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Sample records for human clinical isolates

  1. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Ganges water, human clinical and milk samples at Varanasi, India.

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    Soni, Dharmendra K; Singh, Rakesh K; Singh, Durg V; Dubey, Suresh K

    2013-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Ganges water, human clinical and milk samples were characterized by antibiotic susceptibility, serotype identification, detection of virulence genes and ERIC- and REP-PCR fingerprint analyses. All isolates were uniformly resistant to ampicillin, except two isolates, and showed variable resistance to gentamicin, cotrimoxazole, ofloxacin, rifampicin and tetracycline. Of the 20 isolates found positive for pathogens, seven (four human and three water isolates) belong to serogroups 4b, 4d and 4e; six (one human and five water isolates) belong to serogroups 1/2c and 3c; four milk isolates belong to serogroups 1/2b and 3b; and three milk isolates belong to serogroups 1/2a and 3a. Two water isolates, all human isolates, except one (Pb1) lacking inlJ gene, and three milk isolates possess inlA, inlC, plcA, prfA, actA, hlyA and iap genes. The remaining water and milk isolates showed variable presence of inlJ, plcA, prfA, and iap genes. ERIC- and REP-PCR based analyses collectively indicated that isolates of human clinical samples belong to identical or similar clone and isolates of water and milk samples belong to different clones. Overall study demonstrates the prevalence of pathogenic L. monocytogenes species in the environmental and clinical samples. Most of the isolates were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid Ganciclovir Susceptibility Assay Using Flow Cytometry for Human Cytomegalovirus Clinical Isolates

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    McSharry, James J.; Lurain, Nell S.; Drusano, George L.; Landay, Alan L.; Notka, Mostafa; O’Gorman, Maurice R. G.; Weinberg, Adriana; Shapiro, Howard M.; Reichelderfer, Patricia S.; Crumpacker, Clyde S.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid, quantitative, and objective determination of the susceptibilities of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) clinical isolates to ganciclovir has been assessed by an assay that uses a fluorochrome-labeled monoclonal antibody to an HCMV immediate-early antigen and flow cytometry. Analysis of the ganciclovir susceptibilities of 25 phenotypically characterized clinical isolates by flow cytometry demonstrated that the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ganciclovir for 19 of the isolates were between 1.14 and 6.66 μM, with a mean of 4.32 μM (±1.93) (sensitive; IC50 less than 7 μM), the IC50s for 2 isolates were 8.48 and 9.79 μM (partially resistant), and the IC50s for 4 isolates were greater than 96 μM (resistant). Comparative analysis of the drug susceptibilities of these clinical isolates by the plaque reduction assay gave IC50s of less than 6 μM, with a mean of 2.88 μM (±1.40) for the 19 drug-sensitive isolates, IC50s of 6 to 8 μM for the partially resistant isolates, and IC50s of greater than 12 μM for the four resistant clinical isolates. Comparison of the IC50s for the drug-susceptible and partially resistant clinical isolates obtained by the flow cytometry assay with the IC50s obtained by the plaque reduction assay showed an acceptable correlation (r2 = 0.473; P = 0.001), suggesting that the flow cytometry assay could substitute for the more labor-intensive, subjective, and time-consuming plaque reduction assay. PMID:9736557

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic evaluation of 18 Nocardia isolates from human clinical samples in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Herrera, K; Sandoval, H; Couble, A; Mouniee, D; Ramírez-Durán, N; Uzcategui de Morillo, M; Serrano, J A; Bergeron, E; Boiron, P; Rodríguez-Nava, V

    2012-03-01

    Mexico has the largest number of clinical cases of actinomycetoma in North and South America. Species originally identified by less specific methods have been recently reclassified as other known species or as new species. To assess, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic methods, the species distribution of 18 human clinical isolates originally identified as N. brasiliensis, some of them isolated between 1947 and 1959 in Mexico City. Clinical isolates came from the Hospital General, "Dr. Manuel Gea Gonzalez", and Instituto Nacional de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológica (INDRE) in Mexico, D.F. The strains used in this study included 15 clinical strains isolated between 1947 and 1959 that were originally identified as N. brasiliensis and three more strains obtained in 2007 identified as Nocardia spp. The isolates were identified genotypically by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene, and their phenotypic profiles were obtained with the API Coryne(®) system. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns were tested according to the protocol of the Comité de l'antibiogramme de la Société française de microbiologie[4]. According to 16S rRNA gene, sequencing were identified among 18 human clinical isolates as Nocardia farcinica (n=11) and Nocardia brasiliensis (n=7). A high number of the strains were susceptible to the majority of the antibiotics tested. The phenotypic profiles of the strains were quite uniform for N. farcinica and some variability was observed for N. brasiliensis strains. N. farcinica was the most prevalent species identified. Modern methodologies should be applied in clinical laboratories to accurately identify etiological agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Characteristics of Romanian fluoroquinolone-resistant human clinical Escherichia coli isolates.

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    Usein, Codruţa-Romaniţa; Tatu-Chiţoiu, Dorina; Nica, Maria; Ciontea, Simona Adriana; Palade, Andi-Marian; Condei, Maria; Damian, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Alarming progressive increase in the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli has been documented worldwide. Previous studies have suggested that many E. coli clinical isolates are actually low-virulence opportunists whose success derives more from antibiotic resistance than from pathogenic capability. The co-existence of ESBL production and fluoroquinolone resistance was reported as a major therapeutic challenge for E. coli infections. Considering the sparse information regarding the genetic background of virulence and antibiotic resistance of local isolates, a collection of ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates from human extraintestinal specimens was analyzed using PCR, PCR-sequencing, and PFGE, in order to clarify some aspects regarding their mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance, phylogenetic origin, the content of virulence-encoding determinants, and clonal relatedness. The tested fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli (FQREC) isolates, which displayed genetic heterogeneity, carried double mutations in the QRDR of gyrA previously described, which could explain their high resistance to ciprofloxacin. More than half of them (69%) possessed group 1 blaCTX. like genes, and with one exception, all these isolates were ESBL producers. The FQREC isolates belonging to non B2 phylogenetic groups outnumbered the isolates derived from B2 group (60 versus 27 isolates), and their overall content of virulence-encoding genes (fim, pap, sfa/foc, afa, hly, cnf and aer) was reduced. Regardless of the phylogenetic origin, the most prevalent virulence-associated genes possessed by the FQREC isolates were aer and fim determinants, while none of these isolates carried hly and cnf genes. In the case of weakened patients, the E. coli isolates do not need a robust virulence repertoire in order to overcome the host defense systems. The co-resistance of many FQREC isolates to extended-spectrum cephalosporins may provide a substantial advantage to their survival and

  5. Molecular identification of nocardia isolates from clinical samples and an overview of human nocardiosis in Brazil.

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    Paulo Victor Pereira Baio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nocardia sp. causes a variety of clinical presentations. The incidence of nocardiosis varies geographically according to several factors, such as the prevalence of HIV infections, transplants, neoplastic and rheumatic diseases, as well as climate, socio-economic conditions and laboratory procedures for Nocardia detection and identification. In Brazil the paucity of clinical reports of Nocardia infections suggests that this genus may be underestimated as a cause of human diseases and/or either neglected or misidentified in laboratory specimens. Accurate identification of Nocardia species has become increasingly important for clinical and epidemiological investigations. In this study, seven clinical Nocardia isolates were identified by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA and their antimicrobial susceptibility was also determined. Most Nocardia isolates were associated to pulmonary disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The majority of Brazilian human isolates in cases reported in literature were identified as Nocardia sp. Molecular characterization was used for species identification of Nocardia nova, Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, Nocardia asiatica and Nocardia exalbida/gamkensis. Data indicated that molecular analysis provided a different Nocardia speciation than the initial biochemical identification for most Brazilian isolates. All Nocardia isolates showed susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, the antimicrobial of choice in the treatment nocardiosis. N. nova isolated from different clinical specimens from one patient showed identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and two distinct clones. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although Brazil is the world's fifth-largest country in terms of land mass and population, pulmonary, extrapulmonary and systemic forms of nocardiosis were reported in only 6 of the 26 Brazilian states from 1970 to 2013. A least 33.8% of these 46 cases of nocardiosis proved fatal. Interestingly, coinfection

  6. Molecular identification of nocardia isolates from clinical samples and an overview of human nocardiosis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baio, Paulo Victor Pereira; Ramos, Juliana Nunes; dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; Soriano, Morgana Fonseca; Ladeira, Elisa Martins; Souza, Mônica Cristina; Camello, Thereza Cristina Ferreira; Ribeiro, Marcio Garcia; Hirata Junior, Raphael; Vieira, Verônica Viana; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia sp. causes a variety of clinical presentations. The incidence of nocardiosis varies geographically according to several factors, such as the prevalence of HIV infections, transplants, neoplastic and rheumatic diseases, as well as climate, socio-economic conditions and laboratory procedures for Nocardia detection and identification. In Brazil the paucity of clinical reports of Nocardia infections suggests that this genus may be underestimated as a cause of human diseases and/or either neglected or misidentified in laboratory specimens. Accurate identification of Nocardia species has become increasingly important for clinical and epidemiological investigations. In this study, seven clinical Nocardia isolates were identified by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and their antimicrobial susceptibility was also determined. Most Nocardia isolates were associated to pulmonary disease. The majority of Brazilian human isolates in cases reported in literature were identified as Nocardia sp. Molecular characterization was used for species identification of Nocardia nova, Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, Nocardia asiatica and Nocardia exalbida/gamkensis. Data indicated that molecular analysis provided a different Nocardia speciation than the initial biochemical identification for most Brazilian isolates. All Nocardia isolates showed susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, the antimicrobial of choice in the treatment nocardiosis. N. nova isolated from different clinical specimens from one patient showed identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and two distinct clones. Although Brazil is the world's fifth-largest country in terms of land mass and population, pulmonary, extrapulmonary and systemic forms of nocardiosis were reported in only 6 of the 26 Brazilian states from 1970 to 2013. A least 33.8% of these 46 cases of nocardiosis proved fatal. Interestingly, coinfection by two clones may occur in patients presenting nocardiosis. Nocardia infection may be

  7. Susceptibilities of Human Cytomegalovirus Clinical Isolates to BAY38-4766, BAY43-9695, and Ganciclovir

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    McSharry, James J.; McDonough, Ann; Olson, Betty; Hallenberger, Sabine; Reefschlaeger, Juergen; Bender, Wolfgang; Drusano, George L.

    2001-01-01

    BAY38-4766 and BAY43-9695 are nonnucleosidic compounds with activities against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Two phenotypic assays were used to determine the drug susceptibilities of 36 HCMV clinical isolates to the BAY compounds and ganciclovir. Using either assay, both BAY compounds at a concentration of approximately 1 μM inhibited the replication of all 36 HCMV clinical isolates, including 11 ganciclovir-resistant clinical isolates, by 50%. PMID:11557492

  8. Flow Cytometric Determination of Ganciclovir Susceptibilities of Human Cytomegalovirus Clinical Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, James M.; Lurain, Nell S.; Drusano, George L.; Landay, Alan; Manischewitz, Jody; Nokta, Mostafa; O’Gorman, Maurice; Shapiro, Howard M.; Weinberg, Adriana; Reichelderfer, Patricia; Crumpacker, Clyde

    1998-01-01

    A flow cytometric assay has been developed for the measurement of susceptibilities to ganciclovir of laboratory strains and clinical isolates of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The assay uses fluorochrome-labeled monoclonal antibodies to HCMV immediate-early and late antigens to identify HCMV-infected cells and flow cytometry to detect and quantitate the number of antigen-positive cells. By this assay, the 50 and 90% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 and IC90, respectively) of ganciclovir for the AD169 strain of HCMV were 1.7 and 9.2 μM, respectively, and the IC50 for the ganciclovir-resistant D6/3/1 derivative of the AD169 strain was greater than 12 μM. The ganciclovir susceptibilities of 17 HCMV clinical isolates were also determined by flow cytometric analysis of the effect of ganciclovir on late-antigen synthesis in HCMV-infected cells. The average IC50 of ganciclovir for drug-sensitive HCMV clinical isolates was 3.79 μM (±2.60). The plaque-reduction assay for these clinical isolates yielded an average IC50 of 2.80 μM (±1.46). Comparison of the results of the flow cytometry assays with those obtained from the plaque-reduction assays demonstrated acceptable bias and precision. Flow cytometric and plaque-reduction analysis of cells infected with ganciclovir-resistant clinical isolates failed to show a reduction in the percentage of late-antigen-positive cells or PFU, even at 96 μM ganciclovir. The flow cytometric assay for determining ganciclovir susceptibility of HCMV is quantitative, and objective, and potentially automatable, and its results are reproducible among laboratories. PMID:9542916

  9. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co......Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems......-cultured with human intestinal cells. We show that filtered media from co-cultures contain a factor that reduces conjugation efficiency. Protease treatment of the filtered media eliminates this inhibition of conjugation. This data suggests that a peptide or protein based factor is secreted on the apical side...

  10. Carbapenem resistance in a human clinical isolate identified to be closely related to Acinetobacter indicus.

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    Bonnin, Rémy A; Poirel, Laurent; van der Reijden, Tanny J K; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Lescat, Mathilde; Nordmann, Patrice

    2014-10-01

    Here we report a case of carbapenem resistance in a human clinical isolate that was found to be closely related to the newly described environmental species Acinetobacter indicus. This strain harboured the blaOXA-23 carbapenemase gene located on a conjugative plasmid. Partial sequencing of 16S rDNA and rpoB genes, together with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis, showed that this strain was distantly related to the Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex and was closely related to A. indicus. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Characterization of Staphylococcus caprae Clinical Isolates Involved in Human Bone and Joint Infections, Compared with Goat Mastitis Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ersu, J; Aubin, G G; Mercier, P; Nicollet, P; Bémer, P; Corvec, S

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus caprae is an emerging microorganism in human bone and joint infections (BJI). The aim of this study is to describe the features of S. caprae isolates involved in BJI (H for human) compared with those of isolates recovered in goat mastitis (A for animal). Fourteen isolates of each origin were included. Identifications were performed using a Vitek 2 GP ID card, tuf gene sequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) Vitek MS. Molecular typing was carried out using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DiversiLab technology. The crystal violet method was used to determine biofilm-forming ability. Virulence factors were searched by PCR. Vitek MS technology provides an accurate identification for the two types of isolates compared to that of gold-standard sequencing (sensitivity, 96.4%), whereas the Vitek 2 GP ID card was more effective for H isolates. Molecular typing methods revealed two distinct lineages corresponding to the origin despite few overlaps: H and A. In our experimental conditions, no significant difference was observed in biofilm production ability between H and A isolates. Nine isolates (5 H isolates and 4 A isolates) behaved as weak producers while one A isolate was a strong producer. Concerning virulence factors, the autolysin atlC and the serine aspartate adhesin (sdrZ) genes were detected in 24 isolates (86%), whereas the lipase gene was always detected, except in one H isolate (96%). The ica operon was present in 23 isolates (82%). Fibrinogen-binding (fbe) or collagen-binding (cna) genes were not detected by using primers designed for Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis, even in low stringency conditions. Although S. caprae probably remains underestimated in human infections, further studies are needed to better understand the evolution and the adaptation of this species to its host. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Activity of AMP2041 against human and animal multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabassi, Clotilde Silvia; Sala, Andrea; Santospirito, Davide; Alborali, Giovanni Loris; Carretto, Edoardo; Ghibaudo, Giovanni; Taddei, Simone

    2017-03-23

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing threat to public health. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relevant pathogen causing human and animal infections, frequently displaying high levels of resistance to commonly used antimicrobials. The increasing difficulty to develop new effective antibiotics have discouraged investment in this area and only a few new antibiotics are currently under development. An approach to overcome antibiotic resistance could be based on antimicrobial peptides since they offer advantages over currently used microbicides. The antimicrobial activity of the synthetic peptide AMP2041 was evaluated against 49 P. aeruginosa clinical strains with high levels of antimicrobial resistance, isolated from humans (n = 19) and animals (n = 30). In vitro activity was evaluated by a microdilution assay for lethal dose 90% (LD90), while the activity over time was performed by time-kill assay with 12.5 µg/ml of AMP2014. Evidences for a direct membrane damage were investigated on P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 reference strain, on animal isolate PA-VET 38 and on human isolate PA-H 24 by propidium iodide and on P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 by scanning electron microscopy. AMP2041 showed a dose-dependent activity, with a mean (SEM) LD90 of 1.69 and 3.3 µg/ml for animal and human strains, respectively. AMP2041 showed microbicidal activity on P. aeruginosa isolates from a patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) and resistance increased from first infection isolate (LD90 = 0.3 μg/ml) to the mucoid phenotype (LD90 = 10.4 μg/ml). The time-kill assay showed a time-dependent bactericidal effect of AMP2041 and LD90 was reached within 20 min for all the strains. The stain-dead assay showed an increasing of membrane permeabilization and SEM analysis revealed holes, dents and bursts throughout bacterial cell wall after 30 min of incubation with AMP2041. The obtained results assessed for the first time the good antimicrobial activity of AMP2041 on P. aeruginosa strains of

  13. Genotypic characterisation and cluster analysis of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from domestic pets, human clinical cases and retail food

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    Acke Els

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic similarity of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from pets, compared to human clinical cases and retail food isolates collected in Ireland over 2001-2006 was investigated by cluster analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE fingerprinting profiles. Comparison of the PFGE profiles of 60 pet isolates and 109 human isolates revealed that seven (4.1% profiles were grouped in clusters including at least one human and one pet C. jejuni isolate. In total six (1.6% of 60 pet and 310 food profiles were in clusters with at least one food and one pet C. jejuni isolate. The detection of only a small number of genetically indistinguishable isolates by PFGE profile cluster analysis from pets and from humans with enteritis in this study suggests that pets are unlikely to be an important reservoir for human campylobacteriosis in Ireland. However, genetically indistinguishable isolates were detected and C. jejuni from pets may circulate and may contribute to clinical infections in humans. In addition, contaminated food fed to pets may be a potential source of Campylobacter infection in pets, which may subsequently pose a risk to humans.

  14. Characterization of a 2016 Clinical Isolate of Zika Virus in Non-human Primates

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    Xiao-Feng Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal models are critical to understand disease and to develop countermeasures for the ongoing epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV. Here we report a non-human primate model using a 2016 contemporary clinical isolate of ZIKV. Upon subcutaneous inoculation, rhesus macaques developed fever and viremia, with robust excretion of ZIKV RNA in urine, saliva, and lacrimal fluid. Necropsy of two infected animals revealed that systematic infections involving central nervous system and visceral organs were established at the acute phrase. ZIKV initially targeted the intestinal tracts, spleen, and parotid glands, and retained in spleen and lymph nodes till 10 days post infection. ZIKV-specific immune responses were readily induced in all inoculated animals. The non-human primate model described here provides a valuable platform to study ZIKV pathogenesis and to evaluate vaccine and therapeutics.

  15. Characterization of a 2016 Clinical Isolate of Zika Virus in Non-human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Hao-Long; Huang, Xing-Yao; Qiu, Ye-Feng; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Na-Na; Ye, Qing; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Fan, Hang; An, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Shi-Hui; Gao, Bo; Fa, Yun-Zhi; Tong, Yi-Gang; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Gao, George F; Cao, Wu-Chun; Shi, Pei-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Animal models are critical to understand disease and to develop countermeasures for the ongoing epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV). Here we report a non-human primate model using a 2016 contemporary clinical isolate of ZIKV. Upon subcutaneous inoculation, rhesus macaques developed fever and viremia, with robust excretion of ZIKV RNA in urine, saliva, and lacrimal fluid. Necropsy of two infected animals revealed that systematic infections involving central nervous system and visceral organs were established at the acute phrase. ZIKV initially targeted the intestinal tracts, spleen, and parotid glands, and retained in spleen and lymph nodes till 10days post infection. ZIKV-specific immune responses were readily induced in all inoculated animals. The non-human primate model described here provides a valuable platform to study ZIKV pathogenesis and to evaluate vaccine and therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co-cultured with human intestinal cells. We show that filtered media from co-cultures contain a factor that reduces conjugation efficiency. Protease treatment of the filtered media eliminates this inhibition of conjugation. This data suggests that a peptide or protein based factor is secreted on the apical side of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut. PMID:24955767

  17. Human intestinal cells modulate conjugational transfer of multidrug resistance plasmids between clinical Escherichia coli isolates.

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    Ana Manuel Dantas Machado

    Full Text Available Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co-cultured with human intestinal cells. We show that filtered media from co-cultures contain a factor that reduces conjugation efficiency. Protease treatment of the filtered media eliminates this inhibition of conjugation. This data suggests that a peptide or protein based factor is secreted on the apical side of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut.

  18. Inhibition of Ganciclovir-Susceptible and -Resistant Human Cytomegalovirus Clinical Isolates by the Benzimidazole l-Riboside 1263W94

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, James J.; McDonough, Ann; Olson, Betty; Talarico, Christine; Davis, Michele; Biron, Karen K.

    2001-01-01

    The average 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for AD169 were 0.22 ± 0.09 μM 1263W94 and 5.36 ± 0.12 μM ganciclovir. For 35 human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) clinical isolates the average IC50 was 0.42 ± 0.09 μM 1263W94, and for 26 ganciclovir-susceptible HCMV clinical isolates the average IC50 was 3.78 ± 1.62 μM ganciclovir. Nine HCMV clinical isolates that were resistant to ganciclovir were completely susceptible to 1263W94. PMID:11687477

  19. Comparative genomics of Tunisian Leishmania major isolates causing human cutaneous leishmaniasis with contrasting clinical severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouila, Amel; Guerfali, Fatma Z; Atri, Chiraz; Bali, Aymen; Attia, Hanene; Sghaier, Rabiaa M; Mkannez, Ghada; Dickens, Nicholas J; Laouini, Dhafer

    2017-06-01

    Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (L.) major parasites affects urban and suburban areas in the center and south of Tunisia where the disease is endemo-epidemic. Several cases were reported in human patients for which infection due to L. major induced lesions with a broad range of severity. However, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying this diversity. Our hypothesis is that parasite genomic variability could, in addition to the host immunological background, contribute to the intra-species clinical variability observed in patients and explain the lesion size differences observed in the experimental model. Based on several epidemiological, in vivo and in vitro experiments, we focused on two clinical isolates showing contrasted severity in patients and BALB/c experimental mice model. We used DNA-seq as a high-throughput technology to facilitate the identification of genetic variants with discriminating potential between both isolates. Our results demonstrate that various levels of heterogeneity could be found between both L. major isolates in terms of chromosome or gene copy number variation (CNV), and that the intra-species divergence could surprisingly be related to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and Insertion/Deletion (InDels) events. Interestingly, we particularly focused here on genes affected by both types of variants and correlated them with the observed gene CNV. Whether these differences are sufficient to explain the severity in patients is obviously still open to debate, but we do believe that additional layers of -omic information is needed to complement the genomic screen in order to draw a more complete map of severity determinants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genotypic characterization of Malaysian human isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from carriage and clinical sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakrin, Nik Noorul Shakira Mohamed; Masri, Siti Norbaya; Taib, Niazlin Mohd; Nordin, Syafinaz Amin; Jamal, Farida; Desa, Mohd Nasir Mohd

    2014-12-01

    This study characterized carriage and clinical pneumococcal isolates for serotypes, penicillin susceptibility, virulence genes and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern of penicillin binding protein (PBP) genes. DNA fingerprint of isolates was generated by BOX-PCR. Majority of serotypes were 23F followed by 19F, 19A and 6A. Twenty-four percent of isolates were penicillin non-susceptible (PNSP). All of the targeted virulence genes were detected in all isolates with the exception of pili; 20.6% (n=22) for PI-1 and 14.0% (n=15) for PI-2. Of the 13 isolates which carried both PI-1 and PI-2, 10 were of clinical origin. Digested pbp-DNA produced three PBP-RFLP profiles for pbp1a (A1 to A3), six profiles for pbp2b (B1 to B6) and seven for pbp2x (X1 to X7) mostly in PNSPs. Based on BOX-PCR analysis, the majority of isolates were genetically diverse with a small number of potentially related isolates carrying pili genes. No obvious genotypic association was observed pertaining to carriage and clinical origin of isolates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shewmaker, P L; Whitney, A M; Humrighouse, B W

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented...

  2. VTEC O157 subtypes associated with the most severe clinical symptoms in humans constitute a minor part of VTEC 0157 isolates from Danish Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldgaard, Bemt Bjørn; Scheutz, Flemming; Boel, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    %) as compared to the bovine isolates (13%). Furthermore, a significant correlation between the presence of the vtx2 gene and development of haemolytic-uraemic syndrome was found. The 149 isolates encompassed 16 different phage types (PTs). The majority (87%) of the human clinical isolates were identified, as PT......, of the bovine isolates. All but one PT2 and PT4 isolate carried either vtx2 alone or in combination with vtx2c, whereas none of the PT8 and PT14 isolates carried vtx2. The significant overlap between vtx/phage type combinations in bovine and human clinical isolates indicate that cattle are an important...

  3. Characterization of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium spp. isolates and their interaction with human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are naturally occurring bacteria in the environment. A link has been suggested between M. avium strains in drinking water and clinical isolates from infected individuals. There is a need to develop new screening methodologies tha...

  4. A protocol to isolate and qualify purified human preantral follicles in cases of acute leukemia, for future clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouloungui, Elodie; Zver, Tristan; Roux, Christophe; Amiot, Clotilde

    2018-01-05

    Autotransplantation of cryopreserved ovarian cortex can be associated with a risk of cancer cell reseeding. This issue could be eliminated by grafting isolated preantral follicles. Collagenase NB6 is an enzyme produced under good manufacturing practices (GMP) in compliance with requirements for tissue engineering and transplantation in humans and thus can be used to isolate preantral follicles from ovarian tissue in the framework of further clinical applications. Multicolor flow cytometry is an effective tool to evaluate the potential contamination of follicular suspensions by leukemic cells. The efficiency of collagenase NB6 was evaluated in comparison to collagenase type IA and Liberase DH, in terms of yield, morphology and viability. A short-term in vitro culture of follicles isolated with collagenase NB6 was conducted for 3 days in a fibrin matrix. A modelization procedure was carried out to detect the presence of leukemic cells in follicular suspensions using multicolor flow cytometry (MFC). No statistical differences were found between collagenase NB6, Liberase DH (p = 0.386) and collagenase type IA (p = 0.171) regarding the number of human preantral follicles isolated. The mean diameter of isolated follicles was significantly lower with collagenase NB6 (p good manufacturing practices for cell therapy. Multicolor flow cytometry was able to confirm that final follicular suspensions were free from leukemic cells. This safe isolation technique using collagenase NB6 can be considered for future clinical applications.

  5. Prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in Salmonella spp. isolated from commercial chickens and human clinical isolates from South Africa and Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver T. Zishiri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is a significant public health concern around the world. The injudicious use of antimicrobial agents in poultry production for treatment, growth promotion and prophylaxis has resulted in the emergence of drug resistant strains of Salmonella. The current study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes from Salmonella isolated from South African and Brazilian broiler chickens as well as human clinical isolates. Out of a total of 200 chicken samples that were collected from South Africa 102 (51% tested positive for Salmonella using the InvA gene. Of the overall 146 Salmonella positive samples that were screened for the iroB gene most of them were confirmed to be Salmonella enterica with the following prevalence rates: 85% of human clinical samples, 68.6% of South African chicken isolates and 70.8% of Brazilian chicken samples. All Salmonella isolates obtained were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing with 10 antibiotics. Salmonella isolates from South African chickens exhibited resistance to almost all antimicrobial agents used, such as tetracycline (93%, trimethoprim-sulfamthoxazole (84%, trimethoprim (78.4%, kanamycin (74%, gentamicin (48%, ampicillin (47%, amoxicillin (31%, chloramphenicol (31%, erythromycin (18% and streptomycin (12%. All samples were further subjected to PCR in order to screen some common antimicrobial and virulence genes of interest namely spiC, pipD, misL, orfL, pse-1, tet A, tet B, ant (3"-la, sul 1 and sul. All Salmonella positive isolates exhibited resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent; however, antimicrobial resistance patterns demonstrated that multiple drug resistance was prevalent. The findings provide evidence that broiler chickens are colonised by pathogenic Salmonella harbouring antimicrobial resistance genes. Therefore, it is evident that there is a need for prudent use of antimicrobial agents in poultry production systems in

  6. Effect of EDTA on the resistance of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, A; Solar, H; González, C; Zemelman, R

    2000-11-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunist nosocomial pathogen of world-wide importance and produces severe infections in immunocompromised patients. However, the virulence factors contributing to its pathogenic properties are not well known. The effect of normal human serum against 18 clinical isolates of the most prevalent biotypes of A. baumannii in Chile was investigated. The effect of pre-treatment of the cells with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) or bismuth subsalicylate (BSS), compounds known to decrease the amount of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial capsular polysaccharide (CPS), respectively, in other gram-negative bacteria, was evaluated. Most isolates (16 of 18) showed resistance to normal human serum. Prior treatment with EDTA rendered nine of these isolates susceptible to serum, while seven isolates maintained their resistance. Pre-treatment with BSS did not modify the serum-resistant behaviour of the isolates. The results suggest that LPS might be involved in the resistance of A. baumannii to human serum whereas CPS does not seem to contribute to this property.

  7. Ultrastructural study of the mycelial phase of clinical isolates of Sporothrix schenckii obtained from feline, canine and human cases of sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martins Madrid

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Using transmission electron microscopy, we studied the presence of melanin and cell wall thickness of clinical isolates of Sporothrix schenckii obtained from cats, dogs and humans as compared to reference strains. We detected differences regarding presence of the melanin among the clinical isolates of S. schenckii and a correlation between presence of melanin and cell wall thickness.

  8. BEC, a Novel Enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens Found in Human Clinical Isolates from Acute Gastroenteritis Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonogi, Shinya; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Kawai, Takao; Yoda, Tomoko; Harada, Tetsuya; Kumeda, Yuko; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Hiyoshi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Shota; Kodama, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis for which C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) has been considered an essential factor. Recently, we experienced two outbreaks of food-borne gastroenteritis in which non-CPE producers of C. perfringens were strongly suspected to be the cause. Here, we report a novel enterotoxin produced by C. perfringens isolates, BEC (binary enterotoxin of C. perfringens). Culture supernatants of the C. perfringens strains showed fluid-accumulating activity in rabbit ileal loop and suckling mouse assays. Purification of the enterotoxic substance in the supernatants and high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA of the strains revealed BEC, composed of BECa and BECb. BECa and BECb displayed limited amino acid sequence similarity to other binary toxin family members, such as the C. perfringens iota toxin. The becAB genes were located on 54.5-kb pCP13-like plasmids. Recombinant BECb (rBECb) alone had fluid-accumulating activity in the suckling mouse assay. Although rBECa alone did not show enterotoxic activity, rBECa enhanced the enterotoxicity of rBECb when simultaneously administered in suckling mice. The entertoxicity of the mutant in which the becB gene was disrupted was dramatically decreased compared to that of the parental strain. rBECa showed an ADP-ribosylating activity on purified actin. Although we have not directly evaluated whether BECb delivers BECa into cells, rounding of Vero cells occurred only when cells were treated with both rBECa and rBECb. These results suggest that BEC is a novel enterotoxin of C. perfringens distinct from CPE, and that BEC-producing C. perfringens strains can be causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Additionally, the presence of becAB on nearly identical plasmids in distinct lineages of C. perfringens isolates suggests the involvement of horizontal gene transfer in the acquisition of the toxin genes. PMID:24664508

  9. Actinomyces timonensis sp. nov., isolated from a human clinical osteo-articular sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renvoise, Aurélie; Raoult, Didier; Roux, Véronique

    2010-07-01

    Gram-positive, non-spore-forming rods were isolated from a human osteo-articular sample (strain 7400942(T)). Based on cellular morphology and the results of biochemical analysis, this strain was tentatively identified as a novel species of the genus Actinomyces. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons showed that the bacterium was closely related to the type strain of Actinomyces denticolens (96.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). A comparison of biochemical traits showed that strain 7400942(T) was distinct from A. denticolens in a number of characteristics, i.e. in contrast with A. denticolens, strain 7400942(T) was negative for nitrate reduction and for beta-galactosidase, alpha-glucosidase and alanine arylamidase activities, it was positive for acid production from N-acetylglucosamine, melezitose and glycogen, and it was negative for acid production from turanose. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS protein analysis confirmed that strain 7400942(T) represents a novel species, as scores obtained for its spectra were significant (>2.2) only with strain 7400942(T). On the basis of phenotypic data and phylogenetic inference, it is proposed that this strain should be designated Actinomyces timonensis sp. nov.; the type strain is strain 7400942(T) (=CSUR P35(T)=CCUG 55928(T)).

  10. Molecular Characterization of Clinical Isolates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Resistant to the Protease Inhibitor Darunavir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasková, Klára Grantz; Koíek, Milan; Rezácová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jirí; Yashina, Tatyana; Kagan, Ron M.; Konvalinka, Jan; (Quest); (Charles U)

    2010-03-04

    Darunavir is the most recently approved human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease (PR) inhibitor (PI) and is active against many HIV type 1 PR variants resistant to earlier-generation PIs. Darunavir shows a high genetic barrier to resistance development, and virus strains with lower sensitivity to darunavir have a higher number of PI resistance-associated mutations than viruses resistant to other PIs. In this work, we have enzymologically and structurally characterized a number of highly mutated clinically derived PRs with high levels of phenotypic resistance to darunavir. With 18 to 21 amino acid residue changes, the PR variants studied in this work are the most highly mutated HIV PR species ever studied by means of enzyme kinetics and X-ray crystallography. The recombinant proteins showed major defects in substrate binding, while the substrate turnover was less affected. Remarkably, the overall catalytic efficiency of the recombinant PRs (5% that of the wild-type enzyme) is still sufficient to support polyprotein processing and particle maturation in the corresponding viruses. The X-ray structures of drug-resistant PRs complexed with darunavir suggest that the impaired inhibitor binding could be explained by change in the PR-inhibitor hydrogen bond pattern in the P2 binding pocket due to a substantial shift of the aminophenyl moiety of the inhibitor. Recombinant virus phenotypic characterization, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray structural analysis thus help to explain darunavir resistance development in HIV-positive patients.

  11. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    KAUST Repository

    Bokil, Nilesh J.

    2011-11-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular pathogens target macrophages, we assessed the interactions between UPEC and macrophages. Colonization of the mouse bladder by UPEC strain CFT073 resulted in increased expression of myeloid-restricted genes, consistent with the recruitment of inflammatory macrophages to the site of infection. In in vitro assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1 + vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that some UPEC isolates may subvert macrophage anti-microbial pathways, and that host species differences may impact on intracellular UPEC survival. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characteristics Associated with Biofilm Formation by Human Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates of Different Pathotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Juliane; Böhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jörg; Burdukiewicz, Michał; Weinreich, Jörg; Ali, Aamir; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Rödiger, Stefan; Schierack, Peter

    2017-12-15

    Bacterial biofilm formation is a widespread phenomenon and a complex process requiring a set of genes facilitating the initial adhesion, maturation, and production of the extracellular polymeric matrix and subsequent dispersal of bacteria. Most studies on Escherichia coli biofilm formation have investigated nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 strains. Due to the extensive focus on laboratory strains in most studies, there is poor information regarding biofilm formation by pathogenic E. coli isolates. In this study, we genotypically and phenotypically characterized 187 human clinical E. coli isolates representing various pathotypes (e.g., uropathogenic, enteropathogenic, and enteroaggregative E. coli ). We investigated the presence of biofilm-associated genes ("genotype") and phenotypically analyzed the isolates for motility and curli and cellulose production ("phenotype"). We developed a new screening method to examine the in vitro biofilm formation ability. In summary, we found a high prevalence of biofilm-associated genes. However, we could not detect a biofilm-associated gene or specific phenotype correlating with the biofilm formation ability. In contrast, we did identify an association of increased biofilm formation with a specific E. coli pathotype. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) was found to exhibit the highest capacity for biofilm formation. Using our image-based technology for the screening of biofilm formation, we demonstrated the characteristic biofilm formation pattern of EAEC, consisting of thick bacterial aggregates. In summary, our results highlight the fact that biofilm-promoting factors shown to be critical for biofilm formation in nonpathogenic strains do not reflect their impact in clinical isolates and that the ability of biofilm formation is a defined characteristic of EAEC. IMPORTANCE Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and consist of sessile bacterial cells surrounded by a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix. They cause chronic and device

  13. Characterization of Klebsiella sp. strain 10982, a colonizer of humans that contains novel antibiotic resistance alleles and exhibits genetic similarities to plant and clinical Klebsiella isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H; Zhao, LiCheng; Sahl, Jason W; Robinson, Gwen; Harris, Anthony D; Rasko, David A; Johnson, J Kristie

    2014-01-01

    A unique Klebsiella species strain, 10982, was cultured from a perianal swab specimen obtained from a patient in the University of Maryland Medical Center intensive care unit. Klebsiella sp. 10982 possesses a large IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid encoding a novel FOX AmpC β-lactamase designated FOX-10. A novel variant of the LEN β-lactamase was also identified. Genome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that this isolate contains genes associated with nitrogen fixation, allantoin metabolism, and citrate fermentation. These three gene regions are typically present in either Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates or Klebsiella nitrogen-fixing endophytes but usually not in the same organism. Phylogenomic analysis of Klebsiella sp. 10982 and sequenced Klebsiella genomes demonstrated that Klebsiella sp. 10982 is present on a branch that is located intermediate between the genomes of nitrogen-fixing endophytes and K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. Metabolic features identified in the genome of Klebsiella sp. 10982 distinguish this isolate from other Klebsiella clinical isolates. These features include the nitrogen fixation (nif) gene cluster, which is typically present in endophytic Klebsiella isolates and is absent from Klebsiella clinical isolates. Additionally, the Klebsiella sp. 10982 genome contains genes associated with allantoin metabolism, which have been detected primarily in K. pneumoniae isolates from liver abscesses. Comparative genomic analysis of Klebsiella sp. 10982 demonstrated that this organism has acquired genes conferring new metabolic strategies and novel antibiotic resistance alleles, both of which may enhance its ability to colonize the human body.

  14. Combining cell lines to optimize isolation of human enterovirus from clinical specimens: report of 25 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prim, Núria; Rodríguez, Graciela; Margall, Núria; Del Cuerpo, Margarita; Trallero, Gloria; Rabella, Núria

    2013-01-01

    Cell culture is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of human enteroviruses (HEVs) although molecular techniques are required for detection of some serotypes. Due to the diversity of HEVs, a single cell line is not susceptible to all serotypes, and several lines are required to optimize the isolation of HEVs. In this study, the results of HEV isolation during the last 25 years are reported. A total of 1,192 HEVs were isolated and isolation rates varied depending on the cell line used. MRC5 cells yielded the best results (70.7%), followed by A549 cells (52.6%), RD cells (37.5%), and HEp-2 cells (29.7%). A total of 521 HEVs were characterized, and HEV-B was the most frequent species (81%). Polioviruses (PV) and HEV-A were isolated less frequently (17% and 1%, respectively). None of the cell lines detected all the enteroviruses. MRC5 cells were the most susceptible for isolation of echoviruses (85.7%) and PVs (85.4%), whereas HEp2 was the most susceptible for Coxsackieviruses B (82.6%). Some serotypes were isolated in one cell line only. 40.5% of echoviruses were isolated in MRC5 cells whereas 42.3% and 23.9% of Coxsackieviruses B were isolated in RD cells and HEp2 cells, respectively. Although A549 cells did not achieve the best performance for any enterovirus serotypes, they isolated 52.6% of the total HEVs. In view of these results, MRC5 cells, A549 cells, and RD cells should be combined to optimize isolation of HEVs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Mycobacterium grossiae sp. nov., a rapidly growing, scotochromogenic species isolated from human clinical respiratory and blood culture specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto Enrique; Greninger, Alexander L; Ladutko, Lynn; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Jakubiec, Wesley; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Wallace, Richard J; Simmon, Keith E; Dunn, Bruce E; Jackoway, Gary; Vora, Surabhi B; Quinn, Kevin K; Qin, Xuan; Campbell, Sheldon

    2017-11-01

    A previously undescribed, rapidly growing, scotochromogenic species of the genus Mycobacterium (represented by strains PB739 T and GK) was isolated from two clinical sources - the sputum of a 76-year-old patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, history of tuberculosis exposure and Mycobacterium avium complex isolated years prior; and the blood of a 15-year-old male with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia status post bone marrow transplant. The isolates grew as dark orange colonies at 25-37 °C after 5 days, sharing features in common with other closely related species. Analysis of the complete 16S rRNA gene sequence (1492 bp) of strain PB739 T demonstrated that the isolate shared 98.8 % relatedness with Mycobacterium wolinskyi. Partial 429 bp hsp65 and 744 bp rpoB region V sequence analyses revealed that the sequences of the novel isolate shared 94.8 and 92.1 % similarity with those of Mycobacterium neoaurum and Mycobacterium aurum, respectively. Biochemical profiling, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, HPLC/gas-liquid chromatography analyses and multilocus sequence typing support the taxonomic status of these isolates (PB739 T and GK) as representatives of a novel species. Both isolates were susceptible to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended antimicrobials for susceptibility testing of rapidly growing mycobacteria including amikacin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, doxycycline/minocycline, imipenem, linezolid, clarithromycin and trimethropin/sulfamethoxazole. Both isolates PB739 T and GK showed intermediate susceptibility to cefoxitin. We propose the name Mycobacterium grossiae sp. nov. for this novel species and have deposited the type strain in the DSMZ and CIP culture collections. The type strain is PB739 T (=DSM 104744 T =CIP 111318 T ).

  16. Clinically isolated laryngeal sarcoidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plaschke, Christina Caroline; Owen, Hanne Hoejris; Rasmussen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    to a combination of CO(2)-laser excision of supraglottic tissue and closure of the incision with sutures. All serological tests were negative or normal, including angiotensin 1 converting enzyme. The clinical expression was uniform with pale, smooth swellings of the supraglottic structures. Surgery proved...... successful to maintain normal breathing. None of the many parameters examined--some previously having been found to be abnormal in sarcoidosis--were abnormal in the present cohort. We are therefore unable to elucidate the pathogenesis. The combined surgical approach re-established normal airway function...

  17. Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov., a member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolated from human clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Alexandr; Krizova, Lenka; Maixnerova, Martina; Sedo, Ondrej; Brisse, Sylvain; Higgins, Paul G

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to define the taxonomic status of a phenetically distinct group of 16 strains that corresponds to Acinetobacter genomic species 'close to 13TU', a provisional genomic species of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex recognized by Gerner-Smidt and Tjernberg in 1993. These strains have been isolated in different countries since the early 1990s and were mostly recovered from human clinical specimens. They were compared with 45 reference strains representing the known taxa of the ACB complex using taxonomic methods relevant to the genus Acinetobacter. Based on sequence analysis of the concatenated partial sequences (2976 bp) of seven housekeeping genes, the 16 strains formed a tight and well-supported cluster (intracluster sequence identity of ≥98.4 %) that was clearly separated from the other members of the ACB complex (≤94.7 %). The species status of the group was supported by average nucleotide identity values of ≤91.7 % between the whole genome sequence of representative strain NIPH 973(T) (NCBI accession no. APOO00000000) and those of the other species. In addition, whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS analyses indicated the distinctness of the group at the protein level. Metabolic and physiological tests revealed several typical features of the group, although they did not allow its reliable differentiation from the other members of the ACB complex. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct novel species, for which we propose the name Acinetobacter seifertii sp. nov. The type strain is NIPH 973(T) ( = CIP 110471(T) = CCUG 34785(T) = CCM 8535(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  18. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmaker, P L; Whitney, A M; Humrighouse, B W

    2016-03-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324(T), 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496(T), and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300(T). A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844(T) = CCUG 67100(T) = LMG 28801(T). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Multidrug Resistance Salmonella Genomic Island 1 in a Morganella morganii subsp. morganii Human Clinical Isolate from France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eliette; Barraud, Olivier; Madec, Jean-Yves; Haenni, Marisa; Cloeckaert, Axel; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Doublet, Benoît

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) is a multidrug resistance integrative mobilizable element that harbors a great diversity of antimicrobial resistance gene clusters described in numerous Salmonella enterica serovars and also in Proteus mirabilis. A serious threat to public health was revealed in the recent description in P. mirabilis of a SGI1-derivative multidrug resistance island named PGI1 (Proteus genomic island 1) carrying extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL) and metallo-β-lactamase resistance genes, blaVEB-6 and blaNDM-1, respectively. Here, we report the first description of Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) in a multidrug-resistant clinical Morganella morganii subsp. morganii strain isolated from a patient in France in 2013. Complete-genome sequencing of the strain revealed SGI1 variant SGI1-L carrying resistance genes dfrA15, floR, tetA(G), blaPSE-1 (now referred to as blaCARB-2), and sul1, conferring resistance to trimethoprim, phenicols, tetracyclines, amoxicillin, and sulfonamides, respectively. The SGI1-L variant was integrated into the usual chromosome-specific integration site at the 3' end of the trmE gene. Beyond Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, the SGI1 integrative mobilizable element may thus also disseminate its multidrug resistance phenotype in another genus belonging to the Proteae tribe of the family Enterobacteriaceae. IMPORTANCE Since its initial identification in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 strains, several SGI1 variants, SGI1 lineages, and SGI1-related elements (SGI2, PGI1, and AGI1) have been described in many bacterial genera (Salmonella, Proteus, Morganella, Vibrio, Shewanella, etc.). They constitute a family of multidrug resistance site-specific integrative elements acquired by horizontal gene transfer, SGI1 being the best-characterized element. The horizontal transfer of SGI1/PGI1 elements into other genera is of public health concern, notably with regard to the spread of

  20. The first report of the vanC1 gene in Enterococcus faecium isolated from a human clinical specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Sun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The vanC1 gene, which is chromosomally located, confers resistance to vancomycin and serves as a species marker for Enterococcus gallinarum. Enterococcus faecium TJ4031 was isolated from a blood culture and harbours the vanC1gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays were performed to detect vanXYc and vanTc genes. Only the vanXYc gene was found in the E. faecium TJ4031 isolate. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin and teicoplanin were 2 µg/mL and 1 µg/mL, respectively. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed that the vanC1and vanXYc genes were not expressed. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and southern hybridisation results showed that the vanC1 gene was encoded in the chromosome. E. faecalis isolated from animals has been reported to harbour vanC1gene. However, this study is the first to report the presence of the vanC1gene in E. faecium of human origin. Additionally, our research showed the vanC1gene cannot serve as a species-specific gene of E. gallinarum and that it is able to be transferred between bacteria. Although the resistance marker is not expressed in the strain, our results showed that E. faecium could acquire the vanC1gene from different species.

  1. The first report of the vanC₁ gene in Enterococcus faecium isolated from a human clinical specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingyue; Wang, Yue; Chen, Zhongju; Zhu, Xuhui; Tian, Lei; Sun, Ziyong

    2014-09-01

    The vanC₁ gene, which is chromosomally located, confers resistance to vancomycin and serves as a species marker for Enterococcus gallinarum. Enterococcus faecium TJ4031 was isolated from a blood culture and harbours the vanC₁gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were performed to detect vanXYc and vanTc genes. Only the vanXYc gene was found in the E. faecium TJ4031 isolate. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin and teicoplanin were 2 µg/mL and 1 µg/mL, respectively. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed that the vanC₁ and vanXYc genes were not expressed. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and southern hybridisation results showed that the vanC₁ gene was encoded in the chromosome. E. faecalis isolated from animals has been reported to harbour vanC₁gene. However, this study is the first to report the presence of the vanC₁gene in E. faecium of human origin. Additionally, our research showed the vanC₁gene cannot serve as a species-specific gene of E. gallinarum and that it is able to be transferred between bacteria. Although the resistance marker is not expressed in the strain, our results showed that E. faecium could acquire the vanC₁gene from different species.

  2. GenoType Mycobacterium Assay for Identification of Mycobacterial Species Isolated from Human Clinical Samples by Using Liquid Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz, P.; Gutierrez, J; Zerolo, F. J.; Casal, M.

    2002-01-01

    The GenoType Mycobacterium assay was used to identify 98 mycobacteria isolates by using liquid cultures from positive BACTEC, MGIT, and ESP bottles. This system identifies 16 mycobacteria. There was complete agreement between the GenoType results and the laboratory identifications for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and other Mycobacterium spp. GenoType also identified mixed mycobacterial infections.

  3. Antimicrobial Activity of Few Medicinal Plants against Clinically Isolated Human Cariogenic Pathogens—An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Devapriya, D.; Sathish, Emmanuel S.; S. Jayasurya Kingsley; H. Shyla Jebashree

    2011-01-01

    Hexane, ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol extracts of Psidium guajava, Terminalia chebula, Mimusops elengi and Achyranthes aspera were tested against the dental caries causing bacteria Streptococcus mutans and fungus Candida albicans isolated from caries infected patients. All the four extracts of P. guajava showed activity against both S. mutans and C. albicans. Maximum zone of inhibition was observed in ethyl acetate of P. guajava. The four extracts of T. chebula and M. elengi showed anti...

  4. Prevalence of AmpC type extended spectrum beta lactamases genes in clinical Samples of E.coli Isolated from Poultry and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Farrokhnazar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of antibiotic resistance among pathogens, particularly in health centers and hospitals, has become a major public health problem. This study identified AmpC-type beta-lactamase against the antibiotic ceftazidime, cefotaxime and cefpodoxime in E.coli isolated from human and poultry and types of producing genes were studied by PCR. In this study, 500 clinical human samples of urine from hospitals of Tehran during 5 months as well as 300 poultry samples were collected and transferred to the microbiology laboratory. Biochemical tests such as TSI, Urea and IMViC were performed on suspected colonies with E.coli. To identify ESBL producing strains, beta-lactamase samples were cultured on Mueller-Hinton agar through antimicrobial susceptibility test by disk agar diffusion based on the standard CLSI for initial screening. PCR reactions were done using specific primers CITM, EBCM, DHAM and MOXM to identify the beta-lactamase AmpC. A number of 200 human and 55 poultry E.coli samples were screened. In human samples, 105 (52.5% were resistant and potential producers of ESBL and AmpC; out of those, 102 (51% produced ESBL and 3 (1.5% potentially produced AmpC. In the study on 55 E.coli isolates from poultry samples based on the results of disk agar diffusion test, 4 (7.2% samples were resistant and potential producers of ESBL. None of the samples were AmpC producers. Through PCR, 2 human samples (1% were CITM positive and one sample (0.5% was DHAM positive. Through the PCR carried out on poultry samples, there were no bands with 4 primers. There was AmpC in human samples; while further studies are required for poultry samples, because poultry significantly contribute in production of food for humans and can be an important source for dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Given the significance of Ampc in providing high levels of beta-lactam antibiotic resistance, particularly third generation cephalosporins which are very common treatments, more

  5. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokil, Nilesh J.; Totsika, Makrina; Carey, Alison J.

    2011-01-01

    or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1+ vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data......Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular...

  6. Expression analysis of adherence-associated genes in pneumococcal clinical isolates during adherence to human respiratory epithelial cells (in vitro) by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desa, Mohd Nasir Mohd; Navaratnam, Parasakthi; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2008-11-01

    Pneumococcal virulence determinants have been extensively studied but molecular evidence on virulence gene expression pattern is still lacking. We undertook this study to analyze the regulation pattern of adherence-associated genes; psaA, pspC, cbpG, including ply of serotypes 1, 7F, 19F and 23F clinical isolates during the bacterial adherence to human lung epithelial cells (in vitro), by real-time PCR. We were able to harvest the bacterial RNA (0.5-1 microg microL(-1)) from the infected host cell and analysis showed a consistent upregulation of psaA. Differential expressions were observed for pspC, cbpG and ply genes but the former was mostly upregulated whereas the later two frequently showed either no significant change or a downregulation. Partial nucleotide sequences of psaA, cbpG and ply were highly homologous among the isolates as well as against GenBank sequences (99%) whereas those for pspC were similar (98%) to allelic variants pspC-3 and pspC-5.

  7. Molecular analysis of clinical isolates previously diagnosed as Mycobacterium intracellulare reveals incidental findings of "Mycobacterium indicus pranii" genotypes in human lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Young; Park, Hye Yun; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Jeon, Kyeongman; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Han, Seung-Jung; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-09-30

    Mycobacterium intracellulare is a major cause of Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease in many countries. Molecular studies have revealed several new Mycobacteria species that are closely related to M. intracellulare. The aim of this study was to re-identify and characterize clinical isolates from patients previously diagnosed with M. intracellulare lung disease at the molecular level. Mycobacterial isolates from 77 patients, initially diagnosed with M. intracellulare lung disease were re-analyzed by multi-locus sequencing and pattern of insertion sequences. Among the 77 isolates, 74 (96 %) isolates were designated as M. intracellulare based on multigene sequence-based analysis. Interestingly, the three remaining strains (4 %) were re-identified as "Mycobacterium indicus pranii" according to distinct molecular phylogenetic positions in rpoB and hsp65 sequence-based typing. In hsp65 sequevar analysis, code 13 was found in the majority of cases and three unreported codes were identified. In 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequevar analysis, all isolates of both species were classified within the Min-A ITS sequevar. Interestingly, four of the M. intracellulare isolates harbored IS1311, a M. avium-specific element. Two of three patients infected with "M. indicus pranii" had persistent positive sputum cultures after antibiotic therapy, indicating the clinical relevance of this study. This analysis highlights the importance of precise identification of clinical isolates genetically close to Mycobacterium species, and suggests that greater attention should be paid to nontuberculous mycobacteria lung disease caused by "M. indicus pranii".

  8. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Human Clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates Reveals Misidentification and Misunderstandings of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella variicola, and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linson, Sarah E.; Ojeda Saavedra, Matthew; Cantu, Concepcion; Davis, James J.; Brettin, Thomas; Olsen, Randall J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major threat to public health, causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The emergence of highly drug-resistant strains is particularly concerning. There has been a recognition and division of Klebsiella pneumoniae into three distinct phylogenetic groups: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella variicola, and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae. K. variicola and K. quasipneumoniae have often been described as opportunistic pathogens that have less virulence in humans than K. pneumoniae does. We recently sequenced the genomes of 1,777 extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing K. pneumoniae isolates recovered from human infections and discovered that 28 strains were phylogenetically related to K. variicola and K. quasipneumoniae. Whole-genome sequencing of 95 additional non-ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates recovered from patients found 12 K. quasipneumoniae strains. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis initially identified all patient isolates as K. pneumoniae, suggesting a potential pitfall in conventional clinical microbiology laboratory identification methods. Whole-genome sequence analysis revealed extensive sharing of core gene content and plasmid replicons among the Klebsiella species. For the first time, strains of both K. variicola and K. quasipneumoniae were found to carry the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) gene, while another K. variicola strain was found to carry the New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) gene. K. variicola and K. quasipneumoniae infections were not less virulent than K. pneumoniae infections, as assessed by in-hospital mortality and infection type. We also discovered evidence of homologous recombination in one K. variicola strain, as well as one strain from a novel Klebsiella species, which challenge the current understanding of interrelationships between clades of Klebsiella. IMPORTANCE Klebsiella

  9. Fast track, dynein-dependent nuclear targeting of human immunodeficiency virus Vpr protein; impaired trafficking in a clinical isolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caly, Leon [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia); Kassouf, Vicki T. [Centre for Virus Research, The Westmead Institute for Medical Research, The University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Moseley, Gregory W. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia); Diefenbach, Russell J.; Cunningham, Anthony L. [Centre for Virus Research, The Westmead Institute for Medical Research, The University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Jans, David A., E-mail: david.jans@monash.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia)

    2016-02-12

    Nuclear import of the accessory protein Vpr is central to infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We previously identified the Vpr F72L mutation in a HIV-infected, long-term non-progressor, showing that it resulted in reduced Vpr nuclear accumulation and altered cytoplasmic localisation. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the effects of nuclear accumulation of the F72L mutation are due to impairment of microtubule-dependent-enhancement of Vpr nuclear import. We use high resolution imaging approaches including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and other approaches to document interaction between Vpr and the dynein light chain protein, DYNLT1, and impaired interaction of the F72L mutant with DYNLT1. The results implicate MTs/DYNLT1 as drivers of Vpr nuclear import and HIV infection, with important therapeutic implications. - Highlights: • HIV-1 Vpr utilizes the microtubule network to traffic towards the nucleus. • Mechanism relies on interaction between Vpr and dynein light chain protein DYNLT1. • Long-term non-progressor derived mutation (F72L) impairs this interaction. • Key residues in the vicinity of F72 contribute to interaction with DYNLT1.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Campylobacter ureolyticus Clinical Isolate RIGS 9880

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, William G; Yee, Emma; On, Stephen L W

    2015-01-01

    The emerging pathogen Campylobacter ureolyticus has been isolated from human and animal genital infections, human periodontal disease, domestic and food animals, and from cases of human gastroenteritis. We report the whole-genome sequence of the human clinical isolate RIGS 9880, which is the firs...

  11. Within-Farm Changes in Dairy Farm-Associated Salmonella Subtypes and Comparison to Human Clinical Isolates in Michigan, 2000-2001 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habing, Greg G.; Manning, Shannon; Bolin, Carole; Cui, Yuehua; Rudrik, James; Dietrich, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Temporal changes in the distribution of Salmonella subtypes in livestock populations may have important impacts on human health. The first objective of this research was to determine the within-farm changes in the population of subtypes of Salmonella on Michigan dairy farms that were sampled longitudinally in 2000-2001 and again in 2009. The second objective was to determine the yearly frequency (2001 through 2012) of reported human illnesses in Michigan associated with the same subtypes. Comparable sampling techniques were used to collect fecal and environmental samples from the same 18 Michigan dairy farms in 2000-2001 and 2009. Serotypes, multilocus sequence types (STs), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) banding patterns were identified for isolates from 6 farms where >1 Salmonella isolate was recovered in both 2000-2001 and 2009. The distribution of STs was significantly different between time frames (P Salmonella were due to recovery of MDR subtypes of S. enterica serotypes Senftenberg and Typhimurium in 2000-2001 and genetically distinct, pansusceptible subtypes of the same serotypes in 2009. The annual frequency of human illnesses between 2001 and 2012 with a PFGE pattern matching a bovine strain decreased for patterns recovered from dairy farms in 2000-2001 and increased for patterns recovered in 2009. These data suggest important changes in the population of Salmonella on dairy farms and in the frequency of human illnesses associated with cattle-derived subtypes. PMID:26070676

  12. A novel exopolysaccharide from a clinical isolate of Prevotella nigrescens: purification, chemical characterization and possible role in modifying human leukocyte phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, K; Yamanaka, T; Yamamoto, N; Furukawa, T; Fukushima, H; Walker, C B; Leung, K-P

    2005-02-01

    Prevotella nigrescens, a gram-negative black-pigmented anaerobic rod, has frequently been isolated from periodontitis and periapical periodontitis lesions. We have isolated an exopolysaccharide-producing P. nigrescens, strain 22, from a chronic periodontitis lesion. The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition and function of the exopolysaccharide associated with this clinical isolate. The chemical composition and structure of the purified exopolysaccharide from strain 22 were determined by high performance liquid chromatography and methylation analysis. To define the biological function of this exopolysaccharide, a chemically induced exopolysaccharide nonproducing mutant, strain 328, which was derived from strain 22, was established. The biological effects of exopolysaccharide were determined by comparing the ability of strain 22, strain 328 or heat-killed strain 22 to form abscesses in mice and to interfere with the phagocytic activity of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Chemical analysis showed that isolated exopolysaccharide consisted of mannose (521.6 microg/mg), glucose (25.6 microg/mg), fructose (65.8 microg/mg), galactose (12.5 microg/mg), arabinose (6.2 microg/mg), xylose (3.2 microg/mg), rhamnose (6.1 microg/mg), and ribose (0.6 microg/mg). Methylation analysis of exopolysaccharide indicated that the linkages of mannose were primarily (1-->2, 1-->6) (1-->2) (1-->6), and (1-->3). Strain 22 and, to a lesser extent, its heat-killed counterpart induced greater abscess formation in mice than strain 328, even though the enzymatic profile of strain 22 was similar to that of strain 328. The ability of strain 328 to induce abscess formation was restored by adding the purified exopolysaccharide isolated from strain 22 to the cell suspension of strain 328. Exopolysaccharide alone failed to induce abscess formation in mice. Further, strain 328 but not the untreated or heat-killed strain 22, was phagocytosed by polymorphonuclear

  13. Genetic differences between avian and human isolates of Candida dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McManus, Brenda A

    2009-09-01

    When Candida dubliniensis isolates obtained from seabird excrement and from humans in Ireland were compared by using multilocus sequence typing, 13 of 14 avian isolates were genetically distinct from human isolates. The remaining avian isolate was indistinguishable from a human isolate, suggesting that transmission may occur between humans and birds.

  14. Total excitation of the isolated human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durrer, D.; Dam, R.Th. van; Freud, G.E.; Janse, M.J.; Meijler, F.L.; Arzbaecher, R.C.

    To obtain information conceming the time course and instantaneous distribution of the excitatory process of the normal human healt, studies were made on isolated human hearts from seven individuals who died from various cerebral conditions, but who had no history of cardiac disease. Measurements

  15. Development of Hepatocyte-like Cell Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem cell as a Host for Clinically Isolated Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-Ngiamsuntorn, Khanit; Hongeng, Suradej; Wongkajornsilp, Adisak

    2017-08-14

    This unit describes protocols to develop hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) starting from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a natural host for hepatitis C virus (HCV). These include the preparation of MSCs from bone marrow, the reprogramming of MSCs into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and the differentiation of iPSCs into HLCs. This unit also incorporates the characterization of the resulting cells at each stage. Another section entails the preparations of HCV. The sources of HCV are either the clinically isolated HCV (HCVser) and the conventional JFH-1 genotype. The last section is the infection protocol coupled with the measurement of viral titer. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Impact of glycoprotein B genotype and naturally occurring ORF UL56 polymorphisms upon susceptibility of clinical human cytomegalovirus isolates to letermovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischka, Peter; Zhang, Douglas; Holder, Daniel; Zimmermann, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Letermovir is a novel anti-HCMV drug in Phase III development that targets the UL56 subunit of the viral terminase complex. In immunocompromised patients four major glycoprotein B (gB) subtypes are known and may influence pathogenesis and thus disease outcomes. Using a panel of 74 letermovir-naïve, low-passage, clinical HCMV isolates, we examined the potential impact of i) gB genotype and ii) naturally occurring UL56 sequence variations upon susceptibility to letermovir. Our data show that letermovir's potency is independent of gB subtype and show that naturally-occurring letermovir-resistance is rare or possibly absent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Selective medium to isolate human Bifidobacterium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Dongxue; Zhang, Jiachao; Bai, Na; Huang, Weiqiang; Zhang, Heping

    2014-04-04

    To compare five selective media to isolate human Bifidobacterium. Feces from six healthy human volunteers were diluted and cultivated on five Bifidobacterium selective media. After anaerobic cultivation, bacterial colonies were counted, selected and identified. Meanwhile, bacterial genomic DNA was extracted from the feces samples, and the Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (q-PCR) were applied to reveal the diversity of Bifidobacterium. The amount of Bifidobacterium grown on BSM and BLM media was similar to the result detected by q-PCR and was significantly higher than that on three other media. Bifidobacterium isolated from BLM medium was similar to the identified result of DGGE profile. BLM medium is the best selective medium for Bifidobacterium isolation from human gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Yeasts isolated from clinical samples of AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Rejane Pereira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate yeasts in oropharyngeal secretion, urine, sputum and inguinal scales from AIDS patients, clinical samples were collected from one hundred patients interned in the Infectious and Parasitic Diseases Sector of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco and in Hospital Universitário Osvaldo Cruz of the Universidade de Pernambuco. Yeasts were isolated from seventy-two out of one hundred and eight clinical samples. The isolated yeasts were: Candida albicans (sixty-two isolates, Candida tropicalis (four isolates, Candida glabrata (two isolates, Candida parapsilosis (two isolates, Candida krusei (one isolate and Trichosporon pullulans (one isolate.

