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Sample records for human clinical samples

  1. Isolation and clinical sample typing of human leptospirosis cases in Argentina.

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    Chiani, Yosena; Jacob, Paulina; Varni, Vanina; Landolt, Noelia; Schmeling, María Fernanda; Pujato, Nazarena; Caimi, Karina; Vanasco, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Leptospira typing is carried out using isolated strains. Because of difficulties in obtaining them, direct identification of infective Leptospira in clinical samples is a high priority. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) proved highly discriminatory for seven pathogenic species of Leptospira, allowing isolate characterization and robust assignment to species, in addition to phylogenetic evidence for the relatedness between species. In this study we characterized Leptospira strains circulating in Argentina, using typing methods applied to human clinical samples and isolates. Phylogenetic studies based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences enabled typing of 8 isolates (6 Leptospira interrogans, one Leptospira wolffii and one Leptospira broomii) and 58 out of 85 (68.2%) clinical samples (55 L. interrogans, 2 Leptospira meyeri, and one Leptospira kirschneri). MLST results for the L. interrogans isolates indicated that five were probably Canicola serogroup (ST37) and one was probably Icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup (ST17). Eleven clinical samples (21.6%), provided MLST interpretable data: five were probably Pyrogenes serogroup (ST13), four Sejroe (ST20), one Autumnalis (ST22) and one Canicola (ST37). To the best of our knowledge this study is the first report of the use of an MLST typing scheme with seven loci to identify Leptospira directly from clinical samples in Argentina. The use of clinical samples presents the advantage of the possibility of knowing the infecting strain without resorting to isolates. This study also allowed, for the first time, the characterization of isolates of intermediate pathogenicity species (L. wolffii and L. broomii) from symptomatic patients.

  2. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in a clinic sample of transsexuals in Italy.

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    Loverro, Giuseppe; Di Naro, Edoardo; Caringella, Anna Maria; De Robertis, Anna Lisa; Loconsole, Daniela; Chironna, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Detectable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Reports on the prevalence of detectable HPV DNA among transsexuals (not sex workers) are scarce. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of detectable HPV DNA in a clinic sample of transsexuals and to assess the relationship between detectable HPV DNA and cytological outcomes. Clinical samples (oral, anal, vaginal, cervicovaginal and penile scraped cells) from 35 transsexuals (surgically treated and surgically untreated) who attended the outpatient Clinic of Gender Identity Dysphoria of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Policlinico Hospital (Bari, Italy) were collected for cytological analysis and HPV DNA detection and typing. All enrolled subjects answered an anonymous structured questionnaire about their sexual habits. Serological status for other sexually transmitted diseases (hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), HIV and syphilis) was also evaluated. HPV DNA was detected in 14 of 35 patients (40.0%). The prevalence of detectable HPV DNA was 38.2% (13/34) in tested anal samples, 9.1% (2/22) in vaginal samples and 8.3% (1/12) in penile samples. Oncogenic HPV genotypes have been detected in 93% of HPV-positive transsexuals. More than one-third (35.7%) of HPV-positive transsexuals were infected with at least one of the four vaccine-preventable genotypes, 6, 11, 16 and 18. The high rate of detectable HPV DNA by oncogenic types suggests that periodic cytological screening and clinical evaluation may be necessary since transsexuals are at high risk of anogenital cancer. Also promoting HPV vaccination in younger subjects may be advisable. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Genotyping of cystic echinococcosis isolates from clinical samples of human and domestic animals

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    S.A. Fadhil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cystic hydatid disease is a cosmopolitan important disease in both human and animals. Many strains were investigated in this parasite. The aim of study was to characterize genotype variations of Echinococcus granulosus isolates collected from human and domestic animals in Al-Qadisiyah province/ Iraq based on sequencing of nad1 mitochondrial gene. Eighty hydatid cysts of human (12, sheep (15, cattle (36, and camels (17 were collected from hospital and slaughter house of the province, during October 2014 to June 2015; microscopic examination was made for cysts fluid to determine the fertility. DNAs extraction was done for each sample in addition to purify and concentrate of extracted DNA samples was performed to determine nad1 (400bp gene used conventional PCR method. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using NCBI-Blast Alignment identification and Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean. Twenty five (10 from human and 5 from each studied animals samples were chosen due to their fertility and high DNA purity, in which three strains (genotypes were investigated including sheep strain (G1 40%, buffalo strain (G3 48% and camel strain (G6 12%, where human samples related to G1(20% and G3(80%; sheep samples related to G1(80% and G3(20%; cattle samples related to G1(60%, G3 (20% and G6 (20%; camels samples related to G1(20%, G3(40% and G6(40%. The dominant strain is a buffalo strain (G3; both of buffalo strain (G3 and sheep strain (G1 represented the actual source of human infection. There is no host specificity of detected genotypes.

  4. Evaluation of the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with metabolic activity in culture-negative human clinical samples.

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    Cubero, N; Esteban, J; Palenque, E; Rosell, A; Garcia, M J

    2013-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is assumed to remain in a quiescent state during latent infection, being unable to grow in culture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the detection of viable but non-cultivable bacilli with metabolic activity in human clinical samples using a procedure that is independent of the immunological status of the patient. The study was performed on 66 human clinical samples, from patients subjected to routine diagnosis to rule out a mycobacterial infection. Specimens from pulmonary and extra-pulmonary origins were verified to contain human DNA before testing for M. tuberculosis DNA, rRNA and transient RNA by real-time quantitative PCR. Clinical records of 55 patients were also reviewed. We were able to detect viable but non-cultivable bacilli with a metabolic activity in both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary samples. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RNA was detected in the majority of culture-positive samples whereas it was detected in one-third of culture-negative samples, 20% of them showed metabolic activity. Amplifications of the ftsZ gene and particularly of the main promoter of the ribosomal operon rrnA, namely PCL1, seem to be good targets to detect active bacilli putatively involved in latent infection. Moreover, this last target would provide information on the basal metabolic activity of the bacilli detected. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  5. Molecular identification of nocardia isolates from clinical samples and an overview of human nocardiosis in Brazil.

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    Paulo Victor Pereira Baio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nocardia sp. causes a variety of clinical presentations. The incidence of nocardiosis varies geographically according to several factors, such as the prevalence of HIV infections, transplants, neoplastic and rheumatic diseases, as well as climate, socio-economic conditions and laboratory procedures for Nocardia detection and identification. In Brazil the paucity of clinical reports of Nocardia infections suggests that this genus may be underestimated as a cause of human diseases and/or either neglected or misidentified in laboratory specimens. Accurate identification of Nocardia species has become increasingly important for clinical and epidemiological investigations. In this study, seven clinical Nocardia isolates were identified by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA and their antimicrobial susceptibility was also determined. Most Nocardia isolates were associated to pulmonary disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The majority of Brazilian human isolates in cases reported in literature were identified as Nocardia sp. Molecular characterization was used for species identification of Nocardia nova, Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, Nocardia asiatica and Nocardia exalbida/gamkensis. Data indicated that molecular analysis provided a different Nocardia speciation than the initial biochemical identification for most Brazilian isolates. All Nocardia isolates showed susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, the antimicrobial of choice in the treatment nocardiosis. N. nova isolated from different clinical specimens from one patient showed identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and two distinct clones. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although Brazil is the world's fifth-largest country in terms of land mass and population, pulmonary, extrapulmonary and systemic forms of nocardiosis were reported in only 6 of the 26 Brazilian states from 1970 to 2013. A least 33.8% of these 46 cases of nocardiosis proved fatal. Interestingly, coinfection

  6. Detection of head-to-tail DNA sequences of human bocavirus in clinical samples.

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    Jessica Lüsebrink

    Full Text Available Parvoviruses are single stranded DNA viruses that replicate in a so called "rolling-hairpin" mechanism, a variant of the rolling circle replication known for bacteriophages like φX174. The replication intermediates of parvoviruses thus are concatemers of head-to-head or tail-to-tail structure. Surprisingly, in case of the novel human bocavirus, neither head-to-head nor tail-to-tail DNA sequences were detected in clinical isolates; in contrast head-to-tail DNA sequences were identified by PCR and sequencing. Thereby, the head-to-tail sequences were linked by a novel sequence of 54 bp of which 20 bp also occur as conserved structures of the palindromic ends of parvovirus MVC which in turn is a close relative to human bocavirus.

  7. Detection of Clostridium tetani in human clinical samples using tetX specific primers targeting the neurotoxin.

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    Ganesh, Madhu; Sheikh, Nasira K; Shah, Pooja; Mehetre, Gajanan; Dharne, Mahesh S; Nagoba, Basavraj S

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus resulting from ear injury remains an important health problem, particularly in the developing world. We report the successful detection of Clostridium tetani using tetX specific primers targeting the Cl. tetani neurotoxin. The sample was obtained from an ear discharge of a case of otogenic tetanus in a 2-year-old male child. Based on the culture results of the ear discharge, Gram staining and virulence testing by genotyping, a diagnosis of tetanus was confirmed. This is the first report from India on the successful detection of Cl. tetani in a human clinical sample using tetX specific primers targeting the Cl. tetani neurotoxin.

  8. Human papillomavirus testing by self-sampling: assessment of accuracy in an unsupervised clinical setting

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    Szarewski, Anne; Cadman, Louise; Mallett, Susan; Austin, Janet; Londesborough, Philip; Waller, Jo; Wardle, Jane; Altman, Douglas G; Cuzick, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the performance and acceptability of unsupervised self-sampling with clinician sampling for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types for the first time in a UK screening setting. Setting: Nine hundred and twenty women, from two demographically different centres, attending for routine cervical smear testing Methods: Women performed an unsupervised HPV self-test. Immediately afterwards, a doctor or nurse took an HPV test and cervical smear. Women with an abnormality on any test were offered colposcopy. Results: Twenty-one high-grade and 39 low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) were detected. The sensitivity for high-grade disease (CIN2+) for the self HPV test was 81% (95% confidence interval [CI] 60–92), clinician HPV test 100% (95% CI 85–100), cytology 81% (95% CI 60–92). The sensitivity of both HPV tests to detect high- and low-grade cervical neoplasia was much higher than that of cytology (self-test 77% [95%CI 65–86], clinician test 80% [95% CI 68–88], cytology 48% [95% CI 36–61]). For both high-grade alone, and high and low grades together, the specificity was significantly higher for cytology (greater than 95%) than either HPV test (between 82% and 87%). The self-test proved highly acceptable to women and they reported that the instructions were easy to understand irrespective of educational level. Conclusions: Our results suggest that it would be reasonable to offer HPV self-testing to women who are reluctant to attend for cervical smears. This approach should now be directly evaluated among women who have been non-attenders in a cervical screening programme. PMID:17362570

  9. High risk human papillomavirus genotyping in clinical samples: evaluation of different commercial tests.

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    Paolini, F; Rollo, F; Brandi, R; Benevolo, M; Mariani, L; Cercato, M C; Vocaturo, A; Venuti, A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the performance of several commercial human papillomavirus (HPV) tests in a cohort of 281 women. The hybrid capture II, the PreTect-HPV-Proofer, the linear array, and DR.HPVTMIVD were utilized to detect and type HPV in parallel with in-house PCR tests followed by direct automated sequencing or by sub-cloning and sequencing. The concordance levels along with other tests were evaluated with a Cohen's K value varying between 0.60 to 0.88, indicating good correlation with nearly perfect agreement between hybrid capture II, (HCII) and the linear array test. High sensitivity was recorded by the linear array and HCII with 100% (95% CI, 0.8021 to 1.0000) detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) III by both methods. Conversely, the PreTect-HPV-Proofer showed high specificity with 12% (95% CI, 0.7966 to 0.9163) positivity on normal samples. The genotyping analysis showed that agreement among tests was only low to moderate with great differences between different HPV types. Multiple infections were detected with poor concordance and sub-cloning assays revealed the presence of a lower number of HPV in comparison to the other methods. In summary, the use of different HPV tests applied to the same group of cervical smears may possibly lead to incongruent results, suggesting the need to standardize type-specific sensitivity of genotyping methods and the need to evaluate their accuracy in detecting multiple HPV infections. This would be a prerequisite for the use of genotyping assays in cervical cancer screening programs.

  10. Genotypic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii Strains Associated with Human Toxoplasmosis in Spain: Direct Analysis from Clinical Samples

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    Fuentes, Isabel; Rubio, Jose M.; Ramírez, Carmen; Alvar, Jorge

    2001-01-01

    Genetic analysis of the SAG2 locus was performed to determine the prevalence of the different genotypes of Toxoplasma gondii (strain types I, II, and III) associated with human toxoplasmosis in Spain. This determination was made directly from primary clinical samples, obviating the previous process of isolation in mice or cell culture. A total of 34 isolates of T. gondii, collected from immunocompromised patients and congenital infection cases, were analyzed. Restriction fragment length polymorphism in PCR-amplified SAG2 products was used to group strains into one of the three genotypes of T. gondii. Complete characterization of the SAG2 gene was successful in 76.5% of the cases, demonstrating the feasibility of direct genotype analysis from clinical samples of different origins. Strains of T. gondii type II were the most prevalent in immunocompromised patients, with 52% of cases, while strains of type I were present in 75% of the congenital infection cases. These data differ from previous reports that show type II strains to be mostly associated with all kinds of human toxoplasmosis. These differences might be an effect of selection in the process of culture and isolation of the samples performed by other researchers prior to strain characterization. PMID:11283088

  11. Comparison of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tropism Profiles in Clinical Samples by the Trofile and MT-2 Assays▿

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    Coakley, Eoin; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Huang, Wei; Mangas-Ruiz, Marga; Maurer, Irma; Harskamp, Agnes M.; Gupta, Soumi; Lie, Yolanda; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B.

    2009-01-01

    The recent availability of CCR5 antagonists as anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapeutics has highlighted the need to accurately identify CXCR4-using variants in patient samples when use of this new drug class is considered. The Trofile assay (Monogram Biosciences) has become the method that is the most widely used to define tropism in the clinic prior to the use of a CCR5 antagonist. By comparison, the MT-2 assay has been used since early in the HIV epidemic to define tropism in clinical specimens. Given that there are few data from direct comparisons of these two assays, we evaluated the performance of the plasma-based Trofile assay and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based MT-2 assay for the detection of CXCR4 use in defining the tropism of HIV isolates derived from clinical samples. The various samples used for this comparison were derived from participants of the Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV infection and AIDS who underwent consecutive MT-2 assay testing of their PBMCs at approximately 3-month intervals. This unique sample set was specifically selected because consecutive MT-2 assays had demonstrated a shift from negative to positive in PBMCs, reflecting the first emergence of CXCR4-using virus in PBMCs above the level of detection of the assay in these individuals. Trofile testing was performed with clonal HIV type 1 (HIV-1) variants (n = 21), MT-2 cell culture-derived cells (n = 20) and supernatants (n = 42), and plasma samples (n = 76). Among the clonal HIV-1 variants and MT-2 cell culture-derived samples, the results of the Trofile and MT-2 assays demonstrated a high degree of concordance (95% to 98%). Among consecutive plasma samples, detection of CXCR4-using virus was at or before the time of first detection by the MT-2 assay in 5/10 patients by the original Trofile assay and in 9/10 patients by the enhanced-sensitivity Trofile assay. Differences in the time to the first detection of CXCR4 use between the MT-2 assay (PBMCs

  12. Genotyping of human parvovirus B19 in clinical samples from Brazil and Paraguay using heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing.

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    Mendonça, Marcos César Lima de; Ferreira, Ana Maria de Amorim; Santos, Marta Gonçalves Matos dos; Oviedo, Elva Cristina; Bello, Maria Sônia Dal; Siqueira, Marilda Mendonça; Maceira, Juan Manuel Piñeiro; von Hubinger, Maria Genoveva; Couceiro, José Nelson dos Santos Silva

    2011-06-01

    Heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing were utilised to genotype human parvovirus B19 samples from Brazil and Paraguay. Ninety-seven serum samples were collected from individuals presenting with abortion or erythema infectiosum, arthropathies, severe anaemia and transient aplastic crisis; two additional skin samples were collected by biopsy. After the procedure, all clinical samples were classified as genotype 1.

  13. Genotyping of human parvovirus B19 in clinical samples from Brazil and Paraguay using heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing

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    Marcos César Lima de Mendonça

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Heteroduplex mobility assay, single-stranded conformation polymorphism and nucleotide sequencing were utilised to genotype human parvovirus B19 samples from Brazil and Paraguay. Ninety-seven serum samples were collected from individuals presenting with abortion or erythema infectiosum, arthropathies, severe anaemia and transient aplastic crisis; two additional skin samples were collected by biopsy. After the procedure, all clinical samples were classified as genotype 1.

  14. Bottom–up protein identifications from microliter quantities of individual human tear samples. Important steps towards clinical relevance.

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    Peter Raus

    2015-12-01

    With 375 confidently identified proteins in the healthy adult tear, the obtained results are comprehensive and in large agreement with previously published observations on pooled samples of multiple patients. We conclude that, to a limited extent, bottom–up tear protein identifications from individual patients may have clinical relevance.

  15. A real-time ITS1-PCR based method in the diagnosis and species identification of Leishmania parasite from human and dog clinical samples in Turkey.

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    Toz, Seray Ozensoy; Culha, Gulnaz; Zeyrek, Fadile Yıldız; Ertabaklar, Hatice; Alkan, M Ziya; Vardarlı, Aslı Tetik; Gunduz, Cumhur; Ozbel, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by L. infantum and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by L. tropica and L. infantum have been reported in Turkey. L. infantum is also responsible for canine leishmaniasis (CanL) and it is widely common in the country. The main aim of the present study was to design a real-time PCR method based on the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region in the diagnosis of all clinical forms of leishmaniasis in Mediterranean, and to identify the species directly from clinical samples. Totally, 315 clinical specimens, human/canine visceral (blood, bone marrow, lymph node) and cutaneous (lesion aspiration) samples, and 51 Turkish Leishmania isolates typed by isoenzymatic method were included in the study. For optimization, DNA samples of the 34 strains were amplified by conventional ITS1-PCR and then sequenced for designing the primers and probes, allowing the species identification. Following the validation with the isolates, the test was applied on clinical samples and melting temperatures were used for genotyping. A group of PCR products were further sequenced for confirmation and assigning the inter- and intraspecies heterogeneity. The diagnosis of leishmaniasis is successfully achieved by the new real-time PCR method, and the test identified 80.43% of human and canine VL samples as L.infantum and 6.52% as L.tropica; 52.46% of CL samples as L. infantum and 26.90% as L. tropica. In 13.04% of visceral and 20.62% of cutaneous samples, two peaks were observed. However, the higher peak was found to be concordant with the sequencing results in 96.96%, in terms of species identification. The real-time ITS1 PCR assay clearly identified the leishmanial species in 81.58% of all clinical samples. Genotypic variations of Leishmania parasites in Turkey within species and intraspecies were observed, and L. tropica is also found as causative agent of human and canine VL in Turkey.

  16. A real-time ITS1-PCR based method in the diagnosis and species identification of Leishmania parasite from human and dog clinical samples in Turkey.

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    Seray Ozensoy Toz

    Full Text Available Human visceral leishmaniasis (VL caused by L. infantum and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL caused by L. tropica and L. infantum have been reported in Turkey. L. infantum is also responsible for canine leishmaniasis (CanL and it is widely common in the country. The main aim of the present study was to design a real-time PCR method based on the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 region in the diagnosis of all clinical forms of leishmaniasis in Mediterranean, and to identify the species directly from clinical samples. Totally, 315 clinical specimens, human/canine visceral (blood, bone marrow, lymph node and cutaneous (lesion aspiration samples, and 51 Turkish Leishmania isolates typed by isoenzymatic method were included in the study. For optimization, DNA samples of the 34 strains were amplified by conventional ITS1-PCR and then sequenced for designing the primers and probes, allowing the species identification. Following the validation with the isolates, the test was applied on clinical samples and melting temperatures were used for genotyping. A group of PCR products were further sequenced for confirmation and assigning the inter- and intraspecies heterogeneity. The diagnosis of leishmaniasis is successfully achieved by the new real-time PCR method, and the test identified 80.43% of human and canine VL samples as L.infantum and 6.52% as L.tropica; 52.46% of CL samples as L. infantum and 26.90% as L. tropica. In 13.04% of visceral and 20.62% of cutaneous samples, two peaks were observed. However, the higher peak was found to be concordant with the sequencing results in 96.96%, in terms of species identification. The real-time ITS1 PCR assay clearly identified the leishmanial species in 81.58% of all clinical samples. Genotypic variations of Leishmania parasites in Turkey within species and intraspecies were observed, and L. tropica is also found as causative agent of human and canine VL in Turkey.

  17. Human Cytomegalovirus and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: Restriction of Primary Isolation to Blood Samples and Susceptibilities of Clinical Isolates from Other Sources to Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients with disseminated infection, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is widespread in the microvascular endothelium of multiple organs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used in parallel to human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF) to recover HCMV from blood samples of immunocompromised patients. Using the shell vial technique, comparable median numbers of p72-positive HUVEC and HELF cells were found with the 26 HCMV-positive buffy coat samples out of 150 ex...

  18. A rapid DNA extraction method from culture and clinical samples. Suitable for the detection of human cytomegalovirus by the polymerase chain reaction.

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    Zandotti, C; De Lamballerie, X; Guignole-Vignoli, C; Bollet, C; De Micco, P

    1993-02-01

    We propose an one-step DNA extraction method suitable for the polymerase chain reaction. This procedure utilizes Chelex 100, a chelating in exchange resin. This technique was compared with a traditional technique (proteinase K lysis, phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation) for isolation of human cytomegalovirus DNA from clinical samples. The procedure using Chelex 100 appeared to be a simple and fast extraction method for human cytomegalovirus DNA.

  19. Dermabacter hominis: a usually daptomycin-resistant gram-positive organism infrequently isolated from human clinical samples

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Natal, I.; Sáez-Nieto, J A; Medina-Pascual, M J; Albersmeier, A.; Valdezate, S.; Guerra-Laso, J M; H. Rodríguez; Marrodán, T; Parras, T; TAUCH, A.; Soriano, F

    2014-01-01

    During a 12-year period, Dermabacter hominis was isolated from 21 clinical samples belonging to 14 patients attending a tertiary hospital in León, Spain. Samples included blood cultures (14), peritoneal dialysis catheter exit sites (three), cutaneous abscesses (two), an infected vascular catheter (one) and a wound swab (one). Identification was made by API Coryne™ V2.0, Biolog™ GP2 and 16S rRNA gene amplification. Six febrile patients had positive blood cultures (one, two or three sets) and a...

  20. Detection of Rare Drug Resistance Mutations by Digital PCR in a Human Influenza A Virus Model System and Clinical Samples.

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    Whale, Alexandra S; Bushell, Claire A; Grant, Paul R; Cowen, Simon; Gutierrez-Aguirre, Ion; O'Sullivan, Denise M; Žel, Jana; Milavec, Mojca; Foy, Carole A; Nastouli, Eleni; Garson, Jeremy A; Huggett, Jim F

    2016-02-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is being increasingly used for the quantification of sequence variations, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), due to its high accuracy and precision in comparison with techniques such as quantitative PCR (qPCR) and melt curve analysis. To develop and evaluate dPCR for SNP detection using DNA, RNA, and clinical samples, an influenza virus model of resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) was used. First, this study was able to recognize and reduce off-target amplification in dPCR quantification, thereby enabling technical sensitivities down to 0.1% SNP abundance at a range of template concentrations, a 50-fold improvement on the qPCR assay used routinely in the clinic. Second, a method was developed for determining the false-positive rate (background) signal. Finally, comparison of dPCR with qPCR results on clinical samples demonstrated the potential impact dPCR could have on clinical research and patient management by earlier (trace) detection of rare drug-resistant sequence variants. Ultimately this could reduce the quantity of ineffective drugs taken and facilitate early switching to alternative medication when available. In the short term such methods could advance our understanding of microbial dynamics and therapeutic responses in a range of infectious diseases such as HIV, viral hepatitis, and tuberculosis. Furthermore, the findings presented here are directly relevant to other diagnostic areas, such as the detection of rare SNPs in malignancy, monitoring of graft rejection, and fetal screening. Copyright © 2016 Whale et al.

  1. Gene expression data from acetaminophen-induced toxicity in human hepatic in vitro systems and clinical liver samples

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    Robim M. Rodrigues

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This data set is composed of transcriptomics analyses of (i liver samples from patients suffering from acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (ALF and (ii hepatic cell systems exposed to acetaminophen and their respective controls. The in vitro systems include widely employed cell lines i.e. HepaRG and HepG2 cells as well as a novel stem cell-derived model i.e. human skin-precursors-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hSKP-HPC. Data from primary human hepatocytes was also added to the data set “Open TG-GATEs: a large-scale toxicogenomics database” (Igarashi et al., 2015 [1]. Changes in gene expression due to acetaminophen intoxication as well as comparative information between human in vivo and in vitro samples are provided. The microarray data have been deposited in NCBI׳s Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GEO: GSE74000. The provided data is used to evaluate the predictive capacity of each hepatic in vitro system and can be directly compared with large-scale publically available toxicogenomics databases. Further interpretation and discussion of these data feature in the corresponding research article “Toxicogenomics-based prediction of acetaminophen-induced liver injury using human hepatic cell systems” (Rodrigues et al., 2016 [2].

  2. Electrochemical genosensor array for the simultaneous detection of multiple high-risk human papillomavirus sequences in clinical samples

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    Civit, Laia [Nanobiotechnology and Bioanalysis Group, Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Fragoso, Alex, E-mail: alex.fragoso@urv.cat [Nanobiotechnology and Bioanalysis Group, Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Hoelters, Sebastian; Duerst, Matthias [Department for Gynecology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); O' Sullivan, Ciara K., E-mail: ciara.osullivan@urv.cat [Nanobiotechnology and Bioanalysis Group, Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Passeig Lluis Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-risk human papillomavirus is detected in virtually all-invasive cervical cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrochemical genosensor for simultaneous detection of multiple high-risk HPV applied to cervical scrape samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent correlation with HPV genotyping carried out within a hospital laboratory. - Abstract: An electrochemical genosensor array for the simultaneous detection of three high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences, HPV16, 18 and 45, exhibiting high sensitivity and selectivity is presented. The electrodes of a 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 array were modified via co-immobilization of a 1:100 (mol/mol) mixture of a thiolated probe and an oligoethyleneglycol-terminated bipodal thiol. Detection of synthetic and PCR products was carried out in a sandwich type format, with the target hybridized between a surface immobilized probe and a horseradish peroxidase-labelled secondary reporter probe. The detection limits obtained in the detection of each individual target were in the pM range, allowing the application of this sensor for the detection of samples obtained from PCR amplification of cervical scrape samples. The results obtained exhibited an excellent correlation with the HPV genotyping carried out within a hospital laboratory. Multiplexing and cross-reactivity studies demonstrated high selectivity over potential interfering sequences, facilitating application of the developed platform for the high-throughput screening of multiple high-risk DNA sequences.

  3. Sampling human indigenous saliva peptidome using a lollipop-like ultrafiltration probe: simplify and enhance peptide detection for clinical mass spectrometry.

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    Zhu, Wenhong; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-08-07

    Although human saliva proteome and peptidome have been revealed they were majorly identified from tryptic digests of saliva proteins. Identification of indigenous peptidome of human saliva without prior digestion with exogenous enzymes becomes imperative, since native peptides in human saliva provide potential values for diagnosing disease, predicting disease progression, and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Appropriate sampling is a critical step for enhancement of identification of human indigenous saliva peptidome. Traditional methods of sampling human saliva involving centrifugation to remove debris may be too time-consuming to be applicable for clinical use. Furthermore, debris removal by centrifugation may be unable to clean most of the infected pathogens and remove the high abundance proteins that often hinder the identification of low abundance peptidome. Conventional proteomic approaches that primarily utilize two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) gels in conjugation with in-gel digestion are capable of identifying many saliva proteins. However, this approach is generally not sufficiently sensitive to detect low abundance peptides/proteins. Liquid chromatography-Mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics is an alternative that can identify proteins without prior 2-DE separation. Although this approach provides higher sensitivity, it generally needs prior sample pre-fractionation and pre-digestion with trypsin, which makes it difficult for clinical use. To circumvent the hindrance in mass spectrometry due to sample preparation, we have developed a technique called capillary ultrafiltration (CUF) probes. Data from our laboratory demonstrated that the CUF probes are capable of capturing proteins in vivo from various microenvironments in animals in a dynamic and minimally invasive manner. No centrifugation is needed since a negative pressure is created by simply syringe withdrawing during sample collection. The CUF probes combined with LC-MS have

  4. Detection of Achromobacter xylosoxidans in hospital, domestic, and outdoor environmental samples and comparison with human clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoureux, Lucie; Bador, Julien; Fardeheb, Sakina; Mabille, Cédric; Couchot, Charlyne; Massip, Clémence; Salignon, Anne-Lise; Berlie, Guillaume; Varin, Véronique; Neuwirth, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic nonfermentative Gram-negative rod considered an important emerging pathogen among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients worldwide and among immunocompromised patients. This increased prevalence remains unexplained, and to date no environmental reservoir has been identified. The aim of this study was to identify potential reservoirs of A. xylosoxidans in hospital, domestic, and outdoor environments and to compare the isolates with clinical ones. From 2011 to 2012, 339 samples were collected in Dijon's university hospital, in healthy volunteers' homes in the Dijon area, and in the outdoor environment in Burgundy (soil, water, mud, and plants). We designed a protocol to detect A. xylosoxidans in environmental samples based on a selective medium: MCXVAA (MacConkey agar supplemented with xylose, vancomycin, aztreonam, and amphotericin B). Susceptibility testing, genotypic analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and blaOXA-114 sequencing were performed on the isolates. A total of 50 strains of A. xylosoxidans were detected in hospital (33 isolates), domestic (9 isolates), and outdoor (8 isolates) samples, mainly in hand washing sinks, showers, and water. Most of them were resistant to ciprofloxacin (49 strains). Genotypic analysis and blaOXA-114 sequencing revealed a wide diversity among the isolates, with 35 pulsotypes and 18 variants of oxacillinases. Interestingly, 10 isolates from hospital environment were clonally related to clinical isolates previously recovered from hospitalized patients, and one domestic isolate was identical to one recovered from a CF patient. These results indicate that A. xylosoxidans is commonly distributed in various environments and therefore that CF patients or immunocompromised patients are surrounded by these reservoirs.

  5. Prevalence of AmpC type extended spectrum beta lactamases genes in clinical Samples of E.coli Isolated from Poultry and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Farrokhnazar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of antibiotic resistance among pathogens, particularly in health centers and hospitals, has become a major public health problem. This study identified AmpC-type beta-lactamase against the antibiotic ceftazidime, cefotaxime and cefpodoxime in E.coli isolated from human and poultry and types of producing genes were studied by PCR. In this study, 500 clinical human samples of urine from hospitals of Tehran during 5 months as well as 300 poultry samples were collected and transferred to the microbiology laboratory. Biochemical tests such as TSI, Urea and IMViC were performed on suspected colonies with E.coli. To identify ESBL producing strains, beta-lactamase samples were cultured on Mueller-Hinton agar through antimicrobial susceptibility test by disk agar diffusion based on the standard CLSI for initial screening. PCR reactions were done using specific primers CITM, EBCM, DHAM and MOXM to identify the beta-lactamase AmpC. A number of 200 human and 55 poultry E.coli samples were screened. In human samples, 105 (52.5% were resistant and potential producers of ESBL and AmpC; out of those, 102 (51% produced ESBL and 3 (1.5% potentially produced AmpC. In the study on 55 E.coli isolates from poultry samples based on the results of disk agar diffusion test, 4 (7.2% samples were resistant and potential producers of ESBL. None of the samples were AmpC producers. Through PCR, 2 human samples (1% were CITM positive and one sample (0.5% was DHAM positive. Through the PCR carried out on poultry samples, there were no bands with 4 primers. There was AmpC in human samples; while further studies are required for poultry samples, because poultry significantly contribute in production of food for humans and can be an important source for dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Given the significance of Ampc in providing high levels of beta-lactam antibiotic resistance, particularly third generation cephalosporins which are very common treatments, more

  6. Different EV enrichment methods suitable for clinical settings yield different subpopulations of urinary extracellular vesicles from human samples

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    Felix Royo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Urine sample analysis is irreplaceable as a non-invasive method for disease diagnosis and follow-up. However, in urine samples, non-degraded protein and RNA may be only found in urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs. In recent years, various methods of uEV enrichment using low volumes of urine and unsophisticated equipment have been developed, with variable success. We compared the results of the differential ultracentrifugation procedure with 4 of these methods. The methods tested were a lectin-based purification, Exoquick (System Biosciences, Total Exosome Isolation from Invitrogen and an in-house modified procedure employing the Exosomal RNA Kit from Norgen Biotek Corp. The analysis of selected gene transcripts and protein markers of extracellular vesicles (EVs revealed that each method isolates a different mixture of uEV protein markers. In our conditions, the extraction with Norgen's reagent achieved the best performance in terms of gene transcript and protein detection and reproducibility. By using this method, we were able to detect alterations of EVs protein markers in urine samples from prostate cancer adenoma patients. Taken together, our results show that the isolation of uEVs is feasible from small volumes of urine and avoiding ultracentrifugation, making easier the analysis in a clinical facility. However, caution should be taken in the selection of the enrichment method since they have a differential affinity for protein uEVs markers and by extension for different subpopulation of EVs.

  7. Identification of Opportunistic Pathogenic Bacteria in Drinking Water Samples of Different Rural Health Centers and Their Clinical Impacts on Humans

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    Pavan Kumar Pindi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available International drinking water quality monitoring programs have been established in order to prevent or to reduce the risk of contracting water-related infections. A survey was performed on groundwater-derived drinking water from 13 different hospitals in the Mahabubnagar District. A total of 55 bacterial strains were isolated which belonged to both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. All the taxa were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis based on which they are phylogenetically close to 27 different taxa. Many of the strains are closely related to their phylogenetic neighbors and exhibit from 98.4 to 100% sequence similarity at the 16S rRNA gene sequence level. The most common group was similar to Acinetobacter junii (21.8% and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (10.9% which were shared by 7 and 5 water samples, respectively. Out of 55 isolates, only 3 isolates belonged to coliform group which are Citrobacter freundii and Pantoea anthophila. More than half (52.7%, 29 strains of the phylogenetic neighbors which belonged to 12 groups were reported to be pathogenic and isolated from clinical specimens. Out of 27 representative taxa are affiliated have eight representative genera in drinking water except for those affiliated with the genera Exiguobacterium, Delftia, Kocuria, and Lysinibacillus.

  8. [Clinical research V. Sample size].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Bernal-Rosales, Laura Paola

    2011-01-01

    In clinical research it is impossible and inefficient to study all patients with a specific pathology, so it is necessary to study a sample of them. The estimation of the sample size before starting a study guarantees the stability of the results and allows us to foresee the feasibility of the study depending on the availability of patients and cost. The basic structure of sample size estimation is based on the premise that seeks to demonstrate, among other cases, that the observed difference between two or more maneuvers in the subsequent state is real. Initially, it requires knowing the value of the expected difference (δ) and its data variation (standard deviation). These data are usually obtained from previous studies. Then, other components must be considered: a (alpha), percentage of error in the assertion that the difference between means is real, usually 5 %; and β, error rate accepting the claim that the no-difference between the means is real, usually ranging from 15 to 20 %. Finally, these values are substituted into the formula or in an electronic program for estimating sample size. While summary and dispersion measures vary with the type of variable according to the outcome, the basic structure is the same.

  9. First report of mecC MRSA in human samples from Austria: molecular characteristics and clinical data

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    H. Kerschner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports of mecC methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains have been published from several European countries. We describe the first six mecC MRSA isolates of human origin from Austria and report the application of a rapid PCR test. Candidate isolates (n = 295 received between 2009 and 2013 were investigated phenotypically by cefoxitin screening and streaking on ChromID MRSA plates. The presence of mecC was confirmed in six isolates from blood cultures, wound swabs and screening samples of four female and two male patients (age range 7–89 years by an in-house PCR method and the new Genspeed MRSA test (Greiner Bio-One, Kremsmünster, Austria. The mecC MRSA were further characterized by whole genome sequencing, multilocus sequence and spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Eucast disk-diffusion method and Vitek 2. The six mecC MRSA isolates were from two clonal lineages (CC130, including a new single-locus variant, and CC599 and four different spa types (t843, t1535, t3256, t5930. Analysis for virulence factor genes yielded lukED, eta, etd2 and edin-B (CC130 isolates and tst, lukED, eta and sel (ST599 isolates. The Genspeed MRSA test identified mecC in all isolates whereas Vitek 2 failed to detect methicillin resistance in one isolate. The strains were susceptible to a wide range of non-β-lactam antibiotics. All patients were successfully treated or decolonized. mecC MRSA are present in Austria as colonizers but may also cause infections. Thus, laboratories must choose appropriate test methods such as cefoxitin screening and confirmation using molecular assays specifically targeting mecC.

  10. Occurrence and characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamases producing Escherichia coli in foods of animal origin and human clinical samples in Chhattisgarh, India

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    Bhoomika

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL (blaTEM, blaSHV, and blaCTX-M genes in Escherichia coli isolated from chicken meat, chevon meat, raw milk, and human urine and stool samples collected from tribal districts of Chhattisgarh, viz., Jagdalpur, Dantewada, Kondagaon, and Kanker. Materials and Methods: A total of 330 samples, comprising 98 chicken meat, 82 chevon meat, 90 raw milk, and 60 human urine and stool samples, were processed for isolation of E. coli. Isolates were confirmed biochemically and further tested against commonly used antibiotics to know their resistant pattern. The resistant isolates were tested for ESBL production by phenotypic method followed by characterization with molecular method using multiplex-polymerase chain reaction technique. Results: Overall 57.87% (191/330 samples were found positive for E. coli, which include 66.32% (65/98 chicken meat, 46.34% (38/82 chevon meat, 81.11% (73/90 raw milk, and 25% (15/60 human urine and stool samples. Isolates showed the highest resistance against cefotaxime (41.36% followed by oxytetracycline (34.03%, ampicillin (29.31%, cephalexin (24.60%, cefixime (16.75%, and ceftazidime (13.08%. Phenotypic method detected 10.99% (21/191 isolates as presumptive ESBL producers, however, molecular method detected 3.66% (7/191, 2.09% (4/191, and 0.00% (0/191 prevalence of blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV, respectively. Conclusion: The present study indicates a high prevalence of E. coli in raw chicken meat, chevon meat, and milk due to poor hygienic practices. The antibiotic susceptibility test detected the presence of the resistance pattern against ESBL in E. coli isolated from raw chicken meat, chevon meat, milk, and also in human clinical samples is of great concern. The appearance of E. coli in the human food chain is alarming and requires adaptation of hygienic practices and stipulate use of antibiotics.

  11. Identification of legionella in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarraud, Sophie; Descours, Ghislaine; Ginevra, Christophe; Lina, Gerard; Etienne, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Currently, several methods are used for the detection of Legionella in clinical samples, and these methods constitute part of the criteria for defining legionellosis cases. Urinary antigen detection is the first-line diagnostic test, although this test is limited to L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) (Helbig et al., J Clin Microbiol 41:838-840, 2003). The use of molecular techniques can improve Legionaire's disease (LD) diagnosis by detecting other serogroups and species (Diederen et al., J Clin Microbiol 46:671-677, 2008). The isolation of Legionella strains from pulmonary samples by axenic culture is still required to perform further epidemiological investigations (Blyth et al., N S W Public Health Bull 20:157-161, 2009; Fields et al., Clin Microbiol Rev 15:506-526, 2002) but demonstrates various sensitivities. Amoebic coculture has been described as a method to recover Legionella from clinical culture-negative specimens (La Scola et al., J Clin Microbiol 39:365-366, 2001; Rowbotham, J Clin Pathol 36:978-986, 1983) and can be proposed for optimizing Legionella strain isolation from samples contaminated by oropharyngeal flora. Identification of Legionella isolates is based on serological characterization, genotypic methods (with sequencing of the mip gene as the standard method) and, more recently, the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) method.This chapter is limited to the identification of Legionella in clinical samples; antibody detection in human serum will not be discussed.

  12. Development of a Multiplex PCR Technique for Detection and Epidemiological Typing of Salmonella in Human Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Juan; Sota, Mertxe; Vivanco, Ana Belén; Perales, Ildefonso; Cisterna, Ramón; Rementeria, Aitor; Garaizar, Javier

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a multiplex PCR assay for Salmonella detection and epidemiological typing. Six sets of primers were designed to detect the major Salmonella serotypes and phage types in Spain. An internal amplification control was designed in order to detect PCR inhibition. The different amplification profiles obtained allowed us to detect Salmonella bacteria and to distinguish the clinically prevalent Salmonella enterica serotypes Enteritidis, Typhimurium and subspecies I serotype 4,5,12:i:−. Using this method, we could detect a specific band for DT104 and U302 phage types in Salmonella serotype Typhimurium. Salmonella enterica serotype Hadar and other C2 serogroup strains showed two specific band profiles. In the validation stage, the assay was reproducible for all serotypes studied, apart from some C2 serogroup strains. When the technique was applied to clinical stool specimens, the prevalent serotypes Enteritidis and Typhimurium were detected with a sensitivity of 93%, specificity of 100%, and efficiency of 98%. Also, a low PCR inhibition rate (8%) was obtained. The overall agreement of the multiplex PCR with conventional culture-based techniques was 95% for Salmonella typing using Cohen's kappa index. PMID:15071035

  13. A Point-of-Care Immunosensor for Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Clinical Urine Samples Using a Cuneated Polysilicon Nanogap Lab-on-Chip.

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    S R Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, a glycoprotein hormone secreted from the placenta, is a key molecule that indicates pregnancy. Here, we have designed a cost-effective, label-free, in situ point-of-care (POC immunosensor to estimate hCG using a cuneated 25 nm polysilicon nanogap electrode. A tiny chip with the dimensions of 20.5 × 12.5 mm was fabricated using conventional lithography and size expansion techniques. Furthermore, the sensing surface was functionalized by (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and quantitatively measured the variations in hCG levels from clinically obtained human urine samples. The dielectric properties of the present sensor are shown with a capacitance above 40 nF for samples from pregnant women; it was lower with samples from non-pregnant women. Furthermore, it has been proven that our sensor has a wide linear range of detection, as a sensitivity of 835.88 μA mIU(-1 ml(-2 cm(-2 was attained, and the detection limit was 0.28 mIU/ml (27.78 pg/ml. The dissociation constant Kd of the specific antigen binding to the anti-hCG was calculated as 2.23 ± 0.66 mIU, and the maximum number of binding sites per antigen was Bmax = 22.54 ± 1.46 mIU. The sensing system shown here, with a narrow nanogap, is suitable for high-throughput POC diagnosis, and a single injection can obtain triplicate data or parallel analyses of different targets.

  14. A Point-of-Care Immunosensor for Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Clinical Urine Samples Using a Cuneated Polysilicon Nanogap Lab-on-Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, S R; Hashim, U; Gopinath, Subash C B; Poopalan, P; Ramayya, H R; Iqbal Omar, M; Haarindraprasad, R; Veeradasan, P

    2015-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a glycoprotein hormone secreted from the placenta, is a key molecule that indicates pregnancy. Here, we have designed a cost-effective, label-free, in situ point-of-care (POC) immunosensor to estimate hCG using a cuneated 25 nm polysilicon nanogap electrode. A tiny chip with the dimensions of 20.5 × 12.5 mm was fabricated using conventional lithography and size expansion techniques. Furthermore, the sensing surface was functionalized by (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and quantitatively measured the variations in hCG levels from clinically obtained human urine samples. The dielectric properties of the present sensor are shown with a capacitance above 40 nF for samples from pregnant women; it was lower with samples from non-pregnant women. Furthermore, it has been proven that our sensor has a wide linear range of detection, as a sensitivity of 835.88 μA mIU(-1) ml(-2) cm(-2) was attained, and the detection limit was 0.28 mIU/ml (27.78 pg/ml). The dissociation constant Kd of the specific antigen binding to the anti-hCG was calculated as 2.23 ± 0.66 mIU, and the maximum number of binding sites per antigen was Bmax = 22.54 ± 1.46 mIU. The sensing system shown here, with a narrow nanogap, is suitable for high-throughput POC diagnosis, and a single injection can obtain triplicate data or parallel analyses of different targets.

  15. Human papillomavirus 16 E2 interacts with neuregulin receptor degradation protein 1 affecting ErbB-3 expression in vitro and in clinical samples of cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, Francesca; Curzio, Gianfranca; Melucci, Elisa; Terrenato, Irene; Antoniani, Barbara; Carosi, Mariantonia; Mottolese, Marcella; Vici, Patrizia; Mariani, Luciano; Venuti, Aldo

    2016-05-01

    The ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors play a key role in regulating many cellular functions and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) may interact with transductional pathway of different growth factor receptors. Here, these interactions were analysed in W12 cell line carrying HPV 16 genome and in clinical samples. W12 cells, in which HPV16 becomes integrated during passages, were utilised to detect viral and ErbB family expression at early (W12E) and late passages (W12G). Interestingly, a strong reduction of ErbB-3 expression was observed in W12G. Loss of the E2 and E5 viral genes occurs in W12G and this may affect ErbB-3 receptor expression. E2 and E5 rescue experiments demonstrated that only E2 gene was able to restore ErbB-3 expression. E2 is a transcriptional factor but the expression levels of ErbB3 were unaffected and ErbB-3 promoter did not show any consensus sequence for E2, thus E2 may interact in another way with ErbB3. Indeed, HPV 16 E2 can modulate ErbB-3 by interacting with the ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degradation protein 1 (Nrdp-1) that is involved in the regulation of this receptor, via ubiquitination and degradation. E2 co-immunoprecipitated in a complex with Nrdp-1 leading to hypothesise an involvement of this interaction in ErbB-3 regulation. In addition, 90% of the clinical samples with integrated virus and E2 loss showed no or low ErbB-3 positivity, confirming in vitro results. In conclusion, the new discovered interaction of HPV-16 E2 with Nrdp-1 may affect ErbB-3 expression.

  16. Sampling Human Indigenous Saliva Peptidome Using a Lollipop-Like Ultrafiltration Probe: Simplify and Enhance Peptide Detection for Clinical Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Wenhong; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Although human saliva proteome and peptidome have been revealed 1-2 they were majorly identified from tryptic digests of saliva proteins. Identification of indigenous peptidome of human saliva without prior digestion with exogenous enzymes becomes imperative, since native peptides in human saliva provide potential values for diagnosing disease, predicting disease progression, and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Appropriate sampling is a critical step for enhancement of identification of huma...

  17. ITS1 PCR-RFLP Diagnosis and Characterization of Leishmania in Clinical Samples and Strains from Cases of Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in States of the Mexican Southeast

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    Amalia Monroy-Ostria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis includes a spectrum of clinical forms localized cutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis which can be caused by different strains of Leishmania belonging to the L. mexicana or L. braziliensis complexes which may coexist in the same endemic area. We evaluated the PCR-RFLP assay of the ITS1 genes for direct identification of Leishmania species in 163 clinical samples and 21 Mexican isolates of Leishmania. In relation to the Mexican isolates of Leishmania 52% displayed a pattern similar to the L. (L. mexicana, 5% showed a mixed pattern compatible with L. (L. mexicana and L. (V. braziliensis, eight with L. (L. amazonensis and L. (L. mexicana, and one to L. (V. braziliensis. Most of the clinical samples, 109/116 (94%, gave a pattern similar to that of the L. mexicana, two clinical samples gave similar patterns to that of Leishmania braziliensis, and 5 samples gave patterns that suggest a coinfection of L. (L. mexicana and L. (V. braziliensis or L. (L. mexicana and L. (L. amazonensis. The ITS1 PCR-RFLP assay is a multipurpose tool for diagnosis of Leishmania from clinical samples and enables determination of the infecting species of New World Leishmania in the field in relatively short time and low cost.

  18. PCR and Microscopic Identification of Isolated Leishmania tropica from Clinical Samples of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Human Population of Kohat Region in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

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    Nasser M. Abd El-Salam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania tropica was isolated from the clinical patients of cutaneous leishmaniasis in rural community of Kohat district in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province and was identified through PCR, microscopy, and culture techniques. A total of 113 samples from the clinical patients were examined through PCR, microscopy, and culture which showed 87.61% (99/113, 53.98% (61/113, and 46.90% (53/113 prevalence. During the study, 186 bp Leishmania tropica was identified through PCR. Thus the sensitivity of PCR is very high as compared to the conventional techniques.

  19. PCR and microscopic identification of isolated Leishmania tropica from clinical samples of cutaneous leishmaniasis in human population of Kohat region in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Salam, Nasser M; Ayaz, Sultan; Ullah, Riaz

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania tropica was isolated from the clinical patients of cutaneous leishmaniasis in rural community of Kohat district in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province and was identified through PCR, microscopy, and culture techniques. A total of 113 samples from the clinical patients were examined through PCR, microscopy, and culture which showed 87.61% (99/113), 53.98% (61/113), and 46.90% (53/113) prevalence. During the study, 186 bp Leishmania tropica was identified through PCR. Thus the sensitivity of PCR is very high as compared to the conventional techniques.

  20. Intestinal parasites and genotyping of Giardia duodenalis in children: first report of genotype B in isolates from human clinical samples in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Julio César Torres-Romero; Antonio de Jesus Euan-Canto; Namibya Benito-González; Nayely Padilla-Montaño; Claribel Huchin-Chan; Julio Lara-Riegos; Roberto Cedillo-Rivera

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is one of the most prevalent enteroparasites in children. This parasite produces several clinical manifestations. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of genotypes of G. duodenalis causing infection in a region of southeastern Mexico. G. duodenalis cysts were isolated (33/429) from stool samples of children and molecular genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis, targeting the trioseph...

  1. [Hemolysis produced by Candida tropicalis isolates from clinical samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Emanuele Júlio Galvão de; Fávero, Daniel; Scremin, Henrique; Oliveira, Marcelo Tempesta de; Furlaneto-Maia, Luciana; Quesada, Regina Mariuza Borsato; Furlaneto, Márcia Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Yeasts belonging to the genus Candida are responsible for the majority of fungal infections in humans. Candida tropicalis has been one of most commonly isolated non-albicans species. To analyze in vitro hemolysis promoted by clinical isolates of C. tropicalis obtained from blood and other clinical samples from hospitalized patients at the University Hospital of Londrina State University, Paraná, Brazil. The hemolysis promoted by 28 clinical isolates of C. tropicalis was evaluated, and the isolates were grouped into classes according to the hemolysis levels. The majority of the blood isolates showed weak hemolysis (+), while the classes of strong hemolysis (+++) and very strong hemolysis (++++) predominated among isolates from other clinical samples such as urine, nail lesions and tracheal secretions. However, no statistical differences were detected (p> 0.05). Isolates of C. tropicalis obtained from different clinical samples showed a capacity to promote in vitro hemolysis.

  2. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-09-09

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample.

  3. Bacteriophages in clinical samples can interfere with microbiological diagnostic tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Jaque, Maryury; Muniesa, Maite; Navarro, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and they are found everywhere their bacterial hosts are present, including the human body. To explore the presence of phages in clinical samples, we assessed 65 clinical samples (blood, ascitic fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and serum). Infectious tailed phages were detected in >45% of ascitic fluid and urine samples. Three examples of phage interference with bacterial isolation were observed. Phages prevented the confluent bacterial growth required for an antibiogram assay when the inoculum was taken from an agar plate containing lysis plaques, but not when taken from a single colony in a phage-free area. In addition, bacteria were isolated directly from ascitic fluid, but not after liquid enrichment culture of the same samples, since phage propagation lysed the bacteria. Lastly, Gram-negative bacilli observed in a urine sample did not grow on agar plates due to the high densities of infectious phages in the sample. PMID:27609086

  4. Silver percutaneous absorption after exposure to silver nanoparticles: a comparison study of three human skin graft samples used for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, C; Adami, G; Crosera, M; Larese, F; Casarin, S; Castagnoli, C; Stella, M; Maina, G

    2014-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly applied to a wide range of materials for biomedical use. These enable a close contact with human skin, thanks to the large release of silver ions that is responsible for a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Silver can permeate the skin; however, there are no data available on silver permeation through skin grafts commonly used in burns recovery. The aim of our study was to evaluate silver penetration using fresh, cryopreserved, and glycerolized human skin grafts after exposure to a suspension of AgNPs in synthetic sweat using a Franz diffusion cell apparatus for 24 h. Silver permeation profiles revealed a significantly higher permeation through glycerolized skin compared with both fresh and cryopreserved skin: 24-h silver flux penetration was 0.2 ng cm(-2) h(-1) (lag time: 8.2 h) for fresh skin, 0.3 ng cm(-2) h(-1) (lag time: 10.9 h) for cryopreserved skin, and 3.8 ng cm(-2) h(-1) (lag time: 6.3 h) for glycerolized skin. Permeation through glycerolized skin is significantly higher compared to both fresh and cryopreserved skin. This result can generate relevant clinical implications for burns treatment with products containing AgNPs.

  5. Microfluidic hydrogel arrays for direct genotyping of clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Mathies, Richard A

    2016-05-15

    A microfluidic hydrogel DNA microarray is developed to overcome the limitations of conventional planar microarrays such as low sensitivity, long overnight hybridization time, lack of a melting verification of proper hybrid, and complicated sample preparation process for genotyping of clinical samples. Unlike our previous prototype hydrogel array which can analyze only single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) targets, the device is the first of its type to allow direct multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection of human clinical samples comprising double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This advance is made possible by incorporating a streptavidin (SA) hydrogel capture/purification element in a double T-junction at the start of the linear hydrogel array structure and fabricating ten different probe DNAs-entrapped hydrogels in microfluidic channels. The purified or unpurified polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products labeled with a fluorophore and a biotin are electrophoresed through the SA hydrogel for binding and purification. After electrophoretic washing, the fluorophore-labeled DNA strand is then thermally released for hybridization capture by its complementary probe gel element. We demonstrate the precise and rapid discrimination of the genotypes of five different clinical targets by melting curve analysis based on temperature-gradient electrophoresis within 3h, which is at least 3-fold decrease in incubation time compared to conventional microarrays. In addition, a 1.7 pg (0.024 femtomoles) limit of detection for clinical samples is achieved which is ~100-fold better sensitivity than planar microarrays.

  6. Optimization and validation of sample preparation for metagenomic sequencing of viruses in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Dagmara W; Zagordi, Osvaldo; Geissberger, Fabienne-Desirée; Kufner, Verena; Schmutz, Stefan; Böni, Jürg; Metzner, Karin J; Trkola, Alexandra; Huber, Michael

    2017-08-08

    Sequence-specific PCR is the most common approach for virus identification in diagnostic laboratories. However, as specific PCR only detects pre-defined targets, novel virus strains or viruses not included in routine test panels will be missed. Recently, advances in high-throughput sequencing allow for virus-sequence-independent identification of entire virus populations in clinical samples, yet standardized protocols are needed to allow broad application in clinical diagnostics. Here, we describe a comprehensive sample preparation protocol for high-throughput metagenomic virus sequencing using random amplification of total nucleic acids from clinical samples. In order to optimize metagenomic sequencing for application in virus diagnostics, we tested different enrichment and amplification procedures on plasma samples spiked with RNA and DNA viruses. A protocol including filtration, nuclease digestion, and random amplification of RNA and DNA in separate reactions provided the best results, allowing reliable recovery of viral genomes and a good correlation of the relative number of sequencing reads with the virus input. We further validated our method by sequencing a multiplexed viral pathogen reagent containing a range of human viruses from different virus families. Our method proved successful in detecting the majority of the included viruses with high read numbers and compared well to other protocols in the field validated against the same reference reagent. Our sequencing protocol does work not only with plasma but also with other clinical samples such as urine and throat swabs. The workflow for virus metagenomic sequencing that we established proved successful in detecting a variety of viruses in different clinical samples. Our protocol supplements existing virus-specific detection strategies providing opportunities to identify atypical and novel viruses commonly not accounted for in routine diagnostic panels.

  7. Evaluation and Validation of a Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Quantitation of Human Adenovirus 14 from Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    tract bacteria . The described assay is easy to use, sensitive and specific for HAdV-14a in clinical throat swab specimens, and very rapid since...genitourinary infections, and gastroenteritis [7]. Although basic military trainee sites can involve several types, public health response measures at... gastroenteritis . J Virol 81: 5978–5984. 6. Walsh MP, Chintakuntlawar A, Robinson CM, Madisch I, Harrach B, et al. (2009) Evidence of Molecular

  8. Cladosporium Species Recovered from Clinical Samples in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Sutton, Deanna A; Martin-Vicente, Adela; Cano-Lira, José F; Wiederhold, Nathan; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa

    2015-09-01

    Cladosporium species are ubiquitous, saprobic, dematiaceous fungi, only infrequently associated with human and animal opportunistic infections. We have studied a large set of Cladosporium isolates recovered from clinical samples in the United States to ascertain the predominant species there in light of recent taxonomic changes in this genus and to determine whether some could possibly be rare potential pathogens. A total of 92 isolates were identified using phenotypic and molecular methods, which included sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and a fragment of the large subunit (LSU) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), as well as fragments of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1α) and actin (Act) genes. The most frequent species was Cladosporium halotolerans (14.8%), followed by C. tenuissimum (10.2%), C. subuliforme (5.7%), and C. pseudocladosporioides (4.5%). However, 39.8% of the isolates did not correspond to any known species and were deemed to comprise at least 17 new lineages for Cladosporium. The most frequent anatomic site of isolation was the respiratory tract (54.5%), followed by superficial (28.4%) and deep tissues and fluids (14.7%). Species of the two recently described cladosporiumlike genera Toxicocladosporium and Penidiella are reported for the first time from clinical samples. In vitro susceptibility testing of 92 isolates against nine antifungal drugs showed a variety of results but high activity overall for the azoles, echinocandins, and terbinafine.

  9. Assessment of the quality of sample labelling for clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Pérez-Huertas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the quality of the labels for clinical trial samples through current regulations, and to analyze its potential correlation with the specific characteristics of each sample. Method: A transversal multicenter study where the clinical trial samples from two third level hospitals were analyzed. The eleven items from Directive 2003/94/EC, as well as the name of the clinical trial and the dose on the label cover, were considered variables for labelling quality. The influence of the characteristics of each sample on labelling quality was also analyzed. Outcome: The study included 503 samples from 220 clinical trials. The mean quality of labelling, understood as the proportion of items from Appendix 13, was of 91.9%. Out of these, 6.6% did not include the name of the sample in the outer face of the label, while in 9.7% the dose was missing. The samples with clinical trial-type samples presented a higher quality (p < 0.049, blinding reduced their quality (p = 0.017, and identification by kit number or by patient increased it (p < 0.01. The promoter was the variable which introduced the highest variability into the analysis. Conclusions: The mean quality of labelling is adequate in the majority of clinical trial samples. The lack of essential information in some samples, such as the clinical trial code and the period of validity, is alarming and might be the potential source for dispensing or administration errors.

  10. Sample size determination in clinical trials with multiple endpoints

    CERN Document Server

    Sozu, Takashi; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    This book integrates recent methodological developments for calculating the sample size and power in trials with more than one endpoint considered as multiple primary or co-primary, offering an important reference work for statisticians working in this area. The determination of sample size and the evaluation of power are fundamental and critical elements in the design of clinical trials. If the sample size is too small, important effects may go unnoticed; if the sample size is too large, it represents a waste of resources and unethically puts more participants at risk than necessary. Recently many clinical trials have been designed with more than one endpoint considered as multiple primary or co-primary, creating a need for new approaches to the design and analysis of these clinical trials. The book focuses on the evaluation of power and sample size determination when comparing the effects of two interventions in superiority clinical trials with multiple endpoints. Methods for sample size calculation in clin...

  11. Validation of Malingered Amnesia Measures with a Large Clinical Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiffenstein, Manfred F.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A sample of chronic postconcussive patients with and without overt malingering signs was compared with objectively brain-injured patients (total sample=106) on common episodic memory and malingered amnesia measures. Findings validate commonly cited malingering measures and new methods of classifying malingering in real-world clinical samples. (SLD)

  12. A microRNA isolation method from clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Zununi Vahed

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The current isolation method can be applied for most clinical samples including cells, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues and even body fluids with a wide applicability in molecular biology investigations.

  13. Dielectric characterisation of human tissue samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Nennie, F.; Deiana, D.; Veen, A.J. van der; Monni, S.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of tissues samples are required for investigation and simulation purposes in biomedical applications of EM sensors. While available open literature mostly deals with ex-vivo characterization of isolated tissues, knowledge on dielectric properties of these tissues in their o

  14. Pattern designation of PCBs in human samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, M.S.; Fischbein, A.; Rosenman, K.D.; Levin, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    In order to asses the nature of PCB exposures in humans, statistical measures of PCB patterns in blood serum (as Aroclor 1254 or 1260) were made in 348 cases, representing several exposed and non-exposed groups. Although the cases were not representative of any population, most (252/348) had an Arcolor 1260 pattern, with evidence that PCB congeners in blood serum were usually derived from both Aroclor 1254 and 1260. The method is readily applied to routine packed column gc analysis.

  15. On an Approach to Bayesian Sample Sizing in Clinical Trials

    CERN Document Server

    Muirhead, Robb J

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores an approach to Bayesian sample size determination in clinical trials. The approach falls into the category of what is often called "proper Bayesian", in that it does not mix frequentist concepts with Bayesian ones. A criterion for a "successful trial" is defined in terms of a posterior probability, its probability is assessed using the marginal distribution of the data, and this probability forms the basis for choosing sample sizes. We illustrate with a standard problem in clinical trials, that of establishing superiority of a new drug over a control.

  16. Yeasts isolated from clinical samples of AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Rejane Pereira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate yeasts in oropharyngeal secretion, urine, sputum and inguinal scales from AIDS patients, clinical samples were collected from one hundred patients interned in the Infectious and Parasitic Diseases Sector of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco and in Hospital Universitário Osvaldo Cruz of the Universidade de Pernambuco. Yeasts were isolated from seventy-two out of one hundred and eight clinical samples. The isolated yeasts were: Candida albicans (sixty-two isolates, Candida tropicalis (four isolates, Candida glabrata (two isolates, Candida parapsilosis (two isolates, Candida krusei (one isolate and Trichosporon pullulans (one isolate.

  17. Sampling circulating tumor cells for clinical benefits: how frequent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Sai Mun; Tan, Karen M L; Chua, Hui Wen; Tan, Doreen; Fareda, Delly; Osmany, Saabry; Li, Mo-Huang; Tucker, Steven; Koay, Evelyn S C

    2015-06-25

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells shed from tumors or metastatic sites and are a potential biomarker for cancer diagnosis, management, and prognostication. The majority of current studies use single or infrequent CTC sampling points. This strategy assumes that changes in CTC number, as well as phenotypic and molecular characteristics, are gradual with time. In reality, little is known today about the actual kinetics of CTC dissemination and phenotypic and molecular changes in the blood of cancer patients. Herein, we show, using clinical case studies and hypothetical simulation models, how sub-optimal CTC sampling may result in misleading observations with clinical consequences, by missing out on significant CTC spikes that occur in between sampling times. Initial studies using highly frequent CTC sampling are necessary to understand the dynamics of CTC dissemination and phenotypic and molecular changes in the blood of cancer patients. Such an improved understanding will enable an optimal, study-specific sampling frequency to be assigned to individual research studies and clinical trials and better inform practical clinical decisions on cancer management strategies for patient benefits.

