontology tool. Some of the valuable differently expressed proteins were chosen for further verification by Western blotting. ResultsIntensity changes of 19 spots were detected among 1396 protein spots. A total of 13 different proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF MS successfully ; eight of these were up-regulated and five down-regulated in colon mueosa of IBS rat. The eight over-expressed proteins were cytokeratin 8, protein disulfide isomerase A3 ( PDIA3 ),peroxiredoxin-6, cathepsin S, heterogeneous nuclear ribonueleoprotein F, eukaryotic translation initiation factor, earbonyl reductase 1, glyoxalase I; five under-expressed proteins were alpha-enolase, transgelin,serpinB5, cardiac α-actin 1 and 40S ribosomal protein SA. The results of Western blotting confirmed that PDIA3 was indeed over-expressed in colonic mucosa of IBS rat. ConclusionsSome proteins related to immunity of intestinal tract, inflammation and nerve are differently expressed in colonic mueosa of IBS rat. It is suggested that immunity, inflammation and neuro-endocrine network in gut are associated with the pathogenesis of IBS.

  2. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  3. The glutathione biotransformation system and colon carcinogenesis in human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubben, M.J.A.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Katan, M.B.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for a protective role of the glutathione biotransformation system in carcinogenesis is growing. However, most data on this system in relation to colorectal cancer originate from animal studies. Here we review the human data. In humans, a significant association was found between glutathione

  4. PSF3 marks malignant colon cancer and has a role in cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahama, Yumi [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueno, Masaya [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Mori, Masaki [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 (Japan); Takakura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: ntakaku@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Signal Transduction, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-02-05

    PSF3 (partner of Sld five 3) is a member of the tetrameric complex termed GINS, composed of SLD5, PSF1, PSF2, and PSF3, and well-conserved evolutionarily. Previous studies suggested that some GINS complex members are upregulated in cancer, but PSF3 expression in colon carcinoma has not been investigated. Here, we established a mouse anti-PSF3 antibody, and examined PSF3 expression in human colon carcinoma cell lines and colon carcinoma specimens. We found that PSF3 is expressed in the crypt region in normal colonic mucosa and that many PSF3-positive cells co-expressed Ki-67. This suggests that PSF3-positivity of normal mucosa is associated with cell proliferation. Expression of the PSF3 protein was greater in carcinoma compared with the adjacent normal mucosa, and even stronger in high-grade malignancies, suggesting that it may be associated with colon cancer progression. PSF3 gene knock-down in human colon carcinoma cell lines resulted in growth inhibition characterized by delayed S-phase progression. These results suggest that PSF3 is a potential biomarker for diagnosis of progression in colon cancer and could be a new target for cancer therapy.

  5. Abnormal colonic motility in mice overexpressing human wild-type α-synuclein

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The presynaptic protein α-synuclein (αSyn) has been implicated in both familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson’s disease. We examined whether human αSyn-overexpressing mice under Thy1 promoter (Thy1-αSyn) display alterations of colonic function. Basal fecal output was decreased in Thy1-αSyn mice fed ad libitum. Fasted/refed Thy1-αSyn mice had a slower distal colonic transit than the wild-type mice, as monitored by 2.2-fold increase in time to expel an intracolonic bead and 2.9-fold higher co...

  6. Quercetin induces human colon cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting the nuclear factor-kappa B Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-An; Zhang, Shuangxi; Yin, Qing; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells with the ability to act as chemopreventers. Its cancer-preventive effect has been attributed to various mechanisms, including the induction of cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis as well as the antioxidant functions. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) is a signaling pathway that controls transcriptional activation of genes important for tight regulation of many cellular processes and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer. Inhibitors of NF-κB pathway have shown potential anti-tumor activities. However, it is not fully elucidated in colon cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin induces apoptosis in human colon cancer CACO-2 and SW-620 cells through inhibiting NF-κB pathway, as well as down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 and up-regulation of Bax, thus providing basis for clinical application of quercetin in colon cancer cases.

  7. Antimicrobial Use, Human Gut Microbiota and Clostridium difficile Colonization and Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Vincent

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Broad-spectrum antimicrobials have profound detrimental effects on the structure and diversity of the indigenous intestinal microbiota. These alterations often impair colonization resistance, allowing the establishment and proliferation of C. difficile in the gut. Studies involving animal models have begun to decipher the precise mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota mediates colonization resistance against C. difficile and numerous investigations have described gut microbiota alterations associated with C. difficile colonization or infection in human subjects. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT is a highly effective approach for the treatment of recurrent CDI that allows the restoration of a healthy intestinal ecosystem via infusion of fecal material from a healthy donor. The recovery of the intestinal microbiota after FMT has been examined in a few reports and work is being done to develop custom bacterial community preparations that could be used as a replacement for fecal material.

  8. Survivin promotes the invasion of human colon carcinoma cells by regulating the expression of MMP‑7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Yuqin; Yang, Feng; Wang, Peng; Wang, Wenjun; Su, Yan; Luo, Weiren

    2014-03-01

    Increased expression levels of survivin are crucial for invasion activity in several types of human cancer, including colon carcinoma. However, the molecular mechanisms whereby survivin regulates cancer invasion have not been completely elucidated. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the role of matrix metalloprotease‑7 (MMP‑7) in cell invasion that is induced by survivin by using in vitro assays, including western blot, immunofluorescence and qPCR analyses. The results demonstrated that the ectopic expression of survivin significantly promoted the invasive activity of colon carcinoma cells (SW620 and HCT‑116) and resulted in increased levels of MMP‑7 activation. By contrast, the small interfering RNA (siRNA)‑based knockdown of survivin markedly reduced cell migration and led to a dose‑dependent decrease in MMP‑7 expression levels. Compared with the controls, knockdown of MMP‑7 by siRNA in colon carcinoma cells led to reduced invasion ability, whereas no obvious changes were observed when MMP‑7 expression was silenced in survivin‑overexpressing colon carcinoma cells. These findings demonstrate that MMP‑7 is crucial for survivin‑mediated invasiveness, suggesting that the survivin‑mediated MMP‑7 signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of colon carcinoma.

  9. Plaque assay for human coronavirus NL63 using human colon carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drosten Christian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronaviruses cause a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. Human coronavirus (hCoV NL63 is associated with up to 10% of common colds. Viral plaque assays enable the characterization of virus infectivity and allow for purifying virus stock solutions. They are essential for drug screening. Hitherto used cell cultures for hCoV-NL63 show low levels of virus replication and weak and diffuse cytopathogenic effects. It has not yet been possible to establish practicable plaque assays for this important human pathogen. Results 12 different cell cultures were tested for susceptibility to hCoV-NL63 infection. Human colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2 replicated virus more than 100 fold more efficiently than commonly used African green monkey kidney cells (LLC-MK2. CaCo-2 cells showed cytopathogenic effects 4 days post infection. Avicel, agarose and carboxymethyl-cellulose overlays proved suitable for plaque assays. Best results were achieved with Avicel, which produced large and clear plaques from the 4th day of infection. The utility of plaque assays with agrose overlay was demonstrated for purifying virus, thereby increasing viral infectivity by 1 log 10 PFU/mL. Conclusion CaCo-2 cells support hCoV-NL63 better than LLC-MK2 cells and enable cytopathogenic plaque assays. Avicel overlay is favourable for plaque quantification, and agarose overlay is preferred for plaque purification. HCoV-NL63 virus stock of increased infectivity will be beneficial in antiviral screening, animal modelling of disease, and other experimental tasks.

  10. Modulation of histamine release from human colon mast cells by protease inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of protease inhibitors to modulate histamine release from human colon mast cells.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 in the absence or presence of tryptase and chymase inhibitors, and histamine release was determined.RESULTS: IgE dependent histamine release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 37%, 26% and 36.8% by chymase inhibitors Z-Ile-Glu-Pro-Phe-CO2Me (ZIGPFM), N-Tosyl-L-phenylalanyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK), and α1-antitrypsin, respectively. Similarly, inhibitors of tryptase leupeptin, N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), lactoferrin and protamine were also able to inhibit anti-IgE induced histamine release by a maximum of some 48%, 37%, 40% and 34%, respectively. Preincubation of these inhibitors with cells for 20 min before challenged with anti-IgE had small effect on the inhibitory actions of these inhibitors on colon mast cells. A specific inhibitor of aminopeptidase amastatin had no effect on anti-IgE induced histamine release. The significant inhibition of calcium ionophore induced histamine release was also observed with the inhibitors of tryptase and chymase examined. Apart from leupeptin and protamine, the inhibitors tested by themselves did not stimulate colon mast cells.CONCLUSION: It was demonstrated that both tryptase and chymase inhibitors could inhibit IgE dependent and calcium ionophore induced histamine release from dispersed colon mast cells in a concentration dependent of manner, which suggest that they are likely to be developed as a novel class of anti-inflammatory drugs to treat chronic of colitis in man.

  11. Inhibition of tryptase release from human colon mast cells by protease inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of protease inhibitors to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 in the absence or presence of tryptase and chymase inhibitors,and tryptase release was determined.RESULTS: IgE dependent tryptase release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 37%, 40% and 36.6% by chymase inhibitors Z-Ile-Glu-Pro-Phe-CO2Me (ZIGPFM), N-tosyl-L-phenylalanyl-chloromethyl ketone (TPCK), and α1-antitrypsin, respectively. Similarly, the inhibitors of tryptase leupeptin, N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and lactoferrin were also able to inhibit anti-IgE induced tryptase release by a maximum of 39.4%,47.6% and 36.6%, respectively. The inhibitory actions of chymase inhibitors, but not tryptase inhibitors on colon mast cells were enhanced by preincubation of them with cells for 20 min before challenged with anti-IgE. At a concentration of 10 μg/mL, protamine was able to inhibit anti-IgE and calcium ionophore induced tryptase release. However, at 100 μg/mL, protamine elevated tryptase levels in supernatants.A specific inhibitor of aminopeptidase amastatin had no effect on anti-IgE induced tryptase release. The significant inhibition of calcium ionophore induced tryptase release was also observed with the inhibitors of tryptase and chymase examined. The inhibitors tested by themselves did not stimulate tryptase release from colon mast cells.CONCLUSION: It was demonstrated for the first time that both tryptase and chymase inhibitors could inhibit IgE dependent and calcium ionophore induced tryptase release from dispersed colon mast cells in a concentration dependent of manner, which suggest that they are likely to be developed as a novel class of anti-inflammatory drugs to treat chronic of colitis in man.

  12. Effect of a hyperlipidic diet rich in omegas 3, 6 and 9 on aberrant crypt formation in rat colonic mucosa Efeito de uma dieta hiperlipídica rica em ômegas 3, 6 e 9 na formação de criptas aberrantes em mucosa cólica de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idália Maria Brasil Burlamaqui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine whether a hypercaloric and hyperlipidic diet enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids influences the formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF in colonic mucosa of Wistar rats treated with azoxymethane (AOM. METHODS: At eight weeks of life, the rats were assigned to four groups: Group I―standard diet (STD not treated with AOM; Group II―hypercaloric and hyperlipidic diet (FED, not treated with AOM; Group III―STD, treated with AOM; Group IV―FED, treated with AOM. At 16 weeks, the animals were injected intraperitoneal with 0.9% saline solution (Group I and II or AOM at 15mg/Kg (Groups III and IV once a week for two weeks. Fifteen weeks later, the animals were euthanized. RESULTS: FED promoted weight gain in Groups II and IV compared to Groups I and III, respectively. The groups did not differ with regard to the total number of ACF. The Chi-square test revealed no predominance of the presence of foci with OBJETIVO: Determinar se uma dieta hipercalórica, hiperlipídica, rica em ácidos graxos poliinsaturados (FED tem influência na formação de focos de cripta aberrante (FCA em mucosa cólica de ratos Wistar expostos ao azoximetano (AOM. MÉTODOS: Com oito semanas de vida, os ratos foram distribuídos em quatro grupos: Grupo I: Dieta padrão (SD sem AOM; Grupo II: FED, sem AOM; Grupo III: SD, com AOM; Grupo IV: FED com AOM. Com 16 semanas, os animais dos grupos I e II receberam injeções intraperitoneais de solução salina 0,9%, enquanto os dos grupos III e IV receberam AOM na dose de 15mg/Kg de peso, 1 vez por semana por duas semanas. Quinze semanas após, os animais foram mortos. RESULTADOS: FED promoveu aumento de peso nos grupos II e IV em relação aos grupos I e III. Não houve aumento significante no número total de FCA entre os grupos. Em relação à multiplicidade das criptas por FCA, o teste do qui-quadrado mostrou que não houve predominância da presença <4 criptas por foco. Contudo, focos ≥5 criptas

  13. Dynamics of thymus organogenesis and colonization in early human development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Farley (Alison); L.X. Morris (Lucy); E.M. Vroegindeweij (Eric); M.L.G. Depreter (Marianne); H. Vaidya (Harsh); F.H. Stenhouse (Frances); S.R. Tomlinson (Simon); R.A. Anderson (Richard); T. Cupedo (Tom); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); B.C. Clare (Blackburn)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe thymus is the central site of T-cell development and thus is of fundamental importance to the immune system, but little information exists regarding molecular regulation of thymus development in humans. Here we demonstrate, via spatial and temporal expression analyses, that the genet

  14. Beyond diversity: functional microbiomics of the human colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egert, M.G.G.; Graaf, de A.; Smidt, H.; Vos, de W.M.; Venema, K.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular tools have revealed wide microbial diversity in the human alimentary tract. Most intestinal microorganisms have not been cultured and the in situ functions of distinct groups of the intestinal microbiota are largely unknown but pivotal to understanding the role of these microorganisms in h

  15. Localization of human BRCA1 and BRCA2 in non-inherited colorectal carcinomas and matched normal mucosas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Gallon, D J; Peffault de Latour, M; Hizel, C; Vissac, C; Cure, H; Pezet, D; Dechelotte, P J; Chipponi, J; Chassagne, J; Bignon, Y J

    2001-01-01

    We characterized the expression of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 38 sporadic colorectal carcinomas and matched normal mucosas with 9 anti-BRCA1 antibodies and 4 anti-BRCA2 antibodies, raised against several different epitopes, using immunohistochemical technique. We demonstrated an increased BRCA1 and BRCA2 staining in the apical cell pole of epithelial malignant cells and we also revealed a significant increase in BRCA1 and BRCA2 nuclear foci in tumor colorectal specimens in comparison with corresponding normal tissues. These increases in BRCA1 and BRCA2 expression may be explained by the fact that colorectal tissue is subject to very active proliferation and differentiation.

  16. Nogo-A expression in injured spinal cord following human olfactory mucosa-derived olfactory ensheathing cells transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wang; Qiang Li; Xijing He; Weixiong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of olfactory bulb-derived olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) promotes motor functional recovery in rats with acute spinal cord injury, possibly by Nogo-A expression changes at the injury site. The present study transplanted OECs derived from the olfactory mucosa (OM) of rats. OM-derived OEC (OM-OEC) transplantation significantly reduced the increase of Nogo-A protein and mRNA expression caused by spinal cord injury, supporting the hypothesis that OM-OECs improve spinal cord regeneration by reducing Nogo-A expression.

  17. Depth-dependent differences in community structure of the human colonic microbiota in health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aonghus Lavelle

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to develop techniques for spatial microbial assessment in humans and to establish colonic luminal and mucosal spatial ecology, encompassing longitudinal and cross-sectional axes. DESIGN: A microbiological protected specimen brush was used in conjunction with a biopsy forceps to sample the colon in nine healthy volunteers undergoing colonoscopy. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis was used to determine the major variables in the spatial organization of the colonic microbiota. RESULTS: Protected Specimen Brush sampling retrieved region-specific, uncontaminated samples that were enriched for bacterial DNA and depleted in human DNA when compared to biopsy samples. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis revealed a segmentation of bacterial communities between the luminal brush and biopsy-associated ecological niches with little variability across the longitudinal axis of the colon and reduced diversity in brush samples. CONCLUSION: These results support the concept of a microbiota with little longitudinal variability but with some degree of segregation between luminal and mucosal communities.

  18. Secreted human adipose leptin decreases mitochondrial respiration in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, pobese subjects. We conclude that secreted products from the adipose tissue of obese subjects inhibit mitochondrial respiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues.

  19. Secreted human adipose leptin decreases mitochondrial respiration in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einav Yehuda-Shnaidman

    Full Text Available Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese subjects decreased basal (40%, p<0.05 and maximal (50%, p<0.05 OCR and gene expression of mitochondrial proteins and Bax without affecting cell viability or expression of glycolytic enzymes. Similar changes could be recapitulated by incubating cells with leptin, whereas, leptin-receptor specific antagonist inhibited the reduced OCR induced by conditioned media from obese subjects. We conclude that secreted products from the adipose tissue of obese subjects inhibit mitochondrial respiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues.

  20. A piglet model for studying Candida albicans colonization of the human oro-gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeflinger, Jennifer L; Coleman, David A; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Miller, Michael J; Hoyer, Lois L

    2014-08-01

    Pigs from a variety of sources were surveyed for oro-gastrointestinal (oro-GIT) carriage of Candida albicans. Candida albicans-positive animals were readily located, but we also identified C. albicans-free pigs. We hypothesized that pigs could be stably colonized with a C. albicans strain of choice, simply by feeding yeast cells. Piglets were farrowed routinely and remained with the sow for 4 days to acquire a normal microbiota. Piglets were then placed in an artificial rearing environment and fed sow milk replacer. Piglets were inoculated orally with one of three different C. albicans strains. Piglets were weighed daily, and culture swabs were collected to detect C. albicans orally, rectally and in the piglet's environment. Stable C. albicans colonization over the course of the study did not affect piglet growth. Necropsy revealed mucosally associated C. albicans throughout the oro-GIT with the highest abundance in the esophagus. Uninoculated control piglets remained C. albicans-negative. These data establish the piglet as a model to study C. albicans colonization of the human oro-GIT. Similarities between oro-GIT colonization in humans and pigs, as well as the ease of working with the piglet model, suggest its adaptability for use among investigators interested in understanding C. albicans-host commensal interactions.

  1. Flux analysis of the human proximal colon using anaerobic digestion model 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motelica-Wagenaar, Anne Marieke; Nauta, Arjen; van den Heuvel, Ellen G H M; Kleerebezem, Robbert

    2014-08-01

    The colon can be regarded as an anaerobic digestive compartment within the gastro intestinal tract (GIT). An in silico model simulating the fluxes in the human proximal colon was developed on basis of the anaerobic digestion model 1 (ADM1), which is traditionally used to model waste conversion to biogas. Model calibration was conducted using data from in vitro fermentation of the proximal colon (TIM-2), and, amongst others, supplemented with the bio kinetics of prebiotic galactooligosaccharides (GOS) fermentation. The impact of water and solutes absorption by the host was also included. Hydrolysis constants of carbohydrates and proteins were estimated based on total short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ammonia production in vitro. Model validation was established using an independent dataset of a different in vitro model: an in vitro three-stage continuous culture system. The in silico model was shown to provide quantitative insight in the microbial community structure in terms of functional groups, and the substrate and product fluxes between these groups as well as the host, as a function of the substrate composition, pH and the solids residence time (SRT). The model confirms the experimental observation that methanogens are washed out at low pH or low SRT-values. The in silico model is proposed as useful tool in the design of experimental setups for in vitro experiments by giving insight in fermentation processes in the proximal human colon.