  19. Trichosporon species isolated from human respiratory system

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Dynowska

    2014-01-01

    The research included clinical material collected from the patients of the Specialist Medical Unit for Tubereles. Lung Diseases and Oncology in Olsztyn with particular consideration to the respiratory system and to Trichosporon species. In total 3 species were isolated: Trichosporon beigelii Vuillemin, Trichosporon capitatum Diddens et Lodder and Trichosporon pullulans Diddens et Lodder. T. beigelii dominated in the materiał examined.

  20. Molecular identification of clinical Nocardia isolates from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Honnavar, Prasanna; Kaur, Harsimran; Samanta, Palash; Ray, Pallab; Ghosh, Anup; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2015-10-01

    The epidemiology of nocardiosis is evolving with increasing number of Nocardia spp. causing human infection. In recent years, molecular techniques have been used to identify Nocardia spp. There are limited data available on the spectrum of Nocardia spp. isolated from clinical samples in India. Here, a molecular study was carried on 30 clinical isolates maintained in our National Culture Collection to evaluate the techniques used for identifying the agents. The isolates were identified by sequencing two promising genes: the 16S rRNA gene and hsp65. Both hsp65 and the 16S rRNA gene could reliably identify 90 % of Nocardia isolates, i.e. N. farcinica, N. cyriacigeorgica, N. brasiliensis, N. otitidiscaviarum, N. amamiensis and N. pneumoniae. The mean percentage dissimilarity of sequence identification was higher using the hsp65 gene (4 %, range 0-7.9 %) compared with the 16S rRNA gene (2.3 %, range 0-8.9 %). Two isolates that showed ambiguous results in both the short segment of the 16S rRNA gene and hsp65 sequences could be resolved by sequencing a larger fragment (∼1000 bp) of the 16S rRNA gene. Both of these isolates were identified as N. beijingensis with similarities of 99.8 and 100 % compared with the standard strain. Genotyping of N. cyriacigeorgica strains was performed using hsp65 gene sequences and compared with previously described genotypes. Our N. cyriacigeorgica isolates belonged to genotype 1 (n = 4) and genotype 2 (n = 2). The present study highlights a wide spectrum of Nocardia spp. in India and emphasizes the need for molecular techniques for identification to the species level.

  1. Identification and Pathogenic Potential of Clinical Bacillus and Paenibacillus Isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Celandroni

    Full Text Available The soil-related Bacillus and Paenibacillus species have increasingly been implicated in various human diseases. Nevertheless, their identification still poses problems in the clinical microbiology laboratory and, with the exception of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, little is known on their pathogenicity for humans. In this study, we evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS in the identification of clinical isolates of these genera and conducted genotypic and phenotypic analyses to highlight specific virulence properties. Seventy-five clinical isolates were subjected to biochemical and MALDI-TOF MS identification. 16S rDNA sequencing and supplemental tests were used to solve any discrepancies or failures in the identification results. MALDI-TOF MS significantly outperformed classical biochemical testing for correct species identification and no misidentification was obtained. One third of the collected strains belonged to the B. cereus species, but also Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis were isolated at high rate. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that all the B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. simplex, B. mycoides, Paenibacillus glucanolyticus and Paenibacillus lautus isolates are resistant to penicillin. The evaluation of toxin/enzyme secretion, toxin-encoding genes, motility, and biofilm formation revealed that B. cereus displays the highest virulence potential. However, although generally considered nonpathogenic, most of the other species were shown to swim, swarm, produce biofilms, and secrete proteases that can have a role in bacterial virulence. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS appears useful for fast and accurate identification of Bacillus and Paenibacillus strains whose virulence properties make them of increasing clinical relevance.

  2. FACTORS THAT AFFECTING HUMAN ISLET ISOLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Yasunaru; Ricordi, Camillo; Miki, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Toshihiko; Pileggi, Antonello; Khan, Aisha; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Inverardi, Luca; Ichii, Hirohito

    2008-01-01

    More than 10,000 IEQ/kg recipient weight islets are often necessary to achieve insulin independence in patients with type 1 diabetes. Several studies have identified high BMI donor and pancreas size are important factors for the success of human islet isolation. However, donor shortage underscores the need to improve isolation outcomes from lower BMI pancreas donors and/or small pancreata. Aim of this study was to identify the critical factors affecting isolation outcome. The data from 207 isolations performed from 2002 to 2006 were analyzed with respect to donor characteristics, pancreas condition and processing variables. More than 3,000 IEQ/g pancreas weight were considered as an acceptable isolation outcome (AIO). AIO were obtained from donors with a BMI>30kg/m2 (p=0.002). The pancreatic surface integrity was also a significant factor towards AIO (p=0.02). Moreover, a longer digestion time (p=0.04) and the proportion of trapped islet negatively affected AIO rates (p=0.004). As previously reported, pancreata from high BMI donors were suitable for islet isolation and transplantation, as they yielded higher total islet particle numbers and higher IEQ/g. Although BMI and pancreas size are not controllable due to organ donor shortage, factors such as pancreatic surface integrity, shorter digestion and lower proportions of trapped islet were found to be significant factors to obtain higher rates of AIO. The development of better protocol and systematic training of processing and procurement teams will be of assistance in increasing the number of successful human islet isolations. PMID:18374062

  3. Enzymatic isolation of viable human odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffaro, H M; Pääkkönen, V; Tjäderhane, L

    2016-05-01

    To improve an enzymatic method previously used for isolation of rat odontoblasts to isolate viable mature human odontoblasts. Collagenase I, collagenase I/hyaluronidase mixture and hyaluronidase were used to extract mature human odontoblasts from the pulp chamber. Detachment of odontoblasts from dentine was determined with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and to analyse the significance of differences in tubular diameter, and the t-test was used. MTT-reaction was used to analyse cell viability, and nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney post hoc tests were used to analyse the data. Immunofluorescent staining of dentine sialoprotein (DSP), aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) were used to confirm the odontoblastic nature of the cells. MTT-reaction and FESEM demonstrated collagenase I/hyaluronidase resulted in more effective detachment and higher viability than collagenase I alone. Hyaluronidase alone was not able to detach odontoblasts. Immunofluorescence revealed the typical odontoblastic-morphology with one process, and DSP, AQP4 and MMP-20 were detected. Quantitative PCR of DSPP confirmed that the isolated cells expressed this odontoblast-specific gene. The isolation of viable human odontoblasts was successful. The cells demonstrated morphology typical for odontoblasts and expressed characteristic odontoblast-type genes and proteins. This method will enable new approaches, such as apoptosis analysis, for studies using fully differentiated odontoblasts. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Isolation and culture of human astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Ariane; Prevot, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Although rodent models have been essential to unveil the emerging functions of astrocytes, the existence of interspecies differences calls for caution in extrapolating data from rodent to human astrocytes. We have developed highly enriched primary astrocyte cultures from human fetuses and adult cerebro-cortical biopsies from neurosurgery patients. Immunocytochemical characterization shows that cultures are composed of more than 95% of cells expressing in vitro astrocytic markers. Examination of the morphological and proliferative properties of cultures derived from the cerebral cortex and the hypothalamus both in untreated conditions and after treatment with EGF-related ligands illustrates the high plasticity of human astrocytes and their functional heterogeneity according to the cerebral region of origin. Our preparation offers the opportunity to characterize human astrocyte functions in vitro and also provides a valuable tool for studying the functional heterogeneity of human astrocytes isolated from distinct brain regions.

  5. Pathogenicity of Rhodococcus equi in mice, isolated from environment, human and horse clinical samples Patogenicidade atogenicidade em camundongos de isolados clí- clínicos, nicos, ambientais e humanos de Rhodococcus equi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus M. Costa

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen associated with bronchopneumonia, mesenteric lymphadenitis and enterocolitis in foals. Although R. equi is likely to be found in every horse-breeding farm, the clinical disease is unrecognized in most of them. Capsule components, equi factor, micolic acid and some products encoded by the large 85-90Kb plasmid were described as virulence factors. However, the pathogenesis of R. equi infections and the sensibility of foals are not completely understood. The aim of this study was evaluate the virulence of R. equi isolated from human, horses and environment for mices. Nine strains carrying the 85-90Kb plasmid isolated from foal clinical specimens, one from immunodeficient human patient and six plasmidless strains (four isolated from feces, one from pasture and one from immunodeficient human patient were inoculated in cyclophosphamide immunossuppressed mice. The pathological changes and viability of R. equi cells in the liver of mice was verified after the 3rd, 6th an 10th day after inoculation for horse and environmental isolates and for R. equi isolates from human patients on the 1st, 3rd and 6th day. During the necropsy procedures, infiltrate of macrophages and pyogranulomatous lesions were detected after the sixth pos-inoculation day in the liver and spleen. In horse isolates, only plasmid positive strains were virulent, but in human isolates both strains (plasmid positive e plasmid negative were virulent. Both groups of the immunossupressed mice inoculated with R. equi isolated from environment showed pathological changes. All R. equi strains were unable to kill non imunossuppressed mice.Rhodococ-cus equi é um patógeno intracelular facultativo associado com broncopneumonia, linfadenite mesentérica e enterocolite em potros. Apesar do patógeno ser amplamente distribuído no ambiente equino, a doença não é encontrada em todos os criatórios. Componentes capsulares, "fator equi",

  6. Isolated deficiency of IgE in humans: update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Maltsev

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Isolated deficiency IgE is one of the most common primary immunodeficiency diseases in human with prevalence of 1 case per 30 people of total population. Genetic basis of this immunodeficiency are polymorphisms of 5923A/G and 7888C/T in AICDA gene of B-lymphocytes. Recently several new studies have been conducted that expand the current understanding of the nature of an isolated IgE deficiency in human. Several recent epidemiological studies specified immunodeficiency frequency in different cohorts of patients and confirmed the relationship of immunological and clinical phenotypes, including recurrent infections, autoimmunity and oncology. The results of a number of clinical cases have expanded the knowledge of the heterogeneity of clinical symptoms of the di­sease. Several studies investigated the complications of an isolated deficiency IgE, including chronic gastritis and peptic stomach ulcer associated with H. pylori, and atherosclerosis and related vascular accidents. The results of comparative clinical studies demonstrate high efficiency of base immunotherapy with normal human immunoglobulin preparations for the intramuscular and intravenous usage.

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: population divergence and resistance to oxidative stress in clinical, domesticated and wild isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Diezmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been associated with human life for millennia in the brewery and bakery. Recently it has been recognized as an emerging opportunistic pathogen. To study the evolutionary history of S. cerevisiae, the origin of clinical isolates and the importance of a virulence-associated trait, population genetics and phenotypic assays have been applied to an ecologically diverse set of 103 strains isolated from clinics, breweries, vineyards, fruits, soil, commercial supplements and insect guts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA sequence data from five nuclear DNA loci were analyzed for population structure and haplotype distribution. Additionally, all strains were tested for survival of oxidative stress, a trait associated with microbial pathogenicity. DNA sequence analyses identified three genetic subgroups within the recombining S. cerevisiae strains that are associated with ecology, geography and virulence. Shared alleles suggest that the clinical isolates contain genetic contribution from the fruit isolates. Clinical and fruit isolates exhibit high levels of recombination, unlike the genetically homogenous soil isolates in which no recombination was detected. However, clinical and soil isolates were more resistant to oxidative stress than any other population, suggesting a correlation between survival in oxidative stress and yeast pathogenicity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Population genetic analyses of S. cerevisiae delineated three distinct groups, comprising primarily the (i human-associated brewery and vineyard strains, (ii clinical and fruit isolates (iii and wild soil isolates from eastern U.S. The interactions between S. cerevisiae and humans potentiate yeast evolution and the development of genetically, ecologically and geographically divergent groups.

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: population divergence and resistance to oxidative stress in clinical, domesticated and wild isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diezmann, Stephanie; Dietrich, Fred S

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been associated with human life for millennia in the brewery and bakery. Recently it has been recognized as an emerging opportunistic pathogen. To study the evolutionary history of S. cerevisiae, the origin of clinical isolates and the importance of a virulence-associated trait, population genetics and phenotypic assays have been applied to an ecologically diverse set of 103 strains isolated from clinics, breweries, vineyards, fruits, soil, commercial supplements and insect guts. DNA sequence data from five nuclear DNA loci were analyzed for population structure and haplotype distribution. Additionally, all strains were tested for survival of oxidative stress, a trait associated with microbial pathogenicity. DNA sequence analyses identified three genetic subgroups within the recombining S. cerevisiae strains that are associated with ecology, geography and virulence. Shared alleles suggest that the clinical isolates contain genetic contribution from the fruit isolates. Clinical and fruit isolates exhibit high levels of recombination, unlike the genetically homogenous soil isolates in which no recombination was detected. However, clinical and soil isolates were more resistant to oxidative stress than any other population, suggesting a correlation between survival in oxidative stress and yeast pathogenicity. Population genetic analyses of S. cerevisiae delineated three distinct groups, comprising primarily the (i) human-associated brewery and vineyard strains, (ii) clinical and fruit isolates (iii) and wild soil isolates from eastern U.S. The interactions between S. cerevisiae and humans potentiate yeast evolution and the development of genetically, ecologically and geographically divergent groups.

  9. A clinically isolated syndrome: butterfly glioma mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramshekhar Menon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The report explores a unique and treatable "butterfly"- glioma mimic and the neuroimaging characteristics that help to diagnose this entity. A 35-year-old patient presented with subacute-onset, progressive frontal lobe dysfunction followed by features of raised intracranial pressure. Neuroimaging features were consistent with a "butterfly" lesion that favored the possibility of a gliomatosis cerebri with significant edema and marked corpus callosum and fornix thickening. Contrast-enhanced and perfusion images revealed a confluent tumefactive lesion with a characteristic "broken-ring" pattern of enhancement, mass-effect and low perfusion; features favoring an alternative inflammatory pathology. This was peculiar as calloso-forniceal involvement of this nature has not been previously reported in inflammatory demyelinating mass lesions. This was confirmed as a tumefactive demyelination on histopathology. Following treatment, on clinical and imaging follow-up, significant resolution was evident suggesting a monophasic illness. This case highlights the stringent clinico-radiological-pathological approach required in the evaluation and management of butterfly lesions despite the striking imaging appearances. Tumefactive demyelination in this patient represents a clinically isolated syndromic presentation of an inflammatory pathology that can resemble gliomatosis cerebri. These "butterfly"-glioma mimics are scarcely reported in the literature, are eminently treatable with variable prognosis and prone for relapse.

  10. Isolation & characterization of Brucella melitensis isolated from patients suspected for human brucellosis in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Anita; Kumar, Ashu; Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Mangalgi, Smita; Prakash, Archana; Tiwari, Sapana; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2016-05-01

    Brucellosis is endemic in the southern part of India. A combination of biochemical, serological and molecular methods is required for identification and biotyping of Brucella. The present study describes the isolation and biochemical, molecular characterization of Brucella melitensis from patients suspected for human brucellosis. The blood samples were collected from febrile patients suspected to have brucellosis. A total of 18 isolates were obtained from 102 blood samples subjected to culture. The characterization of these 18 isolates was done by growth on Brucella specific medium, biochemical reactions, CO2 requirement, H2S production, agglutination with A and M mono-specific antiserum, dye sensitivity to basic fuchsin and thionin. Further, molecular characterization of the isolates was done by amplification of B. melitensis species specific IS 711 repetitive DNA fragment and 16S (rRNA) sequence analysis. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of omp2 locus and IS711 gene was also done for molecular characterization. All 102 suspected samples were subjected to bacteria isolation and of these, 18 isolates could be recovered on blood culture. The biochemical, PCR and PCR-RFLP and 16s rRNA sequencing revealed that all isolates were of B. melitensis and matched exactly with reference strain B. melitensis 16M. The present study showed an overall isolation rate of 17.64 per cent for B. melitensis. There is a need to establish facilities for isolation and characterization of Brucella species for effective clinical management of the disease among patients as well as surveillance and control of infection in domestic animals. Further studies are needed from different geographical areas of the country with different level of endemicity to plan and execute control strategies against human brucellosis.

  11. Induction of IL-6 and CCL5 (RANTES in human respiratory epithelial (A549 cells by clinical isolates of respiratory syncytial virus is strain specific

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    Levitz Ruth

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major respiratory pathogen of infants and young children. During each seasonal epidemic, multiple strains of both subgroup A and B viruses circulate in the community. Like other RNA viruses, RSV genome replication is prone to errors that results in a heterogeneous population of viral strains some of which may possess differences in virulence. We sought to determine whether clinical isolates of RSV differ in their capacity to induce inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and CCL5 (previously known as RANTES [regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein], which are known to be induced in vitro and in vivo in response to RSV, during infection of A549 cells. Results Screening of subgroup A and B isolates revealed heterogeneity among strains to induce IL-6 and CCL5. We chose two subgroup B strains, New Haven (NH1067 and NH1125, for further analysis because of their marked differences in cytokine inducing properties and because subgroup B strains, in general, are less genetically heterogeneous as compared to subgroup A strains. At 12 and 24 hours post infection RSV strains, NH1067 and NH1125 differed in their capacity to induce IL-6 by an order of magnitude or more. The concentrations of IL-6 and CCL5 were dependent on the dose of infectious virus and the concentration of these cytokines induced by NH1125 was greater than that of those induced by NH1067 when the multiplicity of infection of NH1067 used was as much as 10-fold higher than that of NH1125. The induction of IL-6 was dependent on viable virus as infection with UV-inactivated virus did not induce IL-6. The difference in IL-6 induction most likely could not be explained by differences in viral replication kinetics. The intracellular level of RSV RNA, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR, was indistinguishable between the 2 strains though the titer of progeny virus produced by NH1125 was greater than that produced by

  12. Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) as a non-human primate model for evaluation of candidate dengue vaccines: induction and maintenance of specific protective immunity against challenges with clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, Meng Ling; Ami, Yasushi; Muhammad Azami, Nor Azila; Shirai, Kenji; Yoksan, Sutee; Suzaki, Yuriko; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Saijo, Masayuki; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro

    2017-11-21

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the major infectious diseases in tropical regions and approximately half of the world population is at risk of infection. Vaccines would offer an effective control measure against this disease. We previously reported on the utility of marmosets as an animal model for studying primary and secondary dengue infections. Infected marmosets consistently develop viraemia and antibody kinetics that reflect those of patients with dengue. Thus, it is important to determine the utility of marmosets as an animal model for demonstrating vaccine efficacy. In this study, marmosets were inoculated with candidate vaccine and parent strains and challenged with a clinical DENV strain. The viraemia and antibody kinetics in these marmosets were determined. Marmosets consistently develop lower viraemia with an attenuated vaccine strain. During secondary challenge, the IgM response was delayed, whereas the IgG levels rose rapidly, indicating a secondary antibody response. The neutralizing activities against the homotypic serotype were high; all marmosets were protected against viraemia following secondary inoculation. The viraemia markers and antibody responses were consistent with those of human DENV infection and vaccinees. These results demonstrate the utility of marmosets as an animal model for the study of vaccine efficacy.

  13. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter coli clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Castillo, Ana; Torres-Sánchez, María José; Aznar-Martín, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter spp. is a major cause of acute bacterial diarrhea in humans worldwide, and C. coli is responsible for 10% of the cases. A study was made of the antimicrobial susceptibility using the E-test(®), and the clonal relationship using PCR-RFLP, of the flaA gene, as well as PFGE techniques on 43 C. coli clinical isolates. Only 49% and 2% of the isolates were susceptible to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Imipenem and clindamyicn, with 100% and 84% of the strains, respectively, being susceptible, were the most active antimicrobials. The PCR-RFLP of flaA gene technique grouped fourteen isolates into six clusters, while the PFGE technique grouped eleven isolates into five clusters. Ciprofloxacin and erythromycin are not suitable for the treatment of C. coli infections. Clindamycin could be considered as a therapeutic alternative in cases of enteritis, while imipenem is the best alternative for extra-intestinal infections. Both PFGE and PCR-RFLP can be useful to detect clones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Genotyping of clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba genus in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Carolina; Reyes-Batlle, María; Ysea, María Alejandra Vethencourt; Pérez, Mónica V Galindo; de Rondón, Carmen Guzmán; Paduani, Anaibeth J Nessi; Pérez, Angelyseb Dorta; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; de Galindo, María Virginia Pérez; de Suárez, Eva Pérez; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Valladares, Basilio; Piñero, José E; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2016-12-01

    Free-living amoebae of Acanthamoeba genus are opportunistic pathogens distributed worldwide. Strains included in this genus are causative agents of a fatal encephalitis and a sight-threating keratitis in humans and other animals. In this study, 550 clinical samples which were collected between 1984 and 2014 from different patients with suspected infections due to Acanthamoeba were initially screened for the presence of this amoebic genus at the Laboratorio de Amibiasis-Escuela de Bioanálisis at the Universidad Central de Venezuela. Samples were cultured in 2% Non-Nutrient agar plates seeded with a layer of heat killed Escherichia coli. From the 550 clinical samples included in this study, 18 of them were positive for Acanthamoeba genus after culture identification. Moreover, positive samples were confirmed after amplification of the Diagnostic Fragment 3 (DF3) of the Acanthamoeba18S rDNA genus and sequencing was carried out in order to genotype the isolated strains of Acanthamoeba. Furthermore, the pathogenic potential of the strains was checked by performing thermotolerance and osmotolerance assays. Sequencing of the DF3 region resulted in the identification of genotype T4 in all the isolated strains. Moreover, most isolates were thermotolerant or both thermotolerant and osmotolerant and thus were classified as potentially pathogenic strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the molecular characterization at the genotype level of Acanthamoeba strains in Venezuela.

  15. Human Satellite Cell Isolation and Xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Steven M; Tamaki, Stanley; Xu, Xiaoti; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells are mononucleated cells of the skeletal muscle lineage that exist beneath the basal lamina juxtaposed to the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers. It is widely accepted that satellite cells mediate skeletal muscle regeneration. Within the satellite cell pool of adult muscle are skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs), also called satellite stem cells, which fulfill criteria of tissue stem cells: They proliferate and their progeny either occupies the adult MuSC niche during self-renewal or differentiates to regenerate mature muscle fibers. Here, we describe robust methods for the isolation of enriched populations of human satellite cells containing MuSCs from fresh human muscle, utilizing mechanical and enzymatic dissociation and purification by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We also describe a process for xenotransplantation of human satellite cells into mouse muscle by injection into irradiated, immunodeficient, mouse leg muscle with concurrent notexin or bupivacaine muscle injury to increase engraftment efficiency. The engraftment of human MuSCs and the formation of human muscle can then be analyzed by histological and immunofluorescence staining, or subjected to in vivo experimentation.

  16. Effect of photodynamic therapy on clinical isolates of Staphylococcus spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Miyabe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus spp. are opportunistic microorganisms known for their capacity to develop resistance against antimicrobial agents. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT on 20 Staphylococcus strains isolated from the human oral cavity, including S. aureus, S. schleiferi, S. epidermidis, S. capitis, S. haemolyticus, and S. lentus. A suspension of each Staphylococcus strain (10(6 cells/mL was submitted to PDT using methylene blue and a low power laser. The isolated effects of methylene blue, laser treatment and ciprofloxacin were also evaluated. After the experimental treatments, 0.1 mL aliquots of the suspensions were seeded onto BHI agar for determination of the number of colony-forming units (CFU/mL. The results were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p < 0.05. The mean reduction in bacterial counts of the strains submitted to PDT ranged from 4.89 to 6.83 CFU (log10/mL, with the observation of a decreasing susceptibility to treatment of S. schleiferi, S. haemolyticus, S. epidermidis, S. capitis, S. aureus, and S. lentus. The results showed that PDT was effective in reducing the number of viable cells of all clinical Staphylococcus isolates studied.

  17. Nocardia donostiensis sp. nov., isolated from human respiratory specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercibengoa, Maria; Bell, Melissa; Marimón, José Maria; Humrighouse, Benjamin; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Pötter, Gabrielle; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio

    2016-05-01

    Three human clinical isolates (X1654, X1655, and W9944) were recovered from the sputum and bronchial washings of two patients with pulmonary infections. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of the isolates showed that they share 100 % sequence similarity with each other and belong to the genus Nocardia. Close phylogenetic neighbours are Nocardia brevicatena ATCC 15333(T) (98.6 %) and Nocardia paucivorans ATCC BAA-278T (98.4 %). The in silico DNA-DNA relatedness between the isolates ranges from 96.8 to 100 % suggesting that they belong to the same genomic species. The DNA-DNA relatedness between X1654 and N. brevicatena ATCC 15333(T) is 13.3 ± 2.3 % and N. paucivorans ATCC BAA-278T is 18.95 ± 1.1 % suggesting that they do not belong to the same genomic species. Believed to represent a novel species, these isolates were further characterised to establish their taxonomic standing within the genus. Chemotaxonomic data for isolate X1654 are consistent with those described for the genus Nocardia: this isolate produced saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, tuberculostearic acid (15.9 %), the major menaquinone was MK-8 (H4cyclic), mycolic acid chain lengths ranged from 38 to 58 carbons, produced meso-diaminopimelic acid with arabinose, glucose, and galactose as the whole cell sugars. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylinositol mannosides. The DNA G+C content is 66.7 mol  %. Based on the combination of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and genotypic data for X1654, X1655, and W9944, we conclude that these isolates represent a novel species within the genus Nocardia for which we propose the name Nocardia donostiensis sp. nov. with X1654(T) (=DSM 46814(T) = CECT 8839(T)) as the type strain.

  18. lactamase in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... ... Kolayli F, Karadenizli A, Demirdag K, Gunaydin. M, Altindis M, Caylan R, Ucmak H (2007) .Extended-spectrum beta- lactamases in ceftazidime resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in Turkish hospitals. Indian. J. Med. Microbiol. 25(4):346-350. Mammeri H, Gilly L, Laurans G,Vedel ...

  19. Biofilm Formation among Clinical and Food Isolates of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. A total of 725 Listeria monocytogenes isolates, 607 from various foods and 118 from clinical cases of listeriosis, were investigated concerning their ability to form biofilms, at 4°C during 5 days and at 37°C during 24 h. Methods. Biofilm production was carried out on polystyrene tissue culture plates. Five L. monocytogenes isolates were tested for biofilm formation after being exposed to acidic and osmotic stress conditions. Results. Significant differences (P<0.01 between clinical and food isolates were observed. At 37°C for 24 h, most food isolates were classified as weak or moderate biofilm formers whereas all the clinical isolates were biofilm producers, although the majority were weak. At 4°C during 5 days, 65 and 59% isolates, from food and clinical cases, respectively, were classified as weak. After both sublethal stresses, at 37°C just one of the five isolates tested was shown to be more sensitive to subsequent acidic exposure. However, at 4°C both stresses did not confer either sensitivity or resistance. Conclusions. Significant differences between isolates origin, temperature, and sublethal acidic stress were observed concerning the ability to form biofilms. Strain, origin, and environmental conditions can determine the level of biofilm production by L. monocytogenes isolates.

  20. Differences in the API 20E biochemical patterns of clinical and environmental Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Lozano-Leon, Antonio; Viña-Feas, Alejandro; de Novoa, Jacobo; Garcia-Martin, Oscar

    2006-02-01

    Genetic differences in clinical and environmental strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus have been widely used as criteria in identifying pathogenic isolates. However, few studies have been carried out to assess the differences in biochemical characteristics of V. parahaemolyticus isolates from human and environmental sources. We compared the biochemical profiles obtained by the characterization of V. parahaemolyticus isolates from human infections and the marine environment using the API 20E system. Environmental and clinical isolates showed significant differences in the gelatin and arabinose tests. Additionally, clinical isolates were correctly identified according to the API 20E profile using 0.85% NaCl diluent, but they presented nonspecific profiles with 2% NaCl diluent. In contrast, use of 2% NaCl diluent facilitated correct identification of the environmental isolates. Clinical isolates showed significant differences in up to five biochemical tests with respect to the API 20E database. The API 20E system is widely used in routine identification of bacteria in clinical laboratories, and this discrepancy in an important number of biochemical tests may lead to misidentification of V. parahaemolyticus infection.

  1. Molecular phylogeny of Escherichia coli isolated from clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lames

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... Full Length Research Paper ... A total of 45 E. coli isolates were obtained from different clinical samples by standard bacteriological methods. PCR was conducted to determine the phylogenetic grouping of ... distributions of E. coli isolates in phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D) varied depending on the.

  2. Sensitivity pattern of clinical isolates of Candida albicans from hiv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the sensitivity pattern of clinical isolates of C. albicans from HIV/AIDS patients to combined P. grisea extract and tioconazole. Twenty isolates of C. albicans were obtained from high vaginal swab (HVS) from HIV/AIDS patients in Bishop Shanahan Hospital, Nsukka after their ...

  3. Influence of human urine to antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli producing β-lactamase of different types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ž. Žagar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the influence of human urine on the antibiotic susceptibilities of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli strains producing different types of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL. The study was performed on 26 ESBL negative strains of K. pneumoniae, 80 K. pneumoniae strains producing SHV-ESBLs (52-SHV-5, 31- SHV-2 and 7- SHV-12, 94 E. coli strains harbouring TEM- ESBLs and 14 E. coli strains possessing CTX-M group 1 β-lactamases. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of amoxycillin alone and combined with clavulanate (co-amoxilcav, cephalexin, cefuroxime, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were performed in parallel in Mueller-Hinton broth and urine by broth microdilution method. With ESBL negative strains, urine increased MIC90 of amoxycillin alone and combined with clavulanate, cephalexin, cefuroxime, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Against SHV-5 producers, an increase in MIC90 was observed with cefotaxime, cefepime and ciprofloxacin when the test was performed in urine. SHV-2 producers showed elevated MIC90 of ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone and cefepime in the presence of urine, in contrast to SHV-12 producers which displayed elevated MIC90 only for cefotaxime. Urine increased MIC90 of amoxycillin/clavulanate, ceftazidime and cefepime against CTX-M producers, and of amoxycillin/clavulanate, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefepime and ciprofloxacin for TEM producers. According to our results the activity of antibiotics used for the treatment of urinary tract infection could be overestimated by a standard in vitro testing. However, most of antibiotics used for the treatment of urinary tract infection achieve very high concentration in urine and that could abrogate the reduction of antimicrobial activity by biological fluid.

  4. Genetics of human isolated hereditary hair loss disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, S; Khan, S; Ahmad, W

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary hair loss in human is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders. It is characterized by sparse to complete absence of hair on the scalp and other parts of the body. In few cases tightly curled twisted wooly hair (WH) on the scalp has been reported as well. The hair loss disorders, including both syndromic and non-syndromic (isolated) forms, segregate either in autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern. To date, seven autosomal dominant and equal numbers of autosomal recessive isolated forms of hair loss disorders have been characterized. Genes responsible for causing most of these disorders have been identified. In this review, we have provided an update on clinical and genetic aspects of isolated hereditary hair loss disorders manifesting with hypotrichosis and/or WHs. Because most of the recessive genes have been mapped using consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, therefore emphasis is given to mutations identified in these families. OMIM nomenclature has been followed to indicate different forms of hair loss disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. MLVA genotyping of human Brucella isolates from Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Henk L.; Espinosa, Benjamin; Castillo, Rosa; Hall, Eric; Guillen, Alfredo; Zevaleta, Milagros; Gilman, Robert H.; Melendez, Paolo; Guerra, Carlos; Draeger, Angelika; Broglia, Alessandro; Nöckler, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Recent human Brucella melitensis isolates from Peru were genotyped by multiple locus variable number repeat analysis. All 24 isolates originated from hospitalized patients living in the central part of Peru and consisted of six genomic groups comprising two to four isolates and nine unique

  6. Proteogenomic Investigation of Strain Variation in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Heunis, Tiaan

    2017-08-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis consists of a large number of different strains that display unique virulence characteristics. Whole-genome sequencing has revealed substantial genetic diversity among clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and elucidating the phenotypic variation encoded by this genetic diversity will be of utmost importance to fully understand M. tuberculosis biology and pathogenicity. In this study we integrated whole-genome sequencing and mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) to reveal strain-specific characteristics in the proteomes of two clinical M. tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean isolates. Using this approach we identified 59 peptides containing single amino acid variants, which covered ~9% of all total coding nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants detected by whole-genome sequencing. Furthermore, we identified 29 distinct peptides that mapped to a hypothetical protein not present in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference proteome. Here we provide evidence for the expression of this protein in the clinical M. tuberculosis SAWC3651 isolate. The strain-specific databases enabled confirmation of genomic differences (i.e. large genomic regions of difference and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants) in these two clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and allowed strain differentiation at the proteome level. Our results contribute to the growing field of clinical microbial proteogenomics and can improve our understanding of phenotypic variation in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  7. Quinolones Resistance And R-Plasmids Of Clinical Isolates Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There has been reported incidence in the emergence of. Quinolones resistance in clinical isolates in Nigeria and the level in resistance has been on the increase. Objective: To determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmids profiles of 67 clinical Pseudomonas species from a teaching hospital ...

  8. Utilization of carbon sources by clinical isolates of Aeromonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediger, Karoline C; Surek, Monica; Dallagassa, Cibelle B; Assis, Flávia E A; Piantavini, Mario S; Souza, Emanuel M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Farah, Sônia M S S; Alberton, Dayane; Fadel-Picheth, Cyntia M T

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria in the genus Aeromonas are primarily aquatic organisms; however, some species can cause diseases in humans, ranging from wound infections to septicemia, of which diarrhea is the most common condition. The ability to use a variety of carbon substrates is advantageous for pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, we used Biolog GN2 microplates to analyze the ability of 103 clinical, predominantly diarrheal, isolates of Aeromonas to use various carbon sources, and we verified whether, among the substrates metabolized by these strains, there were some endogenous to the human intestine. The results indicate that Aeromonas present great diversity in the utilization of carbon sources, and that they preferentially use carbohydrates and amino acids as carbon sources. Among the carbon sources metabolized by Aeromonas in vitro, some were found to be components of intestinal mucin, including aspartic acid, glutamic acid, l-serine, galactose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, and glucose, which were used by all strains tested. Additionally, mannose, d-serine, proline, threonine, and N-acetyl-galactosamine were used by several strains. The potential to metabolize substrates endogenous to the intestine may contribute to Aeromonas' capacity to grow in and colonize the intestine. We speculate that this may help explain the ability of Aeromonas to cause diarrhea.

  9. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Aileen I.; Hong, Hsiang-Hsi; Fu, Jen-Fen; Chang, Chih-Chun; Wang, I-Kuan; Huang, Wen-Hung; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Hsu, Ching-Wei

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify predictors of success rate of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) isolation from human deciduous teeth pulp. A total of 161 deciduous teeth were extracted at the dental clinic of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The MSCs were isolated from dental pulps using a standard protocol. In total, 128 colonies of MSCs were obtained and the success rate was 79.5%. Compared to teeth not yielding MSCs successfully, those successfully yielding MSCs were found to have less severe dental caries (no/mild-to-moderate/severe: 63.3/24.2/12.5% versus 12.5/42.4/42.4%, P pulpitis (no/yes: 95.3/4.7% versus 51.5/48.5%, P pulpitis (OR = 9.111, 95% CI = 2.921–28.420, P pulpitis expressed longer colony doubling time than pulps without pulpitis. Furthermore, there were higher expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin- (IL-) 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein- (MCP-) 1, P pulpitis was relatively unsuitable for MSC processing and isolation. PMID:28377925

  10. Comparison of epidemiologically linked Campylobacter jejuni isolated from human and poultry sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajhar, S A; Jennison, A V; Patel, B; Duffy, L L

    2015-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is responsible for most foodborne bacterial infections worldwide including Australia. The aim of this study was to investigate a combination of typing methods in the characterization of C. jejuni isolated from clinical diarrhoeal samples (n = 20) and chicken meat (n = 26) in order to identify the source of infection and rank isolates based on their relative risk to humans. Sequencing of the flaA short variable region demonstrated that 86% of clinical isolates had genotypes that were also found in chicken meat. A polymerase chain reaction binary typing system identified 27 different codes based on the presence or absence of genes that have been reported to be associated with various aspects of C. jejuni pathogenicity, indicating that not all isolates may be of equal risk to human health. The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) of the C. jejuni isolates was classified into six classes (A, B, C, E, F, H) with 10·4% remaining unclassified. The majority (72·7%) of clinical isolates possessed sialylated LOS classes. Sialylated LOS classes were also detected in chicken isolates (80·7%). Antimicrobial tests indicated a low level of resistance, with no phenotypic resistance found to most antibiotics tested. A combination of typing approaches was useful to assign isolates to a source of infection and assess their risk to humans.

  11. Biological variability in clinical isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Barrio Alicia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen clinical isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis were obtained from women who attended health centers of the Goverment of Madrid. A total of 1,848 vaginal specimens recovered during the gynaecological examination were seeded in culture tubes containing liquid Diamond medium. Pathogenicity to mice was determined after intraperitoneal inoculation of mice by quantification of mortality and gross damage to abdominal organs. As could be expected, a broad variability was obtained, being some of the isolates more virulent than the reference strain. Regarding to metronidazole susceptibility, none resistant isolate was found but different degrees of susceptibility were determined.

  12. Clinical significance of the isolation of Candidaspecies from hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yankee C. Magalhães

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we isolated and phenotypically identified 108 yeast strains from various clinical specimens collected from 100 hospitalized patients at three tertiary hospitals in São Luís-Maranhão, Brazil, from July to December 2010. The isolates were analyzed for their susceptibility to four of the most widely used antifungal agents in the surveyed hospitals, amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5-flucytosine and voriconazole. The species identified were Candida albicans (41.4%, Candida tropicalis (30.1%, C. glabrata (7.4%, Candida parapsilosis(5.5%, Candida krusei (4.6%, Cryptococcus neoformans (4.6%, Trichosporonspp. (3.7%, Candida norvegensis (0.9%, Rhodotorula glutinis (0.9% and Pichia farinosa (0.9%. A higher isolation rate was observed in the following clinical specimens: urine (54 isolates; 50%, respiratory tract samples (21 isolates; 19.4% and blood (20 isolates; 18.6%. Candida albicans isolates were 100% sensitive to all antifungal agents tested, whereas Candida krusei and Crytococcus neoformans displayed intermediate resistance to 5-flucytosine, with Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC values of 8 mg/mL and 16 mg/mL, respectively. Both strains were also S-DD to fluconazole with an MIC of 16 mg/mL. C. tropicalis was resistant to 5-flucytosine with an MIC of 32 μg/mL. This study demonstrates the importance of identifying the yeast species involved in community and nosocomial infections.

  13. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Dong-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX, intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX and Sparfloxacin (SFX, and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  14. High diversity of plasmids harbouring blaCMY-2 among clinical Escherichia coli isolates from humans and companion animals in the upper Midwestern USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Hansen, Katrine Hartung; Nielsen, Christine

    2014-01-01

    To determine the population structure and genetic relatedness of plasmids encoding CMY-2 β-lactamase in clinical Escherichia coli from humans and companion animals within a defined geographical area....

  15. [Adhesion of clinical Candida albicans isolate to buccal epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, A

    1999-01-01

    Mucosal adherence and germ tube formation are considered to be important virulence factors of C. albicans. Adherence is a precondition for colonisation and invasion. We investigated 11 clinical isolates (among them 5 cases recovered from oesophageal thrush) for quantification of the two characteristics and correlated the results with clinical data. Adherence was measured on buccal epithelial cells and the continuous flow culture was used for quantification of germ tube formation. Adherence of strains recovered from clinically, culturally and serologically confirmed oesophageal thrush adhered stronger to buccal epithelial cells than isolates from patients with heavy colonisation without signs of candidosis. Strains with stronger adherence showed a significantly faster and an increased germ tube formation in the continuous flow culture. Strains from oesophageal thrush therefore show a more marked expression of the investigated virulence factors. Therefore a good adherence is a necessity for infection of the oesophagus by C. albicans. The preferential isolation of C. albicans from oesophageal thrush (> 90%) supports this assumption.

  16. The consequences of a sudden demographic change on the seroprevalence pattern, virulence genes, identification and characterisation of integron-mediated antibiotic resistance in the Salmonella enterica isolated from clinically diarrhoeic humans in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K M; Hassan, W M M; Mohamed, R A H

    2014-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify and characterise integrons and integrated resistance gene cassettes among eight multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella serovars isolated from humans in Egypt. Virulotyping by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the detection of the presence of virulence genes. Integron PCR was used to detect the presence of class 1 in the MDR strains. The associated individual resistance gene cassettes were identified using specific PCRs. The isolated serovars were Salmonella Grampian (C1; 2/5), Larose (C1; 1/5), Hato (B; 1/5) and Texas (B; 1/5). Among the Salmonella serovars, five Salmonella isolates showed the highest resistance to amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, lincomycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin and trimethoprim (100%), followed by neomycin, norfloxacin and tetracycline (80%), while the lowest resistance was recorded to colistin sulphate and ciprofloxacin in percentages of 20 and 40%, respectively. The invA, avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD and sopB genes were detected in all isolates (100%), while the spvC and gipA genes were totally (100%) absent from all isolates. The remaining three virulence genes were diversely distributed as follows: the bcfC gene was detected in all isolates except Salmonella Hato (80%); the sodC1 gene was detected only in Salmonella Grampian and Salmonella Texas (60%); and the sopE1 gene was detected only in Salmonella Grampian, Hato and Texas (60%). Class 1 integrons were detected in 90% of the MDR isolates, comprising serovars Muenster, Florian, Noya, Grampian, Larose, Hato and Texas. Of the class 1 integron-positive isolates, 45% harboured Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) either right junction or right and left junction having an A-C-S-T phenotype. Of the class 1 integron-positive isolates, 44% harboured integron gene cassette aadA2, while 11% harboured the floR gene present in multidrug resistance flanked by two integrons of SGI1. The results of the present study indicate that

  17. Nocardia isolation from clinical samples with the paraffin baiting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafghi, Mehdi Fatahi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Soori, Tahereh; Saber, Sasan; Meysamie, Alipasha; Gheitoli, Khavar; Habibnia, Shadi; Rasouli Nasab, Masoumeh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2015-03-01

    The genus Nocardia is a cause of infection in the lungs, skin, brain, cerebrospinal fluid, eyes, joints and kidneys. Nocardia isolation from polymicrobial specimens is difficult due to its slow growth. Several methods have been reported for Nocardia isolation from clinical samples. In the current study, we used three methods: paraffin baiting technique, paraffin agar, and conventional media for Nocardia isolation from various clinical specimens from Iranian patients. In this study, we examined 517 samples from various clinical specimens such as: sputum of patients with suspected tuberculosis, bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, tracheal aspirate, cutaneous and subcutaneous abscesses, cerebrospinal fluid, dental abscess, mycetoma, wound, bone marrow biopsy, and gastric lavage. All collected specimens were cultured on carbon-free broth tubes (paraffin baiting technique), paraffin agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar, and Sabouraud dextrose agar with cycloheximide and were incubated at 35°C for one month. Seven Nocardia spp. were isolated with paraffin baiting technique, compared with 5 positive results with the paraffin agar technique and 3 positive results with Sabouraud dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. The prevalence of nocardial infections in our specimens was 5.28%. In the present study, the use of the paraffin baiting technique appeared to be more effective than other methods for Nocardia isolation from various clinical specimens.

  18. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L James

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development.This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation, in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera.Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes.

  19. Antibiotic Susceptibilities and Serotyping of Clinical Streptococcus Agalactiae Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altay Atalay

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococci, GBS are frequently responsible for sepsis and meningitis seen in the early weeks of life. GBS may cause perinatal infection and premature birth in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to serotype GBS strains isolated from clinical samples and evaluate their serotype distribution according to their susceptibilities to antibiotics and isolation sites. Material and Methods: One hundred thirty one S. agalactiae strains isolated from the clinical samples were included in the study. Of the strains, 99 were isolated from urine, 20 from soft tissue, 10 from blood and 2 from vaginal swab. Penicillin G and ceftriaxone susceptibilities of GBS were determined by the agar dilution method. Susceptibilities to erythromycin, clindamycin, vancomycin and tetracycline were determined by the Kirby-Bauer method according to CLSI criteria. Serotyping was performed using the latex aglutination method using specific antisera (Ia, Ib, II-VIII. Results: While in 131 GBS strains, serotypes VII and VIII were not detected, the most frequently isolated serotypes were types Ia (36%, III (30.5% and II (13% respectively. Serotype Ia was the most frequently seen serotype in all samples. All GBS isolates were susceptible to penicilin G, ceftriaxone and vancomycin. Among the strains, tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin resistance rates were determined as 90%, 14.5%, and 13% respectively. Conclusion: Penicillin is still the first choice of treatment for the infections with all serotypes of S. agalactiae in Turkey.

  20. Patient experience of source isolation: lessons for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Ruth Linda; Shaban, Ramon; Moyle, Wendy

    2011-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is now the leading antimicrobial-resistant organism of concern to clinicians worldwide. Preventing and controlling the increase and spread of MRSA within the health-care environment is therefore an important function of the infection control team. The prevention and control of MRSA requires strict use of both Standard and Additional Precautions, which include good hand hygiene practices, judicious antimicrobial prescribing, and source isolation. While few would dispute the need for these precautions for preventing the spread of MRSA and other infections, their use may result in adverse physical and psychological effects for the patient. In an age of quality and safety of health care, ensuring infection control practice such as source isolation and contact precautions adhere to fundamental human rights is paramount. This paper presents a review of the literature on the patient experience of source isolation for MRSA or other infectious diseases. The review yielded five major interconnected themes: (1) psychological effects of isolation; (2) coping with isolation; (3) social isolation; (4) communication and information provision; and (5) physical environment and quality of care. It found that the experience of isolation by patients has both negative and positive elements. Isolation may result in detrimental psychological effects including anxiety, stress and depression, but may also result in the patient receiving less or substandard care. However, patients may also benefit from the quietness and privacy of single rooms. Nurses and other healthcare workers must look for ways to improve the experience of isolation and contact precautions of patients in source isolation. Opportunities exist in particular in improving the environment and the patient's self-control of the situation and in providing adequate information.

  1. Outflow characteristics of isolated anterior segments of human eyes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, B. G.; Ruijter, J. M.; Hoyng, P. F.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between intraocular pressure (IOP) and flow through the trabecular meshwork in isolated anterior segments of human eyes. Outflow facility (C) is thought to decrease proportionally with increasing IOP in human eyes in vivo and in vitro. Twenty-nine eviscerated human

  2. Detection of -Lactamases in nosocomial gram negative clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues C

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available -lactamases represent the most common mechanism of -lactam resistance. Extended spectrum -lactamases (ESBLs represent a major group of -lactamses currently being identified worldwide in large numbers along with inducible AmpC -lactamases and derepressed mutants. The present study was done to detect -lactamase production in clinical isolates by rearranging routine discs used in reporting susceptibility to specifically assess ESBLs, AmpC -lactamases (both inducible and hyperproducers i.e., derepressed mutants. A total of 286 clinical isolates were studied using a novel predictor disc approximation method to detect the above mechanisms of resistance with careful use and placement of antimicrobial discs. Of the 286 isolates, 151(53% were ESBL producers of which 131(46% were also derepressed mutants while remaining 20(7% were plain ESBL producers. Forty (14% were plain derepressed mutants. Inducible AmpC -lactamase production was detected in 19(7% of the isolates. The commonest ESBL producers were E.coli and K. pneumoniae. The high incidence of -lactamase production due to multiple mechanisms in clinical isolates is alarming and urgent action needs to be taken from both a therapeutic and infection control perspective.

  3. Differential cytopathogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus prototypic and clinical isolates in primary pediatric bronchial epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyle Peter V

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV causes severe respiratory disease in infants. Airway epithelial cells are the principle targets of RSV infection. However, the mechanisms by which it causes disease are poorly understood. Most RSV pathogenesis data are derived using laboratory-adapted prototypic strains. We hypothesized that such strains may be poorly representative of recent clinical isolates in terms of virus/host interactions in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs. Methods To address this hypothesis, we isolated three RSV strains from infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis and compared them with the prototypic RSV A2 in terms of cytopathology, virus growth kinetics and chemokine secretion in infected PBEC monolayers. Results RSV A2 rapidly obliterated the PBECs, whereas the clinical isolates caused much less cytopathology. Concomitantly, RSV A2 also grew faster and to higher titers in PBECs. Furthermore, dramatically increased secretion of IP-10 and RANTES was evident following A2 infection compared with the clinical isolates. Conclusions The prototypic RSV strain A2 is poorly representative of recent clinical isolates in terms of cytopathogenicity, viral growth kinetics and pro-inflammatory responses induced following infection of PBEC monolayers. Thus, the choice of RSV strain may have important implications for future RSV pathogenesis studies.

  4. Macrorestriction Analysis of Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Sporothrix schenckii

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly, L. C.; Altman, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii causes sporotrichosis, a disease that most commonly presents as a subacute or chronic skin infection. An unusually high incidence of clinical cases of sporotrichosis occurred in the southwest of Western Australia over the last 5 years. Anecdotal accounts from patients implicated contact with hay prior to infection. Isolates of S. schenckii from hay and clinical cases were investigated by traditional phenotypic methods and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The pheno...

  5. [Antibiotic resistance and virulence factors in clinical Salmonella enterica isolates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toro, María; Seral, Cristina; Rojo-Bezares, Beatriz; Torres, Carmen; Castillo, F Javier; Sáenz, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    The increase of Salmonella enterica isolates multi-resistant to different antibiotics, including β-lactams and fluoroquinolones, is a problem of clinical importance. The dissemination of Salmonella Typhimurium resistant to ampicillin (AMP)-chloramphenicol (CHL)-streptomycin (STR)-sulphonamides and (SUL)-tetracycline (TET), that harbour the Salmonella Genomic Island type 1 (SGI1), and the acquisition of transferable genetic material have favoured the multi-resistance in this genus. A total of 114 clinical S.enterica isolates were studied (period 2009-2010). The susceptibility to 20 antibiotics was determined by disc diffusion and microdilution. The antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and the integrons were analysed by PCR, and sequencing in the AMP(R) isolates. In all the blaPSE-1-positive isolates, the clonal relationship was determined by PFGE, as well as the presence of SGI1 and 29 virulence genes by PCR. Eighteen different serotypes were found among the 114 isolates studied, Typhimurium (61%) and Enteritidis (16%) being the most prevalent. High percentages of resistance to SUL (68%), TET (58%), AMP (55%) and STR (46%) were observed. The great majority (92%) of 63 AMP(R) isolates were multi-resistant, with the AMP-STR-TET-SUL phenotype (19 isolates) being the most frequent one and associated with the blaTEM-1b+strA-strB+tet(B)+sul2 genotype. Class 1 integrons (7 different structures) were observed in 48% AMP(R) isolates, highlighting the blaOXA-1+aadA1 structure (8 isolates), one empty integron and non-classical integrons (5 isolates). The blaPSE-1 gene was detected inside the classical SGI1 structure in 13 clonally-related isolates that showed the same virulence profile. The high percentage of multi-resistant S.enterica isolates, especially associated to S.Typhimurium, to the AMP, STR, TET and SUL phenotype, and to the blaTEM-1b+strA-strB+tet(B)+sul2 genotype, shows an important risk of possible failures in the treatment of serious infections caused by this

  6. Molecular characterization of human Dirofilaria isolates from Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najuma Nazar

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Molecular identification of D. repens isolated from human source assumes significance from the point of zoonotic threat of this mosquito-borne nematode. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close evolutionary relationship with Asian isolate of D. honkongensis. Timely detection and treatment of infection in dogs, together with mosquito control, should be an integral part of the control strategy of this disease.

  7. Isolation and Identification of Bacterial Species from the Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and Identification of Bacterial Species from the Human Gallbladders Bile of Sudanese Patients. ... On the other hand, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas spp. were less frequently isolated from bile specimens showing frequencies of 4 (4%) for each. Conclusion: The finding of this study indicated that ...

  8. Epidemiology of Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the huge burden of tuberculosis (TB) in Nigeria, case detection rate of infectious cases still remain low, thus constituting obstacle to eradication of the disease in the community. We carried out a 15 month (1st January 2008 to 30th March 2009) retrospective review of epidemiology of clinical isolates of M.

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance Trend of Bacteria from Clinical Isolates: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For decades, antimicrobials have proven useful for the treatment of bacterial infections. However, the immergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major challenge to public health in many countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates from clinical sources.

  10. Susceptibility of clinical isolates of uropathogenic bacteria from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resistance of uropathogens to antibiotics has been on increase and responsible for increased mortality and morbidity among patients. Clinical isolates (22) of uropathogenic bacteria comprising Escherichia coli, Klebsiella Pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis and Staphylococcus aureus were tested for susceptibility to standard ...

  11. Asperger syndrome, violent thoughts and clinically isolated syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbruggen, N; Van Geit, N; Bissay, V; Zeeuws, D; Santermans, L; Baeken, C

    2010-12-01

    A young man, 23 years old, with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), presented violent thoughts during a neurological consultation. He was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome based on a psychiatric and (neuro)psychological examination. Possible risk factors for acting-out and the implications for treatment, if CIS would evolve to MS, are discussed based on a review of the literature.

  12. Human Enteroviruses isolated during acute flaccid paralysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All 28 isolates from L20B were characterized by rRT-PCR as Sabin-like polioviruses. No wild poliovirus or VDPV was found. However from the microneutralisation assay, six different enteroviruses were characterized. Among these, Coxsackie B viruses were most predominant followed by Echovirus. Three children from ...

  13. Isolation of human foetal myoblasts and its application for microencapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anna Aihua; Bourgeois, Jacqueline; Potter, Murray; Chang, Patricia L

    2008-01-01

    Foetal cells secrete more growth factors, generate less immune response, grow and proliferate better than adult cells. These characteristics make them desirable for recombinant modification and use in microencapsulated cellular gene therapeutics. We have established a system in vitro to obtain a pure population of primary human foetal myoblasts under several rounds of selection with non-collagen coated plates and identified by desmin staining. These primary myoblasts presented good proliferation ability and better differentiation characteristics in monolayer and after microencapsulation compared to murine myoblast C2C12 cells based on creatine phosphokinase (CPK), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and multi-nucleated myotubule determination. The lifespan of primary myoblasts was 70 population doublings before entering into senescent state, with a population time of 18-24 hrs. Hence, we have developed a protocol for isolating human foetal primary myoblasts with excellent differentiation potential and robust growth and longevity. They should be useful for cell-based therapy in human clinical applications with microencapsulation technology.

  14. Isolation of human foetal myoblasts and its application for microencapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anna Aihua; Bourgeois, Jacqueline; Potter, Murray; Chang, Patricia L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Foetal cells secrete more growth factors, generate less immune response, grow and proliferate better than adult cells. These characteristics make them desirable for recombinant modification and use in microencapsulated cellular gene therapeutics. We have established a system in vitro to obtain a pure population of primary human foetal myoblasts under several rounds of selection with non-collagen coated plates and identified by desmin staining. These primary myoblasts presented good proliferation ability and better differentiation characteristics in monolayer and after microencapsulation compared to murine myoblast C2C12 cells based on creatine phosphokinase (CPK), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and multi-nucleated myotubule determination. The lifespan of primary myoblasts was 70 population doublings before entering into senescent state, with a population time of 18–24 hrs. Hence, we have developed a protocol for isolating human foetal primary myoblasts with excellent differentiation potential and robust growth and longevity. They should be useful for cell-based therapy in human clinical applications with microencapsulation technology. PMID:18366454

  15. The isolation of Candida rugosa and Candida mesorugosa from clinical samples in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjapong, Gloria; Bartlett, Michael; Hale, Marie; Garrill, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    Members of the Candida rugosa species complex have been described as emerging fungal pathogens and are responsible for a growing number of Candida infections. In this communication we report the isolation of Candida rugosa and Candida mesorugosa in Ghana. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of this species complex from a clinical setting in Africa.The isolates were identified on the basis of their rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. For one isolate, obtained from sputum, the sequence grouped well with that of C. rugosa. Two other isolates from urine had sequences that grouped with Candida mesorugosa. Morphologically, C. rugosa formed white, wrinkled, and flat colonies on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA), whereas C. mesorugosa formed white, smooth colonies. On chromogenic medium, the isolates formed small, dry greenish-blue colonies with a pale or white border, similar to C. albicans. The C. rugosa isolate produced pseudohyphae in human serum and on CMA-Tween 80 agar. In contrast, the C. mesorugosa isolates did not generate pseudohyphae in human serum, but generated a few pseudohyphae with abundant blastoconidia on CMA-Tween 80 agar. Growth was observed at 37 °C and 42 °C but not at 45 °C.The two C. mesorugosa isolates had Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of 6 and 48 μg ml(-1) for fluconazole and are thus resistant. The C. rugosa isolate had an MIC of 24 μg ml(-1), indicative of resistance. All three isolates were susceptible to itraconazole and voriconazole (with respective MICs of < 0.125 μg ml(-1)). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Biofilm formation in Hafnia alvei HUMV-5920, a human isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itziar Chapartegui-González

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hafnia alvei is a Gram-negative, rodshaped, facultative anaerobic bacterium of the family Enterobacteriaceae that has been isolated from various mammals, fish, insects and birds. In humans, case reports of Hafnia-associated enteric infections have been chiefly reported in Spain. Although H. alvei shares some virulence mechanisms with other Gram-negative enteropathogens little is known about the factors that contribute to its pathogenesis or virulence factors and regulatory circuits that may enhance the establishment and survival of H. alvei in the environment. The goal of the present study was to analyze the capacity of a H. alvei clinical isolate (strain HUMV-5920 to form biofilms. Biofilm formation by this strain increases during growth at 28 °C compared to 37 °C. Investigation of multicellular behavior by confocal microscopy, crystal violet and calcofluor staining in this strain showed biofilm formation associated with the production of cellulose. Importantly, several genes related to cellulose production including bcsABZC and yhjQ are present in the H. alvei HUMV-5920 chromosome. The ability of H. alvei to adhere to abiotic surfaces and to form biofilms likely contributes to its persistence in the hospital environment or food processing environments, increasing the probability of causing infections. Therefore, a better understanding of the adherence properties of this species will provide greater insights into the diseases it causes.

  17. Whole genome sequencing of clinical isolates of Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanevik, K; Bakken, R; Brattbakk, H R; Saghaug, C S; Langeland, N

    2015-02-01

    Clinical isolates from protozoan parasites such as Giardia lamblia are at present practically impossible to culture. By using simple cyst purification methods, we show that Giardia whole genome sequencing of clinical stool samples is possible. Immunomagnetic separation after sucrose gradient flotation gave superior results compared to sucrose gradient flotation alone. The method enables detailed analysis of a wide range of genes of interest for genotyping, virulence and drug resistance. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Conversion from clinically isolated syndrome to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhle, J; Disanto, G; Dobson, R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We explored which clinical and biochemical variables predict conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) in a large international cohort. METHODS: Thirty-three centres provided serum samples from 1047 CIS cases with...... positivity was associated with higher EBNA-1 IgG titres. CONCLUSIONS: We validated MRI lesion load, OCB and age at CIS as the strongest independent predictors of conversion to CDMS in this multicentre setting. A role for vitamin D is suggested but requires further investigation....

  19. Antimicrobial resistance of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from seafood and humans in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahzadeh, Esmail; Ojagh, Seyed Mahdi; Hosseini, Hedayat; Ghaemi, Ezzat Allah; Irajian, Gholamreza; Naghizadeh Heidarlo, Masoud

    2016-11-01

    Fourteen Listeria monocytogenes isolates previously collected from seafood (n = 7) and human patients (n = 7) were studied for their antimicrobial susceptibility against eight common antimicrobials (ampicillin, penicillin, gentamicin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and cefotaxime). A high resistance level to ampicillin, cefotaxime (100%), and pencillin (57% in seafood isolates and 71.4% in clinical isolates) was observed in this study. However, all of the isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. Simultaneous resistance was identified in 4 clinical isolates (57.1%). Genotypic characterization of fish isolates (isolated from three fish species) was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A high diversity among fish isolates was observed. PFGE analyses distinguished the 4 isolates into 4 reproducible pulsotypes. There was no correlation between the antibiograms with pulsotypes. In conclusion, the resistance of seafood isolates to the antibiotics commonly used to treat listeriosis could be a potential health hazard for consumers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen I. Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify predictors of success rate of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC isolation from human deciduous teeth pulp. A total of 161 deciduous teeth were extracted at the dental clinic of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The MSCs were isolated from dental pulps using a standard protocol. In total, 128 colonies of MSCs were obtained and the success rate was 79.5%. Compared to teeth not yielding MSCs successfully, those successfully yielding MSCs were found to have less severe dental caries (no/mild-to-moderate/severe: 63.3/24.2/12.5% versus 12.5/42.4/42.4%, P<0.001 and less frequent pulpitis (no/yes: 95.3/4.7% versus 51.5/48.5%, P<0.001. In a multivariate regression model, it was confirmed that the absence of dental caries (OR = 4.741, 95% CI = 1.564–14.371, P=0.006 and pulpitis (OR = 9.111, 95% CI = 2.921–28.420, P<0.001 was significant determinants of the successful procurement of MSCs. MSCs derived from pulps with pulpitis expressed longer colony doubling time than pulps without pulpitis. Furthermore, there were higher expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin- (IL- 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein- (MCP- 1, P<0.01, and innate immune response [toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1 and TLR8, P<0.05; TLR2, TLR3, and TLR6, P<0.01] in the inflamed than noninflamed pulps. Therefore, a carious deciduous tooth or tooth with pulpitis was relatively unsuitable for MSC processing and isolation.

  1. Homogeneity of Danish environmental and clinical isolates of Shewanella algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Holt, H.M.; Gerner-Smidt, P.

    2000-01-01

    Danish isolates of Shewanella algae constituted by whole-cell protein profiling a very homogeneous group, and no clear distinction was seen between strains from the marine environment and strains of clinical origin. Although variation between all strains was observed by ribotyping and random...... amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, no clonal relationship between infective strains was found. From several patients, clonally identical strains of S. algae were reisolated up to 8 months after the primary isolation, indicating that the same strain may be able to maintain the infection....

  2. Antimicrobial resistance levels amongst staphylococci isolated from clinical cases of bovine mastitis in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmeti, Ibrahim; Behluli, Behlul; Mestani, Mergim; Ademi, Arsim; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2016-10-31

    Mastitis is one of the most frequent and costly disease in cattle. We studied milk samples from cattle with mastitis from farms in Kosovo to identify mastitis-causing pathogens and possible effective antibiotics. Our ultimate goal is to help implement adequate antibiotic management and treatment practices in Kosovo METHODOLOGY: A total of 152 milk samples were collected from cows with clinical mastitis from different farms in Kosovo. After identification of microorganisms, antibiotic susceptibility and the occurrence of enterotoxins was investigated. Staphylococci were found in 89 samples, of which 58 were coagulase negative and 31 coagulase positive. S. aureus was isolated from 27 samples, S. epidermidis from 25, and S. chromogenes from 15, while other species of staphylococci were isolated from the remaining 22 isolates. Interestingly, the bacterial diversity was different between cows in different periods of lactation and among different breeds. Most of the isolates (76/89) were resistant to two or more antibiotics. The highest resistance was to penicillin and ampicillin (> 65%), followed by tetracycline, oxacillin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol (> 23%), and less than 3% to erythromycin. Of the 89 isolates, 40 produced enterotoxins that were most frequently typed as A and C. We detected human bacterial pathogens in the cultures of milk samples from cows with mastitis. The isolates demonstrated resistance to two or more antibiotics, some of which are frequently used to treat animal and human infections. We recommend increased control and more stringent use of antibiotics in veterinary as well as human medicine.