  18. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells From Human Prostate Cancer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Quinn, S. Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice. PMID:24686446

  19. Development and validation of a sensitive liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method for the simultaneous analysis of granisetron and 7-hydroxy granisetron in human plasma and urine samples: application in a clinical pharmacokinetic study in pregnant subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Chen, Hui-Jun; Caritis, Steve; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2016-02-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for the quantification of granisetron and its major metabolite, 7-hydroxy granisetron in human plasma and urine samples was developed and validated. Respective stable isotopically labeled granisetron and 7-hydroxy granisetron were used as internal standards (IS). Chromatography was performed using an Xselect HSS T3 analytical column with a mobile phase of 20% acetonitrile in water (containing 0.2 mM ammonium formate and 0.14% formic acid, pH 4) delivered in an isocratic mode. Tandem mass spectrometry operating in positive electrospray ionization mode with multiple reaction monitoring was used for quantification. The standard curves were linear in the concentration ranges of 0.5-100 ng/mL for granisetron and 0.1-100 ng/mL for 7-hydroxy granisetron in human plasma samples, and 2-2000 ng/mL for granisetron and 2-1000 ng/mL for 7-hydroxy granisetron in human urine samples, respectively. The accuracies were >85% and the precision as determined by the coefficient of variations was validated method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study after intravenous administration of 1 mg granisetron to a pregnant subject.

  20. Isolation of Campylobacter from human stool samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Salim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Campylobacter is an undetected cause of diarrhoea especially under 5 years of age in most of the countries. Isolation of this organism is difficult, expensive and cumbersome. Aims: Our objective of this study was to isolate this pathogen from the stool specimens on routinely available blood containing laboratory media using the candle jar for creating the microaerophilic atmosphere in our setup. Settings and Designs: A descriptive study. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 stool samples were inoculated onto selective and non-selective media with and without filtration using a 0.45 μm membrane. The inoculated media were simultaneously incubated in microaerophilic conditions using the Anoxomat as well as in candle jars at temperatures 37°C and 42°C. The culture isolates were confirmed by standard phenotypic tests. A simplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting the 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid of Campylobacter was performed on the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA of the culture isolates as well as on the DNA extracted from the stool filtrates. Statistical Analysis: Data was expressed as a proportion. Results: Campylobacter could be isolated in 5 out of 50 stool samples using both the Anoxomat as well as the candle jar. Furthermore, we did not find any difference between the isolation using the selective and blood containing media as well as the different incubation temperatures. All the five were confirmed phenotypically and genotypically to be Campylobacter jejuni. The PCR results corroborated with that of the culture. Conclusions: Isolation by culture was as sensitive as that of the PCR.

  1. A Clinical Sample of Women Who Have Sexually Abused Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Kathleen Coulborn

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study of a clinical sample of 72 women who allegedly abused 332 children. Perspectives include whether the abuse was intrafamilial, extrafamilial, or both, and whether the abuse involved single or multiple abusers. Also examines situational factors, individual deficits, and other factors that might lead women to sexually abuse…

  2. Clinical and laboratory experience of chorionic villous sampling in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-14

    Dec 14, 2013 ... clinical and laboratory procedures, including general characteristics of women, indications and outcome, complications, ... that has to provide for supportive therapies, rehabilitation ... completed until the samples are analyzed in the laboratory ... involves the use of aspiration needles set made up of gauge.

  3. Pros and cons of direct genotyping on tuberculosis clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh, Hamidreza; Kargarpour Kamakoli, Mansour; Farmanfarmaei, Ghazaleh; Masoumi, Morteza; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Fateh, Abolfazl; Ebrahimzadeh, Nayereh; Rahimi Jamnani, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Farzam; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2017-02-01

    Prompt genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is crucial for improving molecular epidemiological investigation of tuberculosis (TB). We performed a retrospective study to evaluate the use of 24 loci MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem-repeat) directly on 135 clinical samples from 84 TB patients. There was a direct correlation between genotyping on clinical samples by MIRU-VNTR and bacterial load (P = 0.001). VNTR loci were amplified successfully for 41.5% of the clinical samples (19-24 loci), 32.6% (13-18 loci), 23.7% (7-12 loci) and 2.2% (1-6 loci). Loci of 2401, 577, 2996 and 154 had the highest power to show the mixed strains infection in clinical samples. Direct MIRU-VNTR is partially successful in complete genotyping of M. tuberculosis strains. On the other hand, detection of polyclonal infection is undoubtedly reliable based on the direct MIRU-VNTR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementing human factors in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Methods Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have received aviation-derived human factors training. Results The human factors training was evaluated positively, and thought to be both acceptable and relevant to practice. However, the staff found it harder to implement what they had learned in their own clinical areas, and this was principally attributed to features of the informal organisational cultures. Conclusions In order to successfully apply human factors approaches in hospital, careful consideration needs to be given to the local context and informal culture of clinical practice. PMID:24631959

  5. Clinical science and human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaud, J J

    2001-09-01

    The debate between mentalism/cognitivism and behaviorism is analyzed, and it is concluded that behaviorism is the philosophy more closely associated with psychology as a behavioral science, the cognitive approach being more closely aligned with biological science. Specific objections to mentalistic interpretations of behavioral phenomena are detailed, and examples from clinical psychology are used to show the importance of behavioral approaches in applied domains. It is argued that the relation between behavior theory and clinical psychology is critical to the continued advancement of applied psychology. Behavior analysis is offered as a direct, applied extension of behavior theory as well as a highly practical and effective approach for understanding, explaining, and modifying the factors that contribute to and maintain maladaptive behaviors.

  6. Clinical illnesses associated with isolation of dysgonic fermenter 3 from stool samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, R N; Berry, C D; Phillips, M G; Hamilos, D L; Koneman, E W

    1992-01-01

    The clinical significance of the fastidious organism DF-3 isolated from stool cultures is unclear. We sought to improve our understanding of this organism and to further define its association with human disease. Stool cultures for DF-3 were obtained from three sources: an ongoing study of enteric pathogens in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, a screening procedure in which all stool samples submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin assay were cultured for DF-3, and sto...

  7. Dust mites in a routine clinical stool sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bushra Zia; Hassaan Bin Aftab; Mohammad Faizan Zahid; Joveria Farooqi; Feroze Uddin; Mohammad Asim Beg

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of dust mite carriage in a 56-year-old gentleman. Dust mites eggs and larvae were found in a stool sample which was taken for a routine clinical examination. He was completely asymptomatic with no history of rash, airway disease or other allergic manifestations associated with dust mites. We noticed that the oval structure of mite eggs resembled helminth eggs and therefore may be misidentified during routine clinical analysis. As the patient was otherwise healthy, it was concluded that no rigorous antiparasitic therapy was necessary to eliminate dust mites from his system.

  8. [Psychometric Properties of the Metacognition Scales about Rumination in Clinical and Non-clinical Turkish Samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Adviye Esin; Sungur, Mehmet Zihni; Konkan, Ramazan; Şenormancı, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the reliability and validity of the Turkish adaptations of the Positive Beliefs about Rumination Scale (PBRS) and the Negative Beliefs about Rumination Scale (NBRS) in clinical and non-clinical samples. While the non-clinical sample of the study consisted of 455 participants, the clinical sample was composed of 60 major depressive disorder (MDD), 30 panic disorder (PD) and 30 social anxiety disorder (SAD) cases. The results of the factor analyses confirm the construct validity and original factor structure of the scales. Findings obtained from internal consistency and test-retest analyses indicated good reliability for the scales. Supporting the convergent validity of the scales, the correlations between metacognitions about rumination and depressive symptoms, rumination, metacognitions about worry, pathological worry, and anxiety symptoms were found to be positive and significant in the non-clinical sample. Hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that both scales have predictive validity for depressive symptoms after controlling for anxiety symptoms. As for extreme group comparisons, it supported the criterion-related validity of the scales. In discriminant clinical validity examinations, although both scales were able to differentiate MDD, PD, and SAD groups from healthy controls, they were unable to differentiate the depressive group from the other anxiety disorder groups. A comprehensive psychometric evaluation of the scales demonstrated that both PBRS and NBRS are reliable and valid assessment devices that can be used for research purposes both in clinical and non-clinical groups in Turkey.

  9. Rapid detection of cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum samples by polymerase chain reaction: correlation of virus isolation and clinical outcome for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K K; Vestbo, Jørgen; Benfield, T;

    1997-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and serum samples from 153 patients with pulmonary symptoms who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and underwent BAL were examined for the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) by conventional culture and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR.......0; confidence interval [CI], 3.8-16.8) or the finding of CMV DNA in serum (RR, 7.4; CI, 3.2-17.3) or BAL fluid (RR, 8.0; CI, 3.1-20.7) by PCR. Mortality was found to be similar for patients who did or did not have CMV detected by either culture or PCR. Detection of CMV DNA by PCR was a more rapid and sensitive...

  10. "Good samples make good assays" – the problem of sourcing clinical samples for a standardization project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houcke, Sofie K; Thienpont, Linda M

    2013-05-01

    Clinical samples are the cornerstone in all aspects related to in vitro diagnostic testing. They are particularly valuable in the process of establishing/validating metrological traceability, because they eliminate commutability issues potentially associated with artificial calibrators. Therefore, they are essential for IFCC standardization projects. However, sourcing clinical specimens is particularly challenging. It mostly turns out that only dedicated supply sources can accommodate the varying specifications within reasonable timelines. Here we describe the torturous experience in this regard of the IFCC Working Group for Standardization of Thyroid Function tests (since transformed into a Committee). We always focused on obtaining high quality samples in sufficient volume to serve all project participants. We applied a step-up approach: in phase I, we used high volume (200 mL of plasma/serum) single donations from apparently healthy individuals, and switched in phase II and III to medium-sized volume clinical samples (15 – 30 mL) from well-defined patient categories. In the first two phases we observed for some assays a sample-related discrepant analytical performance for total/free triiodothyronine and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), whereas in phase III we faced a severe delay in obtaining the relevant panels for free thyroxine (FT4) and TSH (n = 90 and n = 100, respectively). Additional experiments only allowed us to exclude hypothesized causes of the observations. We believe that there would be merit in a collaborative effort by chairholders of similar projects to establish a sample procurement infrastructure based on a solid relationship with commercial supply sources with the support of a significant number of committed clinicians.

  11. Pathogenicity of Rhodococcus equi in mice, isolated from environment, human and horse clinical samples Patogenicidade atogenicidade em camundongos de isolados clí- clínicos, nicos, ambientais e humanos de Rhodococcus equi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus M. Costa

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen associated with bronchopneumonia, mesenteric lymphadenitis and enterocolitis in foals. Although R. equi is likely to be found in every horse-breeding farm, the clinical disease is unrecognized in most of them. Capsule components, equi factor, micolic acid and some products encoded by the large 85-90Kb plasmid were described as virulence factors. However, the pathogenesis of R. equi infections and the sensibility of foals are not completely understood. The aim of this study was evaluate the virulence of R. equi isolated from human, horses and environment for mices. Nine strains carrying the 85-90Kb plasmid isolated from foal clinical specimens, one from immunodeficient human patient and six plasmidless strains (four isolated from feces, one from pasture and one from immunodeficient human patient were inoculated in cyclophosphamide immunossuppressed mice. The pathological changes and viability of R. equi cells in the liver of mice was verified after the 3rd, 6th an 10th day after inoculation for horse and environmental isolates and for R. equi isolates from human patients on the 1st, 3rd and 6th day. During the necropsy procedures, infiltrate of macrophages and pyogranulomatous lesions were detected after the sixth pos-inoculation day in the liver and spleen. In horse isolates, only plasmid positive strains were virulent, but in human isolates both strains (plasmid positive e plasmid negative were virulent. Both groups of the immunossupressed mice inoculated with R. equi isolated from environment showed pathological changes. All R. equi strains were unable to kill non imunossuppressed mice.Rhodococ-cus equi é um patógeno intracelular facultativo associado com broncopneumonia, linfadenite mesentérica e enterocolite em potros. Apesar do patógeno ser amplamente distribuído no ambiente equino, a doença não é encontrada em todos os criatórios. Componentes capsulares, "fator equi",

  12. Direct identification of chlamydiae from clinical samples using a DNA microarray assay: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, Nicole; Kempf, Evelyne; Hotzel, Helmut; Schubert, Evelyn; Torgerson, Paul; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf; Tasara, Taurai; Pospischil, Andreas; Sachse, Konrad

    2008-02-01

    While DNA microarrays have become a widely accepted tool for mRNA expression monitoring, their use in rapid diagnosis of bacterial and viral pathogens is only emerging. So far, insufficient sensitivity and high costs have been the major limiting factors preventing more widespread use of microarray platforms in direct testing of clinical samples. In the present study, a total of 339 samples, among them 293 clinical specimens from animals and humans, were examined by the ArrayTube (AT) DNA microarray assay to detect chlamydial DNA and identify the species of Chlamydia and Chlamydophila involved. Samples included nasal and conjunctival swabs, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and fresh organ tissue, milk, feces and cell culture. Notably, the AT test was shown to detect mixed infections in clinical samples. The calculated median sensitivity of 0.81 over the entire panel of clinical samples was comparable to conventional 16S PCR, but slightly lower than real-time PCR and other PCR assays. However, when a panel of long-time stored swab samples was excluded from the calculation, the sensitivity was clearly higher (0.87) and equivalent to that of real-time PCR. Altogether, the data demonstrate the suitability of this DNA microarray assay for routine diagnosis.

  13. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research Past ... the forefront of human health research today are clinical trials—studies that use human volunteers to help medical ...

  14. Analysis of Helicobacter pylori genotypes in clinical gastric wash samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Oikawa, Ritsuko; Ono, Shoko; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Kudo, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Kato, Mototsugu; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a key factor in the development of gastric cancer; indeed, clearance of H. pylori helps prevent gastric cancer. However, the relationship between gastric cancer and the abundance and diversity of H. pylori genotypes in the stomach remains unknown. Here, we present, for the first time, a quantitative analysis of H. pylori genotypes in gastric washes. A method was first developed to assess diversity and abundance by pyrosequencing and analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), a gene associated with clarithromycin resistance. This method was then validated using arbitrarily mixed plasmids carrying 23S rRNA with single nucleotide polymorphisms. Multiple strains were detected in many of 34 clinical samples, with frequency 24.3 ± 24.2 and 26.3 ± 33.8 % for the A2143G and A2144G strains, respectively. Importantly, results obtained from gastric washes were similar to those obtained from biopsy samples. The method provides opportunities to investigate drug resistance in H. pylori and assess potential biomarkers of gastric cancer risk, and should thus be validated in large-scale clinical trials.

  15. WAIS-IV visual puzzles in a mixed clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallows, Robert R; Hilsabeck, Robin C

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about which cognitive functions underlie the new Visual Puzzles subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV). The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between Visual Puzzles and common neuropsychological measures in a mixed clinical sample. A total of 44 veterans (75% men) were administered the WAIS-IV as part of a neuropsychological evaluation. Average age was 47.4 years (SD = 11.8), and average education was 13.8 years (SD = 2.3). Correlations were conducted to examine relationships between Visual Puzzles, demographic variables, and neuropsychological measures. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to determine which measures contributed the most variance to Visual Puzzles. Visual Puzzles correlated significantly with measures of visuospatial reasoning, verbal learning and recall, mental flexibility, processing speed, and naming, which accounted for 50% of the variance in Visual Puzzles performance. The results indicate that Visual Puzzles is not a pure measure of visuoperceptual reasoning, at least in a mixed clinical sample, because memory, mental flexibility, processing speed, and language abilities also contribute to successful performance of the task. Thus it may be important to consider other aspects of cognitive functioning when interpreting Visual Puzzles performance.

  16. Approach-Induced Biases in Human Information Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Laurence T.; Rutledge, Robb B.; Malalasekera, W. M. Nishantha; Kennerley, Steven W.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Information sampling is often biased towards seeking evidence that confirms one’s prior beliefs. Despite such biases being a pervasive feature of human behavior, their underlying causes remain unclear. Many accounts of these biases appeal to limitations of human hypothesis testing and cognition, de facto evoking notions of bounded rationality, but neglect more basic aspects of behavioral control. Here, we investigated a potential role for Pavlovian approach in biasing which information humans will choose to sample. We collected a large novel dataset from 32,445 human subjects, making over 3 million decisions, who played a gambling task designed to measure the latent causes and extent of information-sampling biases. We identified three novel approach-related biases, formalized by comparing subject behavior to a dynamic programming model of optimal information gathering. These biases reflected the amount of information sampled (“positive evidence approach”), the selection of which information to sample (“sampling the favorite”), and the interaction between information sampling and subsequent choices (“rejecting unsampled options”). The prevalence of all three biases was related to a Pavlovian approach-avoid parameter quantified within an entirely independent economic decision task. Our large dataset also revealed that individual differences in the amount of information gathered are a stable trait across multiple gameplays and can be related to demographic measures, including age and educational attainment. As well as revealing limitations in cognitive processing, our findings suggest information sampling biases reflect the expression of primitive, yet potentially ecologically adaptive, behavioral repertoires. One such behavior is sampling from options that will eventually be chosen, even when other sources of information are more pertinent for guiding future action. PMID:27832071

  17. Clinical exome sequencing: results from 2819 samples reflecting 1000 families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillano, Daniel; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Kumar Kandaswamy, Krishna; Weiss, Maximilian ER; Köster, Julia; Marais, Anett; Paknia, Omid; Schröder, Rolf; Garcia-Aznar, Jose Maria; Werber, Martin; Brandau, Oliver; Calvo del Castillo, Maria; Baldi, Caterina; Wessel, Karen; Kishore, Shivendra; Nahavandi, Nahid; Eyaid, Wafaa; Al Rifai, Muhammad Talal; Al-Rumayyan, Ahmed; Al-Twaijri, Waleed; Alothaim, Ali; Alhashem, Amal; Al-Sannaa, Nouriya; Al-Balwi, Mohammed; Alfadhel, Majid; Rolfs, Arndt; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2017-01-01

    We report our results of 1000 diagnostic WES cases based on 2819 sequenced samples from 54 countries with a wide phenotypic spectrum. Clinical information given by the requesting physicians was translated to HPO terms. WES processes were performed according to standardized settings. We identified the underlying pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants in 307 families (30.7%). In further 253 families (25.3%) a variant of unknown significance, possibly explaining the clinical symptoms of the index patient was identified. WES enabled timely diagnosing of genetic diseases, validation of causality of specific genetic disorders of PTPN23, KCTD3, SCN3A, PPOX, FRMPD4, and SCN1B, and setting dual diagnoses by detecting two causative variants in distinct genes in the same patient. We observed a better diagnostic yield in consanguineous families, in severe and in syndromic phenotypes. Our results suggest that WES has a better yield in patients that present with several symptoms, rather than an isolated abnormality. We also validate the clinical benefit of WES as an effective diagnostic tool, particularly in nonspecific or heterogeneous phenotypes. We recommend WES as a first-line diagnostic in all cases without a clear differential diagnosis, to facilitate personal medical care. PMID:27848944

  18. Rapid detection of cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum samples by polymerase chain reaction: correlation of virus isolation and clinical outcome for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K K; Vestbo, Jørgen; Benfield, T;

    1997-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and serum samples from 153 patients with pulmonary symptoms who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and underwent BAL were examined for the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) by conventional culture and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR......) for detection of CMV DNA. PCR detected CMV more frequently than did cultures of BAL fluid (PCR of BAL fluid, 53%; PCR of serum, 40%; and culture, 30%). In a multivariate model, development of extrapulmonary CMV disease was predicted by the finding of CMV in BAL fluid by culture (relative risk [RR], 8.......0; confidence interval [CI], 3.8-16.8) or the finding of CMV DNA in serum (RR, 7.4; CI, 3.2-17.3) or BAL fluid (RR, 8.0; CI, 3.1-20.7) by PCR. Mortality was found to be similar for patients who did or did not have CMV detected by either culture or PCR. Detection of CMV DNA by PCR was a more rapid and sensitive...

  19. Rapid detection of cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum samples by polymerase chain reaction: correlation of virus isolation and clinical outcome for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K K; Vestbo, Jørgen; Benfield, T

    1997-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and serum samples from 153 patients with pulmonary symptoms who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and underwent BAL were examined for the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) by conventional culture and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR......) for detection of CMV DNA. PCR detected CMV more frequently than did cultures of BAL fluid (PCR of BAL fluid, 53%; PCR of serum, 40%; and culture, 30%). In a multivariate model, development of extrapulmonary CMV disease was predicted by the finding of CMV in BAL fluid by culture (relative risk [RR], 8.......0; confidence interval [CI], 3.8-16.8) or the finding of CMV DNA in serum (RR, 7.4; CI, 3.2-17.3) or BAL fluid (RR, 8.0; CI, 3.1-20.7) by PCR. Mortality was found to be similar for patients who did or did not have CMV detected by either culture or PCR. Detection of CMV DNA by PCR was a more rapid and sensitive...

  20. A duplex PCR for rapid and simultaneous detection of Brucella spp. in human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnejad, Reza; Mohamadi, Mozafar; Piranfar, Vahbeh; Mortazavi, Seied Mojtaba; Kachuei, Reza

    2013-06-01

    To design a duplex PCR for rapid and simultaneous detection of Brucella species. in human blood samples. Fifty-two peripheral bloods samples were collected from suspicious patients with brucellosis. Following DNA extraction, PCR assay were performed, using three primers that could simultaneously identify and differentiate three major species of pathogenic Brucella in humans and animals. Of the 52 peripheral bloods samples tested, 25 sample (48%) showed positive reactions in PCR. Twelve samples were positive for Brucella abortus 39 (B. abortus 39) (23%), 13 for Brucella melitensis 39 (B. melitensis 39) (25%) and 0 for Brucella ovis 39 (B. ovis 39) (0%). This work demonstrates that in case where specific primers were utilized, duplex PCR has proved to be a simple, fast, and relatively inexpensive method for simultaneous detection of important species of Brucella in clinical samples. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A duplex PCR for the rapid and simultaneous detection of Brucella spp. in human blood samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Mirnejad; Mozafar mohamadi; Vahbeh Piranfar; Seied Mojtaba Mortazavi; Reza Kachuei

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To design a duplex PCR for rapid and simultaneous detection of Brucella species. in human blood samples. Methods: Fifty-two peripheral bloods samples were collected from suspicious patients with brucellosis. Following DNA extraction, PCR assay were performed, using three primers that could simultaneously identify and differentiate three major species of pathogenic Brucella in humans and animals. Results: Of the 52 peripheral bloods samples tested, 25 sample (48%) showed positive reactions in PCR. Twelve samples were positive for Brucella abortus (B. abortus) (23%), 13 for Brucella melitensis (B. melitensis) (25%) and 0 for Brucella ovis (B. ovis) (0%). Conclusions: This work de=monstrates that in case where specific primers were utilized, duplex PCR has proved to be a simple, fast, and relatively inexpensive method for simultaneous detection of important species of Brucella in clinical samples.

  2. Human-Robot Site Survey and Sampling for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Edwards, Laurence; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Kunz, Clayton; Lee, Susan Y.; Park, Eric; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Ackner, Nir

    2006-01-01

    NASA is planning to send humans and robots back to the Moon before 2020. In order for extended missions to be productive, high quality maps of lunar terrain and resources are required. Although orbital images can provide much information, many features (local topography, resources, etc) will have to be characterized directly on the surface. To address this need, we are developing a system to perform site survey and sampling. The system includes multiple robots and humans operating in a variety of team configurations, coordinated via peer-to-peer human-robot interaction. In this paper, we present our system design and describe planned field tests.

  3. Proteomic biomarker discovery in 1000 human plasma samples with mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cominetti, Ornella; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Corthésy, John

    2016-01-01

    the quality of the MS data and provided descriptive statistics. The data set was interrogated for proteins with most stable expression levels in that set of plasma samples. We evaluated standard clinical variables that typically impact forthcoming results and assessed body mass index-associated and gender......-specific proteins at two time points. We demonstrate that analyzing a large number of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery with MS using isobaric tagging is feasible, providing robust and consistent biological results....

  4. Social Cognition in a Clinical Sample of Personality Disorder Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo eRuiz-Tagle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Social cognition was assessed in a clinical sample of Personality Disorder (PD stable patients receiving ambulatory treatment (N=17 and healthy matched controls (N=17 using tests of recognition of emotions in faces and eyes, in a test of social faux pas and in theory of mind stories. Results indicated that when compared with healthy controls, individuals with PD showed a clear tendency to obtain lower scoring in tasks assessing recognition of emotion in faces (T=-2,602, p=0,014, eyes (T=-3,593, p=0,001, TOM stories (T=-4,706, p=0,000 and Faux pas (T=-2,227, p=0,035. In the present pilot study, PD individuals with a normal cognitive efficiency showed an impaired performance at social cognition assessment including emotion recognition and theory of mind.

  5. Human Polymorphisms as Clinical Predictors in Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Prado Montes de Oca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and serum markers in human host can predict leprosy susceptibility per se as well as be useful in classification and/or prediction of clinical variants and immunological responses in leprosy. Adequate and timely assessment of potential risks associated with these 38 host leprosy genes could diminish epidemiological burden and improve life quality of patients with this still prevalent mycobacterial disease.

  6. Human transcriptome array for high-throughput clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weihong; Seok, Junhee; Mindrinos, Michael N; Schweitzer, Anthony C; Jiang, Hui; Wilhelmy, Julie; Clark, Tyson A; Kapur, Karen; Xing, Yi; Faham, Malek; Storey, John D; Moldawer, Lyle L; Maier, Ronald V; Tompkins, Ronald G; Wong, Wing Hung; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2011-03-01

    A 6.9 million-feature oligonucleotide array of the human transcriptome [Glue Grant human transcriptome (GG-H array)] has been developed for high-throughput and cost-effective analyses in clinical studies. This array allows comprehensive examination of gene expression and genome-wide identification of alternative splicing as well as detection of coding SNPs and noncoding transcripts. The performance of the array was examined and compared with mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) results over multiple independent replicates of liver and muscle samples. Compared with RNA-Seq of 46 million uniquely mappable reads per replicate, the GG-H array is highly reproducible in estimating gene and exon abundance. Although both platforms detect similar expression changes at the gene level, the GG-H array is more sensitive at the exon level. Deeper sequencing is required to adequately cover low-abundance transcripts. The array has been implemented in a multicenter clinical program and has generated high-quality, reproducible data. Considering the clinical trial requirements of cost, sample availability, and throughput, the GG-H array has a wide range of applications. An emerging approach for large-scale clinical genomic studies is to first use RNA-Seq to the sufficient depth for the discovery of transcriptome elements relevant to the disease process followed by high-throughput and reliable screening of these elements on thousands of patient samples using custom-designed arrays.

  7. In silico analyses of metagenomes from human atherosclerotic plaque samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Suparna; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Alhede, Morten

    2015-01-01

    a challenge. RESULTS: To investigate microbiome diversity within human atherosclerotic tissue samples, we employed high-throughput metagenomic analysis on: (1) atherosclerotic plaques obtained from a group of patients who underwent endarterectomy due to recent transient cerebral ischemia or stroke. (2...

  8. Validity of PROMIS® Physical Function Measures in Diverse Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalet, Benjamin D.; Hays, Ron D.; Jensen, Sally E.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Fries, James F.; Cella, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the validity of the PROMIS® Physical Function measures using longitudinal data collected in six chronic health conditions. Study Design and Setting Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), major depressive disorder (MDD), back pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic heart failure (CHF), and cancer completed the PROMIS Physical Function computerized adaptive test (CAT) or fixed-length short form (SF) at baseline and at the end of clinically-relevant follow-up intervals. Anchor items were also administered to assess change in physical function and general health. Linear mixed effects models and standardized response means were estimated at baseline and follow-up. Results 1415 individuals participated (COPD n = 121; CHF n = 57; back pain n = 218; MDD n = 196, RA n = 521; cancer n = 302). The PROMIS Physical Function scores improved significantly for treatment of CHF and back pain patients, but not for patients with MDD or COPD. Most of the patient subsamples that reported improvement or worsening on the anchors showed a corresponding positive or negative change in PROMIS Physical Function. Conclusion This study provides evidence that the PROMIS Physical Function measures are sensitive to change in intervention studies where physical function is expected to change and able to distinguish among different clinical samples. The results inform the estimation of meaningful change, enabling comparative effectiveness research. PMID:26970039

  9. A DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Agustin F.; Assenov, Yassen; Martin-Subero, Jose Ignacio; Balint, Balazs; Siebert, Reiner; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hidalgo, Manuel; Tan, Aik-Choon; Galm, Oliver; Ferrer, Isidre; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Villanueva, Alberto; Carmona, Javier; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Berdasco, Maria; Moreno, Victor; Capella, Gabriel; Monk, David; Ballestar, Esteban; Ropero, Santiago; Martinez, Ramon; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Prosper, Felipe; Agirre, Xabier; Fraga, Mario F.; Graña, Osvaldo; Perez-Jurado, Luis; Mora, Jaume; Puig, Susana; Prat, Jaime; Badimon, Lina; Puca, Annibale A.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Lengauer, Thomas; Bridgewater, John; Bock, Christoph; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Most of the studies characterizing DNA methylation patterns have been restricted to particular genomic loci in a limited number of human samples and pathological conditions. Herein, we present a compromise between an extremely comprehensive study of a human sample population with an intermediate level of resolution of CpGs at the genomic level. We obtained a DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples in which we interrogated 1505 CpG sites. The DNA methylation patterns revealed show this epigenetic mark to be critical in tissue-type definition and stemness, particularly around transcription start sites that are not within a CpG island. For disease, the generated DNA methylation fingerprints show that, during tumorigenesis, human cancer cells underwent a progressive gain of promoter CpG-island hypermethylation and a loss of CpG methylation in non-CpG-island promoters. Although transformed cells are those in which DNA methylation disruption is more obvious, we observed that other common human diseases, such as neurological and autoimmune disorders, had their own distinct DNA methylation profiles. Most importantly, we provide proof of principle that the DNA methylation fingerprints obtained might be useful for translational purposes by showing that we are able to identify the tumor type origin of cancers of unknown primary origin (CUPs). Thus, the DNA methylation patterns identified across the largest spectrum of samples, tissues, and diseases reported to date constitute a baseline for developing higher-resolution DNA methylation maps and provide important clues concerning the contribution of CpG methylation to tissue identity and its changes in the most prevalent human diseases. PMID:21613409

  10. On the improvement of blood sample collection at clinical laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood samples are usually collected daily from different collection points, such hospitals and health centers, and transported to a core laboratory for testing. This paper presents a project to improve the collection routes of two of the largest clinical laboratories in Spain. These routes must be designed in a cost-efficient manner while satisfying two important constraints: (i) two-hour time windows between collection and delivery, and (ii) vehicle capacity. Methods A heuristic method based on a genetic algorithm has been designed to solve the problem of blood sample collection. The user enters the following information for each collection point: postal address, average collecting time, and average demand (in thermal containers). After implementing the algorithm using C programming, this is run and, in few seconds, it obtains optimal (or near-optimal) collection routes that specify the collection sequence for each vehicle. Different scenarios using various types of vehicles have been considered. Unless new collection points are added or problem parameters are changed substantially, routes need to be designed only once. Results The two laboratories in this study previously planned routes manually for 43 and 74 collection points, respectively. These routes were covered by an external carrier company. With the implementation of this algorithm, the number of routes could be reduced from ten to seven in one laboratory and from twelve to nine in the other, which represents significant annual savings in transportation costs. Conclusions The algorithm presented can be easily implemented in other laboratories that face this type of problem, and it is particularly interesting and useful as the number of collection points increases. The method designs blood collection routes with reduced costs that meet the time and capacity constraints of the problem. PMID:24406140

  11. Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Acinetobacter Baumanii Strains Isolated from Clinical Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Aðca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available      Aim :  In this study it was aimed to investigate the antibiotic susceptibilities of Acinetobacter baumanii strains isolated from various clinical samples sent to Tavsanli State Hospital Microbiology Laboratory retrospectively. Material and Method: All of the cultures were examined for the agent and antibiotic susceptibilities. For the identification of bacteria, various chemical tests and BBL Crystal E/NF (Beckton Dickinson, ABD system was used. Antibiotic susceptibilities were investigated according to CLSI criteria on Mueller Hinton agar by disc diffusion method. Results: There were 74 strains isolated and identified as Acinetobacter baumanii. Most of the strains were isolated from  tracheal aspirate specimens (46 % Most of the strains were isolated from nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance was high among strains. The most susceptible antibiotic was gentamicin (30%. Discussion: To prevent the development of resistance, antibiotics should be used carefully in appropriate doses and time, empirical  antibiotherapy should be determined for each centre according to resistance rates of the centre and should be regulated according to the antibiogram results. Increasing resistance rates in Acinetobacter strains leads to the usage of new alternative antibiotics.  

  12. Social Cognition in a Clinical Sample of Personality Disorder Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tagle, Amparo; Costanzo, Elsa; De Achával, Delfina; Guinjoan, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Social cognition was assessed in a clinical sample of personality disorder (PD) stable patients receiving ambulatory treatment (N = 17) and healthy matched controls (N = 17) using tests of recognition of emotions in faces and eyes, in a test of social faux pas and in theory of mind (ToM) stories. Results indicated that when compared with healthy controls, individuals with PD showed a clear tendency to obtain lower scoring in tasks assessing recognition of emotion in faces (T = −2.602, p = 0.014), eyes (T = −3.593, p = 0.001), ToM stories (T = −4.706, p = 0.000), and Faux pas (T = −2.227, p = 0.035). In the present pilot study, PD individuals with a normal cognitive efficiency showed an impaired performance at social cognition assessment including emotion recognition and ToM. PMID:26074824

  13. Non-invasive prenatal chromosomal aneuploidy testing--clinical experience: 100,000 clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron M McCullough

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: As the first laboratory to offer massively parallel sequencing-based noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT for fetal aneuploidies, Sequenom Laboratories has been able to collect the largest clinical population experience data to date, including >100,000 clinical samples from all 50 U.S. states and 13 other countries. The objective of this study is to give a robust clinical picture of the current laboratory performance of the MaterniT21 PLUS LDT. STUDY DESIGN: The study includes plasma samples collected from patients with high-risk pregnancies in our CLIA-licensed, CAP-accredited laboratory between August 2012 to June 2013. Samples were assessed for trisomies 13, 18, 21 and for the presence of chromosome Y-specific DNA. Sample data and ad hoc outcome information provided by the clinician was compiled and reviewed to determine the characteristics of this patient population, as well as estimate the assay performance in a clinical setting. RESULTS: NIPT patients most commonly undergo testing at an average of 15 weeks, 3 days gestation; and average 35.1 years of age. The average turnaround time is 4.54 business days and an overall 1.3% not reportable rate. The positivity rate for Trisomy 21 was 1.51%, followed by 0.45% and 0.21% rate for Trisomies 18 and 13, respectively. NIPT positivity rates are similar to previous large clinical studies of aneuploidy in women of maternal age ≥ 35 undergoing amniocentesis. In this population 3519 patients had multifetal gestations (3.5% with 2.61% yielding a positive NIPT result. CONCLUSION: NIPT has been commercially offered for just over 2 years and the clinical use by patients and clinicians has increased significantly. The risks associated with invasive testing have been substantially reduced by providing another assessment of aneuploidy status in high-risk patients. The accuracy and NIPT assay positivity rate are as predicted by clinical validations and the test demonstrates improvement in the

  14. Groundbreaking Mars Sample Return for Science and Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara; Draper, David; Eppler, Dean; Treiman, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Partnerships between science and human exploration have recent heritage for the Moon (Lunar Precursor Robotics Program, LPRP) and nearearth objects (Exploration Precursor Robotics Program, xPRP). Both programs spent appreciable time and effort determining measurements needed or desired before human missions to these destinations. These measurements may be crucial to human health or spacecraft design, or may be desired to better optimize systems designs such as spacesuits or operations. Both LPRP and xPRP recommended measurements from orbit, by landed missions and by sample return. LPRP conducted the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) missions, providing high-resolution visible imagery, surface and subsurface temperatures, global topography, mapping of possible water ice deposits, and the biological effects of radiation [1]. LPRP also initiated a landed mission to provide dust and regolith properties, local lighting conditions, assessment of resources, and demonstration of precision landing [2]. This mission was canceled in 2006 due to funding shortfalls. For the Moon, adequate samples of rocks and regolith were returned by the Apollo and Luna programs to conduct needed investigations. Many near-earth asteroids (NEAs) have been observed from the Earth and several have been more extensively characterized by close-flying missions and landings (NEAR, Hayabusa, Rosetta). The current Joint Robotic Precursor Activity program is considering activities such as partnering with the New Frontiers mission OSIRIS-Rex to visit a NEA and return a sample to the Earth. However, a strong consensus of the NEO User Team within xPRP was that a dedicated mission to the asteroid targeted by humans is required [3], ideally including regolith sample return for more extensive characterization and testing on the Earth.

  15. Sampling strategy for estimating human exposure pathways to consumer chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Papadopoulou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure to consumer chemicals has become a worldwide concern. In this work, a comprehensive sampling strategy is presented, to our knowledge being the first to study all relevant exposure pathways in a single cohort using multiple methods for assessment of exposure from each exposure pathway. The selected groups of chemicals to be studied are consumer chemicals whose production and use are currently in a state of transition and are; per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs, traditional and “emerging” brominated flame retardants (BFRs and EBFRs, organophosphate esters (OPEs and phthalate esters (PEs. Information about human exposure to these contaminants is needed due to existing data gaps on human exposure intakes from multiple exposure pathways and relationships between internal and external exposure. Indoor environment, food and biological samples were collected from 61 participants and their households in the Oslo area (Norway on two consecutive days, during winter 2013-14. Air, dust, hand wipes, and duplicate diet (food and drink samples were collected as indicators of external exposure, and blood, urine, blood spots, hair, nails and saliva as indicators of internal exposure. A food diary, food frequency questionnaire (FFQ and indoor environment questionnaire were also implemented. Approximately 2000 samples were collected in total and participant views on their experiences of this campaign were collected via questionnaire. While 91% of our participants were positive about future participation in a similar project, some tasks were viewed as problematic. Completing the food diary and collection of duplicate food/drink portions were the tasks most frequent reported as “hard”/”very hard”. Nevertheless, a strong positive correlation between the reported total mass of food/drinks in the food record and the total weight of the food/drinks in the collection bottles was observed, being an indication of accurate performance

  16. [Fusarium graminearum presence in wheat samples for human consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Mauro; Castañares, Eliana; Dinolfo, María I; Pacheco, Walter G; Moreno, María V; Stenglein, Sebastián A

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important diseases in cereal crops is Fusarium head blight, being Fusarium graminearum the main etiological agent. This fungus has the ability to produce a wide spectrum and quantity of toxins, especially deoxynivalenol (DON). During the last crop season (2012-2013) the climatic conditions favored Fusarium colonization. The objective of this work was to determine the presence of this fungus as well as the DON content in 50 wheat grain samples. Our results showed that 80% of the samples were contaminated with Fusarium graminearum. Twenty four percent (24%) of the samples contained ≥ 1μg/g DON, 26% ranged from 0,5 and 0,99μg/g, and the remaining 50% had values lower than 0,5μg/g. Correlation was found between the presence of Fusarium graminearum and DON. It is necessary to establish DON limit values in wheat grains for human consumption.

  17. Clinical performance of a human papillomavirus messenger RNA test (Aptima HPV Assay) on residual material from archived 3-year-old PreservCyt samples with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldstrøm, Marianne; Ornskov, Dorthe

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is widely used in the triage of women with a borderline smear result but the efficiency of testing women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) is less clear, mainly because of lack of specificity. New HPV tests are emerging, which detect E6/E7...

  18. HUMAN OCULAR DIROFILARIOSIS: CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Trenkić-Božinović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilarioses are zoonoses caused by filaria of the genus Dirofilaria, the parasites of domestic and wild animals. People are just random carriers of this parasite. In Europe, human dirofilariosis is caused by two species: Dirofilaria repens ( D. repens, also known as a species of The Old World , usually with the superficial localization of infection, and D. immitis, which is present throughout the world, and causes, beside superficial, visceral dirofilariosis. So far, based on the data from reference literature, it can be observed that in Serbia about 34 cases of human dirofilariosis have been diagnosed and published. It is assumed that the prevalence of this parasitosis is significantly higher as our country is an endemic area for dirofilariosis in dogs and the region where species of mosquitoes, which are transitory hosts and vectors of Dirofilaria spp., are present. The clinical picture of dirofilariosis depends on the type and location of the parasite in the human body. In our country, patients diagnosed with dirofilariosis had subcutaneous or subconjunctival infection in the majority of cases. Ocular dirofilariosis may affect the orbit and the periorbital region, the skin of the eyelids, the conjunctiva, the Tenon membrane, a retrobulbar space or has an intrabulbar localization. These patients may have a severe disability, and surgery alone can be complicated due to localization. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of this unexpected important zoonoses, with special emphasis on the importance within the ophthalmic practice.

  19. Estimating Sampling Selection Bias in Human Genetics: A Phenomenological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Davide; Taglioli, Luca; De Iasio, Sergio; Gueresi, Paola; Alfani, Guido; Nelli, Sergio; Rossi, Paolo; Paoli, Giorgio; Tofanelli, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    This research is the first empirical attempt to calculate the various components of the hidden bias associated with the sampling strategies routinely-used in human genetics, with special reference to surname-based strategies. We reconstructed surname distributions of 26 Italian communities with different demographic features across the last six centuries (years 1447–2001). The degree of overlapping between "reference founding core" distributions and the distributions obtained from sampling the present day communities by probabilistic and selective methods was quantified under different conditions and models. When taking into account only one individual per surname (low kinship model), the average discrepancy was 59.5%, with a peak of 84% by random sampling. When multiple individuals per surname were considered (high kinship model), the discrepancy decreased by 8–30% at the cost of a larger variance. Criteria aimed at maximizing locally-spread patrilineages and long-term residency appeared to be affected by recent gene flows much more than expected. Selection of the more frequent family names following low kinship criteria proved to be a suitable approach only for historically stable communities. In any other case true random sampling, despite its high variance, did not return more biased estimates than other selective methods. Our results indicate that the sampling of individuals bearing historically documented surnames (founders' method) should be applied, especially when studying the male-specific genome, to prevent an over-stratification of ancient and recent genetic components that heavily biases inferences and statistics. PMID:26452043

  20. Clinical illnesses associated with isolation of dysgonic fermenter 3 from stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, R N; Berry, C D; Phillips, M G; Hamilos, D L; Koneman, E W

    1992-02-01

    The clinical significance of the fastidious organism DF-3 isolated from stool cultures is unclear. We sought to improve our understanding of this organism and to further define its association with human disease. Stool cultures for DF-3 were obtained from three sources: an ongoing study of enteric pathogens in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, a screening procedure in which all stool samples submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin assay were cultured for DF-3, and stool samples submitted specifically for DF-3 culture. Retrospective clinical data were obtained from chart reviews of patients with positive cultures. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and cell wall fatty acid analysis were performed for each DF-3 isolated. Eight isolates of DF-3 were obtained over a period of 8 months. All patients either had severe underlying disease or were immunocompromised, including three patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and two patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The spectrum of clinical disease ranged from chronic diarrhea with a well-defined response to therapy for DF-3 to an asymptomatic carrier state. Cell wall fatty acid analysis of these isolates demonstrated a consistent pattern with a large peak of 12-methyltetradecanoate. DF-3, a fastidious gram-negative coccobacillus, can be recovered from stool cultures of immunocompromised patients by using selective media. The presence of 12-methyltetradecanoate in cell wall fatty acid analysis assists in identification. The increased use of a selective medium-(cefoperazone-vancomycin-amphotericin B) in the evaluation of diarrhea in immunocompromised hosts, including persons with inflammatory bowel disease, may better define the association of DF-3 with human gastrointestinal disease.

  1. Recognition of human face based on improved multi-sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xia; LI Lei-lei; LI Ting-jun; LIU Lu; ZHANG Ying

    2009-01-01

    In order to solve the problem caused by variation illumination in human face recognition, we bring forward a face recognition algorithm based on the improved muhi-sample. In this algorithm, the face image is processed with Retinex theory, meanwhile, the Gabor filter is adopted to perform the feature extraction. The experimental results show that the application of Retinex theory improves the recognition accuracy, and makes the algorithm more robust to the variation illumination. The Gabor filter is more effective and accurate for extracting more useable facial local features. It is proved that the proposed algorithm has good recognition accuracy and it is stable under variation illumination.

  2. Human RAG mutations: biochemistry and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kim, Min-Sung; Walter, Jolan E; Lee, Yu Nee

    2016-04-01

    The recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) and RAG2 proteins initiate the V(D)J recombination process, which ultimately enables the generation of T cells and B cells with a diversified repertoire of antigen-specific receptors. Mutations of the RAG genes in humans are associated with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes, ranging from severe combined immunodeficiency to autoimmunity. Recently, novel insights into the phenotypic diversity of this disease have been provided by resolving the crystal structure of the RAG complex, by developing novel assays to test recombination activity of the mutant RAG proteins and by characterizing the molecular and cellular basis of immune dysregulation in patients with RAG deficiency.

  3. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Marina; Camargo, Milena; Soto-De Leon, Sara C; Sanchez, Ricardo; Parra, Diana; Pineda, Andrea C; Sussmann, Otto; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2013-01-01

    Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204) were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R). HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58) and two low-risk (LR-HPV) (HPV-6/11) types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine) followed by HPV-31(47.2%) in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7%) in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV) in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  4. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Munoz

    Full Text Available Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204 were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R. HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58 and two low-risk (LR-HPV (HPV-6/11 types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine followed by HPV-31(47.2% in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7% in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  5. Spectrophotometric assay of creatinine in human serum sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Krishnegowda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new spectrophotometric method for the analysis of creatinine concentration in human serum samples is developed. The method explores the oxidation of p-methylamino phenol sulfate (Metol in the presence of copper sulfate and creatinine which yields an intense violet colored species with maximum absorbance at 530 nm. The calibration graph of creatinine by fixed time assay ranged from 4.4 to 620 μM. Recovery of creatinine in human serum samples varied from 101% to 106%. Limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.145 μM and 0.487 μM respectively. Sandell’s sensitivity was 0.112 μg cm−2 and molar absorptivity was 0.101 × 104 L mol−1 cm−1. Within day precision was 2.5–4.8% and day-to-day precision range was 3.2–7.8%. The robustness and ruggedness of the method expressed in RSD values ranged from 0.78% to 2.12% and 1.32% to 3.46% respectively, suggesting that the developed method was rugged. This method provides good sensitivity and is comparable to standard Jaffe’s method with comparatively less interference from foreign substances.

  6. Rapid extraction and preservation of genomic DNA from human samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundaram, D; Kim, J-H; Yeo, W-H; Oh, K; Lee, K-H; Kim, M-H; Ryew, S-M; Ahn, S-G; Gao, D; Cangelosi, G A; Chung, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Simple and rapid extraction of human genomic DNA remains a bottleneck for genome analysis and disease diagnosis. Current methods using microfilters require cumbersome, multiple handling steps in part because salt conditions must be controlled for attraction and elution of DNA in porous silica. We report a novel extraction method of human genomic DNA from buccal swab and saliva samples. DNA is attracted onto a gold-coated microchip by an electric field and capillary action while the captured DNA is eluted by thermal heating at 70 °C. A prototype device was designed to handle four microchips, and a compatible protocol was developed. The extracted DNA using microchips was characterized by qPCR for different sample volumes, using different lengths of PCR amplicon, and nuclear and mitochondrial genes. In comparison with a commercial kit, an equivalent yield of DNA extraction was achieved with fewer steps. Room-temperature preservation for 1 month was demonstrated for captured DNA, facilitating straightforward collection, delivery, and handling of genomic DNA in an environment-friendly protocol.

  7. FANTOM5 CAGE profiles of human and mouse samples

    KAUST Repository

    Noguchi, Shuhei

    2017-08-29

    In the FANTOM5 project, transcription initiation events across the human and mouse genomes were mapped at a single base-pair resolution and their frequencies were monitored by CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) coupled with single-molecule sequencing. Approximately three thousands of samples, consisting of a variety of primary cells, tissues, cell lines, and time series samples during cell activation and development, were subjected to a uniform pipeline of CAGE data production. The analysis pipeline started by measuring RNA extracts to assess their quality, and continued to CAGE library production by using a robotic or a manual workflow, single molecule sequencing, and computational processing to generate frequencies of transcription initiation. Resulting data represents the consequence of transcriptional regulation in each analyzed state of mammalian cells. Non-overlapping peaks over the CAGE profiles, approximately 200,000 and 150,000 peaks for the human and mouse genomes, were identified and annotated to provide precise location of known promoters as well as novel ones, and to quantify their activities.

  8. Quantitation of sulfate and thiosulfate in clinical samples by ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, D E; Evrovski, J

    1997-11-21

    For assay of serum sulfate, quantitation by ion conductimetry after separation by anion-exchange chromatography is the method of choice. In comparison to classical barium precipitation methods, chromatographic methods demonstrate increased precision, specificity and sensitivity, and they may be superior to spectrophotometric methods that rely on organic cation precipitation of sulfate. The increased sensitivity and specificity, as well as the inherent capacity of chromatographic methods for simultaneous determination of other anions, has led to its increasing use in the determination of excreted sulfate in clinical profiles of urinary anion composition. Ion chromatography can also be used to quantitate free sulfate in other clinical samples, including cerebrospinal fluid, sweat, saliva, breast milk and human tissues. Finally, ion chromatography shows promise as a more precise and sensitive method for measurement of total acid-labile sulfoesters and thiosulfate.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of Escherichia coli strains isolated from human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Derakhshandeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli is a normal inhabitant of the gastrointestinal tract of vertebrates, including humans. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D. Group A and B1 are generally associated with commensals, whereas group B2 is associated with extra-intestinal pathotypes. Most enteropathogenic isolates, however, are assigned to group D. In the present study, a total of 102 E. coli strains, isolated from human samples, were used. Phylogenetic grouping was done based on the Clermont triplex PCR method using primers targeted at three genetic markers, chuA, yjaA and TspE4.C2. Group A contained the majority of the collected isolates (69 isolates, 67.64%, followed by group B2 (18 isolates, 17.64% and D (15 isolates, 14.7% and no strains were found to belong to group B1. The distribution of phylogenetic groups in our study suggests that although the majority of strains were commensals, the prevalence of enteropathogenic and extra-intestinal pathotypes was noteworthy. Therefore, the role of E. coli in human infections including diarrhea, urinary tract infections and meningitis should be considered.

  10. Profiling critical cancer gene mutations in clinical tumor samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E MacConaill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Detection of critical cancer gene mutations in clinical tumor specimens may predict patient outcomes and inform treatment options; however, high-throughput mutation profiling remains underdeveloped as a diagnostic approach. We report the implementation of a genotyping and validation algorithm that enables robust tumor mutation profiling in the clinical setting. METHODOLOGY: We developed and implemented an optimized mutation profiling platform ("OncoMap" to interrogate approximately 400 mutations in 33 known oncogenes and tumor suppressors, many of which are known to predict response or resistance to targeted therapies. The performance of OncoMap was analyzed using DNA derived from both frozen and FFPE clinical material in a diverse set of cancer types. A subsequent in-depth analysis was conducted on histologically and clinically annotated pediatric gliomas. The sensitivity and specificity of OncoMap were 93.8% and 100% in fresh frozen tissue; and 89.3% and 99.4% in FFPE-derived DNA. We detected known mutations at the expected frequencies in common cancers, as well as novel mutations in adult and pediatric cancers that are likely to predict heightened response or resistance to existing or developmental cancer therapies. OncoMap profiles also support a new molecular stratification of pediatric low-grade gliomas based on BRAF mutations that may have immediate clinical impact. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the clinical feasibility of high-throughput mutation profiling to query a large panel of "actionable" cancer gene mutations. In the future, this type of approach may be incorporated into both cancer epidemiologic studies and clinical decision making to specify the use of many targeted anticancer agents.

  11. Classification of Ralstonia pickettii-like isolates from the environment and clinical samples as Ralstonia insidiosa sp nov.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenye, T; Goris, J; de Vos, P; Vandamme, P; LiPuma, JJ

    2003-01-01

    Thirteen Ralstonia pickettii-like isolates from the environment (water, soil and activated sludge) and human clinical samples (including respiratory secretions of cystic fibrosis patients) were investigated in a polyphasic taxonomic study that employed 16S rDNA sequence analysis, DNA-DNA hybridizati

  12. Classification of Ralstonia pickettii-like isolates from the environment and clinical samples as Ralstonia insidiosa sp nov.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenye, T; Goris, J; de Vos, P; Vandamme, P; LiPuma, JJ

    2003-01-01

    Thirteen Ralstonia pickettii-like isolates from the environment (water, soil and activated sludge) and human clinical samples (including respiratory secretions of cystic fibrosis patients) were investigated in a polyphasic taxonomic study that employed 16S rDNA sequence analysis, DNA-DNA hybridizati

  13. From clinical sites to biorepositories: effectiveness in blood sample management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Céline; Tremblay, Nancy; Iverson, Bonnie; Wong, David; McWeeny, Kerri; Saghbini, Michael; Martinez, Heather; Hogan, Michael; Gaudet, Daniel; Arsenault, Steve

    2010-12-01

    Today's biobanks must work to take full advantage of collected samples, while maximizing sample quality and minimizing costs to sustain operations for a long period of time. This is a tall order that will require collaboration and compromise for both end-users and collection sites. This article discusses the efforts of the Génome Québec-Centre Hospitalier Affilié Universitaire Régional de Chicoutimi Biobank to fractionate blood samples for the simultaneous preservation of plasma and DNA-containing layers while minimizing resources required for shipping and transport. This article also describes methods for successful reproducible application of the plasma-depleted blood sample to GenPlates (GenVault, Carlsbad, CA).

  14. Clinical supervision reflected in a Danish DPCCQ sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    on describing the amount and type of supervision received and given by the sample. Findings from these descriptive statistics will be compared within the sample across demographic parameters such as age and sex, and professional characteristics such as career level, theoretical preferences, type of clients...... (pathology), satisfaction or distress at work, etc. Discussion: Implications of the findings for the development of therapists and the training of supervisors will be discussed....

  15. Sample size considerations for clinical research studies in nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuzan, Cody; West, Erin A; Duong, Jimmy; Cheung, Ken Y K; Einstein, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Sample size calculation is an important element of research design that investigators need to consider in the planning stage of the study. Funding agencies and research review panels request a power analysis, for example, to determine the minimum number of subjects needed for an experiment to be informative. Calculating the right sample size is crucial to gaining accurate information and ensures that research resources are used efficiently and ethically. The simple question "How many subjects do I need?" does not always have a simple answer. Before calculating the sample size requirements, a researcher must address several aspects, such as purpose of the research (descriptive or comparative), type of samples (one or more groups), and data being collected (continuous or categorical). In this article, we describe some of the most frequent methods for calculating the sample size with examples from nuclear cardiology research, including for t tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), non-parametric tests, correlation, Chi-squared tests, and survival analysis. For the ease of implementation, several examples are also illustrated via user-friendly free statistical software.

  16. Saliva sampling in global clinical studies: the impact of low sampling volume on performance of DNA in downstream genotyping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The collection of viable DNA samples is an essential element of any genetics research programme. Biological samples for DNA purification are now routinely collected in many studies with a variety of sampling methods available. Initial observation in this study suggested a reduced genotyping success rate of some saliva derived DNA samples when compared to blood derived DNA samples prompting further investigation. Methods Genotyping success rate was investigated to assess the suitability of using saliva samples in future safety and efficacy pharmacogenetics experiments. The Oragene® OG-300 DNA Self-Collection kit was used to collect and extract DNA from saliva from 1468 subjects enrolled in global clinical studies. Statistical analysis evaluated the impact of saliva sample volume of collection on the quality, yield, concentration and performance of saliva DNA in genotyping assays. Results Across 13 global clinical studies that utilized the Oragene® OG-300 DNA Self-Collection kit there was variability in the volume of saliva sample collection with ~31% of participants providing 0.5 mL of saliva, rather than the recommended 2 mL. While the majority of saliva DNA samples provided high quality genotype data, collection of 0.5 mL volumes of saliva contributed to DNA samples being significantly less likely to pass genotyping quality control standards. Assessment of DNA sample characteristics that may influence genotyping outcomes indicated that saliva sample volume, DNA purity and turbidity were independently associated with sample genotype pass rate, but that saliva collection volume had the greatest effect. Conclusion When employing saliva sampling to obtain DNA, it is important to encourage all study participants to provide sufficient sample to minimize potential loss of data in downstream genotyping experiments. PMID:23759220

  17. Analytical artefacts in the speciation of arsenic in clinical samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slejkovec, Zdenka [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: zdenka.slejkovec@ijs.si; Falnoga, Ingrid [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Goessler, Walter [Institute of Chemistry - Analytical Chemistry, Karl-Franzens University Graz, Universitaetsplatz 1, Graz (Austria); Elteren, Johannes T. van [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Raml, Reingard [Institute of Chemistry - Analytical Chemistry, Karl-Franzens University Graz, Universitaetsplatz 1, Graz (Austria); Podgornik, Helena; Cernelc, Peter [University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Zaloska 7, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-01-21

    Urine and blood samples of cancer patients, treated with high doses of arsenic trioxide were analysed for arsenic species using HPLC-HGAFS and, in some cases, HPLC-ICPMS. Total arsenic was determined with either flow injection-HGAFS in urine or radiochemical neutron activation analysis in blood fractions (in serum/plasma, blood cells). The total arsenic concentrations (during prolonged, daily/weekly arsenic trioxide therapy) were in the {mu}g mL{sup -1} range for urine and in the ng g{sup -1} range for blood fractions. The main arsenic species found in urine were As(III), MA and DMA and in blood As(V), MA and DMA. With proper sample preparation and storage of urine (no preservation agents/storage in liquid nitrogen) no analytical artefacts were observed and absence of significant amounts of alleged trivalent metabolites was proven. On the contrary, in blood samples a certain amount of arsenic can get lost in the speciation procedure what was especially noticeable for the blood cells although also plasma/serum gave rise to some disappearance of arsenic. The latter losses may be attributed to precipitation of As(III)-containing proteins/peptides during the methanol/water extraction procedure whereas the former losses were due to loss of specific As(III)-complexing proteins/peptides (e.g. cysteine, metallothionein, reduced GSH, ferritin) on the column (Hamilton PRP-X100) during the separation procedure. Contemporary analytical protocols are not able to completely avoid artefacts due to losses from the sampling to the detection stage so that it is recommended to be careful with the explanation of results, particularly regarding metabolic and pharmacokinetic interpretations, and always aim to compare the sum of species with the total arsenic concentration determined independently.

  18. Clinical impact of human breast milk metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Dessì, Angelica; Corbu, Sara; Reali, Alessandra; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomics is a research field concerned with the analysis of metabolome, the complete set of metabolites in a given cell, tissue, or biological sample. Being able to provide a molecular snapshot of biological systems, metabolomics has emerged as a functional methodology in a wide range of research areas such as toxicology, pharmacology, food technology, nutrition, microbial biotechnology, systems biology, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the applications of metabolomics in investigating the human breast milk (HBM) metabolome. HBM is the recommended source of nutrition for infants since it contains the optimal balance of nutrients for developing babies, and it provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity, and development. The molecular mechanisms beyond the inter- and intra-variability of HBM that make its composition unique are yet to be well-characterized. Although still in its infancy, the study of HBM metabolome has already proven itself to be of great value in providing insights into this biochemical variability in relation to mother phenotype, diet, disease, and lifestyle. The results of these investigations lay the foundation for further developments useful to identify normal and aberrant biochemical changes as well as to develop strategies to promote healthy infant feeding practices.

  19. Sample sizes in dosage investigational clinical trials: a systematic evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Huang JH; Su QM; Yang J; Lv YH; He YC; Chen JC; Xu L; Wang K; Zheng QS

    2015-01-01

    Ji-Han Huang,1,* Qian-Min Su,2,* Juan Yang,1 Ying-Hua Lv,1 Ying-Chun He,1 Jun-Chao Chen,1 Ling Xu,1 Kun Wang,1 Qing-Shan Zheng11Center for Drug Clinical Research, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Computer, College of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: T...

  20. Relationship between parenting styles, psychopathological intensity and type of symptoms in a adolescents clinical sample

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jose Miguel Antón San Martín; David Seguí-Durán; Laura Antón-Torre

    2016-01-01

      An investigation was conducted to analyze the relationship between perceived parenting styles, presented intensity psychopathology and externalizing-internalizing dimensions in a clinical sample of...

  1. Design, data analysis and sampling techniques for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Karthik; Thomas, Sanjeev V; Suresh, Geetha

    2011-10-01

    Statistical analysis is an essential technique that enables a medical research practitioner to draw meaningful inference from their data analysis. Improper application of study design and data analysis may render insufficient and improper results and conclusion. Converting a medical problem into a statistical hypothesis with appropriate methodological and logical design and then back-translating the statistical results into relevant medical knowledge is a real challenge. This article explains various sampling methods that can be appropriately used in medical research with different scenarios and challenges.

  2. A confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-III in a clinical sample with crossvalidation in the standardization sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, D Bradley; Ryan, Joseph J; Axelrod, Bradley N; Schellenberger, Tony

    2002-05-01

    A maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) was performed by applying LISREL 8 to a clinical sample (n=328). Analyses were designed to determine which of the nine hypothesized oblique factor solutions could best explain intelligence as measured by the WAIS-III in the general clinical sample. Competing latent variable models were identified in previous studies and a priori model modifications were made to test derivations of the nine base models. Results in the clinical sample were crossvalidated by testing all models in the normative sample used in the standardization of the scale. Findings in both the clinical and standardization samples supported a six-factor model including Semantic Memory, Verbal Reasoning, Constructional Praxis, Visual Reasoning, Working Memory, and Processing Speed factors. Our analysis differed from that presented in the WAIS-III manual as we tested more complex models of intelligence in addition to the ones evaluated by the test publishers. As a result, a six-factor model that corresponded to an expanded version of a model based on Horn's Gf-Gc theory was empirically supported as having the best fit to the data. More complex derivations of this model failed to achieve sufficient goodness of fit.

  3. A confirmatory factor analysis of the WMS-III in a clinical sample with crossvalidation in the standardization sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley Burton, D; Ryan, Joseph J; Axelrod, Bradley N; Schellenberger, Tony; Richards, Heather M

    2003-08-01

    A maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) was performed by applying LISREL 8 to a general clinical sample (n=281). Analyses were designed to determine which of seven hypothesized oblique factor solutions could best explain memory as measured by the WMS-III. Competing latent variable models were identified in previous studies. Results in the clinical sample were crossvalidated by testing all models in the WMS-III standardization samples (combined n=1,250). Findings in both the clinical and standardization samples supported a four-factor model containing auditory memory, visual memory, working memory, and learning factors. Our analysis differed from that presented in the WMS-III manual and by other authors. We tested our models in a clinical sample and included selected word list subtests in order to test the viability of a learning dimension. Consistent with prior research, we were also unable to empirically support the viability of the immediate and delayed memory indices, despite allowing the error terms between the immediate and delayed memory subtests to correlate.

  4. Survey and Rapid detection of Bordetella pertussis in clinical samples targeting the BP485 in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eLiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis is an important human respiratory pathogen. Here, we describe a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method for the rapid detection of B. pertussis in clinical samples based on a visual test. The LAMP assay detected the BP485 target sequence within 60 min with a detection limit of 1.3 pg/µl, a 10-fold increase in sensitivity compared with conventional PCR. All 31 non-pertussis respiratory pathogens tested were negative for LAMP detection, indicating the high specificity of the primers for B. pertussis. To evaluate the application of the LAMP assay to clinical diagnosis, of 105 sputum and nasopharyngeal samples collected from the patients with suspected respiratory infections in China, a total of 12 Bordetella pertussis isolates were identified from 33 positive samples detected by LAMP-based surveillance targeting BP485. Strikingly, a 4.5 months old baby and her mother were found to be infected with B. pertussis at the same time. All isolates belonged to different B. pertussis multilocus sequence typing (MLST groups with different alleles of the virulence-related genes including 4 alleles of ptxA, 6 of prn, 4 of tcfA, 2 of fim2 and 3 of fim3. The diversity of B. pertussis carrying toxin genes in clinical strains indicates a rapid and continuing evolution of B. pertussis. This combined with its high prevalence will make it difficult to control. In conclusion, we have developed a visual detection LAMP assay, which could be a useful tool for rapid B. pertussis detection, especially in situations where resources are poor and in point-of-care tests.