  2. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Erk Marjan J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an anti-oxidant and it can act as an anti-inflammatory agent. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms and effect of curcumin in colon cancer cells using gene expression profiling. Methods Gene expression changes in response to curcumin exposure were studied in two human colon cancer cell lines, using cDNA microarrays with four thousand human genes. HT29 cells were exposed to two different concentrations of curcumin and gene expression changes were followed in time (3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Gene expression changes after short-term exposure (3 or 6 hours to curcumin were also studied in a second cell type, Caco-2 cells. Results Gene expression changes (>1.5-fold were found at all time points. HT29 cells were more sensitive to curcumin than Caco-2 cells. Early response genes were involved in cell cycle, signal transduction, DNA repair, gene transcription, cell adhesion and xenobiotic metabolism. In HT29 cells curcumin modulated a number of cell cycle genes of which several have a role in transition through the G2/M phase. This corresponded to a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase as was observed by flow cytometry. Functional groups with a similar expression profile included genes involved in phase-II metabolism that were induced by curcumin after 12 and 24 hours. Expression of some cytochrome P450 genes was downregulated by curcumin in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. In addition, curcumin affected expression of metallothionein genes, tubulin genes, p53 and other genes involved in colon carcinogenesis. Conclusions This study has extended knowledge on pathways or processes already reported to be affected by curcumin (cell cycle arrest, phase

  3. Modulation of tryptase secretion from human colon mast cells by histamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of histamine to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells and the potential mechanisms.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colons were challenged with histamine, anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 (CI), and the cell supernatants after challenge were collected. Tryptase release was determined with a sandwich ELISA procedure.able to induce a "bell" shape dose related release of tryptase from colon mast cells. The maximum release of tryptase was approximately 3.5 fold more than spontaneous release. As little as 10 ng/mL histamine showed a similar potency to 10 μg/mL anti-IgE in induction of tryptase release. Histamine induced release of tryptase initiated at 10 s when histamine (100 ng/mL) was added to cells, gradually increased thereafter, and completed at 5 min, Both pertussis toxin or metabolic inhibitors were able to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release. When histamine and anti-IgE were added to colon mast cells at the same time, the quantity of tryptase released was similar to that induced by anti-IgE alone. The similar results were observed with CI. However, when various concentrations of histamine were incubated with cells for 20 min before adding anti-IgE or CI, the quantity of tryptase released was similar to that was induced by histamine alone.CONCLUSION: Histamine is a potent activator of human colon mast cells, which represents a novel and pivotal selfamplification mechanism of mast cell degranulation.

  4. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  5. PDIA3在腹泻型肠易激综合征患者结肠黏膜中的蛋白表达及其意义%Protein Expression and Significance of PDIA3 in Colonic Mucosa of Patients、with Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马丽娟; 吕宾; 孟立娜; 范一宏; 金海峰

    2011-01-01

    Background: The mechanisms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remain unclear yet, and visceral hypersensitivity is considered as one of its main pathophysiological mechanisms. Protein disulfide isomerase A3 (PDIA3) is overexpressed in colonic mucosa in rats with visceral hypersensitivity. However, the protein expression and significance of PDIA3 in colonic mucosa of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) are not clear. Aims: To investigate the protein expression and mechanism of PDIA3 in colonic mucosa of patients with IBS-D. Methods: Fifteen IBS-D patients met Rome Ⅲ diagnostic criteria and 15 healthy controls were included in this study. Western blotting was used to determine the protein expression of PDIA3 in colonic mucosa, and concentration of tryptase in colonic mucosa cultured supernatant was determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with controls, protein expression of PDIA3 was up-regulated in colonic mucosa in IBS-D patients (P<0.01), tryptase concentration was significantly increased (P<0.01). The concentration of tryptase was positively correlated with the protein expression of PDIA3 in patients with IBS-D (r=0.750, P=0.003).Conclusions: PDIA3 may promote the release of tryptase that causes visceral hypersensitivity, and thereby PDIA3 may be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS-D.%肠易激综合征(IBS)的发病机制尚未完全明了,内脏敏感性增高是其主要的病理生理基础之一.研究显示蛋白质二硫键异构酶A3(PDIA3)在内脏高敏感大鼠结肠黏膜组织中高表达,但其在腹泻型IBS(IBS-D)患者结肠黏膜中的蛋白表达及其意义尚不清楚.目的:探讨PDIA3在IBS-D患者结肠黏膜中的蛋白表达及其作用机制.方法:收集符合罗马Ⅲ诊断标准的15例IBS-D患者和15例健康对照者.采用蛋白质印迹法检测结肠黏膜PDIA3蛋白表达,ELISA法检测结肠黏膜孵育上清液类胰蛋白酶浓度.结果:与对照组相比,IBS-D患者结肠黏膜中PDIA3蛋白

  6. Light- and electron microscopical studies of interstitial cells of Cajal and muscle cells at the submucosal border of human colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Peters, S; Thuneberg, L

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) at the submucosal border of the colonic circular muscle are pacemaker cells. We studied smooth muscle cells and ICC at the submucosal surface of the circular muscle layer of the normal human colon....

  7. Identification of the Virulence Landscape Essential for Entamoeba histolytica Invasion of the Human Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Chung-Chau; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Avé, Patrick; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Labruyère, Elisabeth; Guillén, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the pathogenic amoeba responsible for amoebiasis, an infectious disease targeting human tissues. Amoebiasis arises when virulent trophozoites start to destroy the muco-epithelial barrier by first crossing the mucus, then killing host cells, triggering inflammation and subsequently causing dysentery. The main goal of this study was to analyse pathophysiology and gene expression changes related to virulent (i.e. HM1:IMSS) and non-virulent (i.e. Rahman) strains when they are in contact with the human colon. Transcriptome comparisons between the two strains, both in culture conditions and upon contact with human colon explants, provide a global view of gene expression changes that might contribute to the observed phenotypic differences. The most remarkable feature of the virulent phenotype resides in the up-regulation of genes implicated in carbohydrate metabolism and processing of glycosylated residues. Consequently, inhibition of gene expression by RNA interference of a glycoside hydrolase (β-amylase absent from humans) abolishes mucus depletion and tissue invasion by HM1:IMSS. In summary, our data suggest a potential role of carbohydrate metabolism in colon invasion by virulent E. histolytica. PMID:24385905

  8. Transmission of human papillomavirus DNA from patient to surgical masks, gloves and oral mucosa of medical personnel during treatment of laryngeal papillomas and genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmarinen, Taru; Auvinen, Eeva; Hiltunen-Back, Eija; Ranki, Annamari; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2012-11-01

    The risk of occupational human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission from patient to medical personnel during laser vaporization procedures remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of HPV transmission from the patient to the protective surgical masks, gloves and oral mucosa of medical personnel during the treatment of laryngeal papillomas and genital warts. The study involved five male patients scheduled for the surgical treatment of laryngeal papillomas, and five male patients undergoing carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser treatment for urethral warts. Oral mucosa specimens were obtained from the study patients and the employees pre- and postoperatively. Samples were collected from the HPV-infected patient tissue, and from the surgical masks and gloves used by the employees. A total of 120 samples were analyzed for the presence of HPV DNA by PCR, using the degenerated MY09/11/HMB01 primers. After the papilloma procedures, the surgeons' gloves tested HPV positive in one of the five cases and those of the surgical nurse in three of the five cases. After the treatment of genital warts, HPV DNA corresponding to the patient tissue specimens was present in all the samples obtained from the surgical gloves of the operators. All oral mucosa samples obtained from 18 different employees tested HPV negative, as did the surgical mask specimens. According to our study, HPV may contaminate protective equipment, most of all surgical gloves, but transmission of HPV DNA to medical personnel is unlikely to occur provided that protective surgical gloves and masks are applied and disposed of properly.

  9. The colon-selective spasmolytic otilonium bromide inhibits muscarinic M3 receptor-coupled calcium signals in isolated human colonic crypts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Susanne; Hernon, James; Sharp, Paul; Johns, Neil; Addison, Sarah; Watson, Mark; Tighe, Richard; Greer, Shaun; Mackay, Jean; Rhodes, Michael; Lewis, Michael; Stebbings, William; Speakman, Chris; Evangelista, Stefano; Johnson, Ian; Williams, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is a smooth muscle relaxant used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Otilonium bromide has been shown to interfere with the mobilization of calcium in intestinal smooth muscle, but the effects on other intestinal tissues have not been investigated. We identified the muscarinic receptor subtype coupled to calcium signals in colonic crypt derived from the human colonic epithelium and evaluated the inhibitory effects of OB. Calcium signals were monitored by fluorescence imaging of isolated human colonic crypts and Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned human muscarinic M3 receptor subtype (CHO-M3). Colonic crypt receptor expression was investigated by pharmacological and immunohistochemical techniques. The secretagogue acetylcholine (ACh) stimulated calcium mobilization from intracellular calcium stores at the base of human colonic crypts with an EC50 of 14 μM. The muscarinic receptor antagonists 4-DAMP, AF-DX 384, pirenzepine and methroctamine inhibited the ACh-induced calcium signal with the following respective IC50 (pKb) values: 0.78 nM (9.1), 69 nM (7.2), 128 nM (7.1), and 2510 nM (5.8). Immunohistochemical analyses of muscarinic receptor expression demonstrated the presence of M3 receptor subtype expression at the crypt-base. Otilonium bromide inhibited the generation of ACh-induced calcium signals in a dose dependent manner (IC50=880 nM). In CHO-M3 cells, OB inhibited calcium signals induced by ACh, but not ATP. In addition, OB did not inhibit histamine-induced colonic crypt calcium signals. The present studies have demonstrated that OB inhibited M3 receptor-coupled calcium signals in human colonic crypts and CHO-M3 cells, but not those induced by stimulation of other endogenous receptor types. We propose that the M3 receptor-coupled calcium signalling pathway is directly targeted by OB at the level of the colonic epithelium, suggestive of an anti-secretory action in IBS patients suffering with diarrhoea. PMID

  10. The colon-selective spasmolytic otilonium bromide inhibits muscarinic M(3) receptor-coupled calcium signals in isolated human colonic crypts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Susanne; Hernon, James; Sharp, Paul; Johns, Neil; Addison, Sarah; Watson, Mark; Tighe, Richard; Greer, Shaun; Mackay, Jean; Rhodes, Michael; Lewis, Michael; Stebbings, William; Speakman, Chris; Evangelista, Stefano; Johnson, Ian; Williams, Mark

    2002-12-01

    1. Otilonium bromide (OB) is a smooth muscle relaxant used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Otilonium bromide has been shown to interfere with the mobilization of calcium in intestinal smooth muscle, but the effects on other intestinal tissues have not been investigated. We identified the muscarinic receptor subtype coupled to calcium signals in colonic crypt derived from the human colonic epithelium and evaluated the inhibitory effects of OB. 2. Calcium signals were monitored by fluorescence imaging of isolated human colonic crypts and Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the cloned human muscarinic M(3) receptor subtype (CHO-M(3)). Colonic crypt receptor expression was investigated by pharmacological and immunohistochemical techniques. 3. The secretagogue acetylcholine (ACh) stimulated calcium mobilization from intracellular calcium stores at the base of human colonic crypts with an EC(50) of 14 micro M. The muscarinic receptor antagonists 4-DAMP, AF-DX 384, pirenzepine and methroctamine inhibited the ACh-induced calcium signal with the following respective IC(50) (pK(b)) values: 0.78 nM (9.1), 69 nM (7.2), 128 nM (7.1), and 2510 nM (5.8). 4. Immunohistochemical analyses of muscarinic receptor expression demonstrated the presence of M(3) receptor subtype expression at the crypt-base. 5. Otilonium bromide inhibited the generation of ACh-induced calcium signals in a dose dependent manner (IC(50)=880 nM). 6. In CHO-M(3) cells, OB inhibited calcium signals induced by ACh, but not ATP. In addition, OB did not inhibit histamine-induced colonic crypt calcium signals. 7. The present studies have demonstrated that OB inhibited M(3) receptor-coupled calcium signals in human colonic crypts and CHO-M(3) cells, but not those induced by stimulation of other endogenous receptor types. We propose that the M(3) receptor-coupled calcium signalling pathway is directly targeted by OB at the level of the colonic epithelium, suggestive of an anti-secretory action

  11. Inhibition of transfected PTEN on human colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Shui Xu; Wen-Lu Shen; Song-Ying Ouyang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the inhibitory effect of transfected PTEN on LoVo cells.METHODS: Human PTEN cDNA was transferred into LoVo cells via lipofectin and PTEN mRNA levels and its expression were analyzed by Western blot and flow cytometry. Before or after transfection, the effects of 5-Fu on inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry, DNA bands and MTT.RESULTS: PTEN transfection significantly up-regulated PTEN expression in LoVo cells. 5-Fu inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in transfected LoVo cells.CONCLUSION: Transfected PTEN can remark ably up-regulate PTEN expression in LoVo cells and promote the apoptosis.PTEN transfection is associated with 5-Fu treatment effect and has a cooperatively cytotoxic effect.

  12. Evolution of Staphylococcus aureus during human colonization and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J Ross

    2014-01-01

    The diversification of bacterial pathogens during infection is central to their capacity to adapt to different anatomical niches, evade the host immune system, and overcome therapeutic challenges. For example, antimicrobial treatment may fail due to the development of resistance during infection, which is often accompanied by transition to a less virulent state during chronic, persistent infection. In this review, the adaptation of the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus to its host environment during infection will be discussed, particularly in the context of new sequencing technologies which have opened a gateway towards understanding of the molecular processes underlying those adaptations. We now have the capacity to address previously intractable questions regarding bacterial diversification during infection which will ultimately lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and the nature of epidemics, and will inform the design of effective therapeutic measures.

  13. Formation of propionate and butyrate by the human colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2017-01-01

    The human gut microbiota ferments dietary non-digestible carbohydrates into short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). These microbial products are utilized by the host and propionate and butyrate in particular exert a range of health-promoting functions. Here an overview of the metabolic pathways utilized by gut microbes to produce these two SCFA from dietary carbohydrates and from amino acids resulting from protein breakdown is provided. This overview emphasizes the important role played by cross-feeding of intermediary metabolites (in particular lactate, succinate and 1,2-propanediol) between different gut bacteria. The ecophysiology, including growth requirements and responses to environmental factors, of major propionate and butyrate producing bacteria are discussed in relation to dietary modulation of these metabolites. A detailed understanding of SCFA metabolism by the gut microbiota is necessary to underpin effective strategies to optimize SCFA supply to the host.

  14. Colonization of plants by human pathogenic bacteria in the course of organic vegetable production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eHofmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, increasing numbers of outbreaks caused by the consumption of vegetables contaminated with human pathogenic bacteria were reported. The application of organic fertilizers during vegetable production is one of the possible reasons for contamination with those pathogens. In this study laboratory experiments in axenic and soil systems following common practices in organic farming were conducted to identify the minimal dose needed for bacterial colonization of plants and to identify possible factors like bacterial species or serovariation, plant species or organic fertilizer types used, influencing the success of plant colonization by human pathogenic bacteria. Spinach and corn salad were chosen as model plants and were inoculated with different concentrations of Salmonella enterica sv. Weltevreden, Listeria monocytogenes sv. 4b and EGD-E sv. 1/2a either directly (axenic system or via agricultural soil amended with spiked organic fertilizers (soil system. In addition to PCR- and culture-based detection methods, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH was applied in order to localize bacteria on or in plant tissues. Our results demonstrate that shoots were colonized by the pathogenic bacteria at inoculation doses as low as 4x10CFU/ml in the axenic system or 4x105CFU/g in the soil system. In addition, plant species dependent effects were observed. Spinach was colonized more often and at lower inoculation doses compared to corn salad. Differential colonization sites on roots, depending on the plant species could be detected using FISH-CLSM analysis. Furthermore, the transfer of pathogenic bacteria to plants via organic fertilizers was observed more often and at lower initial inoculation doses when fertilization was performed with inoculated slurry compared to inoculated manure. Finally, it could be shown that by introducing a simple washing step, the bacterial contamination was reduced in most cases or even was removed completely in

  15. Promoter hypermethylation mediated downregulation of FBP1 in human hepatocellular carcinoma and colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingquan Chen

    Full Text Available FBP1, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase-1, a gluconeogenesis regulatory enzyme, catalyzes the hydrolysis of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate to fructose 6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. The mechanism that it functions to antagonize glycolysis and was epigenetically inactivated through NF-kappaB pathway in gastric cancer has been reported. However, its role in the liver carcinogenesis still remains unknown. Here, we investigated the expression and DNA methylation of FBP1 in primary HCC and colon tumor. FBP1 was lowly expressed in 80% (8/10 human hepatocellular carcinoma, 66.7% (6/9 liver cancer cell lines and 100% (6/6 colon cancer cell lines, but was higher in paired adjacent non-tumor tissues and immortalized normal cell lines, which was well correlated with its promoter methylation status. Methylation was further detected in primary HCCs, gastric and colon tumor tissues, but none or occasionally in paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. Detailed methylation analysis of 29 CpG sites at a 327-bp promoter region by bisulfite genomic sequencing confirmed its methylation. FBP1 silencing could be reversed by chemical demethylation treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Aza, indicating direct epigenetic silencing. Restoring FBP1 expression in low expressed cells significantly inhibited cell growth and colony formation ability through the induction of G2-M phase cell cycle arrest. Moreover, the observed effects coincided with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. In summary, epigenetic inactivation of FBP1 is also common in human liver and colon cancer. FBP1 appears to be a functional tumor suppressor involved in the liver and colon carcinogenesis.