  3. Isolation and characterization of human rhinovirus antigenic variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Isolation of antigenic variants of human rhinovirus types 2, 14, and 17 was attempted by plaquing untreated virus (P-isolates), selecting variants in the presence of homologous antiserum (C-isolates), and by selecting variants in the presence of antibody following 5-fluorouracil mutagenesis (M-isolates). All viruses were triple-plaque purified and purity neutralization tested prior to isolate selection. Based on a fourfold reduction in neutralizing antibody titer to homologous antiserum, no antigenic variation was found in P-isolates from the three serotypes examined. Antigenic variants of all three serotypes could be isolated by the antiserum selection method (C-isolates). However, antigenic variants of RV17 were isolated at a much higher frequency and showed a larger degree of variation than those of RV2 and RV14. At least two of the variants selected, RV17 (C301) and RV2 (M803), failed to be neutralized by the known 89 rhinovirus antiserum. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of (/sup 35/S) methionine-labelled virion polypeptides revealed that each serotype had a characteristic pattern and that selected RV2 and RV17 isolates had patterns identical to those of the prototype strains. By isoelectric focusing an antigenic variant of RV2 was shown to contain altered virion polypeptides VP1 and VP2 whereas two RV17 antigenic variants demonstrated alterations only in the VP1 polypeptide.

  4. Effect of photodynamic therapy on clinical isolates of Staphylococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Michelle; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Costa, Anna Carolina Borges Pereira da; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Ribeiro, Martha Simões; Feist, Ilíria Salomão

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus spp. are opportunistic microorganisms known for their capacity to develop resistance against antimicrobial agents. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on 20 Staphylococcus strains isolated from the human oral cavity, including S. aureus, S. schleiferi, S. epidermidis, S. capitis, S. haemolyticus, and S. lentus. A suspension of each Staphylococcus strain (10(6) cells/mL) was submitted to PDT using methylene blue and a low power laser. The isolated effects of methylene blue, laser treatment and ciprofloxacin were also evaluated. After the experimental treatments, 0.1 mL aliquots of the suspensions were seeded onto BHI agar for determination of the number of colony-forming units (CFU/mL). The results were analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p Staphylococcus isolates studied.

  5. Molecular identification of Sporothrix clinical isolates in China*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting-ting; Zhang, Ke; Zhou, Xun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular phylogeny of 64 clinical isolates which were identified as Sporothrix schenckii sensu lato by morphological identification. All of the strains were isolates from patients from several provinces in China. The phylogeny was inferred by DNA sequence analyses based on datasets of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and a combined ITS and partial β-tubulin region. Reference sequences were retrieved from GenBank. Results showed that all of the isolates were clustered in a distinct clade with a type of Sporothrix globosa. Our analysis showed that S. globosa is the causal agent of the tested sporotrichosis in China, rather than S. schenckii that was generally believed to be the case. The existence of S. schenckii in China remains to be confirmed. This study improved our understanding of the distribution of the species in S. schenckii complex. PMID:24390750

  6. Molecular identification of Sporothrix clinical isolates in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting-ting; Zhang, Ke; Zhou, Xun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular phylogeny of 64 clinical isolates which were identified as Sporothrix schenckii sensu lato by morphological identification. All of the strains were isolates from patients from several provinces in China. The phylogeny was inferred by DNA sequence analyses based on datasets of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and a combined ITS and partial β-tubulin region. Reference sequences were retrieved from GenBank. Results showed that all of the isolates were clustered in a distinct clade with a type of Sporothrix globosa. Our analysis showed that S. globosa is the causal agent of the tested sporotrichosis in China, rather than S. schenckii that was generally believed to be the case. The existence of S. schenckii in China remains to be confirmed. This study improved our understanding of the distribution of the species in S. schenckii complex.

  7. Romboutsia timonensis, a new species isolated from human gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ricaboni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of the human microbiome was recently revolutionized by microbial culturomics and taxonogenomics. Thanks to this approach, we report here the main characteristics of Romboutsia timonensis strain Marseille-P326, a new bacterium isolated from the right human colon by colonoscopy in a 63-year-old French man with severe anaemia with melaena.

  8. Isolation and in vitro expansion of human colonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, P.; Sato, T.; Merlos-Suarez, A.; Barriga, F.M.; Iglesias, M.; Rossell, D.; Auer, H.; Gallardo, M.; Blasco, M.A.; Sancho, E.; Clevers, H.; Batlle, E.

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation of stem cells of the human colonic epithelium. Differential cell surface abundance of ephrin type-B receptor 2 (EPHB2) allows the purification of different cell types from human colon mucosa biopsies. The highest EPHB2 surface levels correspond to epithelial colonic

  9. Clinical evaluation of isolated abutment teeth in removable partial dentures

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    Zarrati S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Nowadays, removable partial dentures are applied to patients who are not able to use dental implants or fixed prosthesis. Although based on the studies the users of removable partial dentures are in the risk of plaque accumulation and unacceptable changes such as gingivitis, periodontitis and mobility in abutment tooth. It is not clear whether the negative effects of removable partial dentures are more on the isolated teeth which are a kind of abutment adjacent to endentulous area in both sides. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical condition of isolated abutment teeth without splinting in comparison to control abutment from the aspects of B.O.P (bleeding on probing, mobility, pocket depth and gingivitis."nMaterials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the prepared questionnaires were filled out by 50 patients who received removable partial dentures in department of removable prosthodontics of dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The patients had isolated abutment tooth and did not have any systemic disease. The obtained data were analyzed. Using Wilcoxon, exact Fisher and Kruskal-Wallis test."nResults: B.O.P (P=0.004, pocket depth (P=0.035, and mobility (P<0.001 in isolated abutments were more than those in control abutments, but there were not significant differences in the degree of caries (P=0.083 and gingivitis (P=0.07."nConclusion: This study showed that clinical condition of isolated abutments is worse than that of control abutments. More attention should be paid to healthiness of isolated teeth without splinting and periodic follow ups should be done in these cases.

  10. Isolated directional preponderance of caloric nystagmus: I. Clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmagyi, G M; Cremer, P D; Anderson, J; Murofushi, T; Curthoys, I S

    2000-07-01

    To determine the clinical significance of an isolated directional preponderance (DP) on bithermal caloric testing. An isolated caloric DP was defined as a DP, calculated according to the standard Jongkees formula, of > or = 40%, with a spontaneous nystagmus (SN) in darkness of or = 40%. This was followed by a review of the clinical data on the 144 patients identified with such a result and then by a telephone or postal follow-up study of these patients. The study group eventually comprised 114 patients; these were patients in whom a clinical diagnosis could be made at the time the caloric test was done, or who responded to requests for follow-up information. The 34 patients in whom a clinical diagnosis could not be made at the time of the caloric test, and who did not respond to requests for follow-up information, were excluded. A balance disorders clinic in a tertiary referral hospital. All patients underwent standard bithermal caloric testing. Some of the patients also underwent rotational testing. A clinical diagnosis for the cause of the isolated DP, made either at the time of the caloric test or on the basis of information supplied at follow-up by the patient or by the referring physician. Of 114 patients, 39 had benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo, 14 had Ménière's disease, and 5 had migrainous vertigo. Five patients had central nervous system (CNS) disorders, and this was clinically apparent at the time of the caloric test in 4, so that only 1 patient with an isolated DP developed evidence of a CNS disorder after the caloric test was done. In the other 54 patients, no definite diagnosis could be made, but 41 of these 54 were either completely well or much better at follow-up. An isolated DP on caloric testing is usually a transient, benign disorder. About half the patients with an isolated DP have either Ménière's disease or benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo; in most of the other half, no definite diagnosis is made but most of these patients will

  11. Biological activity of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii from clinical and environmental isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marcio Barbosa Junior

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are encapsulated basidiomycetous yeasts with worldwide distribution. They cause cryptococcosis with features of systemic infection, affecting the central nervous system, lungs and skin in humans and animals. These fungi present numerous virulence factors that allow them to invade the host and multiply, among which extracellular enzyme capacity and microbial adaptation to different temperatures are worth mentioning. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the production of protease and investigate possible differences in thermotolerance and urease activity in clinical and environmental yeast isolates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Culture methods and Pz analysis were applied to assess urease and protease, whereas the optical density method was used to analyze biological activity in thermotolerance. RESULTS: There was no significant results as to microbial growth at the tested temperatures (25º, 37º and 42ºC. It was observed that clinical specimens grew better than environmental ones at elevated temperatures. As to C. neoformans, the moderate production of urease enzyme prevailed in both clinical and environmental isolates within 24h or 48h. Moreover, there was significant production on the seventh day of reading. The best reading time for viewing protease production in both isolates and species was the seventh day: 96% clinical samples and 94% environmental isolates. CONCLUSION: Further studies are required in order to investigate the virulence factors of C. neoformans and C. gattii cerebrospinal isolates from patients with meningoencephalitis and environmental samples from Sergipe. Furthermore, a higher technical accuracy and statistical precision are indispensable.

  12. Molecular typing of Trichophyton rubrum clinical isolates from Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryncewicz-Gwóźdź, Anita; Jagielski, Tomasz; Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Dyląg, Mariusz; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Baran, Eugeniusz; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the intraspecific diversity of Trichophyton rubrum clinical isolates. Thirty clinical isolates of T. rubrum were selected for molecular typing by PCR amplification of two tandemly repetitive elements (TRS-1 and TRS-2) of the rDNA and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis with primers designated 1 and 6. The assignment to the species T. rubrum was achieved by nested PCR of ITS1. Five PCR types were produced from the TRS-1 and three from the TRS-2 locus. Thirteen and 23 individual profiles were obtained by RAPD, with primer 1 and 6 respectively. At the phylogenetic level, 26 (87%) isolates were allocated into four clusters, with each cluster comprising isolates of over 80% similarity. The reproducibility of TRS typing was 100%, whereas that of RAPD was 40% and 30%, when using primer 1 and 6 respectively. Neither correlation between the morphological characteristics and the TRS-1-TRS-2 or RAPD genotype nor between TRS-1-TRS-2 and RAPD genotyping was observed. Although both the TRS amplification and RAPD analysis possess the ability to discriminate between T. rubrum strains, the TRS typing method is particularly valuable as its results are much more reproducible, more easily interpreted and recorded than those generated by RAPD. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Resistance patterns in clinical isolates of pathogenic Actinomyces species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, C; Willinger, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Actinomyces spp. are commensals that may occasionally invade deep tissue structures, causing difficult-to-treat and disfiguring lesions. Information on antimicrobial resistance patterns is limited to observations from two previous studies. Therefore, we examined antimicrobial resistance patterns in clinical isolates of Actinomyces spp. In this retrospective assessment of antimicrobial resistance patterns, we identified 392 Actinomyces spp. at a tertiary care centre from January 2008 to December 2014. MICs of various antimicrobial agents, including ampicillin/sulbactam, meropenem, clindamycin, metronidazole and vancomycin for anaerobic actinomycetes, were obtained by Etest. For aerobic actinomycetes, imipenem, cefotaxime, amikacin, linezolid, moxifloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and clarithromycin were tested. MIC results were interpreted based on guidelines published by the CLSI (formerly NCCLS). Actinomyces meyeri was predominantly isolated and accounted for 34% of all Actinomyces spp. identified, followed by Actinomyces turicensis with 23%. Actinomyces neuii is considered to be a rare Actinomyces sp., but accounted for 8% of isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of isolates showed that the Actinomyces spp. were almost uniformly susceptible to β-lactam antimicrobials (with and without β-lactamase inhibitors), carbapenems, tetracyclines and vancomycin. In contrast, Actinomyces spp. isolates were almost uniformly resistant to metronidazole. β-Lactam antimicrobial agents remain the first choice, whereas metronidazole should be avoided, in the treatment of actinomycosis. Reasonable alternatives for treatment are tetracyclines and carbapenems. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Evaluation of phenotypic and genotypic methods for subtyping Campylobacter jejuni isolates from humans, poultry, and cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva Møller; Engberg, J.; Fussing, V.

    2000-01-01

    Six methods for subtyping of Campylobacter jejuni were compared and evaluated with a collection of 90 isolates from poultry, cattle, and sporadic human clinical cases as well as from a waterborne outbreak. The applied methods were Penner heat-stable serotyping; automated ribotyping (Ribo...

  15. Human Adaptation to Isolated and Confined Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W.; Stokols, Daniel; Carrere, Sybil

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted over seven months in a winter Antarctic isolated and confined environment (ICE). Physiological and psychological data was collected several times a week. Information was collected on a monthly basis on behavior and the use of physical facilities. Adaptation and information indicated that there was a significant decrease in epinephrine and norepinephrine during the middle trimester of the winter. No vital changes were found for blood pressure. Self reports of hostility and anxiety show a linear increase. There were no significant changes in depression during ICE. The physiological and psychological data do not move in a synchronous fashion over time. The data also suggest that both ambient qualities of an ICE and discrete social environmental events, such as the arrival of the summer crew, have an impact on the outcome measures used. It may be most appropiate to develop a model for ICE's that incorporates not only global chronic stressors common to all ICE's but also the role of discrete environmental effects which can minimize or enhance the influence of more chronic stressors. Behavioral adjustment information highlight the importance of developing schedules which balance work and recreational activities.

  16. Blastocystis phylogeny among various isolates from humans to insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hisao; Koyama, Yukiko; Tsuchiya, Erika; Takami, Kazutoshi

    2016-12-01

    Blastocystis is a common unicellular eukaryotic parasite found not only in humans, but also in various kinds of animal species worldwide. Since Blastocystis isolates are morphologically indistinguishable, many molecular biological approaches have been applied to classify these isolates. The complete or partial sequences of the small subunit rRNA gene (SSU rDNA) are mainly used for comparisons and phylogenetic analyses among Blastocystis isolates. However, various lengths of the partial SSU rDNA sequence have been used for phylogenetic inference among genetically different isolates. Based on the complete SSU rDNA sequences, consensus terminology of nine subtypes (STs) of Blastocystis sp. that were supported by phylogenetically monophyletic nine clades was proposed in 2007. Thereafter, eight additional kinds of STs comprising non-human mammalian Blastocystis isolates have been reported based on the phylogeny of SSU rDNA sequences, while STs 11 and 12 were only proposed on the base of partial sequences. Although many sequence data from mammalian and avian Blastocystis are registered in GenBank, only limited data on SSU rDNA are available for poikilotherm-derived Blastocystis isolates. Therefore, the phylogenetic positions of the reptilian/amphibian Blastocystis clades are unstable. The phylogenetic inference of various STs comprising mammalian and/or avian Blastocystis isolates was verified herein based on comparisons between partial and complete SSU rDNA sequences, and the phylogenetic positions of reptilian and amphibian Blastocystis isolates were also investigated using 14 new Blastocystis isolates from reptiles with all known isolates from other reptilians, amphibians, and insects registered in GenBank. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation and characterization from human spinal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Toru; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Sunao; Kudo, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Hiroki; Ono, Atsushi; Numasawa, Takuya; Kumagai, Gentaro; Motomura, Shigeru; Yagihashi, Soroku; Toh, Satoshi

    2012-01-27

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a fibroblast-like morphology, multilineage potential, long-term viability and capacity for self-renewal. While several articles describe isolating MSCs from various human tissues, there are no reports of isolating MSCs from human spinal ligaments, and their localization in situ. If MSCs are found in human spinal ligaments, they could be used to investigate hypertrophy or ossification of spinal ligaments. To isolate and characterize MSCs from human spinal ligaments, spinal ligaments were harvested aseptically from eight patients during surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. After collagenase digestion, nucleated cells were seeded at an appropriate density to avoid colony-to-colony contact. Cells were cultured in osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic media to evaluate their multilineage differentiation potential. Immunophenotypic analysis of cell surface markers was performed by flow cytometry. Spinal ligaments were processed for immunostaining using MSC-related antibodies. Cells from human spinal ligaments could be extensively expanded with limited senescence. They were able to differentiate into osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic cells. Flow cytometry revealed that their phenotypic characteristics met the minimum criteria of MSCs. Immunohistochemistry revealed the localization of CD90-positive cells in the collagenous matrix of the ligament, and in adjacent small blood vessels. We isolated and expanded MSCs from human spinal ligaments and demonstrated localization of MSCs in spinal ligaments. These cells may play an indispensable role in elucidating the pathogenesis of numerous spinal diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic relatedness between Japanese and European isolates of Clostridium difficile originating from piglets and their risk associated with human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eUsui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colonization in pig intestine has been a public health concern. We analyzed C. difficile prevalence among piglets in Japan to clarify their origin and extent of the associated risk by using molecular and microbiological methods for both swine and human clinical isolates and foreign isolates. C. difficile was isolated from 120 neonatal piglet faecal samples. Toxin gene profile, antimicrobial susceptibilities, PCR ribotype, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA type of swine isolates were determined and compared with those of human clinical and foreign isolates. One-hundred C. difficile strains were isolated from 69 (57.5% samples, and 61 isolates (61% were toxin gene-positive. Some isolates were resistant to antimicrobials, contributing to antibiotic-associated diarrhoea by C. difficile. These results suggest that C. difficile, prevalent among Japanese pigs, is a potential risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Furthermore, PCR ribotype 078 (12 isolates, which has been linked to multiple outbreaks worldwide, was the third-most frequently isolated of the 14 PCR ribotypes identified. Moreover, MLVA revealed that all 12 PCR ribotype 078 isolates were genetically related to European PCR ribotype 078 strains found in both humans and pigs. To date, in Japan, many breeding pigs have been imported from European countries. The genetic relatedness of C. difficile isolates of Japanese swine origin to those of European origin suggests that they were introduced into Japan via imported pigs.

  19. Molecular, serological, and virulence characteristics of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from environmental, food, and clinical sources in North America and Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaola, Angelo; Ulaszek, Jodie; Kaysner, Charles A; Tenge, Bradley J; Nordstrom, Jessica L; Wells, Joy; Puhr, Nancy; Gendel, Steven M

    2003-07-01

    Potential virulence attributes, serotypes, and ribotypes were determined for 178 pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from clinical, environmental, and food sources on the Pacific, Atlantic, and Gulf Coasts of the United States and from clinical sources in Asia. The food and environmental isolates were generally from oysters, and they were defined as being pathogenic by using DNA probes to detect the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) gene. The clinical isolates from the United States were generally associated with oyster consumption, and most were obtained from outbreaks in Washington, Texas, and New York. Multiplex PCR was used to confirm the species identification and the presence of tdh and to test for the tdh-related hemolysin trh. Most of the environmental, food, and clinical isolates from the United States were positive for tdh, trh, and urease production. Outbreak-associated isolates from Texas, New York, and Asia were predominantly serotype O3:K6 and possessed only tdh. A total of 27 serotypes and 28 ribogroups were identified among the isolates, but the patterns of strain distribution differed between the serotypes and ribogroups. All but one of the O3:K6 isolates from Texas were in a different ribogroup from the O3:K6 isolates from New York or Asia. The O3:K6 serotype was not detected in any of the environmental and food isolates from the United States, and none of the food or environmental isolates belonged to any of the three ribogroups that contained all of the O3:K6 and related clinical isolates. The combination of serotyping and ribotyping showed that the Pacific Coast V. parahaemolyticus population appeared to be distinct from that of either the Atlantic Coast or Gulf Coast. The fact that certain serotypes and ribotypes contained both clinical and environmental isolates while many others contained only environmental isolates implies that certain serotypes or ribotypes are more relevant for human disease.

  20. Study the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Activities of Eight Clinically Applied Disinfectants against Clinical Isolated of Enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Zareniya, Somayeh Hallaj-Nezhadi, Farideh Dinmohamadi, Fakhri Haghi, Maryam Hassan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital-acquired infections are among the most significant reasons of human mortality world-wide which can be controlled by efficient application of suitable disinfectant for hospital setting. The main goal of the present study was to determine the efficacy of eight routinely used hospital disinfectants against clinical isolates. Methods: In our descriptive study, in the first step the antibiogram assay of 99 clinical isolates enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were determined. Then, minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of isolates against Povidone Iodine 10%, Ethanol 70%, Savlon 3.2%, Deconex51Gastro, Procept Floor, Septo med, Surfanious and Gigasept AF were evaluated. Furthermore, the efficacy of disinfectants was reevaluated in presence of 5% (w/v Bovine Serum Albumin. Results: The results showed that Septo med and Surfanious are the most and less potent disinfectants against clinical isolates, respectively. It is also resulted that Povidone Iodine is the most effective choice among the conventional disinfectants in this study. Clearly, addition of 5% organic substances reduced the efficacy of selected disinfectants significantly. Conclusion: Novel quaternary ammonium compounds are the most applicable choice for disinfection of hospital surfaces and instruments in this study.

  1. In Vitro Susceptibility Test of Different Clinical Isolates against Ceftriaxone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hakim Masood

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Because of the prevailing penicillin resistance in microorganisms, broad spectrum cephalosporins are used empirically specially in developing countries. The aim of this study is to determine the susceptibility pattern of different gram positive and gram negative pathogens against third generation cephalosporin-ceftriaxone to explore the existing effectiveness of this antibiotic.Methods: 180 clinical isolates of different gram positive and gram negative pathogens including P.mirabilis, S. typhi P.aeruginosa, E. coli, S. aureus and Klebsiella were collected from blood and urine samples of in-patients. 30 isolates of all species were tested against each of six brands of ceftriaxone using in vitro sensitivity tests by disc diffusion method (NCCLS criteria. The susceptibility limit was ≥21 mm zone of inhibition, while moderately susceptible was considered at 20-14 mm, and those isolates which showed >13 mm or no zone of inhibition were resistant to this antibacterial drug.Results: Ceftriaxone was found most effective against S. aureus. While 96.1% of the isolates showed susceptibility towards ceftriaxone, followed by E. coli (95%, P. aeruginosa (92.7%, K. pneumonia (89.4% and S. typhi (87.2%. P. mirabilis showed lowest susceptibility amongst all the test organisms (83.8%.Conclusion: Ceftriaxone can be used as a drug of choice in infections caused by S. aureus, E. coli, P. aurigenosa, K. pneumonia and S. typhi. However, it should be used with other antimicrobial agents in order to increase its effectiveness against P. mirabilis.

  2. Characterization of integrons in Burkholderia cepacia clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Furlanis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the airways of Cystic Fibrosis (CF patients, frequently developing chronic infections. In 20% of cases these infections cause severe and poorly controlled pathological situations because of the intrinsic antibiotic resistance expressed by the microorganism. CF patients are often subjected to antibiotic therapy: this facilitates the acquisition of antibiotic resistance determinants by the infecting bacteria. Integrons are mobile genetic elements that are widespread in bacterial populations and favor the acquisition of gene cassettes coding for these determinants.The presence of class 1 integrons was investigated by PCR with primers specific for the 5’ and 3’ ends in Burkholderia isolates recovered from patients in treatment at the CF center of Friuli Venezia Giulia. The same integron, carrying an uncommon allelic form (Ib of the aacA4 gene in its cassette array and conferring resistance to some aminoglycosides, was found in two independent isolates (different RAPD profiles infecting two different patients. In both isolates the integron was carried by plasmids and was still present 3 and 6 years later the first finding. Despite the exchange of integrons between bacterial pathogens is fully described, these items were not frequently found in Burkholderia isolates. Although the clinical relevance of the integron we identified is low (a single gene cassette encoding a widespread resistance,we feel concerned that these genetic elements begin to circulate in this bacterial species, as this could make more and more troublesome the treatment of infections notoriously difficult to eradicate.

  3. Explant culture: An advantageous method for isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendijani, Fatemeh

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) research progressively moves towards clinical phases. Accordingly, a wide range of different procedures were presented in the literature for MSC isolation from human tissues; however, there is not yet any close focus on the details to offer precise information for best method selection. Choosing a proper isolation method is a critical step in obtaining cells with optimal quality and yield in companion with clinical and economical considerations. In this concern, current review widely discusses advantages of omitting proteolysis step in isolation process and presence of tissue pieces in primary culture of MSCs, including removal of lytic stress on cells, reduction of in vivo to in vitro transition stress for migrated/isolated cells, reduction of price, processing time and labour, removal of viral contamination risk, and addition of supporting functions of extracellular matrix and released growth factors from tissue explant. In next sections, it provides an overall report of technical highlights and molecular events of explant culture method for isolation of MSCs from human tissues including adipose tissue, bone marrow, dental pulp, hair follicle, cornea, umbilical cord and placenta. Focusing on informative collection of molecular and methodological data about explant methods can make it easy for researchers to choose an optimal method for their experiments/clinical studies and also stimulate them to investigate and optimize more efficient procedures according to clinical and economical benefits. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Transepithelial Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Human Intestinal Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Dallin; Enda, Michael; Bond, Tanner; Moghaddam, Seyyed Pouya Hadipour; Conarton, Josh; Scaife, Courtney; Volckmann, Eric; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-11-02

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown transepithelial transport across intestinal epithelial barrier in rats and across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Caco-2 models innately lack mucous barriers, and rat isolated intestinal tissue has been shown to overestimate human permeability. This study is the first report of transport of PAMAM dendrimers across isolated human intestinal epithelium. It was observed that FITC labeled G4-NH2 and G3.5-COOH PAMAM dendrimers at 1 mM concentration do not have a statistically higher permeability compared to free FITC controls in isolated human jejunum and colonic tissues. Mannitol permeability was increased at 10 mM concentrations of G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 dendrimers. Significant histological changes in human colonic and jejunal tissues were observed at G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 concentrations of 10 mM implying that dose limiting toxicity may occur at similar concentrations in vivo. The permeability through human isolated intestinal tissue in this study was compared to previous rat and Caco-2 permeability data. This study implicates that PAMAM dendrimer oral drug delivery may be feasible, but it may be limited to highly potent drugs.

  5. Clinical and veterinary isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis defective in lipopolysaccharide O-chain polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guard-Petter, J.; Parker, C.T. [Agricultural Research Service, Athens, GA (United States). Southeast Poultry Research Lab.; Asokan, K.; Carlson, R.W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    1999-05-01

    Twelve human and chicken isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis belonging to phage types 4, 8, 13a, and 23 were characterized for variability in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composition. Isolates were differentiated into two groups, i.e., those that lacked immunoreactive O-chain, termed rough isolates, and those that had immunoreactive O-chain, termed smooth isolates. Isolates within these groups could be further differentiated by LPS compositional differences as detected by gel electrophoresis and gas liquid chromatography of samples extracted with water, which yielded significantly more LPS in comparison to phenol-chloroform extraction. The rough isolates were of two types, the O-antigen synthesis mutants and the O-antigen polymerization (wzy) mutants. Smooth isolates were also of two types, one producing low-molecular-weight (LMW) LPS and the other producing high-molecular-weight (HMW) LPS. To determine the genetic basis for the O-chain variability of the smooth isolates, the authors analyzed the effects of a null mutation in the O-chain length determinant gene, wzz (cld) of serovar Typhimurium. This mutation results in a loss of HMW LPS; however, the LMW LPS of this mutant was longer and more glucosylated than that from clinical isolates of serovar Enteritidis. Cluster analysis of these data and of those from two previously characterized isogenic strains of serovar Enteritidis that had different virulence attributes indicated that glucosylation of HMW LPS (via oafR function) is variable and results in two types of HMW structures, one that is highly glucosylated and one that is minimally glucosylated. These results strongly indicate that naturally occurring variability in wzy, wzz, and oafR function can be used to subtype isolates of serovar Enteritidis during epidemiological investigations.

  6. Actinomyces cardiffensis sp. nov. from Human Clinical Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Val; Collins, Mattew D.; Hutson, Roger; Falsen, Enevold; Duerden, Brian I.

    2002-01-01

    Eight strains of a previously undescribed catalase-negative Actinomyces-like bacterium were recovered from human clinical specimens. The morphological and biochemical characteristics of the isolates were consistent with their assignment to the genus Actinomyces, but they did not appear to correspond to any recognized species. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed the organisms represent a hitherto unknown species within the genus Actinomyces related to, albeit distinct from, a group of species which includes Actinomyces turicensis and close relatives. Based on biochemical and molecular genetic evidence, it is proposed that the unknown isolates from human clinical sources be classified as a new species, Actinomyces cardiffensis sp. nov. The type strain of Actinomyces cardiffensis is CCUG 44997T. PMID:12202588

  7. Molecular analysis of Rv0679c and Rv0180c genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical isolates of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupa, L; Srikantam, A; Lakshmana Rao, S S; Devi, U; Sivasai, Ksr

    2016-01-01

    Two novel proteins/genes Rv0679c and Rv0180c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) H37Rv were classified as a hypothetical membrane and transmembrane proteins which might have a role in the invasion. Molecular analysis of these genes in human clinical isolates of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients was not well characterised. To assess the molecular diversity of Rv0679c and Rv0180c genes of MTB from clinical isolates of PTB patients. DNA from 97 clinical isolates was extracted and subjected to amplification using selective primers by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR product obtained was sequenced commercially. Clinical isolates obtained from tuberculosis patients were investigated for polymorphisms in the Rv0679c and Rv0180c genes by PCR and DNA sequencing. Genomic DNA isolated by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide method was used for amplification of genes. Rv0679c gene was highly conserved in 61 out of 65 clinical isolates assessed for sequence homology with wild-type H37Rv gene and was identical using ClustalW. Fifty-five out of 78 (70.5%) clinical isolates assessed for Rv0180c were positive for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at 258th position where the nucleotide G was replaced with T (G to T). In clinical isolates of untreated cases, the frequency was 54.5% for SNP at 258th position which is low compared to cases undergoing treatment where the frequency was 73.1%. Molecular analysis of Rv0180c in clinical isolates of PTB assessed in this study was the first report, where an SNP at 258th position G to T was identified within the gene. Rv0679c gene was highly conserved (94%), within Indian clinical isolates as compared to reports from other nations.

  8. Molecular analysis of Rv0679c and Rv0180c genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical isolates of pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Rupa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Two novel proteins/genes Rv0679c and Rv0180c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB H37Rv were classified as a hypothetical membrane and transmembrane proteins which might have a role in the invasion. Molecular analysis of these genes in human clinical isolates of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB patients was not well characterised. Aims: To assess the molecular diversity of Rv0679c and Rv0180c genes of MTB from clinical isolates of PTB patients. Settings and Design: DNA from 97 clinical isolates was extracted and subjected to amplification using selective primers by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The PCR product obtained was sequenced commercially. Patients and Methods: Clinical isolates obtained from tuberculosis patients were investigated for polymorphisms in the Rv0679c and Rv0180c genes by PCR and DNA sequencing. Genomic DNA isolated by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide method was used for amplification of genes. Results: Rv0679c gene was highly conserved in 61 out of 65 clinical isolates assessed for sequence homology with wild-type H37Rv gene and was identical using ClustalW. Fifty-five out of 78 (70.5% clinical isolates assessed for Rv0180c were positive for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at 258th position where the nucleotide G was replaced with T (G to T. In clinical isolates of untreated cases, the frequency was 54.5% for SNP at 258th position which is low compared to cases undergoing treatment where the frequency was 73.1%. Conclusions: Molecular analysis of Rv0180c in clinical isolates of PTB assessed in this study was the first report, where an SNP at 258th position G to T was identified within the gene. Rv0679c gene was highly conserved (94%, within Indian clinical isolates as compared to reports from other nations.

  9. Clinical Interrogation for Unveiling an Isolated Hypophysitis Mimicking Pituitary Adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjoo; Choi, Jun Ho; Kim, Chang Jin; Kim, Jeong Hoon

    2017-03-01

    Hypophysitis is a rare disease entity mimicking a pituitary adenoma. Despite crucial disease involving a pituitary gland which is a main component of the hormonal axis, there have been minimal researches regarding the hypophysitis. In this study, we described the constellation of the preoperative findings including clinical, radiologic, and endocrinologic features, as well as postoperative outcomes of the hypophysitis. The authors reviewed the data retrospectively of a total of 2814 patients who underwent microsurgery at our institution to treat a pituitary mass lesion. Among them, the patients proven as hypophysitis in histologic examination were enrolled, followed by stratification into tumor-associated hypophysitis and isolated hypophysitis depending on the existence of associated tumor lesion. As a result, a total 21 cases were enrolled consisting of the 13 cases of tumor-associated and the 8 cases of isolated hypophysitis. In this study, the isolated hypophysitis was focused on the analysis. All patients with isolated hypophysitis were evaluated the clinical, radiologic, and endocrinologic tests preoperatively. After microsurgery, all patients had a minimum follow up of 6 months (6∼72 months). The clinical symptoms, endocrinologic tests, and brain MRI were checked at every 6 months during first 2 year, since then, at every 12 months. Among 2814 cases of pituitary mass lesion underwent microsurgery, the hypophysitis were found 21 cases (0.74 %). The 13 cases were the tumor-associated hypophysitis, consisting of rathke's cleft cyst (7 cases), craniopharyngioma (3 cases), pituitary adenoma (2 cases), and germinoma (1 case). The 8 cases were the isolated hypophysitis including lymphocytic (4 cases), granulomatous (3 cases), and IgG4-related (1 case) hypophysitis. The patients presented a wide range of clinical symptoms from general weakness to panhypopituitarism. In addition, the most remarkable radiologic features of the isolated hypophysitis were infundibular

  10. Probiotic properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, N A; Saraiva, M A F; Duarte, E A A; de Carvalho, E A; Vieira, B B; Evangelista-Barreto, N S

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and characterize lactic acid bacteria isolated from human milk, with an emphasis on their probiotic properties. The strains were tested for their ability to inhibit growth of Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, as well as for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and for acid pH and bile salt tolerance. Gram-positive and catalase-negative were selected and identified as Enterococcus (83·3%) after sequencing the 16S rDNA gene. All the isolates inhibited growth of Ent. faecalis and S. serotype Enteritidis, 97% inhibited growth of L. monocytogenes and Staph. aureus and 78·8% inhibited growth of E. coli. Most of the isolates were resistant to gentamicin (50%) and vancomycin (47%). Twelve isolates grew when subjected to pH 3·0 and 0·1% bile salts. At lower pH (2·5-2·0), Ent. faecalis F1 and Weissella confusa F8 were more efficient. It was possible to isolate from human milk the lactic acid bacteria with potential for use as probiotics. Lactic acid bacteria isolated of nursing mothers have probiotic properties. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Identities of Microbacterium spp. Encountered in Human Clinical Specimens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The is...

  12. First report of Nocardia fusca isolated in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercibengoa Arana, María; Marimón Ortiz de Zarate, José María

    2015-06-02

    Nocardia fusca was first described in 1983; however, to date, no report of human infection has been done. In this work, we report the first case of N. fusca isolation during an episode of acute exacerbation in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The extent of the role of N. fusca as human pathogen still has to be determined. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Antimicrobial sensitivity profile of Staphylococcus spp. Isolated from clinical mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamires Martins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation of the mammary gland, which is also known as mastitis, occupies a prominent place among the diseases that affect dairy cattle, having a great economic importance in the dairy sector. Mastitis may have different origins, however, infectious mastitis is the most frequent and represents a risk to public health due to the propagation of microorganisms through milk. Staphylococcus spp. are considered the microorganisms that cause the greatest losses in milk production, being that Staphylococcus aureus is the pathogen of major importance because they present high resistence to antimicrobials. Empirical treatment, without prior identification of the pathogens and their resistance profile, may contribute to the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains and risk the efficiency of the antimicrobial. In that scenery, the study aimed to evaluate the resistance profile of Staphylococcus spp. against some antimicrobials used in the treatment of cows with clinical mastitis. The study was conducted on a property in the state of São Paulo from January 2011 to June 2012. We evaluated 29 lactating cows that present clinical mastitis in, at least, one mammary quarter. The diagnosis of clinical mastitis was performed by evaluating the clinical signs and also by Tamis test. Samples of milk from mammary quarters were collected aseptically in sterile tubes for microbiological evaluation. Microorganisms were isolated on sheep blood agar 5% and Sabouraud agar with chloramphenicol. The sensitivity profile of Staphylococcus spp. to the antibiotics ampicillin, cephalexin, ceftiofur, cefaclor, gentamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, penicillin G and oxacillin, was tested by disk diffusion test on Mueller-Hinton agar. From a total of 106 samples of milk analyzed, 64 (60.38% presented microbiological growth, being observed isolation of Streptococcus spp. 29 (34.52%, Staphylococcus spp. 28 (33.33%, Corynebacterium spp. 17 (20.24%, filamentous fungi 4 (4.76%, yeast 4 (4

  14. Identities of Microbacterium spp. Encountered in Human Clinical Specimens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The isolation of strains belonging to M. hydrocarbonoxydans (n = 2), M. esteraromaticum (n = 1), M. oleivorans (n = 1), M. phyllosphaerae (n = 1), and M. thalassium (n = 1) from humans is reported for the first time. Microbacterium sp. strain VKM Ac-1389 (n = 1) and the previously uncultured Microbacterium sp. clone YJQ-29 (n = 1) probably represent new species. Comprehensive antimicrobial susceptibility data are given for the 50 Microbacterium isolates. This study is, so far, the largest on Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens and outlines the heterogeneity of clinical Microbacterium strains. PMID:18799696

  15. Identities of Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The isolation of strains belonging to M. hydrocarbonoxydans (n = 2), M. esteraromaticum (n = 1), M. oleivorans (n = 1), M. phyllosphaerae (n = 1), and M. thalassium (n = 1) from humans is reported for the first time. Microbacterium sp. strain VKM Ac-1389 (n = 1) and the previously uncultured Microbacterium sp. clone YJQ-29 (n = 1) probably represent new species. Comprehensive antimicrobial susceptibility data are given for the 50 Microbacterium isolates. This study is, so far, the largest on Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens and outlines the heterogeneity of clinical Microbacterium strains.

  16. Molecular characterisation and antifungal susceptibility of clinical Trichosporon isolates in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Vijaylatha; Honnavar, Prasanna; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Pamidi, Umabala; Ghosh, Anup; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2016-08-01

    In Asian countries, Trichosporon infection is a well-known disease in Japan. In India, the infection is increasingly recognised. The study was conducted to characterise the clinical Trichosporon isolates from India by phenotypic and molecular techniques. A total of 31 Trichosporon clinical isolates, recovered from patients of 14 hospitals across India were sequenced (ITS and IGS1 regions of rDNA). In vitro drug susceptibility testing of the isolates was performed against amphotericin-B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole. IGS1, rather than ITS sequences, correctly identified the isolates: Trichosporon asahii, 20; Trichosporon ovoides, 3; Trichosporon inkin, 2; Trichosporon asteroides, 1; Trichosporon mucoides, 1; Trichosporon loubieri, 1; Trichosporon debeurmannianum, 1; and Trichosporon dermatis, 1. Trichosporon asahii genotype III was the most common type, followed by genotype I and VII. Both these targets did not help to identify one Trichosporon to the species level. Trichosporon debeurmannianum, T. dermatis and T. asteroides were isolated for the first time from a human disease in India. The minimum inhibitory concentrations for voriconazole and posaconazole were within effective range. The study highlights the presence of wide range of Trichosporon species causing infection in India. Voriconazole or posaconazole may be the better drugs to treat such patients. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Multilocus Sequence Typing of the Clinical Isolates of Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Tehran Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ranjbar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most important serovars of Salmonella enterica and is associated with human salmonellosis worldwide. Many epidemiological studies have focused on the characteristics of Salmonella Typhimurium in many countries as well as in Asia. This study was conducted to investigate the genetic characteristics of Salmonella Typhimurium using multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Methods: Clinical samples (urine, blood, and stool were collected from patients, who were admitted to 2 hospitals in Tehran between April and September, 2015. Salmonella Typhimurium strains were identified by conventional standard biochemical and serological testing. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the Salmonella Typhimurium isolates against 16 antibiotics was determined using the disk diffusion assay. The clonal relationship between the strains of Salmonella Typhimurium was analyzed using MLST. Results: Among the 68 Salmonella isolates, 31% (n=21 were Salmonella Typhimurium. Of the total 21 Salmonella Typhimurium isolates, 76% (n=16 were multidrug-resistant and showed resistance to 3 or more antibiotic families. The Salmonella Typhimurium isolates were assigned to 2 sequence types: ST19 and ST328. ST19 was more common (86%. Both sequence types were further assigned to 1 eBURST group. Conclusion: This is the first study of its kind in Iran to determine the sequence types of the clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium in Tehran hospitals using MLST. ST19 was detected as the major sequence type of Salmonella Typhimurium.

  18. Acetylene reduction (dinitrogen fixation) by clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, C A; Silver, W S

    1977-01-01

    Freshly isolated clinical strains of Klebsiella were tested for the ability to fix dinitrogen by the acetylene reduction assay. Ability to detect this trait was markedly affected by cultural conditions. When the test was run at 37 degrees C in the presence of yeast extract (50 mg/liter), only 1.6% of the organisms were diazotrophs, whereas this temperature without yeast extract yielded 12.9% positive cultures. The optimum condition found was 28 degrees C without yeast extract (21.9% positive); therefore, search for diazotrophy in clinical strains should not be conducted at the usual incubation temperature. There was a high incidence of indole-positive strains among diazotrophs. No such correlation was noted with any other biochemical trait or antibiotic susceptibility tested. The significance of this correlation is not apparent. PMID:336640

  19. Molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Aeromonas species from Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S D Puthucheary

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aeromonas species are common inhabitants of aquatic environments giving rise to infections in both fish and humans. Identification of aeromonads to the species level is problematic and complex due to their phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Aeromonas hydrophila or Aeromonas sp were genetically re-identified using a combination of previously published methods targeting GCAT, 16S rDNA and rpoD genes. Characterization based on the genus specific GCAT-PCR showed that 94 (96% of the 98 strains belonged to the genus Aeromonas. Considering the patterns obtained for the 94 isolates with the 16S rDNA-RFLP identification method, 3 clusters were recognised, i.e. A. caviae (61%, A. hydrophila (17% and an unknown group (22% with atypical RFLP restriction patterns. However, the phylogenetic tree constructed with the obtained rpoD sequences showed that 47 strains (50% clustered with the sequence of the type strain of A. aquariorum, 18 (19% with A. caviae, 16 (17% with A. hydrophila, 12 (13% with A. veronii and one strain (1% with the type strain of A. trota. PCR investigation revealed the presence of 10 virulence genes in the 94 isolates as: lip (91%, exu (87%, ela (86%, alt (79%, ser (77%, fla (74%, aer (72%, act (43%, aexT (24% and ast (23%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study emphasizes the importance of using more than one method for the correct identification of Aeromonas strains. The sequences of the rpoD gene enabled the unambiguous identication of the 94 Aeromonas isolates in accordance with results of other recent studies. Aeromonas aquariorum showed to be the most prevalent species (50% containing an important subset of virulence genes lip/alt/ser/fla/aer. Different combinations of the virulence genes present in the isolates indicate their probable role in the pathogenesis of Aeromonas infections.

  20. Molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Aeromonas species from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthucheary, S D; Puah, Suat Moi; Chua, Kek Heng

    2012-01-01

    Aeromonas species are common inhabitants of aquatic environments giving rise to infections in both fish and humans. Identification of aeromonads to the species level is problematic and complex due to their phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. Aeromonas hydrophila or Aeromonas sp were genetically re-identified using a combination of previously published methods targeting GCAT, 16S rDNA and rpoD genes. Characterization based on the genus specific GCAT-PCR showed that 94 (96%) of the 98 strains belonged to the genus Aeromonas. Considering the patterns obtained for the 94 isolates with the 16S rDNA-RFLP identification method, 3 clusters were recognised, i.e. A. caviae (61%), A. hydrophila (17%) and an unknown group (22%) with atypical RFLP restriction patterns. However, the phylogenetic tree constructed with the obtained rpoD sequences showed that 47 strains (50%) clustered with the sequence of the type strain of A. aquariorum, 18 (19%) with A. caviae, 16 (17%) with A. hydrophila, 12 (13%) with A. veronii and one strain (1%) with the type strain of A. trota. PCR investigation revealed the presence of 10 virulence genes in the 94 isolates as: lip (91%), exu (87%), ela (86%), alt (79%), ser (77%), fla (74%), aer (72%), act (43%), aexT (24%) and ast (23%). This study emphasizes the importance of using more than one method for the correct identification of Aeromonas strains. The sequences of the rpoD gene enabled the unambiguous identication of the 94 Aeromonas isolates in accordance with results of other recent studies. Aeromonas aquariorum showed to be the most prevalent species (50%) containing an important subset of virulence genes lip/alt/ser/fla/aer. Different combinations of the virulence genes present in the isolates indicate their probable role in the pathogenesis of Aeromonas infections.

  1. Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sirin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibilities of S.aureus strains isolated from various clinical specimens between the years 2011-2014 and to investigate the changes of these susceptibilities over the years. Material and Method: Identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of the strains were performed by Vitek 2 compact automated system (bioMérieux, France. The strains found to be intermediate susceptible to vancomycin and teicoplanin were also tested by E-test method. Results: S.aureus strains (n=1442 were most commonly isolated from wound, urine and blood samples. The isolation rates of methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA in hospitalized patients were significantly higher than the isolation rates of MRSA in outpatients. All strains were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid and tigecycline. The total of four years resistance rates of MRSA strains to erythromycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, fusidic acid were significantly higher than the resistance rates of methicillin-sensitive S.aureus (MSSA. The changes in the rates of antibiotic resistance were not statistically significant in MSSA strains over the years, and statistically significant decrease was found in erythromycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin and gentamicin resistance in MRSA strains. Discussion: Glycopeptides, linezolid and tigecycline were the most effective antibiotics against S.aureus strains. It was considered as necessary to detect antimicrobial resistance profiles by effective surveillance studies and monitor the changes occurred over the years in order to prevent the development of resistance and control of infections.

  2. Identification of Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Clinical Isolates from 8 Provinces of China

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    Haican Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are increasing in incidence and prevalence worldwide. In this study, we identified NTM species of the clinical isolates from 8 provinces in China, in order to preliminarily provide some basic scientific data in the different species and distribution of NTM related to pulmonary disease in China. A total of 523 clinical isolates from patients with tuberculosis (TB diagnosed clinically from 2005 to 2012 were identified to the species using conventional and molecular methods, including multilocus PCR, rpoB and hsp65 PCR-PRA, hsp65, rpoB, and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region sequencing. The isolates were identified into 3 bacterium genera, including NTM, Gordonia bronchialis, and Nocardia farcinica, and, for the 488 NTM isolates, 27 species were identified. For all the 27 species of NTM which were found to cause pulmonary infections in humans, the most prevalent species was M. intracellulare, followed by M. avium and M. abscessus. And seven other species were for the first time identified in patients with TB in China. NTM species identification is very important for distinguishing between tuberculosis and NTM pulmonary diseases, and the species diversity drives the creation of diverse and integrated identification methods with higher accuracy and efficacy.

  3. Clinical science and human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaud, J J

    2001-09-01

    The debate between mentalism/cognitivism and behaviorism is analyzed, and it is concluded that behaviorism is the philosophy more closely associated with psychology as a behavioral science, the cognitive approach being more closely aligned with biological science. Specific objections to mentalistic interpretations of behavioral phenomena are detailed, and examples from clinical psychology are used to show the importance of behavioral approaches in applied domains. It is argued that the relation between behavior theory and clinical psychology is critical to the continued advancement of applied psychology. Behavior analysis is offered as a direct, applied extension of behavior theory as well as a highly practical and effective approach for understanding, explaining, and modifying the factors that contribute to and maintain maladaptive behaviors. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. ISOLATION AND PRIMARY CULTURES OF HUMAN INTRAHEPATIC BILE DUCTULAR EPITHELIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetris, A. J.; Markus, B. H.; Saidman, S.; Fung, J. J.; Makowka, L.; Graner, S.; Duquesnoy, R.; Starzl, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY A technique for the isolation of human intrahepatic bile ductular epithelium, and the establishment of primary cultures using a serum- and growth-factor-supplemented medium combined with a connective tissue substrata is described. Initial cell isolates and monolayer cultures display phenotypic characteristics of biliary epithelial cells (low molecular weight prekeratin positive; albumin, alphafetoprotein, and Factor VIII-related antigen negative). Ultrastructural features of the cultured cells show cell polarization with surface microvilli, numerous interepithelial junctional complexes and cytoplasmic intermediate prekeratin filaments. PMID:3131298

  5. High-level fluoroquinolone resistance in ophthalmic clinical isolates belonging to the species Corynebacterium macginleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Miyamoto, Tatsuro; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Ichimura, Minoru; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Shiota, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    The clinical importance of nondiphtherial Corynebacterium, a ubiquitous member of the normal human microflora of the skin and mucous membrane, for ocular surface infections has been recognized recently. We performed an antimicrobial susceptibility test with Etest strips for three fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and levofloxacin) and a taxonomic analysis on 21 isolates of Corynebacterium from ophthalmic samples. Of these, 16 isolates were identified as C. macginleyi at the species level on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons. The remaining five isolates were determined to be C. mastitidis (four) or C. accolens (one). Eleven of the C. macginleyi isolates showed high levels of resistance to all of the fluoroquinolones tested, and one isolate was resistant to norfloxacin alone. An analysis of the amplified quinolone-resistance-determining regions of the gyrA genes revealed that a single amino acid substitution in position 83 of the gyrA product was sufficient to generate the norfloxacin resistance phenotype, and double mutations leading to amino acid changes in positions 83 and 87 were necessary for high-level resistance against the other fluoroquinolones. We conducted the first example of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis on C. macginleyi. The MLST analysis grouped the majority of C. macginleyi isolates into a single lineage, and another molecular strain typing by random amplified polymorphic DNA fragment patterns supported the finding, indicating that a particular lineage of C. macginleyi is dominant on the human ocular surface. This type of population might be particularly adaptable to the milieu on the human ocular surface.

  6. Genotypic diversity and virulence markers of Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A strains isolated from clinical and non-clinical origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campioni, Fábio; Falcão, Juliana P

    2014-03-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A (B1A) strains are considered as non-pathogenic; however, some reports have identified some strains as the causal agents of infection. In South America, few studies molecularly characterized the strains of this biotype. This work typed 51 B1A strains isolated from clinical and non-clinical sources from Brazil and Chile by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR) to elucidate their genotypic diversity, and verify the distribution of 11 virulence markers by PCR. The strains were divided into two groups, ERIC-A and ERIC-B, clustered independently of their clinical or non-clinical origin. No differences were observed in the frequencies of the virulence markers between clinical and non-clinical strains. However, the genes ystB, hreP and myfA occurred exclusively in the strains of the group ERIC-A. Some clinical and non-clinical strains were clustered in the same genetic group and presented the same number of virulence markers, which might suggest the role of the environment and food as a potential source of infection for humans and animals. The results corroborate with the hypothesis that B1A strains are divided into two main clusters that differ in the frequency of some virulence markers, a fact observed for the first time in South American strains. © 2013 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Isolation and functional characterization of the human 90K promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brakebusch, C; Sures, I; Jallal, B

    1999-01-01

    90K is a secreted protein thought to be involved in the body's defense against pathogens and cancer. To elucidate its transcriptional regulation, the promoter of human 90K (HGMW-approved symbol LGAL S3BP) was isolated and characterized. Analysis of the 3. 3-kb 5'-flanking region revealed...... region around the minimal promoter (-99 --> -12) was highly homologous between human and mouse. While both human and mouse minimal promoters contained an interferon-responsive element (IRF-E), the human minimal promoter was not inducible by poly(I). poly(C) in contrast to that of the mouse. Point...... mutations 30 bp upstream of the IRF-E, however, conferred inducibility to the human minimal promoter, suggesting interaction between different promoter elements....

  8. Molecular Characterisation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolated from Typhoidial Humans

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    Arunava Das

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is the major causative agent for typhoidial fever around the globe among human population reported till date. Present research work was carried out for detection and molecular characterisation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolated from humans with Typhoidial fever by biochemical, phenotypical and virulence gene based polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques. The isolated strains were also investigated for antibiotic susceptibility patterns as a control measure. Methodology and Results: A total of 16 clinical samples were collected from the same numbers of patients (7 males and 9 females from Coimbatore, Erode and Salem districts of Tamil Nadu and were processed via broth enrichment methods for isolation and identification of the causative agent S. enterica serovar Typhi. Microbiological and biochemical investigations revealed the presence of S. Typhi from 16 samples. The biotyping of the isolates showed that all the isolates belonged to biotype IV. The PCR analysis confirmed the presence of invA (Invasion gene, 244bp, tyv (Tyveloseepimerase gene, 615 bp, fliC-d (Phage-1 flagellin gene for d-antigen, 750 bp and viaB (Vi antigen gene, 439bp in all 16 clinical samples. The antibiotic susceptibility test that was carried out among the isolates against 12 antimicrobial agents, showed 100 % resistance to only ampicillin and 100 % sensitivity to carbenicillin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, gentamycin, kanamycin and tetracycline.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: This study confirmed the association of virulent strains of S. enterica serovar Typhi from Typhoidial fever among human population and suggested that PCR based diagnostic could be very useful for the rapid detection of S. Typhi isolates. Present study emphasized the use of antibiotic like chloramphenicol or in combination with other antibiotics for the effective control of S. Typhi.

  9. Human Schistosomiasis: Clinical Perspective: Review

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    Rashad S. Barsoum

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations of schistosomiasis pass by acute, sub acute and chronic stages that mirror the immune response to infection. The later includes in succession innate, TH1 and TH2 adaptive stages, with an ultimate establishment of concomitant immunity. Some patients may also develop late complications, or suffer the sequelae of co-infection with other parasites, bacteria or viruses. Acute manifestations are species-independent; occur during the early stages of invasion and migration, where infection-naivety and the host’s racial and genetic setting play a major role. Sub acute manifestations occur after maturity of the parasite and settlement in target organs. They are related to the formation of granulomata around eggs or dead worms, primarily in the lower urinary tract with Schistosoma haematobium, and the colon and rectum with Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma intercalatum and Schistosoma mekongi infection. Secondary manifestations during this stage may occur in the kidneys, liver, lungs or other ectopic sites. Chronic morbidity is attributed to the healing of granulomata by fibrosis and calcification at the sites of oval entrapment, deposition of schistosomal antigen-antibody complexes in the renal glomeruli or the development of secondary amyloidosis. Malignancy may complicate the chronic lesions in the urinary bladder or colon. Co-infection with salmonella or hepatitis viruses B or C may confound the clinical picture of schistosomiasis, while the latter may have a negative impact on the course of other co-infections as malaria, leishmaniasis and HIV. Prevention of schistosomiasis is basically geared around education and periodic mass treatment, an effective vaccine being still experimental. Praziquantel is the drug of choice in the treatment of active infection by any species, with a cure rate of 80%. Other antischistosomal drugs include metrifonate for S. haematobium, oxamniquine for S. mansoni and

  10. Proteomic variation and diversity in clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from invasive and non-invasive sites.

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    Mustapha Bittaye

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for a variety of invasive and non-invasive human infections. There are over 90 serotypes of S. pneumoniae differing in their ability to adapt to the different niches within the host. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to discriminate clinical S. pneumoniae isolates recovered from either blood cultures (invasive site isolates or other sites, including sputum, tracheal aspirate, ear, eye and skin swabs (non-invasive site isolates. Global protein expression profiles for five invasive site and six non-invasive site isolates representing five different serotypes (serotypes 4, 6, 9, 14 and 23 were obtained for each isolate and combined into a single data set using Progenesis SameSpots™ software. One-hundred and eighty six protein spots (39% of the protein spots in the dataset differed significantly (ANOVA, p<0.05 in abundance between the invasive site (101 upregulated protein spots and non-invasive site (85 upregulated protein spots isolates. Correlations between the bacterial proteomes and their sites of isolation were determined by Principal Component Analysis (PCA using the significantly different protein spots. Out of the 186 variable protein spots, 105 exhibited a serotype-associated pattern of variability. The expression of the remaining 81 protein spots was concluded to be uniquely linked to the site of bacterial isolation. Mass spectrometry was used to identify selected protein spots that showed either constant or differential abundance levels. The identified proteins had a diverse range of functions including, capsule biogenesis, DNA repair, protein deglycation, translation, stress response and virulence as well as amino acid, carbohydrate, lipid and nucleotide metabolism. These findings provide insight on the proteins that contribute towards the adaptation of the bacteria to different sites within the host.

  11. Virulence-associated gene pattern of porcine and human Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 4 isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, M; Brodard, I; Overesch, G

    2015-04-02

    Yersinia enterocolitica 4/O:3 is the most important human pathogenic bioserotype in Europe and the predominant pathogenic bioserotype in slaughter pigs. Although many studies on the virulence of Y. enterocolitica strains have showed a broad spectrum of detectable factors in pigs and humans, an analysis based on a strict comparative approach and serving to verify the virulence capability of porcine Y. enterocolitica as a source for human yersiniosis is lacking. Therefore, in the present study, strains of biotype (BT) 4 isolated from Swiss slaughter pig tonsils and feces and isolates from human clinical cases were compared in terms of their spectrum of virulence-associated genes (yadA, virF, ail, inv, rovA, ymoA, ystA, ystB and myfA). An analysis of the associated antimicrobial susceptibility pattern completed the characterization. All analyzed BT 4 strains showed a nearly similar pattern, comprising the known fundamental virulence-associated genes yadA, virF, ail, inv, rovA, ymoA, ystA and myfA. Only ystB was not detectable among all analyzed isolates. Importantly, neither the source of the isolates (porcine tonsils and feces, humans) nor the serotype (ST) had any influence on the gene pattern. From these findings, it can be concluded that the presence of the full complement of virulence genes necessary for human infection is common among porcine BT 4 strains. Swiss porcine BT 4 strains not only showed antimicrobial susceptibility to chloramphenicol, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, colistin, florfenicol, gentamicin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, sulfamethoxazole, streptomycin, tetracycline and trimethoprim but also showed 100% antibiotic resistance to ampicillin. The human BT 4 strains revealed comparable results. However, in addition to 100% antibiotic resistance to ampicillin, 2 strains were resistant to chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid. Additionally, 1 of these strains was resistant to sulfamethoxazole. The results demonstrated that Y. enterocolitica BT 4

  12. Prevotella aurantiaca sp. nov., isolated from the human oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Natsuko; Okamoto, Masaaki

    2010-03-01

    Two anaerobic, pigmented, non-spore-forming, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped strains isolated from the human oral cavity, OMA31(T) and OMA130, were characterized by determining their phenotypic and biochemical features, cellular fatty acid profiles and phylogenetic positions based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the new isolates belonged to a single species of the genus Prevotella. The two isolates showed 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with each other and were most closely related to Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611(T) with 96.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity; the next most closely related strains to the isolates were Prevotella pallens AHN 10371(T) (96.1 %) and Prevotella falsenii JCM 15124(T) (95.3 %). Phenotypic and biochemical characteristics of the isolates were the same as those of P. intermedia JCM 12248(T), P. falsenii JCM 15124(T) and Prevotella nigrescens JCM 12250(T). The isolates could be differentiated from P. pallens JCM 11140( T) by mannose fermentation and alpha-fucosidase activity. Conventional biochemical tests were unable to differentiate the new isolates from P. intermedia, P. falsenii and P. nigrescens. However, hsp60 gene sequence analysis suggested that strain OMA31(T) was not a representative of P. intermedia, P. pallens, P. falsenii or P. nigrescens. Based on these data, a novel species of the genus Prevotella, Prevotella aurantiaca sp. nov., is proposed, with OMA31(T) (=JCM 15754(T)=CCUG 57723(T)) as the type strain.

  13. MRI criteria for MS in patients with clinically isolated syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalban, X.; Tintore, M.; Swanton, J.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, criteria for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) have changed, mainly due to the incorporation of new MRI criteria. While the new criteria are a logical step forward, they are complex and-not surprisingly-a good working knowledge of them is not always evident among...... neurologists and neuroradiologists. In some circumstances, several MRI examinations are needed to achieve an accurate and prompt diagnosis. This provides an incentive for continued efforts to refine the incorporation of MRI-derived information into the diagnostic workup of patients presenting with a clinically...... isolated syndrome. Within the European multicenter collaborative research network that studies MRI in MS (MAGNIMS), a workshop was held in London in November 2007 to review information that may simplify the existing MS diagnostic criteria, while maintaining a high specificity that is essential to minimize...

  14. Color-Removal by Microorganisms Isolated from Human Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Ito

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are essential for human life. Microorganisms decompose the carbon compounds in dead animals and plants and convert them into carbon dioxide. Intestinal bacteria assist in food digestion. Some vitamins are produced by bacteria that live in the intestines. Sewage and industrial wastewater are treated by activated sludge composed of microbial communities. All of these are due to the ability of microbes to produce many enzymes that can degrade chemicals. How do teachers make students understand that microorganisms are always associated with humans, and that microorganisms have the ability to degrade chemicals? The presence of microorganisms on humans can be shown by incubating agar plates after they are touched by the hands of students. The ability of microorganisms to degrade chemicals can be shown by an analytical measurement of the degradation of chemicals. When the chemicals are dyes (colorants in water, microbial activity on degradation of dyes can be demonstrated by observing a decreasing degree of color as a result of the enzymatic activity (e.g., azoreductase. Dyes are widely used in the textile, food, and cosmetic industries. They are generally resistant to conventional biological wastewater treatment systems such as the activated sludge process (4. The discharge of wastewater containing dye pollutes surface water. The ability of microorganisms to decolorize and degrade dyes has been widely investigated to use for bioremediation purposes (5. The goal of this tip is to understand the presence of bacteria on human skin and the ability of bacteria to degrade colorant chemicals (decolorization. In this tip, students first cultivate and isolate bacteria on their hands, and then examine potential decolorization activity of each bacterium by observing the degree of color of the liquid in tubes in which bacteria isolated from students’ hands were inoculated. Decolorization activity of bacterial isolates from human skin has been

  15. Isolation of Borna Disease Virus from Human Brain Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yurie; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Shoya, Yuko; Nakaya, Takaaki; Watanabe, Makiko; Tomonaga, Keizo; Iwahashi, Kazuhiko; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Momiyama, Noriko; Taniyama, Hiroyuka; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kurata, Takeshi; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Serological and molecular epidemiological studies indicate that Borna disease virus (BDV) can infect humans and is possibly associated with certain neuropsychiatric disorders. We examined brain tissue collected at autopsy from four schizophrenic patients and two healthy controls for the presence of BDV markers in 12 different brain regions. BDV RNA and antigen was detected in four brain regions of a BDV-seropositive schizophrenic patient (P2) with a very recent (2 years) onset of disease. BDV markers exhibited a regionally localized distribution. BDV RNA was found in newborn Mongolian gerbils intracranially inoculated with homogenates from BDV-positive brain regions of P2. Human oligodendroglia (OL) cells inoculated with brain homogenates from BDV-positive gerbils allowed propagation and isolation of BDVHuP2br, a human brain-derived BDV. Virus isolation was also possible by transfection of Vero cells with ribonucleoprotein complexes prepared from BDV-positive human and gerbil brain tissues. BDVHuP2br was genetically closely related to but distinct from previously reported human- and animal-derived BDV sequences. PMID:10775596

  16. Two Distinct Clinical Courses of Human Cowpox, Germany, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Eder

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we present two cases of human infection with cowpox virus with distinct clinical courses. A series of clinical photographs documents lesion progression over time. In the first case—an unvaccinated young veterinary assistant—a pustule was treated locally with cortisone. The lesion turned into a large ulcer accompanied by severe lymphadenitis. Based on her close contact to a sick stray cat, infection with cowpox virus was assumed and confirmed by virus isolation, PCR, and serology. The clinical course took up to eleven months until healing of the wound was complete. Transmission of cowpox virus from the cat was likely because a skin swab was PCR-positive and the cat had a high titer of anti-orthopoxvirus antibodies. In contrast, a rather mild clinical course of cowpox was confirmed in a 49-year-old male farmer vaccinated against smallpox. Only a small eschar developed, and wound closure was complete after 6 weeks.