  5. Measuring cognitive errors using the Cognitive Distortions Scale (CDS: psychometric properties in clinical and non-clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Özdel

    Full Text Available The Cognitive Distortions Scale was developed to assess thinking errors using case examples in two domains: interpersonal and personal achievement. Although its validity and reliability has been previously demonstrated in non-clinical samples, its psychometric properties and scoring has not yet been evaluated. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Cognitive Distortions Scale in two Turkish samples and to examine the usefulness of the categorical scoring system. A total of 325 individuals (Sample 1 and Sample 2 were enrolled in this study to assess those psychometric properties. Our Sample 1 consisted of 225 individuals working as interns at the Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Teaching and Research Hospital and Sample 2 consisted of 100 patients diagnosed with depression presenting to the outpatient unit of the same Hospital. Construct validity was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, and the Automatic Thought Questionnaire. Factor analyses supported a one-factor model in these clinical and non-clinical samples. Cronbach's α values were excellent in both the non-clinical and clinical samples (0.933 and 0.918 respectively. Cognitive Distortions Scale scores showed significant correlation with relevant clinical measures. Study Cognitive Distortions Scale scores were stable over a time span of two weeks. This study showed that the Cognitive Distortions Scale is a valid and reliable measure in clinical and non-clinical populations. In addition, it shows that the categorical exists/does not exist scoring system is relevant and could be used in clinical settings.

  6. Reliable single cell array CGH for clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew T Czyż

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disseminated cancer cells (DCCs and circulating tumor cells (CTCs are extremely rare, but comprise the precursors cells of distant metastases or therapy resistant cells. The detailed molecular analysis of these cells may help to identify key events of cancer cell dissemination, metastatic colony formation and systemic therapy escape. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Ampli1™ whole genome amplification (WGA technology and high-resolution oligonucleotide aCGH microarrays we optimized conditions for the analysis of structural copy number changes. The protocol presented here enables reliable detection of numerical genomic alterations as small as 0.1 Mb in a single cell. Analysis of single cells from well-characterized cell lines and single normal cells confirmed the stringent quantitative nature of the amplification and hybridization protocol. Importantly, fixation and staining procedures used to detect DCCs showed no significant impact on the outcome of the analysis, proving the clinical usability of our method. In a proof-of-principle study we tracked the chromosomal changes of single DCCs over a full course of high-dose chemotherapy treatment by isolating and analyzing DCCs of an individual breast cancer patient at four different time points. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The protocol enables detailed genome analysis of DCCs and thereby assessment of the clonal evolution during the natural course of the disease and under selection pressures. The results from an exemplary patient provide evidence that DCCs surviving selective therapeutic conditions may be recruited from a pool of genomically less advanced cells, which display a stable subset of specific genomic alterations.

  7. Quantification of unmethylated Alu (QUAlu): a tool to assess global hypomethylation in routine clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buj, Raquel; Mallona, Izaskun; Díez-Villanueva, Anna; Barrera, Víctor; Mauricio, Dídac; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Reverter, Jordi L; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Azuara, Daniel; Ramírez, Jose L; Alonso, Sergio; Rosell, Rafael; Capellà, Gabriel; Perucho, Manuel; Robledo, Mercedes; Peinado, Miguel A; Jordà, Mireia

    2016-03-01

    Hypomethylation of DNA is a hallmark of cancer and its analysis as tumor biomarker has been proposed, but its determination in clinical settings is hampered by lack of standardized methodologies. Here, we present QUAlu (Quantification of Unmethylated Alu), a new technique to estimate the Percentage of UnMethylated Alu (PUMA) as a surrogate for global hypomethylation. QUAlu consists in the measurement by qPCR of Alu repeats after digestion of genomic DNA with isoschizomers with differential sensitivity to DNA methylation. QUAlu performance has been evaluated for reproducibility, trueness and specificity, and validated by deep sequencing. As a proof of use, QUAlu has been applied to a broad variety of pathological examination specimens covering five cancer types. Major findings of the preliminary application of QUAlu to clinical samples include: (1) all normal tissues displayed similar PUMA; (2) tumors showed variable PUMA with the highest levels in lung and colon and the lowest in thyroid cancer; (3) stools from colon cancer patients presented higher PUMA than those from control individuals; (4) lung squamous cell carcinomas showed higher PUMA than lung adenocarcinomas, and an increasing hypomethylation trend associated with smoking habits. In conclusion, QUAlu is a simple and robust method to determine Alu hypomethylation in human biospecimens and may be easily implemented in research and clinical settings.

  8. Sterile paper points as a bacterial DNA-contamination source in microbiome profiles of clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, J.; Buijs, M.J.; Laine, M.L.; Wismeijer, D.; Loos, B.G.; Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives High throughput sequencing of bacterial DNA from clinical samples provides untargeted, open-ended information on the entire microbial community. The downside of this approach is the vulnerability to DNA contamination from other sources than the clinical sample. Here we describe

  9. [Histological view of ethics in medicine and handling of residual samples in clinical laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2004-03-01

    One of the important ethical issues in clinical laboratory medicine is whether organs and/or specimens should belong to the examinees. Tracing back to ancient Greece, an episode of the death of Asklepios, killed by Zeus to revive the dead, and the great contribution of Hippocrates to medicine including the vow and ethics of medicine, have been described. In the relationship between doctors and patients, the former had been superior to the latter for more than 2400 years, however, the situation has been changing from that to the same position since 1960th, along with the development of bioethics from medical ethics. For the promotion of bioethics, world medical associations have contributed declarations and continuous discussion. The declarations are based on the avoidance of actions detrimental to the life, health, privacy or dignity of examinees. On the medical use of human organs and specimens in relation to human rights, the mind and the body, discussion has continued, however, a consensus on the details has not been reached. A view on the use of residual samples for methodological study, teaching and research in the clinical laboratory was proposed by the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine in 2002. Briefly, it included confidentiality of the laboratory staff, responsibility of the laboratory director, the absence of a necessity to obtain consent for the use of residual samples for methodological study when they are made anonymous or pooled, and the recommendation to obtain a judgement by an ethics committee for research use. The background and discussion for the proposal and the current situation on how to obtain consent from patients in Japan are mentioned.

  10. [The quality control of preanalytical variations for the determination of lead in samples of human origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kun; Wang, Wei; He, Falin; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this article was to provide the quality control requirements of preanalytical variation for the determination of lead in samples of human origin, reduce the influence of preanalytical variation on the test results. According to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute documents, control of preanalytical variation in trace element determinations, analytical procedures for the determination of lead in blood and urine and other references and guidelines, the methods of quality control of lead determination had been made, including: the factors needed to be considered before collection, preservation, transportation and other preanalytical factors, the abilities and considerations of laboratory staff, etc.

  11. Technical and clinical aspects of spectrometric analysis of trace elements in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S; Gerson, B; Reitz, R E; Sadjadi, S A

    1998-12-01

    The capabilities of ICP-MS far exceed the slow, single-element analysis of GFAAS for determination of multiple trace elements. Additionally, its sensitivity is superior to that of DCP, ICP, and FAAS. The analytic procedure for ICP-MS is relatively straightforward and bypasses the need for digestion in many cases. It enables the physician to identify the target trace element(s) in intoxication cases, nutritional deficiency, or disease, thus eliminating the treatment delays experienced with sequential testing methods. This technology has its limitations as well. The ICP-MS cannot be used in the positive ion mode to analyze with sufficient sensitivity highly electronegative elements such as fluorine, because F+ is unstable and forms only by very high ionization energy. The ICP mass spectrometers used in most commercial laboratories utilize the quadrupole mass selector, which is limited by low resolution and, thus, by the various interferences previously discussed. For example, when an argon plasma is used, selenium (m/e 80) and chromium (m/e 52) in serum, plasma, and blood specimens are subject to polyatomic and molecular ion interferences. Low-resolution ICP mass spectrometers can therefore be used to analyze many trace elements, but they are not universal analyzers. High-resolution ICP-MS can resolve these interferences, but with greater expense. With the advent of more research and development of new techniques, some of these difficulties may be overcome, making this technique even more versatile. Contamination during sample collection and analysis causes falsely elevated results. Attention and care must be given to avoid contamination. Proper collection devices containing negligible amounts of trace elements should be used. Labware, preferably plastic and not glass, must be decontaminated prior to use by acid-washing and rinsed with [table: see text] de-ionized water. A complete description of sample collection and contamination has been written by Aitio and

  12. Human Defensins: Potential Tools for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wenghoefer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As components of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides in the form of human defensins play an important role in host defense by serving as the epithelial layer’s biochemical barrier against local infections. Recent studies have shown these molecules to have far more additional cellular functions besides their antimicrobial activity. Defensins play a role in cell division, attraction and maturation of immune cells, differentiation and reorganization of epithelial tissues, wound healing and tumor suppression. This multitude of function makes human defensins appear to be excellent tools for therapeutic approaches. These antimicrobial peptides may be used directly as a remedy against bacterial and viral infections. Furthermore, the application of human defensins can be used to promote wound healing and epithelial reorganization. In particular, human β-defensins have a strong impact on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Human β-defensins have already been applied as a vaccination against HIV-1. Another potentially useful characteristic of defensins is their suitability as diagnostic markers in cancer therapy. In particular, α-defensins have already been used for this purpose. Human α-defensin-3, for example, has been described as a tumor marker for lymphocytes. High gene expression levels of α-defensin-3 and -4 have been detected in benign oral neoplasia, α-defensin-6 is considered to be a tumor marker for colon cancer.

  13. Muscle pain: animal and human experimental and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchettini, P

    1993-10-01

    The search for the identification of the sensory apparatus encoding muscle pain sensation in humans is recounted. Basic neurophysiologic animal studies, leading to a description of slowly conducting afferent from muscle and definition of high threshold polymodal muscle nociceptors, and pioneer psychophysic human studies together with recent microneurographic experiments in humans are described. The phenomena of muscle pain broad localization and distant referral are discussed, and clinical implications are extrapolated to interpret muscle pain as a localizing sign of mononeuropathy or radiculopathy. The identification of human muscle nociceptors has defined the scientific standard to test emerging clinical descriptions having muscle pain as a symptom.

  14. Nested-multiplex PCR detection of Orthopoxvirus and Parapoxvirus directly from exanthematic clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trindade Giliane S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orthopoxvirus (OPV and Parapoxvirus (PPV have been associated with worldwide exanthematic outbreaks. Some species of these genera are able to infect humans and domestic animals, causing serious economic losses and public health impact. Rapid, useful and highly specific methods are required to detect and epidemiologically monitor such poxviruses. In the present paper, we describe the development of a nested-multiplex PCR method for the simultaneous detection of OPV and PPV species directly from exanthematic lesions, with no previous viral isolation or DNA extraction. Methods and Results The OPV/PPV nested-multiplex PCR was developed based on the evaluation and combination of published primer sets, and was applied to the detection of the target pathogens. The method showed high sensitivity, and the specificity was confirmed by amplicon sequencing. Exanthematic lesion samples collected during bovine vaccinia or contagious ecthyma outbreaks were submitted to OPV/PPV nested-multiplex PCR and confirmed its applicability. Conclusion These results suggest that the presented multiplex PCR provides a highly robust and sensitive method to detect OPV and PPV directly from clinical samples. The method can be used for viral identification and monitoring, especially in areas where OPV and PPV co-circulate.

  15. The Dutch version of the Child Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory: validation in a clinical sample and a school sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Diehle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the inclusion of trauma-related cognitions in the DSM-5 criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, the assessment of these cognitions has become essential. Therefore, valid tools for the assessment of these cognitions are warranted. Objective: The current study aimed at validating the Dutch version of the Child Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory (CPTCI. Method: We included children aged 8–19 years in our study and assessed the factor structure, reliability and validity of the CPTCI in a clinical sample (n=184 and a school sample (n=318. Results: Our results supported the two-factor structure of the CPTCI and showed good internal consistency for the total scale and the two subscales. We found significant positive correlations between the CPTCI and measures of PTSD, depression, and anxiety disorder. The CPTCI correlated negatively with a measure of quality of life. Furthermore, we found significantly higher scores in the clinical sample than in the school sample. For children who received treatment, we found that a decrease in CPTCI scores was accompanied by a decrease in posttraumatic stress symptoms and comorbid problems indicating that the CPTCI is able to detect treatment effects. Conclusion: Overall, our results suggest that the Dutch CPTCI is a reliable and valid instrument.

  16. Dried blood spots as a sampling technique for the quantitative determination of guanfacine in clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Henion, Jack; Abbott, Richard; Wang, Phillip

    2011-11-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) technology was evaluated for the quantitative determination of guanfacine in human blood in clinical studies. A very sensitive DBS assay has been developed using HPLC coupled with an AB Sciex 5500 QTRAP® (Applied Biosystems/MDS Sciex, ON, Canada) MS system (LC-MS/MS) with a linear calibration range of 0.05 to 25 ng/ml. High-resolution MS using an Exactive Orbitrap® (ThermoFisher, LLC., CA, USA) was compared with the QTRAP using extracted exact mass ion current profiles for guanfacine and its stable-isotope-incorporated internal standard. The sample preparation employed liquid-liquid extraction with methyl t-butyl ether of 5 mm punched DBS card disks, followed by reversed-phase HPLC separation coupled with either MS/MS or high-resolution MS. Routine experiments were performed to establish the robustness of the DBS assay, including precision, accuracy, linearity, selectivity, sensitivity and long-term stability of up to 76 days. In addition, several factors that potentially affect quantitation were investigated, including blood volume for DBS spotting, punch size and punch location. A sensitive research assay with a LLOQ of 0.05 ng/ml was developed and subjected to several components of a method validation common to a regulated bioanalysis procedure employing DBS. This method development and partial validation study determined that spot volume, punch size or punch location do not affect assay accuracy and precision. The DBS approach was successfully applied to a clinical study (a Phase I, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to assess the effect of varying multiple oral doses of guanfacine on the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, safety, and tolerability profiles in healthy adult subjects). The pharmacokinetic profiles for 12 volunteers generated from the DBS assay and from a previously validated plasma assay were compared and were found to be comparable. DBS incurred samples collected from finger prick blood and

  17. Harvesting multipotent progenitor cells from a small sample of tonsillar biopsy for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Raju; Arad, Michal; Ortlip, Timothy; Portney, Benjamin A; Meltzer, W Alex; Diaconu, Silviu; Silipino, Lorna E; Wang, Ying; Kaetzel, David M; Taylor, Rodney J; Zalzman, Michal

    2017-07-27

    Human adult stem cells hold the potential for the cure of numerous conditions and degenerative diseases. They possess major advantages over pluripotent stem cells as they can be derived from donors at any age, and therefore pose no ethical concerns or risk of teratoma tumor formation in vivo. Furthermore, they have a natural ability to differentiate and secrete factors that promote tissue healing without genetic manipulation. However, at present, clinical applications of adult stem cells are limited by a shortage of a reliable, standardized, and easily accessible tissue source which does not rely on specimens discarded from unrelated surgical procedures. Human tonsil-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) were isolated from a small sample of tonsillar tissue (average 0.88 cm(3)). Our novel procedure poses a minimal mechanical and enzymatic insult to the tissue, and therefore leads to high cell viability and yield. We characterized these MPCs and demonstrated robust multipotency in vitro. We further show that these cells can be propagated and maintained in xeno-free conditions. We have generated tonsillar biopsy-derived MPC (T-MPC) lines from multiple donors across a spectrum of age, sex, and race, and successfully expanded them in culture. We characterized them by cell surface markers, as well as in vitro expansion and differentiation potential. Our procedure provides a robust yield of tonsillar biopsy-derived T-MPCs. Millions of MPCs can be harvested from a sample smaller than 1 g, which can be collected from a fully awake donor in an outpatient setting without the need for general anesthesia or hospitalization. Our study identifies tonsillar biopsy as an abundant source of adult MPCs for regenerative medicine.

  18. Clinical, radiological and molecular diagnosis correlation in serum samples from patients with osteoarticular tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe García-Elorriaga

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Nested PCR in serum samples is a rapid, highly sensitive and specific modality for OTB detection. PCR should be performed in addition to clinical evaluation, imaging studies, acid-fast bacilli staining, culture and histopathology diagnosis, if possible.

  19. Paenibacillus spp. isolated from human and environmental samples in Spain: detection of 11 new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Sáez-Nieto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One hundred thirty-six isolates, 88 human and 48 environmental, that met the requirements to belong to the genus Paenibacillus were identified using a polyphasic taxonomic approach known as 16S rRNA plus phenotypic traits. Thirty-seven Paenibacillus species were identified; some had not been previously reported from clinical samples. The main species were P. pabuli (13 isolates, P. provencensis (11, P. phoenicis (9 and P. lautus (8. P. pabuli (11/13 and P. provencensis (8/11 were mainly environmental isolates, while P. phoenicis (9/9 and P. lautus (6/8 were mainly human isolates. Despite the difficulties in assigning to human Paenibacillus isolates a role as a pathogen or contaminant, here 25% of the isolates were involved in true infections, especially in those cases that affected abscesses, wound exudates, ocular infections and diverse fluids. In addition, 15 isolates were identified as 11 ‘Candidatus’ to a new species, all of them from human specimens except one that was obtained from laboratory air. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed 95.6% of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, 44% were resistant to cotrimoxazole, 20 to 30% were resistant to cefotaxime and vancomycin and 13% were resistant to rifampicin and erythromycin.

  20. Indications, results, and clinical impact of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling in gastroenterology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J-M; Polkowski, M; Larghi, A

    2011-01-01

    -positive cytopathological results and needle tract seeding are also discussed. The present Clinical Guideline describes the results of EUS-guided sampling in the different clinical settings, considers the role of this technique in patient management, and makes recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use. A two...

  1. Validity of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist in a Clinical Sample of Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabekiroglu, Koray; Aman, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the congruent and criterion validity of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) in a clinical sample of toddlers seen over 1 year in Turkey. All consecutive patients (N = 93), 14-43 months old (mean, 30.6 mos.), in a child psychiatry outpatient clinic were included. The ABC, Autism Behavior Checklist (AuBC), and Child Behavior…

  2. Factorial Validity and Invariance of the GHQ-12 among Clinical and Nonclinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Helder Miguel; Vasconcelos-Raposo, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the internal reliability, factorial validity, and measurement invariance of a Brazilian-Portuguese version of the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) across clinical and nonclinical groups. The clinical sample consisted of 228 chronic hemodialysis patients (41.7% female), with a mean age of 48.23 (SD =…

  3. Factorial Validity and Invariance of the GHQ-12 among Clinical and Nonclinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Helder Miguel; Vasconcelos-Raposo, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the internal reliability, factorial validity, and measurement invariance of a Brazilian-Portuguese version of the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) across clinical and nonclinical groups. The clinical sample consisted of 228 chronic hemodialysis patients (41.7% female), with a mean age of 48.23 (SD =…

  4. Psychotic experiences in a mental health clinic sample : implications for suicidality, multimorbidity and functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelleher, I.; Devlin, N.; Wigman, J. T. W.; Kehoe, A.; Murtagh, A.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Cannon, M.

    Background Recent community-based research has suggested that psychotic experiences act as markers of severity of psychopathology. There has, however, been a lack of clinic-based research. We wished to investigate, in a clinical sample of adolescents referred to a state-funded mental health service,

  5. Clinical significance of human alpha-fetoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yachnin, S.

    1978-01-01

    Deviations from the normal of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) concentrations in fetal serum, amniotic fluid, maternal serum and adult human serum can be explained by understanding the normal physiology and the pathophysiology of AFP synthesis and metabolism. AFP is the prototype of oncofetal markers. Emphasis is given to the usefulness of elevated serum AFP levels in the diagnosis and management of primary hepatomas and tumors of germ cell origin. The ability to detect neural tube defects early in gestation by monitoring maternal serum and amniotic fluid AFP concentrations is discussed.

  6. "ISA-Lation" of Single-Stranded Positive-Sense RNA Viruses from Non-Infectious Clinical/Animal Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Aubry

    Full Text Available Isolation of viral pathogens from clinical and/or animal samples has traditionally relied on either cell cultures or laboratory animal model systems. However, virus viability is notoriously susceptible to adverse conditions that may include inappropriate procedures for sample collection, storage temperature, support media and transportation. Using our recently described ISA method, we have developed a novel procedure to isolate infectious single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses from clinical or animal samples. This approach, that we have now called "ISA-lation", exploits the capacity of viral cDNA subgenomic fragments to re-assemble and produce infectious viral RNA in susceptible cells. Here, it was successfully used to rescue enterovirus, Chikungunya and Tick-borne encephalitis viruses from a variety of inactivated animal and human samples. ISA-lation represents an effective option to rescue infectious virus from clinical and/or animal samples that may have deteriorated during the collection and storage period, but also potentially overcomes logistic and administrative difficulties generated when complying with current health and safety and biosecurity guidelines associated with shipment of infectious viral material.

  7. Human computer interaction issues in Clinical Trials Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starren, Justin B; Payne, Philip R O; Kaufman, David R

    2006-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly rely upon web-based Clinical Trials Management Systems (CTMS). As with clinical care systems, Human Computer Interaction (HCI) issues can greatly affect the usefulness of such systems. Evaluation of the user interface of one web-based CTMS revealed a number of potential human-computer interaction problems, in particular, increased workflow complexity associated with a web application delivery model and potential usability problems resulting from the use of ambiguous icons. Because these design features are shared by a large fraction of current CTMS, the implications extend beyond this individual system.

  8. Freezing adversely affects measurement of vascular endothelial growth factor levels in human aqueous samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankarathi Balaiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sankarathi Balaiya Sandeep Grover Ravi K Murthy Kakarla V ChalamDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USAPurpose: Aqueous levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF can be a surrogate marker of intraocular VEGF activity and a measure of efficacy of anti-VEGF treatment in a variety of vasoproliferative retinal disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and central retinal vein occlusion. Measurement of the VEGF level may be adversely affected by premeasurement variables, such as freezing and delay, in sample analysis. We aim to evaluate the effect of storage and delayed measurement of human aqueous VEGF levels in these conditions.Methods: Aqueous samples collected from patients receiving intravitreal injection of bevacizumab for various retinal diseases were divided into two groups. In Group 1, the VEGF levels were analyzed on the same day; in Group 2, the VEGF levels were analyzed after 21 days of freezer storage (-80°C using immunobead assay. Statistical comparison using a paired t-test was performed between the two groups.Results: Thirty-one aqueous humor samples were collected, and the VEGF concentration for fresh samples was 7.8 ± 5.9 pg/mL (mean ± SD compared to 6.5 ± 6.0 pg/mL in frozen samples, resulting in a statistically significant difference (P = 0.03.Conclusions: Accurate measurement of the VEGF level is a vital component of clinical decision-making. Delayed analysis of VEGF levels in aqueous samples may result in significant sample degradation and lower levels of measured VEGF.Keywords: VEGF level, aqueous humor, immunobead assay, VEGF storage

  9. SEROTYPING AND ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE OF SALMONELLA ISOLATED FROM LETTUCE AND HUMAN DIARRHEA SAMPLES IN BURKINA FASO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siourimè, Somda Namwin; Isidore, Bonkoungou Ouindgueta Juste; Oumar, Traoré; Nestor, Bassolé Ismael Henri; Yves, Traoré; Nicolas, Barro; Aly, Savadogo

    2017-01-01

    Background: In Burkina Faso dirty water in particular those of the stoppings and the gutter ones are used for vegetables irrigation in the gardens. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of Salmonella serotypes from humans and lettuce samples inBurkina Faso. Materials and Methods:Salmonella strains isolated from patients in 2009 to 2015 and lettuce samples in 2014 in Burkina Faso were serotyped using specific antisera. All strains were subjected to a set of 14 antibiotics to study their antibiogram by using Baeur–Kirby disk diffusion method. Results: Out of 154 Salmonella isolated, 60 were from human and 94 from lettuce samples. Serotyping revealed four different serotypes and 39% (60) untypeable strains from human and lettuce (14 and 46 strains). Salmonella serotypes from human and lettuce samples were: Paratyphi A (10% and 22%), Paratyphi B (34% and 8%), Paratyphi C (14% and 18%) and Typhi (21% and 1%). A high resistance of Salmonella Paratyphi B and Salmonella spp to tetracycline were 70% from human and 35 % from lettuce samples. Multiresistance was observed to tetracycline, chloramphenicol and amoxicillin/clavulanic-acid or ampicillin with Salmonella ParatyphiB 35% and Salmonella Typhi 33% from human samples and Salmonella spp 4% from lettuce samples. Conclusion: This study showed the diversity of Salmonella serotypes from both clinical and environmental samples and emergence of multiresistant Salmonella to antibiotics in Burkina Faso. A lettuce is a potential source of transmission of Salmonella causing diarrhea among human in Burkina Faso. List of non-standard Abbreviations : HDB: Hôpital du District de Bogodogo, LNSP: Laboratoire National de Santé Publique, DSG : District Sanitaire de Gourcy, DSB : District Sanitaire de Boromo PMID:28670637

  10. Psychometric evaluation of the MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical Scales in two Dutch Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, P.T. van der; Egger, J.I.M.; Derksen, J.J.L.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we evaluate internal validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability of the MMPI-2 Restructured Clinical (RC) scales in the Dutch MMPI-2 normative sample (N = 1,244) and a Dutch outpatient psychiatric sample (N = 1,066). We pay special attention to a critique regarding

  11. Hanging drop cultures of human testis and testis cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Young, J; Nielsen, J E

    2014-01-01

    limited by the lack of experimental models. The aim of this study was to establish an experimental tissue culture model to maintain normal and malignant germ cells within their niche and allow investigation of treatment effects. METHODS: Human testis and testis cancer specimens from orchidectomies were...

  12. Evaluation of middlebrook 7H11 associated with human or sheep blood for the detection of mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples

    OpenAIRE

    Agapito, Juan; Escuela de Tecnología Médica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander von Humboldt, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. microbiólogo.; Cuadros, Luis; Escuela de Tecnología Médica, facultad de Medicina, universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Tecnólogo médico.; Tarrillo, Sergio; Escuela de Tecnología Médica, facultad de Medicina, universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Tecnólogo médico.; Soto, Alonso; Asociación Latinoamericana de Biotecnología. Lima, Perú. Hospital Nacional Hipólito unanue. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, universidad Ricardo Palma. Lima, Perú. Médico Internista.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the diagnostic yield of the media Middlebrook 7H11 combined with human or ovine blood in comparison with the Ogawa solid media for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. Material and methods. We evaluated sputum samples of patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary tuberculosis. The samples were seeded in Middlebrook 7H11 agar associated with human or ovine blood and in Ogawa media. Results. A total of 130 samples were collected. The positivity for M.tuberculos...

  13. Self-Sampling for Human Papillomavirus Testing among Non-Attenders Increases Attendance to the Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enerly, Espen; Bonde, Jesper; Schee, Kristina;

    2016-01-01

    Increasing attendance to screening offers the best potential for improving the effectiveness of well-established cervical cancer screening programs. Self-sampling at home for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing as an alternative to a clinical sampling can be a useful policy to increase attendance....... To determine whether self-sampling improves screening attendance for women who do not regularly attend the Norwegian Cervical Cancer Screening Programme (NCCSP), 800 women aged 25-69 years in the Oslo area who were due to receive a 2nd reminder to attend regular screening were randomly selected and invited...... alternative for increasing cervical cancer screening coverage in Norway....

  14. Optimized Clinical Use of RNALater and FFPE Samples for Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Kastaniegaard, Kenneth; Padurariu, Simona

    Introduction and Objectives The availability of patient samples is essential for clinical proteomic research. Biobanks worldwide store mainly samples stabilized in RNAlater as well as formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) biopsies. Biobank material is a potential source for clinical...... we compare to FFPE and frozen samples being the control. Methods From the sigmoideum of two healthy participants’ twenty-four biopsies were extracted using endoscopy. The biopsies was stabilized either by being directly frozen, RNAlater, FFPE or incubated for 30 min at room temperature prior to FFPE...

  15. Rapid whole genome sequencing for the detection and characterization of microorganisms directly from clinical samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Saputra, Dhany; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is becoming available as a routine tool for clinical microbiology. If applied directly on clinical samples this could further reduce diagnostic time and thereby improve control and treatment. A major bottle-neck is the availability of fast and reliable bioinformatics...... information and drastically reduce diagnostic time. This may prove very useful, but the need for data analysis is still a hurdle to clinical implementation. To overcome this problem a publicly available bioinformatics tool was developed in this study....... tools. This study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of WGS directly on clinical samples and to develop easy-to-use bioinformatics tools for analysis of the sequencing data. Thirty-five random urine samples from patients with suspected urinary tract infections were examined using conventional...

  16. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation from Clinical and Environmental Samples in Iran: Twenty Years of Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Velayati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are opportunistic pathogens that are widely distributed in the environment. There is a lack of data on species distribution of these organisms from Iran. This study consists of a review of NTM articles published in Iran between the years 1992 and 2014. In this review, 20 articles and 14 case reports were identified. Among the 20 articles, 13 (65% studies focused on NTM isolates from clinical specimens, 6 (30% studies examined NTM isolates from environmental samples, and one (5% article included both clinical and environmental isolates. M. fortuitum (229/997; 23% was recorded as the most prevalent and rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM species in both clinical (28% and environmental (19% isolated samples (P < 0.05. Among slow growing mycobacteria (SGM, M. simiae (103/494; 21% demonstrated a higher frequency in clinical samples whereas in environmental samples it was M. flavescens (44/503; 9%. These data represent information from 14 provinces out of 31 provinces of Iran. No information is available in current published data on clinical or environmental NTM from the remaining 17 provinces in Iran. These results emphasize the potential importance of NTM as well as the underestimation of NTM frequency in Iran. NTM is an important clinical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Iran. Continued research is needed from both clinical and environmental sources to help clinicians and researchers better understand and address NTM treatment and prevention.

  17. Characterizing healthy samples for studies of human cognitive aging

    OpenAIRE

    Geldmacher, David S.; Levin, Bonnie E.; Wright, Clinton B.

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the cognitive declines associated with aging, and differentiating them from the effects of disease in older adults, are important goals for human neuroscience researchers. This is also an issue of public health urgency in countries with rapidly aging populations. Progress toward understanding cognitive aging is complicated by numerous factors. Researchers interested in cognitive changes in healthy older adults need to consider these complexities when they design and interpre...

  18. The Frequency of the Accidental Contamination with Laboratory Samples in Yazd Clinical Laboratories’ personnel in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari, AA. (PhD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: laboratory personnel have always accidental exposure to clinical samples, which can cause the transmission of infection. This threat can be prevented and controlled by education for the use of safety instruments. The purpose was to determine the frequency of accidental exposure to laboratory samples among Yazd laboratory personnel in 2011. Material and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 of Yazd clinical laboratory personnel. The data was collected, using a valid and reliable questioner, via interview and analyzed by means of SPSS software. Results: Eighty-six percent of the subjects reported an experience of accidental exposure to clinical samples, such as blood, serum and urine. The causes were carelessness (41% and work overload (29%. Needle- stick was the most prevalent injury (52% particularly in sampler workers (51% and in their hands (69%. There wasn’t significant relationship between accidental exposure to laboratory samples and the variables such as private and governmental laboratories (p=0.517, kind of employment (p=0.411, record of services (p=0.439 and academic degree (p=0.454. The subjects aged 20-29 (p=0.034 and worked in sampling unit had the highest accidental exposure. Conclusion: based on the results, inexperience of the personnel especially in sampling room, overload at work and ignorance of applying safety instruments are known as the most important reasons for accidental exposure to clinical samples. Keywords: Contamination; accidental Exposure; Infectious agents; laboratory; personnel

  19. Physiopathology of human embryonic implantation: clinical incidences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Demailly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation consists of a series of events promoting the invasion of the endometrium and then the uterine arterial system by the extra-embryonic trophoblast. In order for this semi-heterologous implantation to succeed, the endometrium has to first undergo a number of structural and biochemical changes (decidualization. The decidua's various constituents subsequently play a role in the embryonic implantation. The third step is the transformation of the uterine vascular system and the growth of the placenta, which will provide the foetoplacental unit with nutrients. Several physiopathological aspects will be discussed: 1 the implantation window, regulated by maternal and embryonic hormonal secretions and thus influenced by any defects in the latter: dysharmonic luteal phase, 21-hydroxylase block, abnormal integrin expression, 2 the successive trophoblast invasions of uterine vessels which, when defective, lead to early embryo loss or late-onset vascular pathologies, as preeclampsia, 3 the pregnancy's immunological equilibrium, with a spontaneously tolerated semi-allogeneic implant, 4 the impact of pro-coagulant factors (thrombophilia on the pregnancy's progression, 5 the environment of the uterus, ranging from hydrosalpinx to uterine contractions. In summary, the least anatomical or physiological perturbation can interfere with human embryonic implantation - a very particular phenomenon and a true biological paradox.

  20. Three dimensional imaging of paraffin embedded human lung tissue samples by micro-computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Scott

    Full Text Available Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D micro-architecture of lung tissue can provide insights into the pathology of lung disease. Micro computed tomography (µCT has previously been used to elucidate lung 3D histology and morphometry in fixed samples that have been stained with contrast agents or air inflated and dried. However, non-destructive microstructural 3D imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues would facilitate retrospective analysis of extensive tissue archives of lung FFPE lung samples with linked clinical data.FFPE human lung tissue samples (n = 4 were scanned using a Nikon metrology µCT scanner. Semi-automatic techniques were used to segment the 3D structure of airways and blood vessels. Airspace size (mean linear intercept, Lm was measured on µCT images and on matched histological sections from the same FFPE samples imaged by light microscopy to validate µCT imaging.The µCT imaging protocol provided contrast between tissue and paraffin in FFPE samples (15 mm x 7 mm. Resolution (voxel size 6.7 µm in the reconstructed images was sufficient for semi-automatic image segmentation of airways and blood vessels as well as quantitative airspace analysis. The scans were also used to scout for regions of interest, enabling time-efficient preparation of conventional histological sections. The Lm measurements from µCT images were not significantly different to those from matched histological sections.We demonstrated how non-destructive imaging of routinely prepared FFPE samples by laboratory µCT can be used to visualize and assess the 3D morphology of the lung including by morphometric analysis.

  1. Ultraminiaturized assay for rapid, low cost detection and quantification of clinical and biochemical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parween, Shahila; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-04-01

    Herein, we report a simple, sensitive, rapid and low-cost ultraminiaturized assay technique for quantitative detection of 1 μl of clinical or biochemical sample on a novel ultraminiaturized assay plate (UAP). UAP is prepared by making tiny cavities on a polypropylene sheet. As UAP cannot immobilize a biomolecule through absorption, we have activated the tiny cavities of UAP by 1-fluoro-2-nitro-4-azidobenzene in a photochemical reaction. Activated UAP (AUAP) can covalently immobilize any biomolecule having an active nucleophilic group such as amino group. Efficacy of AUAP is demonstrated by detecting human IgE, antibody of hepatitis C virus core antigen and oligonucleotides. Quantification is performed by capturing the image of the colored assay solution and digitally quantifying the image by color saturation without using costly NanoDrop spectrophotometer. Image - based detection of human IgE and an oligonucleotide shows an excellent correlation with absorbance - based assay (recorded in a NanoDrop spectrophotometer); it is validated by Pearson's product-moment correlation with correlation coefficient of r = 0.9545088 and r = 0.9947444 respectively. AUAP is further checked by detecting hepatitis C virus Ab where strong correlation of color saturation with absorbance with respect to concentration is observed. Ultraminiaturized assay successfully detects target oligonucleotides by perfectly hybridizing with their respective complementary oligonucleotide probes but not with a random oligonucleotide. Ultraminiaturized assay technique has substantially reduced the requirement of reagents by 100 times and assay timing by 50 times making it a potential alternative to conventional method.

  2. Sampling Based Trajectory Planning for Robots in Dynamic Human Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Open-ended human environments, such as pedestrian streets, hospital corridors, train stations etc., are places where robots start to emerge. Hence, being able to plan safe and natural trajectories in these dynamic environments is an important skill for future generations of robots. In this work...... method for selecting the best trajectory in the RRT, according to the cost of traversing a potential field. Furthermore the RRT expansion is enhanced to direct the search and account for the kinodynamic robot constraints. A model predictive control (MPC) approach is taken to accommodate...

  3. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  4. [Analysis of human tissue samples for volatile fire accelerants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibs, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    In police investigations of fires, the cause of a fire and the fire debris analysis regarding traces of fire accelerants are important aspects for forensic scientists. Established analytical procedures were recently applied to the remains of fire victims. When examining lung tissue samples, vapors inhaled from volatile ignitable liquids could be identified and differentiated from products of pyrolysis caused by the fire. In addition to the medico-legal results this evidence allowed to draw conclusions as to whether the fire victim was still alive when the fire started.

  5. Multilocus sequence typing of Trichomonas vaginalis clinical samples from Amsterdam, the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veer, C; Himschoot, M; Bruisten, S M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In this cross-sectional epidemiological study we aimed to identify molecular profiles for Trichomonas vaginalis and to determine how these molecular profiles were related to patient demographic and clinical characteristics. Setting Molecular typing methods previously identified two genetically distinct subpopulations for T. vaginalis; however, few molecular epidemiological studies have been performed. We now increased the sensitivity of a previously described multilocus sequence typing (MLST) tool for T. vaginalis by using nested PCR. This enabled the typing of direct patient samples. Participants From January to December 2014, we collected all T. vaginalis positive samples as detected by routine laboratory testing. Samples from patients either came from general practitioners offices or from the sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic in Amsterdam. Epidemiological data for the STI clinic patients were retrieved from electronic patient files. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was the success rate of genotyping direct T. vaginalis positive samples. The secondary outcome was the relation between T. vaginalis genotypes and risk factors for STI. Results All 7 MLST loci were successfully typed for 71/87 clinical samples. The 71 typed samples came from 69 patients, the majority of whom were women (n=62; 90%) and half (n=34; 49%) were STI clinic patients. Samples segregated into a two population structure for T. vaginalis representing genotypes I and II. Genotype I was most common (n=40; 59.7%). STI clinic patients infected with genotype II reported more sexual partners in the preceding 6 months than patients infected with genotype I (p=0.028). No other associations for gender, age, ethnicity, urogenital discharge or co-occurring STIs with T. vaginalis genotype were found. Conclusions MLST with nested PCR is a sensitive typing method that allows typing of direct (uncultured) patient material. Genotype II is possibly more prevalent

  6. Hopelessness depression as a distinct dimension of depressive symptoms among clinical and non-clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, T E; Steer, R A; Abramson, L Y; Alloy, L B; Metalsky, G I; Schmidt, N B

    2001-05-01

    Subtyping depression has been an interest of theorists and clinicians for at least four centuries. In this paper, we examined the validity of the symptom cluster component of the hopelessness theory of depression. We used structural equation modeling analyses on large samples of psychiatric outpatients (N=1604, 844, and 680) and Air Force cadets (N=1404) who completed the items of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Findings were supportive of the hopelessness depression cluster as a distinct depressive syndrome. Implications for the nosology of depression and for depression theory were discussed.

  7. Human papillomavirus self-sampling for screening nonattenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Janni Uyen Hoa; Rebolj, Matejka; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2017-01-01

    In organized cervical screening programs, typically 25% of the invited women do not attend. The Copenhagen Self-sampling Initiative (CSi) aimed to gain experiences on participation among screening nonattenders in the Capital Region of Denmark. Here, we report on the effectiveness of different...... region of Denmark were identified via the organized national invitation module. Screening history was obtained via the nationwide pathology registry. Twenty-four thousand women were invited, and as an alternative to the regular communication platforms (letter and phone), women could request a home test...... via a mobile-friendly webpage. Instruction material and video-animation in several languages were made available online. Chi-square test was used to test differences. Out of all invited, 31.7% requested a home test, and 20% returned it to the laboratory. In addition, 10% were screened at the physician...

  8. ISOLATION AND SPECIATION OF CANDIDA FROM CLINICAL SAMPLES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL AT KURNOOL, ANDHRAPRADESH, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available : Candida is one of the most frequently encountered opportunistic fungi that cause infection in humans. The pathogenesis of Candida is complex and probably varies with each infection. This study was conducted to understand the prevalence of Candida from various clinical specimens of patients and to show the emergence of Non albicans Candida in clinical samples. This study also focused on the antifungal susceptibility which guides the clinicians to treat the infection effectively. METHODS: Clinical samples were collected from outpatients and inpatients of Government General Hospital, Kurnool over a period of one year from March2008 to June2009. Isolation, culture, speciation of Candida was done by using standard methods. Antifungal susceptibility testing was done by disc diffusion technique against amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole and clotrimazole. RESULTS: Candida manifests in various sites depending on the predisposing factors and immune status of the person. In this study we found the association of Candida with various predisposing factors (Pregnancy, Oral contraceptive pills’s, Immune suppression, Diabetes. This study observed the dominance of non-albicans Candida (51% in the clinical samples over Candida albicans (49%. The maximum antifungal susceptibility was observed against amphotericin B in both the albicans and non-albicans Candia, but non-albicans Candida showed maximum resistance to azoles. CONCLUSION: Candida albicans was the most predominant species (49% isolated in various clinical samples. There was an increase in the prevalence of non albicans Candida in this study. Among the nonalbicans Candida (51% Candid tropicalis was the commonest species isolated. Candida albicans showed maximum susceptibility to amphotericin B and maximum resistance to azoles was seen in nonalbicans Candida.

  9. Human bite of the hand: clinical and surgical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Simancas-Pereira Hernán; Fonseca-Caro John Fredy; Acevedo-Granados Camilo Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: human bites of the hand carries a risk of infection and functional and/oraesthetic complications, according to the mechanism of trauma, duration and specificfactors of the victim and the aggressor. The management of acute episodes isessential and must be an interdisciplinary care.Objective: to review human bites of the hand.Methodology: Thematic review which included the evaluation of clinical casereports published in the last fifteen years in English and Spanish, obtained by el...

  10. Human Motion Video Analysis in Clinical Practice (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    V.V. Borzikov; N.N. Rukina; O.V. Vorobyova; A.N. Kuznetsov; A. N. Belova

    2015-01-01

    The development of new rehabilitation approaches to neurological and traumatological patients requires understanding of normal and pathological movement patterns. Biomechanical analysis of video images is the most accurate method of investigation and quantitative assessment of human normal and pathological locomotion. The review of currently available methods and systems of optical human motion analysis used in clinical practice is presented here. Short historical background is provi...

  11. Reducing sample complexity of polyclonal human autoantibodies by chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Sascha; Faude, Alexander; Rabenstein, Monika; Balzer-Geldsetzer, Monika; Nölker, Carmen; Bacher, Michael; Dodel, Richard

    2010-08-15

    Chromatofocusing was performed in order to separate a polyclonal antigen-specific mixture of human immunoglobulins (IgGs) that would then allow for further analyses of as few different IgGs as possible. Because polyclonal IgGs only differ by amino acid sequence and possible post-translational modifications but not by molecular weight, we chose chromatofocusing for protein separation by different isoelectric points. We isolated antigen-specific IgGs from commercially available intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) using a combination of affinity- and size exclusion-chromatography and in order to reduce the complexity of the starting material IVIG was then replaced by single-donor plasmapheresis material. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), we observed a clear decrease in the number of different light and heavy chains in the chromatofocusing peak as compared to the starting material. In parallel, we monitored slight problems with the selected peak in isoelectric focusing as the first dimension of 2-DE, displayed in by the less proper focusing of the spots. When we tested whether IgGs were binding to their specific antigen after chromatofocusing, we were able to show that they were still in native conformation. In conclusion, we showed that chromatofocusing can be used as a first step in the analysis of mixtures of very similar proteins, e.g. polyclonal IgG preparations, in order to minimize the amount of different proteins in separated fractions in a reproducible way. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploring self-criticism: confirmatory factor analysis of the FSCRS in clinical and nonclinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Paula; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Duarte, Joana

    2015-01-01

    The Forms of Self-criticizing/Attacking and Self-reassuring Scale (FSCRS) is a self-report questionnaire that assesses the forms of self-criticism and self-reassurance. The aim of this study was to explore the latent structure of the FSCRS in nonclinical and clinical samples. Data from 381 participants from the general population and from 304 participants from clinical settings were subjected to confirmatory factor analyses to explore several structural models reflecting alternative representations of the FSCRS dimensionality. Overall, the model with the best fit to the data, in both samples, was the three-factor model (inadequate self, hated self and reassured self subscales) replicating the FSCRS original structure. The scale showed good psychometric characteristics, and the three factors discriminated between the clinical and nonclinical samples. To our knowledge, this is the first study to confirm the factor structure of the FSCRS in a purely clinical sample, and to test alternative models. This study adds to the existent literature that has been supporting the conceptualization of self-criticism as a multidimensional construct. Given the good psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the FSCRS, its use is encouraged and recommended for the assessment of self-criticism in both clinical and research settings.

  13. Indications, results, and clinical impact of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling in gastroenterology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J-M; Polkowski, M; Larghi, A

    2011-01-01

    -positive cytopathological results and needle tract seeding are also discussed. The present Clinical Guideline describes the results of EUS-guided sampling in the different clinical settings, considers the role of this technique in patient management, and makes recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use. A two......-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. A separate Technical Guideline describes the general technique of EUS-guided sampling, particular techniques to maximize the diagnostic yield depending on the nature of the target lesion, and sample processing. The target readership......This article is part of a combined publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) about endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling in gastroenterology, including EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and EUS-guided trucut biopsy (EUS...

  14. The importance of genus Candida in human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojić-Miličević Gordana M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiology is a rapidly changing field. As new researches and experiences broaden our knowledge, changes in the approach to diagnosis and therapy have become necessary and appropriate. Recommended dosage of drugs, method and duration of administration, as well as contraindications to use, evolve over time all drugs. Over the last 2 decades, Candida species have emerged as causes of substantial morbidity and mortality in hospitalized individuals. Isolation of Candida from blood or other sterile sites, excluding the urinary tract, defines invasive candidiasis. Candida species are currently the fourth most common cause of bloodstream infections (that is, candidemia in U.S. hospitals and occur primarily in the intensive care unit (ICU, where candidemia is recognized in up to 1% of patients and where deep-seated Candida infections are recognized in an additional 1 to 2% of patients. Despite the introduction of newer anti-Candida agents, invasive candidiasis continues to have an attributable mortality rate of 40 to 49%; excess ICU and hospital stays of 12.7 days and 15.5 days, respectively, and increased care costs. Postmortem studies suggest that death rates related to invasive candidiasis might, in fact, be higher than those described because of undiagnosed and therefore untreated infection. The diagnosis of invasive candidiasis remains challenging for both clinicians and microbiologists. Reasons for missed diagnoses include nonspecific risk factors and clinical manifestations, low sensitivity of microbiological culture techniques, and unavailability of deep tissue cultures because of risks associated with the invasive procedures used to obtain them. Thus, a substantial proportion of invasive candidiasis in patients in the ICU is assumed to be undiagnosed and untreated. Yet even when invasive candidiasis is diagnosed, culture diagnosis delays treatment for 2 to 3 days, which contributes to mortality. Interventions that do not rely on a specific

  15. Assessment of human exposure to airborne fungi in agricultural confinements: personal inhalable sampling versus stationary sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Atin; Reponen, Tiina; Lee, Shu-An; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2004-01-01

    Accurate exposure assessment to airborne fungi in agricultural environments is essential for estimating the associated occupational health hazards of workers. The objective of this pilot study was to compare personal and stationary sampling for assessing farmers' exposure to airborne fungi in 3 different agricultural confinements located in Ohio, USA (hog farm, dairy farm, and grain farm), using Button Personal Inhalable Samplers. Personal exposures were measured with samplers worn by 3 subjects (each carrying 2 samplers) during 3 types of activities, including animal feeding in the hog farm, cleaning and animal handling in the dairy farm, and soybean unloading and handling in the grain farm. Simultaneously, the stationary measurements were performed using 5 static Button Samplers and 1 revolving Button Sampler. The study showed that the total concentration of airborne fungi ranged from 1.4 x 10(4)-1.2 x 10(5) spores m(-3) in 3 confinements. Grain unloading and handling activity generated highest concentrations of airborne fungi compared to the other 2 activities. Prevalent airborne fungi belonged to Cladosporium, Aspergillus/Penicillium, Ascospores, smut spores, Epicoccum, Alternaria, and Basidiospores. Lower coefficients of variations were observed for the fungal concentrations measured by personal samplers (7-12%) compared to the concentrations measured by stationary samplers (27-37%). No statistically significant difference was observed between the stationary and personal measurement data for the total concentrations of airborne fungi (p > 0.05). Revolving stationary and static stationary Button Samplers demonstrated similar performance characteristics for the collection of airborne fungi. This reflects the low sensitivity of the sampler's efficiency to the wind speed and direction. The results indicate that personal exposure of agricultural workers in confinements may be adequately assessed by placing several Button Samplers simultaneously operating in a

  16. Identification of Legionella from clinically diagnosed pneumonia patients and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, R; Tarafder, S; Saleh, A A; Miah, M R A

    2015-04-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a multisystem disease with life-threatening acute and severe form of pneumonia which is responsible for 2-9% pneumonia with high mortality. Eighty six respiratory tract samples and urine were collected from clinically diagnosed pneumonia patients and 12 water samples were collected from different environment. Identification of Legionella was done by culture and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) of respiratory tract samples and environmental samples and Legionella Antigen (Ag) in urine was detected by Immunochromatographic test (ICT). Legionella was identified from 4 (4.65%) clinically diagnosed pneumonia patients of which 1(1.16%) case was culture positive, 1(1.16%) case was urine ICT positive and PCR was positive in all four cases. Of the 12 water samples tested, 4 (33.33%) samples were Legionella positive by PCR but culture results of these samples were negative. Identification of Legionella should be done by PCR in parallel with culture and urine ICT. Detection of Legionella in environmental samples is also needed to explore possible links between the water sources and disease transmission in population.

  17. Exploring the acceptability of human papillomavirus self-sampling among Muslim immigrant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofters AK

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aisha K Lofters,1–4 Mandana Vahabi,5,6 Mitra Fardad,7 Afrah Raza8 1Centre for Urban Health Solutions, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, 2Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, St. Michael’s Hospital, 4Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, 5Faculty of Community Services, Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, 6Graduate Program in Immigration and Settlement Studies, Ryerson University, 7Faculty of Community Service, Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 8University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Background: With appropriate screening (ie, the Papanicolaou [Pap] test, cervical cancer is highly preventable, and high-income countries, including Canada, have observed significant decreases in cervical cancer mortality. However, certain subgroups, including immigrants from countries with large Muslim populations, experience disparities in cervical cancer screening. Little is known about the acceptability of human papillomavirus (HPV self-sampling as a screening strategy among Muslim immigrant women in Canada. This study assessed cervical cancer screening practices, knowledge and attitudes, and acceptability of HPV self-sampling among Muslim immigrant women. Methods: A convenience sample of 30 women was recruited over a 3-month period (June–August 2015 in the Greater Toronto Area. All women were between 21 and 69 years old, foreign-born, and self-identified as Muslim, and had good knowledge of English. Data were collected through a self-completed questionnaire. Results: More than half of the participants falsely indicated that Pap tests may cause cervical infection, and 46.7% indicated that the test is an intrusion on privacy. The majority of women reported that they would be willing to try HPV self-sampling, and more than half would prefer this method to provider-administered sampling methods

  18. Validation of the Novaco Anger Scale-Provocation Inventory (Danish) With Nonclinical, Clinical, and Offender Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Stine Bjerrum; Novaco, Raymond; Heinola-Nielsen, Vivian;

    2015-01-01

    Anger has high prevalence in clinical and forensic settings, and it is associated with aggressive behavior and ward atmosphere on psychiatric units. Dysregulated anger is a clinical problem in Danish mental health care systems, but no anger assessment instruments have been validated in Danish....... Because the Novaco Anger Scale and Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI) has been extensively validated with different clinical populations and lends itself to clinical case formulation, it was selected for translation and evaluation in the present multistudy project. Psychometric properties of the NAS-PI were...... investigated with samples of 477 nonclinical, 250 clinical, 167 male prisoner, and 64 male forensic participants. Anger prevalence and its relationship with other anger measures, anxiety/depression, and aggression were examined. NAS-PI was found to have high reliability, concurrent validity, and discriminant...

  19. A review of traditional and contemporary assays for direct and indirect detection of Equid herpesvirus 1 in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R; Crossley, Beate M; Timoney, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    Equid herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) is one of the most economically important equine viral pathogens. Its clinical manifestations in horses vary from acute upper respiratory tract disease, abortion, or neonatal death, to neurological disease termed equine herpesviral myeloencephalopathy, which may lead to paralysis and a fatal outcome. Successful identification of EHV-1 infection in horses depends on a variety of factors such as suitable case selection with emphasis on timing of sample collection, selection of appropriate sample(s) based on the clinical manifestations, application of relevant diagnostic technique(s) and/or test(s), and careful evaluation and interpretation of laboratory results. Several traditional serologic and virus isolation assays have been described; however, these assays have inherent limitations that prevent rapid and reliable detection of EHV-1. The advent of molecular biologic techniques has revolutionized the diagnosis of infectious diseases in humans and animal species. Specifically, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays have allowed detection of nucleic acid in clinical specimens precisely and rapidly as compared to the traditional methods that detect the agent or antigen, or agent-specific antibodies in serum. The new molecular methods, especially real-time PCR, can be a very useful means of EHV-1 detection and identification. Veterinarians involved in equine practice must be aware of the advantages and disadvantages of various real-time PCR assays, interpretation of viral genetic marker(s), and latency in order to provide the best standard of care for their equine patients. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Direct detection of rpoB and katG gene mutations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Pandey

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: We can conclude that genetic mutation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be identified directly from the clinical samples. However, we have carried this study in less sample size and to validate research on large number of sample is recommended.

  1. Survey and visual detection of Zaire ebolavirus in clinical samples targeting the nucleoprotein gene in Sierra Leone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV can lead to severe hemorrhagic fever with a high risk of death in humans and other primates. To guide treatment and prevent spread of the viral infection, a rapid and sensitive detection method is required for clinical samples. Here, we described and evaluated a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP method to detect Zaire ebolavirus using the nucleoprotein gene (NP as a target sequence. Two different techniques were used, a calcein/Mn2+ complex chromogenic method and real-time turbidity monitoring. The RT-LAMP assay detected the NP target sequence with a limit of 4.56 copies/μL within 45 min under 61°C, a similar even or increase in sensitivity than that of real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Additionally, all pseudoviral particles or non- Zaire EBOV genomes were negative for LAMP detection, indicating that the assay was highly specific for EBOV. To appraise the availability of the RT-LAMP method for use in clinical diagnosis of EBOV, of 417 blood or swab samples collected from patients with clinically suspected infections in Sierra Leone, 307 were identified for RT-LAMP-based surveillance of EBOV. Therefore, the highly specific and sensitive RT-LAMP method allows the rapid detection of EBOV, and is a suitable tool for clinical screening, diagnosis, and primary quarantine purposes.

  2. Anaerococcus nagyae sp. nov., isolated from human clinical specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A C M; Vries , de E. D.; Jean-Pierre, H; van Winkelhoff, A J

    We describe a new Anaerococcus species isolated from human clinical specimens. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences of three strains showed <98% similarity with its closest relative Anaerococcus octavius. Phylogenetically the isolated strains form a cluster and can be differentiated from other

  3. Anal human papillomavirus DNA in women at a colposcopy clinic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauwers, K.W.M. d'

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the type-specific prevalence of anal and cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and the cytology in HIV-negative women without a history of cervical cancer, attending a colposcopy clinic. To examine if an HPV positive anal smear is related to anal pathology and

  4. Anal human papillomavirus DNA in women at a colposcopy clinic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauwers, K.W.M. d'

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the type-specific prevalence of anal and cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and the cytology in HIV-negative women without a history of cervical cancer, attending a colposcopy clinic. To examine if an HPV positive anal smear is related to anal pathology and conseq

  5. Anaerococcus degenerii sp nov., isolated from human clinical specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A. C. M.; Elgersma, P. E.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    Four clinical isolates of gram-positive strict anaerobic cocci were isolated from four different human mixed anaerobic infections. The taxonomical status of the four strains could not be established using standard identification techniques. The biochemical features of the strains were established

  6. Optimization of techniques for multiple platform testing in small, precious samples such as human chorionic villus sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarska, Margareta D; Akhlaghpour, Marzieh; Lee, Bora; Barlow, Gillian M; Xu, Ning; Wang, Erica T; Mackey, Aaron J; Farber, Charles R; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-der I; Goodarzi, Mark O; Guller, Seth; Williams, John

    2016-11-01

    Multiple testing to understand global changes in gene expression based on genetic and epigenetic modifications is evolving. Chorionic villi, obtained for prenatal testing, is limited, but can be used to understand ongoing human pregnancies. However, optimal storage, processing and utilization of CVS for multiple platform testing have not been established. Leftover CVS samples were flash-frozen or preserved in RNAlater. Modifications to standard isolation kits were performed to isolate quality DNA and RNA from samples as small as 2-5 mg. RNAlater samples had significantly higher RNA yields and quality and were successfully used in microarray and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq libraries generated using 200 versus 800-ng RNA showed similar biological coefficients of variation. RNAlater samples had lower DNA yields and quality, which improved by heating the elution buffer to 70 °C. Purification of DNA was not necessary for bisulfite-conversion and genome-wide methylation profiling. CVS cells were propagated and continue to express genes found in freshly isolated chorionic villi. CVS samples preserved in RNAlater are superior. Our optimized techniques provide specimens for genetic, epigenetic and gene expression studies from a single small sample which can be used to develop diagnostics and treatments using a systems biology approach in the prenatal period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Intrusions, avoidance and overgeneral memory in a non-clinical sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, Beatrijs J. A.; Wessel, I.; Merckelbach, H.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a positive relationship between intrusions, effortful avoidance and overgeneral memory in people suffering from (mild) depression or PTSD. The purpose of the present study was to investigate these relationships in a non-clinical sample. As part of a mass testing session,

  8. Likelihood of Condom Use When Sexually Transmitted Diseases Are Suspected: Results from a Clinic Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Richard A.; Milhausen, Robin R.; Graham, Cynthia A.; Yarber, William L.; Sanders, Stephanie A.; Charnigo, Richard; Shrier, Lydia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the event-level associations between perceived risk of sexually transmitted disease (STD) acquisition/transmission and condom use during penile-vaginal intercourse (PVI) among STD clinic attendees. Method: A convenience sample (N = 622) completed daily electronic assessments. Two questions were proxies of perceived risk:…

  9. Validity of the WISC-IV Spanish for a Clinically Referred Sample of Hispanic Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel Montes, Liza E.; Allen, Daniel N.; Puente, Antonio E.; Neblina, Cris

    2010-01-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) is the most commonly used intelligence test for children. Five years ago, a Spanish version of the WISC-IV was published (WISC-IV Spanish; Wechsler, 2005), but a limited amount of published information is available regarding its utility when assessing clinical samples. The current study included…

  10. Protein Profile study of clinical samples using Laser Induced Fluorescence as the detection method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Raja, Sujatha N.; Rai, Lavanya;

    2009-01-01

      Protein profiles of tissue homogenates were recorded using HPLC separation and LIF detection method. The samples were collected from volunteers with clinically normal or cervical cancer conditions. It is shown that the protein profile can be classified as belonging to malignant or normal state ...

  11. A Mediation Model of Interparental Collaboration, Parenting Practices, and Child Externalizing Behavior in a Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjobli, John; Hagen, Kristine Amlund

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined maternal and paternal parenting practices as mediators of the link between interparental collaboration and children's externalizing behavior. Parent gender was tested as a moderator of the associations. A clinical sample consisting of 136 children with externalizing problems and their families participated in the study.…

  12. A Comparison of English Reading Passages for Elicitation of Speech Samples from Clinical Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas W.

    2006-01-01

    Oral reading passages are often used to elicit speech samples from clinical populations. Few objective guidelines exist, however, to guide one's selection from among the many existing passages. Therefore, this study was undertaken to describe phonetic, lexical, and structural characteristics of 15 oral reading passages. The passages differed…

  13. Maternal Drug Abuse History, Maltreatment, and Functioning in a Clinical Sample of Urban Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onigu-Otite, Edore C.; Belcher, Harolyn M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the association between maternal drug abuse history, maltreatment exposure, and functioning, in a clinical sample of young children seeking therapy for maltreatment. Methods: Data were collected on 91 children, mean age 5.3 years (SD 1.0). The Preschool and Early Childhood Functional Assessment Scales (PECFAS) was…

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children in a Large Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestle, Sarah L.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Schiffman, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C; Chorpita, Tracey, Brown, Collica, & Barlow, 1997) is a 14-item self-report measure of worry in children and adolescents. Although the PSWQ-C has demonstrated favorable psychometric properties in small clinical and large community samples, this study represents the first psychometric…

  15. Mediators of the Link between Autistic Traits and Relationship Satisfaction in a Non-Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, Monique M. H.; Finkenauer, Catrin; Begeer, Sander

    2010-01-01

    People with ASD have deficits in their social skills and may therefore experience lower relationship satisfaction. This study investigated possible mechanisms to explain whether and how autistic traits, measured with the AQ, influence relationship satisfaction in a non-clinical sample of 195 married couples. More autistic traits were associated…

  16. Intrusions, avoidance and overgeneral memory in a non-clinical sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, Beatrijs J. A.; Wessel, I.; Merckelbach, H.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a positive relationship between intrusions, effortful avoidance and overgeneral memory in people suffering from (mild) depression or PTSD. The purpose of the present study was to investigate these relationships in a non-clinical sample. As part of a mass testing session,

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children in a Large Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestle, Sarah L.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Schiffman, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C; Chorpita, Tracey, Brown, Collica, & Barlow, 1997) is a 14-item self-report measure of worry in children and adolescents. Although the PSWQ-C has demonstrated favorable psychometric properties in small clinical and large community samples, this study represents the first psychometric…

  18. Molecular characterization of metallo β-lactamase producing multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from various clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalaivani Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a potent opportunistic nosocomial human pathogen among Gram-negative bacteria causing various life-threatening infections in patients from Intensive Care Units. This bacterium has become resistant to almost all commonly available antibiotics with limited treatment options. Multi drug resistant P. aeruginosa (MDRPA is a major cause of concern among hospital acquired infections. It uses distinctive resistant mechanisms virtually to all the available antibiotics such as Metallo β-lactamases (MBL production, extended spectrum β-lactamase production (ESBL, up regulation of efflux systems related genes and decreased outer membrane permeability. This study was carried out to find one the predominant resistance mechanisms among MDRPA and the prevalence of corresponding resistance genes. Materials and Methods: MDRPA isolates collected from various clinical samples for a period of 1-year (November 2009-Octo ber 2010 were included to detect the predominant mechanism of resistance using phenotypic and molecular methods. Molecular characterization of all these isolates was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the presence of blaVIM-2, blaIMP-1, blaOXA-23, and blaNDM-1 genes with specific primers. Results: Among 75 MDRPA isolates 84% (63 were MBL producers. Molecular characterization studied by PCR showed the presence of blaVIM-2 gene in 13% of MBL producers. Conclusion: The prevalence of MBLs has been increasing worldwide, particularly among P. aeruginosa, leading to severe limitations in the therapeutic options for the management. Thus, proper resistance screening measures and appropriate antibiotic policy can be strictly adopted by all the healthcare facility providers to overcome these superbugs.