  16. Matrix Stiffness Corresponding to Strictured Bowel Induces a Fibrogenic Response in Human Colonic Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Laura A.; Rodansky, Eva S.; Sauder, Kay L.; Horowitz, Jeffrey C.; Mih, Justin D.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Higgins, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Crohn’s disease is characterized by repeated cycles of inflammation and mucosal healing which ultimately progress to intestinal fibrosis. This inexorable progression towards fibrosis suggests that fibrosis becomes inflammation-independent and auto-propagative. We hypothesized that matrix stiffness regulates this auto-propagation of intestinal fibrosis. Methods The stiffness of fresh ex vivo samples from normal human small intestine, Crohn’s disease strictures, and the unaffected margin were measured with a microelastometer. Normal human colonic fibroblasts were cultured on physiologically normal or pathologically stiff matrices corresponding to the physiological stiffness of normal or fibrotic bowel. Cellular response was assayed for changes in cell morphology, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) staining, and gene expression. Results Microelastometer measurements revealed a significant increase in colonic tissue stiffness between normal human colon and Crohn’s strictures as well as between the stricture and adjacent tissue margin. In Ccd-18co cells grown on stiff matrices corresponding to Crohn’s strictures, cellular proliferation increased. Pathologic stiffness induced a marked change in cell morphology and increased αSMA protein expression. Growth on a stiff matrix induced fibrogenic gene expression, decreased matrix metalloproteinase and pro-inflammatory gene expression, and was associated with nuclear localization of the transcriptional cofactor MRTF-A. Conclusions Matrix stiffness, representative of the pathological stiffness of Crohn’s strictures, activates human colonic fibroblasts to a fibrogenic phenotype. Matrix stiffness affects multiple pathways suggesting the mechanical properties of the cellular environment are critical to fibroblast function and may contribute to autopropagation of intestinal fibrosis in the absence of inflammation, thereby contributing to the intractable intestinal fibrosis characteristic of Crohn’s disease. PMID

  17. Expression of connexins 26, 32 and 43 in the human colon--an immunohistochemical study.

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Sobaniec-Lotowska; Mariusz Koda; Stanislaw Sulkowski; Luiza Kanczuga-Koda; Mariola Sulkowska

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is a mechanism for direct cell-to-cell signalling and is mediated by gap junctions (GJs), which consist of proteins called connexins (Cxs). GJIC plays a critical role in tissue development and differentiation and is important in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the expression of Cx26, Cx32 and Cx43 in the human colon. Surgical specimens were obtained from patients who underwent surgical resection of c...

  18. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K; ZENG, ZHAOSHI; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B.; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut ) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer i...

  19. Anti-proliferative action of silibinin on human colon adenomatous cancer HT-29 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reyhan Akhtar; Mohd Ali; Safrannisa Mahmood; Sankar Nath Sanyal

    2014-01-01

    Background: Silibinin a flavonoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) exhibit a variety of pharmacological actions, including anti-proliferative and apoptotic activities against various types of cancers in intact animals and cancer cell lines. In the present study, the effect of silibinin on human colon cancer HT-29 cells was studied. Method: Incubations of cells with different silibinin concentrations (0.783-1,600 μg/ml) for 24, 48 or 72 h showed a progressive decline in cell viability. Res...

  20. Carriers of human mitochondrial DNA macrohaplogroup M colonized India from southeastern Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Marrero, Patricia; Abu-Amero, Khaled K.; Larruga, Jose M; Cabrera, Vicente M

    2016-01-01

    Background From a mtDNA dominant perspective, the exit from Africa of modern humans to colonize Eurasia occurred once, around 60 kya, following a southern coastal route across Arabia and India to reach Australia short after. These pioneers carried with them the currently dominant Eurasian lineages M and N. Based also on mtDNA phylogenetic and phylogeographic grounds, some authors have proposed the coeval existence of a northern route across the Levant that brought mtDNA macrohaplogroup N to A...

  1. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 controls human colonic epithelial restitution, migration, and Rac1 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Larsen, Sylvester; Linnemann, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    of the study was to investigate the role of cIAP2 for wound healing in the normal human colon. Wound tissue was generated by taking rectosigmoidal biopsies across an experimental ulcer in healthy subjects after 5, 24, and 48 h. In experimental ulcers, the expression of cIAP2 in regenerating intestinal...... epithelial cells (IECs) was increased at the wound edge after 24 h (P

  2. Oestrogen inhibits human colonic motility by a non-genomic cell membrane receptor-dependent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Classical effects of oestrogen involve activation of target genes after binding nuclear receptors. Oestrogenic effects too rapid for DNA transcription (non-genomic) are known to occur. The effect of oestrogen on colonic motility is unknown despite the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in pregnant and premenopausal women. METHODS: Histologically normal colon was obtained from proximal resection margins of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended in organ baths under 1 g of tension. After equilibration, they were exposed to 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8) or bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8). Fulvestrant, an oestrogen receptor antagonist, was added to some baths (n = 8). Other strips were exposed to calphostin C or cycloheximide. Carbachol was added in increasing concentrations and contractile activity was recorded isometrically. RESULTS: Oestrogen inhibited colonic contractility (mean difference 19.7 per cent; n = 8, P < 0.001). In keeping with non-genomic, rapid-onset steroid action, the effect was apparent within minutes and reversible. It was observed with both 17beta-oestradiol and BSA-conjugated oestrogen, and was not altered by cycloheximide. Effects were inhibited by fulvestrant, suggesting receptor mediation. CONCLUSION: Oestrogen decreases contractility in human colonic smooth muscle by a non-genomic mechanism involving cell membrane coupling.

  3. Antitumor Effects of Fucoidan on Human Colon Cancer Cells via Activation of Akt Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong-Seok; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-05-01

    We identified a novel Akt signaling mechanism that mediates fucoidan-induced suppression of human colon cancer cell (HT29) proliferation and anticancer effects. Fucoidan treatment significantly inhibited growth, induced G1-phase-associated upregulation of p21WAF1 expression, and suppressed cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase expression in HT29 colon cancer cells. Additionally, fucoidan treatment activated the Akt signaling pathway, which was inhibited by treatment with an Akt inhibitor. The inhibition of Akt activation reversed the fucoidan-induced decrease in cell proliferation, the induction of G1-phase-associated p21WAF1 expression, and the reduction in cell cycle regulatory protein expression. Intraperitoneal injection of fucoidan reduced tumor volume; this enhanced antitumor efficacy was associated with induction of apoptosis and decreased angiogenesis. These data suggest that the activation of Akt signaling is involved in the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells treated with fucoidan. Thus, fucoidan may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for colon cancer.

  4. Depletion of mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 causes increased apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue-Yamauchi, Akane, E-mail: ainoyama@research.twmu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan); Oda, Hideaki [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 is required for mitochondrial fission in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 participates in inhibition of colon cancer cell apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 can inhibit apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release. -- Abstract: Mitochondria play a critical role in regulation of apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, by releasing apoptogenic factors including cytochrome c. Growing evidence suggests that dynamic changes in mitochondrial morphology are involved in cellular apoptotic response. However, whether DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission is required for induction of apoptosis remains speculative. Here, we show that siRNA-mediated DRP1 knockdown promoted accumulation of elongated mitochondria in HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells. Surprisingly, DRP1 down-regulation led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of these cells. A higher rate of cytochrome c release and reductions in mitochondrial membrane potential were also revealed in DRP1-depleted cells. Taken together, our present findings suggest that mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 inhibits colon cancer cell apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release and mitochondrial membrane integrity.

  5. Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2012-05-11

    Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC(50)=75 μM). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  6. Assessing the potential for raw meat to influence human colonization with Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Margaret; Zhao, Chang; Thapaliya, Dipendra; Bitterman, Patrick; Kates, Ashley E; Hanson, Blake M; Smith, Tara C

    2017-09-07

    The role of household meat handling and consumption in the transfer of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) from livestock to consumers is not well understood. Examining the similarity of S. aureus colonizing humans and S. aureus in meat from the stores in which those individuals shop can provide insight into the role of meat in human S. aureus colonization. S. aureus isolates were collected from individuals in rural and urban communities in Iowa (n = 3347) and contemporaneously from meat products in stores where participants report purchasing meat (n = 913). The staphylococcal protein A (spa) gene was sequenced for all isolates to determine a spa type. Morisita indices and Permutational Multivariate Analysis of Variance Using Distance Matrices (PERMANOVA) were used to determine the relationship between spa type composition among human samples and meat samples. spa type composition was significantly different between households and meat sampled from their associated grocery stores. spa types found in meat were not significantly different regardless of the store or county in which they were sampled. spa types in people also exhibit high similarity regardless of residential location in urban or rural counties. Such findings suggest meat is not an important source of S. aureus colonization in shoppers.

  7. The flavonol isorhamnetin exhibits cytotoxic effects on human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Sara; Lopez, Sergio; Varela, Lourdes M; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Jimenez, Ana; Abia, Rocio; Guillen, Rafael; Muriana, Francisco J G

    2010-10-27

    The aim of this study was to determine whether isorhamnetin, an immediate 3'-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, affects proliferation, cell death, and the cell cycle of human colon carcinoma (HCT-116) cells. Isorhamnetin was found to be a potent antiproliferative agent in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 72 μM after 48 h of incubation as estimated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that isorhamnetin exerted a stimulatory effect on apoptosis and necrosis. Isorhamnetin also increased the number of cells in G2/M phase. Serum deprivation appeared to potentiate the effects of isorhamnetin on cell death and facilitated cell cycle progression to G0/G1 phase. These results suggest that isorhamnetin might mediate inhibition of HCT-116 cell growth through the perturbation of cell cycle progression and are consistent with the notion that G2/M checkpoints could be a conserved target for flavonoids in human colon cancer cells, leading to apoptotic and necrotic death. These antiproliferative, apoptotic, necrotic, and cell cycle effects suggest that isorhamnetin may have clinically significant therapeutic and chemopreventive capabilities. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the effect of isorhamnetin on human colon cancer cells.

  8. Potential Factors Enabling Human Body Colonization by Animal Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszewski, Marcin; Szewczyk, Eligia M

    2017-05-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) is a pyogenic, Lancefield C or G streptococcal pathogen. Until recently, it has been considered as an exclusive animal pathogen. Nowadays, it is responsible for both animal infections in wild animals, pets, and livestock and human infections often clinically similar to the ones caused by group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes). The risk of zoonotic infection is the most significant in people having regular contact with animals, such as veterinarians, cattlemen, and farmers. SDSE is also prevalent on skin of healthy dogs, cats, and horses, which pose a risk also to people having contact with companion animals. The main aim of this study was to evaluate if there are features differentiating animal and human SDSE isolates, especially in virulence factors involved in the first stages of pathogenesis (adhesion and colonization). Equal groups of human and animal SDSE clinical strains were obtained from superficial infections (skin, wounds, abscesses). The presence of five virulence genes (prtF1, prtF2, lmb, cbp, emm type) was evaluated, as well as ability to form bacterial biofilm and produce BLIS (bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances) which are active against human skin microbiota. The study showed that the presence of genes coding for fibronectin-binding protein and M protein, as well as BLIS activity inhibiting the growth of Corynebacterium spp. strains might constitute the virulence factors which are necessary to colonize human organism, whereas they are not crucial in animal infections. Those virulence factors might be horizontally transferred from human streptococci to animal SDSE strains, enabling their ability to colonize human organism.

  9. Effect of Age on the Enteric Nervous System of the Human Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Cheryl E.; Gibbons, Simon J.; Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J.; Lurken, Matthew S.; Schmalz, Philip F.; Roeder, Jaime L.; Linden, David; Cima, Robert R.; Dozois, Eric J.; Larson, David W.; Camilleri, Michael; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Pozo, Maria J; Hicks, Gareth A.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2009-01-01

    The effect of age on the anatomy and function of the human colon is incompletely understood. The prevalence of disorders in adults such as constipation increase with age but it is unclear if this is due to confounding factors or age-related structural defects. The aim of this study was to determine number and subtypes of enteric neurons and neuronal volumes in the human colon of different ages. Normal colon (descending and sigmoid) from 16 patients (9 male) was studied; ages 33–99. Antibodies to HuC/D, ChAT, nNOS, and PGP9.5 were used. Effect of age was determined by testing for linear trends using regression analysis. In the myenteric plexus, number of Hu-positive neurons declined with age (slope = −1.3 neurons/mm/10yrs, p =0.03). The number of ChAT-positive neurons also declined with age (slope = −1.1 neurons/mm/10yrs of age, p=0.02). The number of nNOS-positive neurons did not decline with age. As a result, the ratio of nNOS to Hu increased (slope= 0.03 per 10yrs of age, p=0.01). In the submucosal plexus, the number of neurons did not decline with age (slope = − 0.3 neurons/mm/10 yrs, p =0.09). Volume of nerve fibers in the circular muscle and volume of neuronal structures in the myenteric plexus did not change with age. In conclusion, the number of neurons in the human colon declines with age with sparing of nNOS- positive neurons. This change was not accompanied by changes in total volume of neuronal structures suggesting compensatory changes in the remaining neurons. PMID:19220755

  10. Disentangling hybridization and host colonization in parasitic roundworms of humans and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscione, Charles D; Anderson, Joel D; Sudimack, Dan; Peng, Weidong; Jha, Bharat; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Anderson, Timothy J C

    2007-11-07

    Knowledge of cross-transmission and hybridization between parasites of humans and reservoir hosts is critical for understanding the evolution of the parasite and for implementing control programmes. There is now a consensus that populations of pig and human Ascaris (roundworms) show significant genetic subdivision. However, it is unclear whether this has resulted from a single or multiple host shift(s). Furthermore, previous molecular data have not been sufficient to determine whether sympatric populations of human and pig Ascaris can exchange genes. To disentangle patterns of host colonization and hybridization, we used 23 microsatellite loci to conduct Bayesian clustering analyses of individual worms collected from pigs and humans. We observed strong differentiation between populations which was primarily driven by geography, with secondary differentiation resulting from host affiliation within locations. This pattern is consistent with multiple host colonization events. However, there is low support for the short internal branches of the dendrograms. In part, the relationships among clusters may result from current hybridization among sympatric human and pig roundworms. Indeed, congruence in three Bayesian methods indicated that 4 and 7% of roundworms sampled from Guatemala and China, respectively, were hybrids. These results indicate that there is contemporary cross-transmission between populations of human and pig Ascaris.

  11. Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China); Dong, Wei-Guo, E-mail: dongwg1966@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, Hubei Province (China)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine inhibited cell viability of colon cancer in a time- and dose- dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G{sub 2}/M phase arrest and chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine promoted apoptosis via mitochondrial pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumorigenicity was inhibited by noscapine. -- Abstract: Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC{sub 50} = 75 {mu}M). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G{sub 2}/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  12. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-08-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l(-1) HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l(-1)) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l(-1)) (PRE) (n=19-21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7-8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection.

  13. Superoxide production and expression of NAD(P)H oxidases by transformed and primary human colonic epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Andresen, L; Pedersen, G

    2003-01-01

    Superoxide (O(2)(-)) generation through the activity of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) or reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases has been demonstrated in a variety of cell types, but not in human colonic epithelial cells.......Superoxide (O(2)(-)) generation through the activity of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) or reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases has been demonstrated in a variety of cell types, but not in human colonic epithelial cells....

  14. CHANGES OF NUCLEAR MATRIX PROTEIN AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH c-erbB-2 IN HUMAN COLON ADENOCARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-lan; GAO Jing; LI Yuan-yuan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Nuclear matrix protein is tissue, cell-type specific, and tumor-relative. It plays an important role in the regulation of intranuclear processes. Some researches also showed that a c-erbB-2 promoter-specific DNA-binding nuclear matrix protein is present only in malignant human breast tissues and induces mitogenesis and cell surface expression of the c-erbB-2 protein in resting NIH/3T3 cells. But it is not clear that how it in colon adenocarcinomas. Methods:Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic method was used for NMP identification and immunohistochemistry was used for c-erbB-2 detection in 12 cases of colon adenocarcinomas and matched adjacent normal colon tissues. Results: 5 different nuclear matrix proteins (named C1-C5) were identified in 12 colon adenocarcinoma specimens, but not in the matched adjacent normal colon tissues; 3 nuclear matrix proteins (named N1-N3) were identified in all 12 matched adjacent normal colon tissues, but not in colon adenocarcinoma specimens. A nuclear matrix protein (named N4) was detected in all of 9moderated-well differentiated adenocarcinomas and all 12 matched adjacent normal colon tissues, but not in 3poor-differentiated adenocarcinomas. All of the 10 colon adenocarcinomas which had the nuclear matrix protein C4 were c-erbB-2 expression positive. Conclusion: The data suggest that there are specific nuclear matrix proteins in colon adenocarcinomas and its subtypes, which maybe valuable to serve as markers of colon adenocarcinomas in future. Nuclear matrix protein C4 probably is a c-erbB-2 promotor-specific nuclear matrix protein in colon adenocarcinomas, and may induce the expression of c-erbB-2.

  15. Histone acetylation regulates p21WAF1 expression in human colon cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Xuan Chen; Jing-Yuan Fang; Hong-Yin Zhu; Rong Lu; Zhong-Hua Cheng; De-Kai Qiu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of histone acetylation on regulation of p21WAF1 gene expression in human colon cancer cell lines.METHODS: Two cell lines, Colo-320 and SW1116 were treated with either trichostatin or sodium butyrate. Expressions of p21WAF1 mRNA and protein were detected by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Acetylation of two regions of p21WAF1 gene-associated histones and total cellular histones were examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and Western blotting. RESULTS: Trichostatin or sodium butyrate re-activated p21WAF1 transcription resulted in up-regulated p21WF1 protein level in colon cancer cell lines. Those effects were accompanied by an accumulation of acetylated histones in total cellular chromatin and p21WAF1 gene-associated region of chromatin.CONCLUSION: Histone acetylation regulates p21WAF1 expression in human colon cancer cell lines, Colo-320 and SW1116.

  16. Retroviral endostatin gene transfer inhibits human colon cancer cell growth in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卫昌; 傅建新; 刘强; 阮长耿; 萧树东

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effect of retroviral endostatin gene transfer on the human colon cancer cell line, LoVo.Methods A retroviral vector pLESSN expressing secretable endostatin was constructed and packaged with a titer of 8.2×105 CFU/ml. A LoVo cell line was subjected to retrovirus-mediated endostatin gene transfer. The proviral integration of endostatin was analyzed with PCR. The function of endostatin was tested by MTT assay in vitro and a mouse xenograft model in vivo.Results After transfection and superinfection, amphotropic retrovirus was collected, and transduction with amphotropic retroviruses resulted in endostatin proviral integration. The endostatin secreted by transduced LoVo cells markedly inhibited endothelial cell growth up to 67% (P<0.001), compared with the control cells. The gene expression of endostatin in LoVo colon tumor cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. There was an 86% reduction in tumor size in the endostatin-transduced group, accompanied by a reduction in vessels, compared with the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion Retroviruses can allow functional expression of the endostatin gene in human colon tumors, showing promise for an antitumor strategy using antiangiogenesis.

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma overexpression suppresses proliferation of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu, E-mail: ttamotsu@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Integrative Physiology and Bio-System Control, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Haniu, Hisao [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the correlation between PPAR{gamma} expression and cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} overexpression reduces cell viability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show the synergistic effect of cell growth inhibition by a PPAR{gamma} agonist. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) plays an important role in the differentiation of intestinal cells and tissues. Our previous reports indicate that PPAR{gamma} is expressed at considerable levels in human colon cancer cells. This suggests that PPAR{gamma} expression may be an important factor for cell growth regulation in colon cancer. In this study, we investigated PPAR{gamma} expression in 4 human colon cancer cell lines, HT-29, LOVO, DLD-1, and Caco-2. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis revealed that the relative levels of PPAR{gamma} mRNA and protein in these cells were in the order HT-29 > LOVO > Caco-2 > DLD-1. We also found that PPAR{gamma} overexpression promoted cell growth inhibition in PPAR{gamma} lower-expressing cell lines (Caco-2 and DLD-1), but not in higher-expressing cells (HT-29 and LOVO). We observed a correlation between the level of PPAR{gamma} expression and the cells' sensitivity for proliferation.