  17. Innate immune functions of microglia isolated from human glioma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimm Elizabeth

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innate immunity is considered the first line of host defense and microglia presumably play a critical role in mediating potent innate immune responses to traumatic and infectious challenges in the human brain. Fundamental impairments of the adaptive immune system in glioma patients have been investigated; however, it is unknown whether microglia are capable of innate immunity and subsequent adaptive anti-tumor immune responses within the immunosuppressive tumor micro-environment of human glioma patients. We therefore undertook a novel characterization of the innate immune phenotype and function of freshly isolated human glioma-infiltrating microglia (GIM. Methods GIM were isolated by sequential Percoll purification from patient tumors immediately after surgical resection. Flow cytometry, phagocytosis and tumor cytotoxicity assays were used to analyze the phenotype and function of these cells. Results GIM expressed significant levels of Toll-like receptors (TLRs, however they do not secrete any of the cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α critical in developing effective innate immune responses. Similar to innate macrophage functions, GIM can mediate phagocytosis and non-MHC restricted cytotoxicity. However, they were statistically less able to mediate tumor cytotoxicity compared to microglia isolated from normal brain. In addition, the expression of Fas ligand (FasL was low to absent, indicating that apoptosis of the incoming lymphocyte population may not be a predominant mode of immunosuppression by microglia. Conclusion We show for the first time that despite the immunosuppressive environment of human gliomas, GIM are capable of innate immune responses such as phagocytosis, cytotoxicity and TLR expression but yet are not competent in secreting key cytokines. Further understanding of these innate immune functions could play a critical role in understanding and developing effective immunotherapies to malignant human gliomas.

  18. Isolation and characterization of non tuberculous mycobacteria from humans and animals in Namwala District of Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malama, Sydney; Munyeme, Musso; Mwanza, Sydney; Muma, John Bwalya

    2014-09-09

    The genus Mycobacterium contains more than 100 species, most of which are classified as non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). In Zambia, the NTM are slowly becoming recognized as pathogens of major public health significance with the advent of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). This study aimed at reporting the isolated NTM and ascertains their zoonotic potential and diagnostic significance in Zambia. A total of 100 sputum samples were collected from three health facilities from suspected pulmonary tuberculosis human patients. In addition, 67 lymph node tissue samples from cattle and 14 from Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) showing tuberculosis-like lesions were collected. The samples were appropriately decontaminated and cultured on Middlebrook 7H10 and Stone brink. The isolates were then identified accordingly using the 16S ribosomal RNA analysis method. A total of 8 NTM were isolated from human sputum, 12 from cattle and 1 from the Kafue lechwe. The identified NTM included M. intracellulae, M. abscess, M. chimaera, M. bolleti, M. fortuitum and M. stomatopae sp. Nov. The isolation of NTM from humans and animals at the interface in Namwala district has highlighted the clinical significance and diagnostic challenge. The epidemiological investigation of NTM in the study area is therefore recommended. This should include sampling from environmental sources such as water and soil.

  19. Genetic diversity and virulence potential of clinical and environmental Aeromonas spp. isolates from a diarrhea outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lívia Christina Alves da; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Melo, Beatriz Souza Toscano de; Mendes-Marques, Carina Lucena; Rezende, Antonio Mauro; Almeida, Alzira Maria Paiva de; Leal, Nilma Cintra

    2017-08-18

    Aeromonas spp. are gram-negative bacteria that can cause a variety of infections in both humans and animals and play a controversial role in diarrhea outbreaks. Our aim was to identify clinical and environmental Aeromonas isolates associated with a cholera outbreak in a northeast county of Brazil at the species level. We also aimed to determine the genetic structure of the bacterial population and the virulence potential of the Aeromonas isolates. Analysis based on concatenated sequences of the 16S rRNA and gyrB genes suggested the classification of the 119 isolates studied into the following species: A. caviae (66.9%), A. veronii (15.3%), A. aquariorum (9.3%), A. trota (3.4%), A. hydrophila (3.4%) and A. jandaei (1.7%). One isolate did not fit any Aeromonas species assessed, which might indicate a new species. The haplotype network based on 16S rRNA gene sequences identified 59 groups among the 119 isolates and 26 reference strains, and it clustered almost all A. caviae isolates into the same group. The analysis of the frequency patterns of seven virulence-associated genes (alt, ast, hlyA, aerA, exu, lip, flaA/B) revealed 29 virulence patterns composed of one to seven genes. All the isolates harbored at least one gene, and three of them harbored all seven virulence genes. The results emphasize the need to improve local water supply and maintain close monitoring of possible bacterial contamination in the drinking water.

  20. Evaluation of Potential Probiotics Isolated from Human Milk and Colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaceno, Quésia S; Souza, Jaqueline P; Nicoli, Jacques R; Paula, Raquel L; Assis, Gabriela B; Figueiredo, Henrique C; Azevedo, Vasco; Martins, Flaviano S

    2017-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a diversity of bacterial species in human milk, even in aseptically collected samples. The present study evaluated potential probiotic bacteria isolated from human milk and associated maternal variables. Milk samples were collected from 47 healthy women and cultured on selective and universal agar media under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Bacterial isolates were counted and identified by Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight mass spectrometry and then tested for probiotic properties. Total bacteria in human milk ranged from 1.5 to 4.0 log10 CFU/mL. The higher bacterial counts were found in colostrum (mean = 3.9 log10 CFU/mL, 95% CI 3.14-4.22, p = 0.00001). The most abundant species was Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 76). The potential probiotic candidates were Lactobacillus gasseri (n = 4), Bifidobacterium breve (n = 1), and Streptococcus salivarius (n = 4). Despite the small sample size, L. gasseri was isolated only in breast milk from mothers classified into a normal weight range and after a vaginally delivered partum. No potential probiotics showed antagonism against pathogens, but all of them agglutinated different pathogens. Nine bacterial isolates belonging to the species L. gasseri, B. breve, and S. salivarius were selected as potential probiotics. The present study confirms the presence in breast milk of a bacterial microbiota that could be the source of potential probiotic candidates to be used in the formula of simulated maternal milk.

  1. Nontuberculous mycobacteria: Reports of clinical laboratory isolation in a three county area, North Carolina, 2006 -2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Laboratory reports of mycobacteria isolation and identification are created during the clinical diagnostic process to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). NTM isolation rates are expected to exceed rates of true NTM infectio...

  2. Carnosic acid acts synergistically with gentamicin in killing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Nicolás M; Fiorilli, Graciela; Cáceres Guido, Paulo A; Moreno, Silvia

    2016-11-15

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is resistant to different commonly used antibiotics, stressing the need for further strategies to treat this human pathogen with worldwide prevalence. The use of phytochemicals within the current pharmacology is a promising approach to enhance the antimicrobial activity of common antibiotics in the battle against these bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the antimicrobial effectiveness of carnosic acid, the major constituent of Rosmarinus officinalis L. leaves, in combination with gentamicin against multi-drug resistant MRSA clinical isolates obtained from pediatric patients with bacteremia. Anti-MRSA activity was studied using the broth microdilution assay and time-kill method. Combinations of subinhibitory concentrations of carnosic acid and gentamicin were examined using the checkerboard method. Carnosic acid exhibited a good antibacterial activity against all multidrug-resistant MRSA clinical isolates tested, which are resistant to four up to nine antibiotics. In addition, the combination of carnosic acid with gentamicin not only decreased the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of both by 4- to 5-fold, but also improved the bactericidal potency of the common antibiotic by 32- to 40-fold against both gentamicin-susceptible and gentamicin-resistant MRSA clinical isolates. A clear bactericidal synergistic activity between carnosic acid and gentamicin in killing multidrug-resistant MRSA clinical isolates with a fractional bactericidal concentration index (FBCI) of 0.28-0.35 was demonstrated. Our findings show the potential use of carnosic acid in combination with gentamicin as a promising alternative for the control of healthcare-associated infections caused by multidrug-resistant MRSA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Azoreductase activity of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, F; Franklin, W; Cerniglia, C E

    1990-07-01

    A plate assay was developed for the detection of anaerobic bacteria that produce azoreductases. With this plate assay, 10 strains of anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing azo dyes were isolated from human feces and identified as Eubacterium hadrum (2 strains), Eubacterium spp. (2 species), Clostridium clostridiiforme, a Butyrivibrio sp., a Bacteroides sp., Clostridium paraputrificum, Clostridium nexile, and a Clostridium sp. The average rate of reduction of Direct Blue 15 dye (a dimethoxybenzidine-based dye) in these strains ranged from 16 to 135 nmol of dye per min per mg of protein. The enzymes were inactivated by oxygen. In seven isolates, a flavin compound (riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, or flavin mononucleotide) was required for azoreductase activity. In the other three isolates and in Clostridium perfringens, no added flavin was required for activity. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that each bacterium expressed only one azoreductase isozyme. At least three types of azoreductase enzyme were produced by the different isolates. All of the azoreductases were produced constitutively and released extracellularly.

  4. Implementing human factors in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Methods Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have rece...

  5. Isolation and characterization of human articular chondrocytes from surgical waste after total knee arthroplasty (TKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Naranda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Cartilage tissue engineering is a fast-evolving field of biomedical engineering, in which the chondrocytes represent the most commonly used cell type. Since research in tissue engineering always consumes a lot of cells, simple and cheap isolation methods could form a powerful basis to boost such studies and enable their faster progress to the clinics. Isolated chondrocytes can be used for autologous chondrocyte implantation in cartilage repair, and are the base for valuable models to investigate cartilage phenotype preservation, as well as enable studies of molecular features, nature and scales of cellular responses to alterations in the cartilage tissue. Methods Isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes from the surgical waste obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA was performed. To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of the isolated cells, gene expression of collagen type 2 (COL2, collagen 1 (COL1 and aggrecan (ACAN was evaluated. Immunocytochemical staining of all mentioned proteins was performed to evaluate chondrocyte specific production. Results Cartilage specific gene expression of COL2 and ACAN has been shown that the proposed protocol leads to isolation of cells with a high chondrogenic potential, possibly even specific phenotype preservation up to the second passage. COL1 expression has confirmed the tendency of the isolated cells dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like phenotype already in the second passage, which confirms previous findings that higher passages should be used with care in cartilage tissue engineering. To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, immunocytochemical staining of the evaluated chondrocyte specific products was performed as well. Discussion In this study, we developed a protocol for isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes with the desired phenotype from the surgical waste obtained during TKA. TKA is a

  6. Detection of Amp C Beta Lactamases in Clinical Isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 16 E.coli isolates (40%) and 16 Klebsiella isolates (39.02%) screened harbored AmpC enzymes, of which 43.75% of E.coli and 56.25% of Klebsiella isolates coproduced ESBL enzymes. Pure AmpC production was observed in 56.25% of E.coli and 43.75% of Klebsiella isolates. The inhibitor based test was useful ...

  7. Clinical bacterial isolates from hospital environment as agents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteria were isolated from the air, floor and patients' surgical wounds in the theatre and surgical ward by using MacConkey agar, Chocolate agar Nutrient agar and Peptone water broth as isolating media. Plasmid sizes and bands of selected twenty (20) of the isolates were determined by electrophoresis analysis to ...

  8. Genome sequence of a clinical isolate of dermatophyte, Trichophyton rubrum from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Chitra; Dey, Sanchita Sanchaya; Mahajan, Siddharth; Prabu, Ramachandira; Jangir, Pramod Kumar; Gupta, Chhavi; Das, Shukla; Ramachandran, Vishnampettai Ganapathysubramanian; Bhattacharya, Sambit Nath; Pandey, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Taneja, Bhupesh

    2015-04-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is one of the major causative agents of dermatophytosis in humans worldwide. We report the draft genome sequence of T. rubrum var. raubitschekii from Delhi, India, isolated from a patient presenting symptoms of onychomycosis. The total estimated genome size of the clinical isolate is 25.2 MB containing 8265 predicted protein-coding sequences, 91 tRNA and 15 rRNA genes. Sequence analysis of the secreted subtilases, one of the major virulence factors in dermatophytes, clusters them into three subfamilies with distinct sequence features. The genome sequence is a step in understanding diversity of dermatophytes worldwide and will aid in identification of virulence factors and dissecting mechanisms of pathogenesis among them. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Clinical relevance of non-tuberculous mycobacteria isolated in the Nijmegen-Arnhem region, The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Bendien, S.A.; Lange, W.C.M. de; Hoefsloot, W.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency of clinical isolation of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in the Netherlands is increasing, but its clinical relevance is often uncertain. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and clinical relevance of isolation of NTM in four associated hospitals in a single region in the

  10. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Yersinia enterocolitica isolated from pigs and humans in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoslavskij, Aleksandr; Kudirkienė, Eglė; Marcinkutė, Audronė; Bajoriūnienė, Almina; Korkeala, Hannu; Malakauskas, Mindaugas

    2013-06-01

    Yersiniosis is one of the three leading foodborne zoonoses in Lithuania, and the incidence of 12.86 per 100,000 population was the highest among EU member states in 2010. Contaminated pig carcasses and subsequently undercooked pig meat are considered to be the primary transmission vehicle of enteropathogenic Y. enterocolitica to consumers. With the aim of evaluating pigs as a possible source of human yersiniosis in Lithuania, this study investigated the genetic diversity of Y. enterocolitica isolated from pigs and human cases of yersiniosis. In addition, the antimicrobial resistance of selected isolates from both sources was compared. In total, 83 Y. enterocolitica strains were characterised using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Overall, 68% of Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 pulsotypes found in human clinical samples were identical to 81% of pulsotypes found in the pig production chain. Yersinia enterocolitica pulsotype II was confirmed as the dominant pulsotype in the pig production chain and was identical to nine of 19 Y. enterocolitica strains found in humans. All tested Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains were resistant to ampicillin and erythromycin and sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Of the strains studied, 5% were resistant to tetracycline and streptomycin. This study showed that pigs may be the main source of human yersiniosis in Lithuania. In addition, Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains isolated from the pig production chain and from yersiniosis patients shared similar resistance to different antimicrobials. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Comparison of machine and human recognition of isolated instrument tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinaga, Ichiro

    2002-05-01

    This paper describes three different machine recognition experiments and a recently conducted human experiment in order to compare the abilities of machines and humans to recognize isolated instrument tones. The computer recognition software is based on the Lazy Learning Machine, which is an exemplar-based learning system using a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classifier with a genetic algorithm to find the optimal set of weights for the features to improve its performance. The performance of the software was progressively improved by adding more features. These include centroid and other higher order moments, such as skewness and kurtosis, the velocities of moments, spectral irregularity, tristimulus, and time-domain envelope shape. Also, realtime recognition is now possible by using Miller Pucketts PD, a realtime software synthesis system, and his fiddle~ object. The training data was taken from the McGill Master Samples. The human experiment involved eighty-eight conservatory students. Although the average human scores are similar to the machine scores, the best human subjects far exceeded the capabilities of the machine. The excellent performance of the humans in this experiment presents new challenges for timbre-recognition computer models.

  12. Genomic Features of Environmental and Clinical Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates Lacking Recognized Virulence Factors Are Dissimilar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronella, N.; Chew Leung, C.; Pightling, A. W.; Banerjee, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen that can cause illness after the consumption or handling of contaminated seafood. The primary virulence factors associated with V. parahaemolyticus illness are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and Tdh-related hemolysin (TRH). However, clinical strains lacking tdh and trh have recently been isolated, and these clinical isolates are poorly understood. To help understand the emergence of clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, a genomic approach was used to comprehensively compare 4 clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates with 16 environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates and 34 clinical isolates positive for tdh or trh, or both, with the objective of identifying genomic features that are unique to clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The prevalence of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) common to clinical isolates was thoroughly examined in each of the clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The tdh PAI was not present in any clinical or environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. The trh PAI was not present in any environmental isolates; however, in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolate 10-4238, the majority of the trh PAI including a partial trh1 gene was present, which resulted in reclassification of this isolate as a tdh-negative and trh-positive isolate. In the other clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates, neither the trh gene nor the trh PAI was present. We identified 862 genes in clinical tdh- and trh-negative isolates but not in environmental tdh- and trh-negative isolates. Many of these genes are highly homologous to genes found in common enteric bacteria and included genes encoding a number of chemotaxis proteins and a novel putative type VI secretion system (T6SS) effector and immunity protein (T6SS1). The availability of genome sequences from clinical V. parahaemolyticus tdh- and trh-negative isolates and the comparative analysis may help provide an understanding of how this pathotype is able to

  13. Antibacterial effects of Lactobacillus isolates of curd and human milk origin against food-borne and human pathogens.

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    Sharma, Chetan; Singh, Brij Pal; Thakur, Nishchal; Gulati, Sachin; Gupta, Sanjolly; Mishra, Santosh Kumar; Panwar, Harsh

    2017-05-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the antibacterial efficacy of lactobacilli isolated from curd and human milk samples. Identities of thirty-one different lactobacilli (20 from curd and 11 from human milk) were confirmed by genus-specific PCR and 16S rRNA-based sequencing. These strains belonged to five species, Lactobacillus casei, L. delbrueckii, L. fermentum, L. plantarum, and L. pentosus. Antibacterial activities of cell-free supernatants (CFSs) of all the Lactobacillus isolates were estimated through standard agar-well diffusion assay, against commonly occurring food-borne and clinically important human pathogens. None of the lactobacilli cell-free supernatant (CFS) exhibited inhibitory activity against four pathogens, namely Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, and Shigella flexneri were moderately inhibited by majority of CFSs, whereas, weak activity was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. CFS of some of the curd isolates displayed antagonistic activity against Streptococcus mutans; however, human milk lactobacilli did not displayed any inhibitory activity against them. As expected, Nisin (Nisaplin ® ) showed inhibitory activity against Gram-positive, S. aureus, B. cereus, and L. monocytogenes. Interestingly, few of the examined CFSs exhibited inhibitory activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. Findings from this study support the possibility to explore the tested lactobacilli and their CFSs as natural bio-preservatives, alone or in combination with approved bacteriocins in food and pharma formulations after validating their safety.

  14. Comparative analysis and supragenome modeling of twelve Moraxella catarrhalis clinical isolates

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    Hermans Peter WM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background M. catarrhalis is a gram-negative, gamma-proteobacterium and an opportunistic human pathogen associated with otitis media (OM and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. With direct and indirect costs for treating these conditions annually exceeding $33 billion in the United States alone, and nearly ubiquitous resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics among M. catarrhalis clinical isolates, a greater understanding of this pathogen's genome and its variability among isolates is needed. Results The genomic sequences of ten geographically and phenotypically diverse clinical isolates of M. catarrhalis were determined and analyzed together with two publicly available genomes. These twelve genomes were subjected to detailed comparative and predictive analyses aimed at characterizing the supragenome and understanding the metabolic and pathogenic potential of this species. A total of 2383 gene clusters were identified, of which 1755 are core with the remaining 628 clusters unevenly distributed among the twelve isolates. These findings are consistent with the distributed genome hypothesis (DGH, which posits that the species genome possesses a far greater number of genes than any single isolate. Multiple and pair-wise whole genome alignments highlight limited chromosomal re-arrangement. Conclusions M. catarrhalis gene content and chromosomal organization data, although supportive of the DGH, show modest overall genic diversity. These findings are in stark contrast with the reported heterogeneity of the species as a whole, as wells as to other bacterial pathogens mediating OM and COPD, providing important insight into M. catarrhalis pathogenesis that will aid in the development of novel therapeutic regimens.

  15. Human Polymorphisms as Clinical Predictors in Leprosy

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    Prado Montes de Oca, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Genetic and serum markers in human host can predict leprosy susceptibility per se as well as be useful in classification and/or prediction of clinical variants and immunological responses in leprosy. Adequate and timely assessment of potential risks associated with these 38 host leprosy genes could diminish epidemiological burden and improve life quality of patients with this still prevalent mycobacterial disease. PMID:22220182

  16. Genetic acquisition of NDM gene offers sustainability among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shweta; Upadhyay, Supriya; Sen, Malay Ranjan; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Choudhury, Debarati; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    New Delhi metallo β-lactamases are one of the most significant emerging resistance determinants towards carbapenem drugs. Their persistence and adaptability often depends on their genetic environment and linkage. This study reports a unique and novel arrangement of blaNDM-1 gene within clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north India. Three NDM positive clonally unrelated clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from hospital patients. Association of integron with blaNDM-1 and presence of gene cassettes were assessed by PCR. Genetic linkage of NDM gene with ISAba125 was determined and in negative cases linkage in upstream region was mapped by inverse PCR. In which only one isolate's NDM gene was linked with ISAba125 for mobility, while other two reveals new genetic arrangement and found to be inserted within DNA directed RNA polymerase gene of the host genome detected by inverse PCR followed by sequencing analysis. In continuation significance of this novel linkage was further analyzed wherein promoter site detected by Softberry BPROM software and activity were assessed by cloning succeeding semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicating the higher expression level of NDM gene. This study concluded out that the unique genetic makeup of NDM gene with DNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase favours adaptability to the host in hospital environment against huge antibiotic pressure.

  17. Genetic acquisition of NDM gene offers sustainability among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings.

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    Shweta Mishra

    Full Text Available New Delhi metallo β-lactamases are one of the most significant emerging resistance determinants towards carbapenem drugs. Their persistence and adaptability often depends on their genetic environment and linkage. This study reports a unique and novel arrangement of blaNDM-1 gene within clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north India. Three NDM positive clonally unrelated clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from hospital patients. Association of integron with blaNDM-1 and presence of gene cassettes were assessed by PCR. Genetic linkage of NDM gene with ISAba125 was determined and in negative cases linkage in upstream region was mapped by inverse PCR. In which only one isolate's NDM gene was linked with ISAba125 for mobility, while other two reveals new genetic arrangement and found to be inserted within DNA directed RNA polymerase gene of the host genome detected by inverse PCR followed by sequencing analysis. In continuation significance of this novel linkage was further analyzed wherein promoter site detected by Softberry BPROM software and activity were assessed by cloning succeeding semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicating the higher expression level of NDM gene. This study concluded out that the unique genetic makeup of NDM gene with DNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase favours adaptability to the host in hospital environment against huge antibiotic pressure.

  18. Pathogenetic characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from clinical and seafood sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongxay, Khamphouth; Wang, Shuna; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Beibei; Hu, Hongxia; Pan, Zijiang; Chen, Suyun; Fang, Weihuan

    2008-08-15

    A total of 216 Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates from seafood and clinical samples in eastern China were investigated for their hemolytic and urea-producing phenotypes, presence of putative virulence genes tdh and trh. Twenty-one clinical isolates (84%, 21/25) and 3 seafood isolates (1.57%, 3/191) were tdh-positive while only 3 clinical isolates (12%) and 7 seafood isolates (3.66%) were positive for trh gene. We further examined the pathogenicity of selected V. parahaemolyticus isolates in in vitro and in vivo systems. The clinical isolates were apparently more enteropathogenic (74.26 per thousand vs 62.07 per thousand expressed as intestine/body weight ratio, Pcytotoxicity as measured by LDH release of the HeLa cells although there were no statistical differences. The tdh-positive V. parahaemolyticus isolates were of higher enteropathogenicity (Pcytotoxic and adhesive to the cultured cell lines as well. From the in vitro and in vivo pathogenicity profiles, trh-positive isolates seemed to line between tdh-positive isolates and those without tdh and trh. There were two isolates H8 and H10 from clinical cases having moderate enteropathogenicity and virulence to mice, but were tdh-negative yet trh-positive. These results seem to suggest that hemolysins TDH and/or TRH may not be necessarily the only virulence factors of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates.

  19. The effect of environmental conditions on biofilm formation of Burkholderia pseudomallei clinical isolates.

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    Nur Siti K Ramli

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative saprophytic bacterium, is the causative agent of the potentially fatal melioidosis disease in humans. In this study, environmental parameters including temperature, nutrient content, pH and the presence of glucose were shown to play a role in in vitro biofilm formation by 28 B. pseudomallei clinical isolates, including four isolates with large colony variants (LCVs and small colony variants (SCVs morphotypes. Enhanced biofilm formation was observed when the isolates were tested in LB medium, at 30 °C, at pH 7.2, and in the presence of as little as 2 mM glucose respectively. It was also shown that all SVCs displayed significantly greater capacity to form biofilms than the corresponding LCVs when cultured in LB at 37 °C. In addition, octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C(8-HSL, a quorum sensing molecule, was identified by mass spectrometry analysis in bacterial isolates referred to as LCV CTH, LCV VIT, SCV TOM, SCV CTH, 1 and 3, and the presence of other AHL's with higher masses; decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C(10-HSL and dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (C(12-HSL were also found in all tested strain in this study. Last but not least, we had successfully acquired two Bacillus sp. soil isolates, termed KW and SA respectively, which possessed strong AHLs degradation activity. Biofilm formation of B. pseudomallei isolates was significantly decreased after treated with culture supernatants of KW and SA strains, demonstrating that AHLs may play a role in B. pseudomallei biofilm formation.

  20. Evaluation of different detection methods of biofilm formation in the clinical isolates

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    Afreenish Hassan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are associated with chronic and recurrent human infections and are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents. There are various methods to detect biofilm production like Tissue Culture Plate (TCP, Tube method (TM, Congo Red Agar method (CRA, bioluminescent assay, piezoelectric sensors, and fluorescent microscopic examination. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to compare three methods for the detection of biofilms. METHOD: The study was carried out at the Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan, from January 2010 to June 2010. A total of 110 clinical isolates were subjected to biofilm detection methods. Isolates were identified by standard microbiological procedures. Biofilm detection was tested by TCP, TM and CRA. Antibiotic susceptibility test of biofilm producing bacteria was performed by using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique according to CLSI guidelines. RESULTS: The TCP method was considered to be superior to TM and CRA. From the total of 110 clinical isolates, TCP method detected 22.7% as high, 41% moderate and 36.3% as weak or non-biofilm producers. We have observed higher antibiotic resistance in biofilm producing bacteria than non-biofilm producers. CONCLUSION: We can conclude from our study that the TCP method is a more quantitative and reliable method for the detection of biofilm forming microorganisms as compared to TM and CRA methods, and it can be recommended as a general screening method for detection of biofilm producing bacteria in laboratories.

  1. Switching of colony morphology and adhesion activity of Trichosporon asahii clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Tomoe; Yoshiyama, Nao; Ohgane, Yuzuha; Ikeda, Reiko

    2016-02-01

    Trichosporon asahii is a pathogenic yeast that causes trichosporonosis, a deep-seated infection, in immunocompromised hosts. Pathogenic factors involved in this infection have not been investigated in detail, but morphological phenotype switching is thought to be important for T. asahii pathogenesis. Therefore, we analyzed adhesion, which may be a key early step in T. asahii infection, after morphological phenotype switching. T. asahii clinical isolates show several colony morphologies. In this study, colonies showing white-farinose (W), off-white-smooth (O), off-white-rugose (OR), smooth (S), and yellowish-white (Y) morphologies were obtained from three isolates and compared in an adhesion assay performed in cell culture dishes. At least one type of colony morphology from each clinical isolate adhered strongly to the culture dish surface, although the colony type that displayed strong adherence varied among the strains. Thus, morphological phenotype switching altered the adhesion of T. asahii strains. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Comparative "-omics" in Mycoplasma pneumoniae Clinical Isolates Reveals Key Virulence Factors.

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    Maria Lluch-Senar

    Full Text Available The human respiratory tract pathogen M. pneumoniae is one of the best characterized minimal bacterium. Until now, two main groups of clinical isolates of this bacterium have been described (types 1 and 2, differing in the sequence of the P1 adhesin gene. Here, we have sequenced the genomes of 23 clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae. Studying SNPs, non-synonymous mutations, indels and genome rearrangements of these 23 strains and 4 previously sequenced ones, has revealed new subclasses in the two main groups, some of them being associated with the country of isolation. Integrative analysis of in vitro gene essentiality and mutation rates enabled the identification of several putative virulence factors and antigenic proteins; revealing recombination machinery, glycerol metabolism and peroxide production as possible factors in the genetics and physiology of these pathogenic strains. Additionally, the transcriptomes and proteomes of two representative strains, one from each of the two main groups, have been characterized to evaluate the impact of mutations on RNA and proteins levels. This study has revealed that type 2 strains show higher expression levels of CARDS toxin, a protein recently shown to be one of the major factors of inflammation. Thus, we propose that type 2 strains could be more toxigenic than type 1 strains of M. pneumoniae.

  3. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahal, Gulcan; Bilkay, Isil Seyis

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis which exists in healthy human skin as a commensal inhabitant is also an important pathogen forming biofilms on many surfaces and recently, increased resistance traits were suggested to be acquired in biofilm environments. In this study; clinical Prevalences, antibiotic resistances and biofilm formations of S. epidermidis strains were determined and comparison of all these findings with each other was carried out in order to take precautions against them and figure out if high biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains display multi drug resistance. According to our results; samples of wound and blood were the most S. epidermidis isolated clinical materials (40%; 35%) and cardiothoracic surgery was the most S. epidermidis observed service unit. All of these strains were sensitive to vancomycin, however 65% of them showed resistance to all β-lactam antibiotics (Penicillin, Oxacillin, Amoxicilin/Clavulonic acid), used in this study and 60% of all S. epidermidis strains were found as multi drug resistant. When the results of strong biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains are examined; they were isolated from sample of blood and service unit of cardiovascular surgery in highest frequency and 80% of them were β-lactam resistant whereas 100% of them were multi drug resistant. One of these multi drug resistant strains which was resistant to maximum amount of different antimicrobial classes, was also observed as maximum biofilm forming strain among all the other S. epidermidis isolates. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming strains shows that; biofilms play a role in antimicrobial resistance traits of S. epidermidis.

  4. Molecular Epidemiological and Antibiotic Susceptibility Characterization of Brucella Isolates from Humans in Sicily, Italy▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianelli, Cinzia; Graziani, Caterina; Santangelo, Carmela; Xibilia, Maria Teresa; Imbriani, Alida; Amato, Rosa; Neri, Domenico; Cuccia, Mario; Rinnone, Sebastiano; Di Marco, Vincenzo; Ciuchini, Franco

    2007-01-01

    Brucellosis is a serious problem in Sicily. Brucella melitensis was identified as the species most frequently isolated in humans in Italy. No data, however, are available about the molecular epidemiological characterization of Brucella isolates from humans. We have conducted this study to molecularly characterize clinical isolates of Brucella spp. and to evaluate their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Twenty Brucella isolates were studied. Differential growth characteristics and DNA polymorphisms such as the restriction patterns of the PCR-amplified omp2a and omp2b genes, rpoB nucleotide sequencing, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis of 16 loci (MLVA-16) were used to characterize the strains. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the E-test method on two different agar media, and the results were compared. All isolates were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3. rpoB nucleotide sequence analysis allowed the identification of two different genotypes of B. melitensis biovar 3. On the other hand, the MLVA-16 typing assay recognized 17 distinct genotypes. All isolates were sensitive to all tested antibiotics (rifampin, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), and the Mueller-Hinton agar plate is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility testing by the E-test method. Our findings identify B. melitensis biovar 3 as the etiological agent isolated in Sicily and encourage the use of both molecular methods, and in particular of the MLVA-16 assay, in epidemiological trace-back analysis. This study represents the first epidemiological data from molecular typing of Brucella strains circulating in Italy and, in particular, in eastern Sicily. PMID:17634297

  5. Genetic variability of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis isolates from humans, chickens, and pigs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getachew, Yitbarek; Hassan, Latiffah; Zakaria, Zunita; Abdul Aziz, Saleha

    2013-08-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have been reported to be present in humans, chickens, and pigs in Malaysia. In the present study, representative samples of VRE isolated from these populations were examined for similarities and differences by using the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method. Housekeeping genes of Enterococcus faecium (n = 14) and Enterococcus faecalis (n = 11) isolates were sequenced and analyzed using the MLST databases eBURST and goeBURST. We found five sequence types (STs) of E. faecium and six STs of E. faecalis existing in Malaysia. Enterococcus faecium isolates belonging to ST203, ST17, ST55, ST79, and ST29 were identified, and E. faecium ST203 was the most common among humans. The MLST profiles of E. faecium from humans in this study were similar to the globally reported nosocomial-related strain lineage belonging to clonal complex 17 (CC17). Isolates from chickens and pigs have few similarities to those from humans, except for one isolate from a chicken, which was identified as ST203. E. faecalis isolates were more diverse and were identified as ST4, ST6, ST87, ST108, ST274, and ST244, which were grouped as specific to the three hosts. E. faecalis, belonging to the high-risk CC2 and CC87, were detected among isolates from humans. In conclusion, even though one isolate from a chicken was found clonal to that of humans, the MLST analysis of E. faecium and E. faecalis supports the findings of others who suggest VRE to be predominantly host specific and that clinically important strains are found mainly among humans. The infrequent detection of a human VRE clone in a chicken may in fact suggest a reverse transmission of VRE from humans to animals.

  6. Characterisation of clinically isolated Streptococcus pyogenes from balanoposthitis patients, with special emphasis on emm89 isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tadao; Hata, Nanako; Matsui, Hideyuki; Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a variety of diseases, such as pharyngitis and toxic shock syndrome. In addition, this bacterium is a causative agent of balanoposthitis. To reveal the bacteriological characteristics of the isolates from balanoposthitis patients, we analysed 47 isolates. In addition, novel clade genotype emm89 S. pyogenes isolates have been reported to be spreading worldwide recently. Hence, we further analysed eight emm89 isolates. A drug susceptibility experiment was performed and emm types were determined. More detailed experiments, such as PCR analysis for the presence of virulence-associated genes and MLST analysis, were performed especially using emm89 isolates. All isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, but 34 % of the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The emm types of the isolates varied, with emm89 and emm11 being the most prevalent, but the emm1 type was not detected. The analysis of emm89 isolates revealed that drug susceptibilities varied. All isolates were negative for the hasABC gene and produced active NADase that are characteristics of novel clade genotype emm89 S. pyogenes. MLST analysis demonstrated that six isolates were of the ST101 type, the most predominant type reported thus far, but two isolates were of the ST646 type. According to the PCR analysis used to determine the presence of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin-related genes, the six ST101 isolates were further classified into four groups. These results suggest that balanoposthitis is caused by a variety of types of S. pyogenes, with novel clade genotype emm89 isolates playing a role in balanoposthitis infections in Japan.

  7. Cyclosporine A decreases the fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration of Candida albicans clinical isolates but not biofilm formation and cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibawa, T; Nurrokhman; Baly, I; Daeli, P R; Kartasasmita, G; Wijayanti, N

    2015-03-01

    Among the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most abundant species in humans. One of the virulent factors of C. albicans is its ability to develop biofilm. Biofilm forming microbes are characterized by decreasing of its susceptibility to antibiotics and antifungal. The fungicidal effect of fluconazole may be enhanced by cyclosporine A in laboratory engineered C. albicans strains. The aim of this work is to analyze the synergistic effect of cyclosporine A with fluconazole in C. albicans clinical isolates and the effect of cycolsporine A alone in the biofilm formation. Six fluconazole resistant and six sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates were analyzed for its minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs), biofilm formation, and cell growths. A semi-quantitative XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5- sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assay was conducted to measure the biofilm formation. Cyclosporine A has synergistic effect with fluconazole that was shown by decreasing MICs of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. However, cyclosporine A alone did not influence the biofilm formation and cell growth of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. These results indicated that cyclosporine A might be a promising candidate of adjuvant therapy for fluconazole against both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates.

  8. Usefulness of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for identifying clinical Trichosporon isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Júnior, J N; Figueiredo, D S Y; Toubas, D; Del Negro, G M B; Motta, A L; Rossi, F; Guitard, J; Morio, F; Bailly, E; Angoulvant, A; Mazier, D; Benard, G; Hennequin, C

    2014-08-01

    Trichosporon spp. have recently emerged as significant human pathogens. Identification of these species is important, both for epidemiological purposes and for therapeutic management, but conventional identification based on biochemical traits is hindered by the lack of updates to the species databases provided by the different commercial systems. In this study, 93 strains, or isolates, belonging to 16 Trichosporon species were subjected to both molecular identification using IGS1 gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis. Our results confirmed the limits of biochemical systems for identifying Trichosporon species, because only 27 (36%) of the isolates were correctly identified using them. Different protein extraction procedures were evaluated, revealing that incubation for 30 min with 70% formic acid yields the spectra with the highest scores. Among the six different reference spectra databases that were tested, a specific one composed of 18 reference strains plus seven clinical isolates allowed the correct identification of 67 of the 68 clinical isolates (98.5%). Although until recently it has been less widely applied to the basidiomycetous fungi, MALDI-TOF appears to be a valuable tool for identifying clinical Trichosporon isolates at the species level. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  9. Increased Efficiency of Group B Coxsackievirus Isolation from Clinical Specimens by Use of BGM Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegus, M A; Hollick, G E

    1982-05-01

    A continuous African green monkey kidney cell line, designated BGM, was compared with primary cynomolgus monkey kidney cells and human embryonic lung cells for efficiency of enterovirus isolation. A selective enhanced sensitivity of BGM cells both in terms of isolation rate and speed of isolation was found for group B coxsackieviruses but could not be demonstrated for a number of other nonpolio enteroviruses.

  10. Occurrence and characteristics of extended-spectrum-ß-lactamase- and AmpC-producing clinical isolates derived from companion animals and horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierikx, C.M.; Duijkeren, van E.; Schoormans, A.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Veldman, K.T.; Kant, A.; Huijsdens, X.; Zwaluw, van der K.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Mevius, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence and characteristics of extended-spectrum -lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates in clinical samples of companion animals and horses and compare the results with ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates described in humans. Between October 2007 and August

  11. Antibiotic susceptibility of periodontal Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rams, Thomas E; Feik, Diane; Mortensen, Joel E; Degener, John E; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius in subgingival dental plaque biofilms may contribute to forms of periodontitis that resist treatment with conventional mechanical root debridement/surgical procedures and may additionally participate in some extraoral infections. Because systemic antibiotics are often used in these clinical situations, and little is known of the antibiotic susceptibility of subgingival isolates of these two bacterial species, this study determined the in vitro susceptibility to six antibiotics of fresh S. constellatus and S. intermedius clinical isolates from human periodontitis lesions. A total of 33 S. constellatus and 17 S. intermedius subgingival strains, each recovered from separate patients with severe chronic periodontitis (n = 50) before treatment, were subjected to antibiotic gradient strip susceptibility testing with amoxicillin, azithromycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline on blood-supplemented Mueller-Hinton agar and to the inhibitory effects of metronidazole at 16 mg/L in an enriched Brucella blood agar dilution assay. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing interpretative standards were used to assess the results. Clindamycin was the most active antibiotic against S. constellatus (minimum inhibitory concentration at 90% [MIC90] 0.25 mg/L), and amoxicillin was most active against S. intermedius (MIC90 0.125 mg/L). A total of 30% of the S. constellatus and S. intermedius clinical isolates were resistant in vitro to doxycycline, 98% were only intermediate in susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, and 90% were resistant to metronidazole at 16 mg/L. Subgingival S. constellatus and S. intermedius exhibited variable antibiotic susceptibility profiles, potentially complicating empirical selection of periodontitis antibiotic therapy in patients who are species positive.

  12. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research Past ... the forefront of human health research today are clinical trials—studies that use human volunteers to help medical ...

  13. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs from Human Adenoid Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Se Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent progenitor cells that originally derived from bone marrow. Clinical use of bone marrow-derived MSC is difficult due to morbidity and low MSC abundance and isolation efficiency. Recently, MSCs have been isolated from various adult tissues. Here we report the isolation of adenoid tissue-derived MSCs (A-MSCs and their characteristics. Methods: We compared the surface markers, morphologies, and differentiation and proliferation capacities of previously established tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs with cells isolated from adenoid tissue. The immunophenotype of A-MSCs was investigated upon interferon (IFN-γ stimulation. Results: A-MSCs, T-MSCs, and BM-MSCs showed negative CD45, CD31 HLA-DR, CD34, CD14, CD19 and positive CD 90, CD44, CD73, CD105 expression. A-MSCs were fibroblast-like, spindle-shaped non-adherent cells, similar to T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Adipogenesis was observed in A-MSCs by the formation of lipid droplets after Oil Red O staining. Osteogenesis was observed by the formation of the matrix mineralization in Alizarin Red staining. Chondrogenesis was observed by the accumulation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan-rich matrix in collagen type II staining. These data were similar to those of T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Expression of marker genes (i.e., adipogenesis; lipoprotein lipase, proliferator-activator receptor-gamma, osteogenesis; osteocalcin, alkaline phasphatase, chondrogenesis; aggrecan, collagen type II α1 in A-MSCs were not different from those in T-MSCs and BM-MSCs. Conclusions: A-MSCs possess the characteristics of MSCs in terms of morphology, multipotent differentiation capacity, cell surface markers, and immunogeneity. Therefore, A-MSCs fulfill the definition of MSCs and represent an alternate source of MSCs.

  14. Differences in cell morphometry, cell wall topography and gp70 expression correlate with the virulence of Sporothrix brasiliensis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Rafaela A; Kubitschek-Barreira, Paula H; Teixeira, Pedro A C; Sanches, Glenda F; Teixeira, Marcus M; Quintella, Leonardo P; Almeida, Sandro R; Costa, Rosane O; Camargo, Zoilo P; Felipe, Maria S S; de Souza, Wanderley; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2013-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic infectious disease affecting both humans and animals. For many years, this subcutaneous mycosis had been attributed to a single etiological agent; however, it is now known that this taxon consists of a complex of at least four pathogenic species, including Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis. Gp70 was previously shown to be an important antigen and adhesin expressed on the fungal cell surface and may have a key role in immunomodulation and host response. The aim of this work was to study the virulence, morphometry, cell surface topology and gp70 expression of clinical isolates of S. brasiliensis compared with two reference strains of S. schenckii. Several clinical isolates related to severe human cases or associated with the Brazilian zoonotic outbreak of sporotrichosis were genotyped and clustered as S. brasiliensis. Interestingly, in a murine subcutaneous model of sporotrichosis, these isolates showed a higher virulence profile compared with S. schenckii. A single S. brasiliensis isolate from an HIV-positive patient not only showed lower virulence but also presented differences in cell morphometry, cell wall topography and abundant gp70 expression compared with the virulent isolates. In contrast, the highly virulent S. brasiliensis isolates showed reduced levels of cell wall gp70. These observations were confirmed by the topographical location of the gp70 antigen using immunoelectromicroscopy in both species. In addition, the gp70 molecule was sequenced and identified using mass spectrometry, and the sequenced peptides were aligned into predicted proteins using Blastp with the S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis genomes.

  15. Pregnancy - associated human listeriosis: Virulence and genotypic analysis of Listeria monocytogenes from clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Dharmendra Kumar; Singh, Durg Vijai; Dubey, Suresh Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a life-threatening pathogen, poses severe risk during pregnancy, may cause abortion, fetal death or neonatal morbidity in terms of septicemia and meningitis. The present study aimed at characterizing L. monocytogenes isolated from pregnant women based on serotyping, antibiotic susceptibility, virulence genes, in vivo pathogenicity test and ERIC- and REP-PCR fingerprint analyses. The results revealed that out of 3700 human clinical samples, a total of 30 (0.81%) isolates [12 (0.80%) from placental bit (1500), 18 (0.81%) from vaginal swab (2200)] were positive for L. monocytogenes. All the isolates belonged to serogroup 4b, and were + ve for virulence genes tested i.e. inlA, inlC, inlJ, plcA, prfA, actA, hlyA, and iap. Based on the mice inoculation tests, 20 isolates showed 100% and 4 isolates 60% relative virulence while 6 isolates were non-pathogenic. Moreover, 2 and 10 isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and cefoxitin, respectively, while the rest susceptible to other antibiotics used in this study. ERIC- and REP-PCR collectively depicted that the isolates from placental bit and vaginal swab had distinct PCR fingerprints except a few isolates with identical patterns. This study demonstrates prevalence of pathogenic strains mostly resistant to cefoxitin and/or ciprofloxacin. The results indicate the importance of isolating and characterizing the pathogen from human clinical samples as the pre-requisite for accurate epidemiological investigations.

  16. Detection of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type XI carrying highly divergent mecA, mecI, mecR1, blaZ, and ccr genes in human clinical isolates of clonal complex 130 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shore, Anna C

    2011-08-01

    Methicillin resistance in staphylococci is mediated by penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP 2a), encoded by mecA on mobile staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements. In this study, two clonal complex 130 (CC130) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from patients in Irish hospitals were identified that were phenotypically PBP 2a positive but lacked mecA by conventional PCR and by DNA microarray screening. The isolates were identified as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus using the GeneXpert real-time PCR assay. Whole-genome sequencing of one isolate (M10\\/0061) revealed a 30-kb SCCmec element encoding a class E mec complex with highly divergent blaZ-mecA-mecR1-mecI, a type 8 cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) complex consisting of ccrA1-ccrB3, an arsenic resistance operon, and flanking direct repeats (DRs). The SCCmec element was almost identical to that of SCCmec type XI (SCCmec XI) identified by the Sanger Institute in sequence type 425 bovine MRSA strain LGA251 listed on the website of the International Working Group on the Classification of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome Elements. The open reading frames (ORFs) identified within SCCmec XI of M10\\/0061 exhibited 21 to 93% amino acid identity to ORFs in GenBank. A third DR was identified ca. 3 kb downstream of SCCmec XI, indicating the presence of a possible SCC remnant. SCCmec XI was also identified in the second CC130 MRSA isolate by PCR and sequencing. The CC130 MRSA isolates may be of animal origin as previously reported CC130 S. aureus strains were predominantly from bovine sources. The highly divergent nature of SCCmec XI relative to other SCCmec elements indicates that it may have originated in another taxon.

  17. PER, CTX-M, TEM and SHV Beta-lactamases in Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolated from Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Nasehi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sDifferent types of extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs are encountered in the clinical settings worldwide. There are a few studies regarding the prevalence of ESBL genes among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates at Tehran especially those of blaPER and blaCTX. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of blaSHV, blaTEM ,blaPER and blaCTX genes among clinical K. pneumoniae of different hospitals in Tehran.Materials and MethodsTwo hundred isolates of K. pneumoniae were received from different clinical specimens. The susceptibility of the isolates to 10 different antibiotics was examined by disk diffusion test. The MICs for ceftazidime were also determined using micro-broth dilution assay. Isolates showing MIC 4 μg/ml for ceftazidime were screened for ESBL production by phenotypic confirmatory test (PCT and subjected to PCR for studied genes. Variation among four amplified genes was evaluated using PCR-RFLP.ResultsBy disk diffusion test, resistance to ceftazidime and cefotaxime were 34.7% and 33.5% respectively. However, all strains were susceptible to imipenem. Eighty isolates showed MICs≥ 4 μg/ml for ceftazidime of which 77 (96% were positive for ESBL in PCT. The prevalence of blaSHV, blaCTX-M, blaTEM and blaPER among these isolates were 26%, 24.5%, 18% and 7.5%, respectively. No variation was detected in the genes by PCR-RFLP.ConclusionAs far as we know this is the first report of the blaPER-1 in K. pneumoniae in Iran. The blaCTX-M was the second most common gene detected among the ESBL positive isolates of K. pneumoniae. For rapid identification of ESBL producing isolates it was recommended that clinical laboratories adopt simple test based on CLSI recommendation for confirming ESBL production in enterobacterial species.

  18. Mutant prevention concentrations of daptomycin for Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinel, Clara; Jaussaud, Clara; Auzou, Michel; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Cattoir, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    Owing to the emergence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, treatment of enterococcal infections has become challenging. Although spontaneous in vitro resistance frequencies are low, the emergence of resistance is increasingly reported during daptomycin therapy. The mutant selection window (MSW), comprised between the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the mutant prevention concentration (MPC), corresponds to the concentration range within which resistant mutants may be selected. Since no data are available for enterococci, the aim of this study was to determine MPCs and MSWs for 12 representative E. faecium clinical isolates. MICs and MPCs were determined by broth microdilution and agar dilution methods, respectively. A basic MSW-derived pharmacodynamic analysis was also performed using mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) values obtained with dosages from 4 to 12 mg/kg. MICs and MPCs of daptomycin ranged from 0.5 to 4 mg/L and from 2 to 32 mg/L, respectively, with no correlation between them. The wideness of MSWs ranged from 2× to 32× MIC. Mean plasma Cmax values of daptomycin were calculated from 55 to 174.5 mg/L when using a dosage from 4 to 12 mg/kg. All Cmax values were above the MPCs whatever the dosage. Taking into account the protein binding of daptomycin (ca. 90%), the unbound fraction Cmax was just within the MSW in 67-92% of strains at recommended dosages (4-6 mg/kg) and was above the MPC for the majority of strains only with the highest dosage (12 mg/kg). This study shows that free daptomycin Cmax values usually fell into MSWs when using lower dosages (<10 mg/kg). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Distinct patterns of innate immune activation by clinical isolates of respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, Ruth; Gao, Yajing; Dozmorov, Igor; Song, Ran; Wakeland, Edward K; Kahn, Jeffrey S

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major respiratory pathogen of infants and young children. Multiple strains of both subgroup A and B viruses circulate during each seasonal epidemic. Genetic heterogeneity among RSV genomes, in large part due to the error prone RNA-dependent, RNA polymerase, could mediate variations in pathogenicity. We evaluated clinical strains of RSV for their ability to induce the innate immune response. Subgroup B viruses were used to infect human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) and primary monocyte-derived human macrophages (MDM) from a variety of donors. Secretions of IL-6 and CCL5 (RANTES) from infected cells were measured following infection. Host and viral transcriptome expression were assessed using RNA-SEQ technology and the genomic sequences of several clinical isolates were determined. There were dramatic differences in the induction of IL-6 and CCL5 in both A549 cells and MDM infected with a variety of clinical isolates of RSV. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the pattern of innate immune activation in MDM was virus-specific and host-specific. Specifically, viruses that induced high levels of secreted IL-6 and CCL5 tended to induce cellular innate immune pathways whereas viruses that induced relatively low level of IL-6 or CCL5 did not induce or suppressed innate immune gene expression. Activation of the host innate immune response mapped to variations in the RSV G gene and the M2-1 gene. Viral transcriptome data indicated that there was a gradient of transcription across the RSV genome though in some strains, RSV G was the expressed in the highest amounts at late times post-infection. Clinical strains of RSV differ in cytokine/chemokine induction and in induction and suppression of host genes expression suggesting that these viruses may have inherent differences in virulence potential. Identification of the genetic elements responsible for these differences may lead to novel approaches to antiviral agents and vaccines.

  20. Distinct patterns of innate immune activation by clinical isolates of respiratory syncytial virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, Ruth; Wakeland, Edward K.

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major respiratory pathogen of infants and young children. Multiple strains of both subgroup A and B viruses circulate during each seasonal epidemic. Genetic heterogeneity among RSV genomes, in large part due to the error prone RNA-dependent, RNA polymerase, could mediate variations in pathogenicity. We evaluated clinical strains of RSV for their ability to induce the innate immune response. Subgroup B viruses were used to infect human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) and primary monocyte-derived human macrophages (MDM) from a variety of donors. Secretions of IL-6 and CCL5 (RANTES) from infected cells were measured following infection. Host and viral transcriptome expression were assessed using RNA-SEQ technology and the genomic sequences of several clinical isolates were determined. There were dramatic differences in the induction of IL-6 and CCL5 in both A549 cells and MDM infected with a variety of clinical isolates of RSV. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the pattern of innate immune activation in MDM was virus-specific and host-specific. Specifically, viruses that induced high levels of secreted IL-6 and CCL5 tended to induce cellular innate immune pathways whereas viruses that induced relatively low level of IL-6 or CCL5 did not induce or suppressed innate immune gene expression. Activation of the host innate immune response mapped to variations in the RSV G gene and the M2-1 gene. Viral transcriptome data indicated that there was a gradient of transcription across the RSV genome though in some strains, RSV G was the expressed in the highest amounts at late times post-infection. Clinical strains of RSV differ in cytokine/chemokine induction and in induction and suppression of host genes expression suggesting that these viruses may have inherent differences in virulence potential. Identification of the genetic elements responsible for these differences may lead to novel approaches to antiviral agents and vaccines

  1. [Antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical Nocardia isolates identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uner, Mahmut Celalettin; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Müştak, Hamit Kaan

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia species are ubiquitous in the environment and responsible for various human infections such as pulmonary, cutaneous, central nervous system and disseminated nocardiosis. Since the clinical pictures and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Nocardia species exhibit variability, susceptibility testing is recommended for every Nocardia isolates. The aims of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Nocardia clinical isolates and to compare the results of broth microdilution and disc diffusion susceptibility tests. A total of 45 clinical Nocardia isolates (isolated from 17 respiratory tract, 8 brain abscess, 7 pus, 3 skin, 3 conjunctiva, 2 blood, 2 tissue, 2 pleural fluid and 1 cerebrospinal fluid samples) were identified by using conventional methods and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Susceptibility testing was performed for amikacin, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, linezolid and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) by broth microdilution method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria recommended in 2011 approved standard (M24-A2) and disk diffusion method used as an alternative comparative susceptibility testing method. Among the 45 Nocardia strains, N.cyriacigeorgica (n: 26, 57.8%) was the most common species, followed by N.farcinica (n: 12, 26.7%), N.otitiscaviarum (n: 4, 8.9%), N.asteroides (n: 1, 2.2%), N.neocaledoniensis (n: 1, 2.2%) and N.abscessus (n: 1, 2.2%). Amikacin and linezolid were the only two antimicrobials to which all isolates were susceptible for both broth microdilution and disk diffusion tests. In broth microdilution test, resistance rates to TMP-SMX, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin were found as 15.6%, 37.8% and 84.4% respectively, whereas in the disk diffusion test, the highest resistance rate was observed against ciprofloxacin (n: 33, 73.3%), followed by TMP-SMX (n: 22, 48.9%) and ceftriaxone (n: 15, 33.3%). In both of these tests, N.cyriacigeorgica was the species with the

  2. Profiling of volatile organic compounds produced by clinical Aspergillus isolates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, M. G.; Brinkman, P.; Escobar, N.; Bos, L. D.; de Heer, K.; Meijer, M.; Janssen, H.-G.; de Cock, H.; Wösten, H. A. B.; Visser, C. E.; van Oers, M. H. J.; Sterk, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath may identify the presence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. We aimed to detect VOC profiles emitted by in vitro cultured, clinical Aspergillus isolates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Three clinical Aspergillus isolates and a

  3. Clinical relevance of Mycobacterium chelonae-abscessus group isolation in 95 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Zwaan, R. de; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the clinical relevance of Mycobacterium chelonae-abscessus group isolation from clinical samples. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed medical files of all patients from whom these mycobacteria were isolated between January 1999 and January 2005 and re-identified the

  4. Probiotic assessment of Enterococcus faecalis CP58 isolated from human gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nueno-Palop, Carmen; Narbad, Arjan

    2011-02-28

    A total of seventy lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from the faeces of healthy humans and their identities were confirmed by sequencing of their 16S rDNA genes. Of these only 5 isolates were found to resist bile salts and indicated survival in the simulated in vitro digestion assay which reproduces the stomach and intestinal digestion indicating their tolerance to gastric enzymes and the low pH conditions. Species that showed the best resistance to these conditions were: Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus sp., uncultured bifidobacteria, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus anginosus. These strains were investigated further to study their capacity to adhere to human intestinal Caco-2 cells. E. faecalis was the most adherent strain. Examination of the virulence determinants for this strain indicated that it was positive for efaAfs, gelE, agg, cpd, cob, ccf and cad, a profile that is similar to that of many E. faecalis isolates from food sources. The cytolysin biosynthetic genes cylA, cylB and cylM that are more associated with the clinical isolates of E. faecium were not detected in this strain. The antibiotic susceptibility tests indicated that the strain was sensitive to vancomycin, tetracycline, rifampicin and erythromycin but resistant only to kanamycin and chloramphenicol. These data suggest that the strain E. faecalis CP58 may be tested further for beneficial properties and developed as a new probiotic. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Human Polymorphisms as Clinical Predictors in Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Prado Montes de Oca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and serum markers in human host can predict leprosy susceptibility per se as well as be useful in classification and/or prediction of clinical variants and immunological responses in leprosy. Adequate and timely assessment of potential risks associated with these 38 host leprosy genes could diminish epidemiological burden and improve life quality of patients with this still prevalent mycobacterial disease.

  6. Comparison of Human and Soil Candida tropicalis Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Fluconazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Liang; Lin, Chih-Chao; Chang, Te-Pin; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Chen, Hui-Ting; Lee, Ching-Fu; Hsieh, Chih-Wen; Chen, Pei-Chen; Lo, Hsiu-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by treatment-resistant non-albicans Candida species, such as C. tropicalis, has increased, which is an emerging challenge in the management of fungal infections. Genetically related diploid sequence type (DST) strains of C. tropicalis exhibiting reduced susceptibility to fluconazole circulated widely in Taiwan. To identify the potential source of these wildly distributed DST strains, we investigated the possibility of the presence in soil of such C. tropicalis strains by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DST typing methods. A total of 56 C. tropicalis isolates were recovered from 26 out of 477 soil samples. Among the 18 isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole, 9 belonged to DST149 and 3 belonged to DST140. Both DSTs have been recovered from our previous studies on clinical isolates from the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance of Yeasts (TSARY) program. Furthermore, these isolates were more resistant to agricultural azoles. We have found genetically related C. tropicalis exhibiting reduced susceptibility to fluconazole from the human hosts and environmental samples. Therefore, to prevent patients from acquiring C. tropicalis with reduced susceptibility to azoles, prudent use of azoles in both clinical and agricultural settings is advocated. PMID:22496832

  7. Prevalence of toxin genes among the clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and its clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Deodhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus causes a variety of infections, ranging from a mild skin infection to blood stream infections and deep seated infections. As Stapylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB has the tendency to cause endovascular and metastatic infections, complications can occur at almost all sites of the body. Hence, SAB is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in spite of appropriate antimicrobial treatment. The virulence in S. aureus is determined by the presence of adhesins and toxins, which behave like superantigens (SAgs and leads to a massive release of proinflammatory cytokines causing overwhelming inflammatory response leading to endothelial leakage, hemodynamic shock, multiorgan failure, and possibly death. Materials and Methods: One year prospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in southern part of India included all patients with SAB. Clinical details were filled according to. All isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR for enterotoxin profiling. Results: A total of 101 patients of SAB were identified which comprises of 61 (60.4% patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA and 40 (39.6% patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Most common predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, severe organ dysfunction, shock, tachycardia, and leukocytosis. Two-third of the isolates had at least one enterotoxin, most prevalent was sea; 28% and 27% (P - value = 0.001 MSSA isolates had seg and sei; whereas, 38.6% (P - value < 0.001 of MRSA isolates were found to have sea. The most common enterotoxin associated with mortality was sei, which comprised of 38% of all mortality. Conclusion: In SAB, the significant predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, presence of multiorgan dysfunction, and shock. Although overall significance between the enterotoxin and shock could not be demonstrated, it successfully

  8. Biofilm detection and the clinical significance of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Růzicka, F; Holá, V; Votava, M; Tejkalová, R; Horvát, R; Heroldová, M; Woznicová, V

    2004-01-01

    ... and in 147 strains isolated from skin. The strains were examined for the presence of ica operone, for the ability to form biofilm by Christensen's test-tube method and for the production of slime by Congo Red agar method...

  9. Isolation of chlorhexidine-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, H; Kozukue, H

    1982-01-01

    The chlorhexidine resistance of 317 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospital patients was determined. The distribution pattern of their susceptibility to chlorhexidine clearly revealed two peaks, and the frequency of resistance to chlorhexidine was 84.2%.

  10. Quinolone and macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and C-coli: Resistance mechanisms and trends in human isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Taylor, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    resistance in Campylobacter and track resistance trends in human clinical isolates in relation to use of these agents in food animals. Susceptibility data suggest that erythromycin and other macrolides should remain the drugs of choice in most regions, with systematic surveillance and central measures...

  11. Dystonia and Tremor: The Clinical Syndromes with Isolated Tremor

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Albanese; Francesca Del Sorbo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dystonia and tremor share many commonalities. Isolated tremor is part of the phenomenological spectrum of isolated dystonia and of essential tremor. The occurrence of subtle features of dystonia may allow one to differentiate dystonic tremor from essential tremor. Diagnostic uncertainty is enhanced when no features of dystonia are found in patients with a tremor syndrome, raising the question whether the observed phenomenology is an incomplete form of dystonia. Methods: Known form...

  12. Genetic diversity of human isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeri, S A; Yasin, R M; Koh, Y T; Puthucheary, S D; Thong, K L

    2003-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine clonal relationship and genetic diversity of the human strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolated from 1995 to 2002 from different parts of Malaysia. Antimicrobial susceptibility test, plasmid profiling and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were applied to analyse 65 human isolates of S. Enteritidis obtained over an eight year period from different parts of Malaysia. Four nonhuman isolates were included for comparison. A total of 14 distinct XbaI-pulsed-field profiles (PFPs) were observed, although a single PFP X1 was predominant and this particular clone was found to be endemic in Malaysia. The incidence of drug resistant S. Enteritidis remained relatively low with only 37% of the strains analysed being resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. All except one resistant strain carried at least one plasmid ranging in size from 3.7 to 62 MDa giving nine plasmid profiles. The three isolates from raw milk and one from well-water had similar PFPs to that of the human isolates. Salmonella Enteritidis strains were more diverse than was previously thought. Fourteen subtypes were noted although one predominant clone persisted in Malaysia. The combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, plasmid profiling and antibiograms provided additional discrimination to the highly clonal strains of S. Enteritidis. This is the first report to assess the genotypes of the predominant clinical S. Enteritidis in different parts of the country. As S. Enteritidis is highly endemic in Malaysia, the data generated would be useful for tracing the source during outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the study area.