  19. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganova, Inna [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Ponomarev, Vladimir [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Blasberg, Ronald [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: blasberg@neuro1.mskcc.org

    2007-10-15

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  20. Isolating Influenza RNA from Clinical Samples Using Microfluidic Oil-Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Francis R.; Wang, Jingjing; Opal, Steven M.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2016-01-01

    The effective and robust separation of biomolecules of interest from patient samples is an essential step in diagnostic applications. We present a platform for the fast extraction of nucleic acids from clinical specimens utilizing paramagnetic PMPs, an oil-water interface, a small permanent magnet and a microfluidic channel to separate and purify captured nucleic acids from lysate in less than one minute, circumventing the need for multiple washing steps and greatly simplifying and expediting the purification procedure. Our device was able to isolate influenza RNA from clinical nasopharyngeal swab samples with high efficiency when compared to the Ambion® MagMAXTM Viral RNA Isolation Kit, sufficiently separating nucleic acid analytes from PCR-inhibiting contaminants within the lysate while also critically maintaining high integrity of the viral genome. We find that this design has great potential for rapid, efficient and sensitive nucleic acid separation from patient sample. PMID:26886007

  1. Buffer AVL Alone Does Not Inactivate Ebola Virus in a Representative Clinical Sample Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Sophie J; Weller, Simon A; Phelps, Amanda; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O'Brien, Lyn M; Steward, Jackie; Lonsdale, Steve G; Lever, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Rapid inactivation of Ebola virus (EBOV) is crucial for high-throughput testing of clinical samples in low-resource, outbreak scenarios. The EBOV inactivation efficacy of Buffer AVL (Qiagen) was tested against marmoset serum (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(8) 50% tissue culture infective dose per milliliter [TCID50 · ml(-1)]) and murine blood (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(7) TCID50 · ml(-1)) at 4:1 vol/vol buffer/sample ratios. Posttreatment cell culture and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis indicated that treatment with Buffer AVL did not inactivate EBOV in 67% of samples, indicating that Buffer AVL, which is designed for RNA extraction and not virus inactivation, cannot be guaranteed to inactivate EBOV in diagnostic samples. Murine blood samples treated with ethanol (4:1 [vol/vol] ethanol/sample) or heat (60°C for 15 min) also showed no viral inactivation in 67% or 100% of samples, respectively. However, combined Buffer AVL and ethanol or Buffer AVL and heat treatments showed total viral inactivation in 100% of samples tested. The Buffer AVL plus ethanol and Buffer AVL plus heat treatments were also shown not to affect the extraction of PCR quality RNA from EBOV-spiked murine blood samples. © Crown copyright 2015.

  2. Comparison of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis Strains isolated from water and clinical samples: antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas

    Full Text Available Enterococci are part of the normal intestinal flora in a large number of mammals, and these microbes are currently used as indicators of fecal contamination in water and food for human consumption. These organisms are considered one of the primary causes of nosocomial and environmental infections due to their ability to survive in the environment and to their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials. The aims of this study were to determine the biochemical patterns and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from clinical samples and from water (groundwater, water from the Xochimilco wetland, and treated water from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area and to determine the genetic relationships among these isolates. A total of 121 enterococcus strains were studied; 31 and 90 strains were isolated from clinical samples and water (groundwater, water from the Xochimilco wetland, and water for agricultural irrigation, respectively. Identification to the species level was performed using a multiplex PCR assay, and antimicrobial profiles were obtained using a commercial kit. Twenty-eight strains were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. E. faecium strains isolated from water showed an atypical biochemical pattern. The clinical isolates showed higher resistance to antibiotics than those from water. Both the enterococci isolated from humans, and those isolated from water showed high genetic diversity according to the PFGE analysis, although some strains seemed to be closely related. In conclusion, enterococci isolated from humans and water are genetically different. However, water represents a potential route of transmission to the community and a source of antimicrobial resistance genes that may be readily transmitted to other, different bacterial species.

  3. Comparison of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis Strains isolated from water and clinical samples: antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mazari-Hiríart, Marisa; Ponce de León, Sergio; Amieva-Fernández, Rosa I; Agis-Juárez, Raúl A; Huebner, Johannes; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Enterococci are part of the normal intestinal flora in a large number of mammals, and these microbes are currently used as indicators of fecal contamination in water and food for human consumption. These organisms are considered one of the primary causes of nosocomial and environmental infections due to their ability to survive in the environment and to their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials. The aims of this study were to determine the biochemical patterns and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from clinical samples and from water (groundwater, water from the Xochimilco wetland, and treated water from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area) and to determine the genetic relationships among these isolates. A total of 121 enterococcus strains were studied; 31 and 90 strains were isolated from clinical samples and water (groundwater, water from the Xochimilco wetland, and water for agricultural irrigation), respectively. Identification to the species level was performed using a multiplex PCR assay, and antimicrobial profiles were obtained using a commercial kit. Twenty-eight strains were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). E. faecium strains isolated from water showed an atypical biochemical pattern. The clinical isolates showed higher resistance to antibiotics than those from water. Both the enterococci isolated from humans, and those isolated from water showed high genetic diversity according to the PFGE analysis, although some strains seemed to be closely related. In conclusion, enterococci isolated from humans and water are genetically different. However, water represents a potential route of transmission to the community and a source of antimicrobial resistance genes that may be readily transmitted to other, different bacterial species.

  4. Bridging the gap between sample collection and laboratory analysis: using dried blood spots to identify human exposure to chemical agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Elizabeth I.; Blake, Thomas A.; Perez, Jonas W.; Crow, Brian S.; Shaner, Rebecca L.; Coleman, Rebecca M.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2016-05-01

    Public health response to large scale chemical emergencies presents logistical challenges for sample collection, transport, and analysis. Diagnostic methods used to identify and determine exposure to chemical warfare agents, toxins, and poisons traditionally involve blood collection by phlebotomists, cold transport of biomedical samples, and costly sample preparation techniques. Use of dried blood spots, which consist of dried blood on an FDA-approved substrate, can increase analyte stability, decrease infection hazard for those handling samples, greatly reduce the cost of shipping/storing samples by removing the need for refrigeration and cold chain transportation, and be self-prepared by potentially exposed individuals using a simple finger prick and blood spot compatible paper. Our laboratory has developed clinical assays to detect human exposures to nerve agents through the analysis of specific protein adducts and metabolites, for which a simple extraction from a dried blood spot is sufficient for removing matrix interferents and attaining sensitivities on par with traditional sampling methods. The use of dried blood spots can bridge the gap between the laboratory and the field allowing for large scale sample collection with minimal impact on hospital resources while maintaining sensitivity, specificity, traceability, and quality requirements for both clinical and forensic applications.

  5. Human cysticercosis: parasitology, pathology, clinical manifestations and available treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbe, G

    1994-10-01

    Human cysticercosis is a global health problem and neurocysticercosis a serious clinical syndrome. The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis can now be made with a high degree of accuracy by scrutiny of clinical signs and symptoms in combination with X-ray, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, serological tests and laboratory examinations. Differential clinical diagnosis with tumor, and vascular and inflammatory conditions, may however, prove difficult in nonendemic areas. The management of cysticercosis has been radically changed by the advent of effective chemotherapy. Both the heterocyclic pyrazinoisoquinoline compound, praziquantel and the benzimidazole carbamate, albendazole, have now been extensively tested and successfully used for treatments of neurocysticercosis, usually in combination with corticosteroids. The definition of appropriate criteria and guidelines for the use of chemotherapy, may however, require further research. Surgical interventions continue to play an important role in certain clinical presentations. Recent advances in immunological research hold realistic promise for the development of a vaccine against Taenia solium.

  6. Determination of the optimal sample size for a clinical trial accounting for the population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, Nigel; Miller, Frank; Day, Simon; Hee, Siew Wan; Madan, Jason; Zohar, Sarah; Posch, Martin

    2017-07-01

    The problem of choosing a sample size for a clinical trial is a very common one. In some settings, such as rare diseases or other small populations, the large sample sizes usually associated with the standard frequentist approach may be infeasible, suggesting that the sample size chosen should reflect the size of the population under consideration. Incorporation of the population size is possible in a decision-theoretic approach either explicitly by assuming that the population size is fixed and known, or implicitly through geometric discounting of the gain from future patients reflecting the expected population size. This paper develops such approaches. Building on previous work, an asymptotic expression is derived for the sample size for single and two-arm clinical trials in the general case of a clinical trial with a primary endpoint with a distribution of one parameter exponential family form that optimizes a utility function that quantifies the cost and gain per patient as a continuous function of this parameter. It is shown that as the size of the population, N, or expected size, N∗ in the case of geometric discounting, becomes large, the optimal trial size is O(N1/2) or O(N∗1/2). The sample size obtained from the asymptotic expression is also compared with the exact optimal sample size in examples with responses with Bernoulli and Poisson distributions, showing that the asymptotic approximations can also be reasonable in relatively small sample sizes. © 2016 The Author. Biometrical Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Human DNA quantification and sample quality assessment: Developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Margaret M; Thompson, Jonelle M; McLaren, Robert S; Purpero, Vincent M; Thomas, Kelli J; Dobrowski, Patricia A; DeGroot, Gretchen A; Romsos, Erica L; Storts, Douglas R

    2016-07-01

    Quantification of the total amount of human DNA isolated from a forensic evidence item is crucial for DNA normalization prior to short tandem repeat (STR) DNA analysis and a federal quality assurance standard requirement. Previous commercial quantification methods determine the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations, but provide limited information about the condition of the DNA sample. The PowerQuant(®) System includes targets for quantification of total human and total human male DNA as well as targets for evaluating whether the human DNA is degraded and/or PCR inhibitors are present in the sample. A developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) System was completed, following SWGDAM Validation Guidelines, to evaluate the assay's specificity, sensitivity, precision and accuracy, as well as the ability to detect degraded DNA or PCR inhibitors. In addition to the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations in a sample, data from the degradation target and internal PCR control (IPC) provide a forensic DNA analyst meaningful information about the quality of the isolated human DNA and the presence of PCR inhibitors in the sample that can be used to determine the most effective workflow and assist downstream interpretation.

  8. Sample size calculations in human electrophysiology (EEG and ERP) studies: A systematic review and recommendations for increased rigor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Michael J; Carbine, Kaylie A

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing focus across scientific fields on adequate sample sizes to ensure non-biased and reproducible effects. Very few studies, however, report sample size calculations or even the information needed to accurately calculate sample sizes for grants and future research. We systematically reviewed 100 randomly selected clinical human electrophysiology studies from six high impact journals that frequently publish electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potential (ERP) research to determine the proportion of studies that reported sample size calculations, as well as the proportion of studies reporting the necessary components to complete such calculations. Studies were coded by the two authors blinded to the other's results. Inter-rater reliability was 100% for the sample size calculations and kappa above 0.82 for all other variables. Zero of the 100 studies (0%) reported sample size calculations. 77% utilized repeated-measures designs, yet zero studies (0%) reported the necessary variances and correlations among repeated measures to accurately calculate future sample sizes. Most studies (93%) reported study statistical values (e.g., F or t values). Only 40% reported effect sizes, 56% reported mean values, and 47% reported indices of variance (e.g., standard deviations/standard errors). Absence of such information hinders accurate determination of sample sizes for study design, grant applications, and meta-analyses of research and whether studies were adequately powered to detect effects of interest. Increased focus on sample size calculations, utilization of registered reports, and presenting information detailing sample size calculations and statistics for future researchers are needed and will increase sample size-related scientific rigor in human electrophysiology research.

  9. Use of the experience sampling method in the context of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Simone J W; Hasmi, Laila; Drukker, Marjan; van Os, J; Delespaul, Philippe A E G

    2016-01-01

    Objective The experience sampling method (ESM) is a structured diary technique to appraise subjective experiences in daily life. It is applied in psychiatric patients, as well as in patients with somatic illness. Despite the potential of ESM assessment, the improved logistics and its increased administration in research, its use in clinical trials remains limited. This paper introduces ESM for clinical trials in psychiatry and beyond. Methods ESM is an ecologically valid method that yields a comprehensive view of an individual's daily life. It allows the assessment of various constructs (eg, quality of life, psychopathology) and psychological mechanisms (eg, stress-sensitivity, coping). These constructs are difficult to assess using cross-sectional questionnaires. ESM can be applied in treatment monitoring, as an ecological momentary intervention, in clinical trials, or in single case clinical trials. Technological advances (eg, smartphone applications) make its implementation easier. Results Advantages of ESM are highlighted and disadvantages are discussed. Furthermore, the ecological nature of ESM data and its consequences are explored, including the potential pitfalls of ambiguously formulated research questions and the specificities of ESM in statistical analyses. The last section focuses on ESM in relation to clinical trials and discusses its future use in optimising clinical decision-making. Conclusions ESM can be a valuable asset in clinical trial research and should be used more often to study the benefits of treatment in psychiatry and somatic health. PMID:27443678

  10. Comparison of clinical samples for visceral Leishmaniasis diagnosis in asymptomatic dogs by PCR hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Sidney A.; Ituassu, Leonardo T.; Melo, Maria N. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Parasitologia], e-mail: saninoalmeida@gmail.com, e-mail: Itituassu@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: melo@icb.ufmg.br; Leite, Rodrigo S.; Andrade, Antero S.R. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: rleite2005@gmail.com, e-mail: antero@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    The canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) diagnosis still represents a challenge because of complexity of this disease. The aim of present study was to compare different clinical samples for diagnosis of CVL by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) combined with hybridization of {sup 32}P labeled probes. Bone marrow (BM), skin biopsy (SB), peripheral blood (PB) and conjunctival swab (CS) were used in this work. With this purpose 40 asymptomatic dogs, all positive by parasitological test, were obtained. From each animal were collected SB with sterile punches from ear internal surface, 1.0 mL of PB, BM aspirates from sternum and CS from both lower eyelid. Each clinical sample was submitted to suitable DNA purification process and PCR-hybridization assays. The positive results obtained with PCR were 55%, 25%, 30% and 22.5% for CS, BM, SB and PB respectively while the PCR followed by hybridization showed a positivity of 87.5%, 50%, 45% and 27.5% respectively. The hybridization assay was able to increase the PCR positivity in all kinds of clinical samples. The best performance was obtained using CS samples. We concluded that the PCR associated with DNA radioactive probes was a very sensitive tool for diagnosis of CVL in asymptomatic dogs and the CS has an important potential for regular screening of dogs. (author)

  11. Estimating WAIS-IV indexes: proration versus linear scaling in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umfleet, Laura Glass; Ryan, Joseph J; Gontkovsky, Sam T; Morris, Jeri

    2012-04-01

    We compared the accuracy of proration and linear scaling for estimating Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV), Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI), and Perceptual Reasoning Index (PRI) composites from all possible two subtest combinations. The purpose was to provide practice relevant psychometric results in a clinical sample. The present investigation was an archival study that used mostly within-group comparisons. We analyzed WAIS-IV data of a clinical sample comprising 104 patients with brain damage and 37 with no known neurological impairment. In both clinical samples, actual VCI and PRI scores were highly correlated with estimated index scores based on proration and linear scaling (all rs ≥.95). In the brain-impaired sample, significant mean score differences between the actual and estimated composites were found in two comparisons, but these differences were less than three points; no other significant differences emerged. Overall, findings demonstrate that proration and linear scaling methods are feasible procedures when estimating actual Indexes. There was no advantage of one computational method over the other. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effect of sample aliquot size on the limit of detection and reproducibility of clinical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guorong; Kobayashi, Lori; Nazarenko, Irina

    2007-11-01

    Nucleic acid amplification technologies significantly improved the limit of detection (LOD) for diagnostic assays. The ability of these assays to amplify fewer than 10 target copies of DNA or RNA imposes new requirements on the preparation of clinical samples. We report a statistical method to determine how large of an aliquot is necessary to reproducibly provide a detectable number of cells. We determined the success probability (p) based on aliquot size and sample volume. The binomial distribution, based on p and the concentration of cells in sample, was used to calculate the probability of getting no target objects in an aliquot and to determine the minimum number of objects per aliquot necessary to generate a reproducible clinical assay. The described method was applied to find a minimum aliquot volume required for a set LOD, false-negative rate (FNR), and %CV. For example, to keep FNR FNRs are 47.2% and 44.9%. This probability model is a useful tool to predict the impact of aliquot volume on the LOD and reproducibility of clinical assays. Even for samples for which pathogens are homogeneously distributed, it is theoretically impossible to collect a single pathogen consistently if the concentration of pathogen is below a certain limit.

  13. Parental behavior and adolescent self-esteem in clinical and nonclinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, D M; Metha, A

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between multiple dimensions of self-esteem and adolescents' perceptions of parental behaviors using nonclinical (n = 119) and clinical (n = 30) samples of adolescents. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), a modified version of Osgood's Semantic Differential (OSD), Schaefer's Children's Report of Parental Behavior Inventory (CRPBI) short form), and a demographic questionnaire were administered to participants. Scores from the self-esteem measures were empirically combined and factor analyzed, yielding four dimensions of self-esteem. Multivariate analysis of variance were used to compare self-esteem dimension scores for males and females within both samples. Correlations and partial correlations were conducted to determine the nature of the relationships between each dimension of self-esteem and perceptions of parental behaviors. Nonclinical adolescents scored higher than did clinical adolescents on all self-esteem dimensions. Males scored higher than females only on the dimension of Self-Esteem Competence. Perceptions of parental behaviors were consistently unrelated to dimensions of self-esteem among adolescents in the clinical sample. Among adolescents in the nonclinical sample, perceptions of parental support and autonomy granting were related to multiple dimensions of self-esteem. Perceptions of parental discipline were inconsistently related to dimensions of nonclinical self-esteem.

  14. Clinical, radiological and molecular diagnosis correlation in serum samples from patients with osteoarticular tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guadalupe Garca-Elorriaga; Olga Martnez-Elizondo; Guillermo del Rey-Pineda; Csar Gonzlez-Bonilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serum samples, in the diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis (OTB) in a setting where only clinical and imaging diagnoses determine the treatment.Methods:A total of 44 consecutive serum specimens were collected from clinically suspected OTB patients, based on clinical and radiological [X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography] features. They were screened by in-house nested PCR. In addition, a few specimens were examined by Gram stain, acid-fast bacilli stain, histopathology and routine bacterial culture. A total of 39 specimens were collected from patients suffering from other bone diseases of nontuberculous origin and included as negative controls.Results:Of the 44 clinically suspected OTB patients, in-house nested PCR was positive in 40 (91%) cases; PCR was negative in 38 (97%) negative controls. Sensitivity and specificity of our in-house nested PCR was 90.9% and 97.4%, respectively. The PCR report was available within 48 h. It was possible to standardize serum PCR technique and in positive cases, a good correlation was observed in terms of an adequate treatment response.Conclusions:Nested PCR in serum samples is a rapid, highly sensitive and specific modality for OTB detection. PCR should be performed in addition to clinical evaluation, imaging studies, acid-fast bacilli staining, culture and histopathology diagnosis, if possible.

  15. [Isolation of Sporothrix pallida complex in clinical and environmental samples from Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Choappa, Rodrigo M; Vieille Oyarzo, Peggy I; Carvajal Silva, Laura C

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of S. pallida complex from medical samples and home garden soil of a patient in Chile is here in reported. Fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii complex can cause various infections. In Chile, the medical and environmental isolates of these this complex are rare. The aim of this study was to identify an unusual agent in a case of onychomycosis and to detect its presence in the patient's home garden. For this purpose, clinical samples were obtained by scraping the patient's subungueal first right toe nail as well as by taking soil samples from different areas of her home garden. Species identification was performed by morphophysiology and one of the strains isolated from the patient's toe nail was sent to CBS for molecular confirmation (14.062). S. pallida complex was identified both from the patient's toe nail and samples taken from her home garden.

  16. A database of naturally occurring human urinary peptides and proteins for use in clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Zürbig; Joshua Coon; Hartwig Bauer; Georg Behrens; Mohammed Dakna; Anna Dominiczak; Stephane Decramer; Jochen Ehrich; Danilo Fliser; Moritz Frommberger; Arnold Ganser; Mark Giolami; Igor Golovko; David Good; Wilfried Gwinner

    2007-01-01

    Owing to its availability, ease of collection and correlation with (patho-) physiology, urine is an attractive source for clinical proteomics. However, the lack of comparable datasets from large cohorts has greatly hindered development in this field. Here we report the establishment of a high resolution proteome database of naturally occurring human urinary peptides and proteins - ranging from 800-17,000 Da - from over 3,600 individual samples using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass s...

  17. HaloPlex Targeted Resequencing for Mutation Detection in Clinical Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tumor Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Lotte N J; Falk-Sörqvist, Elin; Ljungström, Viktor; Mattsson, Johanna; Sundström, Magnus; La Fleur, Linnéa; Mathot, Lucy; Micke, Patrick; Nilsson, Mats; Botling, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the advent of massively parallel next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled substantial advances in the study of human diseases. Combined with targeted DNA enrichment methods, high sequence coverage can be obtained for different genes simultaneously at a reduced cost per sample, creating unique opportunities for clinical cancer diagnostics. However, the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) process of tissue samples, routinely used in pathology departments, results in DNA fragmentation and nucleotide modifications that introduce a number of technical challenges for downstream biomolecular analyses. We evaluated the HaloPlex target enrichment system for somatic mutation detection in 80 tissue fractions derived from 20 clinical cancer cases with paired tumor and normal tissue available in both FFPE and fresh-frozen format. Several modifications to the standard method were introduced, including a reduced target fragment length and two strand capturing. We found that FFPE material can be used for HaloPlex-based target enrichment and next-generation sequencing, even when starting from small amounts of DNA. By specifically capturing both strands for each target fragment, we were able to reduce the number of false-positive errors caused by FFPE-induced artifacts and lower the detection limit for somatic mutations. We believe that the HaloPlex method presented here will be broadly applicable as a tool for somatic mutation detection in clinical cancer settings.

  18. Bacteria-human somatic cell lateral gene transfer is enriched in cancer samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Riley

    Full Text Available There are 10× more bacterial cells in our bodies from the microbiome than human cells. Viral DNA is known to integrate in the human genome, but the integration of bacterial DNA has not been described. Using publicly available sequence data from the human genome project, the 1000 Genomes Project, and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, we examined bacterial DNA integration into the human somatic genome. Here we present evidence that bacterial DNA integrates into the human somatic genome through an RNA intermediate, and that such integrations are detected more frequently in (a tumors than normal samples, (b RNA than DNA samples, and (c the mitochondrial genome than the nuclear genome. Hundreds of thousands of paired reads support random integration of Acinetobacter-like DNA in the human mitochondrial genome in acute myeloid leukemia samples. Numerous read pairs across multiple stomach adenocarcinoma samples support specific integration of Pseudomonas-like DNA in the 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR of four proto-oncogenes that are up-regulated in their transcription, consistent with conversion to an oncogene. These data support our hypothesis that bacterial integrations occur in the human somatic genome and may play a role in carcinogenesis. We anticipate that the application of our approach to additional cancer genome projects will lead to the more frequent detection of bacterial DNA integrations in tumors that are in close proximity to the human microbiome.

  19. Pre-clinical Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahryari, Varahram; Nip, Hannah; Saini, Sharanjot; Dar, Altaf A; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Colden, Melissa; Bucay, Nathan; Tabatabai, Laura Z; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir; Majid, Shahana

    2016-08-29

    To study the multifaceted biology of prostate cancer, pre-clinical in vivo models offer a range of options to uncover critical biological information about this disease. The human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model provides a useful alternative approach for understanding the specific interactions between genetically and molecularly altered tumor cells, their organ microenvironment, and for evaluation of efficacy of therapeutic regimens. This is a well characterized model designed to study the molecular events of primary tumor development and it recapitulates the early events in the metastatic cascade prior to embolism and entry of tumor cells into the circulation. Thus it allows elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the initial phase of metastatic disease. In addition, this model can annotate drug targets of clinical relevance and is a valuable tool to study prostate cancer progression. In this manuscript we describe a detailed procedure to establish a human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model.

  20. Clinical Symptoms of Human Rotavirus Infection Observed in Children in Sokoto, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Alkali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus has been identified among the most important causes of infantile diarrhoea, especially in developing countries. The present study was undertaken to determine the occurrence and clinical symptoms of human rotavirus disease among children presenting with varying degree of diarrhoea in selected urban hospitals in Sokoto metropolis, Nigeria. Diarrhoea samples were collected from 200 diarrheic children younger than 5 years of age and tested using a commercially available DAKO Rotavirus ELISA kit which detects the presence of human group A rotaviruses. A questionnaire, based on WHO generic protocol, was completed for each child to generate the primary data. Of the total number of samples collected, 51 were found to be positive for human group A rotavirus indicating 25.5% prevalence of the disease in Sokoto state. The symptoms associated with the disease were analyzed and discussed.

  1. Anaerococcus nagyae sp. nov., isolated from human clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloo, A C M; de Vries, E D; Jean-Pierre, H; van Winkelhoff, A J

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new Anaerococcus species isolated from human clinical specimens. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences of three strains showed octavius. Phylogenetically the isolated strains form a cluster and can be differentiated from other species of the genus Anaerococcus based on its phenotypic characteristics and its MALDI-TOF MS profile. We propose the name Anaerococcus nagyae, with A. nagyae DSM101193 (accession number KU043522) as the type strain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identities of Microbacterium spp. Encountered in Human Clinical Specimens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The is...

  3. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery.

  4. Lack of executive function deficits among adult ADHD individuals from a Brazilian clinical sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloisa Saboya

    Full Text Available Abstract Executive function deficits have been previously documented in individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. Objective: The current study aimed to compare measures of executive functions among a clinical sample of adults with ADHD and normal control subjects, matched for age, gender and education. Methods: Twenty-three self-referred adults diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV criteria, and twenty-five control subjects were assessed using a neuropsychological battery which included the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Tower of Hanoi, Digit Span, Trail Making Test (A and B, Stroop Test and Raven's Progressive Matrices. Results: The ADHD group did not differ significantly from the control subjects on any of the measures assessed. Conclusion: Measures of executive functions using this test battery were unable to discriminate between adults with ADHD and control subjects in this clinical sample.

  5. Recombinant human thrombopoietin: basic biology and evaluation of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuter, David J; Begley, C Glenn

    2002-11-15

    Thrombocytopenia is a common medical problem for which the main treatment is platelet transfusion. Given the increasing use of platelets and the declining donor population, identification of a safe and effective platelet growth factor could improve the management of thrombocytopenia. Thrombopoietin (TPO), the c-Mpl ligand, is the primary physiologic regulator of megakaryocyte and platelet development. Since the purification of TPO in 1994, 2 recombinant forms of the c-Mpl ligand--recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) and pegylated recombinant human megakaryocyte growth and development factor (PEG-rHuMGDF)--have undergone extensive clinical investigation. Both have been shown to be potent stimulators of megakaryocyte growth and platelet production and are biologically active in reducing the thrombocytopenia of nonmyeloablative chemotherapy. However, neither TPO has demonstrated benefit in stem cell transplantation or leukemia chemotherapy. Other clinical studies have investigated the use of TPO in treating chronic nonchemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia associated with myelodysplastic syndromes, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, thrombocytopenia due to human immunodeficiency virus, and liver disease. Based solely on animal studies, TPO may be effective in reducing surgical thrombocytopenia and bleeding, ex vivo expansion of pluripotent stem cells, and as a radioprotectant. Ongoing and future studies will help define the clinical role of recombinant TPO and TPO mimetics in the treatment of chemotherapy- and nonchemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia.

  6. Identities of Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The isolation of strains belonging to M. hydrocarbonoxydans (n = 2), M. esteraromaticum (n = 1), M. oleivorans (n = 1), M. phyllosphaerae (n = 1), and M. thalassium (n = 1) from humans is reported for the first time. Microbacterium sp. strain VKM Ac-1389 (n = 1) and the previously uncultured Microbacterium sp. clone YJQ-29 (n = 1) probably represent new species. Comprehensive antimicrobial susceptibility data are given for the 50 Microbacterium isolates. This study is, so far, the largest on Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens and outlines the heterogeneity of clinical Microbacterium strains.

  7. Identities of Microbacterium spp. Encountered in Human Clinical Specimens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The isolation of strains belonging to M. hydrocarbonoxydans (n = 2), M. esteraromaticum (n = 1), M. oleivorans (n = 1), M. phyllosphaerae (n = 1), and M. thalassium (n = 1) from humans is reported for the first time. Microbacterium sp. strain VKM Ac-1389 (n = 1) and the previously uncultured Microbacterium sp. clone YJQ-29 (n = 1) probably represent new species. Comprehensive antimicrobial susceptibility data are given for the 50 Microbacterium isolates. This study is, so far, the largest on Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens and outlines the heterogeneity of clinical Microbacterium strains. PMID:18799696

  8. Clinical evaluation of nonsyndromic dental anomalies in Dravidian population: A cluster sample analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamunadevi, Andamuthu; Selvamani, M.; Vinitha, V.; Srivandhana, R.; Balakrithiga, M.; Prabhu, S; Ganapathy, N

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To record the prevalence rate of dental anomalies in Dravidian population and analyze the percentage of individual anomalies in the population. Methodology: A cluster sample analysis was done, where 244 subjects studying in a dental institution were all included and analyzed for occurrence of dental anomalies by clinical examination, excluding third molars from analysis. Results: 31.55% of the study subjects had dental anomalies and shape anomalies were more prevalent (22.1%), followed b...

  9. Lack of executive function deficits among adult ADHD individuals from a Brazilian clinical sample

    OpenAIRE

    Eloisa Saboya; Gabriel Coutinho; Daniel Segenreich; Vanessa Ayrão; Paulo Mattos

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Executive function deficits have been previously documented in individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Objective: The current study aimed to compare measures of executive functions among a clinical sample of adults with ADHD and normal control subjects, matched for age, gender and education. Methods: Twenty-three self-referred adults diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV criteria, and twenty-five control subjects were assessed using a neuropsychological ...

  10. Multiplex PCR for the Detection of 10 Viruses Causing Encephalitis/Encephalopathy and its Application to Clinical Samples Collected from Japanese Children with Suspected Viral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngan T K; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Thongprachum, Aksara; Trinh, Quang D; Khamrin, Pattara; Arakawa, Chikako; Ishii, Wakako; Okitsu, Shoko; Komine-Aizawa, Shihoko; Hayakawa, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is a serious neurological condition having a high mortality rate and affecting both children and adults. This study aimed to develop a multiplex PCR method for the simultaneous screening of clinical samples for the presence of the 10 viruses presently considered as the major viral causes of acute encephalitis/ encephalopathy in Asia. Using previously published primers that have been widely used to screen for herpes virus-6, influenza A virus, human parechovirus, herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2, Japanese encephalitis virus, group A rotavirus, enterovirus, adenovirus, and dengue virus in clinical samples, a single-tube multiplex PCR assay was developed and was tested for its sensitivity and specificity. The method was then applied to screen 57 clinical samples, consisting of 13 fecal samples, 5 throat swabs, 3 post-nasal swabs, 18 serum samples, and 18 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples, collected from 18 hospitalized Japanese children with suspected viral encephalitis/encephalopathy for the target viruses, and the results were compared with those of a monoplex PCR method. Positive viral controls of the 10 viruses were correctly typed using this multiplex PCR method. The multiplex PCR method showed high specificity with no unspecific amplification to non-target viruses. The results of applying this PCR method for screening clinical samples showed that 6 fecal samples, 2 serum samples, and 1 CSF sample collected from 7 patients were positive for a virus, specifically group A rotavirus (4 patients, 22.2%), enterovirus (2 patients, 11.1%), or adenovirus (1 patient, 5.6%). In comparison with monoplex PCR, for group A rotavirus, enterovirus, and adenovirus, the sensitivity of this multiplex PCR method decreased for serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and throat swab samples. This newly developed multiplex PCR method is a simple, rapid diagnostic tool and can be used to screen clinical samples for viruses causing acute encephalitis/encephalopathy in children in

  11. [The clinical use of cryopreserved human skin allografts for transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Chacón-Gómez, María; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio; Barrera-Lopez, Araceli; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Querevalu-Murillo, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The biological recovery of human skin allografts is the gold standard for preservation in Skin Banks. However, there is no worldwide consensus about specific allocation criteria for preserved human skin allografts with living cells. A report is presented on the results of 5 years of experience of using human skin allografts in burned patient in the Skin and Tissue Bank at the "Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" The human skin allografts were obtained from multi-organ donors. processed and preserved at -80 °C for 12 months. Allocation criteria were performed according to blood type match, clinical history, and burned body surface. Up to now, the Skin and Tissue Bank at 'Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" has processed and recovered 125,000 cm(2) of human skin allografts. It has performed 34 surgical implants on 21 burned patients. The average of burn body surface was 59.2%. More than two-thirds (67.7%) of recipients of skin allografts were matched of the same to type blood of the donor, and 66.6% survived after 126 days hospital stay. It is proposed to consider recipient's blood group as allocation criteria to assign tissue; and use human skin allografts on patiens affected with burns over 30% of body surface (according the "rule of the 9"). Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Relevance of human parechovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid samples from young infants with sepsis-like illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeziorski, Eric; Schuffenecker, Isabelle; Bohrer, Sandrine; Pain, Jean Baptiste; Segondy, Michel; Foulongne, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    The human parechoviruses (HPeVs) were recently recognized as important viral pathogens involved in various illnesses in young children. However, routine detection is not performed in most clinical laboratories. Therefore, in this study, we aim to assess the relevance of HPeV detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of infants, according to clinical presentation. A total of 120 CSF specimens collected during 2012 from infants aged less than 1 year and previously reported negative for Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and enterovirus were selected. HPeV detection was performed with a commercially available real-time RT-PCR and HPeV strains from positive samples were subsequently genotyped by sequencing. HPeV RNA was detected in nine (7.5%) CSF samples. The median age of infected children was 41 days (range: 19-122 days). HPeV genotyping could be performed on five samples and three HPeV-3, one HPeV-1, and one HPeV-4 were identified. Hyperthermia associated with mottled skin was the predominant clinical presentation. Most clinical presentations of HPeV-infected infants were mild with a final diagnosis of sepsis-like illness. The median hospital stay was 3.5 days and five children received antibiotics. Routine detection of HPeV in CSF may allow differential diagnosis of enterovirus infection and improve etiologic identification of sepsis-like illness in children. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Clinical features and prognosis of a sample of patients with trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Patrícia; Polli, Janaina B; Mattos, Vinícius F; Rosa, Rosana C M; Zen, Paulo R G; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio A; Rosa, Rafael F M

    2013-06-01

    Trisomy 13 or Patau syndrome (PS) is a chromosomal disorder characterized by a well known presentation of multiple congenital anomalies. Our objective was to determine the clinical features and prognosis observed in a sample of patients with PS. The series was composed of patients with diagnosis of PS consecutively evaluated by a Clinical Genetics Service from a reference hospital of southern Brazil, in the period between 1975 and 2012. Statistical analysis was performed using PEPI program (version 4.0), with two-tailed Fisher's exact test for comparison of frequencies (P<0.05). The sample consisted of 30 patients, 60% male, median age at first evaluation of 9 days. Full trisomy of chromosome 13 was the main cytogenetic alteration (73%). The major clinical findings included: cryptorchidism (78%), abnormal auricles (77%), congenital heart defects (76%), polydactyly (63%), microphthalmia (60%) and micrognathia (50%). Four patients (13%) simultaneously had micro/anophthalmia, oral clefts and polydactyly. Some findings were only observed in our sample and included, among others, preauricular tags (10%), duplication of the hallux (3%) and spots following the lines of Blaschko (3%). Mosaicism (20% of cases) had a statistically significant association only with absence of cryptorchidism. The median of survival was 26 days. Patients with and without mosaicism had similar median of survival. Our findings, in agreement with the literature, show that the anomalies in patients with PS can be quite variable, sometimes even atypical. There is no pathognomonic finding, which may make the early identification of these patients challenging.

  14. Psychometric Evaluation of the MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scales in an Israeli Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkalim, Eleanor

    2015-10-01

    The current study cross-culturally evaluated the psychometric properties of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2)/MMPI-2-Restructured Form Restructured Clinical (RC) Scales in psychiatric settings in Israel with a sample of 100 men and 133 women. Participants were administered the MMPI-2 and were rated by their therapists on a 188-item Patient Description Form. Results indicated that in most instances the RC Scales demonstrated equivalent or better internal consistencies and improved intercorrelation patterns relative to their clinical counterparts. Furthermore, external analyses revealed comparable or improved convergent validity (with the exceptions of Antisocial Behavior [RC4] and Ideas of Persecution [RC6] among men), and mostly greater discriminant validity. Overall, the findings indicate that consistent with previous findings, the RC Scales generally exhibit comparable to improved psychometric properties over the Clinical Scales. Implications of the results, limitations, and recommendations for future research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Qualification study of two genomic DNA extraction methods in different clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Alireza; Shamaei, Masoud; Mohammadi Ziazi, Leila; Pourabdollah, Mihan; Dorudinia, Atosa; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Karimi, Shirin

    2014-01-01

    The purity of genomic DNA (gDNA) extracted from different clinical specimens optimizes sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. This study attempted to compare two different DNA extraction techniques namely salting-out and classic phenol-chloroform. Qualification of two different DNA extraction techniques for 634 clinical specimens highly suspected of having mycobacterial infection was performed. Genomic DNA was extracted from 330 clinical samples using phenol-chloroform and 304 by non-toxic salting-out. Qualification of obtained gDNA was done through amplification of internal controls, β-actin and β-globin. β-actin-positive was detected in 279/330 (84%) and 272/304 (89%) samples by phenol-chloroform technique and salting-out, respectively. PCR inhibitor was found for the gDNA of 13/304 (4%) patient samples were negative by β-actin and β-globin tests via salting-out technique in comparison with gDNAs from 27/330 (8.5%) samples extracted by phenol-chloroform procedure. No statistically significant difference was found between phenol-chloroform technique and salting-out for 385 sputum, 29 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), 105 gastric washing, and 38 body fluid (P=0.04) samples. This illustrates that both techniques have the same quality for extracting gDNA. This study discloses salting-out as a non-toxic DNA extraction procedure with a superior time-efficiency and cost-effectiveness in comparison with phenol-chloroform and it can be routinely used in resource-limited laboratory settings.

  16. WAIS-III Matrix Reasoning test performance in a mixed clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugbartey, A T; Sanchez, P N; Rosenbaum, J G; Mahurin, R K; Davis, J M; Townes, B D

    1999-11-01

    This study examined the relationship between the Matrix Reasoning subtest (MRT) of the WAIS-III and a selected number of neuropsychological tests in a heterogeneous clinical sample of English-speaking American (n = 41), and non-English-speaking immigrant (n = 14) adults. A moderate association between the Halstead Category Test and the MRT (-.58) was found in the English-speaking sample. Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant association between measures of verbal abstract reasoning and verbal fluency, and performance on the MRT. Among the immigrant sample, the MRT was also found to be significantly associated with verbal fluency task performance, as well as with the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. Correlational analyses therefore suggest a strong verbal mediation element in the MRT, and that labeling it a nonverbal task may be misleading.

  17. Isolation of Bacteroides from fish and human fecal samples for identification of unique molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabiri, Leila; Alum, Absar; Rock, Channah; McLain, Jean E; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2013-12-01

    Bacteroides molecular markers have been used to identify human fecal contamination in natural waters, but recent work in our laboratory confirmed cross-amplification of several human-specific Bacteroides spp. assays with fecal DNA from fish. For identification of unique molecular markers, Bacteroides from human (n = 4) and fish (n = 7) fecal samples were cultured and their identities were further confirmed using Rapid ID 32A API strips. The 16S rDNA from multiple isolates from each sample was PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced to identify unique markers for development of more stringent human-specific assays. In human feces, Bacteroides vulgatus was the dominant species (75% of isolates), whereas in tilapia feces, Bacteroides eggerthii was dominant (66%). Bacteroides from grass carp, channel catfish, and blue catfish may include Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides ovatus, or Bacteroides stercoris. Phylogenic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed distinct Bacteroides groupings from each fish species, while human sequences clustered with known B. vulgatus. None of the fish isolates showed significant similarity to Bacteroides sequences currently deposited in NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information). This study expands the current sequence database of cultured fish Bacteroides. Such data are essential for identification of unique molecular markers in human Bacteroides that can be utilized in differentiating fish and human fecal contamination in water samples.

  18. Androgenic biomarker prof|ling in human matrices and cell culture samples using high throughput, electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, John H; Titus, Mark A; Efstathiou, Eleni; Fetterly, Gerald J; Mohler, James L

    2014-05-01

    BACKGROUND. A high throughput, high pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with triple quadrupole mass spectral detection (LC/MS/MS) was validated for the measurement of 5 endogenous androgens in human plasma and serum and applied to various in vivo and in vitro study samples to pursue a better understanding of the interrelationship of the androgen axis, intracrine metabolism, and castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CaP). A Shimadzu HPLC system interfaced with a Sciex QTRAP 5500 mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization was used with in line column-switching. Samples were liquid/liquid extracted and chromatographed on a Luna C18(2) column at 60°C with a biphasic gradient using a 15-min run time. The method was validated for five androgens in human plasma and serum, and applied to four sets of samples. Plasma (n=188) and bone marrow aspirate (n=129) samples from patients with CaP, who received abiraterone acetate plus prednisone for up to 945 days(135 weeks), had undetectable androgens after 8 weeks of treatment. Plasma dehydroepiandrosterone(DHEA) concentrations were higher in African Americans than Caucasian Americans with newly diagnosed CaP. Analysis of prostate tumor tissue homogenates demonstrated reproducible testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentrations with a minimal sample size of 1.0–2.0 mg of tissue. Finally, cell pellet and media samples from the LNCaP C4-2 cell line showed conversion of T to DHT. The proposed LC/MS/MS method was validated for quantitation of five endogenous androgens in human plasma and serum, and effectively profiles androgens in clinical specimens and cell culture samples.

  19. Automation of sample preparation for mass cytometry barcoding in support of clinical research: protocol optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Ala F; Wisnewski, Adam V; Raddassi, Khadir

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of multiplexed assays is highly important for clinical diagnostics and other analytical applications. Mass cytometry enables multi-dimensional, single-cell analysis of cell type and state. In mass cytometry, the rare earth metals used as reporters on antibodies allow determination of marker expression in individual cells. Barcode-based bioassays for CyTOF are able to encode and decode for different experimental conditions or samples within the same experiment, facilitating progress in producing straightforward and consistent results. Herein, an integrated protocol for automated sample preparation for barcoding used in conjunction with mass cytometry for clinical bioanalysis samples is described; we offer results of our work with barcoding protocol optimization. In addition, we present some points to be considered in order to minimize the variability of quantitative mass cytometry measurements. For example, we discuss the importance of having multiple populations during titration of the antibodies and effect of storage and shipping of labelled samples on the stability of staining for purposes of CyTOF analysis. Data quality is not affected when labelled samples are stored either frozen or at 4 °C and used within 10 days; we observed that cell loss is greater if cells are washed with deionized water prior to shipment or are shipped in lower concentration. Once the labelled samples for CyTOF are suspended in deionized water, the analysis should be performed expeditiously, preferably within the first hour. Damage can be minimized if the cells are resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) rather than deionized water while waiting for data acquisition.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections in cervical samples from cuban women older than 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Yudira; Torres, Griselda; Kourí, Vivian; Limia, Celia María; Goicolea, Adibel; Capó, Virginia; Pérez, Lissette; de la Torre, Ana Isabel; López, Ledy Xiomara; Govín, Anamays; Correa, Consuelo Beatriz; Alemán, Yoan; Alvarez, Alina Ana; Manzano, Blanca Rosa

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to provide information about the molecular epidemiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) in a group of Cuban women. DNA from cervical samples was analyzed using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which detects 6 of the clinically most relevant high-risk HPV types. Furthermore, end point PCR and sequencing were performed. Three hundred twenty-two women (211 with positive and 111 with negative cytologic results) aged between 30 and 69 years were enrolled. Risk factors associated with HPV infections and premalignant lesions were also investigated. HPV DNA was detected in 76.1% (245/322) of the studied population, and 34 different genotypes were found. There was an association between HPV infection and low educational level, history of oral contraceptives, menopausal stage, as well as cigarette and/or alcohol consumption. Besides, in a multivariate analysis, previous positive Pap test result and positive colposcopy finding were both predictor variables for HPV infections and for premalignant lesions. Human papillomavirus infection was found in 94.3% of women (199/211) with positive cytologic result and in 41.4% (46/111) of those with negative results, being more likely that the first group was infected with any HPV (odds ratio = 23.43; 95% CI = 11.70-46.92; p = .000). The most common genotypes were HPV types 16, 18, 31, 58, 33, and 45. All the cases with HPV positive findings had at least 1 high-risk HPV genotype. This is the first report of the molecular epidemiology of HPV in Cuban women, based on results from a DNA sequence and quantitative PCR. Most individuals were infected with high-risk HPV types. These findings support the inclusion of HPV vaccine in Cuba.

  1. Review of clinical and laboratory features of human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantur B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Brucella spp. continues to pose a human health risk globally despite strides in eradicating the disease from domestic animals. Brucellosis has been an emerging disease since the discovery of Brucella melitensis by Sir David Bruce in 1887. Although many countries have eradicated B. abortus from cattle, in some areas B. melitensis and B. suis have emerged as causes of this infection in cattle, leading to human infections. Currently B. melitensis remains the principal cause of human brucellosis worldwide including India. The recent isolation of distinct strains of Brucella from marine mammals as well as humans is an indicator of an emerging zoonotic disease. Brucellosis in endemic and non-endemic regions remains a diagnostic puzzle due to misleading non-specific manifestations and increasing unusual presentations. Fewer than 10% of human cases of brucellosis may be clinically recognized and treated or reported. Routine serological surveillance is not practiced even in Brucella - endemic countries and we suggest that this should be a part of laboratory testing coupled with a high index of clinical suspicion to improve the level of case detection. The screening of family members of index cases of acute brucellosis in an endemic area should be undertaken to pick up additional unrecognised cases. Rapid and reliable, sensitive and specific, easy to perform and automated detection systems for Brucella spp. are urgently needed to allow early diagnosis and adequate antibiotic therapy in time to decrease morbidity / mortality. The history of travel to endemic countries along with exposure to animals and exotic foods are usually critical to making the clinical diagnosis. Laboratory testing is indispensable for diagnosis. Therefore alertness of clinician and close collaboration with microbiologist are essential even in endemic areas to correctly diagnose and treat this protean human infection. Existing treatment options, largely based on

  2. Clinical,radiological and molecular diagnosis correlation in serum samples from patients with osteoarticular tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guadalupe; Garcia-Elorriaga; Olga; Martinez-Elizondo; Guillermo; del; Rey-Pineda; Cesar; Gonzalez-Bonilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To assess the role of polymerase chain reaction(PCR)in serum sauples,in the diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis(OTB)in a setting where only clinical and imaging diagnoses determine the treatment.Methods:A total of 44 consecutive serum specimens were collected from clinically suspected OTB patients,based on clinical and radiological[X-ray or magnetic resonance imagng/computecl tomography]features.They were scrcened by in-house nested PCR.In addition,a few specimens were examined by Gram stain,acid-fast bacilli stain,histand routine bacterial culture.A total of 39 specimens were collected from patients suffering from other bone diseases of nontuberculous origin and included as negative controls.Results:of the 44 clinically suspected OTB patients,in-house nested PCR was positive in 40(91%)cases;PCR was negative in 38(97%)negative controls.Sensitivity and specificity of our in—house nested PCR was 90.3%and 97.4%,respectively.The PCR report was available within 48 h.It was possible to standardize serum PCR technique and in positive cases,a good n was observed in terms of an adequate treatment response.Conclusions:Nested PCR in serum samples is a rapid,highly sensitive and specific modality for OTB detection,PCR should be performed in addition to clinical evaluation,imaging studies,acidfast bacilli staining,culture and histopathology diagnosis,if possible.

  3. Comparison of clinical characteristics of bipolar and depressive disorders in Korean clinical sample of youth: a retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Seung-Hyun; Joo, Yeonho; Park, Jangho; Youngstrom, Eric A; Kim, Hyo-Won

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of bipolar disorder I, II (BD I and II) and not otherwise specified (BD NOS) to those of major depressive disorder (MDD) in a clinical sample of Korean children and adolescents. This study was a cross-sectional review of longitudinal observational data. Two psychiatrists retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 198 children and adolescents (age 6-18) that were diagnosed as having bipolar or depressive disorders from March 2010 to February 2012 at Department of Psychiatry of Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Every subject's diagnoses were reviewed and confirmed. BD I, II and MDD were assessed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV criteria. BD NOS was defined based on the criteria for the Course and Outcome of Bipolar Youth study. Comparisons were made in demographic information, clinical characteristics, family history, and psychiatric comorbidities at baseline and during observation. Among 198 subjects, 20 (10.1 %) subjects were diagnosed as having BD I, 10 (5.1 %) as BD II, 25 (12.6 %) as BD NOS and 143 (73.7 %) as MDD. BD depression was associated with mood change while taking an antidepressant, familial bipolarity, aggressive behaviors, and atypical features. Comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder tended to be higher in BD NOS than in MDD. Presence of psychosocial stressors was more common in MDD than in BD depression. In children and adolescents, bipolar depression is distinct from unipolar depression in family history, comorbidity, and clinical characteristics.

  4. Expression of Wnt pathway mediators in metaplasic tissue in animal model and clinical samples of tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Lee, Yuk Wa; Wong, Yin Mei; Zhang, Xiaoling; Dai, Kerong; Rolf, Christer Gustav

    2013-09-01

    Tissue metaplasia is observed in both ossified failed healing animal model and clinical samples of tendinopathy. The Wnt signalling pathway plays a vital role in pathological calcification. We hypothesized that the Wnt signalling pathway might contribute to tissue metaplasia and failed healing in tendinopathy. This study aimed to examine the spatial-temporal expression of Wnt pathway mediators in an ossified failed tendon healing animal model and clinical samples of tendinopathy. The effect of Wnt3a on the osteogenic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) was also examined. Ossified failed tendon healing was induced by the injection of collagenase into the patellar tendon of rats. At various times the tendons were harvested for immunohistochemical staining of Wnt3a, β-catenin, Lrp5 and Tcf1. Patellar tendon samples were obtained from 13 patients with patellar tendinopathy (11 unossified and 2 ossified) and 10 controls. Immunohistochemical staining of Wnt3a, β-catenin, Lrp5 and Tcf1 was similarly performed. Rat patellar TDSCs were treated with Wnt3a. The osteogenic differentiation of TDSCs was examined by ALP activity, alizarin red S staining and mRNA expression of osteogenic markers. There was increased expression of Wnt3a, β-catenin, Lrp5 and Tcf1 in the healing fibroblast-like cells, chondrocyte-like cells and ossified deposits in the animal model and in some clinical samples of tendinopathy. Wnt3a increased ALP activity, calcium nodule formation and expression of osteogenic markers in TDSCs. Activation of the Wnt signalling pathway and its effect on TDSCs might contribute to tissue metaplasia and failed healing in some cases of tendinopathy.

  5. Mapping gene associations in human mitochondria using clinical disease phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Scharfe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects

  6. The importance of inducible clindamycin resistance in enterotoxin positive S. aureus isolated from clinical samples

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    Memariani M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Clindamycin is a suitable antibiotic for treatment of skin and soft tissue infections. Moreover, it can suppress toxin production in many pathogenic bacteria such as S. aureus. There are two mechanisms of resistance in this antibiotic. Constitutive resistance can be detected by standard disk diffusion method but in the case of inducible resistance, D-test should be carried out. The main aim of this study is to determine prevalence of clindamycin inducible resistance among methicillin resistant and susceptible isolates of S. aureus isolated from different clinical samples. "nMethods: A total of 87 clinical isolates from clinical samples were collected. Methicillin resistance was determined using standard disk diffusion method. Subsequently, D-test was carried out according to CLSI guideline. Presence of the sea gene (enterotoxin A was detected by PCR using specific primers. "nResults: Out of 87 isolates, 18(20.7% were clindamycin inducible resistant while constitutive resistance was detected among 21(24.1% isolates. The 95% Confidence intervals for the proportion of inducible clindamycin resistance among clinical isolates of S. aureus was 12.2% to 29.2%. The inducible phenotype in MRSA isolates was more common than that of MSSA isolates (33.3% vs 5.1%.Significant differences were found between prevalence of inducible clindamycin resistance and type of infection (p=0.045. Importantly, there was a significant correlation between sea gene and the constitutive/inducible resistance (p<0.0001. "nConclusions: Due to the high prevalence of clindamycin inducible resistance among clinical isolates of S. aureus, we recommend D-test to avoid treatment failure.

  7. Isotope labeled internal standards (ILIS) as a basis for quality control in clinical studies using plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezeli, Melinda; Végvári, Akos; Marko-Varga, György; Laurell, Thomas

    2010-04-18

    For clinical proteomic studies, the quality of the biofluid samples such as human blood plasma is extremely important. In this study we have investigated the stability of human plasma samples by spiking stable isotope-labeled peptides into the plasma and monitoring their degradation under different storage conditions. FPA-1, C4A and C3f were synthesized with isotopically labeled amino acids, and used as reference peptides. The mixture of internal calibrants was spiked into plasma at the starting point of investigation, mimicking the time of collection for future biobanking efforts, and their qualitative and quantitative changes were analyzed over time by using both MALDI-MS (LTQ Orbitrap XL) and nanoLC-ESI-MS (LTQ XL ETD). We have found that all three synthetic peptides were stable in plasma at -20 and -80 degrees C during the examined 2-month period. However, different proteolytic degradation profiles of the peptides were observed at room temperature. We anticipate that the use of these isotope-labeled peptides as internal standards (ILIS) provides a quality control for long-term storage and proteomic plasma analysis.

  8. Clinical significance of vasculogenic mimicry in human gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Qing-ping; Mu, Yong-gao; Zhang, Xiang-hen; Sai, Ke; Pang, Jesse Chung-Sean; Ng, Ho-Keung; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2011-11-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is known as non-endothelial tumor cell-lined microvascular channels in aggressive tumors. We have previously found the presence of VM in high-grade gliomas. In this study, we aimed to identify VM patterns in gliomas and to explore their clinical significance. Tumor samples as well as their detailed clinical/prognostic data were collected from 101 patients. Vasculogenic mimicry in the glioma samples was determined by dual staining for endothelial marker CD34 and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). Tumor samples were also immunohistochemically stained for Ki-67, VEGF, COX-2 and MMP-9. The association between VM and the clinical characteristics of the patients were analyzed. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were performed to compare survival times of the patients. Vasculogenic mimicry was present in 13 out of 101 samples. The higher grade gliomas had a higher incidence of VM than that of lower grade gliomas (P = 0.006). Vasculogenic mimicry channels were associated with the expression of COX-2 and MMP-9 (P age and preoperative epilepsy of the patients, or expression of Ki-67 and VEGF. However, patients with VM-positive gliomas survived a shorter period of time than those with VM negative gliomas (P = 0.027). Interestingly, in high-grade gliomas, the level of microvascular density was lower in VM positive tumors than those VM negative tumors (P = 0.039). Our results suggest that VM channels in gliomas correlate with increasing malignancy and higher aggressiveness, and may provide a complementation to the tumor's blood supply, especially in less vascularized regions, which may aid in the identification of glioma patients with a poorer prognosis.

  9. A Pilot Clinical Study to Investigate the Human Whole Blood Spectrum Characteristics in the Sub-THz Region

    CERN Document Server

    Tseng, Tzu-Fang; Gao, Hao-Cheng; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    We have conducted a pilot clinical study to not only investigate the THz spectra of ex-vivo fresh human whole blood of 28 patients following 8-hours fasting guideline, but also to find out the critical blood ingredients of which the concentration dominantly affects those THz spectra. A great difference between the THz absorption properties of human blood among different people was observed, while the difference can be up to ~15% of the averaged absorption coefficient of the 28 samples. Our pilot clinical study indicates that triglyceride and red blood cell were two dominant factors to have significant clinically defined negative correlation to the sub-THz absorption coefficients.

  10. Identification of bacteria from clinical samples using Bartonella alpha-Proteobacteria growth medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas, Maria B; Maggi, Ricardo G; Diniz, Pedro P V P; Breitschwerdt, Kyle T; Sontakke, Sushama; Breithschwerdt, Edward B

    2007-11-01

    In an effort to overcome historical problems associated with the isolation of Bartonella species from animal and human blood samples, our laboratory developed a novel, chemically modified, insect-based, liquid culture medium (Bartonella alpha-Proteobacteria growth medium, BAPGM). In this study, we describe the isolation of non-Bartonella bacteria from aseptically obtained human blood and tissue samples that were inoculated into BAPGM pre-enrichment culture medium, and were obtained during attempts to define each individuals Bartonella infection status. After incubation for at least 7 days in liquid BAPGM, pre-enriched inoculums were sub-cultured onto a BAPGM/blood agar plate. Bacterial DNA was extracted from pooled plated colonies and amplified using conventional PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Subsequently, amplicons were cloned, sequenced and compared to GenBank database sequences using the BLAST program. Regardless of the patient's Bartonella status, seventeen samples generated only one 16S rDNA sequence, representing the following genera: Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Bartonella, Dermabacter, Methylobacterium, Propionibacterium, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and bacteria listed as "non-cultured" in the GenBank database. Alkalibacterium, Arthrobacter, Erwinia, Kineococcus, Methylobacterium, Propionibacterium, Sphingomonas, and Staphylococcus were isolated from nine Bartonella-infected individuals. Co-isolation of Acinetobacter, Sphingomonas, Staphylococcus spp. and bacteria listed as "non-cultured" in the GenBank database was achieved for four samples in which Bartonella spp. were not detected. Despite the phylogenetic limitations of using partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing for species and strain identification, the investigational methodology described in this study may provide a complementary approach for the isolation and identification of bacteria from patient samples.

  11. Rhodococcus equi human clinical isolates enter and survive within human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Vivas, J; Pilares-Ortega, L; Remuzgo-Martínez, S; Padilla, D; Gutiérrez-Díaz, J L; Navas-Méndez, J

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an emerging opportunistic human pathogen associated with immunosuppressed people, especially those infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathogen resides primarily within lung macrophages of infected patients, which may explain in part its ability to escape normal pulmonary defense mechanisms. Despite numerous studies as a pulmonary pathogen in foals, where a plasmid seems to play an important role in virulence, information on the pathogenesis of this pathogen in humans is still scarce. In this study, fluorescence microscopy and vancomycin protection assays were used to investigate the ability of R. equi human isolates to adhere to and to invade the human alveolar epithelial cell line A549. Our findings indicate that some R. equi clinical strains are capable of adhering, entering and surviving within the alveolar cell line, which may contribute to the pathogen persistence in lung tissues. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence and Reasons for Tooth Loss in a Sample from a Dental Clinic in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Affonso Barretto Montandon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the prevalence and reasons for teeth extractions in a sample from a dental clinic in Brazil. Methods. The prevalence of teeth mortality was analyzed by gender, age, tooth type and reasons for extraction on 800 teeth of 439 subjects, whose data was collected in clinical records in a convenience sample. Results. The groups with range from 35 to 44 years, 45 to 54 years and 55 to 64 years revealed significantly greater number of teeth extractions than other age groups (P<0.0001. The anterior teeth loss increased significantly with aging, while the tooth mortality of premolar and molar were higher in younger people. The caries was the more prevalent reason for tooth mortality among young and adults up to 44 years old, while the periodontal disease was the main reason for extractions from 45 years old until range of 81 years (P<0.0001. Conclusions. It can be suggested that some reasons for tooth loss were age-dependent, but the caries and the periodontal diseases were the main reasons for tooth mortality in this Brazilian sample.

  13. Genotypic characterization, invasion index and antimicrobial resistance pattern in Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from clinical samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behrooz Sadeghi Kalani; Abazar Pournajaf; Mansour Sedighi; Abbas Bahador; Gholamreza Irajian; Firuzeh Valian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate antimicrobial resistance, invasion index and genetic profile in Listeriamonocytogenes isolated from clinical samples. Methods: At all, 170 clinical samples were collected from patients with spontaneous abortions hospitalized in Shariati hospital in Tehran during June 2010 to August 2013. Invasion index was determined using HeLa cells. The multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis (MLVA) was used for evaluation of genetic relatedness. Results: Out of 14 L. monocytogenes isolates, 4 (28.57%), 2 (14.28%), 0 (0%), 5 (35.71%) and 3 (21.42%) were isolated from placental tissue, urine, blood, vaginal and rectal swabs, respectively. High resistance to penicillin and multidrug resistant were found amongst isolates. The invasion index was in the range of 0.001-0.007. Seven different types were obtained by MLVA assay and type 2 and 3 with 4 strains were the most frequent type. Strains isolated from the vagina and the placenta of the same type were also more resistant to penicillin. Conclusions: Since MLVA is a high-throughput screening method that is fairly inexpensive, easy to accomplish, rapid, and trustworthy, it is well suited to interlaboratory comparisons during epidemiological investigations. Also further studies of larger samples from a variety of sources such as food and animal specimens recommended comparing by MLVA method.

  14. Evolution and Diversity of Listeria monocytogenes from Clinical and Food Samples in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a significant foodborne pathogen causing severe systemic infections in humans with high mortality rates. The objectives of this work were to establish a phylogenetic framework of L. monocytogenes from China and to investigate sequence diversity among different serotypes. We selected 17 L. monocytogenes strains recovered from patients and foods in China representing serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, and 1/2c. Draft genome sequences were determined using Illumina MiSeq technique and associated protocols. Open reading frames were assigned using prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline by NCBI. Twenty-four published genomes were included for comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis. More than 154,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified from multiple genome alignment and used to reconstruct maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree. The 41 genomes were differentiated into lineages I and II, which consisted of 4 and 11 subgroups, respectively. A clinical strain from China (SHL009 contained significant SNP differences compared to the rest genomes, whereas clinical strain SHL001 shared most recent common ancestor with strain SHL017 from food. Moreover, clinical strains SHL004 and SHL015 clustered together with two strains (08-5578 and 08-5923 recovered from an outbreak in Canada. Partial sequences of a plasmid found in the Canadian strain were also present in SHL004. We investigated the presence of various genes and gene clusters associated with virulence and subgroup-specific genes, including internalins, L. monocytogenes pathogenicity islands (LIPIs, L. monocytogenes genomic islands (LGIs, stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/cas system. A novel genomic island, denoted as LGI-2 was identified. Comparative sequence analysis revealed differences among the L. monocytogenes strains related to virulence, survival abilities, and attributes against foreign genetic

  15. Sensitive and direct detection of receptor binding specificity of highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus in clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadanobu Takahashi

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV recognizes two types of N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac by galactose (Gal linkages, Neu5Acα2,3Gal and Neu5Acα2,6Gal. Avian IAV preferentially binds to Neu5Acα2,3Gal linkage, while human IAV preferentially binds to Neu5Acα2,6Gal linkage, as a virus receptor. Shift in receptor binding specificity of avian IAV from Neu5Acα2,3Gal linkage to Neu5Acα2,6Gal linkage is generally believed to be a critical factor for its transmission ability among humans. Surveillance of this shift of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian IAV (HPAI is thought to be a very important for prediction and prevention of a catastrophic pandemic of HPAI among humans. In this study, we demonstrated that receptor binding specificity of IAV bound to sialo-glycoconjugates was sensitively detected by quantifying the HA gene with real-time reverse-transcription-PCR. The new assay enabled direct detection of receptor binding specificity of HPAIs in chicken clinical samples including trachea and cloaca swabs in only less than 4 h.