  18. Epigenetic regulation of human DCLK-1 gene during colon-carcinogenesis: clinical and mechanistic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connell, Malaney; Shubhashish, Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. While ~25% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise in patients with a family history (genetic predisposition), ~75% of CRCs are due to age-associated accumulation of epigenetic alterations which can result in the suppression of key tumor suppressor genes leading to mutations and activation of oncogenic pathways. Sporadic colon-carcinogenesis is facilitated by many molecular pathways of genomic instability which include chromosomal instability (CIN), micro-satellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), leading towards loss of homeostasis and onset of neoplastic transformation. The unopposed activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathways, either due to loss of APC function or up-regulation of related stimulatory pathways, results in unopposed hyperproliferation of colonic crypts, considered the single most important risk factor for colon carcinogenesis. Hypermethylation of CpG islands within the promoters of specific genes can potentially inactivate DNA repair genes and/or critical tumor suppressor genes. Recently, CpG methylation of the 5’ promoter of human (h) DCLK1 gene was reported in many human epithelial cancers, including colorectal cancers (CRCs), resulting in the loss of expression of the canonical long isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-L) in hCRCs. Instead, a shorter isoform of DCLK1 (DCLK1-S) was discovered to be expressed in hCRCs, from an alternate β promoter of DCLKL1-gene; the clinical and biological implications of these novel findings, in relation to recent publications is discussed. PMID:27777940

  19. Capsaicin Modulates the Immune Cross Talk Between Human Mononuclears and Cells from Two Colon Carcinoma Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, Hanna; Djaldetti, Meir

    2017-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent alkaloid of the chili peppers, has gained a worldwide reputation. In addition to its culinary assets, capsaicin possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and even carcinopreventive properties. Considering the linkage between chronic inflammation and tumorigenesis, the aim of the study was to evaluate the role of capsaicin in the immune interplay between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and HT-29 or RKO cells from human colon carcinoma lines. PBMCs were incubated for 24 hours with either HT-29 or RKO cells and concentrations of capsaicin ranging between 10 and 200 µM. Subsequently, the generation of the following cytokines was examined: tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-1ra, and IL-10. Capsaicin caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of colon cancer cells proliferation but had no effect on PBMC viability. 200 µM of capsaicin suppressed the production of all cytokines tested. At lower concentrations, the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-1ra was inhibited concentration-dependently, whereas that of IL-6 was stimulated. Capsaicin causes a concentration-dependent alteration of the immune balance between PBMC and colon carcinoma cells expressed as an inhibited generation of inflammatory cytokines. These findings indicate the existence of an additional immunomodulatory mechanism by which this alkaloid may prevent tumor development.

  20. Enhanced transferrin receptor expression by proinflammatory cytokines in enterocytes as a means for local delivery of drugs to inflamed gut mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Harel

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs is often associated with adverse effects related to drug distribution into non-diseased tissues, a situation which attracts a rational design of a targeted treatment confined to the inflamed mucosa. Upon activation of immune cells, transferrin receptor (TfR expression increases at their surface. Because TfR is expressed in all cell types we hypothesized that its cell surface levels are regulated also in enterocytes. We, therefore, compared TfR expression in healthy and inflamed human colonic mucosa, as well as healthy and inflamed colonic mucosa of the DNBS-induced rat model. TfR expression was elevated in the colonic mucosa of IBD patients in both the basolateral and apical membranes of the enterocytes. Increased TfR expression was also observed in colonocytes of the induced colitis rats. To explore the underlying mechanism CaCo-2 cells were treated with various proinflammatory cytokines, which increased both TfR expression and transferrin cellular uptake in a mechanism that did not involve hyper proliferation. These findings were then exploited for the design of targetable carrier towards inflamed regions of the colon. Anti-TfR antibodies were conjugated to nano-liposomes. As expected, iron-starved Caco-2 cells internalized anti-TfR immunoliposomes better than controls. Ex vivo binding studies to inflamed mucosa showed that the anti-TfR immunoliposomes accumulated significantly better in the mucosa of DNBS-induced rats than the accumulation of non-specific immunoliposomes. It is concluded that targeting mucosal inflammation can be accomplished by nano-liposomes decorated with anti-TfR due to inflammation-dependent, apical, elevated expression of the receptor.

  1. Natural variation in populations of persistently colonizing bacteria affect human host cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rahul A; Lee, Yongchan; Kim, Sung-Kook; Israel, Dawn; Peek, Richard M; Blaser, Martin J

    2003-08-15

    The highly diverse bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which persistently colonizes the human stomach, provides models to study the role of genome plasticity in host adaptation. Within H. pylori populations from 2 colonized individuals, intragenomic recombination between cagA DNA repeat sequences leads to deletion or duplication of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the CagA protein, which is injected by a type IV secretion system into host cells. Experimental coculture of gastric epithelial cells with the strains containing these naturally occurring CagA phosphorylation site variants induced markedly divergent host cell morphologic responses. Mutants were constructed in which a phosphorylation site was either added or deleted in the expressed CagA protein; coculture studies confirmed that the naturally occurring differences in CagA phosphorylation are responsible for the observed phenotypic variation. These findings indicate that within an individual host, intragenomic recombination between H. pylori repetitive DNA produces strain variants differing in their signals to host cells.

  2. Modeling microRNA-mRNA Interactions Using PLS Regression in Human Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaohong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in microRNA (miRNA expression patterns have been extensively characterized in several cancers, including human colon cancer. However, how these miRNAs and their putative mRNA targets contribute to the etiology of cancer is poorly understood. In this work, a bioinformatics computational approach with miRNA and mRNA expression data was used to identify the putative targets of miRNAs and to construct association networks between miRNAs and mRNAs to gain some insights into the underlined molecular mechanisms of human colon cancer. Method The miRNA and mRNA microarray expression profiles from the same tissues including 7 human colon tumor tissues and 4 normal tissues, collected by the Broad Institute, were used to identify significant associations between miRNA and mRNA. We applied the partial least square (PLS regression method and bootstrap based statistical tests to the joint expression profiles of differentially expressed miRNAs and mRNAs. From this analysis, we predicted putative miRNA targets and association networks between miRNAs and mRNAs. Pathway analysis was employed to identify biological processes related to these miRNAs and their associated predicted mRNA targets. Results Most significantly associated up-regulated mRNAs with a down-regulated miRNA identified by the proposed methodology were considered to be the miRNA targets. On average, approximately 16.5% and 11.0% of targets predicted by this approach were also predicted as targets by the common prediction algorithms TargetScan and miRanda, respectively. We demonstrated that our method detects more targets than a simple correlation based association. Integrative mRNA:miRNA predictive networks from our analysis were constructed with the aid of Cytoscape software. Pathway analysis validated the miRNAs through their predicted targets that may be involved in cancer-associated biological networks. Conclusion We have identified an alternative bioinformatics

  3. Genetic evidence of paleolithic colonization and neolithic expansion of modern humans on the tibetan plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xuebin; Cui, Chaoying; Peng, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yang, Zhaohui; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Xiang, Kun; Cao, Xiangyu; Wang, Yi; Ouzhuluobu; Basang; Ciwangsangbu; Bianba; Gonggalanzi; Wu, Tianyi; Chen, Hua; Shi, Hong; Su, Bing

    2013-08-01

    Tibetans live on the highest plateau in the world, their current population size is approximately 5 million, and most of them live at an altitude exceeding 3,500 m. Therefore, the Tibetan Plateau is a remarkable area for cultural and biological studies of human population history. However, the chronological profile of the Tibetan Plateau's colonization remains an unsolved question of human prehistory. To reconstruct the prehistoric colonization and demographic history of modern humans on the Tibetan Plateau, we systematically sampled 6,109 Tibetan individuals from 41 geographic populations across the entire region of the Tibetan Plateau and analyzed the phylogeographic patterns of both paternal (n = 2,354) and maternal (n = 6,109) lineages as well as genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism markers (n = 50) in Tibetan populations. We found that there have been two distinct, major prehistoric migrations of modern humans into the Tibetan Plateau. The first migration was marked by ancient Tibetan genetic signatures dated to approximately 30,000 years ago, indicating that the initial peopling of the Tibetan Plateau by modern humans occurred during the Upper Paleolithic rather than Neolithic. We also found evidences for relatively young (only 7-10 thousand years old) shared Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA haplotypes between Tibetans and Han Chinese, suggesting a second wave of migration during the early Neolithic. Collectively, the genetic data indicate that Tibetans have been adapted to a high altitude environment since initial colonization of the Tibetan Plateau in the early Upper Paleolithic, before the last glacial maximum, followed by a rapid population expansion that coincided with the establishment of farming and yak pastoralism on the Plateau in the early Neolithic.

  4. MSH3-deficiency initiates EMAST without oncogenic transformation of human colon epithelial cells.

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    Christoph Campregher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIM: Elevated microsatellite instability at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST is a genetic signature in certain cases of sporadic colorectal cancer and has been linked to MSH3-deficiency. It is currently controversial whether EMAST is associated with oncogenic properties in humans, specifically as cancer development in Msh3-deficient mice is not enhanced. However, a mutator phenotype is different between species as the genetic positions of repetitive sequences are not conserved. Here we studied the molecular effects of human MSH3-deficiency. METHODS: HCT116 and HCT116+chr3 (both MSH3-deficient and primary human colon epithelial cells (HCEC, MSH3-wildtype were stably transfected with an EGFP-based reporter plasmid for the detection of frameshift mutations within an [AAAG]17 repeat. MSH3 was silenced by shRNA and changes in protein expression were analyzed by shotgun proteomics. Colony forming assay was used to determine oncogenic transformation and double strand breaks (DSBs were assessed by Comet assay. RESULTS: Despite differential MLH1 expression, both HCT116 and HCT116+chr3 cells displayed comparable high mutation rates (about 4×10(-4 at [AAAG]17 repeats. Silencing of MSH3 in HCECs leads to a remarkable increased frameshift mutations in [AAAG]17 repeats whereas [CA]13 repeats were less affected. Upon MSH3-silencing, significant changes in the expression of 202 proteins were detected. Pathway analysis revealed overexpression of proteins involved in double strand break repair (MRE11 and RAD50, apoptosis, L1 recycling, and repression of proteins involved in metabolism, tRNA aminoacylation, and gene expression. MSH3-silencing did not induce oncogenic transformation and DSBs increased 2-fold. CONCLUSIONS: MSH3-deficiency in human colon epithelial cells results in EMAST, formation of DSBs and significant changes of the proteome but lacks oncogenic transformation. Thus, MSH3-deficiency alone is unlikely to drive human colon

  5. Human beta-defensin-2 increases cholinergic response in colon epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmerkus, Nina; Vassen, Veit; Sievers, Birte; Goerke, Boeren; Shan, Qixian; Harder, Jürgen; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Bleich, Markus

    2010-06-01

    The human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is expressed in epithelial cells of skin and respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Defensins are arginine-rich small cationic peptides with six intramolecular disulfide bonds and are antimicrobially active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. In addition, they have cytokine-like immunomodulatory properties. We hypothesized that hBD-2 also might influence epithelial cells themselves, thereby altering fluid composition in the gastrointestinal tract. We therefore tested its impact on electrogenic ion transport properties of distal colon in Ussing chamber experiments. Application of hBD-2 did not affect transepithelial voltage or resistance in cAMP-stimulated distal colon. However, it increased cholinergic Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion. After 20 min of incubation with hBD-2, the effect of carbachol (CCh) on the equivalent short circuit current (I'(sc)) was enhanced twofold compared to vehicle-treated colon. Modulation of Ca(2+) signaling by hBD-2 was validated by Fura-2 measurements in human colon carcinoma HT29 cells. Twenty-minute incubation with hBD-2 increased the CCh-induced Ca(2+) transient by 20-30% compared to either vehicle-treated cells or cells treated with the defensins hBD-1, hBD-3, or HD-5. This effect was concentration-dependent, with an EC(50) of 0.043 microg/ml, and still present in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Also, the ionomycin-induced Ca(2+) transient was increased by hBD-2 treatment. We conclude that hBD-2 facilitates cholinergic Ca(2+)-regulated epithelial Cl(-) secretion. These findings contribute to the concept of a specific interaction of antimicrobial peptides with epithelial function.

  6. Quantitative biomarkers of colonic dysplasia based on intrinsic second-harmonic generation signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Wu, Guizhu; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen

    2011-12-01

    Most colorectal cancers arise from dysplastic lesions, such as adenomatous polyps, and these lesions are difficult to be detected by the current endoscopic screening approaches. Here, we present the use of an intrinsic second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal as a novel means to differentiate between normal and dysplastic human colonic tissues. We find that the SHG signal can quantitatively identify collagen change associated with colonic dysplasia that is indiscernible by conventional pathologic techniques. By comparing normal with dysplastic mucosa, there were significant differences in collagen density and collagen fiber direction, providing substantial potential to become quantitative intrinsic biomarkers for in vivo clinical diagnosis of colonic dysplasia.

  7. Sensitivity of nuclear c-myc levels and induction to differentiation-inducing agents in human colon tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C W; Kim, Y S; Childress-Fields, K E; Yeoman, L C

    1992-02-29

    Six human colon tumor cell lines were analyzed for their constitutive levels of the c-myc protein. The nuclear proto-oncogene, c-myc, was detected as an expressed product in all of the human colon tumor cell lines analyzed. The poorly differentiated cell lines HCT116, RKO and C showed c-myc levels that averaged 2-fold greater than their well-differentiated counterparts, i.e., GEO, CBS and FET. When c-myc levels and responses to serum induction were analyzed in the presence of inducers of differentiation, i.e., dimethylformamide, retinoic acid, sodium butyrate and TGF-beta, distinct patterns of sensitivity and resistance emerged. Nuclear c-myc levels were reduced in all the colon cell phenotypes treated with dimethylformamide or sodium butyrate. Only the well-differentiated human colon tumor cell lines were responsive to transforming growth factor-beta. Only one of the human colon tumor cell lines (GEO) responded to retinoic acid. Increased levels of c-myc protein were found to correlate well with greater growth rates and with poor differentiation class. Similarly, a parallel sensitivity to down-regulation of c-myc levels and attenuation of c-myc induction curves for inducers of differentiation were observed in growth sensitive human colon tumor cell lines.

  8. Activation of Intestinal Human Pregnane X Receptor Protects against Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium–Induced Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Qu, Aijuan; Tanaka, Naoki; Kimura, Shioko

    2014-01-01

    The role of intestinal human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in colon cancer was determined through investigation of the chemopreventive role of rifaximin, a specific agonist of intestinal human PXR, toward azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)–induced colon cancer. Rifaximin treatment significantly decreased the number of colon tumors induced by AOM/DSS treatment in PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. Additionally, rifaximin treatment markedly increased the survival rate of PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. These data indicated a human PXR–dependent therapeutic chemoprevention of rifaximin toward AOM/DSS-induced colon cancer. Nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells–mediated inflammatory signaling was upregulated in AOM/DSS-treated mice, and inhibited by rifaximin in PXR-humanized mice. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were also modulated by rifaximin treatment in the AOM/DSS model. In vitro cell-based assays further revealed that rifaximin regulated cell apoptosis and cell cycle in a human PXR-dependent manner. These results suggested that specific activation of intestinal human PXR exhibited a chemopreventive role toward AOM/DSS-induced colon cancer by mediating anti-inflammation, antiproliferation, and proapoptotic events. PMID:25277138

  9. Activation of intestinal human pregnane X receptor protects against azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Qu, Aijuan; Tanaka, Naoki; Kimura, Shioko; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2014-12-01

    The role of intestinal human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in colon cancer was determined through investigation of the chemopreventive role of rifaximin, a specific agonist of intestinal human PXR, toward azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colon cancer. Rifaximin treatment significantly decreased the number of colon tumors induced by AOM/DSS treatment in PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. Additionally, rifaximin treatment markedly increased the survival rate of PXR-humanized mice, but not wild-type or Pxr-null mice. These data indicated a human PXR-dependent therapeutic chemoprevention of rifaximin toward AOM/DSS-induced colon cancer. Nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells-mediated inflammatory signaling was upregulated in AOM/DSS-treated mice, and inhibited by rifaximin in PXR-humanized mice. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were also modulated by rifaximin treatment in the AOM/DSS model. In vitro cell-based assays further revealed that rifaximin regulated cell apoptosis and cell cycle in a human PXR-dependent manner. These results suggested that specific activation of intestinal human PXR exhibited a chemopreventive role toward AOM/DSS-induced colon cancer by mediating anti-inflammation, antiproliferation, and proapoptotic events.

  10. The cardiac glycoside oleandrin induces apoptosis in human colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Li; Zhang, Yuming; Zhao, Wanlu; Zhou, Xia; Wang, Chunxia; Deng, Fan

    2017-07-01

    Evidence indicates that the cardiac glycoside oleandrin exhibits cytotoxic activity against several different types of cancer. However, the specific mechanisms underlying oleandrin-induced anti-tumor effects remain largely unknown. The present study examined the anti-cancer effect and underlying mechanism of oleandrin on human colon cancer cells. The cytotoxicity and IC50 of five small molecule compounds (oleandrin, neriifolin, strophanthidin, gitoxigenin, and convallatoxin) in human colon cancer cell line SW480 cells and normal human colon cell line NCM460 cells were determined by cell counting and MTT assays, respectively. Apoptosis was determined by staining cells with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide, followed by flow cytometry. Intracellular Ca(2+) was determined using Fluo-3 AM,glutathione (GSH) levels were measured using a GSH detection kit,and the activity of caspase-3, -9 was measured using a peptide substrate. BAX, pro-caspase-3, -9, cytochrome C and BCL-2 expression were determined by Western blotting. Oleandrin significantly decreased cell viabilities in SW480, HCT116 and RKO cells. The IC50 for SW480 cells was 0.02 µM, whereas for NCM460 cells 0.56 µM. More interestingly, the results of flow cytometry showed that oleandrin potently induced apoptosis in SW480 and RKO cells. Oleandrin downregulated protein expression of pro-caspase-3, -9, but enhanced caspase-3, -9 activities. These effects were accompanied by upregulation of protein expression of cytochrome C and BAX, and downregulation of BCL-2 protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, oleandrin increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, but decreased GSH concentration in the cells. The present results suggest that oleandrin induces apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanism of anti-cancer property of oleandrin.