  13. Genetic diversity of clinical isolates of Bacillus cereus using multilocus sequence typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruckler James M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus cereus is most commonly associated with foodborne illness (diarrheal and emetic but is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe and fatal infections. Several multilocus sequence typing (MLST schemes have recently been developed to genotype B. cereus and analysis has suggested a clonal or weakly clonal population structure for B. cereus and its close relatives B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis. In this study we used MLST to determine if B. cereus isolates associated with illnesses of varying severity (e.g., severe, systemic vs. gastrointestinal (GI illness were clonal or formed clonal complexes. Results A retrospective analysis of 55 clinical B. cereus isolates submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between 1954 and 2004 was conducted. Clinical isolates from severe infections (n = 27, gastrointestinal (GI illness (n = 18, and associated isolates from food (n = 10 were selected for analysis using MLST. The 55 isolates were diverse and comprised 38 sequence types (ST in two distinct clades. Of the 27 isolates associated with serious illness, 13 clustered in clade 1 while 14 were in clade 2. Isolates associated with GI illness were also found throughout clades 1 and 2, while no isolates in this study belonged to clade 3. All the isolates from this study belonging to the clade 1/cereus III lineage were associated with severe disease while isolates belonging to clade1/cereus II contained isolates primarily associated with severe disease and emetic illness. Only three STs were observed more than once for epidemiologically distinct isolates. Conclusion STs of clinical B. cereus isolates were phylogenetically diverse and distributed among two of three previously described clades. Greater numbers of strains will need to be analyzed to confirm if specific lineages or clonal complexes are more likely to contain clinical isolates or be associated with specific illness, similar to B. anthracis and

  14. Genetic diversity of clinical isolates of Bacillus cereus using multilocus sequence typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmaster, Alex R; Novak, Ryan T; Marston, Chung K; Gee, Jay E; Helsel, Leta; Pruckler, James M; Wilkins, Patricia P

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacillus cereus is most commonly associated with foodborne illness (diarrheal and emetic) but is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe and fatal infections. Several multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes have recently been developed to genotype B. cereus and analysis has suggested a clonal or weakly clonal population structure for B. cereus and its close relatives B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis. In this study we used MLST to determine if B. cereus isolates associated with illnesses of varying severity (e.g., severe, systemic vs. gastrointestinal (GI) illness) were clonal or formed clonal complexes. Results A retrospective analysis of 55 clinical B. cereus isolates submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between 1954 and 2004 was conducted. Clinical isolates from severe infections (n = 27), gastrointestinal (GI) illness (n = 18), and associated isolates from food (n = 10) were selected for analysis using MLST. The 55 isolates were diverse and comprised 38 sequence types (ST) in two distinct clades. Of the 27 isolates associated with serious illness, 13 clustered in clade 1 while 14 were in clade 2. Isolates associated with GI illness were also found throughout clades 1 and 2, while no isolates in this study belonged to clade 3. All the isolates from this study belonging to the clade 1/cereus III lineage were associated with severe disease while isolates belonging to clade1/cereus II contained isolates primarily associated with severe disease and emetic illness. Only three STs were observed more than once for epidemiologically distinct isolates. Conclusion STs of clinical B. cereus isolates were phylogenetically diverse and distributed among two of three previously described clades. Greater numbers of strains will need to be analyzed to confirm if specific lineages or clonal complexes are more likely to contain clinical isolates or be associated with specific illness, similar to B. anthracis and emetic B. cereus

  15. Dystonia and Tremor: The Clinical Syndromes with Isolated Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Alberto; Sorbo, Francesca Del

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia and tremor share many commonalities. Isolated tremor is part of the phenomenological spectrum of isolated dystonia and of essential tremor. The occurrence of subtle features of dystonia may allow one to differentiate dystonic tremor from essential tremor. Diagnostic uncertainty is enhanced when no features of dystonia are found in patients with a tremor syndrome, raising the question whether the observed phenomenology is an incomplete form of dystonia. Methods Known forms of syndromes with isolated tremor are reviewed. Diagnostic uncertainties between tremor and dystonia are put into perspective. Results The following isolated tremor syndromes are reviewed: essential tremor, head tremor, voice tremor, jaw tremor, and upper-limb tremor. Their varied phenomenology is analyzed and appraised in the light of a possible relationship with dystonia. Discussion Clinicians making a diagnosis of isolated tremor should remain vigilant for the detection of features of dystonia. This is in keeping with the recent view that isolated tremor may be an incomplete phenomenology of dystonia. PMID:27152246

  16. Isolation of human spontaneous killer lymphocytes by bacterial adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, R; De Boer, K P; Teodorescu, M

    1980-01-01

    Human lymphocyte subpopulations (B, T1, T2, T3, and T4 our denomination) have been identified previously by bacterial adherence and differences between them in mitogen responses and specific cytotoxic activity have been found. In this study another aspect has been investigated in order to find functions associated with these subpopulations, namely the spontaneous killing (SK) ability. Freshly isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were separated into adherent and non-adherent cells following centrifugation against various bact:rial monolayers. The PBL and the resulting subpopulations of PBL were tested alone or in combination as effector cells in a 4 hr cytotoxicity assay against human lymphoblastoid cel- lines of B or T cell origin. The T3 + T4 cells or T4 cells alone showed a significantly higher SK activity against both B and T target cell lines when compared with unseparated PBL, T1 + T2, or T3 cells alone. Whe Fc portion of IgG, contain the lymphocytes responsible for SK activity and that SK cells can be purified by negative selection using bacterial adherence. PMID:7389207

  17. Infectivity of different genotypes of human Blastocystis hominis isolates in chickens and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Aya; Ebisu, Akiko; Nagata, Satiko; Saitou, Yumie; Yoshikawa, Hisao; Iwatani, Satoru; Kimata, Isao

    2007-06-01

    Most Blastocystis hominis isolates from humans are believed to be potentially zoonotic. This is because B. hominis isolates found in a variety of other host species have been found to have identical or relatively similar genotypes to those found in human isolates. However, the transmission of human B. hominis isolates to other animals has not been confirmed experimentally. In this study, the infectivity associated with several unique human Blastocystis genotypes (subtypes 2, 3, 4 and 7) was therefore investigated by infecting chickens and rats with two isolates of each subtype experimentally. The results showed that one isolate of subtype 4 and one isolate of subtype 7 was capable of infecting both chickens and rats, while two isolates of subtype 2, another isolate of subtype 4, and another isolate of subtype 7 could only infect chickens. Conversely, two isolates of subtype 3 failed to infect either of the animals. These results confirmed that several genotypes from human isolates could infect chickens and/or rats, indicating that chickens and rats are suitable experimental animal models for studying the zoonotic potential of human Blastocystis isolates.

  18. CHARACTERISTICS OF ADHESIVE PROPERTIES OF LACTOBACILLUS - CLINICAL ISOLATES AND COMPONENTS OF BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavryk G.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli detected in all biotopes of digestive tract, starting from the mouth and ending with the colon, is the dominant flora of vaginal biotope. Their adhesiveness to epithelial cells leads to survive in conditions of microorganism biotopes and to form biofilm, thus mediating passive antagonism against conditionally pathogenic bacteria. Colonization resistance provides a set of mechanisms that provide individual anatomical stability and normal microflora. It is experimentally confirmed that lactobacilli provide biotopes colonization resistance of the human body due to competitive inhibition and coagregation of allochthonous microorganisms. It is important to consider the fact that probiotics should not compete with autochthonous microflora, which is always more physiological for each individual than most valuable exogenous bacteria, even with the greatest potential beneficial properties. The probiotic activity should be directed to the main target bacterial therapy, which is to restore physiological ecological community. The aim of research was to compare the adhesive properties of lactobacilli - clinical isolates of probiotic preparations and ingredients to the buccal epithelium cells and erythrocytes 0 (1 of the blood group system AB0 person. Materials and methods. The object of the research were clinical strains of Lactobacillus spp. selected from the mouth, intestines, vagina healthy people. At the the species identification of lactic acid bacteria were taken into account morphological and cultural properties, aerotolerance. The carbohydrate profile was determined using the test system API-50SN L (Bio-Merieux, lack of catalase activity. The ability of allocated bacteria to adhesion were observed in erythrocytes 0 (1 blood and buccal epithelium cells by human Brilis VI and oth. For comparison were used probiotic strains L. rlantarum 8PA3, L.acidophilus KS 400, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938. The effectiveness of adhesion was assessed

  19. Sterols of Pneumocystis carinii hominis organisms isolated from human lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaneshiro, E S; Amit, Z; Chandra, Jan Suresh

    1999-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pneumocystis carinii causes pneumonia (P. carinii pneumonia, or PCP) in immunocompromised individuals such as AIDS patients. Rat-derived P. carinii carinii organisms have distinct sterols which are not synthesized by mammals and not found in other microbes infecting...... mammalian lungs. The dominant sterol present in the organism is cholesterol (which is believed to be scavenged from the host), but other sterols in P. carinii carinii have an alkyl group at C-24 of the sterol side chain (C(28) and C(29) 24-alkylsterols) and a double bond at C-7 of the nucleus. Recently...... in conjunction with analyses of chemically synthesized authentic standards. The sterol composition of isolated P. carinii hominis organisms has yet to be reported. If P. carinii from animal models is to be used for identifying potential drug targets and for developing chemotherapeutic approaches to clear human...

  20. Brevibacterium massiliense sp. nov., isolated from a human ankle discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Véronique; Raoult, Didier

    2009-08-01

    Gram-positive, non-spore-forming rods, strain 5401308T, were isolated from a human ankle discharge. Based on cellular morphology and the results of biochemical testing, this strain was tentatively identified as an undescribed member of the genus Brevibacterium. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 (45.3%), anteiso-C17:0 (19.2%) and iso-C15:0 (18.3%). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison showed that the bacterium was closely related to the type strains of Brevibacterium mcbrellneri (96.3% similarity) and Brevibacterium paucivorans (95.8%). On the basis of phenotypic data and phylogenetic inference, it is proposed that this strain represents a novel species, designated Brevibacterium massiliense sp. nov.; the type strain is 5401308T (=CSUR P26T=CIP 109422T=CCUG 53855T).

  1. Candida nivariensis isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient suffering from oropharyngeal candidiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuningsih, Retno; SahBandar, Ivo N.; Theelen, Bart; Hagen, Ferry; Poot, Ge; Meis, Jacques F.; Rozalyani, Anna; Sjam, Ridhawati; Widodo, Djoko; Djauzi, Samsuridjal; Boekhout, Teun

    Candida nivariensis was isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient who suffered from oropharyngeal candidiasis and was identified with molecular tools. Our isolate demonstrated low MICs to amphotericin B, flucytosine, posaconazole, caspofungin, and isavueonazole and

  2. Candida nivariensis isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient suffering from oropharyngeal candidiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuningsih, R.; SahBandar, IN; Theelen, B.; Hagen, F.; Poot, G.; Meis, J.F.; Rozalyani, A.; Sjam, R.; Widodo, D.; Djauzi, S.; Boekhout, T.

    2008-01-01

    Candida nivariensis was isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient who suffered from oropharyngeal candidiasis and was identified with molecular tools. Our isolate demonstrated low MICs to amphotericin B, flucytosine, posaconazole, caspofungin, and isavuconazole and

  3. Infection of human keratinocytes by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae isolated from milk of the bovine udder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Alves-Barroco, Cynthia; Raposo, Luís R; Costa, Mafalda N; Fortunato, Elvira; Baptista, Pedro Viana; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Santos-Sanches, Ilda

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (SDSD) are considered exclusive animal pathogens; however, a putative zoonotic upper limb cellulitis, a prosthetic joint infection and an infective endocarditis were described in humans. To unravel if bovine SDSD isolates are able to infect human cells, the adherence and internalization to human primary keratinocytes of two bovine SDSD strains isolated from milk collected from udder were analyzed. Bacterial adhesion assays and confocal microscopy indicate a high adherence and internalization of SDSD isolates to human cells, suggesting for the first time the ability of bovine isolates to infect human cells. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic identity of aminoglycoside-resistance genes in Escherichia coli isolates from human and animal sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Wong, River C; Lo, Stephanie W; Chow, Kin-Hung; Wong, Samson S; Que, Tak-Lun

    2010-06-01

    A bacterial collection (n=249) obtained in Hong Kong from 2002 to 2004 was used to investigate the molecular epidemiology of aminoglycoside resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from humans and food-producing animals. Of these, 89 isolates were gentamicin-sensitive (human n=60, animal n=29) and 160 isolates were gentamicin-resistant (human n=107, animal n=53). Overall, 84.1% (90/107) and 75.5% (40/53) of the gentamicin-resistant isolates from human and animal sources, respectively, were found to possess the aacC2 gene. The aacC2 gene for 20 isolates (10 each for human and animal isolates) was sequenced. Two alleles were found that were equally distributed in human and animal isolates. PFGE showed that the gentamicin-resistant isolates exhibited diverse patterns with little clonality. In some isolates, the aacC2 gene was encoded on large transferable plasmids of multiple incompatibility groups (IncF, IncI1 and IncN). An IncFII plasmid of 140 kb in size was shared by one human and three animal isolates. In summary, this study showed that human and animal isolates share the same pool of resistance genes.

  5. A simple isolation and cryopreservation method for adult human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Hualian; Shi, Xiaolei; Gu, Guangxiang; Wu, Yafu; Ding, Yitao

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a stable method of isolation, culture and cryopreservation of adult primary hepatocytes to provide potential hepatocyte resources for the treatment of acute and chronic liver diseases by hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial liver support systems, and for the use of hepatocytes as an in vitro model of the liver. Adult hepatocytes of 20 separate donors were isolated with a two-step extracoporeal collagenase perfusion technique. Seven preincubation time points (2h, 6h, 12h, 24h, 36h, 48h and 72h) were selected, then the hepatocytes were transferred to HepatoZYME-SFM medium containing 10% FBS and 10% DMSO, and were immediately put into an isopropanol progressive freezing container at -80 degrees C overnight and immersed in liquid nitrogen the next day. During the postthawing culture period, viability, plating efficiency, albumin secretion and urea synthesis were analyzed. The viability and plating efficiency of hepatocytes after partial hepatectomy using two-step extracorporeal collagenase perfusion technique were 75.0+/-4.6% and 72.0+/-6.0% respectively. Preincubation at 4? for 12 hours or 24 hours proved to be the optimal time at which the albumin secretion was higher than at other time points (p<0.05). Compared to the immediate cryopreservation groups (IC), we also found significant improvement in viability (61.4+/-4.8%/62.0+/-5.6% vs. 53.4+/-4.2%, p<0.05), plating efficiency (63.2+/-5.8%/62.6+/-3.6% vs. 55.2+/-4.6%, p<0.05), albumin secretion and urea synthesis (p<0.05) at these time points. The two-step extracorporeal collagenase perfusion technique after partial hepatectomy provides a novel, simple, and reliable method for hepatocyte isolation. The results of the present study suggest that recovery of human hepatocytes after isolation preincubation at 4 degrees C for 12 hours to 24 hours prior to cryopreservation can obtain hepatocytes ideal for use in pharmacotoxicology, bioartificial liver and cell therapy

  6. Molecular identification, antifungal susceptibility profile, and biofilm formation of clinical and environmental Rhodotorula species isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Jorge Meneses; Bizerra, Fernando César; Ferreira, Renata Carmona E; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula species are emergent fungal pathogens capable of causing invasive infections, primarily fungemia. They are particularly problematic in immunosuppressed patients when using a central venous catheter. In this study, we evaluated the species distribution of 51 clinical and 8 environmental Rhodotorula species isolates using the ID32C system and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility testing and biofilm formation capability using a crystal violet staining assay were performed. Using ITS sequencing as the gold standard, the clinical isolates were identified as follows: 44 R. mucilaginosa isolates, 2 R. glutinis isolates, 2 R. minuta isolates, 2 R. dairenensis isolates, and 1 Rhodosporidium fluviale isolate. The environmental isolates included 7 R. mucilaginosa isolates and 1 R. slooffiae isolate. Using the ID32C system, along with a nitrate assimilation test, only 90.3% of the isolates tested were correctly identified. In the biofilm formation assay, R. mucilaginosa and R. minuta exhibited greater biofilm formation ability compared to the other Rhodotorula species; the clinical isolates of R. mucilaginosa showed greater biofilm formation compared to the environmental isolates (P = 0.04). Amphotericin B showed good in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 μg/ml) against planktonic cells, whereas voriconazole and posaconazole showed poor activity (MIC(50)/MIC(90), 2/4 μg/ml). Caspofungin and fluconazole MICs were consistently high for all isolates tested (≥64 μg/ml and ≥ 4 μg/ml, respectively). In this study, we emphasized the importance of molecular methods to correctly identify Rhodotorula species isolates and non-R. mucilaginosa species in particular. The antifungal susceptibility profile reinforces amphotericin B as the antifungal drug of choice for the treatment of Rhodotorula infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating putative differences in the ability of biofilm formation among different Rhodotorula

  7. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA reveals clonal relationships among enteropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from non-human primates and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Carvalho

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC strains are important agents of infantile diarrhea all over the world, gaining even greater importance in developing countries. EPEC have also been isolated from various animal species, but most isolates belong to serotypes that differ from those recovered from humans. However, it has been demonstrated that several isolates from non-human primates belong to the serogroups and/or serotypes related to those implicated in human disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic differences between thirteen strains isolated from non-human primates and the same number of strains isolated from human infections. Human isolates belonged to the same serogroup/serotype as the monkey strains and the evaluation was done by analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA. Dendrogram analysis showed that there was no clustering between human and monkey strains. Human and non-human isolates of the EPEC serotypes O127:H40 and O128:H2 shared 90 and 87% of their bands, respectively, indicating strong genomic similarity between the strains, leading to the speculation that they may have arisen from the same pathogenic clone. To our knowledge, this study is the first one comparing genomic similarity between human and non-human primate strains and the results provide further evidence that monkey EPEC strains correlate with human EPEC, as suggested in a previous investigation.

  8. Isolation and characterization of ZZ1, a novel lytic phage that infects Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Jing

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii, a significant nosocomial pathogen, has evolved resistance to almost all conventional antimicrobial drugs. Bacteriophage therapy is a potential alternative treatment for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. In this study, one lytic bacteriophage, ZZ1, which infects A. baumannii and has a broad host range, was selected for characterization. Results Phage ZZ1 and 3 of its natural hosts, A. baumanni clinical isolates AB09V, AB0902, and AB0901, are described in this study. The 3 strains have different sensitivities to ZZ1, but they have the same sensitivity to antibiotics. They are resistant to almost all of the antibiotics tested, except for polymyxin. Several aspects of the life cycle of ZZ1 were investigated using the sensitive strain AB09V under optimal growth conditions. ZZ1 is highly infectious with a short latent period (9 min and a large burst size (200 PFU/cell. It exhibited the most powerful antibacterial activity at temperatures ranging from 35°C to 39°C. Moreover, when ZZ1 alone was incubated at different pHs and different temperatures, the phage was stable over a wide pH range (4 to 9 and at extreme temperatures (between 50°C and 60°C. ZZ1 possesses a 100-nm icosahedral head containing double-stranded DNA with a total length of 166,682 bp and a 120-nm long contractile tail. Morphologically, it could be classified as a member of the Myoviridae family and the Caudovirales order. Bioinformatic analysis of the phage whole genome sequence further suggested that ZZ1 was more likely to be a new member of the Myoviridae phages. Most of the predicted ORFs of the phage were similar to the predicted ORFs from other Acinetobacter phages. Conclusion The phage ZZ1 has a relatively broad lytic spectrum, high pH stability, strong heat resistance, and efficient antibacterial potential at body temperature. These characteristics greatly increase the utility of this phage as an antibacterial agent

  9. Isolation and characterization of ZZ1, a novel lytic phage that infects Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Li, Zhen-Jiang; Wang, Shu-Wei; Wang, Shan-Mei; Huang, De-Hai; Li, Ya-Hui; Ma, Yun-Yun; Wang, Jin; Liu, Fang; Chen, Xiang-Dong; Li, Guang-Xing; Wang, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Zhong-Quan; Zhao, Guo-Qiang

    2012-07-28

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a significant nosocomial pathogen, has evolved resistance to almost all conventional antimicrobial drugs. Bacteriophage therapy is a potential alternative treatment for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. In this study, one lytic bacteriophage, ZZ1, which infects A. baumannii and has a broad host range, was selected for characterization. Phage ZZ1 and 3 of its natural hosts, A. baumanni clinical isolates AB09V, AB0902, and AB0901, are described in this study. The 3 strains have different sensitivities to ZZ1, but they have the same sensitivity to antibiotics. They are resistant to almost all of the antibiotics tested, except for polymyxin. Several aspects of the life cycle of ZZ1 were investigated using the sensitive strain AB09V under optimal growth conditions. ZZ1 is highly infectious with a short latent period (9 min) and a large burst size (200 PFU/cell). It exhibited the most powerful antibacterial activity at temperatures ranging from 35°C to 39°C. Moreover, when ZZ1 alone was incubated at different pHs and different temperatures, the phage was stable over a wide pH range (4 to 9) and at extreme temperatures (between 50°C and 60°C). ZZ1 possesses a 100-nm icosahedral head containing double-stranded DNA with a total length of 166,682 bp and a 120-nm long contractile tail. Morphologically, it could be classified as a member of the Myoviridae family and the Caudovirales order. Bioinformatic analysis of the phage whole genome sequence further suggested that ZZ1 was more likely to be a new member of the Myoviridae phages. Most of the predicted ORFs of the phage were similar to the predicted ORFs from other Acinetobacter phages. The phage ZZ1 has a relatively broad lytic spectrum, high pH stability, strong heat resistance, and efficient antibacterial potential at body temperature. These characteristics greatly increase the utility of this phage as an antibacterial agent; thus, it should be further investigated.

  10. Rapid detection of cytomegalovirus in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum samples by polymerase chain reaction: correlation of virus isolation and clinical outcome for patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K K; Vestbo, Jørgen; Benfield, T

    1997-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and serum samples from 153 patients with pulmonary symptoms who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and underwent BAL were examined for the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) by conventional culture and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR...

  11. Antibiotic susceptibility testing (agar disk diffusion and agar dilution) of clinical isolates of Corynebacterium jeikeium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub, W H; Geipel, U; Leonhard, B; Bauer, D

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-three clinical isolates of Corynebacterium jeikeium were examined for susceptibility to 27 antimicrobial drugs with the agar dilution test. Sheep-blood-supplemented Mueller-Hinton agar performed better than Wilkins-Chalgren agar. Disk susceptibility (Bauer-Kirby) tests were carried out in parallel with 24 of the chemotherapeutic agents. All isolates were susceptible to teicoplanin and vancomycin. All isolates resisted fosfomycin, mupirocin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The isolates varied in susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, fusidic acid, ofloxacin, and tetracycline; most were susceptible to rifampin. Surprisingly few discrepancies between agar dilution and disk diffusion tests were encountered when utilizing NCCLS interpretive criteria currently valid for enterococcal isolates.

  12. Appearance of β-lactam Resistance Genes in Agricultural Soils and Clinical Isolates over the 20th Century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, David W.; Knapp, Charles W.; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2016-01-01

    higher in M versus IF in soils post-1940 (paired-t test; p clinical isolates, suggesting...... ARGs in animal manure and humans are historically interconnected. Archive data further show when non-therapeutic antibiotic use was banned in Denmark, blaCTX-M levels declined in M soils, suggesting accumulated soil ARGs can be reduced by prudent antibiotic stewardship. Conversely, int1 levels have...

  13. Surveillance of listeriosis in Navarre, Spain, 1995-2005--epidemiological patterns and characterisation of clinical and food isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido, V. (Victoria); Torroba, L. (L.); Garcia-Jalon, I. (Isabel); Vitas, A.I. (Ana Isabel)

    2008-01-01

    We monitored the incidence of human listeriosis in Navarre, a region in north of Spain between 1995 and 2005, and carried out the characterisation of Listeria monocytogenes isolates obtained from clinical samples and ready-to-eat products (sliced cooked meat, smoked salmon and liver pate). The active surveillance requesting hospitals to notify all listeriosis cases (n=40) yielded higher incidence rates (average annual rate 0.65/100,000 inhabitants, range 0.18-1.18/100,000 inhabitants) than ex...

  14. Detection of Polish clinical Aspergillus fumigatus isolates resistant to triazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawrot, Urszula; Kurzyk, Ewelina; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2018-01-01

    in Cyp51A gene, four of which were cross-resistant to posaconazole and one to voriconazole. One isolate was intermediate susceptible to itraconazole and harbored no Cyp51A alterations. The study confirms the presence of azole resistant A. fumigatus strains in Poland at a level that is comparative...

  15. Detection of efflux pump activity among clinical isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To detect efflux pump activity (EPA) and screening a suspected efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) [1-. (3-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-piperazine (TFMBP)], which could help in reducing multi-drug resistance. (MDR). Methods: Eighteen isolates, viz, 14 S. aureus, 2 S. lentus, 1 S. xylosus and 1 Micrococcus species from various ...

  16. Antibiogram of clinical isolates from a hospital in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... This was followed by Staphylococcus aureus (16),. Streptococcus spp. (5), Escherichia coli (4) and Klebsiella pneumonia (3). Proteus spp., Enterobacter aerogenes and Bacillus cereus had 2 strains each isolated. The Gram positive bacteria were more resistant to norfloxacin, floxapen, and ciprofloxacin but ...

  17. Detection of efflux pump activity among clinical isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To detect efflux pump activity (EPA) and screening a suspected efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) [1- (3-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-piperazine (TFMBP)], which could help in reducing multi-drug resistance (MDR). Methods: Eighteen isolates, viz, 14 S. aureus, 2 S. lentus, 1 S. xylosus and 1 Micrococcus species from various ...

  18. Prevalence of bla SHV genes in clinical isolates of Klebsiella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five bacterial strains (4 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 1 Escherichia coli) representative of pathogenic species and resistant to β-lactam antibiotics are investigated to isolate the genes responsible of β--lactamase activity. The use of engineering techniques enables us to show the widespread of blaSHV genes particularly in ...

  19. Incidence and susceptibility pattern of clinical isolates from pus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (11%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (11%),Proteus spp. (6.9%) and Escherichia coli (3.4%). From wound swabs, S. aureus isolates was the highest (51.6%) followed by Klebsiella spp. (22.6%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus spp. (9.7% each) and E. coli (6.45%). In ear infection, P. aeruginosa accounted for 58.3%, ...

  20. Molecular phylogeny of Escherichia coli isolated from clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A, B1, B2 and D). Strains of these groups differ in their phenotypic characteristics, including the ability to use certain sugars, antibiotic resistance profiles and growth rate-temperature relationships. A total of 45 E. coli isolates were obtained from ...

  1. Pathophysiological variability of different genotypes of human Blastocystis hominis Egyptian isolates in experimentally infected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Eman M; Hussein, Abdalla M; Eida, Mohamed M; Atwa, Maha M

    2008-04-01

    The genotyping of Blastocystis hominis clinical isolates obtained from 28 gastrointestinal symptomatic patients and 16 asymptomatic individuals were identified by polymerase chain reaction using sequenced-tagged site (STS) primers. Then, pathophysiological variability between different B. hominis genotypes was evaluated in experimentally infected rats. Only four B. hominis subtypes (1, 2, 3, and 4) were detected (18.2%, 9.1%, 54.5%, and 18.2%, respectively) in human isolates. In symptomatic isolates, subtypes 1, 3, and 4 were detected in 8 (28.6%), 16 (57.1%), and 4 (14.3%) patients, respectively. In asymptomatic isolates, subtypes 2, 3, and 4 were identified in 4 (25%), 8 (50%), and 4 (25%), respectively. Subtype 3 was the commonest in humans. Different degrees of pathological changes were found among infected rats by symptomatic subtypes compared with asymptomatic subtypes. The moderate and severe degrees of pathological changes were found only in symptomatic subtypes infected rats while mild degree was found only in asymptomatic subtypes infected rats. Only subtype 1 induced mortality rate with 25% among infected rats. On evaluation of the intestinal cell permeability in the Ussing chamber, a prominent increase in short circuit current (DeltaIsc) was found in symptomatic subtype 1 compared to symptomatic subtypes 3 and 4 infected rats. Minimal effects were found in the asymptomatic and control groups. The results proved that subtype 1 was clinically and statistically highly relevant to the pathogenicity of B. hominis while subtype 2 was irrelevant. Also, the results suggest the presence of pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains among subtypes 3 and 4.

  2. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulcan Sahal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis which exists in healthy human skin as a commensal inhabitant is also an important pathogen forming biofilms on many surfaces and recently, increased resistance traits were suggested to be acquired in biofilm environments. In this study; clinical Prevalences, antibiotic resistances and biofilm formations of S. epidermidis strains were determined and comparison of all these findings with each other was carried out in order to take precautions against them and figure out if high biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains display multi drug resistance. According to our results; samples of wound and blood were the most S. epidermidis isolated clinical materials (40%; 35% and cardiothoracic surgery was the most S. epidermidis observed service unit. All of these strains were sensitive to vancomycin, however 65% of them showed resistance to all β-lactam antibiotics (Penicillin, Oxacillin, Amoxicilin / Clavulonic acid, used in this study and 60% of all S. epidermidis strains were found as multi drug resistant. When the results of strong biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains are examined; they were isolated from sample of blood and service unit of cardiovascular surgery in highest frequency and 80% of them were β-lactam resistant whereas 100% of them were multi drug resistant. One of these multi drug resistant strains which was resistant to maximum amount of different antimicrobial classes, was also observed as maximum biofilm forming strain among all the other S. epidermidis isolates. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming strains shows that; biofilms play a role in antimicrobial resistance traits of S. epidermidis.

  3. Genome analysis of environmental and clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from sequence type-1146.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sánchez

    Full Text Available The genomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates of the new sequence type ST-1146, three environmental (P37, P47 and P49 and one clinical (SD9 isolates, with differences in their antibiotic susceptibility profiles have been sequenced and analysed. The genomes were mapped against P. aeruginosa PAO1-UW and UCBPP-PA14. The allelic profiles showed that the highest number of differences were in "Related to phage, transposon or plasmid" and "Secreted factors" categories. The clinical isolate showed a number of exclusive alleles greater than that for the environmental isolates. The phage Pf1 region in isolate SD9 accumulated the highest number of nucleotide substitutions. The ORF analysis of the four genomes assembled de novo indicated that the number of isolate-specific genes was higher in isolate SD9 (132 genes than in isolates P37 (24 genes, P47 (16 genes and P49 (21 genes. CRISPR elements were found in all isolates and SD9 showed differences in the spacer region. Genes related to bacteriophages F116 and H66 were found only in isolate SD9. Genome comparisons indicated that the isolates of ST-1146 are close related, and most genes implicated in pathogenicity are highly conserved, suggesting a genetic potential for infectivity in the environmental isolates similar to the clinical one. Phage-related genes are responsible of the main differences among the genomes of ST-1146 isolates. The role of bacteriophages has to be considered in the adaptation processes of isolates to the host and in microevolution studies.

  4. Human bocavirus isolated from children with acute respiratory tract infections in Korea, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jong Gyun; Choi, Seong Yeol; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hwan

    2014-12-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) was first recognized in respiratory samples in 2005. The clinical importance of HBoV infection remains unclear. This report describes the clinical features and molecular phylogeny of HBoV isolates in children with acute respiratory infections. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from 1,528 children with acute respiratory infections between 2010 and 2011. Respiratory samples were screened for HBoV by multiplex PCR. A phylogenetic analysis of the HBoV VP1/VP2 gene was also undertaken. HBoV was detected in 187 (12.2%) of the 1,528 patients with a peak incidence of infection observed in patients aged 12-24 months. Coinfection with other respiratory viruses was observed in 107 (57.2%) of the HBoV-positive children. The peak of HBoV activity occurred during the month of June in both 2010 and 2011. A higher previous history of wheezing (P = 0.016), a higher frequency of chest retraction (P respiratory symptom score (P = 0.002), and a longer duration of hospital stay (P = 0.021) were observed in HBoV-positive children compared with the HBoV-negative group. Phylogenetic analysis showed all 187 HBoV-positive isolates were identified as HBoV 1, indicating minimal sequence variations among the isolates. A single lineage of HBoV 1 was found to have circulated in children with acute respiratory infections between 2010 and 2011 and was associated with several clinical characteristics including age, seasonality, and clinical severity with retraction, wheezing, and longer hospitalization. The clinical relevance of the minimal sequence variations of HBoV remains to be determined. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. In vitro activity of antiamoebic drugs against clinical isolates of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Ramesh

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amoebiasis is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries. Although a number of antiamoebic agents are used for its treatment, yet the susceptibility data on clinical isolates of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar are not available. Therefore, the present study was aimed to assess the in vitro susceptibility of clinical isolates of E. histolytica and E. dispar to metronidazole, chloroquine, emetine and tinidazole. Methods A total of 45 clinical isolates (15 E. histolytica and 30 E. dispar were maintained in polyxenic cultures followed by monoxenic cultures. In vitro drug sensitivity (IC50 of clinical isolates and standard reference strain of E. histolytica (HM1: IMSS was assessed by nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT reduction assay after exposure to various concentrations of each drug. Results The results showed that all clinical isolates had a higher IC50 compared to reference strain to all the four drugs. E. histolytica isolates appeared to be more susceptible [IC50 (μm 13.2,26.3,31.2 and 12.4] compared to E. dispar isolates [IC50(μm 15.6,28.9,32.8 and 13.2] and the reference strain of E. histolytica [IC50 (��m 9.5, 15.5, 29.9 and 10.2] to the metronidazole, chloroquine, emetine and tinidazole respectively. Conclusions The results indicate that till date, Entamoeba isolates in India do not seem to be resistant to the commonly used antiamoebic drugs.

  6. Inhibitory effect of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine digluconate in clinical isolates of Sporothrix schenckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Isabel Martins; Mattei, Antonella Souza; Santin, Rosema; dos Reis Gomes, Angelita; Cleff, Marlete Brum; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo

    2012-05-01

    The susceptibility of Sporothrix schenckii isolates from clinical cases of canine, feline and human sporotrichosis, and from the environment, was evaluated with 4% sodium hypochlorite and 6.6% chlorhexidine digluconate using the broth microdilution, agar diffusion and direct exposure techniques. The minimal inhibitory concentration was smaller than 0.8% for chlorhexidine digluconate and between 8% and 4% for sodium hypochlorite. Inhibition zones were not found in agar diffusion for sodium hypochlorite, and zones averaging 1.9 mm were found for chlorhexidine digluconate. In the direct exposure test, sodium hypochlorite demonstrated best performance at 20 min of contact, as chlorhexidine digluconate presented little antimicrobial activity. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Partial Characterization of Bacteriocins Produced by Two New Enterococcus faecium Isolated from Human Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgis, Mélanie; Vu, Khanh Dang; Lacroix, Monique

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed at characterizing two novel bacteriocin-producing enterococcal strains isolated from human intestine. A total of 200 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from a woman stool sample. Two of them were selected for characterization due to their high antimicrobial activity against five strains of Listeria monocytogenes. The selected bacteria were identified as two different strains of Enterococcus faecium and designated MT 104 and MT 162. The bacteriocins produced by MT 104 and MT 162 were stable at different pH ranging from 2 to 11 and were active after different treatments such as heat, enzymes, detergents, and γ-irradiation. The two isolated strains exhibited some probiotic properties such as survival in simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluid, lack of expression of bile salt hydrolase or hemolytic activity, adhesion to Caco-2 cells efficiently, and sensitivity to clinical antimicrobial agents. Thus, the two isolated strains of E. faecium could become new probiotic bacteria and their bacteriocins could be used for controlling L. monocytogenes in combination with irradiation for food preservation.

  8. Identification of putative natriuretic hormones isolated from human urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert J Kramer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This brief review describes some representative methodological approaches to the isolation of putative endogenous inhibitors of epithelial sodium transport - i. e. as ouabain-like factors (OLF that inhibit the sodium transport enzyme Na-K-ATPase or inhibit the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC. Gel chromatography and reverse-phase (RP-HPLC of lyophilized and reconstituted 24h-urine from salt-loaded healthy humans led to two active fractions, a hydrophilic OLF-1 and a lipophilic OLF-2 whose mass (Ms-spectroscopic data indicate a Mr of 391 (1,2. Further identification was attempted by Ms-, IR-, UV- and 1H-NMR- spectroscopy. OLF-1 and OLF-2 may be closely related if not identical to (diascorbic acid or its salts such as vanadium (V-Vv-diascorbate with Mr 403 (3 and VIV-diascorbate. OLF-1 and Vv-diascorbate are about 10-fold stronger inhibitors of Na-K-ATPase than OLF-2 and VIV-diascorbate, respectively. In conscious rats, i.v. infusion of OLF-1 and OLF-2 resulted in a strong natriuresis. In a similar study Cain et al. (4 isolated a sodium transport inhibitor from the urine of uremic patients by gel chromatography and RP-HPLC. In uremic rats a natriuretic response to the injection of the active material was found. Xanthurenic acid 8-O-ß-D-glucoside (Mr 368 and xanthurenic acid 8-O-sulfate (Mr 284 were identified as endogenous inhibitors of sodium transport acting, e.g. by ENaC blockade. No definite relation to blood pressure, body fluid volume or sodium balance has been reported for any of these above factors and further studies to identify the natriuretic and/or ouabain-like compound(s or hormone(s will be needed.

  9. Investigation of dental pulp stem cells isolated from discarded human teeth extracted due to aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-Hua; Chen, Bo; Zhu, Qing-Lin; Kong, Hui; Li, Qi-Hong; Gao, Li-Na; Xiao, Min; Chen, Fa-Ming; Yu, Qing

    2014-11-01

    Recently, human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from inflamed dental pulp tissue have been demonstrated to retain some of their pluripotency and regenerative potential. However, the effects of periodontal inflammation due to periodontitis and its progression on the properties of DPSCs within periodontally compromised teeth remain unknown. In this study, DPSCs were isolated from discarded human teeth that were extracted due to aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and divided into three experimental groups (Groups A, B and C) based on the degree of inflammation-induced bone resorption approaching the apex of the tooth root before tooth extraction. DPSCs derived from impacted or non-functional third molars of matched patients were used as a control. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics, including colony-forming ability, proliferation, cell cycle, cell surface antigens, multi-lineage differentiation capability and in vivo tissue regeneration potential, were all evaluated in a patient-matched comparison. It was found that STRO-1- and CD146-positive DPSCs can be isolated from human teeth, even in very severe cases of AgP. Periodontal inflammation and its progression had an obvious impact on the characteristics of DPSCs isolated from periodontally affected teeth. Although all the isolated DPSCs in Groups A, B and C showed decreased colony-forming ability and proliferation rate (P cells did not necessarily show significantly diminished in vitro multi-differentiation potential. Only DPSCs from Group A and the Control group formed dentin-like matrix in vivo when cell-seeded biomaterials were transplanted directly into an ectopic transplantation model. However, when cell-seeded scaffolds were placed in the root fragments of human teeth, all the cells formed significant dentin- and pulp-like tissues. The ability of DPSCs to generate dental tissues decreased when the cells were isolated from periodontally compromised teeth (P stem cells with certain MSC properties

  10. Diversity of Vibrio navarrensis Revealed by Genomic Comparison: Veterinary Isolates Are Related to Strains Associated with Human Illness and Sewage Isolates While Seawater Strains Are More Distant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Keike; Kukuc, Cindy; Bier, Nadja; Taureck, Karin; Hammerl, Jens A; Strauch, Eckhard

    2017-01-01

    Strains of Vibrio navarrensis are present in aquatic environments like seawater, rivers, and sewage. Recently, strains of this species were identified in human clinical specimens. In this study, V. navarrensis strains isolated from livestock in Germany were characterized that were found in aborted fetuses and/or placentas after miscarriages. The veterinary strains were analyzed using phenotypical and genotypical methods and compared to isolates from marine environments of the Baltic Sea and North Sea. The investigated phenotypical traits were similar in all German strains. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to evaluate a phylogenetic relationship by performing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. For the SNP analysis, WGS data of two American human pathogenic strains and two Spanish environmental isolates from sewage were included. A phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences of five protein-coding housekeeping genes (gyrB, pyrH, recA, atpA, and rpoB), was additionally performed. Both phylogenetic analyses reveal a greater distance of the environmental seawater strains to the other strains. The phylogenetic tree constructed from concatenated sequences of housekeeping genes places veterinary, human pathogenic and Spanish sewage strains into one cluster. Presence and absence of virulence-associated genes were investigated based on WGS data and confirmed by PCR. However, this analysis showed no clear pattern for the potentially pathogenic strains. The detection of V. navarrensis in human clinical specimens strongly suggests that this species should be regarded as a potential human pathogen. The identification of V. navarrensis strains in domestic animals implicates a zoonotic potential of this species. This could indicate a potential threat for humans, as according to the "One Health" concept, human, animal, and environmental health are linked. Future studies are necessary to search for reservoirs of these bacteria in the environment and/or in

  11. Studies of In-Vitro Susceptibility of Clinical Fungal Isolates from Immunocompromised Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sapna Rai

    2014-01-01

    Clinical fungi were isolated from the blood samples of immunocompromised patients from Subhash Chandra Medical College Jabalpur in SDA with chloramphenicol @ 30μg/ml.the common isolates were Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, A. glaucus, A.terreus, A. niger, A. flavus, Penicillium sps. and Curvularia sps. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro susceptibility testing against different antifungals viz Amphotericin B, Ketocaonazole, itraconazole, clotrimazoleand fluconazole and also ...

  12. Characteristic of Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates with quinupristin/dalfopristin resistance in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Guo, Yinjuan; Lv, Jingnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Li, Dan; Chen, Zengqiang; Zhang, Xueqing; Wang, Liangxing; Yu, Fangyou

    2016-10-21

    Quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D) is a valuable alternative antibiotic to vancomycin for the treatment of multi-drug resistant Enterococcus faecium infections. However, resistance to Q/D in E. faecium clinical isolates and nosocomial dissemination of Q/D-resistant E. faecium have been reported in several countries and should be of concern. From January 2012 to December 2015, 911 E. faecium clinical isolates were isolated from various specimens of inpatients at the first Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University located in Wenzhou, east China. Of 911 E. faecium clinical isolates, 9 (1.0 %, 9/911) were resistant to Q/D, with the Q/D MIC values of 64 mg/L(1), 32 mg/L(1), 16 mg/L(3), 8 mg/L(1) and 4 mg/L(3) determined by broth microdilution. All Q/D-resistant isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, tigecycline and teicoplanin but resistant to penicillin, ampicillin and erythromycin. vatE was only found in one Q/D-resistant E. faecium isolate while vatD was not detected in any of the isolates tested. 8 of 9 Q/D-resistant E. faecium isolates were found be positive for both ermB and msrC. The combinations of Q/D resistance determinants were ermB-msrC (7 isolates) and ermB-msrC-vatE (one isolate). ST78, ST761, ST94, ST21 and ST323 accounted for 4, 2, 1, 1 and 1 isolate, respectively, among which ST78 was the prevalent ST. Q/D-resistant E. faecium clinical isolates were first described in China. Carriage of vatE, ermB and msrC was responsible for Q/D resistance.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Southwest Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ojo, Olabisi O

    2010-10-01

    Tuberculosis has had significant effects on Ireland over the past two centuries, causing persistently higher morbidity and mortality than in neighbouring countries until the last decade. This study describes the results of genotyping and drug susceptibility testing of 171 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated between January 2004 and December 2006 in a region of Ireland centred on the city of Cork. Spoligotype comparisons were made with the SpolDB4 database and clustered 130 strains in 23 groups, forty-one strains showed unique Spoligotyping patterns. The commonest spoligotypes detected were ST0137 (X2) (16.9%), and ST0351 (15.8%) (\\'U\\' clade). The major spoligotype clades were X (26.2%), U (19.3%), T (15.2%), Beijing (5.9%), Haarlem (4.7%), LAM (4.1%), BOVIS (1.75%), with 12.9% unassigned strains. A 24-locus VNTR genotyping produced 15 clusters containing 49 isolates, with high discrimination index (HGDI>0.99). A combination of Spoligotyping and VNTR reduced the number of clustered isolates to 47 in 15 clusters (27.5%). This study identified ST351 as common among Irish nationals, and found a low rate of drug resistance with little evidence of transmission of drug resistant strains. Strain clustering was significantly associated with age under 55 years and Irish nationality. Only strains of Euro-American lineage formed clusters. Molecular typing did not completely coincide with the results of contact investigations.

  14. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus clinical isolates, their comparison with strain GG and their recognition by complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissilä, Eija; Douillard, François P; Ritari, Jarmo; Paulin, Lars; Järvinen, Hanna M; Rasinkangas, Pia; Haapasalo, Karita; Meri, Seppo; Jarva, Hanna; de Vos, Willem M

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains are ubiquitous in fermented foods, and in the human body where they are commensals naturally present in the normal microbiota composition of gut, vagina and skin. However, in some cases, Lactobacillus spp. have been implicated in bacteremia. The aim of the study was to examine the genomic and immunological properties of 16 clinical blood isolates of L. rhamnosus and to compare them to the well-studied L. rhamnosus probiotic strain GG. Blood cultures from bacteremic patients were collected at the Helsinki University Hospital laboratory in 2005-2011 and L. rhamnosus strains were isolated and characterized by genomic sequencing. The capacity of the L. rhamnosus strains to activate serum complement was studied using immunological assays for complement factor C3a and the terminal pathway complement complex (TCC). Binding of complement regulators factor H and C4bp was also determined using radioligand assays. Furthermore, the isolated strains were evaluated for their ability to aggregate platelets and to form biofilms in vitro. Genomic comparison between the clinical L. rhamnosus strains showed them to be clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG and to cluster in two distinct lineages. All L. rhamnosus strains activated complement in serum and none of them bound complement regulators. Four out of 16 clinical blood isolates induced platelet aggregation and/or formed more biofilms than L. rhamnosus GG, which did not display platelet aggregation activity nor showed strong biofilm formation. These findings suggest that clinical L. rhamnosus isolates show considerable heterogeneity but are clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG at the genomic level. All L. rhamnosus strains are still normally recognized by the human complement system.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter clinical isolates and emerging antibiogram trends for nosocomial infection management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Muhammad; Rashid, Abid; Aslam, Bilal; Waseem, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad; Khurshid, Mohsin; Rasool, Muhammad Hidayat

    2016-01-01

    The drug resistant Acinetobacter strains are important causes of nosocomial infections that are difficult to control and treat. This study aimed to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Acinetobacter strains isolated from different clinical specimens obtained from patients belonging to different age groups. In total, 716 non-duplicate Acinetobacter isolates were collected from the infected patients admitted to tertiary-care hospitals at Lahore, Pakistan, over a period of 28 months. The Acinetobacter isolates were identified using API 20E, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and interpreted according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. The isolation rate of Acinetobacter was high from the respiratory specimens, followed by wound samples. Antibiotic susceptibility analyses of the isolates revealed that the resistance to cefotaxime and ceftazidime was the most common, in 710 (99.2%) specimens each, followed by the resistance to gentamicin in 670 (93.6%) isolates, and to imipenem in 651 (90.9%) isolates. However, almost all isolates were susceptible to tigecycline, colistin, and polymyxin B. The present study showed the alarming trends of resistance of Acinetobacter strains isolated from clinical specimens to the various classes of antimicrobials. The improvement of microbiological techniques for earlier and more accurate identification of bacteria is necessary for the selection of appropriate treatments.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter clinical isolates and emerging antibiogram trends for nosocomial infection management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sohail

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: The drug resistant Acinetobacter strains are important causes of nosocomial infections that are difficult to control and treat. This study aimed to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Acinetobacter strains isolated from different clinical specimens obtained from patients belonging to different age groups. METHODS: In total, 716 non-duplicate Acinetobacter isolates were collected from the infected patients admitted to tertiary-care hospitals at Lahore, Pakistan, over a period of 28 months. The Acinetobacter isolates were identified using API 20E, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and interpreted according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. RESULTS: The isolation rate of Acinetobacter was high from the respiratory specimens, followed by wound samples. Antibiotic susceptibility analyses of the isolates revealed that the resistance to cefotaxime and ceftazidime was the most common, in 710 (99.2% specimens each, followed by the resistance to gentamicin in 670 (93.6% isolates, and to imipenem in 651 (90.9% isolates. However, almost all isolates were susceptible to tigecycline, colistin, and polymyxin B. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed the alarming trends of resistance of Acinetobacter strains isolated from clinical specimens to the various classes of antimicrobials. The improvement of microbiological techniques for earlier and more accurate identification of bacteria is necessary for the selection of appropriate treatments.

  17. Anti-microbial resistance of non-clinical E. coli isolates from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-microbial resistance profiles of non-clinical E. coli isolates were studied in an 8 years old commercial layer poultry farm in Imo state, Nigeria currently stocking about 6000 birds of different strains and ages, housed in 4 separate buildings. Isolates were screened against 12 antibiotics using the disc diffusion method.

  18. Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli isolates from Danish children: clinical significance and microbiological characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C; Ethelberg, S; Olesen, B

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the prevalence, clinical manifestations and microbiological characteristics of attaching and effacing Escherichia coli isolates, i.e., enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) belonging to the classical EPEC serotypes, non-EPEC attaching and effacing E. coli (A/EEC) and verocytotoxin......-producing E. coli (VTEC), isolated in a case-control study of Danish children aged

  19. Aspergillus pragensis sp nov discovered during molecular reidentification of clinical isolates belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyskova, Pavlina; Hubka, Vit; Kolarik, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    The identity of nine clinical isolates recovered from Czech patients and presumptively identified as Aspergillus sp. section Candidi based on colony morphology was revised using sequences of beta-tubulin, calmodulin gene sequence, and internal transcribed spacer rDNA. Six isolates were from suspe...

  20. Detection of Intracellular Adhesion (ica Gene and Biofilm Formation Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Clinical Blood Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mirzaee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In fact the biofilms are composed of bacterial cells living inmulticellular structures such as tissues and organs embedded within a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS. Ability to attach and biofilm formation are the most important virulence factors Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The aims of this study were to detect intracellular adhesion (ica locus and its relation to the biofilm formation phenotype in clinical isolates of S. aureus isolated from bloodcultures.Methods: A total of 31 clinical S. aureus isolates were collected from Loghman Hospital of Tehran, Iran. In vitro biofilm formation ability was determined by microliter tissue culture plates. All clinical isolates were examined for determination the ica locus by using PCR method.Results: Twelve (38.7% of the isolates were strong biofilm producers. The results showed that 18(80.6% of the isolates carried icaD gene, whereas the prevalence of icaA, icaB and icaC were 51.6%, 45.1% and 77.4% respectively.Conclusions: S. aureus clinical isolates have different ability to form biofilm. This may be caused by the differences in the expression of biofilm related genes, genetic make-up and physiological conditions.

  1. In vitro characterization of representative clinical South African Staphylococcus aureus isolates from various clonal lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosthuysen, W F; Orth, H; Lombard, C. J.; Sinha, B; Wasserman, E

    Data concerning the virulence and pathogenesis of South African strains of Staphylococcus aureus are limited. We investigated host-pathogen interactions of randomly selected clinical S. aureus isolates representing various clones. We characterized the ability of isolates to adhere to fibronectin,

  2. Study on the percent of frequency of ACME-Arca in clinical isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACME is a mobile element of Arginine catabolic in Staphylococcus epidermidis that codes specific virulence factors. The purpose of this study was to examine the specific features and prevalence of ACME-arcA in the isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis resistant to Methicillin isolated by clinical samples in Isfahan.

  3. Adhesion and virulence factor properties of Enterococci isolated from clinical samples in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Samadi Kafil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enterococci rank among leading causes of nosocomial bacteremia, urinary tract infections and community acquired endocarditis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of virulence factors in Enterococci strains isolated from clinical samples in Iranian Educational hospitals. Methodology: Presence of aggregation substance (asa, extracellular surface protein (esp, Enterococcus faecalis antigen A (efaA, adhesin of collagen from E. faecalis (ace, endocarditis and biofilm-associated pilli (ebp as colonization factors and cytolysin (cyl, gelatinase (gel and hyaloronidase (hyl as secretary factors were investigated in isolates. A total of 201 clinical isolates of Enterococci were collected in 2009-2010 from eight educational hospitals. After deoxyribonucleic acid extraction, they were examined for presence of virulence factors by polymerase chain reaction. Results: E. faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were isolated from 56.9% to 43.1%, respectively. Resistance to vancomycin and gentamicin were 33.8% and 83.9% in E. faecium isolates and 16.3% and 88.1% in E. faecalis isolates respectively. Colonization factors were found to be more prevalent in E. faecalis isolates and almost all isolates of E. faecalis had ace, ebp and efaA genes. Esp gene had a higher rate of distribution in Enterococci isolates (75.1% in this study compared with previous studies. One of E. faecalis isolates contained hyl gene, but 38.8% of E. faecium isolates had it. Mutual exclusive were present between hyl and efaA in all E. faecium isolates and 69.7% of E. faecium hyl - positive isolates were esp positive. Conclusion: According to these results, virulence genes were more prevalent in E. faecalis isolates and E. faecalis had more potential pathogenesis for initiating an infection; however because of E. faeciums higher antibiotic resistance, we have been facing higher E. faecium infections in hospitalized patients.

  4. Genome sequence of vibrio cholerae G4222, a South African clinical isolate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Rouw, Wouter J

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative pathogen autochthonous to the aquatic environment, is the causative agent of cholera. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of V. cholerae G4222, a clinical isolate from South Africa....

  5. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry proteomic based identification of clinical bacterial isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Pathogenic bacteria often cause life threatening infections especially in immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, rapid and reliable species identification is essential for a successful treatment and disease management. We evaluated a rapid, proteomic based technique for identification of clinical bacterial isolates by protein profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time - of - flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Methods: Freshly grown bacterial isolates were selected from culture plates. Ethanol/formic acid extraction procedure was carried out, followed by charging of MALDI target plate with the extract and overlaying with α-cyano-4 hydroxy-cinnamic acid matrix solution. Identification was performed using the MALDI BioTyper 1.1, software for microbial identification (Bruker Daltonik GmbH, Bremen, Germany. Results: A comparative analysis of 82 clinical bacterial isolates using MALDI -TOF MS and conventional techniques was carried out. Amongst the clinical isolates, the accuracy at the species level for clinical isolates was 98.78%. One out of 82 isolates was not in accordance with the conventional assays because MALDI-TOF MS established it as Streptococcus pneumoniae and conventional methods as Streptococcus viridans. Interpretation & conclusions: MALDI - TOF MS was found to be an accurate, rapid, cost-effective and robust system for identification of clinical bacterial isolates. This innovative approach holds promise for earlier therapeutic intervention leading to better patient care.

  6. Epidemiological relationships of Campylobacter jejuni strains isolated from humans and chickens in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae-Young; Kwon, Yong-Kuk; Wei, Bai; Jang, Hyung-Kwan; Lim, Suk-Kyung; Kim, Cheon-Hyeon; Jung, Suk-Chan; Kang, Min-Su

    2017-01-01

    Thirty-nine human isolates of Campylobacter jejuni obtained from a national university hospital during 2007-2010 and 38 chicken isolates of C. jejuni were collected from poultry farms during 2009-2010 in South Korea were used in this study. Campylobacter genomic species and virulence-associated genes were identified by PCR. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed to compare their genetic relationships. All isolates were highly resistant to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and tetracycline. Of all isolates tested, over 94% contained seven virulence associated genes (flaA, cadF, racR, dnaJ, cdtA, cdtB, and cdtC). All isolates were classified into 39 types by PFGE clustering with 90% similarity. Some chicken isolates were incorporated into some PFGE types of human isolates. MLST analysis for the 39 human isolates and 38 chicken isolates resulted in 14 and 23 sequence types (STs), respectively, of which 10 STs were new. STs overlapped in both chicken and human isolates included ST-21, ST-48, ST-50, ST-51, and ST-354, of which ST-21 was the predominant ST in both human and chicken isolates. Through combined analysis of PFGE types and STs, three chicken isolates were clonally related to the three human isolates associated with food poisoning (VII-ST-48, XXII-ST-354, and XXVIII-ST-51). They were derived from geographically same or distinct districts. Remarkably, clonal spread of food poisoning pathogens between animals and humans was confirmed by population genetic analysis. Consequently, contamination of campylobacters with quinolone resistance and potential virulence genes in poultry production and consumption may increase the risk of infections in humans.

  7. Human attribute concepts: relative ubiquity across twelve mutually isolated languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Gerard; Thalmayer, Amber Gayle; Bel-Bahar, Tarik S

    2014-07-01

    It has been unclear which human-attribute concepts are most universal across languages. To identify common-denominator concepts, we used dictionaries for 12 mutually isolated languages-Maasai, Supyire Senoufo, Khoekhoe, Afar, Mara Chin, Hmong, Wik-Mungkan, Enga, Fijian, Inuktitut, Hopi, and Kuna-representing diverse cultural characteristics and language families, from multiple continents. A composite list of every person-descriptive term in each lexicon was closely examined to determine the content (in terms of English translation) most ubiquitous across languages. Study 1 identified 28 single-word concepts used to describe persons in all 12 languages, as well as 41 additional terms found in 11 of 12. Results indicated that attribute concepts related to morality and competence appear to be as cross-culturally ubiquitous as basic-emotion concepts. Formulations of universal-attribute concepts from Osgood and Wierzbicka were well-supported. Study 2 compared lexically based personality models on the relative ubiquity of key associated terms, finding that 1- and 2-dimensional models draw on markedly more ubiquitous terms than do 5- or 6-factor models. We suggest that ubiquitous attributes reflect common cultural as well as common biological processes.

  8. Prevotella saccharolytica sp. nov., isolated from the human oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Julia; Tanner, Anne C R; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Wade, William G

    2010-10-01

    Two strains of anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative bacilli isolated from the human oral cavity (D033B-12-2(T) and D080A-01) were subjected to a comprehensive range of phenotypic and genotypic tests and were found to be distinct from any previously described species. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the strains were related most closely to the type strain of Prevotella marshii (93.5 % sequence identity). The novel strains were saccharolytic and produced acetic acid and succinic acid as end products of fermentation. The principal cellular long-chain fatty acids were C₁₆ :₀), iso-C₁₄:₀, C₁₄:₀, anteiso-C₁₅:₀, iso-C₁₆ :₀ and C₁₆:₀) 3-OH. The G+C content of the DNA of strain D033B-12-2(T) was 44 mol%. Strains D033B-12-2(T) and D080A-01 are considered to represent a single novel species of the genus Prevotella, for which the name Prevotella saccharolytica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is D033B-12-2(T) (=DSM 22473(T) =CCUG 57944(T)).

  9. Prevotella colorans sp. nov., isolated from a human wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Michael; Willmann, Matthias; Liese, Jan; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Marschal, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    A strain of obligately anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative and non-spore-forming rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from a human wound and characterized both phenotypically and genotypically. The strain was moderately saccharolytic and proteolytic. Phylogenetic analysis was based on full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and revealed the strain to represent a member of the genus Prevotella, but to be different from the described species, with the closest relationship to Prevotella bergensis and Prevotella multisaccharivorax. The genomic DNA G+C content was 43.2 mol%. The most abundant cellular long-chain fatty acids were 3-OH iso-C17 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0. In view of phenotypical and biochemical characteristics as well as gene sequencing, strain A1336T is considered to represent a novel species within the genus Prevotella, for which the name Prevotella colorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is A1336T (=DSM 100333T =CCUG 67421T =CCOS 902T).

  10. Review of clinical and laboratory features of human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantur B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Brucella spp. continues to pose a human health risk globally despite strides in eradicating the disease from domestic animals. Brucellosis has been an emerging disease since the discovery of Brucella melitensis by Sir David Bruce in 1887. Although many countries have eradicated B. abortus from cattle, in some areas B. melitensis and B. suis have emerged as causes of this infection in cattle, leading to human infections. Currently B. melitensis remains the principal cause of human brucellosis worldwide including India. The recent isolation of distinct strains of Brucella from marine mammals as well as humans is an indicator of an emerging zoonotic disease. Brucellosis in endemic and non-endemic regions remains a diagnostic puzzle due to misleading non-specific manifestations and increasing unusual presentations. Fewer than 10% of human cases of brucellosis may be clinically recognized and treated or reported. Routine serological surveillance is not practiced even in Brucella - endemic countries and we suggest that this should be a part of laboratory testing coupled with a high index of clinical suspicion to improve the level of case detection. The screening of family members of index cases of acute brucellosis in an endemic area should be undertaken to pick up additional unrecognised cases. Rapid and reliable, sensitive and specific, easy to perform and automated detection systems for Brucella spp. are urgently needed to allow early diagnosis and adequate antibiotic therapy in time to decrease morbidity / mortality. The history of travel to endemic countries along with exposure to animals and exotic foods are usually critical to making the clinical diagnosis. Laboratory testing is indispensable for diagnosis. Therefore alertness of clinician and close collaboration with microbiologist are essential even in endemic areas to correctly diagnose and treat this protean human infection. Existing treatment options, largely based on

  11. Genetic diversity of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a public hospital in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Gomila, Margarita; del Carmen Gallegos, Maria; Fernández-Baca, Victoria; Pareja, Antonio; Pascual, Margalida; Díaz-Antolín, Paz; García-Valdés, Elena; Lalucat, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple resistances to antibiotics with increasing frequency, making patient treatment more difficult. The aim of the study is to ascertain the population structure of this clinical pathogen in the Hospital Son Llàtzer, Spain. Results A significant set (56) of randomly selected clinical P. aeruginosa isolates, including multidrug and non-multidrug resistant isolates, were assigned to sequence types (...