  16. Parent-Adolescent Cross-Informant Agreement in Clinically Referred Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rescorla, Leslie A; Ewing, Grace; Ivanova, Masha Y

    2017-01-01

    To conduct international comparisons of parent-adolescent cross-informant agreement in clinical samples, we analyzed ratings on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Youth Self-Report (YSR) for 6,762 clinically referred adolescents ages 11-18 from 7 societies (M = 14.5 years, SD = 2.0 years; 51...... were quite similar, with small and inconsistent informant effects across societies. Cross-informant rs averaged .47 across scales and societies. On average, parents and adolescents agreed well regarding which problem items received low, medium, or high ratings (M r = .87). Mean within-dyad item......% boys). Using CBCL and YSR data, we asked the following questions: (a) Do parents report more problems for their adolescent children than the adolescents report about themselves? (b) How do cross-informant correlations (rs) for scale scores differ by problem type and by society? (c) How well do parents...

  17. Parasitological and clinical studies on human scabies in Cairo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwat, M A; el Okbi, L M; el Sayed, M M; el Okbi, S M; el Deeb, H K

    1993-12-01

    This study is a parasitological and clinical study on human scabies. This study was carried out on 100 patients attending the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic at Ain Shams University Hospitals, including 54 males and 46 females. All patients were subjected to detailed history taking, complete dermatological examination including Skin Scraping Test and Burrow Ink Test. Younger patients attended the dermatology clinic earlier than older patients, who usually delayed their visits until complications occurred. Scratching, erythematous papules and secondary infected lesions were the commonest lesions. The hands, wrist and external genitalia were the most frequently affected sites while the feet, ankles, knees and back were the least affected. Burrows could only be detected in 40% of patients. The most frequent sites were the web spaces, external genitalia, and finger sides. Burrow Ink Test was positive among 85% of patients with burrows while mites could be identified by Skin Scraping Test in 55% of patients. The most frequent clinical manifestations in the parasitologically positive patients were itching, burrows, and papules, and the most frequent sites were the web spaces, and the finger sides. Multiple sites affection was the characteristic feature among the preschool age children who represented 14% of cases.

  18. A Bayesian cost-benefit approach to the determination of sample size in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Pezeshk, Hamid; Gittins, John

    2008-01-15

    Current practice for sample size computations in clinical trials is largely based on frequentist or classical methods. These methods have the drawback of requiring a point estimate of the variance of the treatment effect and are based on arbitrary settings of type I and II errors. They also do not directly address the question of achieving the best balance between the cost of the trial and the possible benefits from using the new treatment, and fail to consider the important fact that the number of users depends on the evidence for improvement compared with the current treatment. Our approach, Behavioural Bayes (or BeBay for short), assumes that the number of patients switching to the new medical treatment depends on the strength of the evidence that is provided by clinical trials, and takes a value between zero and the number of potential patients. The better a new treatment, the more the number of patients who want to switch to it and the more the benefit is obtained. We define the optimal sample size to be the sample size that maximizes the expected net benefit resulting from a clinical trial. Gittins and Pezeshk (Drug Inf. Control 2000; 34:355-363; The Statistician 2000; 49(2):177-187) used a simple form of benefit function and assumed paired comparisons between two medical treatments and that the variance of the treatment effect is known. We generalize this setting, by introducing a logistic benefit function, and by extending the more usual unpaired case, without assuming the variance to be known.

  19. Pathogenesis, developmental consequences, and clinical correlations of human embryo fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Victor Y; Browne, Richard W; Bloom, Michael S; Sakkas, Denny; Alikani, Mina

    2011-03-15

    This narrative review summarizes the current state of knowledge about human embryo fragmentation during IVF. The clinical relevance of fragmentation is discussed and evidence supporting a central role for the oocyte in the pathogenesis of fragmentation is presented. A mechanism of fragmentation as aberrant cell division involving the cytoskeleton is described along with the novel concept of membrane instability in relation to follicular high-density lipoprotein metabolism and cholesterol transport. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The human genome project: Prospects and implications for clinical medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.D.; Waterston, R.H. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1991-10-09

    The recently initiated human genome project is a large international effort to elucidate the genetic architecture of the genomes of man and several model organisms. The initial phases of this endeavor involve the establishment of rough blueprints (maps) of the genetic landscape of these genomes, with the long-term goal of determining their precise nucleotide sequences and identifying the genes. The knowledge gained by these studies will provide a vital tool for the study of many biologic processes and will have a profound impact on clinical medicine.

  1. Molecular characterization of viruses from clinical respiratory samples producing unidentified cytopathic effects in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Yacine; Boivin, Guy

    2009-09-01

    The sequence-independent single primer amplification (SISPA) method was performed to identify a virus in 17 clinical respiratory samples producing uncharacterized cytopathic effects in LLC-MK2 cells. Sequence analysis of 600-1600 bp amplicons allowed the identification of six viruses (one influenza C, two parechovirus-3 and three cardioviruses). Genomic sequences of the cardioviruses showed similarities with those of the recently-described Saffold virus strain although significant variation was present in the viral surface EF and CD loops. These results demonstrate the usefulness of SISPA for identifying emerging viruses and also known viruses not easily identified by standard virological methods.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Viruses from Clinical Respiratory Samples Producing Unidentified Cytopathic Effects in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Boivin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The sequence-independent single primer amplification (SISPA method was performed to identify a virus in 17 clinical respiratory samples producing uncharacterized cytopathic effects in LLC-MK2 cells. Sequence analysis of 600-1600 bp amplicons allowed the identification of six viruses (one influenza C, two parechovirus-3 and three cardioviruses. Genomic sequences of the cardioviruses showed similarities with those of the recently-described Saffold virus strain although significant variation was present in the viral surface EF and CD loops. These results demonstrate the usefulness of SISPA for identifying emerging viruses and also known viruses not easily identified by standard virological methods.

  3. Contemporary models of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: An evaluation with a large clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nadai, Alessandro; Nagpal, Prianka S; Piacentini, John; Peris, Tara S; Geffken, Gary R; Geller, Daniel A; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A; Lewin, Adam B

    2015-09-30

    We evaluated the construct validity of the Child Yale-Brofwn Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CYBOCS) in a large clinical sample (N=730) using confirmatory factor analysis. Results found inadequate fit for a priori models, though a model accounting for overlapping item content displayed good fit. Parallel obsessions/compulsions items may provide largely redundant information on the CYBOCS. Findings suggest modifying the CYBOCS to reduce burden on researchers, patients, and clinicians, and to more accurately measure pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Determination of cadmium and lead in human biological samples by spectrometric techniques: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo; de Carvalho, Anaildes Lago

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of human biological samples, such as blood, urine, nails, and hair, is generally used for the verification of human exposure to toxic metals. In this review, various spectrometric methods for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples are discussed and compared. Several spectrometric techniques are presented and discussed with respect to various characteristics such as sensitivity, selectivity, and cost. Special attention is drawn to the procedures for digestion prior to the determination of cadmium and lead in hair, nails, blood, and urine.

  5. Automated Protein Biomarker Analysis: on-line extraction of clinical samples by Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Cecilia; Świtnicka-Plak, Magdalena A.; Grønhaug Halvorsen, Trine; Cormack, Peter A. G.; Sellergren, Börje; Reubsaet, Léon

    2017-03-01

    Robust biomarker quantification is essential for the accurate diagnosis of diseases and is of great value in cancer management. In this paper, an innovative diagnostic platform is presented which provides automated molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for biomarker determination using ProGastrin Releasing Peptide (ProGRP), a highly sensitive biomarker for Small Cell Lung Cancer, as a model. Molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres were synthesized by precipitation polymerization and analytical optimization of the most promising material led to the development of an automated quantification method for ProGRP. The method enabled analysis of patient serum samples with elevated ProGRP levels. Particularly low sample volumes were permitted using the automated extraction within a method which was time-efficient, thereby demonstrating the potential of such a strategy in a clinical setting.

  6. Automated Protein Biomarker Analysis: on-line extraction of clinical samples by Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Cecilia; Świtnicka-Plak, Magdalena A.; Grønhaug Halvorsen, Trine; Cormack, Peter A.G.; Sellergren, Börje; Reubsaet, Léon

    2017-01-01

    Robust biomarker quantification is essential for the accurate diagnosis of diseases and is of great value in cancer management. In this paper, an innovative diagnostic platform is presented which provides automated molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for biomarker determination using ProGastrin Releasing Peptide (ProGRP), a highly sensitive biomarker for Small Cell Lung Cancer, as a model. Molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres were synthesized by precipitation polymerization and analytical optimization of the most promising material led to the development of an automated quantification method for ProGRP. The method enabled analysis of patient serum samples with elevated ProGRP levels. Particularly low sample volumes were permitted using the automated extraction within a method which was time-efficient, thereby demonstrating the potential of such a strategy in a clinical setting. PMID:28303910

  7. Detection of Campylobacter in human and animal field samples in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbjer, Kristina; Tano, Eva; Chhayheng, Leang; Mac-Kwashie, Akofa Olivia; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Ellström, Patrik; Sokerya, Seng; Sokheng, Choup; Mom, Veng; Chheng, Kannarath; San, Sorn; Davun, Holl; Boqvist, Sofia; Rautelin, Hilpi; Magnusson, Ulf

    2016-06-01

    Campylobacter are zoonotic bacteria and a leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide with Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli being the most commonly detected species. The aim of this study was to detect Campylobacter in humans and livestock (chickens, ducks, pigs, cattle, water buffalo, quail, pigeons and geese) in rural households by routine culturing and multiplex PCR in faecal samples frozen before analysis. Of 681 human samples, 82 (12%) tested positive by PCR (C. jejuni in 66 samples and C. coli in 16), but none by routine culture. Children were more commonly Campylobacter positive (19%) than adult males (8%) and females (7%). Of 853 livestock samples, 106 (12%) tested positive by routine culture and 352 (41%) by PCR. Campylobacter jejuni was more frequent in chickens and ducks and C. coli in pigs. In conclusion, Campylobacter proved to be highly prevalent by PCR in children (19%), ducks (24%), chickens (56%) and pigs (72%). Routine culturing was insufficiently sensitive in detecting Campylobacter in field samples frozen before analysis. These findings suggest that PCR should be the preferred diagnostic method for detection of Campylobacter in humans and livestock where timely culture is not feasible. © 2016 The Authors. APMIS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Societies for Medical Microbiology and Pathology.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Vibrio cholerae Isolated From Clinical Samples in Kurdistan Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanzadeh, Rashid; Rouhi, Samaneh; Shakib, Pegah; Shahbazi, Babak; Bidarpour, Farzam; Karimi, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae causes diarrhoeal disease that afflicts thousands of people annually. V. cholerae is classified on the basis of somatic antigens into serovars or serogroups and there are at least 200 known serogroup. Two serogroups, O1 and O139 have been associated with epidemic diseases. Virulence genes of these bacteria are OmpW, ctxA and tcpA. Due to the importance of V. cholerae infection and developing molecular diagnostics of this organism in medical and microbiology sciences, this study aimed to describe molecular characterization of V. cholerae isolated from clinical samples using a molecular method. In this study, 48 samples were provided during summer 2013 (late August and early September) by reference laboratory. Samples were assessed using biochemical tests initially. The primer of OmpW, ctxA and tcpA genes was used in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) protocols. Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC)-PCR and Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic (REP)-PCR methods were used to subtype V. cholerae. In this study, from a total of 48 clinical stool samples 39 (81.2 %) were positive for V. cholerae in biochemical tests and bacteria culture tests. The PCR results showed that of 39 positive isolates 35 (89.7%), 34 (87.1%) and 37 (94.8%) were positive for ctxA, tcpA and OmpW gene, respectively. Also, in the REP-PCR method with ERIC primer strains were divided into 10 groups. In the REP-PCR method with REP primer, strains were divided into 13 groups. Polymerase chain reaction has specificity and accuracy for identification of the organism and is able to differentiate biotypes. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence is one of the informative and discriminative methods for the analysis of V. cholerae diversity. The REP-PCR is a less informative and discriminative method compared to other methods for the analysis of V. cholerae diversity.

  9. Arsenic speciation in clinical samples: urine analysis using fast micro-liquid chromatography ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Jackie; Leese, Elizabeth

    2011-02-01

    Arsenic speciation is a subject that is developing all the time both from improvements in analytical techniques and from increases in toxicological understanding. Despite speciation methods being widely developed, arsenic speciation is not routinely offered as an analysis in clinical laboratory. The work in this paper describes a simple routine method for arsenic speciation that could be easily implemented in clinical laboratories. The method described, a new, fast analytical method for arsenic speciation, is reported using micro-liquid chromatography hyphenated to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (μLC-ICP-MS). The method uses a low-pressure delivery six-port valve with a 5 cm anion exchange column, which allows a fully resolved separation of five arsenic species (arsenobetaine [AB], arsenite [As(3+)], arsenate [As(5+)], mono-methylarsonic acid [MMA(5+)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(5+)]) in urine in just 6 min. This fast analytical method offers an arsenic speciation method that is feasible for a laboratory that does not have the capability for a dedicated arsenic speciation LC-ICP-MS instrument. The micro-LC system is small, easy to install and is fully integrated with the ICP-MS software. The results reported here are from urine samples from 65 workers in a semiconductor work providing a sample for their routine biological monitoring to assess workplace exposure. Control samples from 20 unexposed people were also determined. Results show that the semiconductor workers exhibit very low levels of arsenic in their urine samples, similar to the levels in the controls, and thus are not significantly exposed to arsenic. Care must be taken when interpreting urinary arsenic species results because it is not always possible to differentiate between dietary and other external sources of exposure.

  10. Mindfulness-Based Interventions in Clinical Samples of Adolescents with Chronic Illness: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola Kohut, Sara; Stinson, Jennifer; Davies-Chalmers, Cleo; Ruskin, Danielle; van Wyk, Margaret

    2017-08-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have emerged as a promising strategy for individuals with a chronic illness, given their versatility in targeting both physical and mental health outcomes. However, research to date has focused on adult or community-based populations. To systematically review and critically appraise MBIs in clinical pediatric samples living with chronic physical illness. Electronic searches were conducted by a Library Information Specialist familiar with the field by using EMBASE, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and EBM Reviews databases. Study Eligibility, Participants, and Interventions: Published English peer-reviewed articles of MBIs in clinical samples of children and adolescents (3-18 years) with chronic physical illness. Two reviewers independently selected articles for review and extracted data. Results are narratively described, and the reporting quality of each study was assessed via the STROBE Checklist. Of a total 4710 articles, 8 articles met inclusion criteria. All studies were small (n < 20, except 1 study of n = 59), included only outpatient adolescent samples, and focused on feasibility and acceptability of MBI; only 1 study included a comparison group (n = 1). No studies included online components or remote attendance. All studies found that MBI was acceptable to adolescents, whereas feasibility and implementation outcomes were mixed. Many studies were underpowered to detect significant differences post-MBI, but MBI did demonstrate improvements in emotional distress in several studies. Conclusions and Implications of Key Findings: The literature on MBIs is preliminary in nature, focusing on adapting and developing MBI for adolescents. Although MBIs appear to be a promising approach to coping with symptoms related to chronic illness in adolescents, future research with adequate sample sizes and rigorous research designs is warranted.

  11. Knowledge and Perceptions about Clinical Trials and the Use of Biomedical Samples: Findings from a Qualitative Study in Rural Northern Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Chatio

    Full Text Available Clinical trials conducted in sub-Saharan Africa have helped to address the prevalent health challenges. The knowledge about how communities perceive clinical trials is however only now evolving. This study was conducted among parents whose children participated in past clinical trials in northern Ghana to assess their knowledge and perceptions of clinical trials and the use of biomedical samples.This was a qualitative study based on eighty in-depth interviews with parents. The participants were randomly selected from among parents whose children were enrolled in a clinical trial conducted in the Kassena-Nankana districts between 2000 and 2003. The interviews were transcribed and coded into emergent themes using Nvivo 9 software. The thematic analysis framework was used to analyze the data.Study participants reported that clinical trials were carried out to determine the efficacy of drugs and to make sure that these drugs were suitable for human beings to use. The conduct of clinical trials was perceived to have helped to reduce the occurrence of diseases such as malaria, cerebrospinal meningitis and diarrhea. Quality of care was reported to be better in clinical trials than in the routine care. Parents indicated that participation in clinical trials positively influenced their health-seeking behavior. Apprehensions about blood draw and the use to which samples were put were expressed, with suspicion by a few participants that researchers sold blood samples. The issue of blood draw was most contentious.Parents perception about the conduct of clinical trials in the study districts is generally positive. However, misconceptions made about the use of blood samples in this study must be taken seriously and strategies found to improve transparency and greater community acceptability.

  12. Nicotine therapy sampling to induce quit attempts among smokers unmotivated to quit: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Matthew J; Hughes, John R; Gray, Kevin M; Wahlquist, Amy E; Saladin, Michael E; Alberg, Anthony J

    2011-11-28

    Rates of smoking cessation have not changed in a decade, accentuating the need for novel approaches to prompt quit attempts. Within a nationwide randomized clinical trial (N = 849) to induce further quit attempts and cessation, smokers currently unmotivated to quit were randomized to a practice quit attempt (PQA) alone or to nicotine replacement therapy (hereafter referred to as nicotine therapy), sampling within the context of a PQA. Following a 6-week intervention period, participants were followed up for 6 months to assess outcomes. The PQA intervention was designed to increase motivation, confidence, and coping skills. The combination of a PQA plus nicotine therapy sampling added samples of nicotine lozenges to enhance attitudes toward pharmacotherapy and to promote the use of additional cessation resources. Primary outcomes included the incidence of any ever occurring self-defined quit attempt and 24-hour quit attempt. Secondary measures included 7-day point prevalence abstinence at any time during the study (ie, floating abstinence) and at the final follow-up assessment. Compared with PQA intervention, nicotine therapy sampling was associated with a significantly higher incidence of any quit attempt (49% vs 40%; relative risk [RR], 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.4) and any 24-hour quit attempt (43% vs 34%; 1.3; 1.1-1.5). Nicotine therapy sampling was marginally more likely to promote floating abstinence (19% vs 15%; RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.7); 6-month point prevalence abstinence rates were no different between groups (16% vs 14%; 1.2; 0.9-1.6). Nicotine therapy sampling during a PQA represents a novel strategy to motivate smokers to make a quit attempt. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00706979.

  13. Clinical trial of a new technique for drugs of abuse testing: a new possible sampling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, Charlotte; Hermansson, Ulric; Beck, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Exhaled breath has recently been proposed as a matrix for drug testing. This study aims to further explore, develop and validate exhaled breath as a safe and effective non-invasive method for drug testing in a clinical setting. Self-reported drug use was recorded and drug testing was performed by mass spectrometry and immunochemical methods using breath, plasma and urine samples from 45 individuals voluntarily seeking treatment for recreational drug use. Cannabis was the most prevalent drug detected by any method. Urine sampling detected most cases. The exhaled breath technique was less sensitive (73%) than plasma analysis for detection of cannabis uses but captures a more recent drug intake than both plasma and urine. Exhaled breath was the preferred specimen to donate according to interview data of the participants. Testing illicit drugs with the exhaled breath sampling technique is a sufficient, non-invasive and safe alternative and complement to plasma and/or urine sampling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical utility and performance of sock sampling in weaner pig diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ken Steen; Okholm, Elisabeth; Johansen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    , agreement between three consecutive herd examinations from the same herd and agreement between quantitative PCR results from pooled faecal samples and sock samples.Twenty-four veterinarians submitted faecal and sock samples for quantitative PCR testing from outbreaks of diarrhoea in nursery pigs (n=38 herds......) where the farmer or veterinarian had decided that antimicrobial treatment was necessary. The veterinarians were asked to fill in a questionnaire and participate in telephone interviews.The apparent prevalence of low pathogen diarrhoea was 0.18 (95% CL: 0.08–0.34). Agreement between the veterinarians......’ clinical aetiological diagnosis and the pooled faecal sample was 0.18 (95% CL: 0.08–0.34), and Cohen’s Kappa was 0.03 (95% CL: −0.08 to 0.14). Antibiotic treatment or prevention strategies were changed in 0.63 (95% CL: 0.46–0.78) of the herds, and the veterinarians indicated that, for 0.32 (95% CL: 0...

  15. Comparison of real-time PCR and conventional PCR with two DNA targets for detection of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum infection in human and dog blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadiha, A; Mohebali, M; Haghighi, A; Mahdian, R; Abadi, A R; Zarei, Z; Yeganeh, F; Kazemi, B; Taghipour, N; Akhoundi, B

    2013-01-01

    Zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is endemic in northwestern Iran. Real-time PCR, conventional PCR, and the direct agglutination test (DAT) were used to diagnose Leishmania infantum infection in blood samples from 100 domestic dogs and 100 humans. Based on clinical evaluation, 82 humans and 72 dogs from the endemic area were categorized as having asymptomatic infection, DAT positive with no clinical signs of VL, or symptomatic infection, DAT positive with at least one sign of VL. Eighteen human samples containing no Leishmania antibodies (DAT(-)) and 28 dog DAT(-) sera from non-endemic areas with no history of VL constituted negative controls. All 46 DAT(-) samples were also negative by Dipstick rK39. Bone marrow material was used for parasitological examinations in symptomatic VL, and peripheral blood samples were used for detection of L. infantum infection using conventional PCR and real-time PCR in non-symptomatic subjects. Two DNA targets (ITS1 kDNA) were used for conventional PCR. L. infantum antibodies in sera were detected by DAT. Parasitemia was measured by real-time PCR targeting kDNA using Taqman Assay. All 72 (100%) symptomatic (38/38) and asymptomatic (34/34) dog DAT(+)samples, 45 of 48 (93.8%) symptomatic human DAT(+) samples, and 32 of 34 (94.1%) human asymptomatic cases were identified by real-time PCR. The mean (59.19 vs 12.38 parasite equivalents/mL of blood) and median (16.15 vs 1 parasite equivalents/mL of blood) ranges of parasitemia were higher in dogs than in humans (Preal-time PCR and DAT (99% in dogs and 95% in humans). Sensitivity of 100% and 93.9%, specificity of 96.4% and 100%, positive predictive values of 98.6% and 100%, and negative predictive values of 100% and 78.3% were found by real-time PCR for dog and human samples, respectively.

  16. Comparison of human glomerulus proteomic profiles obtained from low quantities of samples by different mass spectrometry with the comprehensive database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously constructed an in-depth human glomerulus proteome database from a large amount of sample for understanding renal disease pathogenesis and aiding the biomarker exploration. However, it is usually a challenge for clinical research to get enough tissues for large-scale proteomic characterization. Therefore, in this study, we focused on high-confidence proteomics analysis on small amounts of human glomeruli comparable to those obtained from biopsies using different mass spectrometers and compared these results to the comprehensive database. Results One microgram of human glomerular protein digest was analyzed each on five LC- combined mass spectrometers (LIT-TOF, LTQ-Orbitrap, Q-TOF, LIT and MALDI-TOF/TOF yielding 139, 185, 94, 255 and 108 proteins respectively identified with strict criteria to ensure high confidence (> 99% and low false discovery rate (FDR ( Conclusion This study showed representative human glomerulus proteomic profiles obtained from biopsies through analysis of comparable amounts of samples by different mass spectrometry. Our results implicated that high abundant proteins are more likely to be reproducibly identified in multiple mass spectrometers runs and different mass spectrometers. Furthermore, many podocyte essential proteins such as nephrin, podocin, podocalyxin and synaptopodin were also identified from the small samples in this study. Bioinformatic enrichment analysis results extended our understanding of the major glomerular proteins about their subcellular distributions and functions. The present study indicated that the proteins localized in certain cellular compartments, such as actin cytoskeleton, mitochondrial matrix, cell surface, basolateral plasma membrane, contractile fiber, proteinaceous extracellular matrix and adherens junction, represent high abundant glomerular proteins and these subcellular structures are also highly significantly over-represented in the glomerulus

  17. Digital communication to support clinical supervision: considering the human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Marlow, Annette; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    During the last three years the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Tasmania has used a needs assessment survey to explore the needs of organizations and nursing professionals that facilitate and clinically supervise Bachelor of Nursing students in the workplace. Findings from the survey indicated that staff at healthcare organizations wanted a communication strategy that was easily accessible by clinicians who supervised students during work integrated learning placements. In particular they wanted to receive timely information related to the role and function of supervisors in practice. The development of the digital strategy to strengthen the development of a community of practice between the University, organizations, facilities and clinical supervisors was identified as the key method of improving communication. Blogging and micro blogging were selected as methods of choice for the implementation of the digital strategy because they were easy to set up, use and enable equity of access to geographically dispersed practitioners in urban and rural areas. Change champions were identified to disseminate information about the strategy within their workplaces. Although clinicians indicated electronic communication as their preferred method, there were a number of human factors at a systems and individual level identified to be challenges when communicating with clinical supervisors who were based off-campus. Information communication technology policies and embedded culture towards social presence were impediments to using this approach in some organizations. Additionally, it was found that it is necessary for this group of clinicians to be educated about using digital methods to undertake their role as clinical supervisors in their varied clinical practice environments.

  18. Clinical human brucellosis in Malaysia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagita Hartady

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Clinical human brucellosis is quite rare in Malaysia although seroconverters are relatively more. This report describes a case of clinical human brucellosis in Malaysia. This case involved a 29-year-old research assistant in a veterinary microbiology laboratory. She complained of intermittent fever, anorexia, profuse sweating, malaise, headache, normotensive (110/60 mm Hg, muscle pain, and arthralgia for 3 d. Blood tests against dengue and malaria were negative thus she was prescribed vitamin C, paracetamol and cough syrup for common flu. The complaints, however, persisted on and off for the next 1 month. She eventually developed anemia and hypotension (90/50 mm Hg and started to show reduced body weight. Abdominal palpations revealed hepatomegaly and splenomegaly with pain. Thus, brucellosis was suspected before the Rose-Bengal plate test was performed, which revealed the presence of high level of antibody against Brucella. The same test was repeated after 14 d and the results confirmed the presence of high antibody level against Brucella. Following serum agglutination test, a diagnosis of brucellosis was made and she was eventually prescribed rifampicine p.o. once a day combined with doxycycline p.o. twice a day for 6 consecutive weeks before she made a full recovery.

  19. Inhibitory Interneurons of The Human Neocortex after Clinical Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Akulinin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the human neocortex interneurons (areas 4, 10, 17 and 21 by Brodmann after cardiac arrest (clinical death.Materials and methods. The main group included patients (n=7, men who survived 7—10 days and 70—90 days after cardiac arrest and later died due to heart failure. The control group (n=4, men included individuals after sudden fatal accidents. The morphometric and histological analysis of 420 neocortical fields (Nissl#staining,calbindin D28k, neuropeptide Y was performed using light and confocal microscopy.Results. We verified all main types of interneurons (Basket, Martinotti, and neurogliaform interneurons in neocortex based on the morphology of their bodies and dendritic processes in both groups. The number of calbindin- and NPY-positive neurons in the neocortex was similar in the control and in the postoperative period.However, calbindin- and NPY-immunopositive structure fields including neuronal cell bodies and their dendrites were significantly more represented in neocortex of patients from the main group. Maximum increase in common square in the relative areas of calbindin-immunopositive structures was observed 90 days after ischemia. The squares of NPY#immunopositive fields became larger seven days after resuscitation and remained increased on 90th day post-resuscitation.Conclusion. Our findings demonstrate an increase of calbindin and NPY expression in human neocortex after clinical death, which can be explained by a compensatory  eaction of undamaged inhibitory cortical interneurons directed to protectbrain from ischemia.

  20. [The ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR): validation of the depression scale in a clinical sample].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Wolfram Alexis; Loew, Thomas; von Heymann, Friedrich; Stadtmüller, Godehard; Georgi, Alexander; Tischinger, Michael; Strom, Frederik; Mutschler, Friederike; Tritt, Karin

    2015-06-01

    The ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR) 1 measures the severity of psychiatric disorders with 29 items on 5 subscales as comprehensively as possible. The following syndromes are measured: Depressive syndrome, anxiety syndrome, obsessive-compulsive syndrome, Somatoform syndrome, eating disorder syndrome as well as additional items that cover various mental syndromes, and an overall score. The study reports findings on the validity and sensitivity to change of the depression subscale (ISR-D). In a clinical sample of N=949 inpatients with depression spectrum disorders the convergent validity was determined by correlation with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) 3 and the subscale "depression" of the Symptom-Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) 4. The high correlation between the different instruments confirms the validity of the ISR-Depression Scale. The sensitivity to change of the ISR seems higher than that of the BDI and the SCL-90. Because of its economy and the good psychometric properties the ISR is recommended for use in clinical samples.

  1. PNA-based fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of bacteria in clinical samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with PNA probes (PNA-FISH) that target specific bacterial ribosomal RNA sequences is a powerful and rapid tool for identification of bacteria in clinical samples. PNA can diffuse readily through the bacterial cell wall due to its uncharged backbone, and PNA-FISH....... In all these cases, bacteria can be identified in biofilm aggregates, which may explain their recalcitrance to antibiotic treatment.......Fluorescence in situ hybridization with PNA probes (PNA-FISH) that target specific bacterial ribosomal RNA sequences is a powerful and rapid tool for identification of bacteria in clinical samples. PNA can diffuse readily through the bacterial cell wall due to its uncharged backbone, and PNA......-FISH can be performed with high specificity due to the extraordinary thermal stability of RNA-PNA hybrid complexes. We describe a PNA-FISH procedure and provide examples of the application of PNA-FISH for the identification of bacteria in chronic wounds, cystic fibrosis lungs, and soft tissue fillers...

  2. A Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Clinical Research with Non-Traditional Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licier, Rígel; Miranda, Eric; Serrano, Horacio

    2016-10-17

    The proper handling of samples to be analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) can guarantee excellent results and a greater depth of analysis when working in quantitative proteomics. This is critical when trying to assess non-traditional sources such as ear wax, saliva, vitreous humor, aqueous humor, tears, nipple aspirate fluid, breast milk/colostrum, cervical-vaginal fluid, nasal secretions, bronco-alveolar lavage fluid, and stools. We intend to provide the investigator with relevant aspects of quantitative proteomics and to recognize the most recent clinical research work conducted with atypical samples and analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Having as reference the most recent and different approaches used with non-traditional sources allows us to compare new strategies in the development of novel experimental models. On the other hand, these references help us to contribute significantly to the understanding of the proportions of proteins in different proteomes of clinical interest and may lead to potential advances in the emerging field of precision medicine.

  3. A Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Clinical Research with Non-Traditional Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rígel Licier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The proper handling of samples to be analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS can guarantee excellent results and a greater depth of analysis when working in quantitative proteomics. This is critical when trying to assess non-traditional sources such as ear wax, saliva, vitreous humor, aqueous humor, tears, nipple aspirate fluid, breast milk/colostrum, cervical-vaginal fluid, nasal secretions, bronco-alveolar lavage fluid, and stools. We intend to provide the investigator with relevant aspects of quantitative proteomics and to recognize the most recent clinical research work conducted with atypical samples and analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Having as reference the most recent and different approaches used with non-traditional sources allows us to compare new strategies in the development of novel experimental models. On the other hand, these references help us to contribute significantly to the understanding of the proportions of proteins in different proteomes of clinical interest and may lead to potential advances in the emerging field of precision medicine.

  4. Parasitic Infections Based on 320 Clinical Samples Submitted to Hanyang University, Korea (2004-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Chul; Lee, Soo-Young; Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed 320 clinical samples of parasitic infections submitted to the Department of Environmental Biology and Medical Parasitology, Hanyang University from January 2004 to June 2011. They consisted of 211 nematode infections, 64 trematode or cestode infections, 32 protozoan infections, and 13 infections with arthropods. The nematode infections included 67 cases of trichuriasis, 62 of anisakiasis (Anisakis sp. and Pseudoterranova decipiens), 40 of enterobiasis, and 24 of ascariasis, as well as other infections including strongyloidiasis, thelaziasis, loiasis, and hookworm infecions. Among the cestode or trematode infections, we observed 27 cases of diphyllobothriasis, 14 of sparganosis, 9 of clonorchiasis, and 5 of paragonimiasis together with a few cases of taeniasis saginata, cysticercosis cellulosae, hymenolepiasis, and echinostomiasis. The protozoan infections included 14 cases of malaria, 4 of cryptosporidiosis, and 3 of trichomoniasis, in addition to infections with Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, Entamoeba coli, Endolimax nana, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii. Among the arthropods, we detected 6 cases of Ixodes sp., 5 of Phthirus pubis, 1 of Sarcoptes scabiei, and 1 of fly larva. The results revealed that trichuriasis, anisakiasis, enterobiasis, and diphyllobothriasis were the most frequently found parasitosis among the clinical samples. PMID:24850969

  5. Early maladaptive schemas and personality disorder symptoms: An examination in a non-clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Steven N; Francis, Andrew J P

    2010-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the overall and specific relationship between early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) and personality disorder (PD) symptoms in a non-clinical sample. While a notable previous study has examined the relationship between EMSs and PD symptoms after statistically controlling for gender and within-cluster PD symptoms, they did not control for comorbid axis I and inter-cluster PD symptoms. Hence, we redressed this methodological problem by statistically controlling for these conditions in a series of multiple regressions. In a sample of 178 non-clinical participants, we obtained self-reports of PD symptoms, depression, anxiety, eating disorder, and EMSs. Results of a series of multiple regressions found that EMSs significantly predicted all PD symptoms apart from borderline and antisocial PDs and our hypotheses were largely consistent with hypotheses for cluster A and C PDs. We also found that specific EMSs differentially predicted PD subtypes even after controlling for other PD symptoms, depression, anxiety, and eating disorder symptoms. This study supports the contention that PDs are related to EMSs and there are specific relationships between particular EMSs and particular PDs. 2010 The British Psychological Society.

  6. Cognitive Predictors of Verbal Memory in a Mixed Clinical Pediatric Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley C. Heaton

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Verbal memory problems, along with other cognitive difficulties, are common in children diagnosed with neurological and/or psychological disorders. Historically, these “memory problems” have been poorly characterized and often present with a heterogeneous pattern of performance across memory processes, even within a specific diagnostic group. The current study examined archival neuropsychological data from a large mixed clinical pediatric sample in order to understand whether functioning in other cognitive areas (i.e., verbal knowledge, attention, working memory, executive functioning may explain some of the performance variability seen across verbal memory tasks of the Children’s Memory Scale (CMS. Multivariate analyses revealed that among the cognitive functions examined, only verbal knowledge explained a significant amount of variance in overall verbal memory performance. Further univariate analyses examining the component processes of verbal memory indicated that verbal knowledge is specifically related to encoding, but not the retention or retrieval stages. Future research is needed to replicate these findings in other clinical samples, to examine whether verbal knowledge predicts performance on other verbal memory tasks and to explore whether these findings also hold true for visual memory tasks. Successful replication of the current study findings would indicate that interventions targeting verbal encoding deficits should include efforts to improve verbal knowledge.

  7. China's human resources for maternal and child health: a national sampling survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenghong; Song, Peige; Theodoratou, Evropi; Guo, Sufang; An, Lin

    2015-12-16

    In order to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) 4 and 5, the Chinese Government has invested greatly in improving maternal and child health (MCH) with impressive results. However, one of the most important barriers for further improvement is the uneven distribution of MCH human resources. There is little information about the distribution, quantity and capacity of the Chinese MCH human resources and we sought to investigate this. Cities at prefectural level were selected by random cluster sampling. All medical and health institutions providing MCH-related services in the sampled areas were investigated using a structured questionnaire. The data were weighted based on the proportion of the sampled districts/cities. Amount, proportions and numbers per 10,000 population of MCH human resources were estimated in order to reveal the quantity of the Chinese MCH human resources. The capacity of MCH human resources was evaluated by analyzing data on the education level and professional skills of the staff. There were 77,248 MCH workers in China in 2010. In general, 67.6% and 71.9% of the women's and children's health care professionals had an associate degree or higher, whereas around 30% had only high-school or lower degrees. More than 40% of the women's health workers were capable of providing skilled birth attendance, but these proportions varied between different institutions and locations. Evidence from this study highlights that Chinese MCH human resources are not in shortage in the national level. However, the quantity and capacity of MCH human resources are not evenly distributed among different institutions and locations. Finally there is a need in the improvement of the MCH services by improving the quality of MCH human resources.

  8. Prevalence of Extended –Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella Pneumonia Isolates from Clinical Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizade, H. (MSc

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Klebsiella pneumonia (K.pneumonia is one of the common causes of nosocomial infections. The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of beta-lactamase genes and phenotypic confirmation of extended–spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL producing K.pneumonia isolates from clinical samples. Material and Methods: In this study, 122 K.pneumonia were isolated from clinical specimens of Khoramabad city and were confirmed by standard bacteriological tests. The presence of ESBL enzymes was detected by combined disk diffusion method. PCR assay with specific primers was used to determine blaSHV, blaTEM, blaCTX-15 and blaCTX-M genes in the confirmed isolates. Results: of 122 K.pneumonia isolates, 78 (64.18% were positive for ESBL, using disk diffusion method. According to antibiogram results, 10.65% of isolates were resistant to cefotaxime, 3.27% to ceftazidime and 68.03% to both antibiotics. Ninety isolates (64.18% considered as ESBLs isolates, at the same time, with being resistant to cefotaxime and ceftazidime were also sensitive to cefotaxime-clavulanic acid and ceftazidime-clavulanic acid. In PCR assays, blaCTX-15, blaSHV, blaCTX-M and blaTEM genes were detected in 78.68%, 40.16%, 26.22% and 22.13% of isolates, respectively. Ten resistant patterns of genes were detected. Conclusion: The significance percentage of antibiotic resistant genes of K.pneumonia isolates from clinical samples in Khoramabad city had ESBLs genes; CTX-M category was the most prevalent encoding genes of these enzymes. Keywords: Klebsiella Pneumonia, Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase, Antibiotic Resistance

  9. Antibacterial activity of Argemone mexicana L. against multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from clinical samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahesh C Sahu; Nagen K Debata; Rabindra N Padhy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To monitor the antipseudomonad activity of the weed Argemone mexicana (A.mexicana), with multidrug strains isolated from clinical samples. Methods: Antibiogram of isolated strains were done with disc diffusion method and antipseudomonad activity was monitored with the agar well diffusion method. Results: Twenty seven strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) were isolated from clinical samples from a hospital; among them, 22 were resistant to antibiotics (μg/disc): cefotaxime-30, 16 to amoxyclav-30, 15 to ofloxacin-5, 13 to gentamicin-10, 10 to piperacillin-100/tazobactam-10, 8 to amikacin-30, 7 to gatifloxacin-30, 6 to netilmicin-30, 4 to piperacillin100, 3 to imipenem-10 and 3 strains to nitrofurantoin-300. Each strain was resistant to several antibiotics at specified levels. Of these 27 clinical strains, 15 antibiotic-resistant strains and a antibiotic-sensitive standard strain were used in monitoring antimicrobial activity of leaf-extracts using 3 organic solvents (acetone, methanol and ethanol) and water of the weed, prickly poppy (A. mexicana L.). The methanol-extract had the highest level of antipseudomonad activity both with cold and hot extracts, confirmed by separate Kruskal-Wallis H tests. With the Student’s t-test it was ascertained that the hot extraction concentrate yielded promising antipseudomonad activity than the cold extraction with methanol. Values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of extracts of A. mexicana using acetone, methanol and ethanol as solvents were 10, 8 and 8 mg/mL, respectively; corresponding values of minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were 32, 28 and 24 mg/mL for these solvents, respectively.Conclusions:This study suggests that A. mexicana leaf can be used as complementary medicinein treating diseases caused by multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa.

  10. Assessing decentering: validation, psychometric properties, and clinical usefulness of the Experiences Questionnaire in a Spanish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Joaquim; Franquesa, Alba; Feliu-Soler, Albert; Cebolla, Ausias; García-Campayo, Javier; Tejedor, Rosa; Demarzo, Marcelo; Baños, Rosa; Pascual, Juan Carlos; Portella, Maria J

    2014-11-01

    Decentering is defined as the ability to observe one's thoughts and feelings in a detached manner. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ) is a self-report instrument that originally assessed decentering and rumination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of EQ-Decentering and to explore its clinical usefulness. The 11-item EQ-Decentering subscale was translated into Spanish and psychometric properties were examined in a sample of 921 adult individuals, 231 with psychiatric disorders and 690 without. The subsample of nonpsychiatric participants was also split according to their previous meditative experience (meditative participants, n=341; and nonmeditative participants, n=349). Additionally, differences among these three subgroups were explored to determine clinical validity of the scale. Finally, EQ-Decentering was administered twice in a group of borderline personality disorder, before and after a 10-week mindfulness intervention. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated acceptable model fit, sbχ(2)=243.8836 (p.46; and divergent validity: r<-.35). The scale detected changes in decentering after a 10-session intervention in mindfulness (t=-4.692, p<.00001). Differences among groups were significant (F=134.8, p<.000001), where psychiatric participants showed the lowest scores compared to nonpsychiatric meditative and nonmeditative participants. The Spanish version of the EQ-Decentering is a valid and reliable instrument to assess decentering either in clinical and nonclinical samples. In addition, the findings show that EQ-Decentering seems an adequate outcome instrument to detect changes after mindfulness-based interventions.

  11. Resistance to antivirals in human cytomegalovirus: mechanisms and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J L

    1997-09-01

    Long term therapies needed for managing human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections in immunosupressed patients provided the background for the emergence of the resistance to antivirals active against HCMV. In addition, laboratory selected mutants have also been readily achieved. Both clinical and laboratory resistant strains share the same determinants of resistance. Ganciclovir resistance may be due to a few mutations in the HCMV UL97 gene and/or viral DNA pol gene, the former being responsible for about 70% of clinical resistant isolates. Among them, V464, V594, S595 and F595 are the most frequent mutations. Because of their less extensive clinical use, much less is known about resistance to foscarnet and cidofovir (formerly, HPMPC) but in both cases, it has been associated to mutations in the DNA pol. Ganciclovir resistant strains showing DNA pol mutations are cross-resistant to cidofovir and their corresponding IC50 are normally higher than those from strains harboring only mutations at the UL97 gene. To date, foscarnet resistance seems to be independent of both ganciclovir and cidofovir resistance.

  12. Efficient discrimination and removal of phospholipids during electromembrane extraction from human plasma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vårdal, Linda; Gjelstad, Astrid; Huang, Chuixiu

    2017-01-01

    AIM: For the first time, extracts obtained from human plasma samples by electromembrane extraction (EME) were investigated comprehensively with particular respect to phospholipids using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Thhe purpose was to invest...

  13. Imitation of Tongue Protrusion in Human Neonates: Specificity of the Response in a Large Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Emese; Pilling, Karen; Orvos, Hajnalka; Molnar, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence has accumulated on the young human infant's ability to imitate, the phenomenon has failed to gain unanimous acceptance. Imitation of tongue protrusion, the most tested gesture to date, was examined in a sample of 115 newborns in the first 5 days of life in 3 seating positions. An ethologically based…

  14. Analyses of human colonic mucus obtained by an in vivo sampling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, H.M.; Jonkers, D.M.A.E.; Loof, A.; Houtvin, S.A.L.W. van; Troost, F.J.; Venema, K.; Kodde, A.; Koek, G.H.; Schipper, R.G.; Heerde, W.L. van; Brummer, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The mucus layer is an important dynamic component of the epithelial barrier. It contains mucin glycoproteins and other compounds secreted by the intestinal epithelium, such as secretory IgA. However, a standardized in vivo sampling technique of mucus in humans is not yet available. Aim:

  15. Groundwater sampling methods using glass wool filtration to trace human enteric viruses in Madison, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses have been detected in the Madison, Wisconsin deep municipal well system. Earlier projects by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS) have used glass wool filters to sample groundwater for these viruses directly from the deep municipal wells. Polymerase chain...

  16. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E. M. Vickers

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM, diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM. Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM, while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM, terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM, and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM. Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%, CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%–11%, and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%–6%. Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%, while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%. Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%, ETM (66%, DCF, TBF, MMI (61%–60%, APAP, CBZ (57%–56%, and DTL (48%. Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%, CBZ and ETM (44%–43%, APAP and DCF (40%–38%, MMI, TBF and CSA (37%–35%. This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  17. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Alison E M; Ulyanov, Anatoly V; Fisher, Robyn L

    2017-03-07

    Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM), diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM) and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM). Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM) and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM), while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM), terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM), and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM). Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%), CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%-11%), and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%-6%). Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%), while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%). Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%), ETM (66%), DCF, TBF, MMI (61%-60%), APAP, CBZ (57%-56%), and DTL (48%). Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%), CBZ and ETM (44%-43%), APAP and DCF (40%-38%), MMI, TBF and CSA (37%-35%). This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  18. An integrated nano-scale approach to profile miRNAs in limited clinical samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seumois, Grégory; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Eisley, Christopher J; Omran, Nada; Kalinke, Lukas; North, Mal; Ganesan, Asha P; Simpson, Laura J; Hunkapiller, Nathan; Moltzahn, Felix; Woodruff, Prescott G; Fahy, John V; Erle, David J; Djukanovic, Ratko; Blelloch, Robert; Ansel, K Mark

    2012-01-01

    Profiling miRNA expression in cells that directly contribute to human disease pathogenesis is likely to aid the discovery of novel drug targets and biomarkers. However, tissue heterogeneity and the limited amount of human diseased tissue available for research purposes present fundamental difficulties that often constrain the scope and potential of such studies. We established a flow cytometry-based method for isolating pure populations of pathogenic T cells from bronchial biopsy samples of asthma patients, and optimized a high-throughput nano-scale qRT-PCR method capable of accurately measuring 96 miRNAs in as little as 100 cells. Comparison of circulating and airway T cells from healthy and asthmatic subjects revealed asthma-associated and tissue-specific miRNA expression patterns. These results establish the feasibility and utility of investigating miRNA expression in small populations of cells involved in asthma pathogenesis, and set a precedent for application of our nano-scale approach in other human diseases. The microarray data from this study (Figure 7) has been submitted to the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO; http://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo) under accession no. GSE31030. PMID:23304658

  19. Colorimetric assessment of BCR-ABL1 transcripts in clinical samples via gold nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinhas, Raquel; Correia, Cláudia; Ribeiro, Patricia; Lourenço, Alexandra; Botelho de Sousa, Aida; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro V

    2016-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides (Au-nanoprobes) have been used in a range of applications for the detection of bioanalytes of interest, from ions to proteins and DNA targets. These detection strategies are based on the unique optical properties of gold nanoparticles, in particular, the intense color that is subject to modulation by modification of the medium dieletric. Au-nanoprobes have been applied for the detection and characterization of specific DNA sequences of interest, namely pathogens and disease biomarkers. Nevertheless, despite its relevance, only a few reports exist on the detection of RNA targets. Among these strategies, the colorimetric detection of DNA has been proven to work for several different targets in controlled samples but demonstration in real clinical bioanalysis has been elusive. Here, we used a colorimetric method based on Au-nanoprobes for the direct detection of the e14a2 BCR-ABL fusion transcript in myeloid leukemia patient samples without the need for retro-transcription. Au-nanoprobes directly assessed total RNA from 38 clinical samples, and results were validated against reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR) and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The colorimetric Au-nanoprobe assay is a simple yet reliable strategy to scrutinize myeloid leukemia patients at diagnosis and evaluate progression, with obvious advantages in terms of time and cost, particularly in low- to medium-income countries where molecular screening is not routinely feasible. Graphical abstract Gold nanoprobe for colorimetric detection of BCR-ABL1 fusion transcripts originating from the Philadelphia chromosome.

  20. Elimination of bioweapons agents from forensic samples during extraction of human DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbers, Jason; Wilkinson, Della; Hause, Christine C; Smith, Myron L; Zaidi, Mohsin A; Laframboise, Denis; Wright, Kathryn E

    2014-11-01

    Collection of DNA for genetic profiling is a powerful means for the identification of individuals responsible for crimes and terrorist acts. Biologic hazards, such as bacteria, endospores, toxins, and viruses, could contaminate sites of terrorist activities and thus could be present in samples collected for profiling. The fate of these hazards during DNA isolation has not been thoroughly examined. Our goals were to determine whether the DNA extraction process used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police eliminates or neutralizes these agents and if not, to establish methods that render samples safe without compromising the human DNA. Our results show that bacteria, viruses, and toxins were reduced to undetectable levels during DNA extraction, but endospores remained viable. Filtration of samples after DNA isolation eliminated viable spores from the samples but left DNA intact. We also demonstrated that contamination of samples with some bacteria, endospores, and toxins for longer than 1 h compromised the ability to complete genetic profiling.

  1. Long-term performance and stability of molecular shotgun lipidomic analysis of human plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Laura A; Suoniemi, Matti; Ta, Hung Xuan; Tarasov, Kirill; Ekroos, Kim

    2013-09-17

    The stability of the lipid concentration levels in shotgun lipidomics analysis was tracked over a period of 3.5 years. Concentration levels in several lipid classes, such as phospholipids, were determined in human plasma lipid extracts. Impact of the following factors on the analysis was investigated: sample amount, internal standard amount, and sample dilution factor. Moreover, the reproducibility of lipid profiles obtained in both polarity modes was evaluated. Total number of samples analyzed was approximately 6800 and 7300 samples in negative and positive ion modes, respectively, out of which 610 and 639 instrument control samples were used in stability calculations. The assessed shotgun lipidomics approach showed to be remarkably robust and reproducible, requiring no batch corrections. Coefficients of variation (CVs) of lipid mean concentration measured with optimized analytical parameters were typically less than 15%. The high reproducibility indicated that no lipid degradation occurred during the monitored time period.

  2. A review on the use of NEO-PI-R validity scales in normative, job selection, and clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Blanch

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In this study we review the use of the Positive Presentation Management (PPM and Negative Presentation Management (NPM scales, two NEO-PI-R derived measures originally devised to control for biased and distorted responses. These scales have been used with normative, job selection and clinical samples, in cross-sectional and experimental studies. Methods: Web-based and manual searches in personality and psychological assessment journals were conducted, and information on the PPM and NPM scales was systematically recorded. Means, standard deviations and reliability coefficients were summarized and compared between three types of samples: normative, job selection and clinical. Results: Five studies were performed with normative samples (33%, 3 with employment samples (20% and 7 with clinical samples (47%. Cross-sectional designs were most common (60%, although there were also experimental studies (40%. Reported reliability coefficients were lower than usually accepted. There were differences in mean PPM and NPM scores in regard to the study sample background. Conclusions: There were some discrepancies when reporting PPM and NPM results across the reviewed studies. Normative and employment samples scored higher in PPM than clinical samples. Clinical samples scored higher in NPM than normative and employment samples The PPM and NPM scales could be useful in applied situations, although parallel sources of information should be taken into account to detect distorted responses to the questionnaire. However, the results on these scales should be systematically reported in future studies.

  3. A tool kit for quantifying eukaryotic rRNA gene sequences from human microbiome samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollive, Serena; Peterfreund, Gregory L; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Bittinger, Kyle; Sinha, Rohini; Hoffmann, Christian; Nabel, Christopher S; Hill, David A; Artis, David; Bachman, Michael A; Custers-Allen, Rebecca; Grunberg, Stephanie; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2012-07-03

    Eukaryotic microorganisms are important but understudied components of the human microbiome. Here we present a pipeline for analysis of deep sequencing data on single cell eukaryotes. We designed a new 18S rRNA gene-specific PCR primer set and compared a published rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene primer set. Amplicons were tested against 24 specimens from defined eukaryotes and eight well-characterized human stool samples. A software pipeline https://sourceforge.net/projects/brocc/ was developed for taxonomic attribution, validated against simulated data, and tested on pyrosequence data. This study provides a well-characterized tool kit for sequence-based enumeration of eukaryotic organisms in human microbiome samples.

  4. A human gut metaproteomic dataset from stool samples pretreated or not by differential centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Tanca

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a human gut metaproteomic dataset deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD001573. Ten aliquots of a single stool sample collected from a healthy human volunteer were either pretreated by differential centrifugation (DC; N=5 or not centrifuged (NC; N=5. Protein extracts were then processed by filter-aided sample preparation, single-run liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry, and peptide identification was carried out using Sequest-HT as search engine within the Proteome Discoverer informatic platform. The dataset described here is also related to the research article entitled “Enrichment or depletion? The impact of stool pretreatment on metaproteomic characterization of the human gut microbiota” published in Proteomics (Tanca et al., 2015, [1].

  5. Easily-handled method to isolate mesenchymal stem cells from coagulated human bone marrow samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-Xiang; Wang; Zhi-Yong; Li; Zhi-Kun; Guo; Zi-Kuan; Guo

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To establish an easily-handled method to isolate mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) from coagulated human bone marrow samples. METHODS: Thrombin was added to aliquots of seven heparinized human bone marrow samples to mimic marrow coagulation. The clots were untreated,treated with urokinase or mechanically cut into pieces before culture for MSCs. The un-coagulated samples and the clots were also stored at 4 ℃ for 8 or 16 h before the treatment. The numbers of colony-forming unit-fibroblast(CFU-F) in the different samples were determined. The adherent cells from different groups were passaged and their surface profile was analyzed with flow cytometry. Their capacities of in vitro osteogenesis and adipogenesis were observed after the cells were exposed to specific inductive agents.RESULTS: The average CFU-F number of urokinasetreated samples(16.85 ± 11.77/106) was comparable to that of un-coagulated control samples(20.22 ± 10.65/106,P = 0.293),which was significantly higher than those of mechanically-cut clots(6.5 ± 5.32/106,P < 0.01) and untreated clots(1.95 ± 1.86/106,P < 0.01). The CFU-F numbers decreased after samples were stored,but those of control and urokinase-treated clots remained higher than the other two groups. Consistently,the numbers of the attached cells at passage 0 were higher in control and urokinase-treated clots than those of mechanically-cut clots and untreated clots.The attached cells were fibroblast-like in morphology and homogenously positive for CD44,CD73 and CD90,and negative for CD31 and CD45. Also,they could be induced to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes in vitro. CONCLUSION: Urokinase pretreatment is an optimal strategy to isolate MSCs from human bone marrow samples that are poorly aspirated and clotted.

  6. Rigorous Training of Dogs Leads to High Accuracy in Human Scent Matching-To-Sample Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Marchal

    Full Text Available Human scent identification is based on a matching-to-sample task in which trained dogs are required to compare a scent sample collected from an object found at a crime scene to that of a suspect. Based on dogs' greater olfactory ability to detect and process odours, this method has been used in forensic investigations to identify the odour of a suspect at a crime scene. The excellent reliability and reproducibility of the method largely depend on rigor in dog training. The present study describes the various steps of training that lead to high sensitivity scores, with dogs matching samples with 90% efficiency when the complexity of the scents presented during the task in the sample is similar to that presented in the in lineups, and specificity reaching a ceiling, with no false alarms in human scent matching-to-sample tasks. This high level of accuracy ensures reliable results in judicial human scent identification tests. Also, our data should convince law enforcement authorities to use these results as official forensic evidence when dogs are trained appropriately.

  7. Attachment styles, earlier interpersonal relationships and schizotypy in a non-clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Katherine; Band, Rebecca; Corcoran, Rhiannon; Barrowclough, Christine; Wearden, Alison

    2007-12-01

    This paper investigates associations between adult attachment style, relationships with significant others during childhood, traumatic life-events and schizotypy. Relationships between attachment and hypothesized correlates were investigated in a cross-sectional design using an analogue sample. The reliability of the attachment and trauma measures was investigated using a test-retest design. Three hundred and four students completed the self-report version of the Psychosis Attachment Measure (PAM), maternal and paternal versions of the Parental Bonding Instrument, the Attachment History Questionnaire, a measure of trauma and the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences scale through an internet website. As predicted, there were statistically significant associations between insecure attachment in adult relationships and experiences of negative interpersonal events. Both earlier interpersonal experiences and adult attachment style predicted schizotypy, and adult attachment style emerged as an independent predictor of positive schizotypal characteristics. The findings support associations between adult attachment style and previous interpersonal experiences and between adult attachment and schizotypy. The PAM is a reliable and valid instrument that can be used to explore attachment styles in analogue samples and associations between attachment styles and psychotic symptoms in clinical samples.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex detected by modified fluorescent in situ hybridization in lymph nodes of clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Nuñez, Juan; Avelar, Francisco J; Marquez, Francisco; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Quiñones, Cesar; Guerrero-Barrera, Alma L

    2012-01-12

    Lymph node tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and is the most frequently identified type in Aguascalientes, Mexico. Conventional diagnosis has serious limitations for rapid detection of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in clinical samples. Here PCR and modified FISH have been tested as complementary diagnosis methods for extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The specific insertion sequence IS6110 for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was used to perform PCR and build DNA and PNA FISH probes (20bp). PCR and modified DNA and PNA FISH assays were performed to evaluate 41 lymph node paraffin-embedded tissue samples, in comparison with the histopathology diagnosis, which was considered the gold standard (22 positive and 19 negative). In comparison with histopathology diagnosis PCR showed 62.5 % sensitivity and 77.8 % specificity (χ(2) = 4.583 p 0.05). Ziehl Neelsen stain was positive in only four cases of 22 lymph node samples positive to histopathology.  In contrast, PCR and modified DNA FISH were positive in 20 cases of the same group. The negative cases were coincident in all tests. PCR and DNA FISH showed a significant increase in the number of cases detected and also showed higher sensitivity and specificity compared with data reported by traditional methodology. In developing countries, these techniques could help to complement the early diagnosis and timely treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

  9. Efficient adaptive designs with mid-course sample size adjustment in clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Bartroff, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive designs have been proposed for clinical trials in which the nuisance parameters or alternative of interest are unknown or likely to be misspecified before the trial. Whereas most previous works on adaptive designs and mid-course sample size re-estimation have focused on two-stage or group sequential designs in the normal case, we consider here a new approach that involves at most three stages and is developed in the general framework of multiparameter exponential families. Not only does this approach maintain the prescribed type I error probability, but it also provides a simple but asymptotically efficient sequential test whose finite-sample performance, measured in terms of the expected sample size and power functions, is shown to be comparable to the optimal sequential design, determined by dynamic programming, in the simplified normal mean case with known variance and prespecified alternative, and superior to the existing two-stage designs and also to adaptive group sequential designs when the al...

  10. Sequence space coverage, entropy of genomes and the potential to detect non-human DNA in human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maley Carlo C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes store information for building and maintaining organisms. Complete sequencing of many genomes provides the opportunity to study and compare global information properties of those genomes. Results We have analyzed aspects of the information content of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Escherichia coli (K-12 genomes. Virtually all possible (> 98% 12 bp oligomers appear in vertebrate genomes while 98% to D. melanogaster (12–17 bp, C. elegans (11–17 bp, A. thaliana (11–17 bp, S. cerevisiae (10–16 bp and E. coli (9–15 bp. Frequencies of unique oligomers in the genomes follow similar patterns. We identified a set of 2.6 M 15-mers that are more than 1 nucleotide different from all 15-mers in the human genome and so could be used as probes to detect microbes in human samples. In a human sample, these probes would detect 100% of the 433 currently fully sequenced prokaryotes and 75% of the 3065 fully sequenced viruses. The human genome is significantly more compact in sequence space than a random genome. We identified the most frequent 5- to 20-mers in the human genome, which may prove useful as PCR primers. We also identified a bacterium, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, which has an exceptionally low diversity of oligomers given the size of its genome and its GC content. The entropy of coding regions in the human genome is significantly higher than non-coding regions and chromosomes. However chromosomes 1, 2, 9, 12 and 14 have a relatively high proportion of coding DNA without high entropy, and chromosome 20 is the opposite with a low frequency of coding regions but relatively high entropy. Conclusion Measures of the frequency of oligomers are useful for designing PCR assays and for identifying chromosomes and organisms with hidden structure that had not been previously recognized. This information may be used to detect

  11. Testing the PROMIS® Depression measures for monitoring depression in a clinical sample outside the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilagut, G; Forero, C G; Adroher, N D; Olariu, E; Cella, D; Alonso, J

    2015-09-01

    The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was devised to facilitate assessment of patient self-reported health status, taking advantage of Item Response Theory. We aimed to assess measurement properties of the PROMIS Depression item bank and an 8-item static short form in a Spanish clinical sample. A three-month follow-up study of patients with active mood/anxiety symptoms (n = 218) was carried out. We assessed model unidimensionality (Confirmatory Item Factor Analysis), reliability (internal consistency and Item Information Curves), and validity (convergent-discriminant with correlations; known-groups with comparison of means and effect sizes; and criterion validity with Receiver operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis). We also assessed 3-month responsiveness to change (Cohen's effect sizes (d) in stable and recovered patients). The unidimensional model showed adequate fit (CFI = 0.97, RMSEA = 0.08). Information Curves had reliabilities over 0.90 throughout most of the score continuum. As expected, we observed high correlations with external self-reported depression, and moderate with self-reported anxiety and clinical measures. The item bank showed an increasing severity gradient from no disorder (mean = 48, SE = 0.6) to depression with comorbid anxiety (mean = 55.8, SE = 0.4). PROMIS detected depression disorder with great accuracy according to the area under the curve (AUC = 0.89). Both formats, item bank and short form, were highly responsive to change in recovered patients (d > 0.7) and had small changes in stable patients (d PROMIS Depression measures provide further evidence of their adequacy for monitoring depression levels of patients in clinical settings. This double check of quality (within countries and populations) supports the ability of PROMIS measures for guaranteeing fair comparisons across languages and countries in specific clinical populations.

  12. SAMPLING INTENSITY WITH FIXED PRECISION WHEN ESTIMATING VOLUME OF HUMAN BRAIN COMPARTMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon Maudsley

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cavalieri sampling and point counting are frequently applied in combination with magnetic resonance (MR imaging to estimate the volume of human brain compartments. Current practice involves arbitrarily choosing the number of sections and sampling intensity within each section, and subsequently applying error prediction formulae to estimate the precision. The aim of this study is to derive a reference table for researchers who are interested in estimating the volume of brain regions, namely grey matter, white matter, and their union, to a given precision. In particular, this table, which is based on subsampling of a large brain data set obtained from coronal MR images, offers a recommendation for the minimum number of sections and mean number of points per section that are required to achieve a pre-defined coefficient of error of the volume estimator. Further analysis onMR brain data from a second human brain shows that the sampling intensity recommended is appropriate.

  13. Determination of cholesterol concentration in human milk samples using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamelska, A. M.; Pietrzak-Fiećko, R.; Bryl, K.

    2013-03-01

    Results of an inexpensive and rapid evaluation of the cholesterol concentration in human milk using ATR-FTIR techniques are presented. The FTIR spectrum of pure cholesterol was characterized and quantitatively estimated in the region between 2800 and 3200 cm-1. 125 samples at different stages of lactation were analyzed. There were no differences between the cholesterol concentrations in the samples of early (1-3 months), medium (4-6 months), and late (> 6 months) lactation stages ( p = 0.096968). The cholesterol concentration ranged from 4.30 to 21.77 mg/100 cm3. Such a broad range was due to the differences between the samples from different women ( p = 0.000184). The results indicate that ATR-FTIR has potential for rapid estimation of cholesterol concentration in human milk.