  11. Effect of otilonium bromide on contractile patterns in the human sigmoid colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, D; Aulí, M; Aleu, J; Martínez, E; Rofes, L; Martí-Ragué, J; Jiménez, M; Clavé, P

    2010-06-01

    The mechanism of action of the spasmolytic compound otilonium bromide (OB) on human colonic motility is not understood. The aim of our study was to characterize the pharmacological effects of OB on contractile patterns in the human sigmoid colon. Circular sigmoid strips were studied in organ baths. Isolated smooth muscle cells from human sigmoid colon were examined using the calcium imaging technique. Otilonium bromide inhibited by 85% spontaneous non-neural rhythmic phasic contractions (RPCs), (IC(50) = 49.9 nmol L(-1)) and stretch-induced tone (IC(50) = 10.7 nmol L(-1)) with maximum effects at micromolar range. OB also inhibited by 50% both on- (IC(50) = 38.0 nmol L(-1)) and off-contractions induced by electrical stimulation of excitatory motor neurons. In contrast, the inhibitory latency period prior to off-contractions was unaffected by OB. OB inhibited acetylcholine-, substance P-, and neurokinin A-induced contractions. The L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist BayK8644 reversed the effects of OB on RPCs, on- and off-contractions. Hexamethonium, atropine, the NK(2) antagonist, or depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores by thapsigargin did not prevent the inhibitory effect of OB on RPCs and electrical contractions. KCl-induced calcium transients in isolated smooth muscle cells were also inhibited by OB (IC(50) = 0.2 micromol L(-1)). Otilonium bromide strongly inhibited the main patterns of human sigmoid motility in vitro by blocking calcium influx through L-type calcium channels on smooth muscle cells. This pharmacological profile may mediate the clinically observed effects of the drug in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

  12. Avaliação dos níveis de peroxidação lipídica em células da mucosa cólica após aplicação de enemas com peróxido de hidrogênio: estudo experimental em ratos Evaluation of lipid peroxidation levels on mucosa colonic cells afther application of hydrogen peroxide in enemas: experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Helena Sousa Marques

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A aplicação de clisteres contendo peróxido de hidrogênio (H2O2 determina o aparecimento de quadros graves de colite, algumas vezes de evolução fatal. É possível que a colite induzida por H2O2 possa ocorrer pela quebra da barreira funcional do epitélio cólico por estresse oxidativo. Objetivo: Avaliar os níveis de peroxidação lipídica em células da mucosa cólica após instilação de H2O2 no reto excluso de trânsito fecal. Método: Vinte seis ratos Wistar machos foram submetidos a colostomia proximal terminal no cólon descendente e fístula mucosa distal. Os animais foram randomizados em dois grupos segundo o sacrifício ter sido realizado duas ou quatro semanas após a derivação intestinal. Cada grupo experimental foi dividido e dois subgrupos segundo aplicação de clisteres, em dias alternados, contendo solução fisiológica a 0,9% ou H2O2 a 3%. O diagnóstico de colite foi estabelecido por estudo histopatológico e os níveis de dano oxidativo tecidual pela dosagem de malondialdeído por espectrofotometria. Os resultados foram analisados com os testes de Mann-Whitney e Kruskal-Wallis, estabelecendo-se nível de significância de 5% (pThe use of rectal enemas with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 determines the onset of severe colitis, sometimes with fatal evolution. It is possible that H2O2-induced colitis can occur by damage to the functional epithelial barrier of the colon by oxidative stress. Objective: The aim of present study was evaluate the levels of lipid peroxidation in cells of the colonic mucosa after instillation of H2O2 into the rectum excluded from fecal transit. Method: Twenty six male Wistar rats were undergone to proximal terminal colostomy in the descending colon and distal mucous fistula. The animals were randomized in two experimental groups according to the sacrifice was made two or four weeks after diversion of the fecal stream. Each experimental group was divided into two subgroups second application of

  13. Quantification of Crypt and Stem Cell Evolution in the Normal and Neoplastic Human Colon

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    Ann-Marie Baker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human intestinal stem cell and crypt dynamics remain poorly characterized because transgenic lineage-tracing methods are impractical in humans. Here, we have circumvented this problem by quantitatively using somatic mtDNA mutations to trace clonal lineages. By analyzing clonal imprints on the walls of colonic crypts, we show that human intestinal stem cells conform to one-dimensional neutral drift dynamics with a “functional” stem cell number of five to six in both normal patients and individuals with familial adenomatous polyposis (germline APC−/+. Furthermore, we show that, in adenomatous crypts (APC−/−, there is a proportionate increase in both functional stem cell number and the loss/replacement rate. Finally, by analyzing fields of mtDNA mutant crypts, we show that a normal colon crypt divides around once every 30–40 years, and the division rate is increased in adenomas by at least an order of magnitude. These data provide in vivo quantification of human intestinal stem cell and crypt dynamics.

  14. Circadian variation in expression of G1 phase cyclins D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16 and p21 in human bowel mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Griniatsos; George Marinos; John Bramis; Panayiotis O Michail; Othon P Michail; Stamatios Theocharis; Antonios Arvelakis; Ioannis Papaconstantinou; Evangelos Felekouras; Emmanouel Pikoulis; Ioannis Karavokyros; Chris Bakoyiannis

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether the cellular proliferation rate in the large bowel epithelial cells is characterized by circadian rhythm.METHODS: Between January 2003 and December 2004,twenty patients who were diagnosed as suffering from primary, resectable, non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lower rectum, infiltrating the sphincter mechanism,underwent abdominoperineal resection, total mesorectal excision and permanent left iliac colostomy. In formalinfixed and paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens obtained from the colostomy mucosa every six hours (00:00,06:00, 12:00, 18:00 and 24:00), we studied the expression of G1 phase cydins (D1 and E) as well as the expression of the G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)inhibitors p16 and p21 as indicators of cell cycle progression in colonic epithelial cells using immunohistochemical methods.RESULTS: The expression of both cyclins showed a similar circadian fashion obtaining their lowest and highest values at 00:00 and 18:00, respectively (P< 0.001).A circadian rhythm in the expression of CDK inhibitor proteins p16 and p21 was also observed, with the lowest levels obtained at 12:00 and 18:00 (P<0.001), respectively. When the complexes cyclins D1-p21 and E-p21were examined, the expression of the cyclins was adversely correlated to the p21 expression throughout the day. When the complexes the cyclins D1-p16 and E-p16were examined, high levels of p16 expression were correlated to low levels of cyclin expression at 00:00, 06:00and 24:00. Meanwhile, the highest expression levels of both cyclins were correlated to high levels of p16 expression at 18:00.CONCLUSION: Colonic epithelial cells seem to enter the G1 phase of the cell cycle during afternoon (between 12:00 and 18:00) with the highest rates obtained at 18:00. From a clinical point of view, the present results suggest that G1-phase specific anticancer therapies in afternoon might maximize their anti-tumor effect while minimizing toxicity.

  15. Sodium Butyrate Induces Apoptosis of Human Colon Cancer Cells by Modulating ERK and Sphingosine Kinase 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Min; LIU Yun Gang; ZOU Meng Chen; ZOU Fei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in apoptosis of human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. Methods After the HCT116 cells were pretreated with specific ERK inhibitor (U0126) or specific siRNA and exposed to 10 mmol/L sodium butyrate (NaBT) for 24 h, their apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, levels of SphK2 and ERK protein were measured by Western blot, and translocation of SphK2 was assayed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results The U0126 and siRNAs specific for SphK2 blocked the export of SphK2 from nuclei to cytoplasm and increased the apoptosis of HCT116 cells following NaBT exposure. Over-expression of PKD decreased NaBT-induced apoptosis of HCT116 cells, which was reversed by U0126. Furthermore, transfection of HCT116 cells with constitutively activated PKD plasmids recovered the U0126-blocked export of SphK2. Conclusion ERK regulates the export of SphK2 and apoptosis of HCT116 cells by modulating PKD. Modulation of these molecules may help increase the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to the physiologic anti-colon cancer agent, NaBT.

  16. Patterns of Early-Life Gut Microbial Colonization during Human Immune Development: An Ecological Perspective

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    Isabelle Laforest-Lapointe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in gut microbial colonization during early life have been reported in infants that later developed asthma, allergies, type 1 diabetes, as well as in inflammatory bowel disease patients, previous to disease flares. Mechanistic studies in animal models have established that microbial alterations influence disease pathogenesis via changes in immune system maturation. Strong evidence points to the presence of a window of opportunity in early life, during which changes in gut microbial colonization can result in immune dysregulation that predisposes susceptible hosts to disease. Although the ecological patterns of microbial succession in the first year of life have been partly defined in specific human cohorts, the taxonomic and functional features, and diversity thresholds that characterize these microbial alterations are, for the most part, unknown. In this review, we summarize the most important links between the temporal mosaics of gut microbial colonization and the age-dependent immune functions that rely on them. We also highlight the importance of applying ecology theory to design studies that explore the interactions between this complex ecosystem and the host immune system. Focusing research efforts on understanding the importance of temporally structured patterns of diversity, keystone groups, and inter-kingdom microbial interactions for ecosystem functions has great potential to enable the development of biologically sound interventions aimed at maintaining and/or improving immune system development and preventing disease.

  17. Antitumor Activity of Human Hydatid Cyst Fluid in a Murine Model of Colon Cancer

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    Edgardo Berriel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the antitumor immune response induced by human hydatic cyst fluid (HCF in an animal model of colon carcinoma. We found that anti-HCF antibodies were able to identify cell surface and intracellular antigens in CT26 colon cancer cells. In prophylactic tumor challenge experiments, HCF vaccination was found to be protective against tumor formation for 40% of the mice (P=0.01. In the therapeutic setting, HCF vaccination induced tumor regression in 40% of vaccinated mice (P=0.05. This vaccination generated memory immune responses that protected surviving mice from tumor rechallenge, implicating the development of an adaptive immune response in this process. We performed a proteomic analysis of CT26 antigens recognized by anti-HCF antibodies to analyze the immune cross-reactivity between E. granulosus (HCF and CT26 colon cancer cells. We identified two proteins: mortalin and creatine kinase M-type. Interestingly, CT26 mortalin displays 60% homology with E. granulosus hsp70. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the capacity of HCF vaccination to induce antitumor immunity which protects from tumor growth in an animal model. This new antitumor strategy could open new horizons in the development of highly immunogenic anticancer vaccines.

  18. Antitumor Activity of Human Hydatid Cyst Fluid in a Murine Model of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Sofía; Berois, Nora; Fernández, Gabriel; Freire, Teresa; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the antitumor immune response induced by human hydatic cyst fluid (HCF) in an animal model of colon carcinoma. We found that anti-HCF antibodies were able to identify cell surface and intracellular antigens in CT26 colon cancer cells. In prophylactic tumor challenge experiments, HCF vaccination was found to be protective against tumor formation for 40% of the mice (P = 0.01). In the therapeutic setting, HCF vaccination induced tumor regression in 40% of vaccinated mice (P = 0.05). This vaccination generated memory immune responses that protected surviving mice from tumor rechallenge, implicating the development of an adaptive immune response in this process. We performed a proteomic analysis of CT26 antigens recognized by anti-HCF antibodies to analyze the immune cross-reactivity between E. granulosus (HCF) and CT26 colon cancer cells. We identified two proteins: mortalin and creatine kinase M-type. Interestingly, CT26 mortalin displays 60% homology with E. granulosus hsp70. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the capacity of HCF vaccination to induce antitumor immunity which protects from tumor growth in an animal model. This new antitumor strategy could open new horizons in the development of highly immunogenic anticancer vaccines. PMID:24023528

  19. Reduction in oxidative stress levels in the colonic mucosa without fecal stream after the application of enemas containing aqueous Ilex paraguariensis extract Redução dos níveis de estresse oxidativo na mucosa cólica sem trânsito intestinal após aplicação de enemas contendo extrato aquoso de Ilex paraguariensis

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    Fernando Lorenzetti da Cunha

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the antioxidant effects of enemas containing aqueous extract of Ilex paraguariensis, comparing segments with and without fecal stream and correlating the segments with the duration of intervention. METHODS: Twenty-six Wistar rats were subjected to a diversion of the fecal stream in the left colon by a proximal colostomy and distal mucosal fistula. The rats were distributed randomly into two experimental groups of 13 animals each based on the time of sacrifice after surgical procedure (two or four weeks. Each group was then divided into two experimental subgroups that received either second daily enemas containing 0.9% saline solution or aqueous extract of Ilex paraguariensis at 0.2g/100g. Colitis was diagnosed by histopathological analysis and the detection of oxidative tissue damage by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the tissue levels of malondialdehyde between colon segments with and without fecal stream in each experimental group, and the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to verify the variance between the levels of oxidative stress according the duration of the irrigation; both tests determined significance at 5% (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos antioxidantes de clisteres contendo extrato aquoso de Ilex paraguariensis comparando segmentos com e sem trânsito fecal e correlacionando com o tempo de intervenção. MÉTODOS: Vinte e seis ratos Wistar machos foram submetidos à derivação do trânsito no cólon esquerdo pela confecção de colostomia proximal e fístula mucosa distal. Foram divididos de forma randomizada em dois grupos experimentais de 13 animais, de acordo com o sacrifício ser realizado após duas ou quatro semanas do procedimento cirúrgico. Cada grupo foi dividido em dois subgrupos experimentais segundo a aplicação diária ter sido realizada com enemas diários contendo solução fisiológica a 0,9% ou extrato aquoso de Ilex paraguariensis na concentra

  20. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jian-Yong [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Huang, Yi [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Li, Ji-Peng [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Meng, Yan-Ling [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Yan, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Bian, Yong-Qian [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhao, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Wang, Wei-Zhong, E-mail: weichang@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  1. Absence of tpr-met and expression of c-met in human gastric mucosa and carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heideman, D A; Snijders, P J; Bloemena, E; Meijer, C J; Offerhaus, G J; Meuwissen, S G; Gerritsen, W R; Craanen, M E

    2001-08-01

    The c-met proto-oncogene, encoding the hepatocyte growth factor receptor, can be activated by various mechanisms. These include, among others, gene amplification with concomitant overexpression and the tpr-met oncogenic rearrangement. In the case of gastric cancer, contradictory results on the presence of the tpr-met oncogenic rearrangement have been published. The current study aimed therefore to assess the prevalence of tpr-met expression in Caucasian gastric adenocarcinomas, to evaluate the importance of this oncogene in their carcinogenesis. In addition, the level of c-met expression was determined, to evaluate the role of this alternative mode of activation of the proto-oncogene. A series of Caucasian gastric adenocarcinomas (n=43) and normal gastric mucosal samples (n=14) was analysed for tpr-met and c-met expression. Expression of tpr-met mRNA in the samples was performed by two reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, with excellent correlation. The specificity of both methods was confirmed by direct sequencing of the PCR products of the MNNG-HOS cell line, which is known to contain the rearrangement. The level of c-met expression was assessed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR assays and immunohistochemistry (IHC). None of the normal gastric mucosal or gastric adenocarcinoma samples expressed tpr-met mRNA, as determined by both RT-PCR assays. Seventy per cent of the adenocarcinomas showed overexpression of c-met, according to elevated c-met mRNA levels, compared with the expression level of normal gastric mucosa. A significant correlation was found between the level of c-met mRNA and protein expression. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that tpr-met activation does not play a role in Caucasian gastric carcinogenesis, while overexpression of the c-met gene occurs in the majority of Caucasian gastric adenocarcinomas.

  2. Sulforaphane Preconditioning Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells towards the Bioreductive Anticancer Prodrug PR-104A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie M Erzinger

    Full Text Available The chemoprotective properties of sulforaphane (SF, derived from cruciferous vegetables, are widely acknowledged to arise from its potent induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes. However, much less is known about the impact of SF on the efficacy of cancer therapy through the modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. To identify proteins modulated by a low concentration of SF, we treated HT29 colon cancer cells with 2.5 μM SF. Protein abundance changes were detected by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture. Among 18 proteins found to be significantly up-regulated, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3, bioactivating the DNA cross-linking prodrug PR-104A, was further characterized. Preconditioning HT29 cells with SF reduced the EC50 of PR-104A 3.6-fold. The increase in PR-104A cytotoxicity was linked to AKR1C3 abundance and activity, both induced by SF in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reproducible in a second colon cancer cell line, SW620, but not in other colon cancer cell lines where AKR1C3 abundance and activity were absent or barely detectable and could not be induced by SF. Interestingly, SF had no significant influence on PR-104A cytotoxicity in non-cancerous, immortalized human colonic epithelial cell lines expressing either low or high levels of AKR1C3. In conclusion, the enhanced response of PR-104A after preconditioning with SF was apparent only in cancer cells provided that AKR1C3 is expressed, while its expression in non-cancerous cells did not elicit such a response. Therefore, a subset of cancers may be susceptible to combined food-derived component and prodrug treatments with no harm to normal tissues.

  3. KAI1 gene expression in colonic carcinoma and its clinical significances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Hua Wu; Li Liu; Long-Hua Chen; Yan-Qing Ding

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate KAI1 gene expression in the progression of human colonic carcinoma and its clinical significances.METHODS: KAI1 expression was detected by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in the 4 established cell lines of colorectal carcinoma with different metastatic potentials, and in 80 specimens of colonic carcinoma, 21 colonic carcinoma specimens with lymphatic metastasis and 20 controls of normal colonic mucosa.RESULTS: The expressions of KAI1 in HT29 and SW480 cell lines were higher than those in LoVo and SW620. The expression of KAI1 gene was significantly higher in colorectal carcinoma compared with normal colonic mucosa and lymphatic metastasis (X2=46.838, P<0.01). The expression of KAI1 gene had no relationship with histological grade.The KAI1 expressions in Dukes A and B carcinoma were higher at both mRNA and protein levels compared to Dukes C carcinoma (X2=16.061, P<0.05). The expression of KAI1 in colonic carcinoma specimens with lymphatic metastasis was almost lost. The results of in situ hybridization were in concordance with immunohistochemistry.CONCLUSION: KAI1 is highly related to the metastasis of colonic carcinoma and may be a useful indicator of metastasis in colonic carcinoma.

  4. Proanthocyanidin metabolites associated with dietary fibre from in vitro colonic fermentation and proanthocyanidin metabolites in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Touriño, Sonia; Serrano, José; Fuguet, Elisabet; Torres, Josep Lluis; Goñi, Isabel

    2010-07-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) or condensed tannins, a major group of dietary polyphenols, are oligomers and polymers of flavan-3-ol and flavan-3, 4-diols widely distributed in plant foods. Most literature data on PAs' metabolic fate deal with PAs that can be extracted from the food matrix by aqueous-organic solvents ( extractable proanthocyanidins). However, there are no data on colonic fermentation of non-extractable proanthocyanidins (NEPAs), which arrive almost intact to the colon, mostly associated to dietary fibre (DF). The aim of the present work was to examine colonic fermentation of NEPAs associated with DF, using a model of in vitro small intestine digestion and colonic fermentation. Two NEPA-rich materials obtained from carob pod (Ceratonia siliqua L. proanthocyanidin) and red grapes (grape antioxidant dietary fibre) were used as test samples. The colonic fermentation of these two products released hydroxyphenylacetic acid, hydroxyphenylvaleric acid and two isomers of hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, detected by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Differences between the two products indicate that DF may enhance the yield of metabolites. In addition, the main NEPA metabolite in human plasma was 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid. The presence in human plasma of the same metabolites as were detected after in vitro colonic fermentation of NEPAs suggests that dietary NEPAs would undergo colonic fermentation releasing absorbable metabolites with potential healthy effects.