  12. Clinical and molecular characterisation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, M.H.F.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the results are described of clinical and molecular investigation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations as a hallmark feature, with emphasis on nail patella syndrome, small patella syndrome, isolated patellar aplasia or hypoplasia, and Meier-Gorlin syndrome. The

  13. Isolation and gene expression analysis of single potential human spermatogonial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kopylow, K; Schulze, W; Salzbrunn, A; Spiess, A-N

    2016-04-01

    It is possible to isolate pure populations of single potential human spermatogonial stem cells without somatic contamination for down-stream applications, for example cell culture and gene expression analysis. We isolated pure populations of single potential human spermatogonial stem cells (hSSC) without contaminating somatic cells and analyzed gene expression of these cells via single-cell real-time RT-PCR. The isolation of a pure hSSC fraction could enable clinical applications such as fertility preservation for prepubertal boys and in vitro-spermatogenesis. By utilizing largely nonspecific markers for the isolation of spermatogonia (SPG) and hSSC, previously published cell selection methods are not able to deliver pure target cell populations without contamination by testicular somatic cells. However, uniform cell populations free of somatic cells are necessary to guarantee defined growth conditions in cell culture experiments and to prevent unintended stem cell differentiation. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a cell surface protein of human undifferentiated A-type SPG and a promising candidate marker for hSSC. It is exclusively expressed in small, non-proliferating subgroups of this spermatogonial cell type together with the pluripotency-associated protein and spermatogonial nuclear marker undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1). We specifically selected the FGFR3-positive spermatogonial subpopulation from two 30 mg biopsies per patient from a total of 37 patients with full spermatogenesis and three patients with meiotic arrest. We then employed cell selection with magnetic beads in combination with a fluorescence-activated cell sorter antibody directed against human FGFR3 to tag and visually identify human FGFR3-positive spermatogonia. Positively selected and bead-labeled cells were subsequently picked with a micromanipulator. Analysis of the isolated cells was carried out by single-cell real-time RT-PCR, real-time RT

  14. Clinical and Hormonal Features of a Male Adolescent with Congenital Isolated Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şimşek, Enver; Montenegro, Luciana R; Binay, Cigdem; Demiral, Meliha; Acıkalin, Mustafa Fuat; Latronico, Ana Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to describe the clinical and genetic findings in an adolescent male with isolated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) deficiency and demonstrate the efficacy of recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) replacement in this case. A 14.5-year-old adolescent male was referred with normal pubertal development and small testes. Serum testosterone, FSH, and luteinising hormone (LH) were measured at baseline and after gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation. Testicular biopsy was performed, and rhFSH replacement was administered for 6 months. The patient's FSHβ gene was amplified and sequenced. Basal and GnRH-stimulated FSH levels were undetectable, in contrast with increased LH levels under both conditions. Histopathological investigation of a testicular biopsy specimen revealed a reduced number of Sertoli cells, the absence of germ cells, Leydig cell hyperplasia, and a thickened basement membrane in seminiferous tubules. The testicular size changed from 1 ml at baseline to 6 ml after 6 months of rhFSH replacement. Sequencing of the FSHβ gene exon 3 revealed a new missense mutation (c.364T>C, resulting in p.Cys122Arg) in a homozygous state in the patient; both parents and a sister carried the same mutation in a heterozygous state. We also compared our case with all similar cases published previously. We herein described an adolescent male with isolated FSH deficiency due to a novel FSHβ gene mutation associated with a prepubertal testes size and normal virilisation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. MLST genotypes of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler products, dairy cattle and human campylobacteriosis cases in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonaite, Sigita; Tamuleviciene, Egle; Alter, Thomas; Kasnauskyte, Neringa; Malakauskas, Mindaugas

    2017-06-15

    Campylobacter (C.) jejuni is the leading cause of human campylobacteriosis worldwide. We performed a molecular epidemiological study to investigate the genetic relationship among C. jejuni strains isolated from human diarrhoeal patients, broiler products and dairy cattle in Lithuania. The C. jejuni isolates from human clinical cases, dairy cattle and broiler products were genotyped using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Allele numbers for each housekeeping gene, sequence type (ST), and clonal complex (CC) were assigned by submitting the DNA sequences to the C. jejuni MLST database ( http://pubmlst.org/campylobacter ). Based on the obtained sequence data of the housekeeping genes a phylogenetic analysis of the strains was performed and a minimum spanning tree (MST) was calculated. Among the 262 C. jejuni strains (consisting of 43 strains isolated from dairy cattle, 102 strains isolated from broiler products and 117 clinical human C. jejuni strains), 82 different MLST sequence types and 22 clonal complexes were identified. Clonal complexes CC21 and CC353 predominated among the C. jejuni strains. On ST-level, five sequence types (ST-5, ST-21, ST-50, ST-464 and ST-6410) were dominating and these five STs accounted for 35.9% (n = 94) of our isolates. In addition, 51 (19.5%) C. jejuni strains representing 27 (32.9%) STs were reported for the first time in the PubMLST database ( http://pubmlst.org/campylobacter ). The highest Czekanowski index or proportional similarity index (PSI) was calculated for C. jejuni strains isolated from human campylobacteriosis cases and broiler products (PSI = 0.32) suggesting a strong link between broiler strains and human cases. The PSI of dairy cattle and human samples was lower (PSI = 0.11), suggesting a weaker link between bovine strains and human cases. The calculated Simpson's index of all C. jejuni isolates showed a high genetic diversity (D = 0.96). Our results suggest that broiler products are the most important source of

  16. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Antonio; Yáñez, Antonio; León-Tello, Gloria; Gil, Constantino; Giono, Silvia; Barba, Eduardo; Cedillo, Lilia

    2002-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients. PMID:12057023

  17. Prevalence, identification by a DNA microarray-based assay of human and food isolates Listeria spp. from Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmaïed, F; Helel, S; Le Berre, V; François, J-M; Leclercq, A; Lecuit, M; Smaoui, H; Kechrid, A; Boudabous, A; Barkallah, I

    2014-02-01

    We aimed at evaluating the prevalence of Listeria species isolated from food samples and characterizing food and human cases isolates. Between 2005 and 2007, one hundred food samples collected in the markets of Tunis were analysed in our study. Five strains of Listeria monocytogenes responsible for human listeriosis isolated in hospital of Tunis were included. Multiplex PCR serogrouping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) applying the enzyme AscI and ApaI were used for the characterization of isolates of L. monocytogenes. We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay to a reliable discrimination of species within the Listeria genus. The prevalence of Listeria spp. in food samples was estimated at 14% by using classical biochemical identification. Two samples were assigned to L. monocytogenes and 12 to L. innocua. DNA microarray allowed unambiguous identification of Listeria species. Our results obtained by microarray-based assay were in accordance with the biochemical identification. The two food L. monocytogenes isolates were assigned to the PCR serogroup IIa (serovar 1/2a). Whereas human L. monocytogenes isolates were of PCR serogroup IVb, (serovars 4b). These isolates present a high similarity in PFGE. Food L. monocytogenes isolates were classified into two different pulsotypes. These pulsotypes were different from that of the five strains responsible for the human cases. We confirmed the presence of Listeria spp. in variety of food samples in Tunis. Increased food and clinical surveillance must be taken into consideration in Tunisia to identify putative infections sources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Adherence of Streptococcus sanguis clinical isolates to smooth surfaces and interactions of the isolates with Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferase.

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, S; Torii, M; Kotani, S; Tsuchitani, Y

    1981-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguis isolated from human dental plaque were grown in Todd-Hewitt broth. Cells were collected by centrifugation and lyophilized after extensive washing with water. The cell-associated glucosyltransferase (GTase) activities of S. sanguis strains were assayed with [14C]sucrose. Strain differences in GTase activity were significant within the same serotype or biotype or both. The ability of S. sanguis cells to adhere to smooth glass surfaces was generally weak, irrespective of si...

  19. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from...... humans showed resistance rates lower than those found in imported meat but higher than in domestic meat. These findings indicate that programs for controlling resistant Salmonella spp. are a global issue....

  20. Description of Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum subsp. nov., isolated from humans and reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to determine the taxonomic position of 13 Campylobacter fetus-like isolates from humans (n=8) and reptiles (n=5). Phenotypic characterization, Genusgenus-specific and sap insertion-PCR initially identified all human isolates as type A Campylobacter fetus. Phylogenet...

  1. Social isolation disrupts hippocampal neurogenesis in young non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Cinini, Simone M.; Barnabe, Gabriela F.; Galvão-Coelho, Nicole; de Medeiros, Magda A.; Perez-Mendes, Patrícia; Sousa, Maria B. C.; Covolan, Luciene; Mello, Luiz E.

    2014-01-01

    Social relationships are crucial for the development and maintenance of normal behavior in non-human primates. Animals that are raised in isolation develop abnormal patterns of behavior that persist even when they are later reunited with their parents. In rodents, social isolation is a stressful event and is associated with a decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis but considerably less is known about the effects of social isolation in non-human primates during the transition from adolescence to...

  2. Differences in cell morphometry, cell wall topography and gp70 expression correlate with the virulence of Sporothrix brasiliensis clinical isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela A Castro

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a chronic infectious disease affecting both humans and animals. For many years, this subcutaneous mycosis had been attributed to a single etiological agent; however, it is now known that this taxon consists of a complex of at least four pathogenic species, including Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis. Gp70 was previously shown to be an important antigen and adhesin expressed on the fungal cell surface and may have a key role in immunomodulation and host response. The aim of this work was to study the virulence, morphometry, cell surface topology and gp70 expression of clinical isolates of S. brasiliensis compared with two reference strains of S. schenckii. Several clinical isolates related to severe human cases or associated with the Brazilian zoonotic outbreak of sporotrichosis were genotyped and clustered as S. brasiliensis. Interestingly, in a murine subcutaneous model of sporotrichosis, these isolates showed a higher virulence profile compared with S. schenckii. A single S. brasiliensis isolate from an HIV-positive patient not only showed lower virulence but also presented differences in cell morphometry, cell wall topography and abundant gp70 expression compared with the virulent isolates. In contrast, the highly virulent S. brasiliensis isolates showed reduced levels of cell wall gp70. These observations were confirmed by the topographical location of the gp70 antigen using immunoelectromicroscopy in both species. In addition, the gp70 molecule was sequenced and identified using mass spectrometry, and the sequenced peptides were aligned into predicted proteins using Blastp with the S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis genomes.

  3. Phenotypic and molecular identification of Sporothrix isolates of clinical origin in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaohong; Wan, Zhe; Zhang, Zhenying; Li, Fuqiu; Li, Ruoyu; Liu, Xiaoming

    2013-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is the most common deep mycosis in Northeast China which is an area of high epidemicity due to contact with reeds or cornstalks. In this study, we have characterized a total of 74 clinical isolates from fixed cutaneous, lymphocutaneous and disseminated clinical forms and from Heilongjiang, Jilin, and Liaoning provinces, respectively. All isolates (previously as Sporothrix schenckii) were identified as Sporothrix globosa according to their phenotypic characteristics and calmodulin gene sequences analysis. They were subdivided into two sub-clades (S. globosa I and S. globosa II). Most of our isolates (71/74) presented restricted growth at 37 °C, which differed from a previous report. Up to now, S. globosa is the only pathogenic species in Northeast China, no matter what kind of clinical form and which region it is isolated from. Most of our clinical isolates (68/74) were clustered with three Chinese environmental isolates reported in the literature. The new findings of S. globosa isolates on division and thermotolerance at 37 °C described in this study will help us gain a better understanding of S. globosa.

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolates from northern Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Julio A; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types.

  5. Genetic features of human and bovine Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains isolated in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianciola, L; D'Astek, B A; Mazzeo, M; Chinen, I; Masana, M; Rivas, M

    2016-02-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are important food-borne pathogens associated with human diseases. In Argentina, O157:H7 is the dominant serotype in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) cases. Previously, we have described the almost exclusive circulation of human E. coli O157 strains belonging to the hypervirulent clade 8 in Neuquén Province. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by a broad molecular characterization, if this particular distribution of E. coli O157 clades in Neuquén is similar to the situation in other regions of the country and if it may be originated in a similar profile in cattle, its main reservoir. Two-hundred and eighty O157 strains (54 bovine and 226 human) isolated between 2006 and 2008 in different regions of Argentina were studied. All strains harbored rfbO157, fliCH7, eae, and ehxA genes. The predominant genotype was stx2a/stx2c in human (76.1%) and bovine (55.5%) strains. All human isolates tested by Lineage-Specific Polymorphism Assay (LSPA-6), were lineage I/II; among bovine strains, 94.1% belonged to lineage I/II and 5.9% to lineage I. No LSPA-6 lineage II isolates were detected. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis has revealed the existence of nine clade phylogenetic groups. In our clinical strains collection, 87.6% belonged to the hypervirulent clade 8, and 12.4% were classified as clade 4/5. In bovine isolates, 59.3% strains were clade 8, 33.3% clade 4/5 and 7.4% clade 3. More than 80% of human strains showed the presence of 6 of the 7 virulence determinants described in the TW14359 O157 strain associated with the raw spinach outbreak in the U.S. in 2006. More than 80% of bovine strains showed the presence of 3 of these factors. The q933 allele, which has been related to high toxin production, was present in 98.2% of clinical strains and 75.9% of the bovine isolates. The molecular characterization of human STEC O157 strains allows us to conclude that the particular situation previously described

  6. Resistance to antivirals in human cytomegalovirus: mechanisms and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J L

    1997-09-01

    Long term therapies needed for managing human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections in immunosupressed patients provided the background for the emergence of the resistance to antivirals active against HCMV. In addition, laboratory selected mutants have also been readily achieved. Both clinical and laboratory resistant strains share the same determinants of resistance. Ganciclovir resistance may be due to a few mutations in the HCMV UL97 gene and/or viral DNA pol gene, the former being responsible for about 70% of clinical resistant isolates. Among them, V464, V594, S595 and F595 are the most frequent mutations. Because of their less extensive clinical use, much less is known about resistance to foscarnet and cidofovir (formerly, HPMPC) but in both cases, it has been associated to mutations in the DNA pol. Ganciclovir resistant strains showing DNA pol mutations are cross-resistant to cidofovir and their corresponding IC50 are normally higher than those from strains harboring only mutations at the UL97 gene. To date, foscarnet resistance seems to be independent of both ganciclovir and cidofovir resistance.

  7. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giono Silvia

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients.

  8. The importance of inducible clindamycin resistance in enterotoxin positive S. aureus isolated from clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memariani M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Clindamycin is a suitable antibiotic for treatment of skin and soft tissue infections. Moreover, it can suppress toxin production in many pathogenic bacteria such as S. aureus. There are two mechanisms of resistance in this antibiotic. Constitutive resistance can be detected by standard disk diffusion method but in the case of inducible resistance, D-test should be carried out. The main aim of this study is to determine prevalence of clindamycin inducible resistance among methicillin resistant and susceptible isolates of S. aureus isolated from different clinical samples. "nMethods: A total of 87 clinical isolates from clinical samples were collected. Methicillin resistance was determined using standard disk diffusion method. Subsequently, D-test was carried out according to CLSI guideline. Presence of the sea gene (enterotoxin A was detected by PCR using specific primers. "nResults: Out of 87 isolates, 18(20.7% were clindamycin inducible resistant while constitutive resistance was detected among 21(24.1% isolates. The 95% Confidence intervals for the proportion of inducible clindamycin resistance among clinical isolates of S. aureus was 12.2% to 29.2%. The inducible phenotype in MRSA isolates was more common than that of MSSA isolates (33.3% vs 5.1%.Significant differences were found between prevalence of inducible clindamycin resistance and type of infection (p=0.045. Importantly, there was a significant correlation between sea gene and the constitutive/inducible resistance (p<0.0001. "nConclusions: Due to the high prevalence of clindamycin inducible resistance among clinical isolates of S. aureus, we recommend D-test to avoid treatment failure.

  9. Characterization of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in a culture collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.S. Zanetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in our culture collection did not grow or grew poorly and showed lysis on the culture plates when removed from the collection and inoculated on MacConkey agar. One hypothesis was that bacteriophages had infected and killed those clinical isolates. To check the best storage conditions to maintain viable P. aeruginosa for a longer time, clinical isolates were stored at various temperatures and were grown monthly. We investigated the presence of phage in 10 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa stored in our culture collection. Four strains of P. aeruginosa were infected by phages that were characterized by electron microscopy and isolated to assess their ability to infect. The best condition to maintain the viability of the strains during storage was in water at room temperature. Three Siphoviridae and two Myoviridae phages were visualized and characterized by morphology. We confirmed the presence of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates, and their ability to infect and lyse alternative hosts. Strain PAO1, however, did not show lysis to any phage. Mucoid and multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa showed lysis to 50% of the phages tested.

  10. Characterization of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in a culture collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, C C S; Mingrone, R C C; Kisielius, J J; Ueda-Ito, M; Pignatari, A C C

    2013-08-01

    Some clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in our culture collection did not grow or grew poorly and showed lysis on the culture plates when removed from the collection and inoculated on MacConkey agar. One hypothesis was that bacteriophages had infected and killed those clinical isolates. To check the best storage conditions to maintain viable P. aeruginosa for a longer time, clinical isolates were stored at various temperatures and were grown monthly. We investigated the presence of phage in 10 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa stored in our culture collection. Four strains of P. aeruginosa were infected by phages that were characterized by electron microscopy and isolated to assess their ability to infect. The best condition to maintain the viability of the strains during storage was in water at room temperature. Three Siphoviridae and two Myoviridae phages were visualized and characterized by morphology. We confirmed the presence of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates, and their ability to infect and lyse alternative hosts. Strain PAO1, however, did not show lysis to any phage. Mucoid and multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa showed lysis to 50% of the phages tested.

  11. Linezolid resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis from German hospitals and characterization of two cfr-carrying plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Jennifer; Strommenger, Birgit; Steglich, Matthias; Zimmermann, Ortrud; Fenner, Ines; Lensing, Carmen; Dagwadordsch, Urantschimeg; Kekulé, Alexander S; Werner, Guido; Layer, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    This study was a detailed investigation of Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical isolates exhibiting linezolid resistance. Thirty-six linezolid-resistant S. epidermidis from eight German hospitals, including isolates from suspected hospital-associated outbreaks between January 2012 and April 2013, were analysed with respect to their antimicrobial susceptibility and the presence of cfr and/or mutations in the 23S rRNA, rplC, rplD and rplV genes. Relatedness of isolates was estimated by MLST and SmaI macrorestriction analysis. Characterization of cfr plasmids was carried out by means of Illumina sequencing. The MICs of linezolid varied substantially between the isolates. No apparent correlation was detected between the level of resistance, the presence of cfr and ribosomal target site mutations. S. epidermidis isolates from two hospitals were confirmed as clonally related, indicating the spread of the respective clone over a period of 1 year. Next-generation sequencing revealed two different categories of cfr-expressing plasmids, both of them varying in genetic arrangement and composition from previously published cfr plasmids: p12-00322-like plasmids showed incorporation of cfr into a pGO1-like backbone and displayed capabilities for intra- and inter-species conjugational transfer. To date, linezolid-resistant S. epidermidis have rarely been isolated from human clinical sources in Germany. Here, we describe the emergence and outbreaks of these strains. We detected previously described and novel point mutations in the 23S ribosomal genes. The cfr gene was only present in six isolates. However, this is the first known description of cfr incorporation into conjugative vectors; under selective pressure, these vectors could give reasonable cause for concern. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Antibacterial activity in spices and local medicinal plants against clinical isolates of Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nafisa Hassan; Faizi, Shaheen; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj

    2011-08-01

    Development of resistance in human pathogens against conventional antibiotic necessitates searching indigenous medicinal plants having antibacterial property. Twenty-seven medicinal plants used actively in folklore, ayurvedic and traditional system of medicine were selected for the evaluation of their antimicrobial activity for this study. Eleven plants chosen from these 27 are used as spices in local cuisine. Evaluation of the effectiveness of some medicinal plant extracts against clinical isolates. Nonedible plant parts were extracted with methanol and evaporated in vacuo to obtain residue. Powdered edible parts were boiled three times and cooled in sterile distilled water for 2 min each and filtrate collected. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of plant extracts and filtrates/antibiotics was evaluated against clinical isolates by microbroth dilution method. Water extract of Syzygium aromaticum L. (Myrtaceae) buds, methanol extracts of Ficus carica L. (Moraceae) and Olea europaea L. (Oleaceae) leaves and Peganum harmala L. (Nitrariaceae) seeds had MIC ranges of 31.25-250 µg/ml. S. aromaticum inhibited growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. F. carica and O. europaea inhibited growth of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. pyogenes whereas P. harmala was effective against S. aureus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Candida albicans. Ampicillin, velosef, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and ceftazidime, cefotaxime, cefepime, which are used as control, had MIC ≥ 50 and 1.5 µg/ml, respectively, for organisms sensitive to extracts. Mono/multiextract from identified plants will provide an array of safe antimicrobial agents to control infections by drug-resistant bacteria.

  13. Chromosomal Amplification of the blaOXA-58 Carbapenemase Gene in a Proteus mirabilis Clinical Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girlich, Delphine; Bonnin, Rémy A; Bogaerts, Pierre; De Laveleye, Morgane; Huang, Daniel T; Dortet, Laurent; Glaser, Philippe; Glupczynski, Youri; Naas, Thierry

    2017-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer may occur between distantly related bacteria, thus leading to genetic plasticity and in some cases to acquisition of novel resistance traits. Proteus mirabilis is an enterobacterial species responsible for human infections that may express various acquired β-lactam resistance genes, including different classes of carbapenemase genes. Here we report a Proteus mirabilis clinical isolate (strain 1091) displaying resistance to penicillin, including temocillin, together with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems and susceptibility to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins. Using biochemical tests, significant carbapenem hydrolysis was detected in P. mirabilis 1091. Since PCR failed to detect acquired carbapenemase genes commonly found in Enterobacteriaceae, we used a whole-genome sequencing approach that revealed the presence of blaOXA-58 class D carbapenemase gene, so far identified only in Acinetobacter species. This gene was located on a 3.1-kb element coharboring a blaAmpC-like gene. Remarkably, these two genes were bracketed by putative XerC-XerD binding sites and inserted at a XerC-XerD site located between the terminase-like small- and large-subunit genes of a bacteriophage. Increased expression of the two bla genes resulted from a 6-time tandem amplification of the element as revealed by Southern blotting. This is the first isolation of a clinical P. mirabilis strain producing OXA-58, a class D carbapenemase, and the first description of a XerC-XerD-dependent insertion of antibiotic resistance genes within a bacteriophage. This study revealed a new role for the XerC-XerD recombinase in bacteriophage biology. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. The role of active efflux in antibiotic - resistance of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori

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    Falsafi T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In gram-negative bacteria, active efflux pumps that excrete drugs can confer resistance to antibiotics however, in Helicobacter pylori this role is not well established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of active efflux in resistance of H. pylori isolates to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Twelve multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR isolates resistant to at least four antibiotics, including β-lactams, metronidazole, tetracycline, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin; three resistant to only β-lactams, and two hyper-susceptible isolates, were obtained from screening of 96 clinical isolates of H. pylori . Their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs for antibiotics and ethidium-bromide (EtBr were compared in the presence- and absence of a proton-conductor, carbonyl cyanide-m chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP using agar-dilution and disc diffusion. Drug accumulation studies for EtBr and antibiotics were assessed in the presence and absence of CCCP using spectrofluorometry. Results: MIC of EtBr for eight MAR-isolates was decreased two- to four-folds in the presence of CCCP, of which five showed reduced MICs for β-lactam, metronidazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin with CCCP. Accumulation of EtBr by the MAR-isolates was rapid and not dependant on the pattern of multiple resistance. Antibiotic accumulation assay confirmed the presence of energy-dependant efflux of β-lactam, metronidazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin, but no erythromycin in five MAR isolates. Energy-dependant efflux of EtBr or antibiotics was not observed for four MAR-isolates, and three isolates were resistant only to β-lactams. Conclusion: Energy-dependant efflux plays a role in the resistance of H. pylori clinical isolates to structurally unrelated antibiotics in a broadly specific multidrug efflux manner. Difference in the efflux potential of MAR isolates may be related to the presence or absence of functional efflux-pumps in diverse H. pylori

  15. Molecular typing of Brucella species isolates from livestock and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagalingam, Mohandoss; Shome, Rajeswari; Balamurugan, Vinayagamurthy; Shome, Bibek Ranjan; NarayanaRao, Krishnamsetty; Vivekananda; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Prabhudas, Krishnamsetty

    2012-01-01

    Although host specificity has been observed in different species of Brucella, crossing the animal host boundary is likely to occur at any time. In this study, Bruce ladder PCR and abortus-melitensis-ovis-suis (AMOS) PCR assays were used to characterize 47 Brucella isolates from Indian origin in order to know exact species for understanding epidemiology of brucellosis. Out of them, 28, 14, and 5 isolates were found to be Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella suis, respectively. Further analysis by AMOS PCR has identified that all the B. abortus isolates belong to any one of the biovar 1, 2, or 4; of the five B. suis isolates, three belong to biovar 1 and two belong to any one of the biovar 2, 3, 4, or 5. Although this multiplex Bruce ladder PCR is useful in differentiating all Brucella species, elaborate study is required to further characterize the isolates at exact biovar level.

  16. Evaluation of Escherichia coli isolates from healthy chickens to determine their potential risk to poultry and human health.

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    Zachary R Stromberg

    Full Text Available Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC strains are important pathogens that cause diverse diseases in humans and poultry. Some E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated virulence genes, so appear potentially pathogenic; they conceivably could be transmitted to humans through handling and/or consumption of contaminated meat. However, the actual extraintestinal virulence potential of chicken-source fecal E. coli is poorly understood. Here, we assessed whether fecal E. coli isolates from healthy production chickens could cause diseases in a chicken model of avian colibacillosis and three rodent models of ExPEC-associated human infections. From 304 E. coli isolates from chicken fecal samples, 175 E. coli isolates were screened by PCR for virulence genes associated with human-source ExPEC or avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, an ExPEC subset that causes extraintestinal infections in poultry. Selected isolates genetically identified as ExPEC and non-ExPEC isolates were assessed in vitro for virulence-associated phenotypes, and in vivo for disease-causing ability in animal models of colibacillosis, sepsis, meningitis, and urinary tract infection. Among the study isolates, 13% (40/304 were identified as ExPEC; the majority of these were classified as APEC and uropathogenic E. coli, but none as neonatal meningitis E. coli. Multiple chicken-source fecal ExPEC isolates resembled avian and human clinical ExPEC isolates in causing one or more ExPEC-associated illnesses in experimental animal infection models. Additionally, some isolates that were classified as non-ExPEC were able to cause ExPEC-associated illnesses in animal models, and thus future studies are needed to elucidate their mechanisms of virulence. These findings show that E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated genes, exhibit ExPEC-associated in vitro phenotypes, and can cause ExPEC-associated infections in animal models, and thus may pose a

  17. Evaluation of Escherichia coli isolates from healthy chickens to determine their potential risk to poultry and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Zachary R; Johnson, James R; Fairbrother, John M; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Van Goor, Angelica; Curtiss, Roy; Mellata, Melha

    2017-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains are important pathogens that cause diverse diseases in humans and poultry. Some E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated virulence genes, so appear potentially pathogenic; they conceivably could be transmitted to humans through handling and/or consumption of contaminated meat. However, the actual extraintestinal virulence potential of chicken-source fecal E. coli is poorly understood. Here, we assessed whether fecal E. coli isolates from healthy production chickens could cause diseases in a chicken model of avian colibacillosis and three rodent models of ExPEC-associated human infections. From 304 E. coli isolates from chicken fecal samples, 175 E. coli isolates were screened by PCR for virulence genes associated with human-source ExPEC or avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), an ExPEC subset that causes extraintestinal infections in poultry. Selected isolates genetically identified as ExPEC and non-ExPEC isolates were assessed in vitro for virulence-associated phenotypes, and in vivo for disease-causing ability in animal models of colibacillosis, sepsis, meningitis, and urinary tract infection. Among the study isolates, 13% (40/304) were identified as ExPEC; the majority of these were classified as APEC and uropathogenic E. coli, but none as neonatal meningitis E. coli. Multiple chicken-source fecal ExPEC isolates resembled avian and human clinical ExPEC isolates in causing one or more ExPEC-associated illnesses in experimental animal infection models. Additionally, some isolates that were classified as non-ExPEC were able to cause ExPEC-associated illnesses in animal models, and thus future studies are needed to elucidate their mechanisms of virulence. These findings show that E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated genes, exhibit ExPEC-associated in vitro phenotypes, and can cause ExPEC-associated infections in animal models, and thus may pose a health threat to

  18. Evaluation of Escherichia coli isolates from healthy chickens to determine their potential risk to poultry and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James R.; Fairbrother, John M.; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Van Goor, Angelica; Curtiss, Roy; Mellata, Melha

    2017-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains are important pathogens that cause diverse diseases in humans and poultry. Some E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated virulence genes, so appear potentially pathogenic; they conceivably could be transmitted to humans through handling and/or consumption of contaminated meat. However, the actual extraintestinal virulence potential of chicken-source fecal E. coli is poorly understood. Here, we assessed whether fecal E. coli isolates from healthy production chickens could cause diseases in a chicken model of avian colibacillosis and three rodent models of ExPEC-associated human infections. From 304 E. coli isolates from chicken fecal samples, 175 E. coli isolates were screened by PCR for virulence genes associated with human-source ExPEC or avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), an ExPEC subset that causes extraintestinal infections in poultry. Selected isolates genetically identified as ExPEC and non-ExPEC isolates were assessed in vitro for virulence-associated phenotypes, and in vivo for disease-causing ability in animal models of colibacillosis, sepsis, meningitis, and urinary tract infection. Among the study isolates, 13% (40/304) were identified as ExPEC; the majority of these were classified as APEC and uropathogenic E. coli, but none as neonatal meningitis E. coli. Multiple chicken-source fecal ExPEC isolates resembled avian and human clinical ExPEC isolates in causing one or more ExPEC-associated illnesses in experimental animal infection models. Additionally, some isolates that were classified as non-ExPEC were able to cause ExPEC-associated illnesses in animal models, and thus future studies are needed to elucidate their mechanisms of virulence. These findings show that E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated genes, exhibit ExPEC-associated in vitro phenotypes, and can cause ExPEC-associated infections in animal models, and thus may pose a health threat to

  19. Prospective Isolation of Murine and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Based on Surface Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Mabuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are currently defined as multipotent stromal cells that undergo sustained in vitro growth and can give rise to cells of multiple mesenchymal lineages, such as adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. The regenerative and immunosuppressive properties of MSCs have led to numerous clinical trials exploring their utility for the treatment of a variety of diseases (e.g., acute graft-versus-host disease, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, and cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and myocardial infarction. On the other hand, conventionally cultured MSCs reflect heterogeneous populations that often contain contaminating cells due to the significant variability in isolation methods and the lack of specific MSC markers. This review article focuses on recent developments in the MSC research field, with a special emphasis on the identification of novel surface markers for the in vivo localization and prospective isolation of murine and human MSCs. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological importance of MSC subtypes in vivo with specific reference to data supporting their contribution to HSC niche homeostasis. The isolation of MSCs using selective markers (combination of PDGFRα and Sca-1 is crucial to address the many unanswered questions pertaining to these cells and has the potential to enhance their therapeutic potential enormously.

  20. Comparative genomic analysis and virulence differences in closely related salmonella enterica serotype heidelberg isolates from humans, retail meats, and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Maria; Zhao, Shaohua; Pettengill, James; Luo, Yan; Monday, Steven R; Abbott, Jason; Ayers, Sherry L; Cinar, Hediye N; Muruvanda, Tim; Li, Cong; Allard, Marc W; Whichard, Jean; Meng, Jianghong; Brown, Eric W; McDermott, Patrick F

    2014-05-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) is one of the top serovars causing human salmonellosis. Recently, an antibiotic-resistant strain of this serovar was implicated in a large 2011 multistate outbreak resulting from consumption of contaminated ground turkey that involved 136 confirmed cases, with one death. In this study, we assessed the evolutionary diversity of 44 S. Heidelberg isolates using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) generated by the 454 GS FLX (Roche) platform. The isolates, including 30 with nearly indistinguishable (one band difference) Xbal pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns (JF6X01.0032, JF6X01.0058), were collected from various sources between 1982 and 2011 and included nine isolates associated with the 2011 outbreak. Additionally, we determined the complete sequence for the chromosome and three plasmids from a clinical isolate associated with the 2011 outbreak using the Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) system. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses, we were able to distinguish highly clonal isolates, including strains isolated at different times in the same year. The isolates from the recent 2011 outbreak clustered together with a mean SNP variation of only 17 SNPs. The S. Heidelberg isolates carried a variety of phages, such as prophage P22, P4, lambda-like prophage Gifsy-2, and the P2-like phage which carries the sopE1 gene, virulence genes including 62 pathogenicity, and 13 fimbrial markers and resistance plasmids of the incompatibility (Inc)I1, IncA/C, and IncHI2 groups. Twenty-one strains contained an IncX plasmid carrying a type IV secretion system. On the basis of the recent and historical isolates used in this study, our results demonstrated that, in addition to providing detailed genetic information for the isolates, WGS can identify SNP targets that can be utilized for differentiating highly clonal S. Heidelberg isolates.

  1. Diversity of virulence phenotypes among type III secretion negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

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    Jonida Toska

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent cause of acute infections. The primary virulence factor that has been linked to clinical disease is the type III secretion system, a molecular syringe that delivers effector proteins directly into host cells. Despite the importance of type III secretion in dictating clinical outcomes and promoting disease in animal models of infections, clinical isolates often do not express the type III secretion system in vitro. Here we screened 81 clinical P. aeruginosa isolates for secretion of type III secretion system substrates by western blot. Non-expressing strains were also subjected to a functional test assaying the ability to intoxicate epithelial cells in vitro, and to survive and cause disease in a murine model of corneal infection. 26 of 81 clinical isolates were found to be type III secretion negative by western blot. 17 of these 26 non-expressing strains were tested for their ability to cause epithelial cell rounding. Of these, three isolates caused epithelial cell rounding in a type III secretion system dependent manner, and one strain was cytotoxic in a T3SS-independent manner. Five T3SS-negative isolates were also tested for their ability to cause disease in a murine model of corneal infection. Of these isolates, two strains caused severe corneal disease in a T3SS-independent manner. Interestingly, one of these strains caused significant disease (inflammation despite being cleared. Our data therefore show that P. aeruginosa clinical isolates can cause disease in a T3SS-independent manner, demonstrating the existence of novel modifiers of clinical disease.

  2. Epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of B. fragilis group organisms isolated from clinical specimen and human intestinal microbiota Epidemiologia e resistência a antimicrobianos de microorganismos do grupo B. fragilis isolados de espécime clínico e microbiota intestinal humana

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    Cibele Barreto Mano de Carvalho

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological aspects and the antimicrobial susceptibility profile of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolated from clinical and human intestinal specimens were examined in this study. B. fragilis group strains were isolated from 46 (37% of 124 clinical specimens and the source of the samples was: Blood culture (3, intraabdominal infection (27, brain abscess (2, soft tissue infection (17, respiratory sinus (3, pleural aspirate (9, breast abscess (3, surgical infected wound (22, pelvic inflammatory disease (22, chronic otitis media (9 and miscellaneous (7. Intraabdominal and soft tissue infections were responsible for more than half of the clinical isolates. Susceptibility to penicillin, cefoxitin, tetracycline, metronidazole, chloramphenicol and clindamycin was examined. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and chloramphenicol. For clindamycin and cefoxitin the resistance rates observed were 21.7% and 10.9% respectively. Susceptibility profiles varied among the different species tested. A total of 37 species of B. fragilis group isolated from intestinal microbiota of individuals who had no antimicrobial therapy for at least 1 month before the sampling was also examined. All strains were also susceptible to chloramphenicol and motronidazole and the resistance rates to clindamycin and cefoxitin were 19.4% and 5.4% respectively. A few institutions, in Brazil, have monitored the antimicrobial susceptibility of B. fragilis group strains isolated from anaerobic infections. The resistance rates to cefoxitin and clindamycin and the variation in susceptibility patterns among the species isolated in this study emphasize the need for monitoring of susceptibility patterns of B. fragilis group organisms isolated, especially at our University Hospitals.Alguns aspectos epidemiológicos e o perfil de sensibilidade a antimicrobianos de amostras do grupo B. fragilis isoladas de espécime clínico e microbiota intestinal humana foram delineados neste

  3. Molecular analysis of Tn1546 in Enterococcus faecium isolated from animals and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Ahrens, Peter; Dons, L.

    1998-01-01

    The internal areas and the position of integration of the glycopeptide resistance element Tn1546 were characterized by using PCR fragment length polymorphism, sequencing, and DNA hybridization techniques with 38 high-level vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates of human and animal...... from the reference strain, BM4147. For type 2, 11 isolates of human and animal origins were found, Six human isolates from England were all of type 3. Two human isolates from the United States, indistinguishable from each other, were type 9. These results showed that vancomycin-resistant E. faecium...... of animal and human origins can contain indistinguishable genetic elements coding for vancomycin resistance, indicating either horizontal gene transfer between E. faecium organisms of human and animal origins or the existence of a common reservoir for glycopeptide resistance....

  4. Clonal Analysis of Clinical and Environmental Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Meknes Region, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroui, Itto; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Aboulkacem, Asmae; Elhafa, Hanane; Ouarrak, Khadija; Sbiti, Mohammed; Louzi, Lhoussain; Timinouni, Mohammed; Belhaj, Abdelhaq

    2017-09-27

    From 123 clinical and environmental Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, 24 strains were selected for their similar antibioresistance, virulence and biofilm formation profiles, to examine their diversity and occurrence of clones within two hospitals and different natural sites in Meknes (Morocco). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, using DraI enzyme, didn't reveal a close relationship between clinical and environmental isolates nor between strains of the two hospitals. 19 genotypes were obtained, including two virulent environmental clones and three clinical clones virulent and resistant to antibiotics. Intra-hospital transmission of high-risk clones detected, in and between wards, constitutes a great public health concern.

  5. MRI criteria for MS in patients with clinically isolated syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalban, X.; Tintore, M.; Swanton, J.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, criteria for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) have changed, mainly due to the incorporation of new MRI criteria. While the new criteria are a logical step forward, they are complex and-not surprisingly-a good working knowledge of them is not always evident among...... neurologists and neuroradiologists. In some circumstances, several MRI examinations are needed to achieve an accurate and prompt diagnosis. This provides an incentive for continued efforts to refine the incorporation of MRI-derived information into the diagnostic workup of patients presenting with a clinically...

  6. Workload and clinical significance of the isolation of zygomycetes in a tertiary general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Narbona, M; Guinea, J; Martínez-Alarcón, J; Muñoz, P; Peláez, T; Bouza, E

    2008-05-01

    Several reports of increases in invasive zygomycosis (IZ) at individual institutions across the USA and Europe have contributed to a generalized concept that IZ is an increasing problem and the overestimation of the clinical significance of the isolation of zygomycetes in microbiology departments. We assessed the workload and clinical significance of zygomycetes isolates recovered from clinical samples in our institution over a 19-year period (1988-2006). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of those patients from who isolates of zygomycetes were obtained and calculated the workload of its isolation, the incidence of IZ during this period and the positive predictive value (PPV) of a positive culture. Zygomycetes were recovered from 210 samples (176 patients), i.e., 0.086/1,000 clinical samples processed and 6.3/1,000 samples submitted for fungal isolation. Zygomycetes represented 0.6% of the total fungi recovered. The mean incidence of the disease was 1.2 cases/100,000 admissions (range 0-20). Only 16 of the samples which grew zygomycetes (7.6%) were from infected patients. The workload generated by zygomycetes in our institution and the PPV for IZ of their isolation in our laboratory were very low and the disease was not found to have significantly increased in recent years in our institution. Data from specific institutions cannot be generalized.

  7. Isolation, speciation, and antibiogram of clinically relevant non-diphtherial Corynebacteria (Diphtheroids

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    B S Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Coryneform or the non-diphtherial Corynebacterium species largely remains a neglected group with the traditional consideration of these organisms as contaminants. This concept, however, is slowly changing in the light of recent observations. This study has been done to find out the species distribution and antibiogram of various members of the clinically relevant Coryneform group, isolated from various clinical materials. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fourteen non-duplicate isolates of diphtheroids from various clinical isolates were selected for the study. The isolates were identified to the species level by using a battery of tests; and antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by using a combination of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI and the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC guidelines, in the absence of definitive CLSI guidelines. Results: Corynebacterium amycolatum was the predominant species (35.9% in our series followed by the CDC Group G organisms (15.7%. Each of the remaining 19 species comprised of less than 10% of the isolates. More than half the total isolates were resistant to the penicillins, erythromycin, and clindamycin; while excellent activity (all the strains being susceptible was shown by vancomycin, linezolid, and tigecycline. Chloramphenicol and tetracycline also had good activity in inhibiting more than 80% of the isolates. Multiply drug resistance was exhibited by all the species. Conclusion: This study was an attempt to establish the clinical significance of coryneform organisms. The high level of resistance shown by this group to some of the common antibacterial agents highlights the importance of processing these isolates in select conditions to guide the clinicians towards an appropriate therapy.

  8. Characterization of biofilm formation by clinical isolates of Mycobacterium avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, George; Wu, Martin; Drummond, Daryl C; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2003-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an environmental organism encountered in natural and urban water sources as well as soil. M. avium biofilm has recently been identified on sauna walls and in city water pipes and might have a role in the survival of virulent strains in the environment and in the host. To characterize the M. avium biofilm, an in vitro model was adapted wherein biofilm develops on a PVC surface. Biofilm was detected by staining with crystal violet and visualization by optical microscopy and quantified by A(570). M. avium strains MAC 101, MAC 100, MAC 104, MAC 109, MAC A5 and MAC 5501 (all isolated from the blood of AIDS patients) were used in the assays. Biofilm formation was dependent on the presence of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) or Zn(2+) ions in the water, with the maximal effect seen at a concentration of 1 micro M. The presence of 2 % glucose and peptone as sources of carbon increased the formation of biofilm, while this was partially inhibited by humic acid. Since sliding motility has been associated with the amount of glycopeptidolipid (GPL), TLC was used to determine the presence of GPL. The supernatant of a biofilm-forming culture induced formation of a stable biofilm and amikacin blocked the establishment of biofilm by M. avium strains at subinhibitory concentrations. Bacteria in the biofilm were more resistant to chlorine as well as to exposure to potassium monopersulfate and chloroheximide acetate than were planktonic bacteria. Identification of M. avium genes involved in biofilm formation and further studies of the effect of antimicrobials on the establishment of biofilm may identify approaches for inhibiting M. avium biofilm formation and colonization.

  9. The spasmogenic effects of vanadate in human isolated bronchus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortijo, Julio; Villagrasa, Victoria; Martí-Cabrera, Miguel; Villar, Vicente; Moreau, Joelle; Advenier, Charles; Morcillo, Esteban J; Small, Roger C

    1997-01-01

    Inhalation of vanadium compounds, particularly vanadate, is a cause of occupational bronchial asthma. We have now studied the action of vanadate on human isolated bronchus. Vanadate (0.1 μM–3 mM) produced concentration-dependent, well-sustained contraction. Its −logEC50 was 3.74±0.05 (mean±s.e.mean) and its maximal effect was equivalent to 97.5±4.2% of the response to acetylcholine (ACh, 1 mM).Vanadate (200 μM)-induced contraction of human bronchus was epithelium-independent and was not inhibited by indomethacin (2.8 μM), zileuton (10 μM), a mixture of atropine, mepyramine and phentolamine (each at 1 μM), or by mast cell degranulation with compound 48/80.Vanadate (200 μM)-induced contraction was unaltered by tissue exposure to verapamil or nifedipine (each 1 μM) or to a Ca2+-free, EGTA (0.1 mM)-containing physiological salt solution (PSS). However, tissue incubation with ryanodine (10 μM) in Ca2+-free, EGTA (0.1 mM)-containing PSS reduced vanadate-induced contraction. A series of vanadate challenges was made in tissues exposed to Ca2+-free EGTA (0.1 mM)-containing PSS with the object of depleting intracellular Ca2+ stores. In such tissues cyclopiazonic acid (CPA; 10 μM) prevented Ca2+-induced recovery of vanadate-induced contraction.Tissue incubation in K+-rich (80 mM) PSS, K+-free PSS, or PSS containing ouabain (10 μM) did not alter vanadate (200 μM)-induced contraction. Ouabain (10 μM) abolished the K+-induced relaxation of human bronchus bathed in K+-free PSS. This action was not shared by vanadate (200 μM). The tissue content of Na+ was increased and the tissue content of K+ was decreased by ouabain (10 μM). In contrast, vanadate (200 μM) did not alter the tissue content of these ions. Tissue incubation in a Na+-deficient (25 mM) PSS or in PSS containing amiloride (0.1 mM) markedly inhibited the spasmogenic effect of vanadate (200 μM).Vanadate (200 μM)-induced contractions were markedly

  10. Diversity of Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Vibrio cholerae in Natural Transformation and Contact-Dependent Bacterial Killing Indicative of Type VI Secretion System Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardy, Eryn E; Turnsek, Maryann A; Wilson, Sarah K; Tarr, Cheryl L; Hammer, Brian K

    2016-05-01

    The bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholerae can occupy both the human gut and aquatic reservoirs, where it may colonize chitinous surfaces that induce the expression of factors for three phenotypes: chitin utilization, DNA uptake by natural transformation, and contact-dependent bacterial killing via a type VI secretion system (T6SS). In this study, we surveyed a diverse set of 53 isolates from different geographic locales collected over the past century from human clinical and environmental specimens for each phenotype outlined above. The set included pandemic isolates of serogroup O1, as well as several serogroup O139 and non-O1/non-O139 strains. We found that while chitin utilization was common, only 22.6% of the isolates tested were proficient at chitin-induced natural transformation, suggesting that transformation is expendable. Constitutive contact-dependent killing of Escherichia coli prey, which is indicative of a functional T6SS, was rare among clinical isolates (only 4 of 29) but common among environmental isolates (22 of 24). These results bolster the pathoadaptive model in which tight regulation of T6SS-mediated bacterial killing is beneficial in a human host, whereas constitutive killing by environmental isolates may give a competitive advantage in natural settings. Future sequence analysis of this set of diverse isolates may identify previously unknown regulators and structural components for both natural transformation and T6SS. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Humanized animal exercise model for clinical implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dae Yun; Lee, Sung Ryul; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2014-09-01

    Exercise and physical activity function as a patho-physiological process that can prevent, manage, and regulate numerous chronic conditions, including metabolic syndrome and age-related sarcopenia. Because of research ethics and technical difficulties in humans, exercise models using animals are requisite for the future development of exercise mimetics to treat such abnormalities. Moreover, the beneficial or adverse outcomes of a new regime or exercise intervention in the treatment of a specific condition should be tested prior to implementation in a clinical setting. In rodents, treadmill running (or swimming) and ladder climbing are widely used as aerobic and anaerobic exercise models, respectively. However, exercise models are not limited to these types. Indeed, there are no golden standard exercise modes or protocols for managing or improving health status since the types (aerobic vs. anaerobic), time (morning vs. evening), and duration (continuous vs. acute bouts) of exercise are the critical determinants for achieving expected beneficial effects. To provide insight into the understanding of exercise and exercise physiology, we have summarized current animal exercise models largely based on aerobic and anaerobic criteria. Additionally, specialized exercise models that have been developed for testing the effect of exercise on specific physiological conditions are presented. Finally, we provide suggestions and/or considerations for developing a new regime for an exercise model.

  12. Characterization of temperate phages infecting Clostridium difficile isolates of human and animal origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulovic, Ognjen; Garneau, Julian R; Néron, Audrey; Fortier, Louis-Charles

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive pathogen infecting humans and animals. Recent studies suggest that animals could represent potential reservoirs of C. difficile that could then transfer to humans. Temperate phages contribute to the evolution of most bacteria, for example, by promoting the transduction of virulence, fitness, and antibiotic resistance genes. In C. difficile, little is known about their role, mainly because suitable propagating hosts and conditions are lacking. Here we report the isolation, propagation, and preliminary characterization of nine temperate phages from animal and human C. difficile isolates. Prophages were induced by UV light from 58 C. difficile isolates of animal and human origins. Using soft agar overlays with 27 different C. difficile test strains, we isolated and further propagated nine temperate phages: two from horse isolates (ΦCD481-1 and ΦCD481-2), three from dog isolates (ΦCD505, ΦCD506, and ΦCD508), and four from human isolates (ΦCD24-2, ΦCD111, ΦCD146, and ΦCD526). Two phages are members of the Siphoviridae family (ΦCD111 and ΦCD146), while the others are Myoviridae phages. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and restriction enzyme analyses showed that all of the phages had unique double-stranded DNA genomes of 30 to 60 kb. Phages induced from human C. difficile isolates, especially the members of the Siphoviridae family, had a broader host range than phages from animal C. difficile isolates. Nevertheless, most of the phages could infect both human and animal strains. Phage transduction of antibiotic resistance was recently reported in C. difficile. Our findings therefore call for further investigation of the potential risk of transduction between animal and human C. difficile isolates.

  13. Identification of bacteria isolated from veterinary clinical specimens using MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Melanie; Wudy, Corinna; Zeller-Peronnet, Veronique; Maggipinto, Marzena; Zimmermann, Pia; Straubinger, Alix; Iwobi, Azuka; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Busch, Ulrich; Huber, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has recently emerged as a rapid and accurate identification method for bacterial species. Although it has been successfully applied for the identification of human pathogens, it has so far not been well evaluated for routine identification of veterinary bacterial isolates. This study was performed to compare and evaluate the performance of MALDI-TOF MS based identification of veterinary bacterial isolates with commercially available conventional test systems. Discrepancies of both methods were resolved by sequencing 16S rDNA and, if necessary, the infB gene for Actinobacillus isolates. A total of 375 consecutively isolated veterinary samples were collected. Among the 357 isolates (95.2%) correctly identified at the genus level by MALDI-TOF MS, 338 of them (90.1% of the total isolates) were also correctly identified at the species level. Conventional methods offered correct species identification for 319 isolates (85.1%). MALDI-TOF identification therefore offered more accurate identification of veterinary bacterial isolates. An update of the in-house mass spectra database with additional reference spectra clearly improved the identification results. In conclusion, the presented data suggest that MALDI-TOF MS is an appropriate platform for classification and identification of veterinary bacterial isolates.

  14. Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolated from Sputum in a Gold Mining Workforce in South Africa: An Observational, Clinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    van Halsema, CL; Chihota, VN; Gey van Pittius, NC; Fielding, KL; Lewis, JJ; van Helden, PD; Churchyard, GJ; Grant, AD

    2015-01-01

    Background. The clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), detected by liquid more than solid culture in sputum specimens from a South African mining workforce, is uncertain. We aimed to describe the current spectrum and relevance of NTM in this population. Methods. An observational study including individuals with sputum NTM isolates, recruited at workforce tuberculosis screening and routine clinics. Symptom questionnaires were administered at the time of sputum collection and ...

  15. Effects by silodosin on the partially obstructed rat ureter in vivo and on human and rat isolated ureters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, L; Buono, R; Fossati, N; Rigatti, P; Montorsi, F; Benigni, F; Hedlund, P

    2013-05-01

    α1 -adrenoceptor (-AR) antagonists may facilitate ureter stone passage in humans. We aimed to study effects by the α1 A -AR selective antagonist silodosin (compared to tamsulosin and prazosin) on ureter pressures in a rat model of ureter obstruction, and on contractions of human and rat isolated ureters. After ethical approval, ureters of male rats were cannulated beneath the kidney pelvis for in vivo ureteral intraluminal recording of autonomous peristaltic pressure waves. A partial ureter obstruction was applied to the distal ureter. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was recorded. Approximate clinical and triple clinical doses of the α1 -AR antagonists were given intravenously. Effects by the α1 -AR antagonists on isolated human and rat ureters were studied in organ baths. Intravenous silodosin (0.1-0.3 mg kg(-1) ) or prazosin (0.03-0.1 mg kg(-1) ) reduced obstruction-induced increases in intraluminal ureter pressures by 21-37% or 18-40% respectively. Corresponding effects by tamsulosin (0.01 or 0.03 mg kg(-1) ) were 9-20%. Silodosin, prazosin and tamsulosin reduced MAP by 10-12%, 25-26% (P ureter pressures were expressed as a function of MAP, silodosin had six- to eightfold and 2.5- to eightfold better efficacy than tamsulosin or prazosin respectively. Silodosin effectively reduced contractions of both human and rat isolated ureters. Silodosin inhibits contractions of the rat and human isolated ureters and has excellent functional selectivity in vivo to relieve pressure-load of the rat obstructed ureter. Silodosin as pharmacological ureter stone expulsive therapy should be clinically further explored. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation from Clinical and Environmental Samples in Iran: Twenty Years of Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Velayati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM are opportunistic pathogens that are widely distributed in the environment. There is a lack of data on species distribution of these organisms from Iran. This study consists of a review of NTM articles published in Iran between the years 1992 and 2014. In this review, 20 articles and 14 case reports were identified. Among the 20 articles, 13 (65% studies focused on NTM isolates from clinical specimens, 6 (30% studies examined NTM isolates from environmental samples, and one (5% article included both clinical and environmental isolates. M. fortuitum (229/997; 23% was recorded as the most prevalent and rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM species in both clinical (28% and environmental (19% isolated samples (P < 0.05. Among slow growing mycobacteria (SGM, M. simiae (103/494; 21% demonstrated a higher frequency in clinical samples whereas in environmental samples it was M. flavescens (44/503; 9%. These data represent information from 14 provinces out of 31 provinces of Iran. No information is available in current published data on clinical or environmental NTM from the remaining 17 provinces in Iran. These results emphasize the potential importance of NTM as well as the underestimation of NTM frequency in Iran. NTM is an important clinical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Iran. Continued research is needed from both clinical and environmental sources to help clinicians and researchers better understand and address NTM treatment and prevention.

  17. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Isolation from Clinical and Environmental Samples in Iran: Twenty Years of Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that are widely distributed in the environment. There is a lack of data on species distribution of these organisms from Iran. This study consists of a review of NTM articles published in Iran between the years 1992 and 2014. In this review, 20 articles and 14 case reports were identified. Among the 20 articles, 13 (65%) studies focused on NTM isolates from clinical specimens, 6 (30%) studies examined NTM isolates from environmental samples, and one (5%) article included both clinical and environmental isolates. M. fortuitum (229/997; 23%) was recorded as the most prevalent and rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM) species in both clinical (28%) and environmental (19%) isolated samples (P mycobacteria (SGM), M. simiae (103/494; 21%) demonstrated a higher frequency in clinical samples whereas in environmental samples it was M. flavescens (44/503; 9%). These data represent information from 14 provinces out of 31 provinces of Iran. No information is available in current published data on clinical or environmental NTM from the remaining 17 provinces in Iran. These results emphasize the potential importance of NTM as well as the underestimation of NTM frequency in Iran. NTM is an important clinical problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Iran. Continued research is needed from both clinical and environmental sources to help clinicians and researchers better understand and address NTM treatment and prevention.

  18. Microbiological and Clinical Characteristics of Hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates Associated with Invasive Infections in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yinjuan; Wang, Shanshan; Zhan, Lingling; Jin, Ye; Duan, Jingjing; Hao, Zhihao; Lv, Jingnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Wang, Liangxing; Yu, Fangyou

    2017-01-01

    A distinctive syndrome caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae (HMKP) including pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is now becoming a globally emerging disease. In the present study, 22.8% (84/369) of K. pneumoniae clinical isolates associated with various types of invasive infections were identified as HMKP, with 45.2% associated with PLA. Multivariate regression analysis showed that male patients with 41-50 years, PLA, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension were independent risk factors for HMKP infections. K2 (42.9%, 36/84) was the most common capsular serotype among HMKP isolates, followed by K1 (23.8%, 20/84). Seventy-five percentage of K1 HMKP isolates were associated with PLA, while K2 HMKP isolates accounted for more types of invasive infections. The positive rates of iutA, mrkD, aerobactin, iroN, and rmpA among HMKP isolates were significantly higher than those among non-HMKP isolates (p pneumoniae K2 isolates was more diverse than K1 isolates. K1 and K2 HMKP isolates had respective specific profiles of virulence-associated genes.

  19. Differential expression of putative drug resistance genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Escalante, Laura; Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Said-Fernández, Salvador; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Bermúdez de León, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Understanding drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires an integrated analysis of strain lineages, mutations and gene expression. Previously, we reported the differential expression of esxG, esxH, infA, groES, rpmI, rpsA and lipF genes in a sensitive M. tuberculosis strain and in a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate. Here, we have evaluated the expression of these genes in 24 clinical isolates that belong to different lineages and have different drug resistance profiles. In vitro, growth kinetics analysis showed no difference in the growth of the clinical isolates, and thus drug resistance occurred without a fitness cost. However, a quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis of gene expression revealed high variability among the clinical isolates, including those with similar drug resistance profiles. Due to the complexity of gene regulation pathways and the wide diversity of M. tuberculosis lineages, the use of gene expression as a molecular signature for drug resistance is not straightforward. Therefore, we recommend that the expression of M. tuberculosis genes be performed individually, and baseline expression levels should be verified among several different clinical isolates, before any further applications of these findings. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Growth Factor Content in Human Sera Affects the Isolation of Mesangiogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs from Human Bone Marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Montali

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesangiogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs are human bone marrow-derived multipotent cells, isolated in vitro under selective culture conditions and shown to retain both mesengenic and angiogenic potential. MPCs also co-isolated with multipotent stromal cells (MSCs when bone marrow primary cultures were set up for clinical applications, using human serum (HS in place of fetal bovine serum (FBS. MPC culture purity (over 95% is strictly dependent on HS supplementation with significant batch-to-batch variability. In the present paper we screened different sources of commercially available pooled human AB type serum (PhABS for their ability to promote MPC production under selective culture conditions. As the majority of contaminating cells in MPC cultures were represented by MSC-like cells, we hypothesized a role by differentiating agents present in the sera. Therefore, we tested a number of growth factors (hGF and found that higher concentrations of FGF-2, EGF, PDGF-AB, and VEGF-A as well as lower concentration of IGF-1 give sub-optimal MPC recovery. Gene expression analysis of hGF receptors was also carried out both in MSCs and MPCs, suggesting that FGF-2, EGF and PDGF-AB could act promoting MSC proliferation, while VEGF-A contribute to MSC-like cell contamination, triggering MPC differentiation. Here we demonstrated that managing hGF contents, together with applying specific receptors inhibitors (Erlotinib-HCl and Nintedanib, could significantly mitigate the batch-to-batch variability related to serum supplementation. These data represent a fundamental milestone in view of manufacturing MPC-based medicinal products.

  1. Isolated persistent left superior vena cava: A case report and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarjit Bisoyi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The venous anomaly of a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC affects 0.3%-0.5% of the general population. PLSVC with absent right superior vena cava, also termed as "isolated PLSVC," is an extremely rare venous anomaly. Almost half of the patients with isolated PLSVC have cardiac anomalies in the form of atrial septal defect, endocardial cushion defects, or tetralogy of Fallot. Isolated PLSVC is usually innocuous. Its discovery, however, has important clinical implications. It can pose clinical difficulties with central venous access, cardiothoracic surgeries, and pacemaker implantation. When it drains to the left atrium, it may create a right to left shunt. In this case report, we present the incidental finding of isolated PLSVC in a patient who underwent aortic valve replacement. Awareness about this condition and its variations is important to avoid complications.

  2. Association of biofilm production with colonization among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seong Yeol; Baek, Won-Ki; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2017-03-01

    The pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is increasingly causing healthcare-associated infections worldwide, particularly in intensive care units. Biofilm formation, a factor contributing to the virulence of A. baumannii, is associated with long-term persistence in hospital environments. The present study investigates the clinical impact of biofilm production on colonization and acquisition after patient admission. Forty-nine A. baumannii isolates were obtained between August and November 2013 from Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu, Korea. All isolates were obtained from sputum samples of new patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. The microtiter plate assay was used to determine biofilm formation. Twenty-four A. baumannii isolates (48%) demonstrated enhanced biofilm formation capacity than that of the standard A. baumannii strain (ATCC 19606). All isolates were resistant to carbapenem, 38 isolates (77%) were collected from patients in an intensive care unit, and 47 isolates (95%) were from patients who had been exposed to antibiotics in the previous month. The median duration of colonization was longer for biofilm-producing isolates than that of the biofilm non-biofilm producing isolates (18 days vs. 12 days, p < 0.05). Simultaneous colonization with other bacteria was more common for biofilm-producing isolates than that for the non-biofilm producing isolates. The most prevalent co-colonizing bacteria was Staphylococcus aureus. Biofilm-producing isolates seem to colonize the respiratory tract for longer durations than the non-biofilm producing isolates. During colonization, biofilm producers promote co-colonization by other bacteria, particularly S. aureus. Additional research is required to determine possible links between biofilm formation and nosocomial infection.

  3. Silver nanoparticles: Antibacterial activity against wound isolates & invitro cytotoxic activity on Human Caucasian colon adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Saraniya Devi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To synthesize the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs using the extracts of Hypnea sp. and to investigate the antibacterial activity against Eshcherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and invitro cytotoxic activity on HT-29. Methods: In the present study, AgNPs were synthesized using the aqueous extract of marine macro-algae, and were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourrier Transform Infra red (FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM analysis. Further these synthesized AgNPs were evaluated for their antibacterial activity with the clinical isolates from wound specimens. The isolates were characterized by different tests viz., microscopical observation, colony morphology, biochemical & sugar fermentation tests. The synthesized AgNPs were tested for its antibacterial activity against the isolates by agar well diffussion method. The AgNPs were assessesd for its cytotoxic activity on Human Caucasian colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29 cell lines. Results: In this study, it is clear that the synthesized AgNPs were spherical measuring 10-20nm and was found to be more bactericidal against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli than Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus isolated from wound specimen. The invitro screening of the AgNPs showed potential cytotoxic activity against the colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Proteins can bind to nanoparticles either through the electrostatic attraction of negatively charged carboxylate groups in Hypnea sp. and stabilization of the AgNPs by protein occurs. The antimicrobial activities of AgNPs are influenced by the dimensions of the particles the smaller the particles, the greater antimicrobial effect. The cytotoxic activity may be due to the presence of alkaloids present in the Hypnea sp.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance and genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from humans and foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Benevides Melo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance has increased in recent years, raising the concern of public health authorities. We conducted a study of Escherichia coli isolates obtained from human and food samples to assess the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and to determine the genotype and clonal relationship of 84 E. coli isolates (48 from humans and 36 from foods. An antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed using the disk diffusion method. Virulence factors were evaluated by multiplex PCR, and the clonal relationship among the resistant isolates was studied by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone. Overall, 26%, 20.2%, 15.4% and 6% of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline, ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and cephalotin, respectively. Twenty two percent of the isolates exhibited resistance to more than one antimicrobial agent. Multiple-drug resistance was mostly observed in the human isolates and involved the antibiotics ampicillin and tetracycline. None of the six virulence genes were identified among the isolates. Analysis of genetic diversity by PFGE of 31 resistant isolates, revealed 29 distinct restriction patterns. In conclusion, E. coli from humans and foods are resistant to commonly used antibiotics and are highly genetically diverse. In this setting, inappropriate use of antibiotics may be a cause of high resistance rate instead of clonal spread.

  5. Use of Carbapenems against clinical, nontyphoid Salmonella isolates: results from in vitro and in vivo animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Chen, Chi-Chung; Zhang, Chun-Cheng; Cheng, Kuo Chen; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Ku, Yee Huang; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chuang, Yin-Ching

    2012-06-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates has created the need for new therapeutic agents. We evaluated the intracellular activity of four carbapenem compounds against clinical nontyphoid Salmonella (NTS) isolates in vitro and ex vivo. Subsequently, the efficacy of carbapenem treatment against selected Salmonella isolates in vivo was assessed using a murine peritonitis model. The MIC(50) and MIC(90) for doripenem, ertapenem, imipenem, and meropenem against 126 NTS isolates were found to be 0.062 and 0.062, 0.015 and 0.015, 0.5 and 1, and 0.031 and 0.031 μg/ml, respectively. The intracellular killing effect of ertapenem was sustained for 24 h and was superior to that of imipenem, meropenem, and doripenem; its effect was comparable to that of ceftriaxone. Ertapenem demonstrated an excellent pharmacokinetic profile with a percent time above the MIC of 75.5% and an area under the concentration-time curve/MIC ratio of 20,733. When peritoneal exudate cells were examined directly ex vivo from mice with Salmonella-induced peritonitis, cells from mice treated with ertapenem and ceftriaxone had intracellular and extracellular bacterial counts reduced 10(2)- to 10(4)-fold and exhibited killing effects similar to each other. The survival rates of mice inoculated with 1 × 10(5) and 10(6) CFU of a ceftriaxone-susceptible Salmonella isolate that were subsequently treated with ertapenem or ceftriaxone were 100% and 90%, respectively. When mice were inoculated with 5 × 10(4) and 10(5) CFU of a ceftriaxone-resistant and ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella isolate, mice treated with ertapenem had a higher survival rate than mice treated with ceftriaxone (70% versus 0% and 50% versus 0%, respectively; P Salmonella infections and show that further clinical investigations on the potential use of ertapenem in treatment of human Salmonella infections are warranted.

  6. Association Between Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Food Animals and Blood Stream Isolates from Humans in Europe: An Ecological Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Antonio; Collignon, Peter; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2011-01-01

    and 2008 for 11 countries, using available surveillance data. We also assessed the correlation between human antimicrobial usage and the occurrence of resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections.Results: Strong and significant correlations between prevalences of resistance to ampicillin (r......=0.94), aminoglycosides (r=0.72), third-generation cephalosporins (r=0.76), and fluoroquinolones (r=0.68) were observed for human and poultry E. coli isolates. Similar significant correlations were observed for ampicillin (r=0.91), aminoglycosides (r=0.73), and fluoroquinolone resistance (r=0.......74) in pig and human isolates. In cattle isolates, only ampicillin resistance (r=0.72) was significantly correlated to human isolates. When usage of antimicrobials in humans was analyzed with antimicrobial resistance among human isolates, only correlations between fluoroquinolones (r=0.90) and third...