  14. A novel integrated strategy for detection of human bocavirus based on a heminested PCR assay combined with boiling lysis method of samples in human specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Yao, Qing; Ma, Jing; Li, Jianning; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Yi; Li, Fang; Sun, Yuning

    2014-07-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) has been shown to be associated with acute respiratory tract infection in children. The aim of the work was to develop a novel integrated strategy for human bocavirus detection: heminested PCR assay combined with boiling lysis method of samples. The detection limit of the heminested PCR assay was 1.2 copies of a recombinant DNA plasmid, and no cross-reaction with other respiratory viruses or bacteria was observed. By using the integrated strategy, a total of 202 secretions of the lower respiratory tract of children with acute respiratory diseases were collected and tested. The samples were treated and lysed in boiling lysis buffer rather than extracting viral DNA from secretions, then these sample lysates could be templates and tested by heminested PCR assay, and the amplification of HBoV DNA was detected by using agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that, only 7 samples were found to be positive by conventional single-round PCR; importantly, the other new 41 samples were positive by heminested PCR assay. Additionally, the genomic viral DNA was extracted from all positive and some negative specimens, amplified, and sequenced. The results were perfectly consistent with those of the integrated strategy. Taken together, these results suggest that the novel integrated strategy (heminested PCR assay combined with boiling lysis method of samples) is a convenient, sensitive, cost-effective and reliable detective method for HBoV detection and will have broad application prospects in clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of human Norovirus (HNoV in domestic pig stool samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F. Gutiérrez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available To determine the presence of NoVs as a possible causal zoonotic agent of acute diarrhea in pigs and humans. Materialsand methods. We collected a total of 77 samples from diarrheal children under 5 years and pigs under 2 months from La Chambatown in Tolima, Colombia. These samples were transported to the Laboratory of Virology of the Pontificia Universidad Javerianain Bogotá, and extraction with Trizol-reagent was done following the manufacturer’s instructions. After obtaining the RNA, thenext step was to perform RT-PCR for obtaining the expected amplification product of 213- bp NoVs. Finally, the positive samplesobtained in the RT-PCR were sequenced and analyzed by bioinformatics methods. Results. Six positive diarrheic samples fromchildren and a positive diarrheic sample from pigs were detected by a band of 231 bp. Five of the six positive samples in childrenand the positive pig sample were sequenced and analyzed. Conclusion. Given the close genetic relationship between pig andhuman sequences, this could be an indication of the potential existence of a common animal acting as a reservoir for human orother animal strains.

  16. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence as a fast multielemental technique for human placenta sample analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marguí, E.; Ricketts, P.; Fletcher, H.; Karydas, A. G.; Migliori, A.; Leani, J. J.; Hidalgo, M.; Queralt, I.; Voutchkov, M.

    2017-04-01

    In the present contribution, benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been evaluated as a cost-effective multielemental analytical technique for human placenta analysis. An easy and rapid sample preparation consisting of suspending 50 mg of sample in 1 mL of a Triton 1% solution in deionized water showed to be the most suitable for this kind of samples. However, for comparison purposes, an acidic microwave acidic digestion procedure was also applied. For both sample treatment methodologies, limits of detection for most elements were in the low mg/kg level. Accurate and precise results were obtained using internal standardization as quantification approach and applying a correction factor to compensate for absorption effects. The correction factor was based on the proportional ratio between the slurry preparation results and those obtained for the analysis of a set of human placenta samples analysed by microwave acidic digestion and ICP-AES analysis. As a study case, the developed TXRF methodology was applied for multielemental analysis (K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb and Sr) of several healthy women's placenta samples from two regions in Jamaica.

  17. Residues of PCDDs and PCDFs in human milk samples in Ahmedabad, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashyap, R.; Bhatnagar, V.; Sadhu, H.; Jhamb, N.; Karanjkar, R.; Saiyed, H. [National Inst. of Occupational Health, Ahmedabad (India)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and Polychlorinated dibenzo furans (PCDFs) represent a class of organic environmental pollutants. They are unwanted byproduct of incineration, uncontrolled burning and certain industrial processes. They are persistent in nature and bioaccumulates through food chain. These are hazardous to human health and environment. The residues of these toxicants have been detected in human adipose tissue, blood and milk. WHO has coordinated two rounds of follow up studies on levels of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in human milk and the data shows a decreasing trend during the last 30 years. However, in India there is no data available on the exposure and residues of these contaminants. This study presents first time the levels of dioxin and furans in human milk samples collected from the Ahmedabad city in India.

  18. Clinical description of human bocavirus viremia in children with LRTI, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal K Bubshait

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human bocavirus (HBoV is a major etiology of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI in young children. We tested 149 patients admitted to King Fahd Hospital of the University with diagnosis of LRTI. Viremia caused by the different studied viruses was detected in 31.5% of the total cases by Real-time Polymerase chain reaction. We report five patients who were positive for HBoV in serum samples. Clinical presentation ranged from mild to severe disease as one of them required admission to intensive care unit. Wheezing was a striking feature in most of our patients, but fever was not a consistent finding.

  19. Antibiotic activity and concentrations in clinical samples from patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras-Cañas, V; Gutiérrez-Soto, B; Almonte-Fernández, H; Lara-Oya, A; Navarro-Marí, J M; Garrido-Frenich, A; Vázquez-Alonso, F; Gutiérrez-Fernández, J

    2017-06-19

    Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) is the most common urological disease in patients younger than 50 years, whose long-standing symptoms could be related to an inappropriate therapeutic regimen. The objective was to analyse the sensitivity of microorganisms isolated from patients with CBP and measure the weekly antibiotic concentrations in serum, semen and urine. For the antibiotic sensitivity study, 60 clinical isolates were included between January 2013 and December 2014 from semen samples from patients with microbiologically confirmed CBP. Broth microdilution was performed on the samples. For the antibiotic concentration study from January to May 2014, urine, blood and semen samples were collected weekly, over 4 weeks of treatment from 8 patients with positive cultures for CBP. The concentrations were measured using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The antibiotics fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin had the highest activity (95.2% in both cases). The mean antibiotic concentrations in semen during the 4 weeks studied were as follows: 1.68mg/L, 8.30mg/L, 2.61mg/L, 0.33mg/L and 2.90mg/L, respectively, for patients 1 to 5, who were treated with levofloxacin; 1.625mg/L for patient 6, who was treated with ciprofloxacin; 2.67mg/L for patient 7, who was treated with ampicillin; and 1.05mg/L for patient 8, who was treated with doxycycline. Higher concentrations were obtained in the urine samples than in serum and semen, the latter 2 of which were comparable. Fosfomycin is proposed as the primary alternative to the empiric treatment of CBP due to its high in vitro activity. The antibiotic concentration in semen was higher than the minimal inhibitory concentration against the aetiological agent, although microbiological negativisation was not always correlated with a favourable clinical outcome. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. A fully integrated paperfluidic molecular diagnostic chip for the extraction, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids from clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Natalia M; Wong, Winnie S; Liu, Lena; Dewar, Rajan; Klapperich, Catherine M

    2016-02-21

    Paper diagnostics have successfully been employed to detect the presence of antigens or small molecules in clinical samples through immunoassays; however, the detection of many disease targets relies on the much higher sensitivity and specificity achieved via nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT). The steps involved in NAAT have recently begun to be explored in paper matrices, and our group, among others, has reported on paper-based extraction, amplification, and detection of DNA and RNA targets. Here, we integrate these paper-based NAAT steps into a single paperfluidic chip in a modular, foldable system that allows for fully integrated fluidic handling from sample to result. We showcase the functionality of the chip by combining nucleic acid isolation, isothermal amplification, and lateral flow detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA directly from crude cervical specimens in less than 1 hour for rapid, early detection of cervical cancer. The chip is made entirely of paper and adhesive sheets, making it low-cost, portable, and disposable, and offering the potential for a point-of-care molecular diagnostic platform even in remote and resource-limited settings.

  1. [Clinical use of recombinant human thrombopoietin. Status and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, P B; Hasselbalch, H C

    2001-05-07

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is primarily produced by hepatocytes and regulates the production and differentiation of megakaryocytes and platelets in the bone marrow. The endogenous TPO level is increased when the megakaryocyte count is low, and high in aplastic anaemia and after myeloablative chemotherapy. TPO is cloned and manufactured by a recombinant technique for clinical use. Treatment with recombinant human TPO (rhTPO) after intensive chemotherapy may reduce the need for platelet transfusions. Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in combination with rhTPO has enhanced the mobilisation and harvest product of haematopoietic stem cells. Whether rhTPO is effective in the treatment of the myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anaemia, and other conditions with bone marrow insufficiency (including AIDS) is not yet known. In liver cirrhosis, the endogenous TPO level rapidly increases after liver transplantation. Accordingly, substitution of rhTPO may be indicated in advanced liver failure complicated by thrombocytopenia and bleeding.

  2. Hepcidin modulation in human diseases: From research to clinic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Piperno; Raffaella Mariani; Paola Trombini; Domenico Girelli

    2009-01-01

    By modulating hepcidin production, an organism controls intestinal iron absorption, iron uptake and mobilization from stores to meet body iron need. In recent years there has been important advancement in our knowledge of hepcidin regulation that also has implications for understanding the physiopathology of some human disorders. Since the discovery of hepcidin and the demonstration of its pivotal role in iron homeostasis, there has been a substantial interest in developing a reliable assay of the hormone in biological fluids. Measurement of hepcidin in biological fluids can improve our understanding of iron diseases and be a useful tool for diagnosis and clinical management of these disorders. We reviewed the literature and our own research on hepcidin to give an updated status of the situation in this rapidly evolving field.

  3. Beck Anxiety Inventory: psychometric characteristics in a sample from the clinical Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Morejón, Antonio J; Vázquez-Morejón Jiménez, Raquel; Zanin, Gloria Bellido

    2014-10-28

    Even though the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) is one of the most popular instruments to assess anxiety today, only limited data is available about its psychometric characteristics and normative values in clinical Spanish populations. A study was conducted to test the psychometric characteristics of a Spanish adaptation of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) in a sample of 918 outpatients being treated at a community mental health center in Spain. Results confirmed the adaptation's high internal consistency (∝ = .91), substantial test-retest reliability at 8-10 weeks (r = .84, p Anxiety (r = .86, p Phobic Anxiety (r = .63, p < .01) dimensions of the SCL-90-R, and with the Anxious Thoughts Inventory (r = .57, p < .01). Gender differences in BAI scores did occur, so normative values appear separately for each gender.

  4. [Antimicrobial resistance and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius strains isolated from dog clinical samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, Germán B; Giacoboni, Gabriela I; Gagetti, Paula S; Pasterán, Fernando G; Corso, Alejandra C

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight strains isolated from dog clinical samples identified as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) were studied to assess antimicrobial susceptibility by the diffusion method and clonal relationship by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Methicillin resistance (3/28 isolates; 10,7%) was evaluated by mecA PCR. Fifteen strains (53.6%) were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested, and eleven of them (39.3%) showed multiple resistance (3 or more antimicrobial families). Eleven isolates (39.3%) were resistant to erythromycin due to the presence of ribosomal methylase ermB, whereas clindamycin inducible resistance was not detected. Twenty-seven (27) clonal types were differentiated by PFGE, suggesting high clonal diversity. We emphasize that the finding of multiresistant S. psedintermedius strains is an emerging problem to be considered in veterinary diagnostic laboratory treatment of canine infections and in public health settings.

  5. The association between candidate migraine susceptibility loci and severe migraine phenotype in a clinical sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Steinberg, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of the study was to follow up and to test whether 12 previously identified migraine-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated as risk factors and/or modifying factors for severe migraine traits in a Danish clinic-based population. METHODS: Semi...... polymorphisms showed nominal association with many lifetime attacks and prolonged migraine attacks. CONCLUSION: Our study supports previously reported findings on the association of several single nucleotide polymorphisms with migraine. It also suggests that the migraine susceptibility loci may be risk factors......-structured migraine interviews, blood sampling and genotyping were performed on 1806 unrelated migraineurs recruited from the Danish Headache Center. Genotyping was also performed on a control group of 6415 people with no history of migraine. Association analyses were carried out using logistic regression and odds...

  6. Self-esteem in a clinical sample of morbidly obese children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowicka, P; Höglund, P; Birgerstam, P

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study self-esteem in clinical sample of obese children and adolescents. METHODS: Obese children and adolescents aged 8-19 years (n = 107, mean age 13.2 years, mean BMI 32.5 [range 22.3-50.6], mean BMI z-score 3.22 [range 2.19-4.79]; 50 boys and 57 girls) were referred for treatment...... of primary obesity. Self-esteem was measured with a validated psychological test with five subscales: physical characteristics, talents and skills, psychological well-being, relations with the family and relations with others. A linear mixed effect model used the factors gender and adolescence group......, and the continuous covariates: BMI z-scores, and BMI for the parents as fixed effects and subjects as random effects. RESULTS: Age and gender, but neither the child's BMI z-score nor the BMI of the parents were significant covariates. Self-esteem decreased (p

  7. Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a clinical sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisto, Stephen A; Chung, Tammy A; Cornelius, Jack R; Martin, Christopher S

    2003-06-01

    This study investigated the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES; W. R. Miller & J. S. Tonigan, 1996) in adolescents presenting for treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD). The participants were 80 males and 43 females (mean age = 16.8 years) who presented for AUD treatment (95.1% outpatient, 4.9% inpatient). Participants completed assessments at baseline and 1 year and provided information on alcohol use and related variables monthly between these 2 assessments. Principal-components and confirmatory factor analyses of the baseline SOCRATES identified 2 factors, Taking Steps and Recognition, which showed good internal consistency and concurrent and predictive evidence of validity. The results were interpreted as supporting the use of the SOCRATES with clinical samples of adolescents.

  8. The isolation of Candida rugosa and Candida mesorugosa from clinical samples in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjapong, Gloria; Bartlett, Michael; Hale, Marie; Garrill, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    Members of the Candida rugosa species complex have been described as emerging fungal pathogens and are responsible for a growing number of Candida infections. In this communication we report the isolation of Candida rugosa and Candida mesorugosa in Ghana. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of this species complex from a clinical setting in Africa.The isolates were identified on the basis of their rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. For one isolate, obtained from sputum, the sequence grouped well with that of C. rugosa. Two other isolates from urine had sequences that grouped with Candida mesorugosa. Morphologically, C. rugosa formed white, wrinkled, and flat colonies on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA), whereas C. mesorugosa formed white, smooth colonies. On chromogenic medium, the isolates formed small, dry greenish-blue colonies with a pale or white border, similar to C. albicans. The C. rugosa isolate produced pseudohyphae in human serum and on CMA-Tween 80 agar. In contrast, the C. mesorugosa isolates did not generate pseudohyphae in human serum, but generated a few pseudohyphae with abundant blastoconidia on CMA-Tween 80 agar. Growth was observed at 37 °C and 42 °C but not at 45 °C.The two C. mesorugosa isolates had Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of 6 and 48 μg ml(-1) for fluconazole and are thus resistant. The C. rugosa isolate had an MIC of 24 μg ml(-1), indicative of resistance. All three isolates were susceptible to itraconazole and voriconazole (with respective MICs of < 0.125 μg ml(-1)). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Sensitive Procedure for Rapid Detection of Human Brucellosis, Based on PCR Method in Contaminated Serum Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslam Ghezelsofla

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and objective: Brucellosis is a zoonosis transmittable to humans poses a significant public health problem in many developing countries and requires rapid and accurate diagnostic methods. Here, our aim was to develop a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay in artificially contaminated serum samples as a model for rapid and accurate laboratory confirmation of human brucellosis. Material and methods: In this study, initially the standard Brucella abortus strain (2308 were cultured on Brucella agar medium and then colonies were inactivated by formalin 10 %. Genomic DNA was extracted from inactivated bacterial colonies. Serial dilutions of bacterial-DNA were prepared in fetal bovine serum (FBS and water and subsequently DNA extraction were repeated on these artificially contaminated samples. The two pairs of primers amplified two different fragments included in: a gene encoding an outer membrane protein (omp-2 (primers JPF/JPR and a sequence 16S rRNA of B. abortus (primers F4/R2. Results: The two primers assayed showed a difference in sensitivity for detecting Brucella DNA, ranging between 5 pg and 50 pg for artificially contaminated serum samples and 50Fg and 5 pg for contaminated control samples. Therefore, the sensitivity of PCR using F4/R2 primers was greater than the PCR using JPF/JPR primers.Conclusion: Although the sensitivity of PCR using these primers was affected by serum inhibitors, they are still the most sensitive and they could provide a useful tool for the diagnosis of human brucellosis.

  10. Detection of genogroup IV noroviruses in environmental and clinical samples and partial sequencing through rapid amplification of cDNA ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, G; Pourshaban, M; Iaconelli, M; Muscillo, M

    2008-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) give rise to clinically relevant gastroenteritis in all age groups and are widely distributed in both clinical and environmental settings. NoVs are classified into five genogroups (GI to GV), of which GI, GII and GIV infect humans. While data on the epidemiology of human NoVs GI and GII have been steadily increasing, very little information has been published on the spread of GIV in either the health care system or the environment, resulting in a lack of information about its clinical significance and pathogenesis. In order to investigate the distribution of GIV strains in the environment, we analyzed sewage samples collected from five treatment plants, by using newly designed nested RT-PCR assays. A collection of clinical stool samples, originating from pediatric patients with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis, previously analyzed in our laboratory for the presence of NoV GI or GII, was also analyzed for the presence of GIV norovirus. Results of this work attest to the presence of GIV in both clinical and environmental contexts and underline the importance of routinely screening for this genogroup, along with GI and GII, in order to better understand its distribution, prevalence and role during epidemics, which is probably underestimated.

  11. Distribution, virulence attributes and antifungal susceptibility patterns of Candida parapsilosis complex strains isolated from clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Ilknur; Akyuz, Zeynep; Guler, Nejla Cebeci; Gulmez, Dolunay; Bayramoglu, Gulcin; Kaklikkaya, Nese; Arikan-Akdagli, Sevtap; Aydin, Faruk

    2013-07-01

    It was recently proposed that Candida parapsilosis represents a complex composed of three closely related species, i.e., C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis, and C. metapsilosis. The aim of this study was to describe the distribution of C. parapsilosis complex isolates among clinical samples. We also evaluated antifungal susceptibility profiles, in vitro presence of lipase and secreted aspartyl proteinase, as well as their ability to grow in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solution, and biofilm production. A total of 413 non-C. albicans Candida isolates were obtained from various clinical samples between 2010 and 2011 in a Turkish Tertiary Care Hospital. Of them, 42 were identified as members of the C. parapsilosis complex. Among these, 38 (90.5%) were C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 3 (7.1%) C. metapsilosis, and 1 (2.4%) C. orthopsilosis. All isolates recovered from blood were found to be C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis. In phenotypic tests, all 42 isolates grew in TPN solution and, although 26.2% of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto-isolates were capable of forming biofilms in vitro, neither C. orthopsilosis nor C. metapsilosis isolates were able to do so. Acid proteinase activity was detected in 31% of isolates and lipase activity in 33%. All isolates were sensitive to voriconazole, caspofungin, and anidulafungin, with only a single C. parapsilosis sensu stricto isolate showing dose-dependent susceptible to fluconazole. While the number of C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis isolates remained low, there were no significant differences in antifungal MIC as compared to C. parapsilosis sensu stricto.

  12. Preliminary Examination of the Interpersonal Psychological Theory of Suicide in an Adolescent Clinical Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Sarah E; Hughes, Jennifer L; King, Jessica D; Kennard, Betsy D; Westers, Nicholas J; Mayes, Taryn L; Stewart, Sunita M

    2016-08-01

    This study offers a preliminary examination of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS; Joiner 2005) in an adolescent clinical sample. The IPTS offers a nuanced framework that has many conceptual and practical merits. Although this theory has a growing base of evidence among adults, it has yet to be tested in adolescents using direct measures of its central constructs. Participants were 147 adolescents (76.2 % girls) on an inpatient psychiatric unit, who completed measures of key IPTS constructs of thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, acquired capability for suicide, as well as depression severity, hopelessness, and severity of suicidal symptoms. Our findings were largely consistent with hypotheses derived from the IPTS: perceived burdensomeness, and at a marginal level, thwarted belongingness, were independently associated with current suicidal ideation. The thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness interaction marginally distinguished between adolescents with passive and active suicidal ideation. Acquired capability for suicide was associated with recent suicidal intent. Examination of all three IPTS constructs simultaneously revealed main effects of each construct (with a marginal effect of thwarted belongingness), and interaction effects for thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness, and thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness by acquired capability for suicide in association with suicidal symptom severity. Sex, age, depression severity, and hopelessness were controlled in all analyses. This study offers strong, albeit preliminary, support of the IPTS in a clinical adolescent sample. Assessment of IPTS constructs may be useful in determining persistent risk for suicide attempt. Prospective tests of the theory, and extensions to intervention and prevention should be considered in future IPTS research.

  13. Performance validity testing in a clinical sample of adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorociak, Katherine E; Schulze, Evan T; Piper, Lauren E; Molokie, Robert E; Janecek, Julie K

    2017-06-15

    Neuropsychologists utilize performance validity tests (PVTs) as objective means for drawing inferences about performance validity. The Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) is a well-validated, stand-alone PVT and the Reliable Digit Span (RDS) and Reliable Digit Span-Revised (RDS-R) from the Digit Span subtest of the WAIS-IV are commonly employed, embedded PVTs. While research has demonstrated the utility of these PVTs with various clinical samples, no research has investigated their use in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), a condition associated with multiple neurological, physical, and psychiatric symptoms. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore PVT performance in adults with SCD. Fifty-four adults with SCD (Mage = 40.61, SD = 12.35) were consecutively referred by their hematologist for a routine clinical outpatient neuropsychological evaluation. During the evaluation, participants were administered the TOMM (Trials 1 and 2), neuropsychological measures including the WAIS-IV Digit Span subtest, and mood and behavioral questionnaires. The average score on the TOMM was 47.70 (SD = 3.47, range = 34-50) for Trial 1 and 49.69 (SD = 1.66, range = 38-50) for Trial 2. Only one participant failed Trial 2 of the TOMM, yielding a 98.1% pass rate for the sample. Pass rates at various RDS and RDS-R values were calculated with TOMM Trial 2 performance as an external criterion. Results support the use of the TOMM as a measure of performance validity for individuals with SCD, while RDS and RDS-R should be interpreted with caution in this population.

  14. A percutaneous needle biopsy technique for sampling the supraclavicular brown adipose tissue depot of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chondronikola, M; Annamalai, P; Chao, T; Porter, C; Saraf, M K; Cesani, F; Sidossis, L S

    2015-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has been proposed as a potential target tissue against obesity and its related metabolic complications. Although the molecular and functional characteristics of BAT have been intensively studied in rodents, only a few studies have used human BAT specimens due to the difficulty of sampling human BAT deposits. We established a novel positron emission tomography and computed tomography-guided Bergström needle biopsy technique to acquire human BAT specimens from the supraclavicular area in human subjects. Forty-three biopsies were performed on 23 participants. The procedure was tolerated well by the majority of participants. No major complications were noted. Numbness (9.6%) and hematoma (2.3%) were the two minor complications noted, which fully resolved. Thus, the proposed biopsy technique can be considered safe with only minimal risk of adverse events. Adoption of the proposed method is expected to increase the sampling of the supraclavicular BAT depot for research purposes so as to augment the scientific knowledge of the biology of human BAT.

  15. Is hypersexuality dimensional? Evidence for the DSM-5 from general population and clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Glenn D; Knight, Raymond A; Långström, Niklas

    2011-12-01

    Hypersexual Disorder is currently being considered for inclusion in the DSM-5. To inform this process, we investigated the latent structure of the hypersexuality construct using Meehl's (1995) taxometric method. Data on sexual interests and behaviors were obtained from 2,101 general population males and females in Sweden and 716 male sex offenders from the United States. Taxometric analyses of self-report indicators of hypersexuality supported a dimensional interpretation of latent structure in both samples. These findings suggest that individual differences in hypersexuality are quantitative (matter of degree) rather than qualitative (difference in kind) in nature, at least when self-report data were used. This is another way of saying that hypersexuality is organized along a continuum of increasing sexual frequency and preoccupation, with clinical cases of hypersexuality falling at the upper end of the continuum or dimension. We conclude that the proposed inclusion of Hypersexual Disorder in the DSM-5 should acknowledge the lack of non-arbitrary breaks in the latent symptoms continuum which runs from very low to very high engagement in sexual behavior and preoccupation. The diagnostic threshold should therefore be decided from an analysis of external data on severity, comorbidity, and prognosis for individuals with sub-threshold and full diagnoses, respectively. Additionally, dimensional assessment of Hypersexual Disorder should be part of clinical diagnostic practice.

  16. [Occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Morganella morganii strains isolated from clinical samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalas-Wiecek, Patrycja; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Wróblewska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of M morganii rods isolated from clinical samples. This study included 201 strains isolated in the Clinical Microbiology Department of Dr. A. Jurasz University Hospital in 2008-2010. Identification to species was carried out on the basis of the results of biochemical reactions included in the tests ID 32E and VITEK2 GN. Antimicrobial susceptibility of M. morganii rods was determined by the disk-diffusion method on Mueller-Hinton II Agar. Strains of M morganii most commonly isolated from skin and soft tissue, and material taken from the urinary tract, mainly from patients of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Unit, Department of General and Vascular Surgery and Department of General Surgery and Endocrinology. All of M morganii strains isolated during the three years were susceptible to carbapenems. We reported decrease of strains susceptible to piperacillin and chloramphenicol. In 2010 we showed a higher percentage of strains intermediate to tigecycline, compared with 2009. We observed increase in the percentage of strains resistant to cefoperazone with sulbactam and reported decrease in the percentage of strains resistant and intermediate to aminoglycosides. Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases were produced by 13 (6,5%) of M morganii strains.

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA SPECIES FROM CLINICAL SAMPLES AND THEIR ANTIFUNGAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE AND BACKGROUND : The incidence of Candida infections has increased dramatically over the past few decades due to increase in the number of population susceptible to fungal infections. With multiple antifungal ag ents that are available and recovery of clinical isolates that exhibit inherent or developed resistance to commonly used antifungal agents, it has become imperative to do susceptibility testing routinely. The study was done to determine the predisposing fa ctors, species incidence and susceptibility pattern of Candida isolates to commonly use d antifungal agents. METHODS: A total of 108 Candida species were recovered from symptomatic clinical cases. Candida isolates were speciated by germ tube test, chlamydospore formation on corn meal agar and color produced on chromogenic media. Antifungal susceptibility test was done by disk diffusion method for nystatin, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and amphotericin - B. RESULTS: Candida albicans is the m ost frequently isolated species. However, non - albicans Candida species, taken as a group has predominated in clinical samples. Chromogenic agar medium showed good correlation in species identification in comparison with conventional germ tube test and chla mydospore formation on corn meal agar. C. albicans (41, C. tropicalis (33, C. krusei (30 and C. glabrata (04 were isolated. Candida species showed 95.4% susceptibility to amphotericin - B, 77.8% to voriconazol e, 69.4% to nystatin, 64.1% to f luconazole an d 63.9% to itraconazole. CONCLUSION : Increasing incidence of non - albicans species infection. Chromogenic medium can be used for species identification. Increasing resistance of Candida species to commonly used antifungal agents.

  18. Human tolerogenic DC-10: perspectives for clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amodio Giada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are critically involved in inducing either immunity or tolerance. During the last decades efforts have been devoted to the development of ad hoc methods to manipulate DCs in vitro to enhance or stabilize their tolerogenic properties. Addition of IL-10 during monocyte-derived DC differentiation allows the induction of DC-10, a subset of human tolerogenic DCs characterized by high IL-10/IL-12 ratio and co-expression of high levels of the tolerogenic molecules HLA-G and immunoglobulin-like transcript 4. DC-10 are potent inducers of adaptive type 1 regulatory T cells, well known to promote and maintain peripheral tolerance. In this review we provide an in-depth comparison of the phenotype and mechanisms of suppression mediated by DC-10 and other known regulatory antigen-presenting cells currently under clinical development. We discuss the clinical therapeutic application of DC-10 as inducers of type 1 regulatory T cells for tailoring regulatory T-cell-based cell therapy, and the use of DC-10 as adoptive cell therapy for promoting and restoring tolerance in T-cell-mediated diseases.

  19. The spectrum of genital human papillomavirus infection among men attending a Swedish sexually-transmitted infections clinic: human papillomavirus typing and clinical presentation of histopathologically benign lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström, Arne; Vassilaki, Ismini; Hedblad, Mari-Anne; Syrjänen, Stina

    2013-03-27

    There have been a number of Swedish studies on human papillomavirus (HPV) typing in men, most of which have used less sensitive HPV-typing techniques. The present study included male patients with genital HPV-induced lesions planned for surgery. Samples were prepared for histopathology and PCR. HPV was detected in 233/253 (92%) and HPV 6 or 11 in 89% of the HPV-positive lesions. There were statistically significant differences regarding morphology (p=0.002), location (p=0.000001) and colour (p=0.005) of the lesions for low- vs. mixed or high-risk HPV types. For example, acuminate lesions were mostly found among men with low-risk HPV types, whereas macular lesions were over-represented among them with mixed or high-risk types. The HPV type distribution is similar to that in earlier studies, but we also found correlations with some clinical parameters.

  20. Detection and sequencing of West Nile virus RNA from human urine and serum samples during the 2014 seasonal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Anna; Bán, Enikő; Nagy, Orsolya; Ferenczi, Emőke; Farkas, Ágnes; Bányai, Krisztián; Farkas, Szilvia; Takács, Mária

    2016-07-01

    West Nile virus, a widely distributed mosquito-borne flavivirus, is responsible for numerous animal and human infections in Europe, Africa and the Americas. In Hungary, the average number of human infections falls between 10 and 20 cases each year. The severity of clinically manifesting infections varies widely from the milder form of West Nile fever to West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND). In routine laboratory diagnosis of human West Nile virus infections, serological methods are mainly applied due to the limited duration of viremia. However, recent studies suggest that detection of West Nile virus RNA in urine samples may be useful as a molecular diagnostic test for these infections. The Hungarian National Reference Laboratory for Viral Zoonoses serologically confirmed eleven acute human infections during the 2014 seasonal period. In three patients with neurological symptoms, viral RNA was detected from both urine and serum specimens, albeit for a longer period and in higher copy numbers with urine. Phylogenetic analysis of the NS3 genomic region of three strains and the complete genome of one selected strain demonstrated that all three patients had lineage-2 West Nile virus infections. Our findings reaffirm the utility of viral RNA detection in urine as a molecular diagnostic procedure for diagnosis of West Nile virus infections.

  1. Characterizing human lung tissue microbiota and its relationship to epidemiological and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoqin; Gail, Mitchell H; Consonni, Dario; Carugno, Michele; Humphrys, Michael; Pesatori, Angela C; Caporaso, Neil E; Goedert, James J; Ravel, Jacques; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2016-07-28

    The human lung tissue microbiota remains largely uncharacterized, although a number of studies based on airway samples suggest the existence of a viable human lung microbiota. Here we characterized the taxonomic and derived functional profiles of lung microbiota in 165 non-malignant lung tissue samples from cancer patients. We show that the lung microbiota is distinct from the microbial communities in oral, nasal, stool, skin, and vagina, with Proteobacteria as the dominant phylum (60 %). Microbiota taxonomic alpha diversity increases with environmental exposures, such as air particulates, residence in low to high population density areas, and pack-years of tobacco smoking and decreases in subjects with history of chronic bronchitis. Genus Thermus is more abundant in tissue from advanced stage (IIIB, IV) patients, while Legionella is higher in patients who develop metastases. Moreover, the non-malignant lung tissues have higher microbiota alpha diversity than the paired tumors. Our results provide insights into the human lung microbiota composition and function and their link to human lifestyle and clinical outcomes. Studies among subjects without lung cancer are needed to confirm our findings.

  2. Assessment of erythrocyte aggregation in whole blood samples by light backscattering: clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Firsov, Nikolai N.; Vyshlova, Marina G.; Lademann, Juergen; Richter, Heike; Kiesewetter, Holger; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1999-05-01

    We report on the results of a collaborative effort made in the field of optical diagnostics of whole blood samples to study the ability of red blood cells to aggregate in a Couette chamber. We studied a possibility to quantitatively measure this ability as a function of the physiological state of blood donors. The aggregometer designed by the Russian coauthors of this paper and described in their earlier publications (see e.g. Proc SPIE 1884, 2100, 2678, 2982) was extensively used in the experiments performed in the Rheumatology Institute in Moscow and in the Charite Clinic in Berlin. The following parameters were measured: two characteristic times of RBC aggregation and the average spontaneous aggregation rate in the state of stasis, the average hydrodynamic strength of all aggregates and that of the largest aggregates. Different algorithms of the remission signal processing for the quantitative evaluation of the above parameters were compared. Reproducible alterations of the parameters from their normal values were obtained for blood samples from individuals suffering auto-immune disease and diabetes. Statistical data is reported proving high efficiency of the technique for the diagnostics of rheological disorders. Basing on these data the quantitative criteria of the heaviness of hemorheological state of the patients are proposed that are important for choosing specific therapies for which the patient is minimally resistant.

  3. [Detection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus and human parvovirus 4 infections in blood samples among 95 patients with liver disease in Nanjing by nested PCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Rui; Zhou, Wei-Min; Liu, Xi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Lou, Yong-Liang; Tan, Wen-Jie

    2013-04-01

    To analyze the infection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus (HBoV) and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in blood samples among patients with liver disease in Nanjing by molecular detection. Nested PCR assays were designed and validated to detect B19, HBoV and PARV4, respectively. The assays were used to screen three parvoviruses in blood samples from 95 patients with different liver disease in Nanjing. The parvovirus infection was analyzed statistically. The detection limits were 10 copies of genomic DNA equivalents per reaction for each assays and the good specificity were observed. The frequency of B19 and HBoV were 2/95 (2.1%) and 9/95 (9.5%) in blood samples respectively. No PARV4 was detected. HBoV was detected in 3/5 patients with drug-induced hepatitis. Both B19 and HBoV infection were detected in blood from patients with liver disease.

  4. The Human Thioredoxin System: Modifications and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Isaac Hashemy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin system, comprising thioredoxin (Trx, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR and NADPH, is one of the major cellular antioxidant systems, implicated in a large and growing number of biological functions. Trx acts as an oxidoreductase via a highly conserved dithiol/disulfide motif located in the active site (-Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-Lys-. Different factors are involved in the regulation of Trx activity, including its expression level, localization, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications and some chemical inhibitors. Mammalian TrxRs are selenoproteins which have a –Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- N-terminal active site, as well as a C-terminal selenium-containing active site. Besides two Cys-residues in the redox-regulatory domain of cytosolic Trx (Trx1, human Trx1 has three additional Cys-residues. Post-translational modifications of human Trx1 which are involved in the regulation of its activity can happen via modification of Cys-residues including thiol oxidation, glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation or via modification of other amino acid residues such as nitration of Tyr-49. Because of the numerous functions of the thioredoxin system, its inhibition (mainly happens via the targeting TrxR can result in major cellular consequences, which are potentially pro-oxidant in nature, leading to cell death via necrosis or apoptosis if overexpression of Trx and other antioxidative enzymes can not recuperate cell response. Considering this feature, several anticancer drugs have been used which can inhibit TrxR. Elevated levels of Trx and/or TrxR have been reported in many different human malignancies, positively correlated with aggressive tumor growth and poor prognosis. Moreover, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects of Trx are reasons to study its clinical application as a drug.

  5. Translational Targeted Proteomics Profiling of Mitochondrial Energy Metabolic Pathways in Mouse and Human Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Justina C; Ciapaite, Jolita; van Eunen, Karen; Niezen-Koning, Klary E; Matton, Alix; Porte, Robert J; Horvatovich, Peter; Bakker, Barbara M; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar P

    2016-09-01

    Absolute measurements of protein abundance are important in the understanding of biological processes and the precise computational modeling of biological pathways. We developed targeted LC-MS/MS assays in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode to quantify over 50 mitochondrial proteins in a single run. The targeted proteins cover the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid β-oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation, and the detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Assays used isotopically labeled concatemers as internal standards designed to target murine mitochondrial proteins and their human orthologues. Most assays were also suitable to quantify the corresponding protein orthologues in rats. After exclusion of peptides that did not pass the selection criteria, we arrived at SRM assays for 55 mouse, 52 human, and 51 rat proteins. These assays were optimized in isolated mitochondrial fractions from mouse and rat liver and cultured human fibroblasts and in total liver extracts from mouse, rat, and human. The developed proteomics approach is suitable for the quantification of proteins in the mitochondrial energy metabolic pathways in mice, rats, and humans as a basis for translational research. Initial data show that the assays have great potential for elucidating the adaptive response of human patients to mutations in mitochondrial proteins in a clinical setting.

  6. Antigenic typing of brazilian rabies virus samples isolated from animals and humans, 1989-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAVORETTO Silvana Regina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and human rabies samples isolated between 1989 and 2000 were typified by means of a monoclonal antibody panel against the viral nucleoprotein. The panel had been previously established to study the molecular epidemiology of rabies virus in the Americas. Samples were isolated in the Diagnostic Laboratory of the Pasteur Institute and in other rabies diagnostic centers in Brazil. In addition to the fixed virus samples CVS-31/96-IP, preserved in mouse brain, and PV-BHK/97, preserved in cell culture, a total of 330 rabies virus samples were isolated from dogs, cats, cattle, horses, bats, sheep, goat, swine, foxes, marmosets, coati and humans. Six antigenic variants that were compatible with the pre-established monoclonal antibodies panel were defined: numbers 2 (dog, 3 (Desmodus rotundus, 4 (Tadarida brasiliensis, 5 (vampire bat from Venezuela, 6 (Lasiurus cinereus and Lab (reacted to all used antibodies. Six unknown profiles, not compatible with the panel, were also found. Samples isolated from insectivore bats showed the greatest variability and the most commonly isolated variant was variant-3 (Desmodus rotundus. These findings may be related to the existence of multiple independent transmission cycles, involving different bat species.

  7. Comparison of chlorzoxazone one-sample methods to estimate CYP2E1 activity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Iza; Dalhoff, Kim; Clemmesen, Jens O

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Comparison of a one-sample with a multi-sample method (the metabolic fractional clearance) to estimate CYP2E1 activity in humans. METHODS: Healthy, male Caucasians ( n=19) were included. The multi-sample fractional clearance (Cl(fe)) of chlorzoxazone was compared with one...... estimates, Cl(est) at 3 h or 6 h, and MR at 3 h, can serve as reliable markers of CYP2E1 activity. The one-sample clearance method is an accurate, renal function-independent measure of the intrinsic activity; it is simple to use and easily applicable to humans.......-time-point clearance estimation (Cl(est)) at 3, 4, 5 and 6 h. Furthermore, the metabolite/drug ratios (MRs) estimated from one-time-point samples at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h were compared with Cl(fe). RESULTS: The concordance between Cl(est) and Cl(fe) was highest at 6 h. The minimal mean prediction error (MPE) of Cl...

  8. Selection of Candidate Housekeeping Genes for Normalization in Human Postmortem Brain Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Pagano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The most frequently used technique to study the expression profile of genes involved in common neurological disorders is quantitative real-time RT-PCR, which allows the indirect detection of very low amounts of selected mRNAs in tissue samples. Expression analysis by RT-qPCR requires an appropriate normalization to the expression level of genes characterized by a stable, constitutive transcription. However, the identification of a gene transcribed at a very stable level is difficult if not impossible, since significant fluctuations of the level of mRNA synthesis often accompanies changes of cell behavior. The aim of this study is to identify the most stable genes in postmortem human brain samples of patients affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD suitable as reference genes. The experiments analyzed 12 commonly used reference genes in brain samples from eight individuals with AD and seven controls. After a careful analysis of the results calculated by geNorm and NormFinder algorithms, we found that CYC1 and EIF4A2 are the best reference genes. We remark on the importance of the determination of the best reference genes for each sample to be analyzed and suggest a practical combination of reference genes to be used in the analysis of human postmortem samples.

  9. Comparative study of clinical grade human tolerogenic dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Cáceres E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of tolerogenic DCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for transplantation and autoimmune disorders. Immunomodulatory DCs are primarily generated from monocytes (MDDCs for in vitro experiments following protocols that fail to fulfil the strict regulatory rules of clinically applicable products. Here, we compared the efficacy of three different tolerance-inducing agents, dexamethasone, rapamycin and vitamin D3, on DC biology using GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice or clinical grade reagents with the aim of defining their use for human cell therapy. Methods Tolerogenic MDDCs were generated by adding tolerogenic agents prior to the induction of maturation using TNF-α, IL-β and PGE2. We evaluated the effects of each agent on viability, efficiency of differentiation, phenotype, cytokine secretion and stability, the stimulatory capacity of tol-DCs and the T-cell profiles induced. Results Differences relevant to therapeutic applicability were observed with the cellular products that were obtained. VitD3-induced tol-DCs exhibited a slightly reduced viability and yield compared to Dexa-and Rapa-tol-DCs. Phenotypically, while Dexa-and VitD3-tol-DCs were similar to immature DCs, Rapa-tol-DCs were not distinguishable from mature DCs. In addition, only Dexa-and moderately VitD3-tol-DCs exhibited IL-10 production. Interestingly, in all cases, the cytokine secretion profiles of tol-DCs were not modified by a subsequent TLR stimulation with LPS, indicating that all products had stable phenotypes. Functionally, clearly reduced alloantigen T cell proliferation was induced by tol-DCs obtained using any of these agent. Also, total interferon-gamma (IFN-γ secretion by T cells stimulated with allogeneic tol-DCs was reduced in all three cases, but only T cells co-cultured with Rapa-tol-DCs showed impaired intracellular IFN-γ production. In addition, Rapa-DCs promoted CD4+ CD127 low/negative CD25high and Foxp3+ T cells. Conclusions Our

  10. Comprehensive Determination of Prostate Tumor ETS Gene Status in Clinical Samples Using the CLIA Decipher Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Alba; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Tomlins, Scott A; Erho, Nicholas; Gibb, Ewan A; Chelliserry, Jijumon; Lim, Lony; Lam, Lucia L C; Faraj, Sheila F; Bezerra, Stephania M; Davicioni, Elai; Yousefi, Kasra; Ross, Ashley E; Netto, George J; Schaeffer, Edward M; Lotan, Tamara L

    2017-05-01

    ETS family gene fusions are common in prostate cancer and molecularly define a tumor subset. ERG is the most commonly rearranged, leading to its overexpression, followed by ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5, and these alterations are generally mutually exclusive. We validated the Decipher prostate cancer assay to detect ETS alterations in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-accredited laboratory. Benchmarking against ERG immunohistochemistry and ETV1/4/5 RNA in situ hybridization, we examined the accuracy, precision, and reproducibility of gene expression ETS models using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. The m-ERG model achieved an area under curve of 95%, with 93% sensitivity and 98% specificity to predict ERG immunohistochemistry status. The m-ETV1, -ETV4, and -ETV5 models achieved areas under curve of 98%, 88%, and 99%, respectively. The models had 100% robustness for ETS status, and scores were highly correlated across sample replicates. Models predicted 41.5% of a prospective radical prostatectomy cohort (n = 4036) to be ERG(+), 6.3% ETV1(+), 1% ETV4(+), and 0.4% ETV5(+). Of prostate tumor biopsy samples (n = 509), 41.2% were ERG(+), 8.6% ETV1(+), 0.4% ETV4(+), and none ETV5(+). Higher Decipher risk status tumors were more likely to be ETS(+) (ERG or ETV1/4/5) in the radical prostatectomy and the biopsy cohorts (P ETS status prediction models for molecular classification of prostate tumors. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality assesment for the analysis of PCDDs/PCDFs in individual human serum samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, F. [IIQAB-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Ecotechnologies, Lab. of Dioxins; Abad, E.; Llerena, J.J.; Caixach, J.; Rivera, J.

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this work was to optimise a relevant methodology for the ultratrace analysis of PCDDs/PCDFs in individual human serum samples. In order to carry out the study, different strategies including the elaboration of quality control samples, parallel sample analysis, control blanks and a number of quality assurance measures were implemented as analytical current practices. Some of the main drawbacks in the analysis of PCDDs/PCDFs in these kind of samples come from two conflicting aspects: the small sample size and the low levels expected to be found. Taking this into account, an unavoidable compromise between the sample amount and the minimum analytical requirements, mainly the detection limit (LOD), is mandatory. To reach this goal C{sub 18} solid phase extraction was used to remove the analytes from the matrix. Clean up was performed by solid-liquid adsorption chromatography using a variety of adsorbents. Instrumental analysis was achieved by high-resolution gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS). Finally, the optimised methodology was applied to evaluate the potential impact in general population living in the surroundings of an obsolete municipal waste incinerator plant (MWI). Thus, more than 400 individuals serum samples potentially exposed to the emission of the incinerator and people not exposed were considered in this study.

  12. Survey and rapid detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae in clinical samples targeting the rcsA gene in Beijing, China

    OpenAIRE

    Derong eDong; Wei eLiu; Huan eLi; Yufei eWang; Xinran eLi; Dayang eZou; Zhan eYang; Simo eHuang; Dongsheng eZhou; Liuyu eHuang; Jing eYuan

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a wide-spread nosocomial pathogen. A rapid and sensitive molecular method for the detection of K. pneumoniae in clinical samples is needed to guide therapeutic treatment. In this study, we first described a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the rapid detection of capsular polysaccharide synthesis regulating gene rcsA from K. pneumoniae in clinical samples by using two methods including real-time turbidity monitoring and fluorescence detection to...

  13. Survey and rapid detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae in clinical samples targeting the rcsA gene in Beijing, China

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Derong; Liu, Wei; Li, Huan; Wang, Yufei; Li, Xinran; Zou, Dayang; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Zhou, Dongsheng; Huang, Liuyu; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a wide-spread nosocomial pathogen. A rapid and sensitive molecular method for the detection of K. pneumoniae in clinical samples is needed to guide therapeutic treatment. In this study, we first described a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the rapid detection of capsular polysaccharide synthesis regulating gene rcsA from K. pneumoniaein clinical samples by using two methods including real-time turbidity monitoring and fluorescence detection to ...

  14. Barriers to acceptance of self-sampling for human papillomavirus across ethnolinguistic groups of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Michelle; Lytwyn, Alice; Lohfeld, Lynne; Redwood-Campbell, Lynda; Fowler, Nancy; Karwalajtys, Tina

    2009-01-01

    Immigrant and low socio-economic (SES) women in North America underutilize Papanicolaou screening. Vaginal swab self-sampling for oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) has the potential to increase cervical cancer screening participation. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the perceptions of lower SES and immigrant women regarding self-sampling for HPV. Eleven focus-group interviews were conducted: one with Canadian-born English-speaking lower SES women, and two groups each with Arabic, Cantonese, Dari (Afghani), Somali and Spanish (Latino)-speaking women (one group conducted in English, the other in the native language) recently immigrated to Canada. Five to nine women aged 35 to 65 years and married with children participated in each group. Themes included 1) who might use self-sampling and why; 2) aversion to self-sampling and reasons to prefer physician; 3) ways to improve the appeal of self-sampling. Women generally perceived benefits of self-sampling and a small number felt they might use the method, but all groups had some reservations. Reasons included: uncertainty over performing the sampling correctly; fear of hurting themselves; concern about obtaining appropriate material; and concerns about test accuracy. Women preferred testing by a health care professional because they were accustomed to pelvic examinations, it was more convenient, or they trusted the results. Perceptions of self-sampling for HPV were similar across cultures and pertained to issues of confidence in self-sampling and need for physician involvement in care. These findings can inform programs and studies planning to employ self-sampling as a screening modality for cervical cancer.

  15. Genomic studies of envelope gene sequences from mosquito and human samples from Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitaksajjakul, Pannamthip; Benjathummarak, Surachet; Son, Hyun Ngoc; Thongrungkiat, Supatra; Ramasoota, Pongrama

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an RNA virus showing a high degree of genetic variation as a consequence of its proofreading inability. This variation plays an important role in virus evolution and pathogenesis. Although levels of within-host genetic variation are similar following equilibrium, variation among different hosts is frequently different. To identify dengue quasispecies present among two hosts, we collected patient samples from six acute DENV cases and two pools of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and analyzed the genetic variation of regions of the viral envelope gene. Among human and mosquito samples, we found three major clusters originating from two subpopulations. Although several shared lineages were observed in the two hosts, only one lineage showing evidence of neutral selection was observed among two hosts. Taken together, our data provide evidence for the existence of a DENV quasispecies, with less genetic variation observed in mosquitoes than humans and with circulating lineages found in both host types.

  16. Load and failure behavior of human muscle samples in the context of proximal femur replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Schmidt, Michael; Möbius, Robert; Wolfskämpf, Thomas; Schröder, Christian; Grunert, Ronny; Hammer, Niels; Prietzel, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Background: To ensure adequate function after orthopedic tumor reconstruction, it is important to reattach the remaining soft tissue to the implant. This study aimed at obtaining mechanical properties of textile muscle-implant and muscle-bone connections in a preliminary test. Methods: Two groups of soft-tissue attachment were mechanically tested and compared: Native bone-muscle samples obtained from human femora and muscles attached to a prosthetic implant by means of Trevira® attachment tu...

  17. Dioxin-like activity of environmental compounds in human blood and environmental samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    R transactivation bioassay is utilized in an array of projects to study the AhR-mediated activities of individual chemicals and mixtures and for epidemiological purposes. This review summarizes a series of studies regarding the DL-activity of single compounds and complex compound mixtures in the environment...... a cost-effective and integrated screening tool for measurement of the DL-activity in human, environmental and commercial samples....

  18. Separation of proteins from human plasma by sample displacement chromatography in hydrophobic interaction mode

    OpenAIRE

    Josic, Djuro; Breen, Lucas; Clifton, James; Gajdosik, Martina Srajer; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Rucevic, Marijana; Müller, Egbert

    2012-01-01

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) in reversed-phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced approximately twenty years ago. This method was first used for the preparative purification of peptides and proteins. Recently, SDC in ion-exchange mode was also successfully used for enrichment of low abundance proteins from human plasma. In this paper, the use of SDC for the separation of plasma proteins in hydrophobic interaction mode is demonstrated. By use of two or more columns coupled in se...

  19. A Multitrait-Multimethod Analysis of the Construct Validity of Child Anxiety Disorders in a Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, David A.; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Piacentini, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the construct validity of separation anxiety disorder (SAD), social phobia (SoP), panic disorder (PD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a clinical sample of children. Participants were 174 children, 6 to 17 years old (94 boys) who had undergone a diagnostic evaluation at a university hospital based clinic.…

  20. How to optimise the yield of forensic and clinical post-mortem microbiology with an adequate sampling: a proposal for standardisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, A; Cohen, M C; Lucena, J; Van de Voorde, W; Angelini, A; Ziyade, N; Saegeman, V

    2015-05-01

    Post-mortem microbiology (PMM) is an important tool in forensic pathology, helping to determine the cause and manner of death, especially in difficult scenarios such as sudden unexpected death (SD). Currently, there is a lack of standardization of PMM sampling throughout Europe. We present recommendations elaborated by a panel of European experts aimed to standardize microbiological sampling in the most frequent forensic and clinical post-mortem situations. A network of forensic microbiologists, pathologists and physicians from Spain, England, Belgium, Italy and Turkey shaped a flexible protocol providing minimal requirements for PMM sampling at four practical scenarios: SD, bioterrorism, tissue and cell transplantation (TCT) and paleomicrobiology. Biosafety recommendations were also included. SD was categorized into four subgroups according to the age of the deceased and circumstances at autopsy: (1) included SD in infancy and childhood (0-16 years); (2) corresponded to SD in the young (17-35 years); (3) comprised SD at any age with clinical symptoms; and (4) included traumatic/iatrogenic SD. For each subgroup, a minimum set of samples and general recommendations for microbiological analyses were established. Sampling recommendations for main bioterrorism scenarios were provided. In the TCT setting, the Belgian sampling protocol was presented as an example. Finally, regarding paleomicrobiology, the sampling selection for different types of human remains was reviewed. This proposal for standardization in the sampling constitutes the first step towards a consensus in PMM procedures. In addition, the protocol flexibility to adapt the sampling to the clinical scenario and specific forensic findings adds a cost-benefit value.

  1. Dioxin-like activity of environmental compounds in human blood and environmental samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    and humans. We found that some pesticides, plasticizers and phytoestrogens can activate the AhR, and the combined effect of compounds with no or weak AhR potency cannot be ignored. The significant DL-activity in the wastewater effluent indicates the treatment is not sufficient to prevent contamination...... of surface waters with dioxins. Our results from human studies suggest that the serum DL-activity reflect the complex mixture of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Greenlandic Inuit had lower serum DL-activity level compared to Europeans, probably due to long distance from the dioxin sources and UV...... a cost-effective and integrated screening tool for measurement of the DL-activity in human, environmental and commercial samples....

  2. Dioxin-like activity in environmental and human samples from Greenland and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    and humans. We found that some pesticides, plasticizers and phytoestrogens can activate the AhR, and the combined effect of compounds with no or weak AhR potency cannot be ignored. The significant DL-activity in the wastewater effluent indicates the treatment is not sufficient to prevent contamination...... of surface waters with dioxins. Our results from human studies suggest that the serum DL-activity reflect the complex mixture of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Greenlandic Inuit had lower serum DL-activity level compared to Europeans, probably due to long distance from the dioxin sources and UV...... a cost-effective and integrated screening tool for measurement of the DL-activity in human, environmental and commercial samples....

  3. Epidemiology and clinical presentation of the four human parainfluenza virus types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wen-Kuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs are important causes of upper respiratory tract illness (URTI and lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI. To analyse epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of the four types of human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs, patients with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI were studied in Guangzhou, southern China. Methods Throat swabs (n=4755 were collected and tested from children and adults with ARTI over a 26-month period, and 4447 of 4755 (93.5% patients’ clinical presentations were recorded for further analysis. Results Of 4755 patients tested, 178 (3.7% were positive for HPIV. Ninety-nine (2.1% samples were positive for HPIV-3, 58 (1.2% for HPIV-1, 19 (0.4% for HPIV-2 and 8 (0.2% for HPIV-4. 160/178 (88.9% HPIV-positive samples were from paediatric patients younger than 5 years old, but no infant under one month of age was HPIV positive. Seasonal peaks of HPIV-3 and HPIV-1 occurred as autumn turned to winter and summer turned to autumn. HPIV-2 and HPIV-4 were detected less frequently, and their frequency of isolation increased when the frequency of HPIV-3 and HPIV-1 declined. HPIV infection led to a wide spectrum of symptoms, and more “hoarseness” (p=0.015, “abnormal pulmonary breathing sound” (p Conclusions HPIV infection led to a wide spectrum of symptoms, and similar clinical manifestations were found in the patients with four different types of HPIVs. The study suggested pathogenic activity of HPIV in gastrointestinal illness. The clinical presentation of HPIV infection may differ by patient age.

  4. Least destructive sampling of human remains using laser drilling for Sr isotope analysis by TIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmes, Malte; Moffat, Ian; Grün, Rainer; Armstrong, Richard; Kinsley, Les; McMorrow, Linda

    2013-04-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) measured in ancient human remains can be used to reconstruct migration patterns of ancient human populations. This application is based on the fact that different geologic regions have distinct Sr isotope signatures that are cycled through the soils, plants and rivers, and eventually enter the food cycle. Sr isotope ratios measured in skeletal remains (bones and teeth) reflect the average of dietary Sr that was consumed when the tissue was formed, allowing the investigation of human migration between geologically distinct terrains. The analysis of human remains is always a sensitive topic requiring minimal damage to the sample, while at the same time providing highly precise and accurate results. Samples can be analysed either by solution methods like thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS), or by in-situ laser ablation MC-ICP-MS. For TIMS a drill is used to extract a small amount of sample, which is then digested in acid and Sr is separated out using ion exchange chromatography. This technique provides highly precise and accurate results, because any isobaric interferences are removed during chemical separation. The drawback is that drilling may cause visible damage to the sample, restricting access to precious human remains. LA-MC-ICP-MS analysis is very fast and nearly destruction free. However, the accuracy and precision of LA-MC-ICP-MS is limited by a number of factors including large instrumental mass discrimination, laser-induced isotopic and elemental fractionations and molecular interferences on 87Sr. Its application thus requires rigorous data reduction, which can introduce significant uncertainties into the analysis. This is especially true for samples with relatively low Sr concentrations such as human teeth (e.g., Woodhead et al., 2005; Horstwood et al., 2008; Vroon et al., 2008). In addition, LA-MC-ICP-MS has traditionally required a flat sample surface, thus an unbroken tooth needs to be cut, which is rather

  5. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of human liver samples with Wilson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolmusová, Zuzana; Horňáčková, Michaela; Plavčan, Jozef; Kopáni, Martin; Babál, Pavel; Veis, Pavel

    2013-08-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an elemental analytical technique with various applications. The paper demonstrates the first LIBS measurements of human liver samples for the purpose of detecting the higher copper content related with the advanced stage of Wilson's disease. These measurements were implemented using a Nd:YAG laser working at the wavelength of 532 nm and an echelle type spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera allowing for a wide spectral range coverage (200-950 nm) and rapid camera gating (minimum gating time of 5 ns). Seven liver samples with suspected Wilson's disease and five reference samples were investigated. The main parameter of interest was the Cu/C ratio obtained at first from spectra and secondly directly from an iCCD image. Our experiment is a pilot study, which shows LIBS analysis of human liver samples for the purpose of detecting the normal and higher copper content for the first time. The method proved to be a quick and a low-cost approach for the detection of pathological accumulation of copper in the affected tissue.

  6. DNA purification from crude samples for human identification using gradient elution isotachophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strychalski, Elizabeth A; Konek, Christopher; Butts, Erica L R; Vallone, Peter M; Henry, Alyssa C; Ross, David

    2013-09-01

    Gradient elution isotachophoresis (GEITP) was demonstrated for DNA purification, concentration, and quantification from crude samples, represented here by soiled buccal swabs, with minimal sample preparation prior to human identification using STR analysis. During GEITP, an electric field applied across leading and trailing electrolyte solutions resulted in isotachophoretic focusing of DNA at the interface between these solutions, while a pressure-driven counterflow controlled the movement of the interface from the sample reservoir into a microfluidic capillary. This counterflow also prevented particulates from fouling or clogging the capillary and reduced or eliminated contamination of the delivered DNA by PCR inhibitors. On-line DNA quantification using laser-induced fluorescence compared favorably with quantitative PCR measurements and potentially eliminates the need for quantitative PCR prior to STR analysis. GEITP promises to address the need for a rapid and robust method to deliver DNA from crude samples to aid the forensic community in human identification. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Detection of Streptococcus mutans Genomic DNA in Human DNA Samples Extracted from Saliva and Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Deeley, Kathleen B.; Callahan, Nicholas F.; Noel, Jacqueline B.; Anjomshoaa, Ida; Carricato, Wendy M.; Schulhof, Louise P.; DeSensi, Rebecca S.; Gandhi, Pooja; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Rozhon, Christopher; Patir, Asli; Yildirim, Mine; Poletta, Fernando A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Wendell, Steven; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Seymen, Figen; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W.; Modesto, Adriana; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Caries is a multifactorial disease, and studies aiming to unravel the factors modulating its etiology must consider all known predisposing factors. One major factor is bacterial colonization, and Streptococcus mutans is the main microorganism associated with the initiation of the disease. In our studies, we have access to DNA samples extracted from human saliva and blood. In this report, we tested a real-time PCR assay developed to detect copies of genomic DNA from Streptococcus mutans in 1,424 DNA samples from humans. Our results suggest that we can determine the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in both DNA samples from caries-free and caries-affected individuals. However, we were not able to detect the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in any DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood, which suggests the assay may not be sensitive enough for this goal. Values of the threshold cycle of the real-time PCR reaction correlate with higher levels of caries experience in children, but this correlation could not be detected for adults. PMID:21731912

  8. Novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis detected in samples of human blood bank donors in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza-Mora, Laura; Dolz, Gaby; Solórzano-Morales, Antony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the detection and identification of DNA and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in samples of blood bank donors in Costa Rica using molecular and serological techniques. Presence of Ehrlichia canis was determined in 10 (3.6%) out of 280 blood samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the ehrlichial dsb conserved gene. Analysis of the ehrlichial trp36 polymorphic gene in these 10 samples revealed substantial polymorphism among the E. canis genotypes, including divergent tandem repeat sequences. Nucleotide sequences of dsb and trp36 amplicons revealed a novel genotype of E. canis in blood bank donors from Costa Rica. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) detected antibodies in 35 (35%) of 100 serum samples evaluated. Thirty samples showed low endpoint titers (64-256) to E. canis, whereas five sera yielded high endpoint titers (1024-8192); these five samples were also E. canis-PCR positive. These findings represent the first report of the presence of E. canis in humans in Central America.

  9. Pathogenic Vibrio Strains Isolated from Human Stool and Water Samples from Western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselida Achieng Owuor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigate the type of pathogenic Vibrio strains from water and stool samples collected from Migori, SonduMiriu, Nyando and Yala regions in Western Kenya. Methods: A total of 811 samples (596 water and 215 stool samples were collected during the study periods of May to December 2013 and August to September 2014. Pathogenic Vibrio strains were identified through culturing in TCBS Agar, followed by oxidation, string and serological (polyvalent tests, respectively. The PCR analysis was done using combined primers targeting Vibrionaceae 16SrRNA and species specific primers for V. vulnificus and V. cholerae. Results: The results showed the presence of V. vulnificus and V. cholerae. However, V. parahaemolyticus was not found in any of the samples. The PCR results for 16SrRNA, Vib 1, and Vib 2 showed polymorphism in the genes, this was an indication of cross combination of genes from more than one strain in one isolate. Conclusion: The study showed the presence of V. cholerae (Ogawa and Inaba in water and human stool samples. Type B V. vulnificus was detected in the water sample collected from River Migori. This information is of essence in controlling and managing cholera in the western part of Kenya. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(1: 1-7

  10. The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory: Factor Structure and Invariance in a Sample of Breast Cancer Patients and in a Non-Clinical Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Catarina; Leal, Isabel; Marôco, Ana Lúcia; Tedeschi, Richard G

    2016-10-03

    The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) is frequently used to assess positive changes following a traumatic event. The aim of the study is to examine the factor structure and the latent mean invariance of PTGI. A sample of 205 (M age = 54.3, SD = 10.1) women diagnosed with breast cancer and 456 (M age = 34.9, SD = 12.5) adults who had experienced a range of adverse life events were recruited to complete the PTGI and a socio-demographic questionnaire. We use Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to test the factor-structure and multi-sample CFA to examine the invariance of the PTGI between the two groups. The goodness of fit for the five-factor model is satisfactory for breast cancer sample (χ2(175) = 396.265; CFI = .884; NIF = .813; RMSEA [90% CI] = .079 [.068, .089]), and good for non-clinical sample (χ2(172) = 574.329; CFI = .931; NIF = .905; RMSEA [90% CI] = .072 [.065, .078]). The results of multi-sample CFA show that the model fit indices of the unconstrained model are equal but the model that uses constrained factor loadings is not invariant across groups. The findings provide support for the original five-factor structure and for the multidimensional nature of posttraumatic growth (PTG). Regarding invariance between both samples, the factor structure of PTGI and other parameters (i.e., factor loadings, variances, and co-variances) are not invariant across the sample of breast cancer patients and the non-clinical sample.

  11. Adhesion and virulence factor properties of Enterococci isolated from clinical samples in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Samadi Kafil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enterococci rank among leading causes of nosocomial bacteremia, urinary tract infections and community acquired endocarditis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of virulence factors in Enterococci strains isolated from clinical samples in Iranian Educational hospitals. Methodology: Presence of aggregation substance (asa, extracellular surface protein (esp, Enterococcus faecalis antigen A (efaA, adhesin of collagen from E. faecalis (ace, endocarditis and biofilm-associated pilli (ebp as colonization factors and cytolysin (cyl, gelatinase (gel and hyaloronidase (hyl as secretary factors were investigated in isolates. A total of 201 clinical isolates of Enterococci were collected in 2009-2010 from eight educational hospitals. After deoxyribonucleic acid extraction, they were examined for presence of virulence factors by polymerase chain reaction. Results: E. faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were isolated from 56.9% to 43.1%, respectively. Resistance to vancomycin and gentamicin were 33.8% and 83.9% in E. faecium isolates and 16.3% and 88.1% in E. faecalis isolates respectively. Colonization factors were found to be more prevalent in E. faecalis isolates and almost all isolates of E. faecalis had ace, ebp and efaA genes. Esp gene had a higher rate of distribution in Enterococci isolates (75.1% in this study compared with previous studies. One of E. faecalis isolates contained hyl gene, but 38.8% of E. faecium isolates had it. Mutual exclusive were present between hyl and efaA in all E. faecium isolates and 69.7% of E. faecium hyl - positive isolates were esp positive. Conclusion: According to these results, virulence genes were more prevalent in E. faecalis isolates and E. faecalis had more potential pathogenesis for initiating an infection; however because of E. faeciums higher antibiotic resistance, we have been facing higher E. faecium infections in hospitalized patients.