  5. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor by hydrogen peroxide in human colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wei Zhu; Bao-Ming Yu; Yu-Bao Ji; Ming-Hua Zheng; Dong-Hua Li

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of reactive oxygen species suchas hydrogen peroxide on the progression of human coloncancer.METHODS: Human colon carcinoma cell lines, LS174T andHCT8, were treated respectively with 10- 5,10- 7 or 10- 9 mol@L- 1 hydrogen peroxide for 24h, and co-cultured with humanendothelial cell line ECV-304. The migration of ECV-304induced by cancer cells was calculated and the expressionlevel of vascular endothelial growth factor in cancer cellswas determined by RT-PCR analysis and ELISA.Dactinomycin of 1.5mg@ L-1 which could block transcriptionof cancer cells was applied to observe the effects of H2O2 ontranscriptional activity and the relative half-life of VEGFmRNA. Finally, to evaluate the effect H2O2 on NF-κB activityin colon cancer cells, NF-κB in cytoplasm and nucleus of thecells were detected with FITC-tagged antibody and itspresence in the nucleus (Fn ) Vs cytoplasm ( Fc ) wasmonitored by measuring the green fluorescence integratedover the nucleus by laser scanning cytometry(LSC).RESULTS: Exogenouse hydrogen peroxide of lowconcentration increased the migration of endothelial cellsinduced by colon cancer cells. When cancer cells weretreated with 10-5 mol@ L-1 H2O2, the migration number ofendothelial cells induced by LS174T cells was 203 ± 70, andthe number induced by HCT8 cells was 145 ± 65. The twovalues were significantly higher than those treated with otherconcentrations of h2O2 ( P < 0.01 ). The expression ofvascular endothelial growth factor in cancer cells, whichcould be blocked by dactinomycin, were increased to acertain degree, while the relative half-life of VEGF mRNAwas not prolonged after treatment with hydrogen peroxide.The activity of NF-κB in colon cells rose after the cells wereexposed to hydrogen peroxide for 24h. The Fn values inHCT8 cells were 91 ± 13 (0 mol@ L- 1 h2O2) and 149 ± 40( 10-5mol@L-1 h2O2) ( P< 0.05), in LS174T cells were 127 ± 35(0mol@L-1 H2O2) and 192± 11(10-5 mol@L-1 h2O2) (P< 0.05).lt is similar

  6. Osteolipoma of the buccal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Alvimar-Lima; de Castro, Eni-Vaz-Franco-Lima; Felipini, Renata-Callestini; Ribeiro, Ana-Carolina-Prado; Soubhia, Ana-Maria-Pires

    2010-03-01

    Lipomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms of soft tissue that can be found in any part of the human body. Conversely, their presence in the oral mucosa is rather uncommon, with approximately 4% of the cases occurring in the oral cavity. In such cases, they are likely to have originated from mature adipose tissue and to be among several described histological variants of lipomas, which are identified according to the predominant type of tissue. There is a rare lipoma, known as an osteolipoma or an ossifying lipoma; however, little has been written this type of lipoma characterized by a classical lipoma with areas of osseous metaplasia. Considering the few cases of oral osteolipomas previously described in the English-related literature and the consequent risk of misdiagnosis and overtreatment, this paper describes an extreme case of an osteolipoma affecting the buccal mucosa of an adult patient. This paper focuses particularly on the pathogenesis of this lesion and the discussion of a correct diagnosis.

  7. Evodiamine induces caspase-dependent apoptosis and S phase arrest in human colon lovo cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Xu, Xiang; Yang, Xue; Wang, Xi; Liang, Hua-Ping

    2010-09-01

    Evodiamine, one of the major bioactive components derived from Wu-Chu-Yu, a long-standing Chinese herb, was reported to possess anticancer activity. In this study, we investigated the in-vitro and in-vivo anticancer effects of evodiamine on human colon lovo cells and their potential mechanisms. The 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that the in-vitro proliferation of lovo cells was inhibited by evodiamine of various concentrations. Flow cytometry showed a time-dependent increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and cells arrested in the S phase after treatment with 60 micromol/l evodiamine. Western blot indicated that evodiamine treatment decreased the expression of procaspase-8, procaspase-9, and procaspase-3 in lovo cells, accompanied by the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3. However, the translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G was not affected by evodiamine. Moreover, western blot assay also suggested that evodiamine-induced S phase arrest in lovo cells was associated with a marked decrease in the protein expression of cyclinA, cyclinA-dependent kinase 2, and cdc25c. In-vivo antineoplastic characteristics of evodiamine were examined in a human colon carcinoma lovo xenograft model and results showed that evodiamine increased the number of TUNEL-positive cells accompanied by the downregulated expression of procaspase-8, procaspase-9, and procaspase-3. In conclusion, these findings indicated that evodiamine could inhibit the in-vitro and in-vivo proliferation of human colon lovo cells by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis and S phase arrest.

  8. Thermotherapy enhances oxaliplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human colon carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Liang Zhang; An-Bin Hu; Shu-Zhong Cui; Hong-Bo Wei

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To observe the synergistic effects of hyperthermia in oxaliplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human colon adenocarcinoma Lovo cells.METHODS:The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line Lovo was obtained from Sun Yat-Sen University.Cells were sealed with parafilm and placed in a circulating water bath,and was maintained within 0.01 ℃ of the desired temperature (37 ℃,39 ℃,41 ℃,43 ℃ and 45 ℃).Thermal therapy was given alone to the negarive control group while oxaliplatin was administered to the treatment group at doses of 12.5 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL.Identification of morphological changes,3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay,flow cytometry and Western blotting were used to investigate the effect of thermochemotherapy on human colon adenocarcinoma Lovo cells,including changes in the signal pathway related to apoptosis.RESULTS:A temperature-dependent inhibition of cell growth was observed after oxaliplatin exposure,while a synergistic interaction was detected preferentially with sequential combination.Thermochemotherapy changed the morphology of Lovo cells,increased the inhibition rate of the Lovo cells (P < 0.05) and enhanced cellular population in the G0/G1 phase (16.7%± 4.8 % in phase S plus 3.7% ± 2.4 % in phase G2/M,P < 0.05).Thermochemotherapy increased apoptosis through upregulating p53,Bax and downregulating Bcl-2.Protein levels were elevated in p53,Bax/Bcl-2in thermochemotherapy group as compared with the control group (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION:Thermochemotherapy may play an important role in apoptosis via the activation of p53,Bax and the repression of Bcl-2 in Lovo cells.

  9. Deciphering the colon cancer genes--report of the InSiGHT-Human Variome Project Workshop, UNESCO, Paris 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohonen-Corish, Maija R J; Macrae, Finlay; Genuardi, Maurizio;

    2011-01-01

    The Human Variome Project (HVP) has established a pilot program with the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours (InSiGHT) to compile all inherited variation affecting colon cancer susceptibility genes. An HVP-InSiGHT Workshop was held on May 10, 2010, prior to the HVP...... Integration and Implementation Meeting at UNESCO in Paris, to review the progress of this pilot program. A wide range of topics were covered, including issues relating to genotype-phenotype data submission to the InSiGHT Colon Cancer Gene Variant Databases (chromium.liacs.nl/LOVD2/colon_cancer...

  10. Molecular Characteristics of High-Dose Melphalan Associated Oral Mucositis in Patients with Multiple Myeloma: A Gene Expression Study on Human Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcussen, Mette; Bødker, Julie Støve; Christensen, Heidi Søgaard; Johansen, Preben; Nielsen, Søren; Christiansen, Ilse; Bergmann, Olav Jonas; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen; Vyberg, Mogens; Johnsen, Hans Erik

    2017-01-01

    Toxicity of the oral and gastrointestinal mucosa induced by high-dose melphalan is a clinical challenge with no documented prophylactic interventions or predictive tests. The aim of this study was to describe molecular changes in human oral mucosa and to identify biomarkers correlated with the grade of clinical mucositis. Ten patients with multiple myeloma (MM) were included. For each patient, we acquired three buccal biopsies, one before, one at 2 days, and one at 20 days after high-dose melphalan administration. We also acquired buccal biopsies from 10 healthy individuals that served as controls. We analyzed the biopsies for global gene expression and performed an immunohistochemical analysis to determine HLA-DRB5 expression. We evaluated associations between clinical mucositis and gene expression profiles. Compared to gene expression levels before and 20 days after therapy, at two days after melphalan treatment, we found gene regulation in the p53 and TNF pathways (MDM2, INPPD5, TIGAR), which favored anti-apoptotic defense, and upregulation of immunoregulatory genes (TREM2, LAMP3) in mucosal dendritic cells. This upregulation was independent of clinical mucositis. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB5 (surface receptors on dendritic cells) were expressed at low levels in all patients with MM, in the subgroup of patients with ulcerative mucositis (UM), and in controls; in contrast, the subgroup with low-grade mucositis (NM) displayed 5-6 fold increases in HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB5 expression in the first two biopsies, independent of melphalan treatment. Moreover, different splice variants of HLA-DRB1 were expressed in the UM and NM subgroups. Our results revealed that, among patients with MM, immunoregulatory genes and genes involved in defense against apoptosis were affected immediately after melphalan administration, independent of the presence of clinical mucositis. Furthermore, our results suggested that the expression levels of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB5 may serve as potential

  11. Tart cherry anthocyanins inhibit tumor development in Apc(Min) mice and reduce proliferation of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Soo-Young; Seeram, Navindra P; Nair, Muraleedharan G; Bourquin, Leslie D

    2003-05-08

    Anthocyanins, which are bioactive phytochemicals, are widely distributed in plants and especially enriched in tart cherries. Based on previous observations that tart cherry anthocyanins and their respective aglycone, cyanidin, can inhibit cyclooxygenase enzymes, we conducted experiments to test the potential of anthocyanins to inhibit intestinal tumor development in Apc(Min) mice and growth of human colon cancer cell lines. Mice consuming the cherry diet, anthocyanins, or cyanidin had significantly fewer and smaller cecal adenomas than mice consuming the control diet or sulindac. Colonic tumor numbers and volume were not significantly influenced by treatment. Anthocyanins and cyanidin also reduced cell growth of human colon cancer cell lines HT 29 and HCT 116. The IC(50) of anthocyanins and cyanidin was 780 and 63 microM for HT 29 cells, respectively and 285 and 85 microM for HCT 116 cells, respectively. These results suggest that tart cherry anthocyanins and cyanidin may reduce the risk of colon cancer.

  12. Activation of human colon mast cells through proteinase activated receptor-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Heng He; Yong-Song He; Hua Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of agonists of PAR-2 to rtimulate release of tryptase and histamine from human colon mast cells and the potential mechanisms.METHODS: Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colons were challenged with tc-LIGRLO, tc-OLRGIL, SLIGKV,VKGILS, trypsin, anti-IgE or calcium ionophore A23187, and the cell supernatante after challenge were collected. Tryptase release was determined with a sandwich ELISA procedure and histamine release was measured using a glass fibrebased fluorometric assay.RESULTS: Both PAR-2 agonists tc-LIGRLO-NH2 and SLIGKVNH2 were able to induce dose dependent release of tryptase and histamine from colon mast cells. More than 2.5 fold increase in both tryptase and histamine release was provoked by 100 μmol/mL tc-LIGRLO-NH2, in compariSon with only 2.0 fold increase being stimulated by SLIGKV-NH2. The reverse peptides tc-OLRGIL-NH2 and VKGILS -NH2 at the concentrations tested had no effect on the release of these two mediators. The maximum tryptase release elicited by tc-LIGRLO-NH2 was similar to that induced by anti-IgE(10 μg/mL) or calcium ionophore (1 μg/mL), though the latter was a more potent stimulus for histamine release. Both histamine and tryptase release in response to tc-LIGRLONH2 were completed within 3 min. Trypsin at concentrations from 1.0 to 100 μg/mL was capable of provoking a dose dependent release of tryptase as well as histamine with a maximum of 16 ng/mL tryptase and 14 ng/mL histamine release being achieved. An approximately 80% and 70% inhibition of trypsin induced release of tryptase and histamine were observed with SBTI, respectively. Pretreatment of cells with metabolic inhibitors or pertussis toxin abolished the actions of tc-LIGRLO-NH2, SLIGKV-NH2 and trypsin.CONCLUSION: The agonists of PAR-2 and trypsin are potent secretagogues of human colon mast cells, which are likely to contribute to the development of inflammatory disorders in human gut.

  13. Polyamine and methionine adenosyltransferase 2A crosstalk in human colon and liver cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasi, Maria Lauda [Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); USC Research Center for Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); The Southern California Research Center for Alcoholic and Pancreatic Diseases and Cirrhosis, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Ryoo, Minjung; Skay, Anna [Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); USC Research Center for Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Tomasi, Ivan; Giordano, Pasquale [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Whipps Cross University Hospital, London E11 1NR (United Kingdom); Mato, José M. [CIC bioGUNE, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (Ciberehd), Technology Park of Bizkaia, 48160 Derio, Bizkaia (Spain); Lu, Shelly C., E-mail: shellylu@usc.edu [Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); USC Research Center for Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); The Southern California Research Center for Alcoholic and Pancreatic Diseases and Cirrhosis, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) is an essential enzyme that is responsible for the biosynthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), the principal methyl donor and precursor of polyamines. MAT1A is expressed in normal liver and MAT2A is expressed in all extrahepatic tissues. MAT2A expression is increased in human colon cancer and in colon cancer cells treated with mitogens, whereas silencing MAT2A resulted in apoptosis. The aim of the current work was to examine the mechanism responsible for MAT2A-dependent growth and apoptosis. We found that in RKO (human adenocarcinoma cell line) cells, MAT2A siRNA treatment lowered cellular SAMe and putrescine levels by 70–75%, increased apoptosis and inhibited growth. Putrescine supplementation blunted significantly MAT2A siRNA-induced apoptosis and growth suppression. Putrescine treatment (100 pmol/L) raised MAT2A mRNA level to 4.3-fold of control, increased the expression of c-Jun and c-Fos and binding to an AP-1 site in the human MAT2A promoter and the promoter activity. In human colon cancer specimens, the expression levels of MAT2A, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), c-Jun and c-Fos are all elevated as compared to adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Overexpression of ODC in RKO cells also raised MAT2A mRNA level and MAT2A promoter activity. ODC and MAT2A are also overexpressed in liver cancer and consistently, similar MAT2A-ODC-putrescine interactions and effects on growth and apoptosis were observed in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, there is a crosstalk between polyamines and MAT2A. Increased MAT2A expression provides more SAMe for polyamines biosynthesis; increased polyamine (putrescine in this case) can activate MAT2A at the transcriptional level. This along with increased ODC expression in cancer all feed forward to further enhance the proliferative capacity of the cancer cell. -- Highlights: • MAT2A knockdown depletes putrescine and leads to apoptosis. • Putrescine attenuates MAT2A knockdown-induced apoptosis and growth

  14. Characterization of galactosyl glycerolipids in the HT29 human colon carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Påhlsson, P; Spitalnik, S L; Spitalnik, P F; Fantini, J; Rakotonirainy, O; Ghardashkhani, S; Lindberg, J; Konradsson, P; Larson, G

    2001-12-15

    Glycoglycerolipids constitute a family of glycolipids with apparently very restricted expression in human tissues. They have previously been detected only in the testis and the nervous system. In the present study, two glycoglycerolipids were isolated from the HT29 human colon carcinoma cell line. The glycoglycerolipids were structurally characterized as a monogalactosylglycerolipid (1-O-alkyl-2-O-acyl-3-O-(beta-galactosyl)-sn-glycerol) and a digalactosylglycerolipid (1-O-alkyl-2-O-acyl-3-O-(beta-galactosyl(1-4)alpha-galactosyl)-sn-glycerol) using NMR and mass spectrometry. This digalactosylglycerolipid has not previously been structurally characterized. When HT29 cells were allowed to differentiate into more enterocyte-like cells by culture in glucose-free medium, expression of both of these glycoglycerolipids was greatly diminished. The presence of glycoglycerolipids in a human colon carcinoma cell line indicates that expression of this family of glycolipids may not be as restricted as previously thought. Instead this class of glycolipids may serve as differentiation antigens in various normal tissues and in tumor development. The Galalpha1-4Gal epitope was previously identified as a receptor for bacterial adhesins and toxins. The finding that this epitope is also linked to a glycerolipid moiety opens up new possible roles for this carbohydrate receptor in intracellular signaling.

  15. Current and Potential Treatments for Reducing Campylobacter Colonization in Animal Hosts and Disease in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tylor J.; Shank, Janette M.; Johnson, Jeremiah G.

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacteria-derived gastroenteritis worldwide. In the developed world, Campylobacter is usually acquired by consuming under-cooked poultry, while in the developing world it is often obtained through drinking contaminated water. Once consumed, the bacteria adhere to the intestinal epithelium or mucus layer, causing toxin-mediated inhibition of fluid reabsorption from the intestine and invasion-induced inflammation and diarrhea. Traditionally, severe or prolonged cases of campylobacteriosis have been treated with antibiotics; however, overuse of these antibiotics has led to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. As the incidence of antibiotic resistance, emergence of post-infectious diseases, and economic burden associated with Campylobacter increases, it is becoming urgent that novel treatments are developed to reduce Campylobacter numbers in commercial poultry and campylobacteriosis in humans. The purpose of this review is to provide the current status of present and proposed treatments to combat Campylobacter infection in humans and colonization in animal reservoirs. These treatments include anti-Campylobacter compounds, probiotics, bacteriophage, vaccines, and anti-Campylobacter bacteriocins, all of which may be successful at reducing the incidence of campylobacteriosis in humans and/or colonization loads in poultry. In addition to reviewing treatments, we will also address several proposed targets that may be used in future development of novel anti-Campylobacter treatments. PMID:28386253

  16. Colonizing the embryonic zebrafish gut with anaerobic bacteria derived from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Michael C; Goodyear, Mara; Daigneault, Michelle; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Van Raay, Terence J

    2013-06-01

    The zebrafish has become increasingly popular for microbiological research. It has been used as an infection model for a variety of pathogens, and is also emerging as a tool for studying interactions between a host and its resident microbial communities. The mouse microbiota has been transplanted into the zebrafish gut, but to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to introduce a bacterial community derived from the human gut. We explored two methods for colonizing the developing gut of 5-day-old germ-free zebrafish larvae with a defined anaerobic microbial community derived from a single human fecal sample. Both environmental exposure (static immersion) and direct microinjection into the gut resulted in the establishment of two species-Lactobacillus paracasei and Eubacterium limosum-from a community of 30 strains consisting of 22 anaerobic species. Of particular interest is E. limosum, which, as a strict anaerobe, represents a group of bacteria which until now have not been shown to colonize the developing zebrafish gut. Our success here indicates that further investigation of zebrafish as a tool for studying human gut microbial communities is warranted.