  7. Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates: Antibiotic Susceptibility, Molecular Characteristics, and Ability to Form Biofilm

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    N. Indrawattana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodic monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus characteristics in a locality is imperative as their drug-resistant variants cause treatment problem. In this study, antibiograms, prevalence of toxin genes (sea-see, seg-ser, seu, tsst-1, eta, etb, and etd, PFGE types, accessory gene regulator (agr groups, and ability to form biofilm of 92 S. aureus Thailand clinical isolates were investigated. They were classified into 10 drug groups: groups 1–7 (56 isolates were methicillin resistant (MRSA and 8–10 (36 isolates were methicillin sensitive (MSSA. One isolate did not have any toxin gene, 4 isolates carried one toxin gene (seq, and 87 isolates had two or more toxin genes. No isolate had see, etb, or tsst-1; six isolates had eta or etd. Combined seg-sei-sem-sen-seo of the highly prevalent egc locus was 26.1%. The seb, sec, sel, seu, and eta associated significantly with MSSA; sek was more in MRSA. The sek-seq association was 52.17% while combined sed-sej was not found. Twenty-three PFGE types were revealed, no association of toxin genes with PFGE types. All four agr groups were present; agr group 1 was predominant (58.70% but agr group 2 strains carried more toxin genes and were more frequent toxin producers. Biofilm formation was found in 72.83% of the isolates but there was no association with antibiograms. This study provides insight information on molecular and phenotypic markers of Thailand S. aureus clinical isolates which should be useful for future active surveillance that aimed to control a spread of existing antimicrobial resistant bacteria and early recognition of a newly emerged variant.

  8. Glucose & sodium chloride induced biofilm production & ica operon in clinical isolates of staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astha Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: All colonizing and invasive staphylococcal isolates may not produce biofilm but may turn biofilm producers in certain situations due to change in environmental factors. This study was done to test the hypothesis that non biofilm producing clinical staphylococci isolates turn biofilm producers in presence of sodium chloride (isotonic and high concentration of glucose, irrespective of presence or absence of ica operon. Methods: Clinical isolates of 100 invasive, 50 colonizing and 50 commensal staphylococci were tested for biofilm production by microtiter plate method in different culture media (trypticase soy broth alone or supplemented with 0.9% NaCl/ 5 or 10% glucose. All isolates were tested for the presence of ica ADBC genes by PCR. Results: Biofilm production significantly increased in the presence of glucose and saline, most, when both glucose and saline were used together. All the ica positive staphylococcal isolates and some ica negative isolates turned biofilm producer in at least one of the tested culture conditions. Those remained biofilm negative in different culture conditions were all ica negative. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results showed that the use of glucose or NaCl or combination of both enhanced biofilm producing capacity of staphylococcal isolates irrespective of presence or absence of ica operon.

  9. Glucose & sodium chloride induced biofilm production & ica operon in clinical isolates of staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Astha; Jain, Amita

    2013-01-01

    All colonizing and invasive staphylococcal isolates may not produce biofilm but may turn biofilm producers in certain situations due to change in environmental factors. This study was done to test the hypothesis that non biofilm producing clinical staphylococci isolates turn biofilm producers in presence of sodium chloride (isotonic) and high concentration of glucose, irrespective of presence or absence of ica operon. Clinical isolates of 100 invasive, 50 colonizing and 50 commensal staphylococci were tested for biofilm production by microtiter plate method in different culture media (trypticase soy broth alone or supplemented with 0.9% NaCl/ 5 or 10% glucose). All isolates were tested for the presence of ica ADBC genes by PCR. Biofilm production significantly increased in the presence of glucose and saline, most, when both glucose and saline were used together. All the ica positive staphylococcal isolates and some ica negative isolates turned biofilm producer in at least one of the tested culture conditions. Those remained biofilm negative in different culture conditions were all ica negative. The present results showed that the use of glucose or NaCl or combination of both enhanced biofilm producing capacity of staphylococcal isolates irrespective of presence or absence of ica operon.

  10. Identification of Clinical Isolates of Actinomyces Species by Amplified 16S Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Val; Talbot, P. R.; Stubbs, S. L.; Duerden, B. I.

    2001-01-01

    Amplified 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) restriction analysis (ARDRA), using enzymes HaeIII and HpaII, was applied to 176 fresh and 299 stored clinical isolates of putative Actinomyces spp. referred to the Anaerobe Reference Unit of the Public Health Laboratory Service for confirmation of identity. Results were compared with ARDRA results obtained previously for reference strains and with conventional phenotypic reactions. Identities of some strains were confirmed by analysis of partial 16S rDNA sequences. Of the 475 isolates, 331 (70%) were clearly assigned to recognized Actinomyces species, including 94 isolates assigned to six recently described species. A further 52 isolates in 12 ARDRA profiles were designated as apparently resembling recognized species, and 44 isolates, in 18 novel profiles, were confirmed as members of genera other than Actinomyces. The identities of 48 isolates in nine profiles remain uncertain, and they may represent novel species of Actinomyces. For the majority of species, phenotypic results, published reactions for the species, and ARDRA profiles concurred. However, of 113 stored isolates originally identified as A. meyeri or resembling A. meyeri by phenotypic tests, only 21 were confirmed as A. meyeri by ARDRA; 63 were reassigned as A. turicensis, 7 as other recognized species, and 22 as unidentified actinomycetes. Analyses of incidence and clinical associations of Actinomyces spp. add to the currently sparse knowledge of some recently described species. PMID:11574572

  11. Differentiation of clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates by their GyrB polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abass N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the reliability of the gyrB PCR-RFLP technique in differentiating clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates. Materials and Methods: A primer pair MTUB-f and MTUB-r for M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC was used to differentiate 79 mycobacterial isolates by specific amplification of the 1,020-bp fragment of the gyrB gene (gyrB-PCR1. The MTBC isolates were further differentiated using a set of specific primers MTUB-756-Gf and MTUB-1450-Cr that allowed selective amplification of the gyrB fragment specific for M. tuberculosis (gyrB-PCR2. The DNA polymorphisms in the 1,020-bp gyrB fragment for 7 M. tuberculosis strains confirmed by PCR as well as 2 reference strains; M. tuberculosis H37Rv and M. bovis BCG were analyzed with the restriction enzyme Rsa1. Results: Seventy-seven (97.5% isolates were positive for gyrB-PCR1 and thus identified as members of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC and two (2.6% isolates were negative and identified as Mycobacteria other than tuberculosis (MOTT. All the M. tuberculosis isolates showed the typical M. tuberculosis specific Rsa1 RFLP patterns (100, 360, 560-bp while 360 and 480-bp fragments were generated from M. bovis BCG. Conclusion: The gyrB PCR-RFLP using the endonuclease Rsa1 can be used to differentiate M. tuberculosis from M. bovis in clinical isolates.

  12. Improved micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wettst. (Plantaginaceae) and antimicrobial activity of in vitro and ex vitro raised plants against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of urinary tract infecting (UTI) and respiratory tract infecting (RTI) bacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haque, Sk Moquammel; Chakraborty, Avijit; Dey, Diganta; Mukherjee, Swapna; Nayak, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Biswajit

    2017-01-01

    .... Second aim is to evaluate the antimicrobial potency of in vitro cultured and ex vitro field grown micropropagated plants against different MDR clinical isolates of human urinary tract infecting (UTI...

  13. Frequency and clinical implications of the isolation of rare nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghyun; Seong, Moon-Woo; Kim, Eui-Chong; Han, Sung Koo; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-09

    To date, more than 125 species of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been identified. In this study, we investigated the frequency and clinical implication of the rarely isolated NTM from respiratory specimens. Patients with NTM isolated from their respiratory specimens between July 1, 2010 and June 31, 2012 were screened for inclusion. Rare NTM were defined as those NTM not falling within the group of eight NTM species commonly identified at our institution: Mycobacterium avium, M. intracellulare, M. abscessus, M. massiliense, M. fortuitum, M. kansasii, M. gordonae, and M. peregrinum. Clinical, radiographic and microbiological data from patients with rare NTM were reviewed and analyzed. During the study period, 73 rare NTM were isolated from the respiratory specimens of 68 patients. Among these, M. conceptionense was the most common (nine patients, 12.3%). The median age of the 68 patients with rare NTM was 68 years, while 39 of the patients were male. Rare NTM were isolated only once in majority of patient (64 patients, 94.1%). Among the four patients from whom rare NTM were isolated two or more times, only two showed radiographic aggravation caused by rare NTM during the follow-up period. Most of the rarely identified NTM species were isolated from respiratory specimens only once per patient, without concomitant clinical aggravation. Clinicians could therefore observe such patients closely without invasive work-ups or treatment, provided the patients do not have decreased host immunity towards mycobacteria.

  14. Biochemical identification and numerical taxonomy of Aeromonas spp. isolated from environmental and clinical samples in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñana-Galbis, D; Farfán, M; Lorén, J G; Fusté, M C

    2002-01-01

    To study the phenotypic characteristics of Aeromonas spp. from environmental and clinical samples in Spain and to cluster these strains by numerical taxonomy. A collection of 202 Aeromonas strains isolated from bivalve molluscs, water and clinical samples was tested for 64 phenotypic properties; 91% of these isolates were identified at species level. Aeromonas caviae was predominant in bivalve molluscs and Aerom. bestiarum in freshwater samples. Cluster analyses revealed eight different phena: three containing more than one DNA-DNA hybridization group but including strains that belong to the same phenospecies complex (Aerom. hydrophila, Aerom. sobria and Aerom. caviae), Aerom. encheleia, Aerom. trota and three containing unidentified Aeromonas strains isolated from bivalve molluscs. Aeromonas spp. are widely distributed in environmental and clinical sources. A selection of 16 of the phenotypical tests chosen allowed the identification of most isolates (91%), although some strains remain unidentified, mainly isolates from bivalve molluscs, suggesting the presence of new Aeromonas species. Numerical taxonomy was not in total concordance with the identification of the studied strains. Numerical taxonomy of Aeromonas strains isolated from different sources revealed the presence of potentially pathogenic Aeromonas spp., especially in bivalve molluscs, and phena with unidentified strains that suggest new Aeromonas species.

  15. [Isolation of Blastocystis spp. from human hosts and in vitro determination of different morphological forms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatyalı, Erdoğan; Ozçelik, Semra

    2011-01-01

    Blastocystis is a highly common parasite that infects the gastrointestinal tract of many different organisms. Morphology and the appropriate classification of Blastocystis spp. has only recently been resolved with molecular biological studies. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of Blastocystis spp. among humans and to isolate the parasite from clinical specimens. Blastocystis spp. was detected in 0.48% of the stool samples and the positive samples were cultivated in Locke-Egg Serum (LES). During passages inoculums were investigated by direct microscopy and stained with trichrome and iron hematoxylene. Vacuolar and granular forms were the most common in cultures and also the amoeboid form was observed. LES medium may be a suitable selection for studies aiming to determine the frequency of Blastocystis spp. and for the diagnosis in routine laboratories.

  16. Prevalence and molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Escherichia coli expressing an AmpC phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rikke Lind; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Friis-Møller, Alice

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish the prevalence of the AmpC beta-lactamase phenotype in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and characterize the genetic resistance mechanisms causing the observed phenotype. METHODS: Clinical E. coli (n = 74) with reduced susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins...... and resistance to cefoxitin were collected from the Department of Clinical Microbiology at Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark, in 2006. The AmpC disc test was used to confirm expression of AmpC, and test-positive strains were selected for further antimicrobial susceptibility testing and molecular characterization....... Sequencing of ampC showed that most isolates were not clonally related. CONCLUSIONS: E. coli expressing an AmpC phenotype occur sporadically and cause significant resistance to cephalosporins. The majority of these are hyperproducing chromosomal ampC although some isolates have acquired pAmpC....

  17. Susceptibility profile of Candida spp. isolated from humans and dogs with stomatitis to the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris

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    Živković R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. form a part of human and animal oral cavity flora. However Candida spp. is the main cause of dental related stomatitis in humans and stomatitis in dogs. Stomatitis treatment implies the use of azoles and polyenes to which yeasts build up resistance. The research is directed to the use of natural compounds such as essential oils. The aim of this paper is to define the antifungal activity of thyme oil on 15 clinical strains of Candida spp., isolated from humans and dogs and to determine if there is a difference in susceptibility between human and dog isolates. Sampling in patients with stomatitis was done by swabbing the denture or oral mucosa swab while sampling in dogs was done by swabbing the oral cavity mucosa after stomatitis has been diagnosed. In order to investigate the antifungal activity of thyme oil in vitro, microdilution method was used. Thyme oil expressed antifungal effects on all investigated strains. Also, our data show that the values of minimum fungicide concentration (MFC and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC are lower in human strains. Explanation is that in most cases, stomatitis in humans is asymptomatic and thus not treated, so Candida strains have not developed resistance. On the other hand, stomatitis in dogs is followed by a marked clinical picture and treated is by antimicotics (mostly by azoles, therefore resistant Candida strains are more likely to occur.

  18. Clinical Studies of Human Pancreatic Enzyme Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Stephen J.D.

    1997-01-01

    Very little is known of the effects of diet and disease on panceratic enzyme syntheis in humans as conventional tests measure the secretory response to secreagogues, such as CCK, and secretion may be unrelated to synthesis because of the masking effect of a large intracellular pool of stored enzymes (zymogens). In order to obtain information on enzyme synthesis, as well as secretion, we have measured the incorporation characteristics of isotopically labelled amino acids (e.g., 14C or 13C leucine tracer) into amylase and trypsin protein, extracted by affinity chromatography from duodenal secretions during pancreatic stimulation with CCK-8 The results of our studies in healthy volunteers and patients have suggested that (a) it takes between 75 and 101 min for the participation of newly synthesized pancreatic enzymes in the digestive process, and that zymogen stores are replaced at a rate of between 12 percent and 47 percent per hour in normal healthy subjects, (b) the synthesis and production rates of trypsin and amylase are parallel in healthy subjects, but can diverge under stressful conditions such as hypersecretory states, post-acute pancreatitis and protein malnutrition, (c) hyperphagia stimulates the synthesis of enzymes whilst malnutrition diminishes the synthesis of trypsin to a greater extent than amylase, (d) intravenous glucose and amino acids exert negative feedback control on the synthesis and release of amylase and trypsin, and (e) the decreased secretion of pancreatic enzymes in Type 1 insulin-dependent diabetics is more a consequence of defective enzyme release from zymogen stores than defective synthesis. In conclusion, our results indicate that changes in pancreatic enzyme secretion noted in patients do not always reflect changes in enzyme synthesis, and that the production of individual enzymes may diverge under certain circumstances. Based on the methodology described, it should be possible to develop more sensitive clinical tests of pancreatic

  19. Identification of filamentous fungi isolates by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry: clinical evaluation of an extended reference spectra library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Pierre T; de Bel, Annelies; Martiny, Delphine; Ranque, Stéphane; Piarroux, Renaud; Cassagne, Carole; Detandt, Monique; Hendrickx, Marijke

    2014-11-01

    The identification of filamentous fungi by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) relies mainly on a robust and extensive database of reference spectra. To this end, a large in-house library containing 760 strains and representing 472 species was built and evaluated on 390 clinical isolates by comparing MALDI-TOF MS with the classical identification method based on morphological observations. The use of MALDI-TOF MS resulted in the correct identification of 95.4% of the isolates at species level, without considering LogScore values. Taking into account the Brukers' cutoff value for reliability (LogScore >1.70), 85.6% of the isolates were correctly identified. For a number of isolates, microscopic identification was limited to the genus, resulting in only 61.5% of the isolates correctly identified at species level while the correctness reached 94.6% at genus level. Using this extended in-house database, MALDI-TOF MS thus appears superior to morphology in order to obtain a robust and accurate identification of filamentous fungi. A continuous extension of the library is however necessary to further improve its reliability. Indeed, 15 isolates were still not represented while an additional three isolates were not recognized, probably because of a lack of intraspecific variability of the corresponding species in the database. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. A seventeen-year observation of the antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical Campylobacter jejuni and the molecular mechanisms of erythromycin-resistant isolates in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyuan Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This is the first comprehensive study on the recent trend in antimicrobial resistance and the molecular mechanisms of macrolide resistance in clinical C. jejuni strains isolated in China. More stringent monitoring and regulation of human and animal antimicrobial use are warranted.

  1. Genetic Diversity and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of 200 Clinical and Environmental Aspergillus flavus Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh-Armaki, Mojtaba; Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Ansari, Saham; Omran, Saeed Mahdavi; Saber, Sasan; Rafati, Haleh; Zoll, Jan; van der Lee, Henrich A; Melchers, Willem J G; Verweij, Paul E; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2017-05-01

    Aspergillus flavus has been frequently reported as the leading cause of invasive aspergillosis in certain tropical and subtropical countries. Two hundred A. flavus strains originating from clinical and environmental sources and collected between 2008 and 2015 were phylogenetically identified at the species level by analyzing partial β-tubulin and calmodulin genes. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing was performed against antifungals using the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution method. In addition, genotyping was performed using a short-tandem-repeat (STR) assay of a panel of six microsatellite markers (A. flavus 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, and 3C), in order to determine the genetic variation and the potential relationship between clinical and environmental isolates. The geometric means of the minimum inhibitory concentrations/minimum effective concentrations (MICs/MECs) of the antifungals across all isolates were (in increasing order): posaconazole, 0.13 mg/liter; anidulafungin, 0.16 mg/liter; itraconazole, 0.29 mg/liter; caspofungin, 0.42 mg/liter; voriconazole, 0.64 mg/liter; isavuconazole, 1.10 mg/liter; amphotericin B, 3.35 mg/liter; and flucytosine, 62.97 mg/liter. All of the clinical isolates were genetically different. However, an identical microsatellite genotype was found between a clinical isolate and two environmental strains. In conclusion, posaconazole and anidulafungin showed the greatest in vitro activity among systemic azoles and echinocandins, respectively. However, the majority of the A. flavus isolates showed reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B. Antifungal susceptibility of A. flavus was not linked with the clinical or environmental source of isolation. Microsatellite genotyping may suggest an association between clinical and environmental strains, although this requires further investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility profile of Aspergillus flavus isolates recovered from clinical specimens in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Within the genus Aspergillus, A. flavus is the second most important species of clinical significance. It is predominantly associated with infections involving sinuses, eye and skin, mostly in geographic regions with hot and arid climate, including the Middle East. Recent reports on emergence of resistance to triazoles among Aspergillus spp. is a cause of concern for treatment of patients with invasive aspergillosis. In this study we present data on genetic characterization and antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical and environmental isolates of A. flavus. Methods Ninety-nine Aspergillus section Flavi isolates, originating from clinical (n=92) and environmental (n=7) sources, initially identified by morphological characteristics, were analyzed by partial sequencing of β-tubulin and calmodulin gene fragments and their susceptibilities to six antifungal agents was determined by Etest on RPMI1640 and Muller-Hinton agar media. Etest minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amphotericin B and voriconazole were also compared with zone of inhibition diameters obtained by disc diffusion test on RPMI agar medium. Results The identity of all clinical and environmental isolates was confirmed as A. flavus species by combined analysis of β-tubulin and calmodulin genes. The mean MIC90 (μg/ml) values on RPMI medium for amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, anidulafungin, micafungin and caspofungin were 3, 0.25, 0.25, 0.002, 0.002 and 0.032, respectively. No environmental isolate exhibited MIC value of >2 μg/ml for amphotericin B. For clinical isolates, the zone of inhibition diameters for amphotericin B and voriconazole ranged from 7–16 mm and 24–34 mm, respectively. Linear regression analysis between Etest MIC values and disk diffusion diameters revealed a significant inverse correlation with amphotericin B (p Triazoles and echinocandins showed very good in vitro activity against the A. flavus, however, 10% clinical isolates showed MICs of >2

  3. Trends towards Lower Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Characterization of Acquired Resistance among Clinical Isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae in Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidalgo, Alvaro; Carvajal, Ana; Vester, Birte

    2011-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae in Spain was monitored, and the underlying molecular mechanisms of resistance were investigated. MICs of tylosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, and tylvalosin were determined for 87 B. hyodysenteriae isolates ...

  4. Clinical Isolates of Measles Virus Use CD46 as a Cellular Receptor†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Marianne; Eto, Danelle S.; Valsamakis, Alexandra; Liton, Paloma B.; Fernandez-Muñoz, Rafael; Rota, Paul A.; Bellini, William J.; Forthal, Donald N.; Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory strains of measles viruses (MV), such as Edmonston and Halle, use the complement regulatory protein CD46 as a cell surface receptor. The receptor usage of clinical isolates of MV, however, remains unclear. Receptor usage by primary patient isolates of MV was compared to isolates that had been passaged on a variety of tissue culture cell lines. All of the isolates could infect cells in a CD46-dependent manner, but their tropism was restricted according to cell type (e.g., lymphocytes versus fibroblasts). The results indicate that patient isolates that have not been adapted to tissue culture cell lines use CD46 as a receptor. In addition, passaging primary MV patient isolates in B95-8 cells selected variants that had alternate receptor usage compared to the original isolate. Thus, changes in receptor usage by MV are dependent upon the cell type used for isolation. Furthermore, our results confirm the relevance of the CD46 receptor to natural measles infection. PMID:10756008

  5. Detection of magA Gene in Klebsiella spp. Isolated from Clinical Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zamani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Klebsiella infections are caused mainly by K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca. In the last two decades, a new type of invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae which contains mucoviscosity-associated gene (magA has emerged. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of magA gene and to detect antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Klebsiella   spp. isolated from clinical samples.     Materials and Methods:   Klebsiella isolates were collected from patients admitted to referral hospitals of Hamadan, Iran, during a 12-month period from 2007 to 2008. The samples were analyzed by conventional microbiological methods and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The hypermucoviscosity (HV phenotype of Klebsiella   isolates was characterized by formation of viscous strings >5 mm as a positive test. The susceptibility of isolates to routine antibiotics was assessed by agar disk diffusion method.   Results: Out of 105 Klebsiella isolates, 96.2% was identified as K. pneumoniae and 3.8% as K. oxytoca by PCR. magA gene was detected in 4 (3.8% isolates of K. pneumoniae. The isolates of K. oxytoca contained no magA gene. From 4 isolates with positive magA gene, two of them were HV+ and two were HV- phenotype. Overall, sixty-four isolates (60.95% of K. pneumoniae   showed an HV positive phenotype and all isolates of K. oxytoca were HV-phenotype. The most effective antibiotics against the isolates were tobramycin (79.05%, ceftazidime (79.05%, ceftizoxime (78.09%, ciprofloxacin (76.19%, ceftriaxone (76.24% and amikacin (74.29%.     Conclusion: The results suggest that there is also magA associated serotype of the K. pneumoniae in this region. In addition, the presence of HV+ phenotype may not be associated with magA   .     I

  6. Clinical analysis of bacterial strain profiles isolated from urinary tract infections: A 30-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Koichiro; Uehara, Shinya; Yamamoto, Masumi; Sadahira, Takuya; Mitsuhata, Ritsuko; Araki, Motoo; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Ayano; Kariyama, Reiko; Watanabe, Toyohiko; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed bacterial strains isolated from urine samples of patients with urinary tract infections (UTI) at Okayama University Hospital over a 30-year period to characterize trends in species and antimicrobial susceptibilities. Clinical isolates were collected from in- and out-patients with pyuria and bacteriuria who were treated between 1984 and 2014 (one episode per patient and plural isolates were counted in polymicrobial infection). We examined these isolates to identify pathogens and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Isolates from complicated UTI over a 30-year period revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) was the most frequently isolated in the first decade (1984-1994), MRSA in the second decade (1995-2004), and Escherichia coli (E. coli) in the latest decade (2005-2014). In uncomplicated UTI examined over 20 years, E. coli was the most frequently isolated species accounting for 47-94% of isolates. Fluoroquinolone (FQs)-insusceptible E. coli were first isolated in 1994 and increased to about 35% in 2013 in patients with complicated UTI. Complicated UTI involving P. aeruginosa and MRSA decreased over the last 10 years. Our data suggest that several factors such as shorter hospitalizations, shorter indwelling catheter use, and appropriate antimicrobial use has decreased colonization of P. aeruginosa and MRSA with relative increases in isolation of E. coli including FQs-insusceptible strains. We must continue our surveillance of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria isolated from urine samples and evaluate antibiograms, since their persistence in the urinary tract would be problematic. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Strain Typing of Clinical Isolates, Trichophyton rubrum using Non Transcribed Spacer (NTS) Region as a Molecular Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaraj, Vijayakumar; Vijayaraman, Rajyoganandh S; Elavarashi, Elangovan; Rangarajan, Sudha; Kindo, Anupma Jyoti

    2017-05-01

    Dermatophytes are a group of fungi which infect keratinized tissues and causes superficial mycoses in humans and animals. The group comprises of three major genera, Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton. Among them Trichophyton rubrum is a predominant anthropophilic fungi which causes chronic infections. Although, the infection is superficial and treatable, reinfection/coinfection causes inflation in the treatment cost. Identifying the source and mode of transmission is essential to prevent its transmission. Accurate discrimination is required to understand the clinical (relapse or reinfection) and epidemiological implications of the genetic heterogeneity of this species. Polymorphism in the Non Transcribed Spacer (NTS) region of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters renders an effective way to discriminate strains among T. rubrum. To carry out the strain typing of the clinical isolates, Trichophyton rubrum using NTS as a molecular marker. Seventy T.rubrum clinical isolates obtained from April-2011-March 2013, from Sri Ramachandra Medical Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India, were identified by conventional phenotypic methods and included in this prospective study. The isolates were then subjected to Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) targeting two subrepeat elements (SREs), TRS-1 and TRS-2 of the NTS region. Strain-specific polymorphism was observed in both subrepeat loci. Total, nine different strains were obtained on combining both TRS-1 and TRS-2, SREs. The outcome has given a strong representation for using NTS region amplification in discriminating the T. rubrum clinical isolates. The method can be adapted as a tool for conducting epidemiology and population based study in T. rubrum infections. This will help in future exploration of the epidemiology of T. rubrum.

  8. Temporal expression and localization patterns of variant surface antigens in clinical Plasmodium falciparum isolates during erythrocyte schizogony.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bachmann

    Full Text Available Avoidance of antibody-mediated immune recognition allows parasites to establish chronic infections and enhances opportunities for transmission. The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses a number of multi-copy gene families, including var, rif, stevor and pfmc-2tm, which encode variant antigens believed to be expressed on the surfaces of infected erythrocytes. However, most studies of these antigens are based on in vitro analyses of culture-adapted isolates, most commonly the laboratory strain 3D7, and thus may not be representative of the unique challenges encountered by P. falciparum in the human host. To investigate the expression of the var, rif-A, rif-B, stevor and pfmc-2tm family genes under conditions that mimic more closely the natural course of infection, ex vivo clinical P. falciparum isolates were analyzed using a novel quantitative real-time PCR approach. Expression patterns in the clinical isolates at various time points during the first intraerythrocytic developmental cycle in vitro were compared to those of strain 3D7. In the clinical isolates, in contrast to strain 3D7, there was a peak of expression of the multi-copy gene families rif-A, stevor and pfmc-2tm at the young ring stage, in addition to the already known expression peak in trophozoites. Furthermore, most of the variant surface antigen families were overexpressed in the clinical isolates relative to 3D7, with the exception of the pfmc-2tm family, expression of which was higher in 3D7 parasites. Immunofluorescence analyses performed in parallel revealed two stage-dependent localization patterns of RIFIN, STEVOR and PfMC-2TM. Proteins were exported into the infected erythrocyte at the young trophozoite stage, whereas they remained inside the parasite membrane during schizont stage and were subsequently observed in different compartments in the merozoite. These results reveal a complex pattern of expression of P. falciparum multi-copy gene families during

  9. A comparison of three media for isolation of Nocardia species from clinical specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyar S

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to compare the efficacy of three media namely Modified Thayer Martin medium, McClung′s carbon free broth with paraffin bait and paraffin agar in isolating Nocardia species from clinical specimens. Two hundred and seventy six clinical specimens from 245 cases were studied which included cases of bronchopulmonary and systemic infections and cases of mycetoma. Paraffin agar was found to be an inexpensive and selective medium for isolation of Nocardia species when compared with Modified Thayer Martin medium and paraffin bait techniques.

  10. Hemolytic activity of Trichomonas gallinae isolates does not correspond with clinical virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Richard W; Yabsley, Michael J; Fischer, John R

    2009-03-23

    The hemolytic activity of 22 Trichomonas gallinae isolates was investigated using an 18h erythrocyte hemolysis assay which has been shown to correlate with the clinical virulence of T. vaginalis. Absorbance of the assay supernatants was measured at 540nm and expressed as percentage of complete hemolysis. Mean hemolytic activity of the T. gallinae isolates ranged from 3.5% to 53.4% and did not correspond with clinical virulence. The results of this investigation suggest hemolytic activity is not a useful in vitro virulence assay for T. gallinae.

  11. Effect of incubation temperature on isolation of cytomegalovirus from fresh clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, W W; Menegus, M A

    1983-10-01

    The sensitivity of WI-38 cell monolayers for the isolation of cytomegalovirus from fresh clinical specimens was reduced by 41% when cultures were incubated at 33 rather than at 36 degrees C. The mean time to initial detection of cytomegalovirus cytopathic effects in cultures incubated at 33 degrees C was 4.3 days later than in cultures incubated at 36 degrees C (4.0 and 5.4 days later for saliva and urine cultures, respectively). Thus, incubation of cultures at 33 degrees C seriously compromises the efficiency with which cytomegalovirus can be isolated from clinical specimens.

  12. Molecular epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria isolates from clinical and environmental sources of a metropolitan city.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Velayati

    Full Text Available While NTM infection is mainly acquired from environmental exposure, monitoring of environmental niches for NTM is not a routine practice. This study aimed to find the prevalence of environmental NTM in soil and water in four highly populated suburbs of Tehran, Iran.A total of 4014 samples from soil and water resources were collected and studied. Sediments of each treated sample were cultured in Lowenstein-Jensen medium and observed twice per week for growth rate, colony morphology, and pigmentation. Colonies were studied with phenotypic tests. Molecular analysis was performed on single colonies derived from subculture of original isolates. Environmental samples were compared with 34 NTM isolates from patients who were residents of the study locations.Out of 4014 samples, mycobacteria were isolated from 862 (21.4% specimens; 536 (62.1% belonged to slow growing mycobacteria (SGM and 326 (37.8% were rapid growing mycobacteria (RGM. The five most frequent NTM were M. farcinogens (105/862; 12.1%, M. fortuitum (72/862; 8.3%, M. senegalense (58/862; 6.7%, M. kansasii (54/862; 6.2%, and M. simiae (46/862; 5.3%. In total, 62.5% (539/862 of mycobacterial positive samples were isolated from water and only 37.4% (323/862 of them were isolated from soil samples (P<0.05. Out of 5314 positive clinical samples for mycobacteria, 175 (3.2% isolates were NTM. The trend of NTM isolates increased from 1.2% (13 out of 1078 in 2004 to 3.8% (39 out of 1005 in 2014 (P = 0.0001. The major clinical isolates were M. simiae (51; 29.1%, M. kansasii (26; 14.8%, M. chelonae (28; 16%, and M. fortuitum (13; 7.4%.Comparing the distribution pattern of environmental NTM isolates with clinical isolates suggests a possible transmission link, but this does not apply to all environmental NTM species. Our study confirms an increasing trend of NTM isolation from clinical samples that needs further investigation.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Bovine Mastitis and Close Human Contacts in South African Dairy Herds: Genetic Diversity and Inter-Species Host Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tracy; Kock, Marleen M.; Ehlers, Marthie M.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common etiological agents of contagious bovine mastitis worldwide. The purpose of this study was to genetically characterize a collection of S. aureus isolates (bovine = 146, human = 12) recovered from cases of bovine mastitis and nasal swabs of close human contacts in the dairy environment. Isolates were screened for a combination of clinically significant antimicrobial and virulence gene markers whilst the molecular epidemiology of these isolates and possible inter-species host transmission was investigated using a combination of genotyping techniques. None of the isolates under evaluation tested positive for methicillin or vancomycin resistance encoding genes. Twenty seven percent of the bovine S. aureus isolates tested positive for one or more of the pyrogenic toxin superantigen (PTSAg) genes with the sec and sell genes predominating. Comparatively, 83% of the human S. aureus isolates tested positive for one or more PTSAg genes with a greater variety of genes being detected. Genomic DNA macrorestriction followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of the bovine isolates generated 58 electrophoretic patterns which grouped into 10 pulsotypes at an 80% similarity level. The majority of the bovine isolates, 93.2% (136/146), clustered into four major pulsotypes. Seven sequence types (ST) were identified among the representative bovine S. aureus isolates genotyped, including: ST8 (CC8), ST97 (CC97), ST351 (CC705), ST352 (CC97), ST508 (CC45), ST2992 (CC97) and a novel sequence type, ST3538 (CC97). Based on PFGE analysis, greater genetic diversity was observed among the human S. aureus isolates. Bovine and human isolates from three sampling sites clustered together and were genotypically indistinguishable. Two of the isolates, ST97 and ST352 belong to the common bovine lineage CC97, and their isolation from close human contacts suggests zoonotic transfer. In the context of this study, the third isolate, ST8 (CC8), is

  14. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium breve CECT 7263, a strain isolated from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Esther; Villar-Tajadura, M Antonia; Marín, María; Fontecha, Javier; Requena, Teresa; Arroyo, Rebeca; Fernández, Leónides; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2012-07-01

    Bifidobacterium breve is an actinobacterium frequently isolated from colonic microbiota of breastfeeding babies. Here, we report the complete and annotated genome sequence of a B. breve strain isolated from human milk, B. breve CECT 7263. The genome sequence will provide new insights into the biology of this potential probiotic organism and will allow the characterization of genes related to beneficial properties.

  15. New Actinomyces and Streptococcus coaggregation groups among human oral isolates from the same site.

    OpenAIRE

    Kolenbrander, P E; Inouye, Y.; Holdeman, L V

    1983-01-01

    The coaggregation properties of recent human oral streptococcal and actinomyces isolates from the same site were determined and compared with the coaggregation properties of well-characterized stock strains of these two kinds of bacteria. Streptococcus sanguis, Actinomyces viscosus, Actinomyces naeslundii, and phenotypically similar strains of actinomyces were isolated from subgingival samples from periodontally healthy older individuals, from persons participating in an experimental gingivit...

  16. Frederiksenia canicola gen. nov., sp. nov. isolated from dogs and human dog-bite wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korczak, Bożena M.; Bisgaard, Magne; Christensen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Polyphasic analysis was done on 24 strains of Bisgaard taxon 16 from five European countries and mainly isolated from dogs and human dog-bite wounds. The isolates represented a phenotypically and genetically homogenous group within the family Pasteurellaceae. Their phenotypic profile was similar...

  17. Isolation and purification of plasma albumin from human blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dried isolated plasma albumin was further characterized for purity using protein analysis, optical rotation, solubility and denaturation tests. The results show the plasma album contained 63.67% protein , with specific rotation at[á]598 32 at pH 7.2 of 80 and gradually dissolved in acidified water and ethanol. The plasma ...

  18. Sequence-based identification, genotyping and EUCAST antifungal susceptibilities of Trichosporon clinical isolates from Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabatzis, M; Abel, P; Kanellopoulou, M; Adamou, D; Alexandrou-Athanasoulis, H; Stathi, A; Platsouka, E; Milioni, A; Pangalis, A; Velegraki, A

    2014-08-01

    Trichosporon yeasts constitute emerging pathogens, implicated in organ-specific and systemic infections. In this first, comprehensive study of Trichosporon clinical isolates in Greece, 42 isolates were identified by sequencing the hypervariable D1/D2 domain of the Large Subunit (LSU) rDNA gene, while Trichosporon asahii were genotyped by sequencing the Intergenic Spacer 1 region, and antifungal susceptibilities were determined by the EDef 7.2 (EUCAST) method, in parallel with the CLSI standard. Trichosporon asahii was the primary species (37 isolates) followed by Trichosporon coremiiforme, Trichosporon dermatis, Trichosporon loubieri and Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans. One strain remained unidentified. Seven T. asahii genotypes were recorded. The major genotypes were: genotypes 4 (29%) and 3 (26%) followed by 1, 5 and 7 (9.5% each). Two novel genotypes were identified designated as 10 and 11. EUCAST MIC ≥2 mg/L was recorded in 58% of the isolates (amphotericin B), 41% (itraconazole), 41% (posaconazole) and 38% (voriconazole). Fluconazole MICs of ≥32 mg/L were recorded in 23.8% of the isolates. Analysis of variance performed on absolute values showed that the amphotericin B, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole MICs of T. asahii were equivalent. Typically higher MIC values were displayed by fluconazole. Antifungal susceptibilities of the seven different genotypes were homogeneous. Agreements between EUCAST and CLSI ranged from 88.1 to 97.62%. Overall, the high MICs recorded among the Trichosporon isolates for all tested drugs justify routine susceptibility testing of clinical isolates. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  19. A novel functional class 2 integron in clinical Proteus mirabilis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Quhao; Hu, Qingfeng; Li, Shanshan; Lu, Huoyang; Chen, Guoqiang; Shen, Beiqiong; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Yonglie

    2014-04-01

    To describe a novel functional class 2 integron that was found in clinical Proteus mirabilis isolates. Class 1 and 2 integrons were screened by PCR in 153 clinical Proteus isolates. The variable regions of class 1 and 2 integrons were determined by restriction analysis and sequencing. The mutations of internal stop codons in class 2 integrons and their common promoters were also determined by sequencing. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR was used to analyse the phylogenetic relations of class 2 integron-positive P. mirabilis isolates. Class 1 integrons were detected in 96 (63%) of 153 Proteus isolates: eight different gene cassette arrays were detected, including dfrA32-ereA1-aadA2, which was detected for the first time in P. mirabilis. Class 2 integrons were detected in 101 (66%) of 153 Proteus isolates: four different gene cassette arrays were detected, including dfrA1-catB2-sat2-aadA1, which was detected for the first time in a class 2 integron. A novel functional class 2 integron was detected in 38 P. mirabilis isolates with a common promoter (-35 TTTAAT|16 bp|-10 TAAAGT). The variable region of this functional class 2 integron contained dfrA14 and three novel open reading frames with unknown functions. Very similar ERIC-PCR fingerprinting patterns were detected in these 38 P. mirabilis isolates and were different from other class 2 integron-positive isolates. A novel functional class 2 integron was found for the first time in P. mirabilis. These functional class 2 integron-harbouring P. mirabilis isolates were likely to be clonally spread in our hospital.

  20. Molecular typing of Brucella species isolates from Human and livestock bloods in Isfahan province

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    Ebtehaj Pishva

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings confirm abundance of B. melitensis, particularly biovar 1 in human and sheep are identical but B. abortus biovar 3 as the etiological agent of cattle brucellosis most frequently isolated in the Isfahan area.

  1. Inotropic effects of propofol, thiopental, midazolam, etomidate, and ketamine on isolate human atrial muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelissen, HPMM; Epema, AH; Henning, RH; Krijnen, HJ; Hennis, PJ; denHertog, A

    Background: Cardiovascular instability after intravenous induction of anesthesia may be explained partly by direct negative inotropic effects. The direct inotropic influence of etomidate, ketamine, midazolam, propofol, and thiopental on the contractility of isolated human atrial tissue was

  2. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium catenulatum JCM 1194(T) isolated from human feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Nakano, Akiyo; Yamashita, Naoko; Iioka, Erica; Arakawa, Kensuke; Suda, Wataru; Honda, Kenya; Hattori, Masahira

    2015-09-20

    Bifidobacterium catenulatum JCM 1194(T) was isolated from human feces. This paper is the first report demonstrating the fully sequenced and completely annotated genome of a B. catenulatum strain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrochemical sensors for identifying pyocyanin production in clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismaet, Hunter J; Pinto, Ameet J; Goluch, Edgar D

    2017-11-15

    In clinical practice, delays in obtaining culture results impact patient care and the ability to tailor antibiotic therapy. Despite the advancement of rapid molecular diagnostics, the use of plate cultures inoculated from swab samples continues to be the standard practice in clinical care. Because the inoculation culture process can take between 24 and 48h before a positive identification test can be run, there is an unmet need to develop rapid throughput methods for bacterial identification. Previous work has shown that pyocyanin can be used as a rapid, redox-active biomarker for identifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical infections. However, further validation is needed to confirm pyocyanin production occurs in all clinical strains of P. aeruginosa. Here, we validate this electrochemical detection strategy using clinical isolates obtained from patients with hospital-acquired infections or with cystic fibrosis. Square-wave voltammetric scans of 94 different clinical P. aeruginosa isolates were taken to measure the concentration of pyocyanin. The results showed that all isolates produced measureable concentrations of pyocyanin with production rates correlated with patient symptoms and comorbidity. Further bioinformatics analysis confirmed that 1649 genetically sequenced strains (99.9%) of P. aeruginosa possess the two genes (PhzM and PhzS) necessary to produce pyocyanin, supporting the specificity of this biomarker. Confirming the production of pyocyanin by all clinically-relevant strains of P. aeruginosa is a significant step towards validating this strategy for rapid, point-of-care diagnostics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mapping the carriage of flaA-restriction fragment length polymorphism Campylobacter genotypes on poultry carcasses through the processing chain and comparison to clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Lesley L; Blackall, Patrick J; Cobbold, Rowland N; Fegan, Narelle

    2015-06-01

    Poultry are considered a major source for campylobacteriosis in humans. A total of 1866 Campylobacter spp. isolates collected through the poultry processing chain were typed using flaA-restriction fragment length polymorphism to measure the impact of processing on the genotypes present. Temporally related human clinical isolates (n = 497) were also typed. Isolates were obtained from whole chicken carcass rinses of chickens collected before scalding, after scalding, before immersion chilling, after immersion chilling and after packaging as well as from individual caecal samples. A total of 32 genotypes comprising at least four isolates each were recognised. Simpson's Index of Diversity (D) was calculated for each sampling site within each flock, for each flock as a whole and for the clinical isolates. From caecal collection to after packaging samples the D value did not change in two flocks, decreased in one flock and increased in the fourth flock. Dominant genotypes occurred in each flock but their constitutive percentages changed through processing. There were 23 overlapping genotypes between clinical and chicken isolates. The diversity of Campylobacter is flock dependant and may alter through processing. This study confirms that poultry are a source of campylobacteriosis in the Australian population although other sources may contribute. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High frequency of macrolide resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of Corynebacterium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Pérez, Alberto; Martín-de-Hijas, Nieves Z; Esteban, Jaime; Fernández-Natal, María Isabel; García-Cía, José Ignacio; Fernández-Roblas, Ricardo

    2010-12-01

    The genus Corynebacterium includes a high number of species that are usually isolated from human skin as saprophytes. However, these microorganisms have also been reported as infectious agents in a broad group of patients and have showed broad-spectrum resistance. We studied the susceptibility profiles against macrolides, clindamycin, and streptogramins of 254 clinical strains belonging to the species Corynebacterium urealyticum (120), Corynebacterium amycolatum (66), Corynebacterium jeikeium (17), Corynebacterium striatum (20), Corynebacterium coyleae (12), Corynebacterium aurimucosum (11), and Corynebacterium afermentans subsp. afermentans (8). The MLS(B) phenotype was detected in 186 strains and was associated with the presence of methylase enzymes codified by the erm(X) gene in 171 strains. The erm(B) gene was only detected in two C. urealyticum strains. Fourteen strains showed macrolide resistance, but they did not carry erm genes. mef genes were not detected despite eight C. amycolatum strains showed the M phenotype. Also, the presence of hydrolytic enzymes codified by ere(B) was evaluated, but all results were negative. Resistance to macrolide in Corynebacterium sp. is mainly due to the presence of erm(X) methylase, although other resistance mechanisms could be involved.

  6. Detection and characterization of plasminogen receptors on clinical isolates of Trichosporon asahii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Reiko; Ichikawa, Tomoe; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Shimizu, Nanaho; Ryoke, Tomomi; Haru, Kunihiko; Sugita, Takashi; Takashima, Masako

    2014-12-01

    Trichosporon asahii is the major causative agent of deep-seated trichosporonosis. The virulence factors of this yeast pathogen remain uncharacterized. To investigate the pathogenicity of T. asahii, we focused on the interactions between surface molecules of the yeast and host biomolecules. We examined the ability of surface molecules to bind human plasminogen using clinical isolates of T. asahii. Living T. asahii cells accelerated the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of tissue plasminogen activator. Extracts from cells using lithium chloride contained plasminogen-binding molecules based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses. In all strains tested, several of the fractions obtained using DEAE column chromatography bound and accelerated the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Based on far-Western blotting analyses, a common protein was identified within the four strains, which was identified as a hypothetical protein from genome analyses of T. asahii. blast searches suggested the protein might be heparinase, and heparinase activity was detected in the T. asahii extract. Furthermore, affinity chromatography using plasminogen as a ligand detected one protein band by SDS-PAGE, which was identified as thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase.SPR analyses suggested the presence of molecules on T. asahii cells that could bind plasminogen with differing affinities. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Data in support of proteomic analysis of pneumococcal pediatric clinical isolates to construct a protein array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Olaya-Abril

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface proteins play key roles in the interaction between cells and their environment, and in pathogenic microorganisms they are the best targets for drug or vaccine discovery and/or development. In addition, surface proteins can be the basis for serodiagnostic tools aiming at developing more affordable techniques for early diagnosis of infection in patients. We carried out a proteomic analysis of a collection of pediatric clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen responsible for more than 1.5 million child deaths worldwide. For that, cultured live bacterial cells were “shaved” with trypsin, and the recovered peptides were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. We selected 95 proteins to be produced as recombinant polypeptides, and printed them on an array. We probed the protein array with a collection of patient sera to define serodiagnostic antigens. The mass spectrometry proteomics data correspond to those published in [1] and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium [2] via the PRIDE partner repository [3] with the dataset identifier PXD001740. The protein array raw data are provided as supplemental material in this article.

  8. Endophytic Nocardiopsis sp. from Zingiber officinale with both antiphytopathogenic mechanisms and antibiofilm activity against clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabu, Rohini; Soumya, K R; Radhakrishnan, E K

    2017-06-01

    Novel and potential antimicrobial compounds are essential to tackle the frequently emerging multidrug-resistant pathogens and also to develop environment friendly agricultural practices. In the current study, endophytic actinomycetes from rhizome of Zingiber officinale were explored in terms of its diversity and bioactive properties. Fourteen different organisms were isolated, identified and screened for activity against Pythium myriotylum and human clinical pathogens. Among these, Nocardiopsis sp. ZoA1 was found to have highest inhibition with excellent antibacterial effects compared to standard antibiotics. Remarkable antibiofilm property was also shown by the extract of ZoA1. Its antifungal activity against Pythium and other common phytopathogens was also found to be promising as confirmed by scanning electron microscopic analysis. By PCR-based sequence analysis of phz E gene, the organism was confirmed for the genetic basis of phenazine biosynthesis. Further GC-MS analysis of Nocardiopsis sp. revealed the presence of various compounds including Phenol, 2,4-bis (1,1-dimethylethyl) and trans cinnamic acid which can have significant role in the observed result. The current study is the first report on endophytic Nocardiopsis sp. from ginger with promising applications. In vivo treatment of Nocardiopsis sp. on ginger rhizome has revealed its inhibition towards the colonization of P. myriotylum which makes the study to have promises to manage the severe diseases in ginger like rhizome rot.

  9. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of invasive neonatal Escherichia coli clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Salika Mehreen; Goldbeck, Jessica Marie; Robison, Denise; Eckerd, Annette Marie; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of neonates with Escherichia coli bacteremia and the antibiotic resistance pattern of the bacterial isolates. We assessed the isolates' genetic relatedness and virulence phenotypic characteristics in vitro. A total of 24 neonates with E. coli bacteremia were identified prospectively in a tertiary-care hospital. Clinical and antibiotic resistance data were investigated. The E. coli isolates were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST); the presence of the K1 capsule and their ability to invade intestinal epithelial cells were also assessed. Most newborns were very low birth weight infants. Overall, 75% of the isolates were ampicillin resistant and 17% were gentamicin and tobramycin nonsusceptible. MLST determined sequence types 95 and 131 (ST95 and ST131) predominated, with ST131 becoming significantly more prevalent recently. The K1 capsule was present in 50% of the isolates. ST131 isolates and those producing bacteremia in newborns younger than 7 days showed a highly invasive phenotype. Resistance to antibiotics currently used empirically to treat newborns is present in bacteremia-producing E. coli. Clonal spread among newborns of multidrug-resistant E. coli is possible; therefore, continued surveillance is needed. Identification of additional virulence factors associated with increased invasion in neonatal E. coli strains is important and further studies are warranted. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Assessment of AmpC Beta-Lactamase Genes among Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

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    HedrooshaMolla Agha-Mirzaeie

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: AmpC bta lactamases play a significant role in creating resistance to third generation cephalosporins worldwide. They mostly express on chromosome of Enterobacteriaceae especially Escherichia coli and cause consequential problem inclinical treatment and lead to failure in diagnosis and phenotypic test recommended byClinical and Laboratory Standards Institute.Methods:Totally 200 E. coli isolates from different hospitals of Tehran were collected. The isolates were screened by disk diffusion method according to the CLSI guidelines. The profiles and prevalence surveys of AmpC (Dha, CITM, Mox and FOX-type β-lactamase genes in clinical isolates of E. coli by phenotypic and molecular methods.  Results:Out of 200 Ecoli isolated, 115 (89.8% and 13 (10.2% isolates were identified as ESBL- and AmpC- beta-lactamase producers, respectively. Among mpC producers, 13 (100% and 5 (38.5% isolates was reported by PCR assay as bla-CITM and Dha respectively. Mox and FOX genes were not detected in any sample.Conclusions:Our results highlight the importance of using molecular detection methods to identify β-lactamase-producer that have resistance to antibiotics. 

  11. Occurrence of class 1 integrons in uropathogenic fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical Escherichia coli isolates from Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Stacy A M; Brown, Paul D

    2013-03-01

    Quinolone resistance is generally caused by chromosomal mutations, but has been more recently found associated with the plasmid-mediated qnr genes. The objective of this study was to screen and analyse polymorphisms of integrons in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli in Jamaica. Previous studies in Jamaica identified fluoroquinolone resistance in predominantly uropathogenic E. coli clinical isolates: 45% harbouring qnrA, qnrB and/or qnrS, and 17% were (Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase) ESBL-producers. These isolates were analysed for the presence and variation of class 1 and 2 integrase genes, 5'- and 3'- conserved segments and the Orf513 recombinase gene by primer-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP). Results indicated integron-encoded integrases in 93% of isolates primarily harbouring class 1 integrase genes; four of 58 isolates carried both classes. The Orf513 and 5'- and 3'-conserved segment (CS) regions were identified in 83% and 55% of the isolates respectively. RFLP evaluation of the 5'- and 3'-CS regions in int1-positive strains yielded two main types. The reduced diversity, but wide dispersion of class 1 integrons harbouring qnr genes may give rise to the conservation of the mobile genetic elements in which they are carried. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  12. Antimicrobial resistance in clinical Escherichia coli isolates from poultry and livestock, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Afrah Kamal; Gong, Jiansen; Kelly, Patrick; Lu, Guangwu; Guardabassi, Luca; Wei, Lanjing; Han, Xiangan; Qiu, Haixiang; Price, Stuart; Cheng, Darong; Wang, Chengming

    2017-01-01

    Poultry and livestock are the most important reservoirs for pathogenic Escherichia coli and use of antimicrobials in animal farming is considered the most important factor promoting the emergence, selection and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms. The aim of our study was to investigate antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolated from food animals in Jiangsu, China. The disc diffusion method was used to determine susceptibility to 18 antimicrobial agents in 862 clinical isolates collected from chickens, ducks, pigs, and cows between 2004 and 2012. Overall, 94% of the isolates showed resistance to at least one drug with 83% being resistance to at least three different classes of antimicrobials. The isolates from the different species were most commonly resistant to tetracycline, nalidixic acid, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and ampicillin, and showed increasing resistance to amikacin, aztreonam, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin. They were least resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (3.4%) and ertapenem (0.2%). MDR was most common in isolates from ducks (44/44, 100%), followed by chickens (568/644, 88.2%), pigs (93/113, 82.3%) and cows (13/61, 21.3%). Our finding that clinical E. coli isolates from poultry and livestock are commonly resistant to multiple antibiotics should alert public health and veterinary authorities to limit and rationalize antimicrobial use in China.

  13. Carbapenem nonsusceptibility with modifiedOprDin clinical isolates ofPseudomonas aeruginosafrom India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Debarati; Talukdar, Anupam Das; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Chanda, Debadatta Dhar; Chakravorty, Atanu; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2017-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate OprD porin-mediated carbapenem nonsusceptibility in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of Northeast India. A total of 267 nonduplicate, consecutive clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained. Mutation and expression levels of OprD gene were determined in carbapenem-nonsusceptible carbapenemase-nonproducing isolates. Among 19 carbapenem-nonsusceptible carbapenemase-nonproducing isolates, 11 of them demonstrated variable band pattern while performing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with amplified products of OprD gene. Sequencing of variable band products revealed three mutation patterns in three isolates. Relevant decrease in expression of OprD gene could also be observed in them. All the three isolates exhibited a higher minimum inhibitory concentration for imipenem (64-128 μg/mL) compared to meropenem (16-64 μg/mL). Inactivating mutation and decreased expression of OprD contribute mainly to imipenem resistance as well as to meropenem.

  14. Carbapenem nonsusceptibility with modified OprD in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarati Choudhury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate OprD porin-mediated carbapenem nonsusceptibility in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of Northeast India. A total of 267 nonduplicate, consecutive clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained. Mutation and expression levels of OprD gene were determined in carbapenem-nonsusceptible carbapenemase-nonproducing isolates. Among 19 carbapenem-nonsusceptible carbapenemase-nonproducing isolates, 11 of them demonstrated variable band pattern while performing denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with amplified products of OprD gene. Sequencing of variable band products revealed three mutation patterns in three isolates. Relevant decrease in expression of OprD gene could also be observed in them. All the three isolates exhibited a higher minimum inhibitory concentration for imipenem (64–128 μg/mL compared to meropenem (16–64 μg/mL. Inactivating mutation and decreased expression of OprD contribute mainly to imipenem resistance as well as to meropenem.

  15. Synthetic Organotellurium Compounds Sensitize Drug-Resistant Candida albicans Clinical Isolates to Fluconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis de Sá, L F; Toledo, F T; Gonçalves, A C; Sousa, B A; Dos Santos, A A; Brasil, P F; Duarte da Silva, V A; Tessis, A C; Ramos, J A; Carvalho, M A; Lamping, E; Ferreira-Pereira, A

    2017-01-01

    Invasive Candida albicans infections are a serious health threat for immunocompromised individuals. Fluconazole is most commonly used to treat these infections, but resistance due to the overexpression of multidrug efflux pumps is of grave concern. This study evaluated the ability of five synthetic organotellurium compounds to reverse the fluconazole resistance of C. albicans clinical isolates. Compounds 1 to 4, at fluconazole resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing the major C. albicans multidrug efflux pumps Cdr1p and Mdr1p, whereas compound 5 only sensitized Mdr1p-overexpressing strains to fluconazole. Compounds 1 to 4 also inhibited efflux of the fluorescent substrate rhodamine 6G and the ATPase activity of Cdr1p, whereas all five of compounds 1 to 5 inhibited Nile red efflux by Mdr1p. Interestingly, all five compounds demonstrated synergy with fluconazole against efflux pump-overexpressing fluconazole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, isolate 95-142 overexpressing CDR1 and CDR2, isolate 96-25 overexpressing MDR1 and ERG11, and isolate 12-99 overexpressing CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, and ERG11 Overall, organotellurium compounds 1 and 2 were the most promising fluconazole chemosensitizers of fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates. Our data suggest that these novel organotellurium compounds inhibit pump efflux by two very important and distinct families of fungal multidrug efflux pumps: the ATP-binding cassette transporter Cdr1p and the major facilitator superfamily transporter Mdr1p. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Slime production and antibiotic susceptibility in staphylococci isolated from clinical samples

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    Seza Arslan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 187 isolates from several clinical specimens were identified to species level as 129 Staphylococcus aureus strains and 58 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS strains by the API Staph System (Biomerieux. Slime production was detected both by the conventional Christensen's method as well as by the Congo red agar method. Seventy-two strains of staphylococci isolates (38.5% were found to be slime producers by Christensen's test tube method whereas 58 strains (31% were slime positive with Congo red agar method. There was no statistically significant difference between the two methods for the detection of slime production (P > 0.05. Susceptibility of isolates against antimicrobial agents was tested by the disk diffusion method. Staphylococcal species had resistance to one or more antibiotics. Among the various antimicrobial agents, oxacillin (71.1% and erythromycin (47.1% showed higher resistance than most of the agents used against all isolates. Oxacillin resistant S. aureus (ORSA and oxacillin resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (ORCNS, 97 (75.2% and 36 (62.1% respectively were frequently observed in strains isolated from clinical materials. Among the ORSA strains, two strains were resistant to vancomycin. Moreover, 96 (74.4% of 129 S. aureus strains were positive for blactamase enzyme. However, 78 (81.25% of 96 b-lactamase positive S. aureus strains were b-lactamase positive ORSA isolates, but none of them had vancomycin resistance.

  17. First report on bla NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in three clinical isolates from Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritsch, Michael; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Messerer, Maxim; Baumer, Simon; Liegl, Gabriele; Schubert, Soeren; Löscher, Thomas; Hoelscher, Michael; Belachew, Tefara; Rachow, Andrea; Wieser, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections are recognized as one of the major threats to global health. In this study, we describe for the first time bla NDM-1 gene carrying organisms from Ethiopia consisting of three Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from patients in Jimma. Besides phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular strain typing and sequencing was performed to describe the phylogenetic relation of the Ethiopian isolates in detail in relation to published isolates from all over the globe. Three multi-resistant, bla NDM-1-positive Acinetobacter baumannii isolates, most likely a local clonal diffusion, were isolated. Two of the three isolates described within this study were untreatable with the locally available antimicrobials and were only susceptible to polymyxin B and amikacin. The genome sequences confirmed the isolates to be distinct from the outbreak strains reported from Kenya, the only other characterized bla NDM-1 positive Acinetobacter baumannii strains in East Africa so far. Up to date, no other bacterial species were found to harbour the gene cassette in Jimma and conjugation to E. coli was not successful under laboratory conditions. However, natural transmission to other bacteria seems likely, given the evident lack of hygienic precautions due to limited resource settings. The detected isolates could solely be the tip of the iceberg regarding the presence of NDM-1 producing organisms in the region, as only a limited number of bacterial isolates were evaluated so far and until recently, susceptibility testing and isolation of bacteria could hardly be performed in clinical patient care. These multi-drug resistant organisms pose a serious threat to antimicrobial treatments in Jimma, Ethiopia.

  18. Differential phenotypic diversity among epidemic-spanning Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis isolates from humans or animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Lucía; Betancor, Laura; Martinez, Arací; Giossa, Gerardo; Bryant, Clare; Maskell, Duncan; Chabalgoity, Jose A

    2010-10-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonellae are major causes of food-borne disease worldwide. In Uruguay, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was the most commonly isolated serovar throughout the last decade, with a marked epidemic period between 1995 and 2004. In a previous study, we conducted comparative genomics of 29 epidemic-spanning S. Enteritidis field isolates, and here we evaluated the pathogenic potential of the same set of isolates using several phenotypic assays. The sample included 15 isolates from human gastroenteritis, 5 from invasive disease, and 9 from nonhuman sources. Contrary to the genetic homogeneity previously observed, we found great phenotypic variability among these isolates. One-third of them were defective in at least one assay, namely, 10 isolates were defective in motility, 8 in invasion of Caco-2 cells, and 10 in survival in egg albumen. Twelve isolates were tested for invasiveness in 3-day-old chickens, and five of these were significantly less invasive than the reference strain. The two oldest preepidemic isolates were reduced in fitness in all assays, providing a plausible explanation for the previous negligible incidence of S. Enteritidis in Uruguay and supporting the view that the introduction or emergence of a more virulent strain was responsible for the marked rise of this serovar. Further, we found differences in fitness among the isolates which depended on the source of isolation. A total of 1 out of 14 isolates from human gastroenteritis, but 6 out of 13 isolates from other sources, was impaired in at least two assays, suggesting enhanced fitness among strains able to cause intestinal disease in humans.

  19. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Neoscytalidium dimidiatum Clinical Isolates from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jasper Elvin; Santhanam, Jacinta; Lee, Mei Chen; Wong, Choon Xian; Sabaratnam, Parameswari; Yusoff, Hamidah; Tzar, Mohd Nizam; Razak, Mohd Fuat Abdul

    2017-04-01

    Neoscytalidium dimidiatum is an opportunistic fungus causing cutaneous infections mostly, which are difficult to treat due to antifungal resistance. In Malaysia, N. dimidiatum is associated with skin and nail infections, especially in the elderly. These infections may be mistaken for dermatophyte infections due to similar clinical appearance. In this study, Neoscytalidium isolates from cutaneous specimens, identified using morphological and molecular methods (28 Neoscytalidium dimidiatum and 1 Neoscytalidium sp.), were evaluated for susceptibility towards antifungal agents using the CLSI broth microdilution (M38-A2) and Etest methods. Amphotericin B, voriconazole, miconazole and clotrimazole showed high in vitro activity against all isolates with MIC ranging from 0.0313 to 1 µg/mL. Susceptibility towards fluconazole and itraconazole was noted in up to 10% of isolates, while ketoconazole was inactive against all isolates. Clinical breakpoints for antifungal drugs are not yet available for most filamentous fungi, including Neoscytalidium species. However, the results indicate that clinical isolates of N. dimidiatum in Malaysia were sensitive towards miconazole, clotrimazole, voriconazole and amphotericin B, in vitro.

  20. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Takashi; Enokida, Hideki; Hayami, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Motoshi; Nakagawa, Masayuki

    2012-04-01

    Coincident with their worldwide use, resistance to fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli has increased. To identify the gene expression profiles underlying fluoroquinolone resistance, we carried out genome-wide transcriptome analysis of fluoroquinolone-sensitive E. coli. Four fluoroquinolone-sensitive E. coli and five fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli clinical isolates were subjected to complementary deoxyribonucleic acid microarray analysis. Some upregulated genes' expression was verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction using 104 E. coli clinical isolates, and minimum inhibitory concentration tests were carried out by using their transformants. A total of 40 genes were significantly upregulated in fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates (P operons, which are involved in biofilm formation, was markedly upregulated in our profile of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. One of the phage shock protein operons, pspC, was significantly upregulated in 50 fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates (P operons involved in biofilm formation, were markedly downregulated in fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Deoxyribonucleic acid adenine methyltransferase (dam), which represses type I fimbriae genes, was significantly upregulated in the clinical fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates (P = 0.007). We established pspC- and dam-expressing E. coli transformants from fluoroquinolone-sensitive E. coli, and the minimum inhibitory concentration tests showed that the transformants acquired fluoroquinolone resistance, suggesting that upregulation of these genes contributes to acquiring fluoroquinolone resistance. Upregulation of psp operones and dam underlying pilus operons downregulation might be associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli. © 2011 The Japanese Urological Association.