  12. Evaluation of the DSM-5 severity indicator for binge eating disorder in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M; Ivezaj, Valentina; White, Marney A

    2015-08-01

    This study tested the new DSM-5 severity criterion for binge eating disorder (BED) based on frequency of binge-eating in a clinical sample. This study also tested overvaluation of shape/weight as an alternative severity specifier. Participants were 834 treatment-seeking adults diagnosed with DSM-5 BED using semi-structured diagnostic and eating-disorder interviews. Participants sub-grouped based on DSM-5 severity levels and on overvaluation of shape/weight were compared on demographic and clinical variables. Based on DSM-5 severity definitions, 331 (39.7%) participants were categorized as mild, 395 (47.5%) as moderate, 83 (10.0%) as severe, and 25 (3.0%) as extreme. Analyses comparing three (mild, moderate, and severe/extreme) severity groups revealed no significant differences in demographic variables or body mass index (BMI). Analyses revealed significantly higher eating-disorder psychopathology in the severe/extreme than moderate and mild groups and higher depression in moderate and severe/extreme groups than the mild group; effect sizes were small. Participants characterized with overvaluation (N = 449; 54%) versus without overvaluation (N = 384; 46%) did not differ significantly in age, sex, BMI, or binge-eating frequency, but had significantly greater eating-disorder psychopathology and depression. The robustly greater eating-disorder psychopathology and depression levels (medium-to-large effect sizes) in the overvaluation group was observed without attenuation of effect sizes after adjusting for ethnicity/race and binge-eating severity/frequency. Our findings provide support for overvaluation of shape/weight as a severity specifier for BED as it provides stronger information about the severity of homogeneous groupings of patients than the DSM-5 rating based on binge-eating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Examination of Racial Differences on the MMPI-2 Clinical and Restructured Clinical Scales in an Outpatient Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Yessenia; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Brown, Jessica S.; Anestis, Joye C.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the possibility of differential predictive accuracy of selected Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Second Edition (MMPI-2) clinical and Restructured Clinical (RC) scales in a group of Black and White mental health center clients. Results indicate that Black clients scored higher than White clients on one…

  14. Metabolomic Profiling of Bile Acids in Clinical and Experimental Samples of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaobei; Elliott, Christopher T.; McGuinness, Bernadette; Passmore, Peter; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Hölscher, Christian; McClean, Paula L.; Graham, Stewart F.; Green, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    Certain endogenous bile acids have been proposed as potential therapies for ameliorating Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but their role, if any, in the pathophysiology of this disease is not currently known. Given recent evidence of bile acids having protective and anti-inflammatory effects on the brain, it is important to establish how AD affects levels of endogenous bile acids. Using LC-MS/MS, this study profiled 22 bile acids in brain extracts and blood plasma from AD patients (n = 10) and age-matched control subjects (n = 10). In addition, we also profiled brain/plasma samples from APP/PS1 and WT mice (aged 6 and 12 months). In human plasma, we detected significantly lower cholic acid (CA, p = 0.03) in AD patients than age-matched control subjects. In APP/PS1 mouse plasma we detected higher CA (p = 0.05, 6 months) and lower hyodeoxycholic acid (p = 0.04, 12 months) than WT. In human brain with AD pathology (Braak stages V-VI) taurocholic acid (TCA) were significantly lower (p = 0.01) than age-matched control subjects. In APP/PS1 mice we detected higher brain lithocholic acid (p = 0.05) and lower tauromuricholic acid (TMCA; p = 0.05, 6 months). TMCA was also decreased (p = 0.002) in 12-month-old APP/PS1 mice along with 5 other acids: CA (p = 0.02), β-muricholic acid (p = 0.02), Ω-muricholic acid (p = 0.05), TCA (p = 0.04), and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (p = 0.02). The levels of bile acids are clearly disturbed during the development of AD pathology and, since some bile acids are being proposed as potential AD therapeutics, we demonstrate a method that can be used to support work to advance bile acid therapeutics. PMID:28629125

  15. IHC Profiler: an open source plugin for the quantitative evaluation and automated scoring of immunohistochemistry images of human tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frency Varghese

    Full Text Available In anatomic pathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC serves as a diagnostic and prognostic method for identification of disease markers in tissue samples that directly influences classification and grading the disease, influencing patient management. However, till today over most of the world, pathological analysis of tissue samples remained a time-consuming and subjective procedure, wherein the intensity of antibody staining is manually judged and thus scoring decision is directly influenced by visual bias. This instigated us to design a simple method of automated digital IHC image analysis algorithm for an unbiased, quantitative assessment of antibody staining intensity in tissue sections. As a first step, we adopted the spectral deconvolution method of DAB/hematoxylin color spectra by using optimized optical density vectors of the color deconvolution plugin for proper separation of the DAB color spectra. Then the DAB stained image is displayed in a new window wherein it undergoes pixel-by-pixel analysis, and displays the full profile along with its scoring decision. Based on the mathematical formula conceptualized, the algorithm is thoroughly tested by analyzing scores assigned to thousands (n = 1703 of DAB stained IHC images including sample images taken from human protein atlas web resource. The IHC Profiler plugin developed is compatible with the open resource digital image analysis software, ImageJ, which creates a pixel-by-pixel analysis profile of a digital IHC image and further assigns a score in a four tier system. A comparison study between manual pathological analysis and IHC Profiler resolved in a match of 88.6% (P<0.0001, CI = 95%. This new tool developed for clinical histopathological sample analysis can be adopted globally for scoring most protein targets where the marker protein expression is of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear type. We foresee that this method will minimize the problem of inter-observer variations across labs and

  16. IHC Profiler: An Open Source Plugin for the Quantitative Evaluation and Automated Scoring of Immunohistochemistry Images of Human Tissue Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Renu; De, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    In anatomic pathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC) serves as a diagnostic and prognostic method for identification of disease markers in tissue samples that directly influences classification and grading the disease, influencing patient management. However, till today over most of the world, pathological analysis of tissue samples remained a time-consuming and subjective procedure, wherein the intensity of antibody staining is manually judged and thus scoring decision is directly influenced by visual bias. This instigated us to design a simple method of automated digital IHC image analysis algorithm for an unbiased, quantitative assessment of antibody staining intensity in tissue sections. As a first step, we adopted the spectral deconvolution method of DAB/hematoxylin color spectra by using optimized optical density vectors of the color deconvolution plugin for proper separation of the DAB color spectra. Then the DAB stained image is displayed in a new window wherein it undergoes pixel-by-pixel analysis, and displays the full profile along with its scoring decision. Based on the mathematical formula conceptualized, the algorithm is thoroughly tested by analyzing scores assigned to thousands (n = 1703) of DAB stained IHC images including sample images taken from human protein atlas web resource. The IHC Profiler plugin developed is compatible with the open resource digital image analysis software, ImageJ, which creates a pixel-by-pixel analysis profile of a digital IHC image and further assigns a score in a four tier system. A comparison study between manual pathological analysis and IHC Profiler resolved in a match of 88.6% (P<0.0001, CI = 95%). This new tool developed for clinical histopathological sample analysis can be adopted globally for scoring most protein targets where the marker protein expression is of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear type. We foresee that this method will minimize the problem of inter-observer variations across labs and further help in

  17. Can clinical tests help monitor human papillomavirus vaccine impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meites, Elissa; Lin, Carol; Unger, Elizabeth R; Steinau, Martin; Patel, Sonya; Markowitz, Lauri E; Hariri, Susan

    2013-09-01

    As immunization programs for human papillomavirus (HPV) are implemented more widely around the world, interest is increasing in measuring their impact. One early measurable impact of HPV vaccine is on the prevalence of specific HPV types in a population. In low-resource settings, a potentially attractive strategy would be to monitor HPV prevalence using clinical cervical cancer screening test results to triage specimens for HPV typing. We assessed this approach in a nationally representative population of U.S. females aged 14-59 years. Using self-collected cervico-vaginal swab specimens from 4,150 women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2003-2006, we evaluated type-specific HPV prevalence detected by the Roche linear array (LA) research test on all specimens, compared with type-specific HPV prevalence detected by LA conducted only on specimens positive by the digene hybrid capture 2 (HC-2) clinical test. We calculated weighted prevalence estimates and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and examined relative type-specific HPV prevalence according to the two testing approaches. The population prevalence of oncogenic HPV vaccine types 16/18 was 6.2% (CI:5.4-7.1) by LA if all specimens were tested, and 2.4% (CI:1.9-3.0) if restricted to positive HC-2. Relative prevalence of individual HPV types was similar for both approaches. Compared with typing all specimens, a triage approach would require testing fewer specimens, but a greater reduction in HPV prevalence or a larger group of specimens would be needed to detect vaccine impact. Further investigation is warranted to inform type-specific HPV monitoring approaches around the world.

  18. Separation and Determination of Methylnaltrexone in Human Plasma Samples After Oral Administration by HPLC Coupled with Electrochemical Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG An-bao; Joseph F. Foss; YUAN Chun-su; Joachim Osinski

    2005-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) method coupled with electrochemical detection and solid phase extraction is described for the separation and determination of methylnaltrexone(MNTX), a quaternary opioid antagonist, in human clinical plasma samples after oral administration. Linearity of the standard curve for MNTX was found in the range of 4.0_150 ng/mL and was statistically conformed. The correlation coefficient(r2) and calibration equation obtained from linear regression analysis are 0.9999 and Y=54.27X-0.22, where Y and X represent the peak area and concentration of MNTX, respectively. The detection limit of MNTX under the present experimental conditions is 2.0 ng/mL by estimating at a ratio of 3 of signal to noise. The mean recovery of MNTX in human plasma is higher than 97%. The analytical method was applied to the pharmacokinetic determination of MNTX after single dose oral administration. These data demonstrate that the change of MNTX plasma concentration versus time is obvious. MNTX level of plasma reaches to a plateau between 45 to 120 minutes and then falls slowly. The content of MNTX in plasma sample maintains at an obviously detectable level after twelve hours of oral administration. The pharmacokinetic parameters for a single dose of 19.2 mg/kg in plasma are cmax=206.42(±16.53) ng/mL and tmax=60 min.

  19. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in clinical samples by using a simple lysis method and polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Noriega, A R

    1993-01-01

    We have evaluated the polymerase chain reaction for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples from patients with tuberculous infection. Two simple methods for mycobacterial DNA release have been compared: sonication and lysis with nonionic detergents and proteinase K. The more effective method was the enzymatic technique. By using this protocol with 75 specimens we detected M. tuberculosis DNA in all of the samples, whereas only 48 and 71 samples were positive by acid-fast staining and culture, respectively. Images PMID:8463383

  20. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enterococcus Species Isolated from Different Clinical Samples in a Tertiary Care Hospital of North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Srivastava

    2013-08-01

    Result: Among the 100 isolates of Enterococcus from various clinical samples maximum isolates were from urine sample 70% and E. faecalis 92% constituted the predominant isolate. They were found to be susceptible to linezolid and vancomycin with least sensitive to ciprofloxacin and tetracycline. Conclusion: Routine speciation and in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Enterococcus in various clinical samples is emphasized due to the prevalence of wide variety of Enterococcus species and also appearance of high resistant strains. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(4.000: 389-391

  1. Transcription pattern of UL131A-128 mRNA in clinical strains of human cytomegalovirus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhengrong Sun; Gaowei Ren; Yanping Ma; Ning Wang; Yaohua Ji; Ying Qi; Mali Li; Rong He; Qiang Ruan

    2010-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) mRNA was obtained from human embryonic lung fibroblast cells infected by HCMV clinical strains from urine samples of infants at different kinetic periods. The cDNA of UL131A-128 mRNAs was amplified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and analysed by sequencing. Mean while, clones containing UL131A-128 transcripts in an HCMV cDNA library of a clinical strain were selected and sequenced. It was demonstrated that UL131A-128 mRNA was expressed with immediately early, early and late kinetics. Sequences obtained by RT-PCR showed that the UL131A gene consisted of two exons and the coding region of the UL130 gene was not interrupted by any intron in the region as reported earlier. However, the transcript of the UL128 gene showed two patterns: one pattern consisted of three exons as reported earlier; the other contained the three exons and also the first intron. Moreover, the above characteristics of UL131A-128 spliced transcripts were confirmed by the sequences of clones selected from the HCMV cDNA library. Our results demonstrated that the UL131A, UL130 and UL128 genes were transcribed with the 3′-coterminal, although the initiation points of their mRNA may be different. The variation in the transcripts found in our study indicated the complex nature of transcription of UL131A-128 genes in clinical strains of HCMV.

  2. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium avium isolates recovered from clinical samples and from the environment: molecular characterization for diagnostic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Julio; García, Ignacio Gómez; Aranaz, Alicia; Bezos, Javier; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Mateos, Ana; Gómez-Mampaso, Enrique; Domínguez, Lucas

    2008-04-01

    Isolation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) organisms from clinical samples may occur in patients without clinical disease, making the interpretation of results difficult. The clinical relevance of MAC isolates from different types of clinical samples (n = 47) from 39 patients in different sections of a hospital was assessed by comparison with environmental isolates (n = 17) from the hospital. Various methods for identification and typing (commercial probes, phenotypic characteristics, PCR for detection of IS1245 and IS901, sequencing of the hsp65 gene, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) were evaluated. The same strain was found in all the environmental isolates, 21 out of 23 (91.3%) of the isolates cultured from urine samples, and 5 out of 19 (26.3%) isolates from respiratory specimens. This strain did not cause disease in the patients. Testing best characterized the strain as M. avium subsp. hominissuis, with the unusual feature that 81.4% of these isolates lacked the IS1245 element. Contamination of certain clinical samples with an environmental strain was the most likely event; therefore, characterization of the environmental mycobacteria present in health care facilities should be performed to discard false-positive isolations in nonsterile samples, mainly urine samples. Molecular techniques applied in this study demonstrated their usefulness for this purpose.

  3. Dioxin and PCB levels in human samples from the Greek population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leondiadis, L.; Vassiliadou, I.; Costopoulou, D.; Papadopoulos, A. [Mass Spectrometry and Dioxin Analysis Lab. - NCSR Demokritos, Athens (Greece)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are commercial chemical substances produced in a large scale since 1930, with a wide range of applications in industry, such as for coolant fluids in transformers and dielectric fluids in capacitors. After their health effects became apparent, PCB production was banned in the late 1970s. However, humans are still exposed through PCB leakage of old capacitors and transformers and disposal of contaminated materials. Dioxins (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDFs)), are formed as undesirable by-products mainly during the production of chlorinated chemicals and during the combustion of municipal and hazardous waste. Due to potential health hazard (dermal toxicity, immunotoxicity, reproductive effects, teratogenicity, endocrine disruption and carcinogenicity), their monitoring in humans is of high general concern. Enough information on POP presence in human tissues from industrialized countries is available to suggest that the concentration of these compounds has decreased during the last 10 years. Monitoring of human exposure to PCBs and dioxins, contaminants that accumulate in lipid tissue, is most conveniently performed by analysis of blood plasma or blood serum. Monitoring of dioxins in human milk is of also great importance, since it is especially feared that lactational exposure to dioxins and related compounds may adversely affect brain development and the immune system of infants and children. The present study includes the analyses of non-ortho, mono-ortho, indicator PCBs, and PCDD/Fs in human blood and human milk samples collected between November 2002 and February 2004 and is the first study of this kind to be undertaken in Greece.

  4. Mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems in meropenem- resistant Acinetobacter isolates from clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the resistance mechanisms in Acinetobacter species by phenotypic methods. Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility profile for 150 clinical isolates of Acinetobacte r was determined by the standard disk diffusion method. Isolates detected to be meropenem resistant were tested further by broth microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for meropenem. The resistant isolates were also tested for metallo β -lactamase (MBL production by the double-disk approximation test, for AmpC beta-lactamase production and efflux pump detection by agar microdilution MIC with and without reserpine. Results: Twenty-one isolates were found resistant to meropenem by the standard disk diffusion method. Nine samples were from patients admitted in intensive care units (ICUs. Broth microdilution MICs of the isolates revealed low-level resistance to meropenem. MBL was not produced by any of these isolates. AmpC β -lactamases were produced by nine (43% isolates. ′Efflux pump′-mediated resistance to meropenem was detected in two out of nine random isolates tested for the same . Conclusions: Carbapenem resistance is not uncommon in Acinetobacter isolates. AmpC production may cause carbapenem resistance. MBL and efflux pump may not be important causes of carbapenem resistance.

  5. Clinical Correlates of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) in an Outpatient Sample of Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Nieto, Rebeca; Carballo, Juan J; Díaz de Neira Hernando, Mónica; de León-Martinez, Victoria; Baca-García, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents is a major public health concern. The first goal of our study was to describe the characteristics and functions of NSSI and NSSI thoughts in an adolescent outpatient sample. The second goal was to examine which clinical factors discriminate between these two groups of patients. A group of 267 subjects was recruited from the Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatric Services, Jiménez Díaz Foundation (Madrid, Spain) from November 2011 to October 2012. All participants were administered the Spanish version of the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI). A total of 21.7% of patients reported having engaged in NSSI at least once in their lifetime. The most strongly endorsed function for NSSI was automatic negative reinforcement. In comparison with patients in the NSSI Thoughts group and the control group, patients in the NSSI group scored higher in Internalization of Anger and in all the scales comprising the Children's Depression Inventory. Our findings on the prevalence and functions of NSSI are consistent with the literature. NSSI was mainly performed for emotion regulation purposes; specifically, NSSI seems to be used to cope with anger and depression. In addition, internalization of anger might play a significant role in the maintenance of this behavior.

  6. Self-esteem in a clinical sample of morbidly obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, P; Höglund, P; Birgerstam, P; Lissau, I; Pietrobelli, A; Flodmark, C-E

    2009-01-01

    To study self-esteem in clinical sample of obese children and adolescents. Obese children and adolescents aged 8-19 years (n = 107, mean age 13.2 years, mean BMI 32.5 [range 22.3-50.6], mean BMI z-score 3.22 [range 2.19-4.79]; 50 boys and 57 girls) were referred for treatment of primary obesity. Self-esteem was measured with a validated psychological test with five subscales: physical characteristics, talents and skills, psychological well-being, relations with the family and relations with others. A linear mixed effect model used the factors gender and adolescence group, and the continuous covariates: BMI z-scores, and BMI for the parents as fixed effects and subjects as random effects. Age and gender, but neither the child's BMI z-score nor the BMI of the parents were significant covariates. Self-esteem decreased (p self-esteem on the global scale (p = 0.04) and on the two subscales physical characteristics (p Self-esteem is lower in girls and decreases with age. In treatment settings special attention should be paid to adolescent girls.

  7. Colorimetric detection of clinical DNA samples using an intercalator-conjugated polydiacetylene sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-10-15

    We herein developed a novel colorimetric polydiacetylene (PDA) sensor for very convenient detection of clinical DNA samples based on the interaction between an intercalator and dsDNA. We modified the terminal carboxyl group of a diacetylene monomer (10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid; PCDA) with the intercalator 9-aminoacridine (9AA) and prepared 9AA-modified PDA liposomes containing PCDA-9AA/PCDA/phospholipid (1,2-dimyristoyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine) at a molar ratio of 1.5:6.5:2.0. The PDA sensor underwent an obvious color transition from blue to red in the presence of dsDNA molecules that were PCR-amplified from genomic DNA due to the insertion of the 9AA head group of PDA into the dsDNA. DNA concentrations as low as 20 nM and relatively small molecules (around 100 base pairs) could be detected by the sensor within 1h without DNA electrophoresis. This novel colorimetric method is simple, does not require any instrument, and is therefore appropriate for POCT or portable molecular diagnostic kit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Philadelphia Brief Assessment of Cognition in healthy and clinical Brazilian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Assis Pereira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia Brief Assessment of Cognition (PBAC is a neuropsychological screening instrument that assesses five cognitive domains: working memory, visuospatial functioning, language, episodic memory and comportment. The aim is to verify if PBAC can properly be used in the Brazilian sample. Participated in this study: (a 200 healthy volunteers - 100 young [21.6(2.5 years old] and 100 older adults [70.1(7.3 years old]; >12 years of education; (b 30 Alzheimer's patients (AD [73.7(5.7 years old], 4-11 years in education. The PBAC scores: (a 95.8(2.6, 90.0(4.4 and (b 65.0(10.8 were correlated with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE for young 29.1(0.9, older adults 28.3(1.4 and AD 18.4(3.0 groups. A positive correlation between MMSE and PBAC (r=0.9, p<0.001 was found. Negative correlations were observed between PBAC domains [memory (-0.63, visuospatial abilities (-0.44 and working memory (-0.3 tasks]. MANOVA showed a better male performance in visuospatial functioning (F=8.5, p=0.004. The Brazilian version of PBAC proved to be a promising screening instrument for clinical purposes.

  9. Genetic identification of missing persons: DNA analysis of human remains and compromised samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Cubero, M J; Saiz, M; Martinez-Gonzalez, L J; Alvarez, J C; Eisenberg, A J; Budowle, B; Lorente, J A

    2012-01-01

    Human identification has made great strides over the past 2 decades due to the advent of DNA typing. Forensic DNA typing provides genetic data from a variety of materials and individuals, and is applied to many important issues that confront society. Part of the success of DNA typing is the generation of DNA databases to help identify missing persons and to develop investigative leads to assist law enforcement. DNA databases house DNA profiles from convicted felons (and in some jurisdictions arrestees), forensic evidence, human remains, and direct and family reference samples of missing persons. These databases are essential tools, which are becoming quite large (for example the US Database contains 10 million profiles). The scientific, governmental and private communities continue to work together to standardize genetic markers for more effective worldwide data sharing, to develop and validate robust DNA typing kits that contain the reagents necessary to type core identity genetic markers, to develop technologies that facilitate a number of analytical processes and to develop policies to make human identity testing more effective. Indeed, DNA typing is integral to resolving a number of serious criminal and civil concerns, such as solving missing person cases and identifying victims of mass disasters and children who may have been victims of human trafficking, and provides information for historical studies. As more refined capabilities are still required, novel approaches are being sought, such as genetic testing by next-generation sequencing, mass spectrometry, chip arrays and pyrosequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphisms offer the potential to analyze severely compromised biological samples, to determine the facial phenotype of decomposed human remains and to predict the bioancestry of individuals, a new focus in analyzing this type of markers.

  10. Obesity induction in hamster that mimics the human clinical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordania da Silva, Vivian; Dias, Sílvia Regina Costa; Maioli, Tatiani Uceli; Serafim, Luciana Ribeiro; Furtado, Luis Fernando Viana; Quintão Silva, Maria da Gloria; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano de; Rabelo, Élida Mara Leite

    2017-08-05

    Although obesity is well established in hamsters, studies using diets with high levels of simple carbohydrate associated with lipids are necessary to assess the impact of this type of food in the body. In this study a high sugar and butter diet (HSB) and high temperature were employed towards this end. Obesity was successfully induced at a temperature of 30.3°C to 30.9°C after 38 days feeding the animals an HSB diet. It was shown that although diet is important for the induction of obesity, temperature is also essential because at a temperature slightly below the one required, obesity was not induced, even when the animals were fed for a longer period (150 days).The obese clinical condition was accompanied by biochemical and hematological changes, as increased cholesterol and triglyceride levels and increased leukocyte numbers, similar to alterations observed in obese humans. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that increasing the intake of simple carbohydrates associated with lipids provided evidence of inflammation in obese animals.

  11. Clinical features of human intestinal capillariasis in Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jong Bair; Kao-Pin Hwang; Tsang-En Wang; Tai-Cherng Liou; Shee-Chan Lin; Chin-Roa Kao; Tao-Yeuan Wang; Kwok-Kuen Pang

    2004-01-01

    Human intestinal capillariasis is a rare parasitosis that was first recognized in the Philippines in the 1960 s. Parasitosis is a life threatening disease and has been reported from Thailand, Japan, South of Taiwan (Kaoh-Siung), Korea,Tran, Egypt, Italy and Spain. Its clinical symptoms are characterized by chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain,borborygmus, marked weight loss, protein and electrolyte loss and cachexia. Capillariasis may be fatal if early treatment is not given. We reported 14 cases living in rural areas of Taiwan. Three cases had histories of travelling to Thailand. They might have been infected in Thailand while stayed there. Two cases had the diet of raw freshwater fish before. Three cases received emergency laparotomy due to peritonitis and two cases were found of enteritis cystica profunda. According to the route of transmission,freshwater and brackish-water fish may act as the intermediate host of the parasite. The most simple and convenient method of diagnosing capillariasis is stool examination. Two cases were diagnosed by histology.Mebendazole or albendezole 200 mg orally twice a day for 20-30 d is the treatment of choice. All the patients were cured, and relapses were not observed within 12 mo.

  12. Clinical Characteristics and Genetic Variability of Human Rhinovirus in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Montero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is a leading cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI in young children and infants worldwide and has a high impact on morbidity and mortality in this population. Initially, HRV was classified into two species: HRV-A and HRV-B. Recently, a species called HRV-C and possibly another species, HRV-D, were identified. In Mexico, there is little information about the role of HRV as a cause of ARI, and the presence and importance of species such as HRV-C are not known. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and genetic variability of HRV in Mexican children. Genetic characterization was carried out by phylogenetic analysis of the 5′-nontranslated region (5′-NTR of the HRV genome. The results show that the newly identified HRV-C is circulating in Mexican children more frequently than HRV-B but not as frequently as HRV-A, which was the most frequent species. Most of the cases of the three species of HRV were in children under 2 years of age, and all species were associated with very mild and moderate ARI.

  13. Direct trace-elemental analysis of urine samples by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample deposition on clinical filter papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramendía, Maite; Rello, Luis; Vanhaecke, Frank; Resano, Martín

    2012-10-16

    Collection of biological fluids on clinical filter papers shows important advantages from a logistic point of view, although analysis of these specimens is far from straightforward. Concerning urine analysis, and particularly when direct trace elemental analysis by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) is aimed at, several problems arise, such as lack of sensitivity or different distribution of the analytes on the filter paper, rendering obtaining reliable quantitative results quite difficult. In this paper, a novel approach for urine collection is proposed, which circumvents many of these problems. This methodology consists on the use of precut filter paper discs where large amounts of sample can be retained upon a single deposition. This provides higher amounts of the target analytes and, thus, sufficient sensitivity, and allows addition of an adequate internal standard at the clinical lab prior to analysis, therefore making it suitable for a strategy based on unsupervised sample collection and ulterior analysis at referral centers. On the basis of this sampling methodology, an analytical method was developed for the direct determination of several elements in urine (Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Sb, Sn, Tl, Pb, and V) at the low μg L(-1) level by means of LA-ICPMS. The method developed provides good results in terms of accuracy and LODs (≤1 μg L(-1) for most of the analytes tested), with a precision in the range of 15%, fit-for-purpose for clinical control analysis.

  14. A simple sample preparation method for measuring amoxicillin in human plasma by hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei-Chong; Hou, Zi-Li; Jiang, Xin-Hui; Jiang, Ye

    2013-02-01

    A simple sample preparation method has been developed for the determination of amoxicillin in human plasma by hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltration (HF-CF-UF). A 400-μL plasma sample was placed directly into the HF-CF-UF device, which consisited of a slim glass tube and a U-shaped hollow fiber. After centrifugation at 1.25 × 10(3) g for 10 min, the filtrate was withdrawn from the hollow fiber and 20 µL was directly injected into the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for analysis. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.1-20 µg/mL (r = 0.9996) and the limit of detection was as low as 0.025 µg/mL. The average recovery and absolute recovery were 99.9% and 84.5%, respectively. Both the intra-day and inter-day precisions (relative standard deviation) were less than 3.1% for three concentrations (0.25, 2.5 and 10 µg/mL). The sample preparation process was simplified. Only after a single centrifugal ultrafiltration can the filtrate be injected directly into HPLC. The present method is simple, sensitive and accurate. It could be effective for the analysis of biological samples with high protein contents, especially for the biopharmaceutical analysis of drugs that use traditional isolation techniques for sample preparation such as the protein precipitation method.

  15. Small Sample Kernel Association Tests for Human Genetic and Microbiome Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Chen, Wenan; Zhao, Ni; Wu, Michael C; Schaid, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Kernel machine based association tests (KAT) have been increasingly used in testing the association between an outcome and a set of biological measurements due to its power to combine multiple weak signals of complex relationship with the outcome through the specification of a relevant kernel. Human genetic and microbiome association studies are two important applications of KAT. However, the classic KAT framework relies on large sample theory, and conservativeness has been observed for small sample studies, especially for microbiome association studies. The common approach for addressing the small sample problem relies on computationally intensive resampling methods. Here, we derive an exact test for KAT with continuous traits, which resolve the small sample conservatism of KAT without the need for resampling. The exact test has significantly improved power to detect association for microbiome studies. For binary traits, we propose a similar approximate test, and we show that the approximate test is very powerful for a wide range of kernels including common variant- and microbiome-based kernels, and the approximate test controls the type I error well for these kernels. In contrast, the sequence kernel association tests have slightly inflated genomic inflation factors after small sample adjustment. Extensive simulations and application to a real microbiome association study are used to demonstrate the utility of our method. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. A salting out and resin procedure for extracting Schistosoma mansoni DNA from human urine samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Nilton B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper a simple and cheap salting out and resin (InstaGene matrix® resin - BioRad DNA extraction method from urine for PCR assays is introduced. The DNA of the fluke Schistosoma mansoni was chosen as the target since schistosomiasis lacks a suitable diagnostic tool which is sensitive enough to detect low worm burden. It is well known that the PCR technique provides high sensitivity and specificity in detecting parasite DNA. Therefore it is of paramount importance to take advantage of its excellent performance by providing a simple to handle and reliable DNA extraction procedure, which permits the diagnosis of the disease in easily obtainable urine samples. Findings The description of the extraction procedure is given. This extraction procedure was tested for reproducibility and efficiency in artificially contaminated human urine samples. The reproducibility reached 100%, showing positive results in 5 assay repetitions of 5 tested samples each containing 20 ng DNA/5 ml. The efficiency of the extraction procedure was also evaluated in a serial dilution of the original 20 ng DNA/5 ml sample. Detectable DNA was extracted when it was at a concentration of 1.28 pg DNA/mL, revealing the high efficiency of this procedure. Conclusions This methodology represents a promising tool for schistosomiasis diagnosis utilizing a bio-molecular technique in urine samples which is now ready to be tested under field conditions and may be applicable to the diagnosis of other parasitic diseases.

  17. Cryptic and rare Aspergillus species in Brazil: prevalence in clinical samples and in vitro susceptibility to triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, C E; Gonçalves, S S; Xafranski, H; Bergamasco, M D; Aquino, V R; Castro, P T O; Colombo, A L

    2014-10-01

    Aspergillus spp. are among the most common causes of opportunistic invasive fungal infections in tertiary care hospitals. Little is known about the prevalence and in vitro susceptibility of Aspergillus species in Latin America, because there are few medical centers able to perform accurate identification at the species level. The purpose of this study was to analyze the distribution of cryptic and rare Aspergillus species among clinical samples from 133 patients with suspected aspergillosis admitted in 12 medical centers in Brazil and to analyze the in vitro activity of different antifungal drugs. The identification of Aspergillus species was performed based on a polyphasic approach, as well as sequencing analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, calmodulin, and β-tubulin genes and phylogenetic analysis when necessary. The in vitro susceptibility tests with voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole were performed according to the CLSI M38-A2 document (2008). We demonstrated a high prevalence of cryptic species causing human infection. Only three isolates, representing the species Aspergillus thermomutatus, A. ochraceus, and A. calidoustus, showed less in vitro susceptibility to at least one of the triazoles tested. Accurate identifications of Aspergillus at the species level and with in vitro susceptibility tests are important because some species may present unique resistance patterns against specific antifungal drugs.

  18. Clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic evaluation of Nd:YAG laser pulpotomy on human primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaş, Mesut Enes; Bodur, Haluk; Bariş, Emre; Demir, Cem

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic effects of Nd:YAG laser pulpotomy to formocresol pulpotomy on human primary teeth. Patients with at least two vital primary molar teeth that required pulpotomy, because of pulpal exposure to caries, were selected for this study. After hemorrhage control, complete hemostasis into the canal orifice was achieved by exposure to Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) and an He-Ne laser (the aiming beam of the Nd:YAG laser) in noncontact mode at 2 W, 20 Hz, 100 mJ, or was achieved by applying 1:5 dilution of formocresol. Forty-two teeth in two groups were to be followed up clinically and radiographic at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Eighteen teeth planned for serial extractions were selected for histopathologic study. The teeth were extracted at 7 and 60 days. The teeth in the laser group had a clinical success rate of 85.71% and a radiographic success rate 71.42% at 12 months. The teeth in the formocresol group had a clinical and radiographic success rate of 90.47% at 12 months. There were no statistically significant differences between laser and formocresol group with regard to both clinical and radiographic success rates. There was a statistically significant difference between 7- and 60-day laser groups with regard to inflammatory cell response criteria. Dentin bridge was absent in all samples. No stained bacteria were observed in any of these samples. In conclusion, Nd:YAG laser may be considered as an alternative to formocresol for pulpotomies in primary teeth.

  19. Improvement and Evaluation of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Rapid Detection of Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Human Blood Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xi-meng; Ji, Yong-sheng; Liu, Xian-yong; Xiang, Mei; He, Guang; Xie, Li; Suo, Jing-xia; Suo, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), an attractive DNA amplification method, was developed as a valuable tool for the rapid detection of Toxoplasma gondii. In this study, species-specific LAMP primers were designed by targeting the AF146527 sequence, which was a conserved sequence of 200- to 300-fold repetitive 529 bp fragment of T.gondii. LAMP reaction system was optimized so that it could detect the minimal DNA sample such as a single tachyzoite or 10 copies of recombinant plasmid. No cross-reactivity was found when using DNA from other parasites as templates. Subsequently, a total of 200 human blood samples were directly investigated by two diagnostic methods, LAMP and conventional PCR. Fourteen of 200 (7%) samples were positive for Toxoplasma by LAMP (the primers developed in this study), whereas only 5 of 200 (2.5%) were proved positive by conventional PCR. The procedure of the LAMP assay was very simple, as the reaction would be carried out in a single tube under isothermal conditions at 64°C and the result would be read out with 1 h (as early as 35 min with loop primers). Thus, this method has the advantages of rapid amplification, simple operation, and easy detection and would be useful for rapid and reliable clinical diagnosis of acute toxoplasmosis, especially in developing countries. PMID:28056092

  20. Recognition of serous ovarian tumors in human samples by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Costa, Leverson F. L.; Pietro, Luciana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Almeida, Diogo B.; Bottcher-Luiz, Fatima; Andrade, Liliana A. L. A.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2011-09-01

    We used a multimodal nonlinear optics microscopy, specifically two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), second and third harmonic generation (SHG/THG) microscopies, to observe pathological conditions of ovarian tissues obtained from human samples. We show that strong TPEF + SHG + THG signals can be obtained in fixed samples stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stored for a very long time, and that H&E staining enhanced the THG signal. We then used the multimodal TPEF-SHG-THG microscopies in a stored file of H&E stained samples of human ovarian cancer to obtain complementary information about the epithelium/stromal interface, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillary tissue architecture (SHG). This multicontrast nonlinear optics microscopy is able to not only differentiate between cancerous and healthy tissue, but can also distinguish between normal, benign, borderline, and malignant specimens according to their collagen disposition and compression levels within the extracellular matrix. The dimensions of the layers of epithelia can also be measured precisely and automatically. Our data demonstrate that optical techniques can detect pathological changes associated with ovarian cancer.

  1. Exploring the acceptability of human papillomavirus self-sampling among Muslim immigrant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofters, Aisha K; Vahabi, Mandana; Fardad, Mitra; Raza, Afrah

    2017-01-01

    With appropriate screening (ie, the Papanicolaou [Pap] test), cervical cancer is highly preventable, and high-income countries, including Canada, have observed significant decreases in cervical cancer mortality. However, certain subgroups, including immigrants from countries with large Muslim populations, experience disparities in cervical cancer screening. Little is known about the acceptability of human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling as a screening strategy among Muslim immigrant women in Canada. This study assessed cervical cancer screening practices, knowledge and attitudes, and acceptability of HPV self-sampling among Muslim immigrant women. A convenience sample of 30 women was recruited over a 3-month period (June-August 2015) in the Greater Toronto Area. All women were between 21 and 69 years old, foreign-born, and self-identified as Muslim, and had good knowledge of English. Data were collected through a self-completed questionnaire. More than half of the participants falsely indicated that Pap tests may cause cervical infection, and 46.7% indicated that the test is an intrusion on privacy. The majority of women reported that they would be willing to try HPV self-sampling, and more than half would prefer this method to provider-administered sampling methods. Barriers to self-sampling included confidence in the ability to perform the test and perceived cost, and facilitators included convenience and privacy being preserved. The results demonstrate that HPV self-sampling may provide a favorable alternative model of care to the traditional provider-administered Pap testing. These findings add important information to the literature related to promoting cancer screening among women who are under or never screened for cervical cancer.

  2. Human-parathormone assay for use in dogs: validation, sample handling studies, and parathyroid function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, A G; Nachreiner, R

    1989-07-01

    Ten commercially available parathormone (PTH) assays were competitively validated, using dilutional parallelism, intra-assay and interassay coefficients of variation, and sensitivity and measured responses of 2 dogs to calcium and EDTA infusions. A 2-site immunoradiometric assay for intact human-PTH was superior to the others for estimating canine-PTH, met the criteria for validity, and was further investigated. A series of sample-handling studies was performed. Serum and plasma samples stored at 24 C lost 15% (n = 5; P less than 0.05) of PTH between 2 and 24 hours. This did not occur at 6 C. The mean PTH concentration of sera from blood samples clotted at 24 C was 6% (P less than 0.05) higher than equivalent EDTA samples. Serum samples stored at 6 and 37 C deteriorated 35% and 100% (n = 5; P less than 0.05), respectively, after 1 week, whereas samples stored at -20 and -70 C for 4 weeks did not deteriorate. There was no significant deterioration of PTH in samples frozen (-40 C) and thawed up to 7 times (n = 5). Parathyroid function testing was investigated by use of 2-hour infusions of disodium EDTA (25 mg/kg/h), 10-minute infusions of calcium gluconate (3 mg of elemental calcium/kg/10 min), and physiologic saline controls (n = 8). Renal function was monitored before and after EDTA infusion by exogenous creatinine clearance. Infusion of disodium EDTA increased mean PTH concentration from 67 (time 0) to 317 and 235 pg/ml at 90 and 180 minutes, respectively (P less than 0.001). Infusion of calcium gluconate decreased mean PTH concentration from 84 (time 0) to 14 and 12 pg/ml at 15 and 60 minutes, respectively (P less than 0.005). There were no observable side effects of the infusions in normal conscious dogs and no differences in exogenous creatinine clearance after EDTA infusion.

  3. Culture-independent genome sequencing of clinical samples reveals an unexpected heterogeneity of infections by Chlamydia pecorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Nathan L; Sullivan, Mitchell J; Jelocnik, Martina; Myers, Garry S A; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Chlamydia pecorum is an important global pathogen of livestock, and it is also a significant threat to the long-term survival of Australia's koala populations. This study employed a culture-independent DNA capture approach to sequence C. pecorum genomes directly from clinical swab samples collected from koalas with chlamydial disease as well as from sheep with arthritis and conjunctivitis. Investigations into single-nucleotide polymorphisms within each of the swab samples revealed that a portion of the reads in each sample belonged to separate C. pecorum strains, suggesting that all of the clinical samples analyzed contained mixed populations of genetically distinct C. pecorum isolates. This observation was independent of the anatomical site sampled and the host species. Using the genomes of strains identified in each of these samples, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis revealed that a clade containing a bovine and a koala isolate is distinct from other clades comprised of livestock or koala C. pecorum strains. Providing additional evidence to support exposure of koalas to Australian livestock strains, two minor strains assembled from the koala swab samples clustered with livestock strains rather than koala strains. Culture-independent probe-based genome capture and sequencing of clinical samples provides the strongest evidence yet to suggest that naturally occurring chlamydial infections are comprised of multiple genetically distinct strains.

  4. Study of microtip-based extraction and purification of DNA from human samples for portable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Gareth

    DNA sample preparation is essential for genetic analysis. However, rapid and easy-to-use methods are a major challenge to obtaining genetic information. Furthermore, DNA sample preparation technology must follow the growing need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. The current use of centrifuges, large robots, and laboratory-intensive protocols has to be minimized to meet the global challenge of limited access healthcare by bringing the lab to patients through POC devices. To address these challenges, a novel extraction method of genomic DNA from human samples is presented by using heat-cured polyethyleneimine-coated microtips generating a high electric field. The microtip extraction method is based on recent work using an electric field and capillary action integrated into an automated device. The main challenges to the method are: (1) to obtain a stable microtip surface for the controlled capture and release of DNA and (2) to improve the recovery of DNA from samples with a high concentration of inhibitors, such as human samples. The present study addresses these challenges by investigating the heat curing of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated on the surface of the microtip. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtips are shown to control the capture and release of DNA. Protocols are developed for the extraction and purification of DNA from human samples. Heat-cured PEI-coated microtip methods of DNA sample preparation are used to extract genomic DNA from human samples. It is discovered through experiment that heat curing of a PEI layer on a gold-coated surface below 150°C could inhibit the signal of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Below 150°C, the PEI layer is not completely cured and dissolved off the gold-coated surface. Dissolved PEI binds with DNA to inhibit PCR. Heat curing of a PEI layer above 150°C on a gold-coated surface prevents inhibition to PCR and gel electrophoresis. In comparison to gold-coated microtips, the 225°C-cured PEI-coated microtips improve the

  5. Evaluating 3D printing to solve the sample-to-device interface for LRS and POC diagnostics: example of an interlock meter-mix device for metering and lysing clinical urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Erik; Schoepp, Nathan G; Witters, Daan; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-05-21

    This paper evaluates the potential of 3D printing, a semi-automated additive prototyping technology, as a means to design and prototype a sample-to-device interface, amenable to diagnostics in limited-resource settings, where speed, accuracy and user-friendly design are critical components. As a test case, we built and validated an interlock meter-mix device for accurately metering and lysing human urine samples for use in downstream nucleic acid amplification. Two plungers and a multivalve generated and controlled fluid flow through the device and demonstrate the utility of 3D printing to create leak-free seals. Device operation consists of three simple steps that must be performed sequentially, eliminating manual pipetting and vortexing to provide rapid (5 to 10 s) and accurate metering and mixing. Bretherton's prediction was applied, using the bond number to guide a design that prevents potentially biohazardous samples from leaking from the device. We employed multi-material 3D printing technology, which allows composites with rigid and elastomeric properties to be printed as a single part. To validate the meter-mix device with a clinically relevant sample, we used urine spiked with inactivated Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. A downstream nucleic acid amplification by quantitative PCR (qPCR) confirmed there was no statistically significant difference between samples metered and mixed using the standard protocol and those prepared with the meter-mix device, showing the 3D-printed device could accurately meter, mix and dispense a human urine sample without loss of nucleic acids. Although there are some limitations to 3D printing capabilities (e.g. dimension limitations related to support material used in the printing process), the advantages of customizability, modularity and rapid prototyping illustrate the utility of 3D printing for developing sample-to-device interfaces for diagnostics.

  6. Applicability of the CALUX bioassay for screening of dioxin levels in human milk samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laier, P.; Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Larsen, John Christian;

    2003-01-01

    . The results obtained with the bioassay when testing milk extracts fractionated into dioxins/furans, non-ortho PCB and mono/di-ortho PCB fractions indicated that the correlation between the bioassay and the chemical analyses depends primarily on the A receptor activity observed in the mono/di-ortho PCB......The CALUX (chemically activated luciferase expression) bioassay based on rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells is a sensitive assay for the detection of Ah receptor agonists like 2,3,7,8-substituted chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and related PCBs. In this paper, the assay was optimized...... and applied for monitoring levels of dioxins in human milk samples. Combination effects of dioxin-like compounds were evaluated by testing potential mechanisms of interaction between seven of the major dioxin-like compounds in human milk using the isobole method. Results showed that the compounds acted...

  7. Dioxin-like activity in environmental and human samples from Greenland and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2012-01-01

    of surface waters with dioxins. Our results from human studies suggest that the serum DL-activity reflect the complex mixture of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Greenlandic Inuit had lower serum DL-activity level compared to Europeans, probably due to long distance from the dioxin sources and UV...... degradation of the high potent dioxin and/or the inhibitory effect of the high level of non-DL POPs. Selective bioaccumulation of PCBs in the food chain may contribute to the negative correlation between serum POPs and DL-activity observed in Greenlandic Inuit. Hence the AhR transactivation bioassay provides...... a cost-effective and integrated screening tool for measurement of the DL-activity in human, environmental and commercial samples....

  8. Nondestructive sampling of human skeletal remains yields ancient nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Deborah A; Bonine, Holly M; Mata-Míguez, Jaime; Kemp, Brian M; Snow, Meradeth H; LeBlanc, Steven A

    2012-02-01

    Museum curators and living communities are sometimes reluctant to permit ancient DNA (aDNA) studies of human skeletal remains because the extraction of aDNA usually requires the destruction of at least some skeletal material. Whether these views stem from a desire to conserve precious materials or an objection to destroying ancestral remains, they limit the potential of aDNA research. To help address concerns about destructive analysis and to minimize damage to valuable specimens, we describe a nondestructive method for extracting DNA from ancient human remains. This method can be used with both teeth and bone, but it preserves the structural integrity of teeth much more effectively than that of bone. Using this method, we demonstrate that it is possible to extract both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from human remains dating between 300 BC and 1600 AD. Importantly, the method does not expose the remains to hazardous chemicals, allowing them to be safely returned to curators, custodians, and/or owners of the samples. We successfully amplified mitochondrial DNA from 90% of the individuals tested, and we were able to analyze 1-9 nuclear loci in 70% of individuals. We also show that repeated nondestructive extractions from the same tooth can yield amplifiable mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. The high success rate of this method and its ability to yield DNA from samples spanning a wide geographic and temporal range without destroying the structural integrity of the sampled material may make possible the genetic study of skeletal collections that are not available for destructive analysis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. An Improved Method for High Quality Metagenomics DNA Extraction from Human and Environmental Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bag, Satyabrata; Saha, Bipasa; Mehta, Ojasvi

    2016-01-01

    and human origin samples. We introduced a combination of physical, chemical and mechanical lysis methods for proper lysis of microbial inhabitants. The community microbial DNA was precipitated by using salt and organic solvent. Both the quality and quantity of isolated DNA was compared with the existing...... methodologies and the supremacy of our method was confirmed. Maximum recovery of genomic DNA in the absence of substantial amount of impurities made the method convenient for nucleic acid extraction. The nucleic acids obtained using this method are suitable for different downstream applications. This improved...

  10. Modular Sampling and Analysis Techniques for the Real-Time Analysis of Human Breath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M; Farquar, G; Adams, K; Bogan, M; Martin, A; Benner, H; Spadaccini, C; Steele, P; Davis, C; Loyola, B; Morgan, J; Sankaran, S

    2007-07-09

    At LLNL and UC Davis, we are developing several techniques for the real-time sampling and analysis of trace gases, aerosols and exhaled breath that could be useful for a modular, integrated system for breath analysis. Those techniques include single-particle bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) for the analysis of exhaled aerosol particles or droplets as well as breath samplers integrated with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or MEMS-based differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). We describe these techniques and present recent data obtained from human breath or breath condensate, in particular, addressing the question of how environmental exposure influences the composition of breath.

  11. Genetic Characterization of Atypical Mansonella (Mansonella) ozzardi Microfilariae in Human Blood Samples from Northeastern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Luis A.; Arrospide, Nancy; Recuenco, Sergio; Cabezas, Cesar; Weil, Gary J.; Fischer, Peter U.

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequence comparisons are useful for characterizing proposed new parasite species or strains. Microfilariae with an atypical arrangement of nuclei behind the cephalic space have been recently described in human blood samples from the Amazon region of Peru. Three blood specimens containing atypical microfilariae were genetically characterized using three DNA markers (5S ribosomal DNA, 12S ribosomal DNA, and cytochrome oxidase I). All atypical microfilariae were clustered into the Mansonella group and indistinguishable from M. ozzardi based on these DNA markers. PMID:22826497

  12. Antibiotic resistance genes in the bacteriophage DNA fraction of human fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Pablo; Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Martínez-Castillo, Alexandre; Miró, Elisenda; Argente, Marc; Jofre, Juan; Navarro, Ferran; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-01-01

    A group of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (blaTEM, blaCTX-M-1, mecA, armA, qnrA, and qnrS) were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in bacteriophage DNA isolated from feces from 80 healthy humans. Seventy-seven percent of the samples were positive in phage DNA for one or more ARGs. blaTEM, qnrA, and, blaCTX-M-1 were the most abundant, and armA, qnrS, and mecA were less prevalent. Free bacteriophages carrying ARGs may contribute to the mobilization of ARGs in intra- and extraintestinal environments.

  13. Detection of Shiga toxins genes by Multiplex PCR in clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different methods have been used for detection of shiga toxins; such as,  cell culture, ELISA, and RFPLA. However, all of these methods suffer from high cost, time-consumption and relatively low sensitivity. In this study we used Multiplex PCR method for detection of genes encoding shiga toxins. Material and Methods: In this study, 63 clinical samples were obtained from positive cultures of Shigella and E. coli O157, from Bahman 1391 until Ordibehesht 1392 in Mazandaran province. Initial confirmation of shiga toxins producing bacteria was performed by biochemical and serological methods. After DNA extraction, detection of stx1 and stx2 genes was accomplished by multiplex PCR.  For confirmation of the PCR amplicon, DNA sequencing was used. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed by disk diffusion method. Results:  Among the positive strains, 13 strains contained stx2 genes, 4 strains contained Stx/Stx1 genes and 4 strains harbored both Stx/Stx1 and Stx2. The DNA extracted from other Gram-negative bacteria was not protected by the relevant parts of these toxins. Sequencing of the amplified fragments indicated the correct toxin sequences.  The sensitivity for identification of Stx/Stx1 gene was 1.56 pg/ µl and for Stx2 was 1.08 pg/µl. The toxin positive strains were all sensitive to Cefixime, Gentamicin, Amikacin, Ceftriaxone, and Nitrofurantoin. Conclusion: This method is fast and accurate for detection of bacteria producing shiga toxin and can be used to identify different types of shiga toxin.

  14. The effects of social desirability response bias on STAXI-2 profiles in a clinical forensic sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Troy E; Davis, Michael R; MacKenzie, Rachel; Mullen, Paul E

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the proposition that the 'State-trait anger expression inventory' (2nd ed.; STAXI-2) is susceptible to impression management (IM) and Self-Deceptive Enhancement (SDE) in clinical forensic populations. It was hypothesized that individuals engaging in IM would report significantly lower levels of trait anger, external expression of anger, and internal expression of anger on the STAXI-2. Those reporting above average SDE were predicted to claim higher levels of anger control. A between-groups design was used, comparing STAXI-2 scores of individuals who reported high levels of IM and SDE to those who did not. One-hundred and fifty-nine male patients of a community forensic mental health service, referred for assessment of stalking behaviours, completed the STAXI-2 and Paulhus Deception Scales (PDS). Individuals engaging in high levels of IM and SDE were compared to low scorers in regard to STAXI-2 scales using Mann-Whitney U tests. Individuals engaging in IM had significantly lower levels of reported trait anger, outward expression of anger, and inward expression of anger, and higher levels of anger control. Similar results were found with the SDE scale, although the magnitude of the effect was smaller and not apparent on all subscales. The STAXI-2 was vulnerable to social desirability response bias in this sample of forensic clients. Where the STAXI-2 is used as a basis for treatment recommendations and decisions, it should be administered and interpreted in conjunction with a recognized measure of such bias to improve validity.

  15. Calcium isolation from large-volume human urine samples for 41Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James J; Hui, Susanta K; Jackson, George S; Clark, Sara P; Einstein, Jane; Weaver, Connie M; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H

    2013-08-01

    Calcium oxalate precipitation is the first step in preparation of biological samples for (41)Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry. A simplified protocol for large-volume human urine samples was characterized, with statistically significant increases in ion current and decreases in interference. This large-volume assay minimizes cost and effort and maximizes time after (41)Ca administration during which human samples, collected over a lifetime, provide (41)Ca:Ca ratios that are significantly above background.

  16. Calcium Isolation from Large-Volume Human Urine Samples for 41Ca Analysis by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James J; Hui, Susanta K; Jackson, George S; Clark, Sara P; Einstein, Jane; Weaver, Connie M; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H

    2013-01-01

    Calcium oxalate precipitation is the first step in preparation of biological samples for 41Ca analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry. A simplified protocol for large-volume human urine samples was characterized, with statistically significant increases in ion current and decreases in interference. This large-volume assay minimizes cost and effort and maximizes time after 41Ca administration during which human samples, collected over a lifetime, provide 41Ca:Ca ratios that are significantly above background. PMID:23672965

  17. [Identification of filamentous fungi isolated from clinical samples by two different methods and their susceptibility results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direkel, Sahin; Otağ, Feza; Aslan, Gönül; Ulger, Mahmut; Emekdaş, Gürol

    2012-01-01

    Molds are widely distributed in nature. Aspergillus spp. represent the most frequently observed causative agents, however less frequent pathogens Fusarium, Scedosporium and Zygomycetes have also been considered the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in profoundly immunosuppressed hosts. The aims of this study were to identify filamentous fungi isolated from clinical specimens by conventional and molecular methods, and to detect their antifungal susceptibilities. A total of 6742 clinical specimens obtained from hospitalized patients at critical units of Mersin University Medical Faculty Hospital and sent to our laboratory between April 2008-January 2010 were included in the study. The isolates were identified by classical mycological methods and polymerase chain reaction-based DNA sequencing. Susceptibilities to fluconazole and voriconazole were tested by disk diffusion method and to fluconazole, voriconazole, amfoterisin B, caspofungin and posaconazole by E-test. Filamentous fungi were isolated from 71 (1.05%) samples (13 sputum, 4 wound, 4 peritoneal fluid, 3 extrenal ear discharge, 3 abscess and one of each cerebrospinal fluid, blood, tissue biopsy, nasal swab and conjunctival swab) which belonged to 32 patients (13 female, 19 male; age range 7 months-77 years, mean age: 46.6 years). Of the patients 62.3% presented one or more risk factors such as chronic renal failure (n= 8), chronic obstructive lung disease (n= 6), malignancy (n= 6), diabetes mellitus (n= 5) and peripheral vascular disease (n= 5). Of the isolates six were identified as Aspergillus niger, six as Aspergillus flavus, five as Aspergillus fumigatus, four as Aspergillus terreus, five as Fusarium spp., two as Bipolaris spp., and one of each as Acremonium spp., Aurebasidium spp., Mucor spp., and Scedosporium spp. By conventional methods. Three isolates exhibited different identities by DNA sequencing. All Aspergillus isolates were correctly identified at species level by both methods

  18. Optimization of a Pre-MEKC Separation SPE Procedure for Steroid Molecules in Human Urine Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Olędzka

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many steroid hormones can be considered as potential biomarkers and their determination in body fluids can create opportunities for the rapid diagnosis of many diseases and disorders of the human body. Most existing methods for the determination of steroids are usually time- and labor-consuming and quite costly. Therefore, the aim of analytical laboratories is to develop a new, relatively low-cost and rapid implementation methodology for their determination in biological samples. Due to the fact that there is little literature data on concentrations of steroid hormones in urine samples, we have made attempts at the electrophoretic determination of these compounds. For this purpose, an extraction procedure for the optimized separation and simultaneous determination of seven steroid hormones in urine samples has been investigated. The isolation of analytes from biological samples was performed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE with dichloromethane and compared to solid phase extraction (SPE with C18 and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB columns. To separate all the analytes a micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECK technique was employed. For full separation of all the analytes a running buffer (pH 9.2, composed of 10 mM sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax, 50 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, and 10% methanol was selected. The methodology developed in this work for the determination of steroid hormones meets all the requirements of analytical methods. The applicability of the method has been confirmed for the analysis of urine samples collected from volunteers—both men and women (students, amateur bodybuilders, using and not applying steroid doping. The data obtained during this work can be successfully used for further research on the determination of steroid hormones in urine samples.

  19. High-throughput miRNA profiling of human melanoma blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rass Knuth

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA (miRNA signatures are not only found in cancer tissue but also in blood of cancer patients. Specifically, miRNA detection in blood offers the prospect of a non-invasive analysis tool. Methods Using a microarray based approach we screened almost 900 human miRNAs to detect miRNAs that are deregulated in their expression in blood cells of melanoma patients. We analyzed 55 blood samples, including 20 samples of healthy individuals, 24 samples of melanoma patients as test set, and 11 samples of melanoma patients as independent validation set. Results A hypothesis test based approch detected 51 differentially regulated miRNAs, including 21 miRNAs that were downregulated in blood cells of melanoma patients and 30 miRNAs that were upregulated in blood cells of melanoma patients as compared to blood cells of healthy controls. The tets set and the independent validation set of the melanoma samples showed a high correlation of fold changes (0.81. Applying hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis we found that blood samples of melanoma patients and healthy individuals can be well differentiated from each other based on miRNA expression analysis. Using a subset of 16 significant deregulated miRNAs, we were able to reach a classification accuracy of 97.4%, a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 98.9% by supervised analysis. MiRNA microarray data were validated by qRT-PCR. Conclusions Our study provides strong evidence for miRNA expression signatures of blood cells as useful biomarkers for melanoma.

  20. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 18 in Cervical Cancer Samples Using PCR-ELISA (DIAPOPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KN Tafreshi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection is a major risk factor for adenocarcinoma of the cervix. The high-risk types of the virus such as HPV16 and HPV18, which possess the E6 and E7 oncogenes, are responsible for approximately 50% of all cervical cancers. A rapid, sensitive and specific test has been proposed for detection of HPV to improve cervical cancer screening programs.Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop a fast PCR-ELISA assay designated as DIAPOPS (Detection of Immobilized Amplified Products in a One Phase Systemfor detection of HPV16 and HPV18 types in SCC samples and Pap smears. The type specific primers and probes were designed for PCR and PCR-ELISA. The amplified products were hybridized with a specific biotin-labeled probe for HPV18 inner amplicons. The hybrids were detected with peroxidase conjugated avidin. The test was performed on the paraffin block and Pap smear samples from the cervical cancer patients, and the results of DIAPOPS were compared with conventional PCR assay.Results: The 70 samples (SCC and Pap smear samples were collected from Imam Khomeini and Mirzakoochak Khan Hospitals in Tehran. The PCR-based method detected six HPV16 positive, three HPV18 positive and Two HPV33 positive samples. DIAPOPS results were compared with the conventional PCR results and they showed an increase in sensitivity of the DIAPOPS test. Not only all of them were confirmed by PCR-ELISA but also three samples that conventional PCR showed negative for HPV18, were demonstrated positive by the PCR-ELISA method.Conclusion: The results of the study show that modified PCR-ELISA assay is more sensitive to detect HPV types and can be used for diagnostic purposes.

  1. Determinants of women's likelihood of vaginal self-sampling for human papillomavirus to screen for cervical cancer in Taiwan: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ling; Hsieh, Pao-Chun; Chou, Chia-Hui; Tzeng, Ya-Ling

    2014-11-25

    Many Taiwanese women (43.8%) did not participate in regular cervical screening in 2011. An alternative to cervical screening, self-sampling for human papillomavirus (HPV), has been available at no cost under Taiwan's National Health Insurance since 2010, but the extent and likelihood of HPV self-sampling were unknown. A cross-sectional study was performed to explore determinants of women's likelihood of HPV self-sampling. Data were collected by questionnaire from a convenience sample of 500 women attending hospital gynecologic clinics in central Taiwan from June to October 2012. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, chi-square test, and logistic regression. Of 500 respondents, 297 (59.4%) had heard of HPV; of these 297 women, 69 (23%) had self-sampled for HPV. Among the 297 women who had heard of HPV, 234 (78.8%) considered cost a priority for HPV self-sampling. Likelihood of HPV self-sampling was determined by previous Pap testing, high perceived risk of cervical cancer, willingness to self-sample for HPV, high HPV knowledge, and cost as a priority consideration. Outreach efforts to increase the acceptability of self-sampling for HPV testing rates should target women who have had a Pap test, perceive themselves at high risk for cervical cancer, are willing to self-sample for HPV, have a high level of HPV knowledge, and for whom the cost of self-sampling covered by health insurance is a priority.

  2. Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) in a Community Sample and a Multi-Ethnic Clinical Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamse, Mariëlle E; Junger, Marianne; Leijten, Patty H O; Lindeboom, Robert; Boer, Frits; Lindauer, Ramón J L

    The Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI) is an established parent rating scale to measure disruptive behavior problems in children aged between 2 and 16 years. The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Dutch translation, including analysis on the one-dimensional structure of the ECBI scales using item response theory. Data from two samples from the Netherlands were used, a community sample (N = 326; 51 % boys) and a multi-ethnic clinical sample (N = 197; 62 % boys). The one-dimensional structure of the ECBI Intensity and Problem Scales were confirmed in both of these samples. The results also indicated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability (community sample), and good convergent and divergent validity. The ECBI Intensity Scale was able to differentiate between diagnostic groups (no diagnosis, ADHD, ODD, and CD symptoms), demonstrating good discriminative validity. Findings support the use of the ECBI as a reliable measure for child disruptive behavior problems in a Dutch population. Suggestions for the optimal use of the both ECBI scales for research and screening purposes are made. Also, cultural issues regarding the use of the ECBI are discussed and additional research into the validity of the ECBI is recommended.