  17. Mechanism of Alternariol monomethyl ether-induced mitochondrial apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensassi, Fatma; Gallerne, Cindy; el Dein, Ossama Sharaf; Hajlaoui, Mohamed Rabeh; Bacha, Hassen; Lemaire, Christophe

    2011-12-18

    Alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) is a major mycotoxin produced by fungi of the genus Alternaria and a common contaminant of food products such as fruits and cereals worldwide. AME can cause serious health problems for animals as well as for humans. In this study, human colon carcinoma cells (HCT116) were used to explore the mechanisms of cell death induced by AME. Exposure of HCT116 cells to AME resulted in significant cytotoxicity manifested by a loss in cell viability mainly mediated by activation of apoptotic process. AME activated the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway evidenced by the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) downstream generation of O(2)(-), cytochrome c release and caspase 9 and 3 activation. Experiments conducted on isolated organelles indicated that AME does not directly target mitochondria to induce PTP-dependent permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes. Moreover, no difference was observed in Bax-KO cells in comparison to parental cells, suggesting that the pro-apoptotic protein Bax is not involved in AME-induced mitochondrial apoptosis. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that AME induces cell death in human colon carcinoma cells by activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis.

  18. Carriers of human mitochondrial DNA macrohaplogroup M colonized India from southeastern Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Patricia; Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Larruga, Jose M; Cabrera, Vicente M

    2016-11-10

    From a mtDNA dominant perspective, the exit from Africa of modern humans to colonize Eurasia occurred once, around 60 kya, following a southern coastal route across Arabia and India to reach Australia short after. These pioneers carried with them the currently dominant Eurasian lineages M and N. Based also on mtDNA phylogenetic and phylogeographic grounds, some authors have proposed the coeval existence of a northern route across the Levant that brought mtDNA macrohaplogroup N to Australia. To contrast both hypothesis, here we reanalyzed the phylogeography and respective ages of mtDNA haplogroups belonging to macrohaplogroup M in different regions of Eurasia and Australasia. The macrohaplogroup M has a historical implantation in West Eurasia, including the Arabian Peninsula. Founder ages of M lineages in India are significantly younger than those in East Asia, Southeast Asia and Near Oceania. Moreover, there is a significant positive correlation between the age of the M haplogroups and its longitudinal geographical distribution. These results point to a colonization of the Indian subcontinent by modern humans carrying M lineages from the east instead the west side. The existence of a northern route, previously proposed for the mtDNA macrohaplogroup N, is confirmed here for the macrohaplogroup M. Both mtDNA macrolineages seem to have differentiated in South East Asia from ancestral L3 lineages. Taking this genetic evidence and those reported by other disciplines we have constructed a new and more conciliatory model to explain the history of modern humans out of Africa.

  19. Time- and dose-dependent effects of curcumin on gene expression in human colon cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erk, M.J. van; Teuling, E.; Staal, Y.C.M.; Huybers, S.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Ommen, B. van

    2004-01-01

    Background. Curcumin is a spice and a coloring food compound with a promising role in colon cancer prevention. Curcumin protects against development of colon tumors in rats treated with a colon carcinogen, in colon cancer cells curcumin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, it is an a

  20. The variation of tryptase expression in the colonic mucosa of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome and its effect on the visceral sensitivity%腹泻型肠易激综合征患者结肠黏膜类胰蛋白酶变化及其对内脏感觉的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王承党; 郭朝书

    2010-01-01

    variation of tryptase expression in the colonic mucosa of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome(IBS-D) and the effects of their colonic mucosa cultured supernatants on mice visceral sensitivity. Methods The IBS-D patients study: of twenty-four patients with IBS-D and 12 healthy volunteers, four mucosal biopsies of each individual were collected at ascending colon under colonoscopy. The quantity of mucosal mast cells were detected by toluidine blue stains, and the tryptase concentration of colonic mucosa cultured supernatants were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Animal experiments: fifty-six male six to eight weeks old C57BL/6 mice were divided into 7 groups and then were administrated with healthy volunteer's ascending colonic mucosa-cultured supernatants 100 μl (group A), IBS-D patient' s ascending colonic mucosa-cultured supernatants 100 μl (group B), IBS-D ascending colonic mucosacultured supernatants 100 μl with Fut-175(50 μg/ml, group C), tryptase with different concentration:0.6 ng (group D), 2.2 ng (group E), tryptase 2.2 ng with Fut-175 (group F), and 0.9% sodium chloride as control (group G) respectively. After six hours, the abdominal myoelectric activities (AMAs) were recorded during colorectal balloon distension (CRD), and the expressions of substance P (SP), Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in spinal dorsal horn of lumbosaeral region were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results The number of mast cells in the ascending colon of patients with IBS-D [6.33 ± 1.64) / HP] was higher than that in controls [(3.08 ± 0.77 ) / HP], the difference was statistical significant (P = 0.000). The tryptase concentration of ascending colonic mucosa cultured supernatants in IBS-D patients [(0. 072 ± 0. 023) ng/mg] was higher than that in controls [(0.026 ± 0.014) ng/mg], the difference was statistical significant ( P = 0. 000). In animal experiments, when the inside pressure of balloon was 30, 45, 60 mm

  1. Cigarette smoke extracts induced the colon cancer migration via regulating epithelial mesenchymal transition and metastatic genes in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cho-Won; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Lee, Hae-Miru; Hwang, Kyung-A; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Bumseok; Lee, Moo-Yeol; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2017-02-01

    There was considerable evidence that exposure to cigarette smoke is associated with an increased risk for colon cancer. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the relationship between cigarette smoking and colon cancer remains unclear. Moreover, there were only a few studies on effects of complexing substance contained in cigarette smoke on colon cancer. Thus, we further investigated whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) affects the cell cycle, apoptosis and migration of human metastatic colon cancer cells, SW-620. MTT assay revealed that SW-620 cell proliferation was significantly inhibited following treatments with all CSEs, 3R4F, and two-domestic cigarettes, for 9 days in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, CSE treatments decreased cyclin D1 and E1, and increased p21 and p27 proteins by Western blot analysis in SW-620 cells. Additionally, the treatment of the cells with CSE contributed to these effects expressing by apoptosis-related proteins. An increased migration or invasion ability of SW-620 cells following CSE treatment was also confirmed by a scratch or fibronectin invasion assay in vitro. In addition, the protein levels of E-cadherin as an epithelial maker were down-regulated, while the mesenchymal markers, N-cadherin, snail, and slug, were up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. A metastatic marker, cathepsin D, was also down-regulated by CSE treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that CSE exposure in colon cancer cells may deregulate the cell growth by altering the expression of cell cycle-related proteins and pro-apoptotic protein, and stimulate cell metastatic ability by altering epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and cathepsin D expression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 690-704, 2017.

  2. Models of Human Metastatic Colon Cancer in Nude Mice Orthotopically Constructed by Using Histologically Intact Patient Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinyu; Besterman, Jeffrey M.; Monosov, Ann; Hoffman, Robert M.

    1991-10-01

    There is an important need for clinically relevant animal models for human cancers. Toward this goal, histologically intact human colon-cancer specimens derived surgically from patients were implanted orthotopically to the colon or cecum of nude mice. We have observed extensive orthotopic growth in 13 of 20 cases of implanted patient colon tumors. These showed various growth patterns with subsequent regional, lymph-node, and liver metastasis, as well as general abdominal carcinomatosis. Thus, models for human colon cancer have been developed that show (i) local growth, (ii) abdominal metastasis, (iii) general abdominal carcinomatosis with extensive peritoneal seeding, (iv) lymph-node metastasis, (v) liver metastasis, and (vi) colonic obstruction. These models permit the passage of the tumors to form large cohorts. They will facilitate research into the biology of colon cancer metastatic capability and the development of new drugs active against metastatic cancer. These models may also predict the clinical course and the in vivo response to drugs of the cancer of individual patients.

  3. Expression of IL-6, IL-23 and TGF-β1 in the mucosa of the ileum and ascending colon of patients with irritable bowel syndrome: an analysis of 110 cases%肠黏膜细胞因子在肠易激综合征患者回肠及升结肠组织中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘修波; 张巍巍; 解祥军; 王青

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-23 and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) in the mucosa of the ileum and ascending colon of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).METHODS: One hundred and ten patients with IBS and 40 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Mucosal samples were taken from the ileum and ascending colon of these subjects to detect the expression of IL-6, IL-23 and TGF-β1 by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: The expression levels of IL-6 and IL-23 in the mucosa of the ileum and ascending colon were higher in IBS patients than in controls (IL-6:106.45 ± 12.54 vs 82.45 ± 11.52, t = 10.58; 107.48 ± 18.75 vs 91.32 ± 10.45, t = 5.16;IL-23:10.68 ± 3.35 vs 4.78 ± 2.54, t = 10.12; 11.42 ±2.87 vs 5.20 ± 1.85, t = 12.76, all P < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the expression level of TGF-β1 in the mucosa of the ileum and ascending colon between the two groups (t = 1.57,1.69, both P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: High expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the mucosa of the ileum and ascending colon may have a correlation with visceral perception and altered bowel habits in patients with IBS.%目的:研究肠易激综合征(IBS)患者回肠末端及升结肠黏膜组织中炎性因子白介素(IL)-6、IL-23及LTGF-β1的表达,探讨IBS的发病机制.方法:选取110例IBS患者,另选40例健康体检者为对照,内镜下取回肠及升结肠肠黏膜组织各1块,用免疫组织化学法测定回肠末端及升结肠肠黏膜中IL-6、IL-23及TGF-β1水平.结果:IL-6及IL-23在IBS患者回肠末端及升结肠肠黏膜的表达高于对照组(IL-6:106.45±12.54 vs 82.45±11.52,t=10.58;107.48±18.75 vs 91.32±10.45,t=5.16;IL-23:10.68±3.35 vs 4.78±2.54,t=10.12:11.42±2.87vs 5.20±1.85,t=12.76,均P0.05).结论:IBS患者回肠黏膜及升结肠炎性细胞因子表达水平升高,促炎细胞因子与抑炎细胞因子失衡,与IBS内脏感知及排便习惯的改变等症状的发生有一定相关性.

  4. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Ogawa

    Full Text Available Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors.

  5. Novel snail1 target proteins in human colon cancer identified by proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jesús Larriba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transcription factor Snail1 induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process responsible for the acquisition of invasiveness during tumorigenesis. Several transcriptomic studies have reported Snail1-regulated genes in different cell types, many of them involved in cell adhesion. However, only a few studies have used proteomics as a tool for the characterization of proteins mediating EMT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified by proteomic analysis using 2D-DIGE electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF and ESI-linear ion trap mass spectrometry a number of proteins with variable functions whose expression is modulated by Snail1 in SW480-ADH human colon cancer cells. Validation was performed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Snail1 repressed several members of the 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/phosphothreonine binding proteins and also the expression of the Proliferation-associated protein 2G4 (PA2G4 that was mainly localized at the nuclear Cajal bodies. In contrast, the expression of two proteins involved in RNA processing, the Cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6 and the Splicing factor proline/glutamine-rich (SFPQ, was higher in Snail1-expressing cells than in controls. The regulation of 14-3-3epsilon, 14-3-3tau, 14-3-3zeta and PA2G4 by Snail1 was reproduced in HT29 colon cancer cells. In addition, we found an inverse correlation between 14-3-3sigma and Snail1 expression in human colorectal tumors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified a set of novel Snail1 target proteins in colon cancer that expand the cellular processes affected by Snail1 and thus its relevance for cell function and phenotype.

  6. Orexin A induces autophagy in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells through the ERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Zhao, Yuyan; Guo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Orexins are a class of peptides which have a potent influence on a broad variety of cancer cells. Autophagy is closely associated with tumors; however, its function is not yet completely understood. In this study, we aimed to determine whether orexin A induces autophagy in HCT‑116 human colon cancer cells and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved. For this purpose, HCT‑116 cells were treated with orexin A, and cell viability was then measured by MTT assay, and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. The expression levels of autophagy‑related proteins were measured by western blot analysis. Quantitative analysis of autophagy following acridine orange (AO) staining was performed using fluorescence microscopy, and cellular morphology was observed under a transmission electron microscope. In addition, the HCT‑116 cells were treated with the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, U0126, or the autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, in combination with orexin A in order to examine the activation of ERK. We found that orexin A significantly inhibited the viability of the HCT‑116 cells. Both autophagy and apoptosis were activated during the orexin A‑induced death of HCT‑116 cells. When the HCT‑116 cells were treated with orexin A for 24 h, an accumulation of punctate microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 (LC3) and an increase in LC3‑Ⅱ protein levels were also detected, indicating the activation of autophagy. Moreover, orexin A upregulated ERK phosphorylation; however, U0126 or chloroquine abrogated ERK phosphorylation and decreased autophagy, compared to treatment with orexin A alone. Therefore, our findings demonstratedm that orexin A induced autophagy through the ERK pathway in HCT‑116 human colon cancer cells. The inhibition of autophagy may thus prove to be an effective strategy for enhancing the antitumor potential of orexin A as a treatment for colon cancer.

  7. [Regeneration of the gastric and intestinal mucosas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrup, H J

    1979-05-10

    The physiological cell renewal of gastrointestinal mucosa is regulated in man as in animal through certain mechanisms with measurable kinetic data. Pathologic mucosal alterations, metabolic disorders, pharmacological agents etc. clearly affect the regenerative processes of the gastrointestinal epithelium. Gastrin and pentagastrin stimulate the growth not only of the parietal cells, but also of the superficial epithelium of the gastric mucosa, whereas secretin does not change cell growth. Glucocorticoid steroids inhibit epithelial regeneration in all parts of the gastrointestinal tract. 5-fluorouracil has a similar effect but acts at a different site in the regeneration cycle. Epithelial cell proliferation of the gastric and intestinal mucosa is likewise inhibited in an uremic condition. In inflammatory changes in the human gastric mucosa epithelial cell hyperproliferation relative to the severity of gastritis and anomalous proliferation within regions of dysplasia can be demonstrated. Foveolary hyperplasia in Ménétrier's disease occurs on the basis of excessive hyperproliferation with displacement of regeneration zones.

  8. Runt-related transcription factor 2 in human colon carcinoma: a potent prognostic factor associated with estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sase, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miura, Koh; Shiiba, Kenichi; Sato, Ikuro; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Onodera, Yoshiaki; Miki, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Mika; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Sato, Ryuichiro; Karasawa, Hideaki; Shibata, Chikashi; Unno, Michiaki; Sasaki, Iwao; Sasano, Hironobu

    2012-11-15

    Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) belongs to the RUNX family of heterodimeric transcription factors, and is mainly associated with osteogenesis. Previous in vitro studies demonstrated that RUNX2 increased the cell proliferation of mouse and rat colon carcinoma cells but the status of RUNX2 has remained unknown in human colon carcinoma. Therefore, we examined clinical significance and biological functions of RUNX2 in colon carcinoma. RUNX2 immunoreactivity was examined in 157 colon carcinoma tissues using immunohistochemistry. RUNX2 immunoreactivity was evaluated as percentage of positive carcinoma cells [i.e., labeling index (LI)]. We used SW480 and DLD-1 human colon carcinoma cells, expressing estrogen receptor-β (ER) in subsequent in vitro studies. RUNX2 immunoreactivity was detected in colon carcinoma cells, and the median value of RUNX2 LI was 67%. RUNX2 LI was significantly associated with Dukes' stage, liver metastasis and ERβ status. In addition, RUNX2 LI was significantly associated with adverse clinical outcome of the colon carcinoma patients, and turned out an independent prognostic factor following multivariate analysis. Results of in vitro studies demonstrated that both SW480 and DLD-1 cells transfected with small interfering RNA against RUNX2 significantly decreased their cell proliferation, migration and invasive properties. In addition, RUNX2 mRNA level was significantly decreased by ER antagonist in these two cells. These findings all suggest that RUNX2 is a potent prognostic factor in human colon carcinoma patients through the promotion of cell proliferation and invasion properties, and is at least partly upregulated by estrogen signals through ERβ of carcinoma cells.

  9. Nonlinear fractal dynamics of human colonic pressure activity based upon the box-counting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rongguo; Guo, Xudong

    2013-01-01

    The computational fractal dimension of human colonic pressure activity acquired by a telemetric capsule robot under normal physiological conditions was studied using the box-counting method. The fractal dimension is a numeric value that quantifies to measure how rough the signal is from nonlinear dynamics, rather than its amplitude or other linear statistical features. The colonic pressure activities from the healthy subject during three typical periods were analysed. The results showed that the activity might be fractal with a non-integer fractal dimension after it being integrated over time using the cumsum method, which was never revealed before. Moreover, the activity (after it being integrated) acquired soon after wakening up was the roughest (also the most complex one) with the largest fractal dimension, closely followed by that acquired during sleep with that acquired long time after awakening up (in the daytime) ranking third with the smallest fractal dimension. Fractal estimation might provide a new method to learn the nonlinear dynamics of human gastrointestinal pressure recordings.

  10. Use of Mueller polarimetric imaging for the staging of human colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierangelo, Angelo; Manhas, Sandeep; Benali, Abdelali; Antonelli, Maria Rosaria; Novikova, Tatiana; Validire, Pierre; Gayet, Brice; De Martino, Antonello

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we show the results of multi-spectral Mueller Imaging applied to the analysis of human colon cancer in a backscattering configuration with diffuse light illumination. The analyzed sample behaves as a pure depolarizer. The depolarization power, for both healthy and cancerous zones, is lower for linearly than for circularly polarized incident light for all used wavelengths and increases with increasing wavelength. Based on their visual staging and polarimetric responses, we chose specific zones which we correlated to the histology of the corresponding cuts. The histological examination shows that we see a multilayer interaction in both healthy and abnormal zones, if the light penetration depth is sufficient. The measured depolarization depends on several factors: the presence or absence of tumor, the microscopic structure of cancer (ratio between cellular density and stroma), its exophytic (budding) or endophytic (penetrating) nature, its thickness, the degree of cancer penetration in deeper layers and the nature of healthy tissue left under abnormal layers. These results demonstrate that multi-spectral Mueller imaging can provide useful contrasts for the quick staging of human colon cancer ex-vivo, with additional information about cancerous zones with different microscopic structures.

  11. In vitro radiosensitization by oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil in a human colon cancer cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellstroem, Johan; Kjellen, Elisabeth; Johnsson, Anders [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    2005-10-01

    The current study was designed to compare the radiosensitizing effects of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) in a human colon cancer cell line. A human colon cancer cell line (S1) was treated with various doses of oxaliplatin, 5FU, radiation, and combinations thereof. Various clinically used schedules were mimicked. 5FU was either incubated during 1 h ('bolus') or 24 h ('continuous infusion'). When combining oxaliplatin and 5FU, an isobologram analysis revealed synergistic effects, regardless of 5FU schedule. The IC{sub 10} and IC{sub 50}-doses for the drugs where then combined with radiotherapy. With equitoxic drug doses (IC{sub 50}), radiosensitization was observed in the following order: oxaliplatin>5FU 24 h>5FU 1 h exposure. The degree of potentiation corresponded to approximately 0.8 Gy, 0.7 Gy, and 0.2 Gy, respectively. In this experimental setting, oxaliplatin seemed to be a better radiosensitizer than 5FU, and longer incubation time with 5FU was better than short exposure.