  3. Determination of N-acylhomoserine lactones of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical samples from dogs with otitis externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kušar, Darja; Šrimpf, Karin; Isaković, Petra; Kalšek, Lina; Hosseini, Javid; Zdovc, Irena; Kotnik, Tina; Vengušt, Modest; Tavčar-Kalcher, Gabrijela

    2016-10-18

    Bacterial intercellular communication, called quorum sensing, takes place via the production and collective response to signal molecules. In Gram-negative bacteria, like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, these signaling molecules are N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). P. aeruginosa is a common cause of inflammation of the ear canal (otitis externa) in dogs. It employs quorum sensing to coordinate the expression of host tissue-damaging factors, which are largely responsible for its virulence. The treatment of P. aeruginosa-associated otitis is challenging due to a high intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to several antibiotics. Attenuation of quorum sensing signals to inhibit bacterial virulence is a novel strategy for the treatment of resistant bacterial pathogens, including P. aeruginosa. Therefore, it is important to recognize and define quorum sensing signal molecules in clinical samples. To date, there are no reports on determination of AHLs in the veterinary clinical samples. The purpose of this study was to validate an analytical procedure for determination of the concentration of AHLs in the ear rinses from dogs with P. aeruginosa-associated otitis externa. Samples were obtained with rinsing the ear canals with physiological saline solution. For validation, samples from healthy dogs were spiked with none or different known amounts of the selected AHLs. With the validated procedure, AHLs were analyzed in the samples taken in weekly intervals from two dogs, receiving a standard treatment for P. aeruginosa-associated otitis externa. Validation proved that the procedure enables quantification of AHLs in non-clinical and clinical samples. In addition, a time dependent reduction of AHL concentration was detected for the treated dogs. Our results indicate that liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is superior in detecting AHLs compared to other chromatographic techniques. This is the first report on determination of AHLs in the clinical

  4. Psychometric Properties of the German Narcissism Inventory 90 (NI-90) in a clinical and non-clinical sample of adolescents: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Tobias; Bondue, Rebecca; Daig, Isolde; Fliege, Herbert; Scheithauer, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    The Narcissism Inventory (NI) is a frequently used German inventory for measuring narcissism in clinical settings; an additional short version (NI-90) also exists. Psychometric properties of the NI-90 scales were examined in clinical and non-clinical adolescent samples. Two adolescent samples were assessed with the NI-90: a non-clinical sample (n = 439, mean age ± SD = 15.05 ± 1.77 years) and a clinical sample (n = 235, 18.26 ± 0.77 years). Confirmatory factor analysis and principle component analysis were used to scrutinize the structure of the scales. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict the scores on two scales (helpless self; negative body self). This study revealed heterogeneity in the NI-90 scales, which in turn explains the wide range seen in Cronbach's α (from 0.53 to 0.93). The postulated 4-factor structure could not be replicated in both samples. Multiple regression analysis revealed that personality disorder did not significantly predict negative body self or helpless self scores, whereas eating, mood, as well as somatoform and conversion disorders did. One NI-90 scale (greedy for praise and reassurance) showed sufficient psychometric quality for the measurement of narcissism in both samples. Based on the results, the authors recommend revising the NI-90. Items that may be useful for measuring aspects related to affective and body image complaints are presented. The greedy for praise and reassurance scale may be valuable for measuring features of 'overt' narcissism. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. CLINICAL AND VIROLOGIC FOUNDATION FOR PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS TYPE 6 INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Myukke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about an infection caused by human herpes virus type 6, its' epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical variants, is reviewed. Clinical cases, diagnosed at a time of study, are briefly reviewed.Key words: human herpes virus type 6, exanthema subitum (roseola infantum, fever of unknown origin, mononucleosis like syndrome, meningoencephalitis, children.

  6. Evaluating the first-in-human clinical trial of a human embryonic stem cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Audrey R; Scala, Courtney C

    2012-09-01

    Phase I clinical trials generally raise greater ethical and human protection challenges than later stage clinical trials, suggesting a need to proceed cautiously. This is particularly the case for Phase I trials with a novel therapy being tested in humans for the first time, usually termed first-in-human (FIH) trials. In January 2009, the Food and Drug Administration approved the Investigational New Drug application of Geron Corporation, a small California-based biopharmaceutical company, to initiate a clinical trial to assess GRNOPC1, a human embryonic stem cell-derived candidate therapy for severe spinal cord injuries. This article evaluates the ethical and human subject protection issues raised by the Geron FIH trial. It identifies problems with the approval process and with the conduct of the trial, and then recommends ways to improve review of future proposed trials with novel and high-risk therapies.

  7. Multi-elemental imaging of paraffin-embedded human samples by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, S.; Trichard, F.; Busser, B.; Sabatier-Vincent, M.; Pelascini, F.; Pinel, N.; Templier, I.; Charles, J.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2017-07-01

    Chemical elements play central roles for physiological homeostasis in human cells, and their dysregulation might lead to a certain number of pathologies. Novel imaging techniques that improve the work of pathologists for tissue analysis and diagnostics are continuously sought. We report the use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to perform multi-elemental images of human paraffin-embedded skin samples on the entire biopsy scale in a complementary and compatible way with microscope histopathological examination. A specific instrumental configuration is proposed in order to detect most of the elements of medical interest (i.e. P, Al, Mg, Na, Zn, Si, Fe, and Cu). As an example of medical application, we selected and analysed skin biopsies, including healthy skin tissue, cutaneous metastasis of melanoma, Merkel-cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Clear distinctions in the distribution of chemical elements are observed from the different samples investigated. This study demonstrates the high complementarity of LIBS elemental imaging with conventional histopathology, opening new opportunities for any medical application involving metals.

  8. Quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging to detect osteogenesis imperfecta in human skin samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, J.; Ferreira, A. E.; D'Souza-Li, L.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that leads to bone fractures due to mutations in the Col1A1 or Col1A2 genes that affect the primary structure of the collagen I chain with the ultimate outcome in collagen I fibrils that are either reduced in quantity or abnormally organized in the whole body. A quick test screening of the patients would largely reduce the sample number to be studied by the time consuming molecular genetics techniques. For this reason an assessment of the human skin collagen structure by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) can be used as a screening technique to speed up the correlation of genetics/phenotype/OI types understanding. In the present work we have used quantitative second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to investigate the collagen matrix organization of the OI human skin samples comparing with normal control patients. By comparing fibril collagen distribution and spatial organization, we calculated the anisotropy and texture patterns of this structural protein. The analysis of the anisotropy was performed by means of the two-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform and image pattern analysis with Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). From these results, we show that statistically different results are obtained for the normal and disease states of OI.

  9. Goblet cells of the normal human bulbar conjunctiva and their assessment by impression cytology sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Goblet cells of the conjunctiva are the main source of mucus for the ocular surface. The objectives of this review are to consider the goblet cells as assessed by various histological, cytological and electron microscopy methods, and to assess the consistency of published reports (over more than 25 years) of goblet cell density (GCD) from impression cytology specimens from nominally healthy human subjects. Reported GCD values have been notably variable, with a range from 24 to 2226 cells/mm² for average values. Data analysis suggests that a high density of goblet cells should be expected for the healthy human conjunctiva, with a tendency toward higher values in samples taken from normally covered locations (inferior and superior bulbar conjunctiva) of the open eye (at 973 +/- 789 cells/ mm²) than in samples taken from exposed (interpalpebral) locations (at 427 +/- 376 cells/mm²). No obvious change in GCD was found with respect to age, perhaps because the variability of the data did not allow detection of any age-related decline in GCD. Analyses of published data from 33 other sources indicated a trend for GCD to be lower than normal across a spectrum of ocular surface diseases.

  10. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacu Serban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs, have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of WAIS-IV in a Clinical Sample: Examining a Bi-Factor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Collinson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of studies that have examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale IV (WAIS-IV using the standardization sample. In this study, we investigate its factor structure on a clinical neuropsychology sample of mixed aetiology. Correlated factor, higher-order and bi-factor models are all tested. Overall, the results suggest that the WAIS-IV will be suitable for use with this population.

  12. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of WAIS-IV in a Clinical Sample: Examining a Bi-Factor Model

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel Collinson; Stephen Evans; Miranda Wheeler; Don Brechin; Jenna Moffitt; Geoff Hill; Steven Muncer

    2016-01-01

    There have been a number of studies that have examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale IV (WAIS-IV) using the standardization sample. In this study, we investigate its factor structure on a clinical neuropsychology sample of mixed aetiology. Correlated factor, higher-order and bi-factor models are all tested. Overall, the results suggest that the WAIS-IV will be suitable for use with this population.

  13. Clinical validation of three short forms of the Dutch Wechsler Memory Scale – Fourth Edition (WMS-IV-NL) in a mixed clinical sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Z.; Hendriks, M.P.H.; Veld, W.M. van der; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2016-01-01

    The reliability and validity of three short forms of the Dutch version of the Wechsler Memory Scale–Fourth Edition (WMS-IV-NL) were evaluated in a mixed clinical sample of 235 patients. The short forms were based on the WMS-IV Flexible Approach, that is, a 3-subtest combination (Older Adult Battery

  14. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Diagnoses (Kid-SCID): first psychometric evaluation in a Dutch sample of clinically referred youths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J.; Muris, P.; Braet, C.; Arntz, A.; Beelen, I.

    2015-01-01

    The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Disorders (Kid-SCID) is a semi-structured interview for the classification of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. This study presents a first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Kid-SCID in a Dutch sample of children

  15. Comparison of sequencing platforms for single nucleotide variant calls in a human sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratan, Aakrosh; Miller, Webb; Guillory, Joseph; Stinson, Jeremy; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Schuster, Stephan C

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencings platforms coupled with advanced bioinformatic tools enable re-sequencing of the human genome at high-speed and large cost savings. We compare sequencing platforms from Roche/454(GS FLX), Illumina/HiSeq (HiSeq 2000), and Life Technologies/SOLiD (SOLiD 3 ECC) for their ability to identify single nucleotide substitutions in whole genome sequences from the same human sample. We report on significant GC-related bias observed in the data sequenced on Illumina and SOLiD platforms. The differences in the variant calls were investigated with regards to coverage, and sequencing error. Some of the variants called by only one or two of the platforms were experimentally tested using mass spectrometry; a method that is independent of DNA sequencing. We establish several causes why variants remained unreported, specific to each platform. We report the indel called using the three sequencing technologies and from the obtained results we conclude that sequencing human genomes with more than a single platform and multiple libraries is beneficial when high level of accuracy is required.

  16. Accumulation levels and characteristics of some pesticides in human adipose tissue samples from Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Shi, Lili; Kong, Deyang; Cai, Daoji; Cao, Yanzhong; Liu, Yongming; Pang, Guofang; Yu, Rongbin

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study of pesticide levels and bio-accumulation characteristics in human adipose tissues among residents of Southeast China. A large number of adipose samples (n=633) were selected for 58 pesticides and were analyzed by high sensitive Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The results showed that POPs pesticides were frequently detected, including 2,4'-DDD, 2,4'-DDE, 2,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDD, 4,4'-DDE, 4,4'-DDT, α-HCH, β-HCH, γ-HCH, δ-HCH, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and mirex. Other detected pesticide species were dicofol, methamidophos and chlordimeform, which have rarely been reported. Comparing to different countries, the concentrations of total DDT and HCH in these three Chinese southeastern sites were in the middle range, whereas the HCB and mirex were in the lower end. A significant correlation was observed between region as well as age and POPs pesticide levels. Some pesticide residue levels were also found significantly correlated to occupation. However, there was no significant correlation between gender and pesticides. Meanwhile, it is interesting to find that mortality of malignant tumors tends to associate with the pesticides levels in human adipose tissue. More importantly, the measured data presented in this study provide realistic information which is useful for assessing human exposure to pesticides in the general population of Southeast China. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tracking human footprints in Antarctica through passive sampling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in inland lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Meng, Xiang-Zhou; Wu, Chen-Chou; Bao, Lian-Jun; Wang, Feng; Wu, Feng-Chang; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-06-01

    Freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored in seven inland lakes of Antarctica by a polyethylene (PE)-based passive sampling technique, with the objective of tracking human footprints. The measured concentrations of PAHs were in the range of 14-360 ng L(-1) with the highest values concentrated around the Russian Progress II Station, indicating the significance of human activities to the loading of PAHs in Antarctica. The concentrations of PAHs in the inland lakes were in the upper part of the PAHs levels in aquatic environments from remote and background regions across the globe. The composition profiles of PAHs indicated that PAHs in the inland lakes were derived mainly from local oil spills, which was corroborated by a large number of fuel spillage reports from ship and plane crash incidents in Antarctica during recent years. Clearly, local human activities, rather than long-range transport, are the dominant sources of PAH contamination to the inland lakes. Finally, the present study demonstrates the efficacy of PE-based passive samplers for investigating PAHs in the aquatic environment of Antarctica under complex field conditions.

  18. [Clinical research XXIV. From clinical judgment to ethics in research on humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Marcela; Palacios-Cruz, Lino; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Talavera, Juan O

    2014-01-01

    Bioethics in research is an essential part of the structured review process of an article and it is based on three fundamental principles: respect for persons, beneficence and justice. In addition to not providing valid knowledge, a research with inadequate design, execution and statistical analysis is not ethical either, since these methodological deficiencies will produce information that will not be useful and, therefore, the risks that the participants were exposed to will have been in vain. Beyond scientific validity, there are other aspects that outline if an investigation is ethical, such as the clinical and social value of a study, a fair selection of participants, favorable risk-benefit balance, an independent review, the informed consent and respect for participants and potential participants. Throughout the article here presented, the documents that profile the behavior of investigators to protect the participants, such as the Declaration of Helsinki, the national regulations that rule us and the differences between research without risk, with minimal risk and with greater than minimal risk are discussed. That like in daily life, behavior in research involving human participants must be self-regulated, ie, people with knowledge of the existence of the law discover that the man is outside the realm of nature where work is done under the necessity of natural causality, and falls within the scope of the will; only if the man is free to decide their actions may be a law regulating their action.

  19. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis from human sputum samples through multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Khan, Jafar; Ullah, Aman; Rehman, Hazir; Ali, Ijaz

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has a long history and being present even before the start of recording history. It has left detrimental effects on all aspect of the life and geared the developments in the science of health. TB is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) including five species M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. canetti, and M. microti. M. tuberculosis and M. bovis infect both animals and humans. Therefore, differentiation of these two closely related species is very important for epidemiological and management purpose. We undertook the present study to characterize mycobacteria isolated from sputum of known TB patients by conventional methods and further, by multiplex PCR (mPCR) to detect the prevalence of Zoonotic TB (TB caused by M. bovis). Sputum samples from TB patient were collected from two tertiary care hospitals in Peshawar i.e. Lady Reading Hospital and Hayatabad Medical Complex. All the samples were subjected to Ziehl Neelsen (ZN) stain, culture on Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) and Stone Brink medium, Nitrate reduction test and multiplex PCR. A total of hundred mycobacterial strains were isolated from these samples on the basis of ZN staining, cultural and biochemical methods. Later on, these isolates were subjected to multiplex PCR by using pncATB-1.2 and pncAMT-2 primers specific to M. tuberculosis and JB21, JB22 primers specific to M. bovis. By means of conventional method, these hundred cultures isolates were differentiated into M. tuberculosis (ninety six) and M. bovis (four). Furthermore, by mPCR, it was determined that out of hundred isolates, ninety-eight were identified as M. tuberculosis and two isolates as M. bovis. This molecular method enables to differentiate M. bovis from M. tuberculosis in human sputum.

  20. Occurrence of ADHD in parents of ADHD children in a clinical sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starck M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Martina Starck,1 Julia Grünwald,1 Angelika A Schlarb1,21Faculty of Science, Department of Psychology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, 2Department of Psychology, Faculty for Psychology and Sport Science, University of Bielefeld, Bielefeld, GermanyBackground: Despite the fact that there is a large amount of research on childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD treatment and an increasing amount of research on adult ADHD, little is known about the prevalence and influence of parental ADHD. Therefore, this study examined the frequency of parental ADHD in a clinical sample of German children suffering from ADHD. We also tried to find different levels of symptom severity for prognostic relevance. Furthermore, the association between subtypes of ADHD in children and their parents was investigated.Method: In this study, parents of 79 ADHD children were screened for ADHD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition and International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition. The Wender Utah Rating Scale and the ADHS-Self-Report were given to 75 mothers and 49 fathers for retrospective and current symptoms. Frequency of ADHD symptoms and severity groups was calculated and relationship between parental and children’s ADHD was tested.Results: ADHD occurrence for mothers of children with ADHD was 41.3%, for fathers 51.0%. About 16.0% of the mothers had a mixed type, 9.3% had a hyperactive-impulsive subtype, and 16.0% had an inattentive subtype. Of the fathers, 18.4% had a mixed type, 10.2% had a hyperactive-impulsive subtype, and 22.4% had an inattentive subtype; 61% of the mothers and 46.9% of the fathers had low symptom severity. Medium symptom severity was reported by 37.7% mothers and 46.9% fathers, while 1.3% of the mothers and 6.2% of the fathers showed severe symptoms. No significant correlation between parental and child diagnoses was observed.Conclusion: As nearly half of the parents

  1. Characterization of a clinical unit for digital radiography based on irradiation side sampling technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivetti, Stefano [Fisica Medica, Ospedale di Sassuolo S.p.A., 41049 Sassuolo (Italy); Lanconelli, Nico [Alma Mater Studiorum, Physics Department, University of Bologna, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Bertolini, Marco; Nitrosi, Andrea [Medical Physics Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera ASMN, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, 42123 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Burani, Aldo [Ospedale di Sassuolo S.p.A., 41049 Sassuolo (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: A characterization of a clinical unit for digital radiography (FUJIFILM FDR D-EVO) is presented. This system is based on the irradiation side sampling (ISS) technology and can be equipped with two different scintillators: one traditional gadolinium-oxysulphide phosphor (GOS) and a needle structured cesium iodide (CsI) phosphor panel.Methods: The characterization was achieved in terms of response curve, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and psychophysical parameters (contrast-detail analysis with an automatic reading of CDRAD images). For both scintillation screens the authors accomplished the measurements with four standard beam conditions: RAQ3, RQA5, RQA7, and RQA9.Results: At the Nyquist frequency (3.33 lp/mm) the MTF is about 35% and 25% for CsI and GOS detectors, respectively. The CsI scintillator has better noise properties than the GOS screen in almost all the conditions. This is particularly true for low-energy beams, where the noise for the GOS system can go up to a factor 2 greater than that found for CsI. The DQE of the CsI detector reaches a peak of 60%, 60%, 58%, and 50% for the RQA3, RQA5, RQA7, and RQA9 beams, respectively, whereas for the GOS screen the maximum DQE is 40%, 44%, 44%, and 35%. The contrast-detail analysis confirms that in the majority of cases the CsI scintillator is able to provide improved outcomes to those obtained with the GOS screen.Conclusions: The limited diffusion of light produced by the ISS reading makes possible the achievement of very good spatial resolution. In fact, the MTF of the unit with the CsI panel is only slightly lower to that achieved with direct conversion detectors. The combination of very good spatial resolution, together with the good noise properties reached with the CsI screen, allows achieving DQE on average about 1.5 times greater than that obtained with GOS. In fact, the DQE of unit equipped with CsI is comparable to the best

  2. Validation and quality control of ELISAs for the use with human saliva samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaedicke, Katrin M; Taylor, John J; Preshaw, Philip M

    2012-03-30

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have proven to be a powerful tool for fast and reliable sample analysis, in both clinical diagnostics and in research. Most assays are now available for use with a range of different analytical fluids, including serum, plasma or urine. In recent years, saliva has drawn attention as a potentially valuable diagnostic fluid; however few ELISAs have been validated for use with saliva, or their validation is often incomplete. Saliva has a number of different physical characteristics than, for example, cell culture medium or serum and assuming an ELISA which works well with serum samples will also do so with saliva potentially could lead to erroneous data and conclusions. In this report, we provide a detailed protocol to validate any ELISA for use with saliva samples and show the results of validation procedures for 13 ELISAs for using saliva. Our findings suggest that the majority of ELISAs work reliably with saliva, even if the assay was not specifically designed for this biological fluid. However, we also report a few cases where recovery or intra-and inter-assay variations were unexpectedly high, emphasising the importance of performing a validation procedure for each assay before using it with saliva to ensure accurate and reliable data.

  3. Human genomic DNA analysis using a semi-automated sample preparation, amplification, and electrophoresis separation platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisi, Fariba; Blizard, Benjamin A; Raissi Shabari, Akbar; Ching, Jesus; Kintz, Gregory J; Mitchell, Jim; Lemoff, Asuncion; Taylor, Mike T; Weir, Fred; Western, Linda; Wong, Wendy; Joshi, Rekha; Howland, Pamela; Chauhan, Avinash; Nguyen, Peter; Petersen, Kurt E

    2004-03-01

    The growing importance of analyzing the human genome to detect hereditary and infectious diseases associated with specific DNA sequences has motivated us to develop automated devices to integrate sample preparation, real-time PCR, and microchannel electrophoresis (MCE). In this report, we present results from an optimized compact system capable of processing a raw sample of blood, extracting the DNA, and performing a multiplexed PCR reaction. Finally, an innovative electrophoretic separation was performed on the post-PCR products using a unique MCE system. The sample preparation system extracted and lysed white blood cells (WBC) from whole blood, producing DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Separation of multiple amplicons was achieved in a microfabricated channel 30 microm x 100 microm in cross section and 85 mm in length filled with a replaceable methyl cellulose matrix operated under denaturing conditions at 50 degrees C. By incorporating fluorescent-labeled primers in the PCR, the amplicons were identified by a two-color (multiplexed) fluorescence detection system. Two base-pair resolution of single-stranded DNA (PCR products) was achieved. We believe that this integrated system provides a unique solution for DNA analysis.

  4. [Phenotypic characterization and distribution of Yersinia in human and environmental samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier Castillo, F; Larraz, V; Asunción Lafarga, M; Navarro, M; Gómez-Lus, R

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of species and phenotypes of Yersinia isolated from environmental samples over an eight year period are compared to that of stool cultures obtained from patients of the same geographical location (Zaragoza, Spain). The number of samples and the percentage contamination were as follows: wastewater 362, 67.4%, freshwater 523, 13.4%, raw food 607, 24.5% and cooked food 1134, 7.9%. Yersinia enterocolitica was isolated significantly more frequently than other species in wastewater, while Yersinia intermedia was the most significant species found in freshwater. Significant differences between the percentage isolates of identified species in raw and cooked foods were not found. Fifteen different serogroups were identified from faeces, thirteen of which were also isolated from environmental samples. Three serogroups of Y. enterocolitica associated with human disease were isolated from the patients faeces as follows: O:3, 145 cases; O:8, 3 cases and O:5,27, 1 case. A low proportion were isolated from food: O:3, 3 strains; O:8, 2 strains and O:5,27, 5 strains. Only one isolate from serogroup O:3 was obtained from freshwater.

  5. [Detection and typing by molecular biology of human papillomavirus in genital samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Moya, A; Esquivias Gómez, J I; Vidart Aragón, J A; Picazo de la Garza, J J

    2006-06-01

    Recently, there has been a marked increase in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the etiological relationship between some HPV genotypes and genital cancer has been confirmed. Therefore, we used current molecular biology techniques to evaluate the prevalence of these viruses and their genotype in genital samples. We processed 401 genital samples from 281 women and 120 men, all with a diagnosis compatible with HPV infection. Virus was detected using PCR, and positive samples were typed using an array technique which enabled us to detect the 35 most common types of mucous-associated HPV. Of the 401 patients studied, 185 (46.1%) were positive, and only one type of HPV was detected in 133 cases. We found that 41.6% of the women and 56.7% of the men were positive. A total of 260 HPVs were typed; 154 were high oncogenic risk. They infected 16 men (23.5%) and 88 women (75.2%). The difference was statistically significant (pHVP 16 in 52 cases. We found a 46% prevalence of HPV infection. More than half of these patients were infected by high-risk HPV. The presence of high-risk HPV was significantly higher in women.

  6. Polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in human milk samples from two regions in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinčić, D; Herceg Romanić, S; Matek Sarić, M; Grzunov, J; Dukić, B

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and seven organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in milk samples collected during 2009-2011 from primiparae living in two different regions in Croatia. p,p'-DDE is the dominant organochlorine pesticide. α-HCH/γ-HCH and p,p'-DDE/p,p'-DDT ratios indicate that there is fresh input of γ-HCH in investigated population on both locations, while this is not applicable to p,p'-DDT. The PCB profile was dominated by higher chlorinated congeners. Non-ortho PCB congeners which have the highest TEF values were not detected in any of individual samples. Toxic equivalents for mono-ortho substituted PCB congeners indicated higher exposure to toxic PCBs in Zadar, but estimated daily intakes for both locations indicate that infants consuming mother's milk are not at risk of adverse effects caused by PCBs and OCPs. Our study builds on the previous research of human milk samples collected in Zagreb and reveals that over 10-year period, levels of investigated organochlorine compounds decreased significantly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of inflammatory response in human plasma samples by an automated multicapillary electrophoresis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anders; Hansson, Lars-Olof

    2004-01-01

    A new automated multicapillary zone electrophoresis instrument with a new high-resolution (HR) buffer (Capillarys with HR buffer) for analysis of human plasma proteins was evaluated. Albumin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgG and IgM were determined nephelometrically in 200 patient plasma samples. The same samples were then analyzed on the Capillarys system (Sebia, Paris, France). The albumin concentration from the nephelometric determination was used for quantification of the individual peaks in the capillary electrophoresis (CE) electropherogram. There was strong linear correlation between the nephelometric and electrophoretic determination of alpha(1)-antitrypsin (R(2) = 0.906), alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (R(2) =0.894) and haptoglobin (R(2) = 0.913). There was also good correlation between the two determinations of gamma-globulins (R(2) = 0.883), while the correlation was weaker for fibrinogen (R(2) = 0.377). The Capillarys instrument is a reliable system for plasma protein analysis, combining the advantages of full automation, good analytical performance and high throughput. The HR buffer in combination with albumin quantification allows the simultaneous quantification of inflammatory markers in plasma samples without the need for nephelometric determination of these proteins.

  8. PERT: a method for expression deconvolution of human blood samples from varied microenvironmental and developmental conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlian Qiao

    Full Text Available The cellular composition of heterogeneous samples can be predicted using an expression deconvolution algorithm to decompose their gene expression profiles based on pre-defined, reference gene expression profiles of the constituent populations in these samples. However, the expression profiles of the actual constituent populations are often perturbed from those of the reference profiles due to gene expression changes in cells associated with microenvironmental or developmental effects. Existing deconvolution algorithms do not account for these changes and give incorrect results when benchmarked against those measured by well-established flow cytometry, even after batch correction was applied. We introduce PERT, a new probabilistic expression deconvolution method that detects and accounts for a shared, multiplicative perturbation in the reference profiles when performing expression deconvolution. We applied PERT and three other state-of-the-art expression deconvolution methods to predict cell frequencies within heterogeneous human blood samples that were collected under several conditions (uncultured mono-nucleated and lineage-depleted cells, and culture-derived lineage-depleted cells. Only PERT's predicted proportions of the constituent populations matched those assigned by flow cytometry. Genes associated with cell cycle processes were highly enriched among those with the largest predicted expression changes between the cultured and uncultured conditions. We anticipate that PERT will be widely applicable to expression deconvolution strategies that use profiles from reference populations that vary from the corresponding constituent populations in cellular state but not cellular phenotypic identity.

  9. PERT: a method for expression deconvolution of human blood samples from varied microenvironmental and developmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Wenlian; Quon, Gerald; Csaszar, Elizabeth; Yu, Mei; Morris, Quaid; Zandstra, Peter W

    2012-01-01

    The cellular composition of heterogeneous samples can be predicted using an expression deconvolution algorithm to decompose their gene expression profiles based on pre-defined, reference gene expression profiles of the constituent populations in these samples. However, the expression profiles of the actual constituent populations are often perturbed from those of the reference profiles due to gene expression changes in cells associated with microenvironmental or developmental effects. Existing deconvolution algorithms do not account for these changes and give incorrect results when benchmarked against those measured by well-established flow cytometry, even after batch correction was applied. We introduce PERT, a new probabilistic expression deconvolution method that detects and accounts for a shared, multiplicative perturbation in the reference profiles when performing expression deconvolution. We applied PERT and three other state-of-the-art expression deconvolution methods to predict cell frequencies within heterogeneous human blood samples that were collected under several conditions (uncultured mono-nucleated and lineage-depleted cells, and culture-derived lineage-depleted cells). Only PERT's predicted proportions of the constituent populations matched those assigned by flow cytometry. Genes associated with cell cycle processes were highly enriched among those with the largest predicted expression changes between the cultured and uncultured conditions. We anticipate that PERT will be widely applicable to expression deconvolution strategies that use profiles from reference populations that vary from the corresponding constituent populations in cellular state but not cellular phenotypic identity.

  10. Arterial blood gas analysis of samples directly obtained beyond cerebral arterial occlusion during endovascular procedures predicts clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Alan; Sargento-Freitas, Joao; Pagola, Jorge; Rodriguez-Luna, David; Piñeiro, Socorro; Maisterra, Olga; Rubiera, Marta; Montaner, Joan; Alvarez-Sabin, Jose; Molina, Carlos; Ribo, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Real-time intra-procedure information about ischemic brain damage degree may help physicians in taking decisions about pursuing or not recanalization efforts. We studied gasometric parameters of blood samples drawn through microcatheter in 16 stroke patients who received endovascular reperfusion procedures. After crossing the clot with microcatheter, blood sample was obtained from the middle cerebral artery (MCA) segment distal to occlusion (PostOcc); another sample was obtained from carotid artery (PreOcc). An arterial blood gas (ABG) study was immediately performed. We defined clinical improvement as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) decrease of ≥4. The ABG analysis showed differences between PreOcc and PostOcc blood samples in mean oxygen partial pressure (Pre-PaO2: 78.9 ± 16 .3 vs. 73.9 ± 14 .9 mmHg; P  70 mmHg that better predicted further clinical improvement. Patients with Post-PaO2 > 70 mmHg had higher chances of clinical improvement (81.8% vs. 0%; P = .002) and lower disability (median mRS:3 vs. 6; P= .024). In the logistic regression the only independent predictor of clinical improvement was Post-PaO2 > 70 (OR: 5.21 95% CI: 1.38-67.24; P = .013). Direct local blood sampling from ischemic brain is feasible during endovascular procedures in acute stroke patients. A gradient in oxygenation parameters was demonstrated between pre- and post-occlusion blood samples. ABG information may be used to predict clinical outcome and help in decision making in the angio-suite. Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  11. Clinical and laboratory features of human dirofilariasis in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Ermakova

    2017-01-01

    Our data are consistent with the opinion of KI Skriabin about that human as «dual facultative host» for dirofiliaria. It is rare that parasite in human body is able to develop to the imago stage (according to our observations – 11.4%. The immune response to invasion by dirofiliaria in human is manifested as dense connective tissue which forms a capsule. According to our study the rare cases (22 of detection the sexual mature D. repens (10.4% were localized inside the capsule. Observations of patients with D. repens infection allowed concluding that human for this helminth is «a biological deadend».

  12. STED super-resolution microscopy of clinical paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgen, Peter; Stoldt, Stefan; Conradi, Lena-Christin; Wurm, Christian Andreas; Rüschoff, Josef; Ghadimi, B Michael; Liersch, Torsten; Jakobs, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Formalin fixed and paraffin-embedded human tissue resected during cancer surgery is indispensable for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and represents a vast and largely unexploited resource for research. Optical microscopy of such specimen is curtailed by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional optical microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we used STED super-resolution microscopy enabling optical resolution well below the diffraction barrier. We visualized nanoscale protein distributions in sections of well-annotated paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue stored in a clinical repository. Using antisera against several mitochondrial proteins, STED microscopy revealed distinct sub-mitochondrial protein distributions, suggesting a high level of structural preservation. Analysis of human tissues stored for up to 17 years demonstrated that these samples were still amenable for super-resolution microscopy. STED microscopy of sections of HER2 positive rectal adenocarcinoma revealed details in the surface and intracellular HER2 distribution that were blurred in the corresponding conventional images, demonstrating the potential of super-resolution microscopy to explore the thus far largely untapped nanoscale regime in tissues stored in biorepositories.

  13. STED super-resolution microscopy of clinical paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ilgen

    Full Text Available Formalin fixed and paraffin-embedded human tissue resected during cancer surgery is indispensable for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and represents a vast and largely unexploited resource for research. Optical microscopy of such specimen is curtailed by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional optical microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we used STED super-resolution microscopy enabling optical resolution well below the diffraction barrier. We visualized nanoscale protein distributions in sections of well-annotated paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue stored in a clinical repository. Using antisera against several mitochondrial proteins, STED microscopy revealed distinct sub-mitochondrial protein distributions, suggesting a high level of structural preservation. Analysis of human tissues stored for up to 17 years demonstrated that these samples were still amenable for super-resolution microscopy. STED microscopy of sections of HER2 positive rectal adenocarcinoma revealed details in the surface and intracellular HER2 distribution that were blurred in the corresponding conventional images, demonstrating the potential of super-resolution microscopy to explore the thus far largely untapped nanoscale regime in tissues stored in biorepositories.

  14. Empirical Correlates of Low Scores on MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical Scales in a Sample of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeyeva, Tatyana V.; Tellegen, Auke; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the authors explored the meaning of low scores on the MMPI-2/MMPI-2-RF Restructured Clinical (RC) scales. Using responses of a sample of university students (N = 811), the authors examined whether low (T less than 39), within-normal-limits (T = 39-64), and high (T greater than 65) score levels on the RC scales are…

  15. Brief Report: Examining the Link between Autistic Traits and Compulsive Internet Use in a Non-Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenauer, Catrin; Pollmann, Monique M. H.; Begeer, Sander; Kerkhof, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders or autistic traits may profit from Internet and computer-mediated interactions, but there is concern about their Internet use becoming compulsive. This study investigated the link between autistic traits and Internet use in a 2-wave longitudinal study with a non-clinical community sample (n = 390). As…

  16. A Comparison of Three Self-Report Measures of the Broader Autism Phenotype in a Non-Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Brooke; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Wainer, Allison; Donnellan, M. Brent

    2011-01-01

    Three self-report measures of the broader autism phenotype (BAP) were evaluated in terms of their internal consistency, distribution of scores, factor structure, and criterion-related validity in a non-clinical sample. All measures showed a continuous distribution. The SRS-A and BAPQ showed expected sex differences and were superior to the AQ in…

  17. Prevalence of enterococci and its antibiotic resistance in various clinical samples at tertiary care hospital in Southern Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Atray

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of multiple drug resistance enterococci with 11% VRE is observed in present study. The study emphasizes on invitro antibiotic susceptibility testing for clinical samples and also rational drug usage. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(8.000: 3413-3416

  18. Childhood Trauma in Substance Use Disorder and Depression: An Analysis by Gender among a Brazilian Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Adriana M.; Kerr-Correa, Florence; Souza-Formigoni, Maria Lucia O.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we compared the frequency and intensity of childhood traumas in alcohol- or other drug-dependent patients, in patients with depression, and in a control group without psychiatric diagnoses. Methods: The study had a retrospective design of a clinical sample of men and women from the groups listed above. They were evaluated…

  19. Bringing the Simple View of Reading to the clinic: Relationships between oral and written language skills in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Kerry Danahy; Scott, Cheryl M

    2016-01-01

    The Simple View of Reading (SVR) predicts subtypes of reading disorder based on weaknesses in word recognition, listening comprehension, or both. This practice-based research study explores predictions of the SVR within a clinical practice setting. The study is a retrospective analysis of 112 assessment records from school-aged children (aged 6.0-16.7) referred for speech-language evaluation. Available scores within four areas (listening comprehension, word recognition, reading comprehension, and oral expression) were extracted and then converted to composites. Composite scores were used to categorize children into SVR subtypes. We examined the distribution of children across subtypes and the relationships among the four constructs. Children were distributed across all SVR subtypes, but few had impairments only in word recognition. Children with impairments in listening comprehension or word recognition showed poorer reading comprehension than those that did not, but there was imperfect prediction of reading comprehension impairment at an individual level. There were more significant correlations among constructs for younger children. Oral expression and listening comprehension were closely related across analyses. The SVR is a clinically useful model for capturing variation and explaining relationships among oral and written language in school-age children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection and identification of Trichophyton tonsurans from clinical isolates and hairbrush samples by loop-mediated isothermal amplification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yo, Ayaka; Yamamoto, Mikachi; Nakayama, Takako; Ishikawa, Jun; Makimura, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Since the 1990s, there have been reports of the spread of dermatophytosis caused by Trichophyton tonsurans among contact sports athletes in several countries, including Japan. This study was performed to develop a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) system for rapid and accurate detection and identification of T. tonsurans from clinical isolates or hairbrush samples for diagnosis and to prevent the spread of infection. A specific primer set was prepared by comparing the whole genome sequence of T. tonsurans with those of six other closely related dermatophytes. After confirming the sensitivity and specificity of this system, LAMP assay was performed using 37 clinical samples obtained from three healthy volunteers and 24 judo athletes. A total of 155 fungal isolates (56 strains of various standard fungi, 96 identified T. tonsurans isolates, three hairbrush-cultured isolates from judo athletes) and 37 hairbrush samples (34 samples from 24 judo athletes, and three samples from three healthy volunteers) were used for culture and LAMP assay, respectively. The assay showed no cross-reactivity to standard strains other than T. tonsurans. The detection limit was 100 copies of DNA template per tube. All of the 96 T. tonsurans isolates were amplified, and all samples from healthy volunteers showed negative results. Four of the 34 hairbrush samples obtained from judo athletes showed positive results in LAMP assay, and two of the four were positive in both culture and LAMP assay. We developed a rapid LAMP system with high specificity and sensitivity for diagnosis of T. tonsurans infection.

  1. Clinical application of a molecular assay for the detection of dermatophytosis and a novel non-invasive sampling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizny Gordon, Alice; McIver, Christopher; Kim, Minhee; Murrell, Dedee F; Taylor, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The dermatophytoses are the most common superficial fungal infections worldwide. Clinical diagnosis is not reliable as there are many differentials, and laboratory diagnosis is required to gain access to treatment in more severe disease. Traditional diagnostic methods are limited by suboptimal sensitivity, specificity and prolonged turnaround times. Molecular methods are being used increasingly in the diagnostic algorithm in the clinical microbiology laboratory. The aim of this study was to evaluate a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeting the chitin synthase 1 gene (CHS1) of dermatophytes for analytical specificity, and to assess its clinical application by comparing it to the current methods of microscopy and culture. We also assessed a novel non-invasive sample collection technique involving adhesive tape impressions of suspected lesions. The PCR was highly specific, being able to discern between cultures of dermatophytes and other microorganisms. It also proved to be more sensitive than traditional methods at detecting dermatophytes in clinical samples. Similar sensitivities were seen on the samples assessed by the adhesive tape technique. An internal control system allowed for the detection of inhibition in certain culture and clinical specimens. This rapid and cost-effective technique could be incorporated into the initial diagnostic algorithm for dermatophytosis in Australian laboratories. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteomic workflow for analysis of archival formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded clinical samples to a depth of 10 000 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Duś, Kamila; Mann, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Archival formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded clinical samples represent a very diverse source of material for proteomic investigation of diseases, often with follow-up patient information. Here, we describe an analytical workflow for analysis of laser-capture microdissected formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples that allows studying proteomes to a depth of 10 000 proteins per sample. The workflow involves lysis of tissue in SDS-containing buffer, detergent removal, and consecutive digestion of the proteins with two enzymes by the multienzyme digestion filter-aided sample preparation method. Resulting peptides are fractionated by pipette-tip based strong anion exchange into six fractions and analyzed by LC-MS/MS on a bench top quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Analysis of the data using the MaxQuant software resulted in the identification of 9502 ± 28 protein groups per a 110 nL sample of microdissected cells from human colonic adenoma. This depth of proteome analysis enables systemic insights into the organization of the adenoma cells and an estimation of the abundances of known biomarkers. It also allows the identification of proteins expressed from tumor suppressors, oncogenes, and other key players in the development and progression of the colorectal cancer. Our proteomic platform can be used for quantitative comparisons between samples representing different stages of diseases and thus can be applied to the discovery of biomarkers or drug targets. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Analysis of persistence of human papillomavirus infection in men evaluated by sampling multiple genital sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, G; Nyitray, A G; Lu, B; Perino, A; Marci, R; Schillaci, R; Matranga, D; Firenze, A; Caleca, M; Bellavia, C; Guarneri, F; Giuliano, A; Giovannelli, L

    2015-11-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been studied extensively in women, data on male infection are limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate persistence of HPV infection at multiple genital sites in men and to define potential associations with socio-behavioural characteristics. Penile, urethral and seminal specimens were tested by the INNO-LiPA HPV system (Innogenetics) and a PCR assay. Persistence was defined as the detection of same HPV type at ≥ 2 consecutive visits. The Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were applied to estimate the likelihood of persistence. A total of 50 men (median age: 33 years) were followed for a median of 14.7 months. Altogether, 49%, 36%, 26% and 11% of baseline HPV-positive men had 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-month persistent infection with any HPV type, respectively. The 6-, 12- and 18- month persistence was more common for oncogenic HPV infections; 24-month persistence was similar. The median duration of persistence was 21.7 months for any HPV. The median duration of persistence for any HPV type was significantly longer in the penile sample (22.5 months, 95% CI: 18.3-26.7) than the semen sample (15.3 months, 95% CI: 14.5-16.1). Over a third of type-specific HPV infections in men remained persistent over a 24-month period. The median duration of HPV infection was longer in penile samples compared to seminal samples. As being increasing the attention of HPV vaccination as a potential preventive approach also for men, it is imperative to obtain additional insight on natural history of HPV infection in men, particularly as far as incidence and duration are concerned.

  4. Dimensions of Delusions in Major Depression: Socio-demographic and Clinical Correlates in an Unipolar-Bipolar Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaninotto, Leonardo; Souery, Daniel; Calati, Raffaella; Camardese, Giovanni; Janiri, Luigi; Montgomery, Stuart; Kasper, Siegfried; Zohar, Joseph; De Ronchi, Diana; Mendlewicz, Julien; Serretti, Alessandro

    2015-04-30

    The present study aims at exploring associations between a continuous measure of distorted thought contents and a set of demographic and clinical features in a sample of unipolar/bipolar depressed patients. Our sample included 1,833 depressed subjects. Severity of mood symptoms was assessed by the 21 items Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The continuous outcome measure was represented by a delusion (DEL) factor, extracted from HAM-D items and including items: 2 ("Feelings of guilt"), 15 ("Hypochondriasis"), and 20 ("Paranoid symptoms"). Each socio-demographic and clinical variable was tested by a generalized linear model test, having depressive severity (HAM-D score?DEL score) as the covariate. A family history of major depressive disorder (MDD; p=0.0006), a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, type I ( p=0.0003), a comorbid general anxiety disorder (psocio-demographic or clinical variable was found to be associated to our continuous measure of distorted thinking in depression.

  5. Strong-LAMP: A LAMP Assay for Strongyloides spp. Detection in Stool and Urine Samples. Towards the Diagnosis of Human Strongyloidiasis Starting from a Rodent Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandasegui, Javier; Bajo Santos, Cristina; López-Abán, Julio; Saugar, José María; Rodríguez, Esperanza; Vicente, Belén; Muro, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Strongyloides stercoralis, the chief causative agent of human strongyloidiasis, is a nematode globally distributed but mainly endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. Chronic infection is often clinically asymptomatic but it can result in severe hyperinfection syndrome or disseminated strongyloidiasis in immunocompromised patients. There is a great diversity of techniques used in diagnosing the disease, but definitive diagnosis is accomplished by parasitological examination of stool samples for morphological identification of parasite. Until now, no molecular method has been tested in urine samples as an alternative to stool samples for diagnosing strongyloidiasis. This study aimed to evaluate the use of a new molecular LAMP assay in a well-established Wistar rat experimental infection model using both stool and, for the first time, urine samples. The LAMP assay was also clinically evaluated in patients´ stool samples. Methodology/Principal Findings Stool and urine samples were obtained daily during a 28-day period from rats infected subcutaneously with different infective third-stage larvae doses of S. venezuelensis. The dynamics of parasite infection was determined by daily counting the number of eggs per gram of feces from day 1 to 28 post-infection. A set of primers for LAMP assay based on a DNA partial sequence in the 18S rRNA gene from S. venezuelensis was designed. The set up LAMP assay (namely, Strong-LAMP) allowed the sensitive detection of S. venezuelensis DNA in both stool and urine samples obtained from each infection group of rats and was also effective in S. stercoralis DNA amplification in patients´ stool samples with previously confirmed strongyloidiasis by parasitological and real-time PCR tests. Conclusions/Significance Our Strong-LAMP assay is an useful molecular tool in research of a strongyloidiasis experimental infection model in both stool and urine samples. After further validation, the Strong-LAMP could also be potentially

  6. Comparison of two adult mosquito sampling methods with human landing catches in south-central Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenea, Oljira; Balkew, Meshesha; Tekie, Habte; Gebre-Michael, Teshome; Deressa, Wakgari; Loha, Eskindir; Lindtjørn, Bernt; Overgaard, Hans J

    2017-01-13

    The human landing catch (HLC) is the standard reference method for measuring human exposure to mosquito bites. However, HLC is labour-intensive, exposes collectors to infectious mosquito bites and is subjected to collector bias. These necessitate local calibration and application of alternative methods. This study was undertaken to determine the relative sampling efficiency (RSE) of light traps with or without yeast-produced carbon dioxide bait vs. HLC in south-central Ethiopia. The experiment was conducted for 39 nights in a 3 × 3 Latin square randomized design with Anopheles arabiensis as the target species in the period between July and November 2014 in Edo Kontola village, south-central Ethiopia. Center for Disease Control and Prevention light trap catches (LTC) and yeast-generated carbon dioxide-baited light trap catches (CB-LTC) were each evaluated against HLC. The total nightly mosquito catches for each Anopheles species in either method was compared with HLC by Pearson correlation and simple linear regression analysis on log-transformed [log10(x + 1)] values. To test if the RSE of each alternative method was affected by mosquito density, the ratio of the number of mosquitoes in each method to the number of mosquitoes in HLC was plotted against the average mosquito abundance. Overall, 7606 Anopheles females were collected by the three sampling methods. Among these 5228 (68.7%) were Anopheles ziemanni, 1153 (15.2%) An. arabiensis, 883 (11.6%) Anopheles funestus s.l., and 342 (4.5%) Anopheles pharoensis. HLC yielded 3392 (44.6%), CB-LTC 2150 (28.3%), and LTC 2064 (27.1%) Anopheles females. The RSEs of LTC and HLC for An. arabiensis were significantly correlated (p method for sampling An. arabiensis. LTC can be used for large-scale indoor An. arabiensis surveillance and monitoring when it is difficult to use HLC. CB-LTC does not substantially improve sampling of this major vector compared to LTC in this setting. Trial registration PACTR201411000882128

  7. Evidence That a Psychopathology Interactome Has Diagnostic Value, Predicting Clinical Needs: An Experience Sampling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os, Jim; Lataster, Tineke; Delespaul, Philippe; Wichers, Marieke; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2014-01-01

    Background For the purpose of diagnosis, psychopathology can be represented as categories of mental disorder, symptom dimensions or symptom networks. Also, psychopathology can be assessed at different levels of temporal resolution (monthly episodes, daily fluctuating symptoms, momentary fluctuating mental states). We tested the diagnostic value, in terms of prediction of treatment needs, of the combination of symptom networks and momentary assessment level. Method Fifty-seven patients with a psychotic disorder participated in an ESM study, capturing psychotic experiences, emotions and circumstances at 10 semi-random moments in the flow of daily life over a period of 6 days. Symptoms were assessed by interview with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS); treatment needs were assessed using the Camberwell Assessment of Need (CAN). Results Psychotic symptoms assessed with the PANSS (Clinical Psychotic Symptoms) were strongly associated with psychotic experiences assessed with ESM (Momentary Psychotic Experiences). However, the degree to which Momentary Psychotic Experiences manifested as Clinical Psychotic Symptoms was determined by level of momentary negative affect (higher levels increasing probability of Momentary Psychotic Experiences manifesting as Clinical Psychotic Symptoms), momentary positive affect (higher levels decreasing probability of Clinical Psychotic Symptoms), greater persistence of Momentary Psychotic Experiences (persistence predicting increased probability of Clinical Psychotic Symptoms) and momentary environmental stress associated with events and activities (higher levels increasing probability of Clinical Psychotic Symptoms). Similarly, the degree to which momentary visual or auditory hallucinations manifested as Clinical Psychotic Symptoms was strongly contingent on the level of accompanying momentary paranoid delusional ideation. Momentary Psychotic Experiences were associated with CAN unmet treatment needs, over and above PANSS

  8. Vasoprotective effects of human CD34+ cells: towards clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerman Amir

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of cell-based therapeutics for humans requires preclinical testing in animal models. The use of autologous animal products fails to address the efficacy of similar products derived from humans. We used a novel immunodeficient rat carotid injury model in order to determine whether human cells could improve vascular remodelling following acute injury. Methods Human CD34+ cells were separated from peripheral buffy coats using automatic magnetic cell separation. Carotid arterial injury was performed in male Sprague-Dawley nude rats using a 2F Fogarty balloon catheter. Freshly harvested CD34+ cells or saline alone was administered locally for 20 minutes by endoluminal instillation. Structural and functional analysis of the arteries was performed 28 days later. Results Morphometric analysis demonstrated that human CD34+ cell delivery was associated with a significant reduction in intimal formation 4 weeks following balloon injury as compared with saline (I/M ratio 0.79 ± 0.18, and 1.71 ± 0.18 for CD34, and saline-treated vessels, respectively P Conclusion Delivery of human CD34+ cells limits neointima formation and improves arterial reactivity after vascular injury. These studies advance the concept of cell delivery to effect vascular remodeling toward a potential human cellular product.

  9. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  10. Determination of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin in Postmortem Samples in Ectopic Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiere, Cristian; Lesta, Maria del Mar; Fanton, Laurent; Ventura, Francesco; Bonsignore, Alessandro; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Increased human chorionic gonadotropin levels (HCG) can be detected in femoral blood, bile, and vitreous humor collected during autopsy of pregnant women using a standard kit designed for living patients. In the study herein, the concentrations of HCG were measured in postmortem serum, vitreous, bile, cerebrospinal, and pericardial fluids in 4 cases of fatal ectopic pregnancy and 40 controls using a quantitative electrochemiluminescence immunoassay designed for living patients. No false-negative cases were identified in any of the analyzed samples in any of the ectopic pregnancy cases. No correlations were found between total HCG levels in postmortem serum and the other tested specimens. The results of this study would suggest that higher HCG in bile, vitreous, pericardial, and cerebrospinal fluids may confirm the existence of ectopic pregnancy and therefore identify other situations in which this hormone is increased, although gestational age cannot be reliably estimated using these values. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Ultrasensitive PCR and real-time detection from human genomic samples using a bidirectional flow microreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; West, Jonathan; Auroux, Pierre-Alain; Manz, Andreas; Day, Philip J R

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we present a reliable bidirectional flow DNA amplification microreactor for processing real-world genomic samples. This system shares the low-power thermal responsiveness of a continuous flow reactor with the low surface area to volume ratio character of stationary reactors for reducing surface inhibitory effects. Silanization with dimethyldichlorosilane in combination with dynamic surface passivation was used to enhance PCR compatibility and enable efficient amplification. For real-time fragment amplification monitoring we have implemented an epimodal fluorescent detection capability. The passivated bidirectional flow system was ultrasensitive, achieving an RNase P gene detection limit of 24 human genome copies with a reaction efficiency of 77%. This starts to rival the performance of a conventional real-time PCR instrument with a reaction efficiency of 93% and revitalizes flow-through PCR as a viable component of lab on a chip DNA analysis formats.

  12. Bacteriophage Therapy: Advances in Formulation Strategies and Human Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Lavigne, Rob; Brüssow, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a number of phage therapy phase I and II safety trials have been concluded, showing no notable safety concerns associated with the use of phage. Though hurdles for efficient treatment remain, these trials hold promise for future phase III clinical trials. Interestingly, most phage formulations used in these clinical trials are straightforward phage suspensions, and not much research has focused on the processing of phage cocktails in specific pharmaceutical dosage forms. Additional research on formulation strategies and the stability of phage-based drugs will be of key importance, especially with phage therapy advancing toward phase III clinical trials.

  13. Analyses of robotic traverses and sample sites in the Schrödinger basin for the HERACLES human-assisted sample return mission concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenstra, Edgar S.; Martin, Dayl J. P.; McDonald, Francesca E.; Paisarnsombat, Sarinya; Venturino, Christian; O'Hara, Sean; Calzada-Diaz, Abigail; Bottoms, Shelby; Leader, Mark K.; Klaus, Kurt K.; van Westrenen, Wim; Needham, Debra H.; Kring, David A.

    2016-09-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) developed an integrated Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) that outlines plans for human-assisted sample return from the lunar surface in ∼2024 and for human presence on the lunar surface in ∼2028. Previous studies have identified the Schrödinger basin, situated on the far side of the Moon, as a prime target for lunar science and exploration where a significant number of the scientific concepts reviewed by the National Research Council (NRC, 2007) can be addressed. In this study, two robotic mission traverses within the Schrödinger basin are proposed based on a 3 year mission plan in support of the HERACLES human-assisted sample return mission concept. A comprehensive set of modern remote sensing data (LROC imagery, LOLA topography, M3 and Clementine spectral data) has been integrated to provide high-resolution coverage of the traverses and to facilitate identification of specific sample localities. We also present a preliminary Concept of Operations (ConOps) study based on a set of notional rover capabilities and instrumental payload. An extended robotic mission to the Schrödinger basin will allow for significant sample return opportunities from multiple distinct geologic terrains and will address multiple high-priority NRC (2007) scientific objectives. Both traverses will offer the first opportunity to (i) sample pyroclastic material from the lunar farside, (ii) sample Schrödinger impact melt and test the lunar cataclysm hypothesis, (iii) sample deep crustal lithologies in an uplifted peak ring and test the lunar magma ocean hypothesis and (iv) explore the top of an impact melt sheet, enhancing our ability to interpret Apollo samples. The shorter traverse will provide the first opportunity to sample farside mare deposits, whereas the longer traverse has significant potential to collect SPA impact melt, which can be used to constrain the basin-forming epoch. These robotic missions will revalidate

  14. Cluster Analysis of the Klein Sexual Orientation Grid in Clinical and Nonclinical Samples: When Bisexuality Is Not Bisexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, James D; Klein, Fritz; McCutchan, J Allen; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    We used a cluster analysis to empirically address whether sexual orientation is a continuum or can usefully be divided into categories such as heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual using scores on the Klein Sexual Orientation Grid (KSOG) in three samples: groups of men and women recruited through bisexual groups and the Internet (Main Study men; Main Study women), and men recruited for a clinical study of HIV and the nervous system (HIV Study men). A five-cluster classification was chosen for the Main Study men (n = 212), a four-cluster classification for the Main Study women (n = 120), and a five-cluster classification for the HIV Study men (n = 620). We calculated means and standard deviations of these 14 clusters on the 21 variables composing the KSOG. Generally, the KSOG's overtly erotic items (Sexual Fantasies, Sexual Behavior, and Sexual Attraction), as well as the Self Identification items, tended to be more uniform within groups than the more social items were (Emotional Preference, Socialize with, and Lifestyle). The result is a set of objectively identified subgroups of bisexual men and women along with characterizations of the extent to which their KSOG scores describe and differentiate them. The Bisexual group identified by the cluster analysis of the HIV sample was distinctly different from any of the bisexual groups identified by the clustering process in the Main Sample. Simply put, the HIV sample's bisexuality is not like bisexuality in general, and attempts to generalize (even cautiously) from this clinical Bisexual group to a larger population would be doomed to failure. This underscores the importance of recruiting non-clinical samples if one wants insight into the nature of bisexuality in the population at large. Although the importance of non-clinical sampling in studies of sexual orientation has been widely and justly asserted, it has rarely been demonstrated by direct comparisons of the type conducted in the present study.

  15. Survey and rapid detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae in clinical samples targeting the rcsA gene in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Derong; Liu, Wei; Li, Huan; Wang, Yufei; Li, Xinran; Zou, Dayang; Yang, Zhan; Huang, Simo; Zhou, Dongsheng; Huang, Liuyu; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a wide-spread nosocomial pathogen. A rapid and sensitive molecular method for the detection of K. pneumoniae in clinical samples is needed to guide therapeutic treatment. In this study, we first described a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the rapid detection of capsular polysaccharide synthesis regulating gene rcsA from K. pneumoniaein clinical samples by using two methods including real-time turbidity monitoring and fluorescence detection to assess the reaction. Then dissemination of K. pneumoniae strains was investigated from ICU patients in three top hospitals in Beijing, China. The results showed that the detection limit of the LAMP method was 0.115 pg/μl DNA within 60 min under isothermal conditions (61°C), a 100-fold increase in sensitivity compared with conventional PCR. All 30 non- K. pneumoniae strains tested were negative for LAMP detection, indicating the high specificity of the LAMP reaction. To evaluate the application of the LAMP assay to clinical diagnosis, of 110 clinical sputum samples collected from ICU patients with clinically suspected multi-resistant infections in China, a total of 32 K. pneumoniae isolates were identified for LAMP-based surveillance of rcsA. All isolates belonged to nine different K. pneumoniae multilocus sequence typing (MLST) groups. Strikingly, of the 32 K. pneumoniae strains, 18 contained the Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC)-encoding gene bla KPC-2 and had high resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. Moreover, K. pneumoniae WJ-64 was discovered to contain bla KPC-2 and bla NDM-1genes simultaneously in the isolate. Our data showed the high prevalence of bla KPC-2 among K. pneumoniae and co-occurrence of many resistant genes in the clinical strains signal a rapid and continuing evolution of K. pneumoniae. In conclusion, we have developed a rapid and sensitive visual K. pneumoniae detection LAMP assay, which could be a useful tool for clinical screening, on

  16. Trace samples of human blood in mosquitoes as a forensic investigation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabêlo, K C N; Albuquerque, C M R; Tavares, V B; Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Oliveira, N C L; Crovella, S

    2015-11-23

    Investigations of any type of crime invariably starts at the crime scene by collecting evidence. Thus, the purpose of this research was to collect and analyze an entomological trace from an environment that is similar to those of indoor crime scenes. Hematophagous mosquitoes were collected from two residential units; saliva of volunteers that were residents in the units was also collected for genetic analysis as reference samples. We examined the allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, vWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818, and FGA) and amelogenin. A total of 26 female hematophagous mosquitoes were identified as Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Culex quinquefasciatus; we were able to obtain 11 forensically valid genetic profiles, with a minimum of 0.028203 ng/μL of human DNA. Thus, the results of this study showed that it was possible to correlate human genetic information from mosquitoes with the volunteer reference samples, which validates the use of this information as forensic evidence. Furthermore, we observed mixed genetic profiles from one mosquito. Therefore, it is clearly important to collect these insects indoors where crimes were committed, because it may be possible to find intact genetic profiles of suspects in the blood found in the digestive tract of hematophagous mosquitoes for later comparison to identify an offender and/or exclude suspects.

  17. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates from food products and human samples in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribul, Bruno Rocha; Festivo, Marcia Lima; de Souza, Miliane Moreira Soares; dos Prazeres Rodrigues, Dalia

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. and its association with fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Brazil. A total of 129 NTS isolates (samples from human origin, food from animal origin, environmental, and animal) grouped as from animal (n = 62) and human (n = 67) food were evaluated between 2009 and 2013. These isolates were investigated through serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (qnr, aac(6′)-Ib) and associated integron genes (integrase, and conserved integron region). Resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, from first to third generations, was observed. Fifteen isolates were positive for the presence of qnr genes (8 qnrS, 6 qnrB, and 1 qnrD) and twenty three of aac(6′)-Ib. The conserved integron region was detected in 67 isolates as variable regions, from ±600 to >1000 pb. The spread of NTS involving PMQR carriers is of serious concern and should be carefully monitored. PMID:26887245

  18. Assessment of malathion and its effects on leukocytes in human blood samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit Kumar; Tiwari, Udita; Gaur, Mulayam Singh; Tiwari, Rajeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the present paper, we report a reproducible, cost effective, fast response method for detection of malathion and its effects on leukocytes in different human blood groups. Spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis spectrometry) and Fourier transform infrared coupled with solid phase extraction were applied for analyzing malathion content in human blood plasma. The spiking levels of malathion in the range of 0.1-1.7 µg/mL were extracted from blood plasma samples using SPE. The present active functional groups (C = O; P-O-C; -OH; P = S) were also characterized. The recovery rate of malathion was 80%±4.5%. The calculated correlation coefficient was 0.9799, indicating the linearity of the results. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were (0.1-1.7) µg/mL and (0.3-1.5) µg/mL, respectively. Malathion <1.0 µg/mL showed no significant change while higher levels of malathion exposure (1.5 µg/mL and 3.0 µg/mL) reduced the number of white blood cells. In conclusion, the spectroscopic results may be useful to understand the mechanism of other pesticides such as methyl parathion and parathion.

  19. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates from food products and human samples in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribul, Bruno Rocha; Festivo, Marcia Lima; de Souza, Miliane Moreira Soares; Rodrigues, Dalia dos Prazeres

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. and its association with fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Brazil. A total of 129 NTS isolates (samples from human origin, food from animal origin, environmental, and animal) grouped as from animal (n=62) and human (n=67) food were evaluated between 2009 and 2013. These isolates were investigated through serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (qnr, aac(6')-Ib) and associated integron genes (integrase, and conserved integron region). Resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, from first to third generations, was observed. Fifteen isolates were positive for the presence of qnr genes (8 qnrS, 6 qnrB, and 1 qnrD) and twenty three of aac(6')-Ib. The conserved integron region was detected in 67 isolates as variable regions, from ±600 to >1000pb. The spread of NTS involving PMQR carriers is of serious concern and should be carefully monitored.

  20. Determination of human albumin in serum and urine samples by constant-energy synchronous fluorescence method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Bagheri, Habibollah; Afkhami, Abbas

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive spectrofluorimetric method using constant-energy synchronous fluorescence technique is proposed for the determination of human albumin without separation. In this method, no reagent was used for enhancement of the fluorescence signal of albumin in the solution. Effects of some parameters, such as energy difference between excitation and emission monochromators (ΔE), emission and excitation slit widths and scan rate of wavelength were studied and the optimum conditions were established. For this purpose factorial design and response surface method were employed for optimization of the effective parameters on the fluorescence signal. The results showed that the scan rate of the wavelength has no significant effect on the analytical signal. The calibration curve was linear in the range 0.1-220.0 µg mL(-1) of albumin with a detection limit of 7.0 × 10(-3)  µg mL(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSD) for six replicate measurements of albumin were calculated as 2.2%, 1.7% and 1.3% for 0.5, 10.0 and 100.0 µg mL(-1) albumin, respectively. Furthermore the proposed method has been employed for the determination of albumin in human serum and urine samples.

  1. Characterization of a Hemoglobin Adduct from Ethyl Vinyl Ketone Detected in Human Blood Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Henrik; Motwani, Hitesh V; Osterman Golkar, Siv; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2015-11-16

    Electrophiles have the ability to form adducts to nucleophilic sites in proteins and DNA. Internal exposure to such compounds thus constitutes a risk for toxic effects. Screening of adducts using mass spectrometric methods by adductomic approaches offers possibilities to detect unknown electrophiles present in tissues. Previously, we employed untargeted adductomics to detect 19 unknown adducts to N-terminal valine in hemoglobin (Hb) in human blood. This article describes the characterization of one of these adducts, which was identified as the adduct from ethyl vinyl ketone (EVK). The mean adduct level was 40 ± 12 pmol/g Hb in 12 human blood samples; adduct levels from acrylamide (AA) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) were quantified for comparison. Using l-valine p-nitroanilide (Val-pNA), introduced as a model of the N-terminal valine, the rate of formation of the EVK adduct was studied, and the rate constant determined to 200 M(-1)h(-1) at 37 °C. In blood, the reaction rate was too fast to be feasibly measured, EVK showing a half-life adduct was found to be unstable, with a half-life of 7.6 h. From the mean adduct level measured in human blood, a daily dose (area under the concentration-time-curve, AUC) of 7 nMh EVK was estimated. The AUC of AA from intake via food is about 20 times higher. EVK is naturally present in a wide range of foods and is also used as a food additive. Most probably, naturally formed EVK is a major source to observed adducts. Evaluation of available toxicological data and information on occurrence of EVK indicate that further studies of EVK are motivated. This study illustrates a quantitative strategy in the initial evaluation of the significance of an adduct detected through adduct screening.

  2. The effects of childhood abuse on symptom complexity in a clinical sample: mediating effects of emotion regulation difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Young; Choi, Young Min; Gim, Min Sook; Park, Jun Hyun; Park, Soo Hyun

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to first examine whether childhood abuse predicts symptom complexity, as indicated by the number of clinically elevated scales on the MMPI-2 in an adult clinical sample. Secondly, we investigated whether