  12. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hae-Jeong Park; Sung-Vin Yim; Joo-Ho Chung; Seon-Pyo Hong; Seo-Hyun Yoon; Long-Shan Han; Long-Tai Zheng; Kyung-Hee Jung; Yoon-Kyung Uhm; Je-Hyun Lee; Ji-Seon Jeong; Woo-Sang Joo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-reiated, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cyclerelated, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes.METHODS: We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL,24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE114), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells,and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  13. In Vitro Degradation and Fermentation of Three Dietary Fiber Sources by Human Colonic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donna Z.; Weimer, Paul J.; Jung, Hans-Joachim G.; Savik, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical benefits of dietary fiber supplementation seem to depend partially on the extent of fiber degradation and fermentation by colonic bacteria, little is known about the effect of supplemental fiber type on bacterial metabolism. In an experiment using a non-adapted human bacterial population from three normal subjects, extent of in vitro fermentation was greater for gum arabic (GA) than for psyllium (PSY), which was greater than that for carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). In a separate experiment, in vitro incubation with feces from 52 subjects with fecal incontinence, before and after random assignment to and consumption of one of three fiber (GA, PSY, or CMC) supplements or a placebo for 20-21d, indicated that prior consumption of a specific fiber source did not increase its degradation by fecal bacteria. Results suggest that the colonic microbial community enriched on a particular fiber substrate can rapidly adapt to the presentation of a new fiber substrate. Clinical implications of the findings are that intake of a fiber source by humans is not expected to result in bacterial adaptation that would require continually larger and eventually intolerable amounts of fiber to achieve therapeutic benefits. PMID:23556460

  14. Apoptosis of human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells induced by ceramide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Zhang; Bai-Xiang Li; Chun-Yan Dong; Rui Ren

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of exogenous ceramideinduced apoptosis on human colon carcinoma HT-29cells.METHODS: Light microscope, transmission electron microscope and fluorescence microscope were used to observe the morphology change of apoptosis in HT-29cells. Agarose gel electrophoresis was performed to detect the DNA fragment. Mitochondrial function was detected by MTT assay. mRNA expression of Bcl-2 family gene members was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay.RESULTS: After C2-ceramide treatment, typical characteristics of apoptosis, such as nuclear chromatin breakage, apoptotic body and DNA ladder, could be observed. After exposure to 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide for 12 and 24 h, cell apoptosis was 64.1% and 81.3% respectively, which had a time-and dose-effect relationship. Mitochondrial function started to decrease from 6 h after exposure to ceramide. Meanwhile,ceramide up-regulated or down-regulated the mRNA expression of Bcl-2 family gene members.CONCLUSION: Ceramide induces apoptosis of human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells by affecting the expression of Bcl-2 family gene members and impacting the mitochondrial function.

  15. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Yoon, Seo-Hyun; Han, Long-Shan; Zheng, Long-Tai; Jung, Kyung-Hee; Uhm, Yoon-Kyung; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Joo, Woo-Sang; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Joo-Ho; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2005-09-07

    The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-related, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cycle-related, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes. We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL, 24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE11A), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells. These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells, and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  16. Electroporation-assisted penetration of zinc oxide nanoparticles in ex vivo normal and cancerous human colon tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L. P.; Wu, G. Y.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; He, Y. H.; Xie, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we presented the research of the penetration of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) (30 and 90 nm), and electroporation (EP) assisted penetration of the ZnO NPs in the human normal colon (NC) and adenomatous colon (AC) tissues studied with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and diffuse reflectance (DR) measurement. The results have shown that the attenuation coefficient of colon tissue after the application of 30 or 90 nm ZnO NPs alone decreased approximately by 28% and 14% for NC tissue, 35% and 22% for AC tissue, respectively; while the attenuation coefficient of colon tissue after combined application of 30 or 90 nm ZnO NPs/EP decreased approximately by 46% and 30% for NC tissue, and 53% and 42% for AC tissue, respectively. The results illustrate EP can significantly increase the penetration of ZnO NPs in the colon tissue, especially in AC tissue. Through the analysis of attenuation coefficient and reflectance intensity of the colon tissue, we find that the accumulation of the ZnO NPs in the colon tissue greatly influenced the tissue optical properties.

  17. The nasal mucosa contains a large spectrum of human papillomavirus types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus genera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslund, Ola; Johansson, Hanna; Madsen, Klaus Gregaard;

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus genera are common at cutaneous sites. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of these HPV types in oral and nasal samples....

  18. Keratin23 (KRT23) knockdown decreases proliferation and affects the DNA damage response of colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Hahn, Stephan; Mansilla, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Keratin 23 (KRT23) is strongly expressed in colon adenocarcinomas but absent in normal colon mucosa. Array based methylation profiling of 40 colon samples showed that the promoter of KRT23 was methylated in normal colon mucosa, while hypomethylated in most adenocarcinomas. Promoter methylation...

  19. Effect of infection on cytokine expression in the colon mucosa of patients with irritable bowel syndrome%感染对IBS患者肠黏膜细胞因子表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠辉; 刘希双; 魏良洲; 刘华; 尹继平

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨感染对肠易激综合征(irritable bowel syndrome,IBS)患者神经-免疫-内分泌网络的影响.方法:感染后肠易激综合征(postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome,PI-IBS)患者45例,nonPI-IBS患者60例及30例对照者,结肠镜下活检回盲部黏膜标本,采用免疫组织化学法检测其肠黏膜SP、IL-2、IFN-γ、SPR与5-HT的表达,肥大细胞(mast cells,MC)采用甲苯胺蓝染色.结果:PI-IBS患者的SP表达分别高于non-PI-IBS与对照组(t=2.5,2.8,P<0.01);PI-IBS患者的MC表达分别高于non-PI-IBS与对照组(t=11.5,12.1,P<0.01).PI-IBS患者的5-HT表达分别高于non-PI-IBS与对照组(t=13.6,14.1,P<0.01); PI-IBS患者的SPR表达分别高于non-PI-IBS与对照组(t=3.8,6.1,P<0.05); PI-IBS患者的IFN-γ表达分别高于non-PI-IBS与对照组(t=13.8,15.2,P<0.05); PI-IBS患者的IL-2表达分别高于non-PI-IBS与对照组(t=12.6,14.7,P<0.05).PI-IBS患者回盲部黏膜MC和SP的表达呈高度正相关(r=0.71,P<0.01).PI-IBS患者回盲部黏膜5-HT和SPR的表达呈密切相关(r=0.18,P<0.05).IFN-γ、IL-2阳性表达的PI-IBS患者,SP表达高于非PI-IBS组(r=2.2,2.3,P<0.05)和对照组(t=2.3,2.4,P<0.05).结论:肠道感染后,神经纤维在IBS的免疫-神经-内分泌发生机制中的作用至关重要.%AIM: To explore the impact of infection on the immune-nervous-endocrine network in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).METHODS: Forty-five patients with postin-fectious IBS (PI-IBS), 60 patients with non-postinfectious IBS (non-PI-PBS), and 30 healthy controls were included. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to analyze the expression of substance P (SP), interleukin (IL)-2, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), interferon (IFN)-γ, substance P receptor (SPR) in the colon mucosa of these subjects. Mast cells (MCs) were stained with toluidine blue.RESULTS: The expression of SP, MCs, 5-HT, SP-R, IFN-γ, and IL-2 in PI-IBS patients was higher than that in non-PI-IBS patients and

  20. Bifidobacteria and Butyrate-Producing Colon Bacteria: Importance and Strategies for Their Stimulation in the Human Gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Audrey; Selak, Marija; Lantin, David; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing amount of evidence linking certain disorders of the human body to a disturbed gut microbiota, there is a growing interest for compounds that positively influence its composition and activity through diet. Besides the consumption of probiotics to stimulate favorable bacterial communities in the human gastrointestinal tract, prebiotics such as inulin-type fructans (ITF) and arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS) can be consumed to increase the number of bifidobacteria in the colon. Several functions have been attributed to bifidobacteria, encompassing degradation of non-digestible carbohydrates, protection against pathogens, production of vitamin B, antioxidants, and conjugated linoleic acids, and stimulation of the immune system. During life, the numbers of bifidobacteria decrease from up to 90% of the total colon microbiota in vaginally delivered breast-fed infants to <5% in the colon of adults and they decrease even more in that of elderly as well as in patients with certain disorders such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, allergies, and regressive autism. It has been suggested that the bifidogenic effects of ITF and AXOS are the result of strain-specific yet complementary carbohydrate degradation mechanisms within cooperating bifidobacterial consortia. Except for a bifidogenic effect, ITF and AXOS also have shown to cause a butyrogenic effect in the human colon, i.e., an enhancement of colon butyrate production. Butyrate is an essential metabolite in the human colon, as it is the preferred energy source for the colon epithelial cells, contributes to the maintenance of the gut barrier functions, and has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. It has been shown that the butyrogenic effects of ITF and AXOS are the result of cross-feeding interactions between bifidobacteria and butyrate-producing colon bacteria, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (clostridial cluster IV

  1. Polymeric proanthocyanidins are catabolized by human colonic microflora into low-molecular-weight phenolic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déprez, S; Brezillon, C; Rabot, S; Philippe, C; Mila, I; Lapierre, C; Scalbert, A

    2000-11-01

    Polymeric proanthocyanidins are common constituents of many foods and beverages. Their fate in the human body remains largely unknown. Their metabolism by human colonic microflora incubated in vitro in anoxic conditions has been investigated using nonlabeled and (14)C-labeled purified proanthocyanidin polymers. Polymers were almost totally degraded after 48 h of incubation. Phenylacetic, phenylpropionic and phenylvaleric acids, monohydroxylated mainly in the meta or para position, were identified as metabolites by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Yields were similar to those previously reported for flavonoid monomers. These results provide the first evidence of degradation of dietary phenolic polymers into low-molecular-weight aromatic compounds. To understand the nutritional properties of proanthocyanidins, it is therefore essential to consider the biological properties of these metabolites.

  2. The Role of Polymerase Chain Reaction of High-Risk Human Papilloma Virus in the Screening of High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions in the Anal Mucosa of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Males Having Sex with Males

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Hidalgo-Tenorio; Mar Rivero-Rodriguez; Concepción Gil-Anguita; Javier Esquivias; Rodrigo López-Castro; Jessica Ramírez-Taboada; Mercedes López de Hierro; Miguel A López-Ruiz; R Javier Martínez; Llaño, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the advantages of cytology and PCR of high-risk human papilloma virus (PCR HR-HPV) infection in biopsy-derived diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL = AIN2/AIN3) in HIV-positive men having sex with men (MSM). Methods This is a single-centered study conducted between May 2010 and May 2014 in patients (n = 201, mean age 37 years) recruited from our outpatient clinic. Samples of anal canal mucosa were taken into liquid medium for PCR HPV analysis a...

  3. Effect of caffeic acid esters on carcinogen-induced mutagenicity and human colon adenocarcinoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C V; Desai, D; Kaul, B; Amin, S; Reddy, B S

    1992-11-16

    Propolis, a honey bee hive product, is thought to exhibit a broad spectrum of activities including antibiotic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and tumor growth inhibition; some of the observed biological activities may be due to caffeic acid (cinnamic acid) esters that are present in propolis. In the present study we synthesized three caffeic acid esters, namely methyl caffeate (MC), phenylethyl caffeate (PEC) and phenylethyl dimethylcaffeate (PEDMC) and tested them against the 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl, (DMAB, a colon and mammary carcinogen)-induced mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100. Also, the effect of these agents on the growth of human colon adenocarcinoma, HT-29 cells and activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) was studied. Mutagenicity was induced in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 plus S9 activation using 5 and 10 micrograms DMAB and antimutagenic activities of 0-150 microM MC, 0-60 microM PEC and 0-80 microM PEDMC were determined. The results indicate that MC, PEC and PEDMC were not mutagenic in the Salmonella tester system. DMAB-induced mutagenicity was significantly inhibited with 150 microM MC, 40-60 microM PEC and 40-80 microM PEDMC in both tester systems. Treatment of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells with > 150 microM MC, 30 microM PEC and 20 microM PEDMC significantly inhibited the cell growth and syntheses of RNA, DNA and protein. ODC and PTK activities were also inhibited in HT-29 cells treated with different concentrations of MC, PEC and PEDMC. These results demonstrate that caffeic acid esters which are present in Propolis possess chemopreventive properties when tested in short-term assay systems.

  4. Angiogenesis inhibitor TNP-470 suppresses growth of peritoneal disseminating foci of human colon cancer line Lovo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Fang Fan; Zong-Hai Huang

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of angiogenesis inhibitor TNP-470on peritoneal dissemination of colon cancer in nude mice,METHODS: The MTT assay was used to evaluate theinhibitory effect of TNP-470 on human colon cancer cell lineLovo. Lovo cells were injected into the peritoneal cavity ofBABL/C nu/nu mice and the models of peritonealdissemination were developed. Thirty nude mice wererandomly divided into control and TNP-470-treated group.In TNP-470-treated group, TNP-470 was injectedsubcutaneously every other day from day 1 until sacrifice ordeath (30 mg.kg-1). The control group received a shaminjection of the same volume saline solutionRESULTS: In vltro, TNP-470 inhibited the growth of Lovocells, with its IC50 at 2.14x102μg.L-1 In vivo, TNP-470demonstrated growth inhibition of tumors. Mice body weightand abdominal circumferences were significantly differentbetween TNP-470-treated group (24.5±3.2 g, 7.0±1.1 cm)and control group (29.5±2.1 g, 10.3±1.5 cm), P=0.005 andP=0.001. The number of disseminated foci was significantlydifferent between the control group (92.1±20.6) and theTNP-470-treated group (40.3±12.3), P<0.001. The maximalsize of foci was significantly smaller in TNP-470-treated group(3.3±0.7 mm) than that of control (7.3±2.3 mm), P=0.004.Mean survival time was significantly longer in TNP-470-treated group(98.00±12.06 d) than that in control group(41.86±9.51 d), P<0.001.CONCLUSION: Angiogenesis inhibitor TNP-470 might beeffective in treating peritoneal dissemination of colon cancerand improve the survival rate of nude mice.

  5. Scaffold-Free Coculture Spheroids of Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma Cells and Normal Colonic Fibroblasts Promote Tumorigenicity in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-il Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to form a scaffold-free coculture spheroid model of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CACs and normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs and to use the spheroids to investigate the role of NCFs in the tumorigenicity of CACs in nude mice. We analysed three-dimensional (3D scaffold-free coculture spheroids of CACs and NCFs. CAC Matrigel invasion assays and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice were performed to examine the effect of NCFs on CAC invasive behaviour and tumorigenicity in 3D spheroids. We investigated the expression pattern of fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α by immunohistochemical staining. CAC monocultures did not form densely-packed 3D spheroids, whereas cocultured CACs and NCFs formed 3D spheroids. The 3D coculture spheroids seeded on a Matrigel extracellular matrix showed higher CAC invasiveness compared to CACs alone or CACs and NCFs in suspension. 3D spheroids injected into nude mice generated more and faster-growing tumors compared to CACs alone or mixed suspensions consisting of CACs and NCFs. FAP-α was expressed in NCFs-CACs cocultures and xenograft tumors, whereas monocultures of NCFs or CACs were negative for FAP-α expression. Our findings provide evidence that the interaction between CACs and NCFs is essential for the tumorigenicity of cancer cells as well as for tumor propagation.

  6. Colon distention induces persistent visceral hypersensitivity by mechanotranscription of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, You-Min; Fu, Yu; Wu, Chester C; Xu, Guang-Yin; Huang, Li-Yen; Shi, Xuan-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal pain and distention are major complaints in irritable bowel syndrome. Abdominal distention is mainly attributed to intraluminal retention of gas or solid contents, which may cause mechanical stress to the gut wall. Visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) may account for abdominal pain. We sought to determine whether tonic colon distention causes persistent VHS and if so whether mechanical stress-induced expression (mechanotranscription) of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a role in VHS. Human colonic SMCs were isolated and stretched in vitro to investigate whether mechanical stress upregulates expression of the pain mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Rat colon was distended with a 5-cm-long balloon, and gene expression of COX-2, visceromotor response (VMR), and sensory neuron excitability were determined. Static stretch of colonic SMCs induced marked expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein in a force- and time-dependent manner. Subnoxious tonic distention of the distal colon at ∼30-40 mmHg for 20 or 40 min induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in colonic smooth muscle, but not in the mucosa layer. Lumen distention also increased VMR in a force- and time-dependent manner. The increase of VMR persisted for at least 3 days. Patch-clamp experiments showed that the excitability of colon projecting sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia was markedly augmented, 24 h after lumen distention. Administration of COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 partially but significantly attenuated distention-induced VHS. In conclusion, tonic lumen distention upregulates expression of COX-2 in colonic SMC, and COX-2 contributes to persistent VHS.

  7. Genetics of the pig tapeworm in madagascar reveal a history of human dispersal and colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Yanagida

    Full Text Available An intricate history of human dispersal and geographic colonization has strongly affected the distribution of human pathogens. The pig tapeworm Taenia solium occurs throughout the world as the causative agent of cysticercosis, one of the most serious neglected tropical diseases. Discrete genetic lineages of T. solium in Asia and Africa/Latin America are geographically disjunct; only in Madagascar are they sympatric. Linguistic, archaeological and genetic evidence has indicated that the people in Madagascar have mixed ancestry from Island Southeast Asia and East Africa. Hence, anthropogenic introduction of the tapeworm from Southeast Asia and Africa had been postulated. This study shows that the major mitochondrial haplotype of T. solium in Madagascar is closely related to those from the Indian Subcontinent. Parasitological evidence presented here, and human genetics previously reported, support the hypothesis of an Indian influence on Malagasy culture coinciding with periods of early human migration onto the island. We also found evidence of nuclear-mitochondrial discordance in single tapeworms, indicating unexpected cross-fertilization between the two lineages of T. solium. Analyses of genetic and geographic populations of T. solium in Madagascar will shed light on apparently rapid evolution of this organism driven by recent (<2,000 yr human migrations, following tens of thousands of years of geographic isolation.

  8. Colonic urticaria pattern due to early ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, H.M.; Goldberg, H.I.; Axel, L.

    1981-05-15

    The unusual radiographic pattern of bleb-like mounds on the surface of the colon mucosa, previously described as colonic urticaria, was seen in 3 patients in whom no allergic state was present. This urticaria-like pattern was due to colonic distention in all 3, and represented only submucosal edema on the gross and microscopic specimens. We hypothesize that this pattern is due to early changes of ischemia caused by colon distention.

  9. Effective in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer to intestinal mucosa by VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasahara Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer to the gastrointestinal (GI mucosa is a therapeutic strategy which could prove particularly advantageous for treatment of various hereditary and acquired intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, GI infections, and cancer. Methods We evaluated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein envelope (VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV for efficacy of gene transfer to both murine rectosigmoid colon in vivo and human colon explants ex vivo. LV encoding beta-galactosidase (LV-β-Gal or firefly-luciferase (LV-fLuc reporter genes were administered by intrarectal instillation in mice, or applied topically for ex vivo transduction of human