  1. Emergence of Oxacillinases in Environmental Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Associated with Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Hrenovic, Jasna; Kovacic, Ana; Musić, Martina Šeruga

    2016-10-01

    Six carbapenem-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii were recovered from untreated and treated municipal wastewater of the capital city of Zagreb, Croatia. Molecular identification of environmental isolates of A. baumannii was performed by amplification, sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses of rpoB gene. The presence of blaOXA genes encoding OXA-type carbapenemases (OXA-51-like, OXA-23, and OXA-40-like) was confirmed by multiplex PCR and sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses corroborated the affiliation of detected blaOXA genes to three different clusters and showed association of environmental OXAs with those described from clinical isolates. This result suggests that isolates recovered from municipal wastewater are most probably of clinical origin. Furthermore, the presence of OXA-40-like (OXA-72) in an environmental A. baumannii isolate is reported for the first time. Persistence of A. baumannii harboring the clinically important OXAs in the wastewater treatment process poses a potentially significant source for horizontal gene transfer and implications for wider spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  2. Clinical and Diagnostic Aspects of Brucellosis and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Brucella Isolates in Hamedan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkaman Asadi, Fatemeh; Hashemi, Seyyed Hamid; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Naseri, Zahra

    2017-05-24

    Current drug regimens for brucellosis are associated with relatively high rates of therapeutic failure or relapse. Reduced antimicrobial susceptibility of Brucella spp. has been proposed recently as a potential cause of therapeutic failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic resistance pattern of Brucella melitensis clinical isolates by E-test method in Hamadan, west of Iran. In a 15-month period, all patients with suspected brucellosis were enrolled. Blood specimens were collected for diagnosis of brucellosis by BACTEC system and serological tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates to 7 antibiotics was assessed by the E-test method. One hundred forty-nine patients with brucellosis were evaluated. 38.3% of cultures of clinical samples were positive for BACTEC system, of which 91.2% were associated with a positive serological test result. No significant associations were found between serology and the culture method. All Brucella isolates were susceptible to doxycycline, streptomycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and moxifloxacin. However, decreased sensitivity to rifampin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was found in 35.1% and 3.5% of isolates, respectively. Because of the high rates of intermediate sensitivity to rifampin among Brucella isolates, this drug should be prescribed with caution. We recommend restricting the use of rifampin for treatment of brucellosis except as an alternative drug for special situations.

  3. In vitro and in vivo intracellular killing effects of tigecycline against clinical nontyphoid Salmonella isolates using ceftriaxone as a comparator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chen, Chi-Chung; Chen, Po-Lin; Toh, Han Siong; Weng, Tzu Chieh; Yu, Wen-Liang; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Chuang, Yin-Ching

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella is an important, worldwide food-borne pathogen. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins has been increasingly reported, and new therapeutic agents are desperately needed. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical nontyphoidal Salmonella isolates to tigecycline. Antibacterial activity of tigecycline, ceftriaxone, and ciprofloxacin were investigated by time-kill studies and the murine peritonitis model. The MIC₅₀/MIC₉₀ values of tigecycline, ceftriaxone, and ciprofloxacin against 76 Salmonella isolates were 0.25/0.5, 1/8, and 0.125/0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The intracellular inhibitory activity of tigecycline at 0.5 μg/ml (1 × MIC) against Salmonella isolates in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was sustained for 24 h. In a mouse peritonitis model, tigecycline reduced the extracellular and intracellular bacterial counts from 10⁷ CFU/ml and 10⁵ CFU/ml, respectively, to an undetectable level within 96 h. The results were similar to those obtained with ceftriaxone. The survival rate of mice exposed to tigecycline after being infected by an inoculum of 1 × 10⁵ CFU was 80%, and that of mice exposed to ceftriaxone was 100%. When the inoculum was increased to 1.3 × 10⁶ CFU, the survival rate of mice treated by tigecycline was 20%, and that of mice exposed to ceftriaxone was 0% (P = 0.2). When a ceftriaxone- and ciprofloxacin-resistant but tigecycline-susceptible isolate was tested, mice treated by tigecycline had a higher survival rate than those treated by ceftriaxone (15/20 [75%] versus 6/20 [30%]; P = 0.011). Our results suggest that tigecycline is at least as effective as ceftriaxone for murine Salmonella infections and warrants further clinical investigations to delineate its potential against human Salmonella infections.

  4. Lipooligosaccharide locus classes and putative virulence genes among chicken and human Campylobacter jejuni isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellström, Patrik; Hansson, Ingrid; Nilsson, Anna; Rautelin, Hilpi; Olsson Engvall, Eva

    2016-11-21

    Campylobacter cause morbidity and considerable economic loss due to hospitalization and post infectious sequelae such as reactive arthritis, Guillain Barré- and Miller Fischer syndromes. Such sequelae have been linked to C. jejuni harboring sialic acid structures in their lipooligosaccharide (LOS) layer of the cell wall. Poultry is an important source of human Campylobacter infections but little is known about the prevalence of sialylated C. jejuni isolates and the extent of transmission of such isolates to humans. Genotypes of C. jejuni isolates from enteritis patients were compared with those of broiler chicken with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), to study the patterns of LOS biosynthesis genes and other virulence associated genes and to what extent these occur among Campylobacter genotypes found both in humans and chickens. Chicken and human isolates generally had similar distributions of the putative virulence genes and LOS locus classes studied. However, there were significant differences regarding LOS locus class of PFGE types that were overlapping between chicken and human isolates and those that were distinct to each source. The study highlights the prevalence of virulence associated genes among Campylobacter isolates from humans and chickens and suggests possible patterns of transmission between the two species.

  5. Isolation and identification of stem cells from degenerated human intervertebral discs and their migration characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuhao; Liang, Haifeng; Lee, Soo-Min; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Jian; Fei, Qinming

    2017-02-06

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated and identified separately from the three components of intervertebral disc, i.e. annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP), and cartilage endplate (CEP). However, few studies have been carried out to compare the properties of these three kinds of stem cells, especially their migration ability which is essential for their potential clinical application. In this study, MSCs were isolated from AF, NP, and CEP, respectively, of human degenerated discs and identified by surface markers and multilineage differentiation assay at passage 3. These three types of stem cells were named as AF-MSCs, NP-MSCs, and CEP-MSCs. Then, their biological characteristics were compared in terms of proliferation, passage, colony formation, migration, and invasion capacity. Results showed that all the three types of cells were identified as MSCs and had similar characteristics in proliferation, passage, and colony formation capacity. CEP-MSCs showed the highest migration and invasion potency, while NP-MSCs showed the lowest migration ability and almost no invasion potency, suggesting that CEP-MSCs had the most powerful properties of migration and invasion when compared with AF-MSCs and NP-MSCs. It was also found that the expression of CXCR4 was higher in CEP-MSCs than in the other two, suggesting that SDF-1/CXCR4 axis may play significant roles in the migration of these cells.

  6. Isolation and expansion of human natural T regulatory cells for cellular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Rajendra; Jaggaiahgari, Shashidhar; Pahwa, Savita; Inverardi, Luca; Tzakis, Andreas; Ricordi, Camillo

    2010-12-15

    Natural T regulatory cells (nTregs) play a key role in inducing and maintaining immunological tolerance. Cell-based therapy using purified nTregs is under consideration for several conditions, but procedures employed to date have resulted in cell populations that are contaminated with cytokine secreting effector cells. We have established a method for isolation and ex vivo expansion of human nTregs from healthy blood donors for cellular therapy aimed at preventing allograft rejection in organ transplants. The Robosep instrument was used for initial nTreg isolation and rapamycin was included in the expansion phase of cell cultures. The resulting cell population exhibited a stable CD4(+)CD25(++bright)Foxp3(+) phenotype, had potent functional ability to suppress CD4(+)CD25(negative) T cells without evidence of conversion to effector T cells including TH17 cells, and manifested little to no production of pro-inflammatory cytokines upon in vitro stimulation. Boolean gating analysis of cytokine-expressing cells by flow cytometry for 32 possible profile end points revealed that 96% of expanded nTregs did not express any cytokine. From a single buffy coat, approximately 80 million pure nTregs were harvested after expansion under cGMP conditions; these cell numbers are adequate for infusion of approximately one million cells kg⁻¹ for cell therapy in clinical trials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. HUMAN ISLET ISOLATION AND ALLOTRANSPLANTATION IN 22 CONSECUTIVE CASES1,2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricordi, Camillo; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Carroll, Patricia B.; Zeng, Yijun; Rodriguez Rilo, Horacio L.; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Shapiro, Ron; Fung, John J.; Demetris, Anthony J.; Mintz, Daniel H.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides our initial experience in islet isolation and intrahepatic allotransplantation in 21 patients. In group 1, 10 patients underwent combined liver-islet allotransplantation following upper-abdominal exenteration for cancer. In group 2, 4 patients received a combined liver-islet allograft for cirrhosis and diabetes. One patient had plasma C-peptide >3 pM and was therefore excluded from analysis. In group 3, 7 patients received 8 combined cadaveric kidney-islet grafts (one retransplant) for end-stage renal disease secondary to type 1 diabetes mellitus. The islets were separated by a modification of the automated method for human islet isolation and the preparations were infused into the portal vein. Immunosuppression was with FK506 (group 1) plus steroids (groups 2 and 3). Six patients in group 1 did not require insulin treatment for 5 to >16 months. In groups 2 and 3 none of the patients became insulin-independent, although decreased insulin requirement and stabilization of diabetes were observed. Our results indicate that rejection is still a major factor limiting the clinical application of islet transplantation in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, although other factors such as steroid treatment may contribute to deteriorate islet engraftment and/or function. PMID:1738936

  8. Improved In Vitro Culture of Plasmodium falciparum Permits Establishment of Clinical Isolates with Preserved Multiplication, Invasion and Rosetting Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Letusa; Ahmed Ismail, Hodan; Normark, Johan; Flaberg, Emilie; Szekely, Laszlo; Hultenby, Kjell; Persson, Kristina E. M.; Egwang, Thomas G.; Wahlgren, Mats

    2013-01-01

    To be able to robustly propagate P. falciparum at optimal conditions in vitro is of fundamental importance for genotypic and phenotypic studies of both established and fresh clinical isolates. Cryo-preserved P. falciparum isolates from Ugandan children with severe or uncomplicated malaria were investigated for parasite phenotypes under different in vitro growth conditions or studied directly from the peripheral blood. The parasite cultures showed a minimal loss of parasite-mass and preserved percentage of multiple infected pRBCs to that in peripheral blood, maintained adhesive phenotypes and good outgrowth and multiplication rates when grown in suspension and supplemented with gas. In contrast, abnormal and greatly fluctuating levels of multiple infections were observed during static growth conditions and outgrowth and multiplication rates were inferior. Serum, as compared to Albumax, was found necessary for optimal presentation of PfEMP1 at the pRBC surface and/or for binding of serum proteins (immunoglobulins). Optimal in vitro growth conditions of P. falciparum therefore include orbital shaking (50 rev/min), human serum (10%) and a fixed gas composition (5% O2, 5% CO2, 90% N2). We subsequently established 100% of 76 frozen patient isolates and found rosetting with schizont pRBCs in every isolate (>26% schizont rosetting rate). Rosetting during schizogony was often followed by invasion of the bound RBC as seen by regular and time-lapse microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. The peripheral parasitemia, the level of rosetting and the rate of multiplication correlated positively to one another for individual isolates. Rosetting was also more frequent with trophozoite and schizont pRBCs of children with severe versus uncomplicated malaria (p<0.002; p<0.004). The associations suggest that rosetting enhances the ability of the parasite to multiply within the human host. PMID:23894537

  9. Susceptibility of clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis group strains to cefoxitin, cefoperazone and ticarcillin/clavulanate

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    PEIXOTO JÚNIOR Arnaldo Aires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 40 strains of the B. fragilis group was isolated from clinical specimens in two hospital centers in Fortaleza from 1993 to 1997. The most frequently isolated species was Bacteroides fragilis (19 strains and most isolates came from intra-abdominal and wound infections. The susceptibility profile was traced for cefoxitin, cefoperazone and ticarcillin-clavulanate by using the agar dilution reference method. All isolates were susceptible to ticarcillin-clavulanate (128/2mug/ml. Resistance rates of 15 and 70% were detected to cefoxitin (64mug/ml and cefoperazone (64mug/ml, respectively. Such regional results permit a better orientation in choosing this group of antibiotics for prophylaxis and therapy especially in relation to cefoxitin, which is frequently used in the hospital centers studied.

  10. Frequency, virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria spp. isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Hossein; Radmehr, Behrad

    2013-11-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence, characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of Listeria spp. isolated from bovine clinical mastitis in Iran. Listeria spp. were detected in 21/207 bovine mastitic milk samples from dairy farms in Iran, comprising L. monocytogenes (n=17), L. innocua (n=3) and L. ivanovii (n=1). L. monocytogenes isolates were grouped into serogroups '4b, 4d, 4e', '1/2a, 3a', '1/2b, 3b, 7' and '1/2c, 3c'; all harboured inlA, inlC and inlJ virulence genes. Listeria spp. were most frequently resistant to penicillin G (14/21 isolates, 66.7%) and tetracyclines (11/21 isolates, 52.4%). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology of Salmonella Paratyphi A Isolated from Patients with Bacteremia in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherchan, Jatan Bahadur; Morita, Masatomo; Matono, Takashi; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Ohnishi, Makoto; Sherchand, Jeevan B; Tandukar, Sarmila; Laghu, Ujjwal; Nagamatsu, Maki; Kato, Yasuyuki; Ohmagari, Norio; Hayakawa, Kayoko

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of typhoid and paratyphoid fever in Nepal. We aimed to elucidate the molecular and clinical epidemiology of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Nepal. Isolates were collected from 23 cases of bacteremia due to S. Paratyphi A between December 2014 and October 2015. Thirteen patients (57%) were male, and the median age was 21 years. None of the patients had an underlying chronic disease. All S. Paratyphi A isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ceftriaxone, and chloramphenicol. All isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid and were categorized as intermediately susceptible to levofloxacin. Phylogenetic analysis revealed close relatedness among the isolates, including several clonal groups, suggesting local spread. Patients with bacteremia due to S. Paratyphi A in Kathmandu, Nepal, were relatively young and nondebilitated. Improving control of S. Paratyphi infections should focus on effective infection control measures and selection of empirical therapy based on current resistance patterns.

  12. [Metalo-ß-lactamases in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Escalante, Edgar; Vicente-Taboada, William; Champi-Merino, Roky; Soto-Pastrana, Javier; Flores-Paredes, Wilfredo; Lovera-García, Margarita; Chuquiray-Valverde, Nancy; Bejarano-Cristobal, Carlos; Puray-Chávez, Maritza; León-Sandoval, Segundo

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to detect and characterize molecularly metallo-ß-lactamase (MßL) in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We carry out a cross sectional study in six publics hospital in Lima on August 2011. 51 isolates of P. aeruginosa resistant to ceftazidime and reduced susceptibility to carbapenemes were evaluated.The phenotypic assay was performed using the approximation method with substrate disks (ceftazidime, imipenem and meropenem) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). MßL gene detection was performed using the technique of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) multiplex. Through MßL detected phenotypic method in 15.7% of isolates. Detection of genes revealed the presence of the gene in the 8 isolates blaIMP. The first report of MßL in P. aeruginosa in Peru was described, this should alert the monitoring equipment in the institutions to promote control their spread.

  13. Cdr2p contributes to fluconazole resistance in Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The development of resistance to azole antifungals used in the treatment of fungal infections can be a serious medical problem. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms associated with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole in clinical isolates of Candida dubliniensis , showing evidence of the trailing growth phenomenon. The changes in membrane sterol composition were studied in the presence of subinhibitory fluconazole concentrations. Despite lanosterol and eburicol accumulating as the most prevalent sterols after fluconazole treatment, these ergosterol precursors still support growth of Candida isolates. The overexpression of ABC transporters was demonstrated by immunoblotting employing specific antibodies against Cdr1p and Cdr2p. The presence of a full-length 170 kDa protein Cdr1p was detected in two isolates, while a truncated form of Cdr1p with the molecular mass of 85 kDa was observed in isolate 966\\/3(2). Notably, Cdr2p was detected in this isolate, and the expression of this transporter was modulated by subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis can display the trailing growth phenomenon, and such isolates express similar molecular mechanisms like that of fluconazole-resistant isolates and can therefore be associated with recurrent infections.

  14. Methods for isolating, identifying, and quantifying anthocyanin metabolites in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ferrars, Rachel M; Czank, Charles; Saha, Shikha; Needs, Paul W; Zhang, Qingzhi; Raheem, K Saki; Botting, Nigel P; Kroon, Paul A; Kay, Colin D

    2014-10-21

    The metabolic fate of anthocyanins until recently was relatively unknown, primarily as a result of their instability at physiological pH and a lack of published methods for isolating and identifying their metabolites from biological samples. The aim of the present work was to establish methods for the extraction and quantification of anthocyanin metabolites present in urine, serum, and fecal samples. 35 commercial and 10 synthetic analytes, including both known and predicted human and microbial metabolites of anthocyanins, were obtained as reference standards. HPLC and MS/MS conditions were optimized for organic modifier, ionic modifier, mobile phase gradient, flow rate, column type, MS source, and compound dependent parameters. The impact of sorbent, solvent, acid, preservative, elution, and evaporation on solid phase extraction (SPE) efficiency was also explored. The HPLC-MS/MS method validation demonstrated acceptable linearity (R(2), 0.997 ± 0.002) and sensitivity (limits of detection (LODs): urine, 100 ± 375 nM; serum, 104 ± 358 nM; feces 138 ± 344 nM), and the final SPE methods provided recoveries of 88.3 ± 17.8% for urine, 86.5 ± 11.1% for serum, and 80.6 ± 20.9% for feces. The final methods were applied to clinical samples derived from an anthocyanin intervention study, where 36 of the 45 modeled metabolites were detected within urine, plasma, or fecal samples. The described methods provide suitable versatility for the identification and quantification of an extensive series of anthocyanin metabolites for use in future clinical studies exploring absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination.

  15. Comparison of the VITEK 2 antifungal susceptibility system with Etest using clinical isolates of Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfouzan, Wadha; Al-Enezi, Tahani; AlRoomi, Ebteehal; Sandhya, Vayalil; Chandy, Rachel; Khan, Zia Uddin

    Candida species are part of the normal human microbiota. However, in recent years, nosocomial bloodstream Candida infections have emerged as a significant problem ranking the fourth common cause of fungemia in intensive care units. Although microdilution methods are the ones recommended for susceptibility testing, they are difficult to undertake in the clinical practice. Thus, an automated commercially available test is ideal. To compare minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) obtained with the recently introduced Vitek 2 yeast susceptibility system card (AST-YS01) with Etest. 263 clinical Candida isolates representing six species were included in the study. Categorical agreements (CA) were assessed as described elsewhere. Irrespective of the Candida species tested, the overall CA between Vitek 2 and Etest ranged between 66.7% and 100%. In general, Etest yielded lower MICs than Vitek 2. For Candida albicans, the CA between Vitek 2 and Etest was >95% for amphotericin B, voriconazole and flucytosine, but only 89% for fluconazole. With respect to Candida glabrata, the CA was between 97% and 100%. The major errors were with Candida krusei and flucytosine and Candida kefyr and amphotericin B. Candida tropicalis susceptibility for fluconazole by Vitek 2 reported more SDD and resistant strains than Etest. Candida parapsilosis showed 100% CA against all the four antifungals tested. No very major errors were detected between the two methods. Vitek 2 provided comparable results to Etest with quick turnaround for the testing of Candida species susceptibilities. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation and identification of bacterial causes of clinical mastitis in cattle in Sulaimania region

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    S. A. Hussein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 51 cases of bovine clinical mastitis in Sulaimani district were investigated for their bacteriological causative agents; 76 milk samples were cultured on primary and selective media and the isolated bacteria were tested for their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents used in commercial intramammary infusion products. Eighty two bacterial isolates were obtained and further identified using biochemical tests. Escherichia coli was the most common bacteria followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactia and coagulase–negative staphylococci. Two other bacterial species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcucs uberis were also isolated but in a lower proportion. Antibacterial susceptibility testing showed that the use of florfenicol, cephalexin and gentamicin may be useful for the treatment of clinical mastitis cases in cows.

  17. [Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Resistance Mutations in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli Isolates from Human and Meat Sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Akira; Murakami, Koichi; Etoh, Yoshiki; Sera, Nobuyuki; Horikawa, Kazumi

    2015-03-01

    Recently, there has been a marked increase in the number of reports of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and its genetic determinants in Campylobacter species isolated from meat and human subjects in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. Between 2011 and 2013, 55 and 64 isolates were collected from meat (chicken meat and beef liver) and humans, respectively, in this prefecture. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were conducted using the agar dilution method in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines, using the following 11 antimicrobial agents : cephalexin, cefoxitin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, minocycline, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin and erythromycin. The susceptibility rates of the isolates to three quinolones (nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin) were 43.7%, 41.2%, 40.3%, respectively. All the isolates were multidrug resistant. Whereas 46.9%-51.6% of the human isolates were resistant to one or more of the quinolones, only 32.7%-34.5% of the meat isolates were resistant to one or more of the drugs. DNA sequencing showed that of the 50 quinolone resistant isolates 44 had position 86 isoleucine (Ile) substituted for threonine (Thr) in the GyrA protein (Thr86Ile). This amino acid substitution resulted from ACA to ATA and ACT to ATT mutations of codon 86 in C. jejuni and C. coli, respectively. Furthermore, two of the four C. jejuni isolates lacking the Thr86Ile mutation had combined Ser22Gly-Asn203Ser substitutions, while the remaining two isolates had combined Ser22Gly-Asn203Ser-Ala 206Val substitutions. These four isolates also had cmeABC sequences that differed from the quinolone sensitive C. jejuni ATCC33560(T) strain. In conclusion, C. jejuni and C. coli have relatively high quinolone resistance, and are resistant to other antibiotics. The new combination of amino acid

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from veterinary clinical cases in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluping, R P; Paul, N C; Moodley, A

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a leading aetiologic agent of pyoderma and other body tissue infections in dogs and cats. In recent years, an increased prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has been reported. Isolation of MRSP in serious infections poses a major therapeutic challenge as strains are often resistant to all forms of systemic antibiotic used to treat S. pseudintermedius -related infections. This study investigates the occurrence of MRSP from a total of 7183 clinical samples submitted to the authors' laboratories over a 15-month period. Identification was based on standard microbiological identification methods, and by S. pseudintermedius-specific nuc polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methicillin resistance was confirmed by PBP2a latex agglutination and mecA PCR. Susceptibility against non-beta-lactam antibiotics was carried out using a disc-diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. In addition, susceptibility to pradofloxacin--a new veterinary fluoroquinolone--was also investigated. SCCmec types were determined by multiplex PCR. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was isolated from 391 (5%) samples and 20 were confirmed as MRSP from cases of pyoderma, otitis, wound infections, urinary tract infection and mastitis in dogs only. All 20 isolates were resistant to clindamycin and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Nineteen were resistant to chloramphenicol, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, marbofloxacin and pradofloxacin; additionally, seven isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Fifteen isolates carried SCCmec type II-III, four isolates had type V and one harboured type IV. To date, only a few scientific papers on clinical MRSP strains isolated from the UK have been published, thus the results from this study would provide additional baseline data for further investigations.

  19. Levofloxacin Efflux and smeD in Clinical Isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, So Young; Lee, Kyungwon; Chung, Hae-Sun; Hong, Seong Geun; Suh, Younghee; Chong, Yunsop

    2017-03-01

    Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is the first-line antimicrobial combination for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infections. However, allergy or intolerance and increasing resistance limit the use of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Quinolones can be used as an alternative therapeutic option, but resistance can emerge rapidly during therapy. We analyzed the contribution of SmeABC and SmeDEF efflux pumps to levofloxacin resistance in clinical isolates of S. maltophilia. Nonduplicate clinical isolates of S. maltophilia were collected in 2010 from 11 university hospitals (n = 102). Fifty-five levofloxacin nonsusceptible (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥4 μg/ml) and 47 susceptible (MIC ≤2 μg/ml) isolates were tested for efflux pump overexpression. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR was performed for amplification and quantification of smeB, smeC, smeD, and smeF mRNA. To determine which antimicrobials were affected by smeD overexpression, the growth rates of a levofloxacin-susceptible S. maltophilia isolate were compared by measuring absorbance of antimicrobial-supplemented Luria-Bertani broth (LB) cultures with or without triclosan. Significant relationships between sme gene overexpression and resistance were observed for smeD against levofloxacin, smeC and smeF against ceftazidime, and smeC against ticarcillin-clavulanate. The mean MICs of moxifloxacin and tigecycline did not significantly differ for isolates with or without overexpression of smeB, smeC, and smeF, but were significantly higher for isolates with smeD overexpression. The mean MICs of amikacin were significantly higher for smeC or smeF overexpressing isolates. Increased growth of a levofloxacin-susceptible isolate was observed in LB with 1/2 MIC levofloxacin in the presence of triclosan. These data suggest that the expression of smeD plays a role in levofloxacin resistance in S. maltophilia.

  20. Clinical Significance of Isolation of Mycobacterium avium Complex From Respiratory Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Shen

    2010-07-01

    Conclusion: Despite the increased frequency of recovering MAC from respiratory specimens, most cases did not meet the criteria of American Thoracic Society for clinically significant nontuberculous pulmonary disease. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of drugs against these MAC isolates might help to guide treatment, but further studies should be done.

  1. Total Protein Profile and Drug Resistance in Candida albicans Isolated from Clinical Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Uddin Zaidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to assess the antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida albicans and to evaluate its total protein profile based on morphological difference on drug resistance. Hundred and twenty clinical isolates of C. albicans from various clinical specimens were tested for susceptibility against four antifungal agents, namely, fluconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B, and ketoconazole. A significant increase of drug resistance in clinical isolates of C. albicans was observed. The study showed 50% fluconazole and itraconazole resistance at 32 μg mL−1 with a MIC50 and MIC90 values at 34 and 47 and 36 and 49 μg mL−1, respectively. All isolates were sensitive to amphotericin B and ketoconazole. The SDS-PAGE protein profile showed a prevalent band of ~52.5 kDa, indicating overexpression of gene in 72% strains with fluconazole resistance. Since the opportunistic infections of Candida spp. are increasing along with drug resistance, the total protein profile will help in understanding the evolutionary changes in drug resistance and also to characterize them.

  2. Isolated perifacial lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma with clinically node-negative neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sangeet Kumar; Arora, Sowrabh Kumar; Kumar, Gopal; Sarin, Deepak

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of occult perifacial nodal disease in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma is not well reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of isolated perifacial lymph node metastasis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma with a clinically node-negative neck. The study will shed light on current controversies and will provide valuable clinical and pathological information in the practice of routine comprehensive removal of these lymph node pads in selective neck dissection in the node-negative neck. Prospective analysis. This study was started in August 2011 when intraoperatively we routinely separated the lymph node levels from the main specimen for evaluation of the metastatic rate to different lymph node levels in 231 patients of oral squamous cell cancer with a clinically node-negative neck. The current study demonstrated that 19 (8.22%) out of 231 patients showed ipsilateral isolated perifacial lymph node involvement. The incidence of isolated perifacial nodes did not differ significantly between the oral tongue (7.14%) and buccal mucosa (7.75%). Incidence was statistically significant in cases with lower age group (oral squamous cell carcinoma with a clinically node-negative neck. The incidence of isolated perifacial involvement is high in cases of buccal mucosal and tongue cancers. A meticulous dissection of the perifacial nodes seems prudent when treating the neck in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2252-2256, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Rapid differentiation between clinically relevant mycobacteria in microscopy positive clinical specimens and mycobacterial isolates by line probe assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Lundgren, Bettina H; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2002-01-01

    The Inno LiPA Mycobacteria assay, based on PCR amplification of the 16-23S rRNA spacer region of Mycobacterium species, has been designed for identification of mycobacteria grown in culture media and discrimination between Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. kansas...... mycobacteria in microscopy positive clinical specimens and isolates within 6 h in the same procedural run.......The Inno LiPA Mycobacteria assay, based on PCR amplification of the 16-23S rRNA spacer region of Mycobacterium species, has been designed for identification of mycobacteria grown in culture media and discrimination between Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. kansasii......, M. gordonae, M. xenopi, scrofulaceum and M. chelonae group including M. abscessus. In order to evaluate the system as a fast diagnostic tool, the assay was for the first time used directly on 14 microscopy positive clinical specimens and 71 isolates and the results were compared to those...

  4. Investigators' perspectives on translating human microbiome research into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slashinski, M J; Whitney, S N; Achenbaum, L S; Keitel, W A; McCurdy, S A; McGuire, A L

    2013-01-01

    Human microbiome research has the potential to transform the practice of medicine, fundamentally shifting the ways in which we think not only about human health, illness and disease, but also about clinical practice and public health interventions. Drawing from a larger qualitative study on ethical, legal and social dimensions of human microbiome research, in this article, we document perspectives related to the translation of human microbiome research into clinical practice, focusing particularly on implications for health, illness and disease. We conducted 60 in-depth, semi-structured interviews (2009-2010) with 63 researchers and National Institutes of Health project leaders ('investigators') involved with human microbiome research. The interviews explored a range of ethical, legal and social implications of human microbiome research, including investigators' perspectives on potential strategies for translating findings to clinical practice. Using thematic content analysis, we identified and analyzed emergent themes and patterns. We identified 3 themes: (1) investigators' general perspectives on the clinical utility of human microbiome research, (2) investigators' perspectives on antibiotic use, overuse and misuse, and (3) investigators' perspectives concerning future challenges of translating data to clinical practice. The issues discussed by investigators concerning the clinical significance of human microbiome research, including embracing a new paradigm of health and disease, the importance of microbial communities, and clinical utility, will be of critical importance as this research moves forward. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Time dependent enhanced resistance against antibiotics & metal salts by planktonic & biofilm form of Acinetobacter haemolyticus MMC 8 clinical isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidhani, Sharvari Vijaykumar; Raskar, Aartee Vishnu; Poddar, Sharmishtha; Gosavi, Shriya; Sahu, Praveen Kishore; Pardesi, Karishma Rajendra; Bhide, Shobhana V; Chopade, Balu Ananada

    2014-11-01

    Available literature shows paucity of reports describing antibiotic and metal resistance profile of biofilm forming clinical isolates of Acinetobacter haemolyticus. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antibiotic and metal resistance profile of Indian clinical isolate of A. haemolyticus MMC 8 isolated from human pus sample in planktonic and biofilm form. Antibiotic susceptibility and minimum inhibitory concentration were determined employing broth and agar dilution techniques. Biofilm formation was evaluated quantitatively by microtiter plate method and variation in complex architecture was determined by scanning electron microscopy. Minimum biofilm inhibiting concentration was checked by Calgary biofilm device. Planktonic A. haemolyticus MMC 8 was sensitive to 14 antibiotics, AgNO 3 and HgC1 2 resistant to streptomycin and intermediately resistant to netilmycin and kanamycin. MMC 8 exhibited temporal variation in amount and structure of biofilm. There was 32-4000 and 4-256 fold increase in antibiotic and metal salt concentration, respectively to inhibit biofilm over a period of 72 h as against susceptible planktonic counterparts. Total viable count in the range of 10(5)-10(6) cfu / ml was observed on plating minimum biofilm inhibiting concentration on Muller-Hinton Agar plate without antimicrobial agents. Biofilm forming cells were several folds more resistant to antibiotics and metal salts in comparison to planktonic cells. Presence of unaffected residual cell population indicated presence of persister cells. The results indicate that biofilm formation causes enhanced resistance against antibiotics and metal salts in otherwise susceptible planktonic A. haemolyticus MMC 8.

  6. Social isolation disrupts hippocampal neurogenesis in young non-human primates

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    Simone M Cinini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Social relationships are crucial for the development and maintenance of normal behavior in non-human primates. Animals that are raised in isolation develop abnormal patterns of behavior that persist even when they are later reunited with their parents. In rodents, social isolation is a stressful event and is associated with a decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis but considerably less is known about the effects of social isolation in non-human primates during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. To investigate how social isolation affects young marmosets, these were isolated from other members of the colony for one or three weeks and evaluated for alterations in their behavior and hippocampal cell proliferation. We found that anxiety-related behaviors like scent-marking and locomotor activity increased after social isolation when compared to baseline levels. In agreement, grooming - an indicative of attenuation of tension - was reduced among isolated marmosets. These results were consistent with increased cortisol levels after one and three weeks of isolation. After social isolation (one or three weeks, reduced proliferation of neural cells in the subgranular zone of dentate granule cell layer was identified and a smaller proportion of BrdU-positive cells underwent neuronal fate (doublecortin labeling. Our data is consistent with the notion that social deprivation during the transition from adolescence to adulthood leads to stress and produces anxiety-like behaviors that in turn might affect neurogenesis and contribute to the deleterious consequences of prolonged stressful conditions.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Reduced Susceptibility to Biocides in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

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    Fei Lin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Active efflux is regarded as a common mechanism for antibiotic and biocide resistance. However, the role of many drug efflux pumps in biocide resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii remains unknown. Using biocide-resistant A. baumannii clinical isolates, we investigated the incidence of 11 known/putative antimicrobial resistance efflux pump genes (adeB, adeG, adeJ, adeT1, adeT2, amvA, abeD, abeM, qacE, qacEΔ1, and aceI and triclosan target gene fabI through PCR and DNA sequencing. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR was conducted to assess the correlation between the efflux pump gene expression and the reduced susceptibility to triclosan or chlorhexidine. The A. baumannii isolates displayed high levels of reduced susceptibility to triclosan, chlorhexidine, benzalkonium, hydrogen peroxide, and ethanol. Most tested isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Efflux resistance genes were widely distributed and generally expressed in A. baumannii. Although no clear relation was established between efflux pump gene expression and antibiotic resistance or reduced biocide susceptibility, triclosan non-susceptible isolates displayed relatively increased expression of adeB and adeJ whereas chlorhexidine non-susceptible isolates had increased abeM and fabI gene expression. Increased expression of adeJ and abeM was also demonstrated in multiple antibiotic resistant isolates. Exposure of isolates to subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan or chlorhexidine induced gene expression of adeB, adeG, adeJ and fabI, and adeB, respectively. A point mutation in FabI, Gly95Ser, was observed in only one triclosan-resistant isolate. Multiple sequence types with the major clone complex, CC92, were identified in high level triclosan-resistant isolates. Overall, this study showed the high prevalence of antibiotic and biocide resistance as well as the complexity of intertwined resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of A. baumannii, which highlights the

  8. Study on some characteristics of Staphylococci isolated from sheep sub clinical mastitis milk in Shahrekord, Iran

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    Azizollah Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Staphylococci release a large number of enzymes. Some of these, such as coagulase, beta lactamase, hemolysins and biofilms are considered indices of pathogenicity. The aim of the current study was based on the isolation and identification of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS strains from sheep sub clinical mastitis and examining their biofilm, beta lactamase, hemolysins production and antibiotic resistance pattern. Materials and methods: 55 Staphylococci strains were isolated from seventy cases of sheep subclinical mastitis. Thirty three were determined as Staphylococcus aureus (60% and 22 (40% as CNS. The hemolytic activity was evaluated by plating Staphylococci strains on 5% bovine blood agar. The biofilm assay was performed by using micro titer plates. Beta Lactamase production was detected by test tube iodometric technique and susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined for isolated strains by the disk diffusion method. Results: Twenty six (78.8% S. aureus strains were biofilm producers. For CNS (59.9% strains were positive in biofilm production. Two isolates (6.06%, of S. aureus were α, the same number β and 6 (18.2% isolates were ∂ hemolysin producers. Six isolates of CNS (27.27% were α and ten (45.45% ∂ hemolysin producers. Sixteen S. aureus (48.5% and five CNS (22.72% isolates were positive in beta lactamase production. The isolated Staphylococci show a low sensitivity pattern to methicillin and streptomycin. Discussion and conclusion: A high percentage of strains make α toxin that play a role in S. aureus biofilm formation. Twenty one out of 33 (63.63% isolated Staphylococci were biofilm producers that can have deleterious effects because biofilm formation is thought to play an important role in the survival of virulent strains of Staphylococci. Sixteen out of 33 (48.5% isolated S. aureus were positive in beta lactamase test, Excluding resistant to methicillin, all of these

  9. Frequency of Reduced Vancomycin Susceptibility among Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Isolated in Ahvaz Iran

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    Mojtaba Moosavian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:   One   of   the   most   important   agents   in   hospital-acquired   infections   is Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA infections with decreased susceptibility to vancomycin has recently been more difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible presence of vancomycin intermediate S. aureus (VISA and vancomycin- resistant S. aureus (VRSA and also to determine the frequency of MRSA in clinical specimens.Methods: In this study, 195 S. aureus isolates were collected from the patients were examined. All of the isolates were identified using standard biochemical tests.  Susceptibility of S. aureus isolates against 10 antibiotics was detected by disk diffusion method and was followed by E-test and vancomycin screen agar methods. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of vancomycin was determined according to the CLSI guidelines.  Also, detection of mecA gene was performed by PCR and finally, the results were compared.Results: All of the isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (i.e. MIC range of vancomycin was between 0.25-2 µg/ml. Out of 195 S. aureus isolates, 99 isolates (50.8% were resistant to methicillin, and mecA gene was detected in 96 isolates. These results also showed that the highest and lowest resistance rate of isolates was to penicillin (96.9% and chloramphenicol (0%, respectively.Conclusion: Our findings showed that vancomycin can still be used as a valuable drug for treatment of S. aureus infections in our region. However, periodic evaluation of vancomycin MIC of S. aureus isolates is critical for monitoring MRSA and preventing the spread of VISA or VRSA among patients.

  10. The genetic diversity of metronidazole susceptibility in Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates in an Egyptian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Magied, Aida A; El-Kholya, El-Said I; Abou El-Khair, Salwa M; Abdelmegeed, Eman S; Hamoudaa, Marwa M; Mohamed, Sara A; El-Tantawy, Nora Labeeb

    2017-11-01

    Trichomoniasis is the most common curable sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Resistance to metronidazole in treating trichomoniasis is a problematic health issue. We aimed to determine the minimum lethal concentration (MLC) of metronidazole for Trichomonas vaginalis isolates detected in Mansoura, Egypt and studied the genotypic profile of these isolates. Vaginal swab specimens were obtained from 320 symptomatic and 100 asymptomatic females, for whom clinical examination, vaginal discharge wet mount, Giemsa stain, and culture in modified Diamond's media were performed. Metronidazole susceptibility testing by an aerobic tube assay was performed. Both sensitive and resistant isolates were examined by PCR amplification followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Trichomonas vaginalis was identified in 49/420 (11.7%) using either culture or PCR, while wet mount and Giemsa stain detected the parasite in 8.1 and 7.6% of participants, respectively. After 48 h incubation, most isolates were sensitive to metronidazole with a minimal lethal concentration (MLC) of 1 μg/ml. Mild resistance was observed in two isolates with MLCs of 64 μg\\ml and mild to moderate resistance was observed in an additional two isolates with MLCs of 128 μg/ml. The four isolates that demonstrated low to moderate metronidazole resistance displayed a unique genotype band pattern by RFLP compared to the other 45 samples that were metronidazole sensitive. Our results highlight the presence of in vitro metronidazole tolerance in a few T. vaginalis isolates in Mansoura, Egypt that may lead to the development of drug resistance as well as the possibility of an identifying RFLP pattern in the isolates.

  11. Hypersusceptibility to Azole Antifungals in a Clinical Isolate of Candida glabrata with Reduced Aerobic Growth ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Tronchin, Guy; Rocher, Françoise; Renier, Gilles; Bergès, Thierry; Chabasse, Dominique; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Petite mutations have been described in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and pathogenic yeasts. However, previous studies of the phenotypic traits of these petite mutants reported that they express azole resistance. We describe a clinical isolate of Candida glabrata with a striking association between increased susceptibility to azoles and respiratory deficiency. This isolate was obtained from a urine sample together with a respiration-competent C. glabrata isolate which exhibited azole resistance. The respiratory status of the two isolates was confirmed by cultivation on glycerol-containing agar and oxygraphy. Flow cytometry revealed the normal incorporation of rhodamine 123, and mitochondrial sections with typical cristae were seen by transmission electron microscopy for both isolates. Together, these results suggested a nuclear origin for the reduced respiratory capacity of the hypersusceptible isolate. The sterol contents of these isolates were similar to the sterol content of a reference strain. Sequencing of the ERG11 and PDR1 genes revealed that the sequences were identical in the two isolates, demonstrating their close relatedness. In addition to silent mutations, they carried a nonsense mutation in PDR1 that led to the truncation of transcription factor Pdr1p. They also overexpressed both PDR1 and one of its targets, CDR1, providing a possible explanation for the azole resistance of the respiration-competent isolate. In conclusion, in addition to azole resistance, which is a common feature of C. glabrata mitochondrial petite mutants, the mutation of a nuclear gene affecting aerobic growth may lead to azole hypersusceptibility; however, the mechanisms underlying this phenotype remain to be determined. PMID:19380598

  12. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance pattern of multidrug-resistant enterococci isolated from clinical specimens

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    M M Salem-Bekhit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE pose an emerging problem in hospitals worldwide. The present study was undertaken to determine the occurrence, species prevalence, antibacterial resistance, and phenotypic and genetic characteristics of VRE isolated in Riyadh hospitals, KSA. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and six isolates of enterococcal species were obtained from clinical samples. The antibiotic susceptibility of isolates and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC tests for vancomycin and teicoplanin were determined. Molecular typing of VRE isolates was carried out by using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and the resistance genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: VRE accounted for 3.9% of the isolates and were detected mostly in urine, wound and blood specimens isolated from ICU, internal medicine and surgical wards. All strains were identified to species level and were found to consist of E. faecalis (69.2%, E. faecium (11.3%, E. avium (2.1%, E. hirae (0.8%, E. casseliflavus (1.3% and E. gallinarum (1.3% species. According to the susceptibility data obtained, 8 (3.9% out of 206 isolates were found to be VRE (MICs > 32 μg/ml. The vanA, vanB and vanC gene fragments of E. faecalis, E. faecium and E. gallinarum were amplified from isolates and were detected. PFGE patterns of the VRE isolates revealed homogenous patterns with dominant clone suggesting that the strains intrinsic resistance is independent. Conclusions: This study shows an emergence of VRE along with increased rate of multidrug-resistant enterococci in the area of the study. Regular surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities should be done regularly and the risk factors should be determined.

  13. Detection and viability of Campylobacter species isolates from different species of poultry and humans in Sokoto State, Nigeria

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    I. O. Nwankwo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was conducted to determine the prevalence and viability of Campylobacter species isolates from different species of poultry and humans in Sokoto State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed in the live birds markets, humans on admission and at outpatient clinics in the randomly selected hospitals in Sokoto State. Isolation and characterization of Campylobacter species were performed using standard culture isolation techniques and biochemical characterization. A total of 798 (506 cloacal and 292 fecal swabs from poultry and humans, respectively, were collected and analyzed. The viability of 307 isolates stored in 15% glycerol and 85% tryptone broth at −20°C was determined after 7-13 months. Results: A total of 312 (39% were positive for Campylobacter species which comprises 119 (30%, 20 (30%, 3 (14%, 9 (56%, 1 (50%, and 160 (55% in chicken, guinea fowls, pigeons, ducks, turkey, and humans, respectively. The total of 38 (24%, 63 (39%, and 59 (37% humans and 29 (19%, 79 (52%, and 44 (29% poultry isolates were positive for Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter Coli, and Campylobacter Lari, respectively. A total of 261 (85% of the stored isolates were still viable on re-isolation with the viability rates of 41 (95%, 67 (85%, and 17 (59% at 7, 9, and 13 months of storage, respectively. There was a negative correlation between months of storage and viability rates. However, there was no significant statistical association (p>0.05 between prevalence rate and species of poultry. Conclusion: Campylobacter species have been detected with varying degree of prevalence in both poultry and humans and their ability to survive freezing at −20°C (95% for up to 7 months has been revealed in the study. This is not only a concern to food and livestock industries but also a concern to the public health at large, especially, in view of the study area being considered one of the largest livestock producers in Nigeria

  14. Characterization of Salmonella isolates from beef cattle, broiler chickens and human sources on Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzeed, Y M; Hariharan, H; Poppe, C; Kibenge, F S

    2000-10-01

    Non-typhoid Salmonella serovars remain a potential threat to human health, and beef cattle and broiler chickens are possible sources of these organisms on Prince Edward Island (PEI). In this study, the ceca of beef cattle belonging to fasted and non-fasted groups, and broiler chickens were examined for Salmonella at the time of slaughter. The characteristics of the isolates, including antimicrobial resistance patterns and virulence genes, were studied along with the isolates obtained from cases of human salmonellosis on PEI during the study period (1996-97). The prevalence of Salmonella in beef cattle was 4.6% (11/240). The rate was significantly higher in fasted cattle (7.46%), than in non-fasted cattle (0.94%). The prevalence rate in chickens was 32.5% (39/120). In beef cattle, Salmonella typhimurium phage type (PT) or definitive type (DT) 104 which was resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole and tetracycline, was the most predominant type (64%). In chickens, S. heidelberg, with resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfisoxazole, predominated. Of 26 isolates from humans, the most common serovar was S. typhimurium, including a multidrug-resistant strain of DT104. Examination by PCR revealed presence of the virulence gene invA in all serovars, and the spvC gene in all S. typhimurium isolates, of both beef cattle and human origin. Among the other serovars the latter gene was found in 7 human isolates, but in none of the chicken or beef isolates. All but 3 of the spvC-positive isolates possessed a 90 kilobasepair (kbp) plasmid suggesting that the 3 isolates had the spvC gene on their chromosome. These findings were confirmed by plasmid DNA isolation using 3 different protocols and by sequence analysis of the spvC-PCR product.

  15. ERIC-PCR Genotyping of Some Campylobacter jejuni Isolates of Chicken and Human Origin in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Heba A; El Hofy, Fatma I; Ammar, Ahmed M; Abd El Tawab, Ashraf A; Hefny, Ahmed A

    2015-12-01

    The public health importance of the genus Campylobacter is attributed to several species causing diarrhea in consumers. Poultry and their meat are considered the most important sources of human campylobacteriosis. In this study, 287 samples from chicken (131 cloacal swabs, 39 chicken skin, 78 chicken meat, and 39 cecal parts) obtained from retail outlets as well as 246 stool swabs from gastroenteritis patients were examined. A representative number of the biochemically identified Campylobacter jejuni isolates were identified by real-time PCR, confirming the identification of the isolates as C. jejuni. Genotyping of the examined isolates (n = 31) by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR (ERIC-PCR) revealed a high discriminatory index of ERIC-PCR (D = 0.948), dividing C. jejuni isolates of chicken and human origins into 18 profiles and four clusters. The 18 profiles obtained indicated the heterogeneity of C. jejuni. Dendrogram analysis showed that four clusters were generated; all human isolates fell into clusters I and III. These observations further support the existence of a genetic relationship between human and poultry isolates examined in the present study. In conclusion, the results obtained support the speculation that poultry and poultry meat have an important role as sources of infection in the acquisition of Campylobacter infection in humans.

  16. Isolate-dependent growth, virulence, and cell wall composition in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

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    Nansalmaa Amarsaikhan

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus is a mediator of allergic sensitization and invasive disease in susceptible individuals. The significant genetic and phenotypic variability between and among clinical and environmental isolates are important considerations in host-pathogen studies of A. fumigatus-mediated disease. We observed decreased radial growth, rate of germination, and ability to establish colony growth in a single environmental isolate of A. fumigatus, Af5517, when compared to other clinical and environmental isolates. Af5517 also exhibited increased hyphal diameter and cell wall β-glucan and chitin content, with chitin most significantly increased. Morbidity, mortality, lung fungal burden, and tissue pathology were decreased in neutropenic Af5517-infected mice when compared to the clinical isolate Af293. Our results support previous findings that suggest a correlation between in vitro growth rates and in vivo virulence, and we propose that changes in cell wall composition may contribute to this phenotype.

  17. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Arcobacter butzleri isolated from a diarrhoeic non-human primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R; Messier, S; Daignault, D; Lorange, M

    1999-01-01

    The bacteriological examination of a faecal specimen from a 20-year-old female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with diarrhoeal illness revealed the presence of a large number of a relatively new enteric pathogen, Arcobacter butzleri. The animal was from a closed colony of about 60 females, some of them were showing intermittent diarrhoea possibly related to Giardia spp. Conditions for the isolation and identification of A. butzleri are reported, as well as discussions about its role as a primary pathogen and its zoonotic potential.

  19. Biofilm-Forming ClinicalStaphylococcusIsolates Harbor Horizontal Transfer and Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Águila-Arcos, Sandra; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Itxaso; Garaiyurrebaso, Olatz; Garbisu, Carlos; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Alkorta, Itziar

    2017-01-01

    Infections caused by staphylococci represent a medical concern, especially when related to biofilms located in implanted medical devices, such as prostheses and catheters. Unfortunately, their frequent resistance to high doses of antibiotics makes the treatment of these infections a difficult task. Moreover, biofilms represent a hot spot for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) by bacterial conjugation. In this work, 25 biofilm-forming clinical staphylococcal isolates were studied. We found that Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates showed a higher biofilm-forming capacity than Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Additionally, horizontal transfer and relaxase genes of two common staphylococcal plasmids, pSK41 and pT181, were detected in all isolates. In terms of antibiotic resistance genes, aac6-aph2a, ermC , and tetK genes, which confer resistance to gentamicin, erythromycin, and tetracycline, respectively, were the most prevalent. The horizontal transfer and antibiotic resistance genes harbored on these staphylococcal clinical strains isolated from biofilms located in implanted medical devices points to the potential risk of the development and dissemination of multiresistant bacteria.

  20. Antibacterial Activity of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton Hassk. Leaf Extract against Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes

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    Surasak Limsuwan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol extract of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton Hassk. leaf was evaluated for antibacterial activity against 47 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes. The extract exhibited good anti-S. pyogenes activity against all the tested isolates with similar minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, 3.91–62.5 μg mL−1 and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC, 3.91–62.5 μg mL−1 ranges. No surviving cells were detected at 16 h after treatment with 8 × MIC of the extract. The extract-treated cells demonstrated no lysis and cytoplasmic leakage through the bacterial membrane. Electron micrographs further revealed that the extract did not cause any dramatic changes on the treated cells. Rhodomyrtone, an isolated compound, exhibited good anti-S. pyogenes activity (14 isolates, expressed very low MIC (0.39–1.56 μg mL−1 and MBC (0.39-1.56 μg mL−1 values. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf extract and rhodomyrtone displayed promising antibacterial activity against clinical isolates of S. pyogenes.

  1. The sensitivity of clinical isolates of Leishmania from Peru and Nepal to miltefosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Vanessa; Croft, Simon L; De Doncker, Simonne; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Koirala, Siddhartha; Rijal, Suman; Miranda, Cesar; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Chappuis, Francois

    2005-08-01

    Clinical isolates of Leishmania, from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) cases in Nepal and from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) cases in Peru, were cultured using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to type species and strain. Promastigotes from 38 isolates, within eight passages from isolation, were used to infect mouse peritoneal macrophage cultures in vitro, and the amastigote sensitivity to miltefosine was determined. The concentration required to kill 50% of intracellular amastigotes from Nepalese VL isolates, all typed as Leishmania (L.) donovani (N = 24) from both Sbv responders and nonresponders, ranged from 8.7 to 0.04 microg/mL. In contrast, the concentration required to kill 50% intracellular amastigotes from isolates from Peru, typed as L.(V.) braziliensis (N = 8), was > 30 to 8.4 microg/mL, L.(V.) guyanensis (N = 2) > 30 to 1.9 microg/mL, L.(L.) mexicana (N = 1) > 30 microg/mL, and L. (V.) lainsoni (N = 4) was 3.4 to 1.9 microg/mL. This demonstrates a notable difference in the intrinsic sensitivity of Leishmania species to miltefosine in vitro. If this model can be correlated to therapeutic outcome, it may have implications for the interpretation of clinical trials.

  2. Non tuberculous mycobacteria isolated from clinical specimens at a tertiary care hospital in South India

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    Jesudason M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This is a retrospective analysis of the isolation rates of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM from various clinical specimens and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Methods: All NTM isolated between 1999 and 2004 at Christian Medical College, Vellore, South India, were identified with various biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility test for all NTM was performed by standard methods. Results : A total of 32,084 specimens were received for culture, of which 4473 (13.9% grew acid fast bacilli (AFB. Four thousand three hundred (96.1% of the AFB were M. tuberculosis while 173 (3.9% were NTM. Of the 173 NTM, 115 (66.5% were identified to the species level. Pus, biopsy specimens and sputum specimens yielded most of the NTM of which M. chelonae (46% and M. fortuitum (41% accounted for majority of them. M. chelonae and M. fortuitum , showed highest susceptibility to amikacin (99.2%. NTM were repeatedly isolated from seven sputum specimens, 15 biopsy and pus specimens, two CSF and two blood cultures. Six were isolated from patients with AIDS and five from post transplant patients. Conclusions: The isolation of NTM from various clinical specimens is reported in this study to highlight the associated diseases and therapeutic options in these infections.

  3. Isolation of mycobacteria from clinical samples collected in the United States from 2004 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Tyler C; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Harris, Beth; Van Palmer, Mitchell; Waters, Wade Ray

    2013-05-08

    Mycobacteria other than M. bovis may interfere with current bovine tuberculosis diagnostic tests resulting in false positive test results. As the prevalence of M. bovis decreases in the United States, interference from other mycobacteria play an increasingly important role in preventing the eradication of M. bovis. To identify mycobacteria other than M. bovis that may be interfering with current diagnostic tests, a retrospective study was performed to identify mycobacteria isolated from clinical tissues at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories between 1 January 2004 and 9 October 2011. During the study period, 2,366 mycobacteria other than M. bovis were isolated from samples submitted for clinical diagnosis of M. bovis. Fifty-five mycobacterial species were isolated during this time period. In cattle, M. avium complex, M. fortuitum/fortuitum complex, M. smegmatis, M. kansasii, and M. terrae complex were the predominate species other than M. bovis isolated from tissues submitted for culture. Mycobacteria other than M. bovis isolated from deer were predominantly M. avium complex, M. terrae/terrae complex, and M. fortuitum/fortuitum complex. These data provide information characterizing the species and relative prevalence of mycobacteria other than M. bovis that may interfere with current diagnostic tests.

  4. Pathogens isolated from clinical mastitis in Murrah buffaloes and their antibiogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Charaya

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the etiology of clinical mastitis in Murrah buffaloes and to develop an antibiogram of organisms isolated. Materials and Methods: A total of 564 quarter milk samples of 144 buffaloes suffering from clinical mastitis received in Veterinary College Central Laboratory were inoculated on blood agar, MacConkey’s lactose agar and sabouraud dextrose agar. Bacteria isolated were characterized to the species level and subjected to in-vitro antimicrobial sensitivity testing. Results: Out of 564 quarters examined for mastitis, 320 (56.73% quarters were found culturally positive showing isolation of Staphylococcus aureus 140 (38.04%, Streptococcus dysgalactiae 112 (30.43%, Streptococcus agalactiae 13 (3.53%, Escherichia coli 74 (20.10% and Corynebacterium pyogenes 29 (7.88%. On carrying antibiogram staphylococci and streptococci revealed high sensitivity towards chloramphenicol, gentamicin, amikacin and enrofloxacin. Streptococci showed high sensitivity towards ceftriaxone and cefaperazone also. E. coli was found highly sensitive to chloramphenicol and gentamicin. C. pyogenes was sensitive to the majority of antibiotics. Conclusion: S. aureus was the most predominant bacteria isolated from mastitis cases and irrespective of the isolates chloramphenicol was found to be most sensitive when tested in-vitro.

  5. Neosporosis in Beagle dogs: clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, isolation and genetic characterization of Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Vianna, M C B; Kwok, O C H; Hill, D E; Miska, K B; Tuo, W; Velmurugan, G V; Conors, M; Jenkins, M C

    2007-11-10

    Clinical neosporosis was diagnosed in a litter of five pups born to a Beagle bitch from Virginia, USA. Four of the pups developed limb weakness starting at 4 weeks of age. The dogs were suspected to have neosporosis based on clinical signs and empirically treated with Clindamycin (75 mg, oral, twice daily, total 150 mg) starting at 9 weeks of age and the dosage was doubled at 13 weeks of age. Antibodies to Neospora caninum were detected in sera of the dam and pups when first tested serologically at the age of 4 months. The owner donated the pup with the worst clinical signs and the dam for research; both dogs were euthanized. Viable N. caninum was isolated in gamma interferon gene knock out (KO) mice and in cell culture from the pup killed at 137 days of age. Tissue cysts, but no tachyzoites, were found in histological sections of brain and muscles. The isolate was also identified as N. caninum by PCR and sequence analysis and designated NC-9. N. caninum was neither isolated by bioassay in KO mice nor found in histological sections of tissues of the bitch. Clinical signs in the remaining three pups improved considerably after a 6-month treatment with Clindamycin; N. caninum antibody titers were still persistent in these pups at 23 months of age. Results indicate that medication with Clindamycin can improve clinical condition but not eliminate N. caninum infection.

  6. Application of MALDI-TOF MS for requalification of a Candida clinical isolates culture collection

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    Reginaldo Lima-Neto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial culture collections underpin biotechnology applications and are important resources for clinical microbiology by supplying reference strains and/or performing microbial identifications as a service. Proteomic profiles by MALDI-TOF MS have been used for Candida spp. identification in clinical laboratories and demonstrated to be a fast and reliable technique for the routine identification of pathogenic yeasts. The main aim of this study was to apply MALDI-TOF MS combined with classical phenotypic and molecular approaches to identify Candida clinical isolates preserved from 1 up to 52 years in a Brazilian culture collection and assess its value for the identification of yeasts preserved in this type of collections. Forty Candida spp. clinical isolates were identified by morphological and biochemical analyses. Identifications were also performed by the new proteomic approach based on MALDI-TOF MS. Results demonstrated 15% discordance when compared with morphological and biochemical analyses. Discordant isolates were analysed by ITS sequencing, which confirmed the MALDI-TOF MS identifications and these strains were renamed in the culture collection catalogue. In conclusion, proteomic profiles by MALDI-TOF MS represents a rapid and reliable method for identifying clinical Candida species preserved in culture collections and may present clear benefits when compared with the performance of existing daily routine methods applied at health centres and hospitals.

  7. Application of MALDI-TOF MS for requalification of a Candida clinical isolates culture collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Neto, Reginaldo; Santos, Cledir; Lima, Nelson; Sampaio, Paula; Pais, Célia; Neves, Rejane P

    2014-01-01

    Microbial culture collections underpin biotechnology applications and are important resources for clinical microbiology by supplying reference strains and/or performing microbial identifications as a service. Proteomic profiles by MALDI-TOF MS have been used for Candida spp. identification in clinical laboratories and demonstrated to be a fast and reliable technique for the routine identification of pathogenic yeasts. The main aim of this study was to apply MALDI-TOF MS combined with classical phenotypic and molecular approaches to identify Candida clinical isolates preserved from 1 up to 52 years in a Brazilian culture collection and assess its value for the identification of yeasts preserved in this type of collections. Forty Candida spp. clinical isolates were identified by morphological and biochemical analyses. Identifications were also performed by the new proteomic approach based on MALDI-TOF MS. Results demonstrated 15% discordance when compared with morphological and biochemical analyses. Discordant isolates were analysed by ITS sequencing, which confirmed the MALDI-TOF MS identifications and these strains were renamed in the culture collection catalogue. In conclusion, proteomic profiles by MALDI-TOF MS represents a rapid and reliable method for identifying clinical Candida species preserved in culture collections and may present clear benefits when compared with the performance of existing daily routine methods applied at health centres and hospitals.

  8. DETECTION AND ISOLATION OF CD59 FROM HUMAN SEMINAL PLASMA

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    A REZAIE

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. CD59 is one of the complement regulatory proteins (CRPs which exert inhibitory function by blocking the formation of C5b-9 complex or Membrane Attacks complex (MAC. Regarding the therapeutic role of CD59 in treatment of pathological effects in uncontrolled activation of complements system and its efficiency to overcome the hyper-acute rejection, CD59 was suggested for maintenance of transplanted organ. In this study We determined and isolated CD59 from seminal plasma. Methods. Six normospermic sample according to WHO standards were chosen. Plasma of samples was separated and to remove the postasomes, the seminal plama was ultra centrifuged. CD59 was detected by Dot-Blot using CD59 mAb (MEM43. The molecular weight and purity of protein was detected by SOS-PAGE method follwed by Westerm Blot. Results. Protein was present in the 6.5 ml and 15ml of gel fitration fractions. Molecular weight based on marker size in these two fractions was 65 and 21KD respectively. Discussion. CD59 had previously beem purified by lysis of erythrocyte cell membrane. Because of use of detergent and preservative agents, this method decreased physiologic effects of the protein. In this study the isolation was performed from prostasome granules" without using of any detergent and preservative agents.

  9. Human mesenchymal stromal cells : biological characterization and clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the characterization of the biological and functional properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), isolated from different tissue sources. The differentiation capacity of MSCs from fetal and adult tissues has been tested and compared. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has

  10. Molecular characterization of Egyptian human and anima Echinococcus granulosus isolates by RAPD-PCR technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Magda E; Bishara, Sawsan A; Helmy, Hanan; Oteifa, Nihad M; El-Hoseiny, Laila M; Ramzy, Reda M R; Ahmed, Mona A

    2004-04-01

    Five primers of known, but arbitrary nucleotide sequence (OPH-03, OPH-05, OPH-12, OPH-15, OPH-18) were used to detect genetic variability in Egyptian human, camel and pig E. granulosus isolates. OPH-03, OPH-05 & OPH-15 proved useful as genetic markers of strain variation, while OPH-12 and OPH-18 allowed distinction at the genus level i.e. diversified from Cysticercus tenuicollis. OPH-03 was the most effective giving sharp distinct banding pattern and the least values of similarity coefficients. Some variations were detected within E. granulosus isolates from the same host. The level of heterogeneity was low in three of the human isolates, camel and pig strains. Individual variation was detectable within other 3 human isolates. Human and camel isolates were the most related pair, having similar patterns and the highest similarity coefficients. The study implies that human cases in Egypt are of the camel/dog strain, and camels are important hosts for the transmission of human hydatidosis.

  11. In vitro drug susceptibility of 2275 clinical non-tuberculous Mycobacterium isolates of 49 species in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Laan, T. van der; Dekhuijzen, R.; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D. van

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 2275 clinical isolates of 49 species of non-tuberculous mycobacteria isolated in The Netherlands were subjected to standardised drug susceptibility testing using the Middlebrook 7H10 agar dilution method. Clarithromycin and rifabutin were most active, with 87% and 83% of all isolates,

  12. Line probe assay for differentiation within Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Evaluation on clinical specimens and isolates including Mycobacterium pinnipedii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Marianne Kirstine; Bek, Dorte; Rasmussen, Erik Michael

    2009-01-01

    A line probe assay (GenoType MTBC) was evaluated for species differentiation within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). We included 387 MTBC isolates, 43 IS6110 low-copy MTBC isolates, 28 clinical specimens with varying microscopy grade, and 30 isolates of non-tuberculous mycobacteria...

  13. Isolation of human oncogene sequences (v-fes homologue) from a cosmid library.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groffen; N. Heisterkamp; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); W. van de Ven (Wim); J.R. Stephenson

    1982-01-01

    textabstractTo define the human homolog (or homologs) of transforming sequences (v-fes gene) common to Gardner (GA) and Snyder Theilen (ST) isolates of feline sarcoma virus (FeSV), a representative library of human lung carcinoma DNA in a cosmid vector system was constructed. Three cosmid clones

  14. «Veillonella massiliensis», a new anaerobic species isolated from human colostrum

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    Amadou Hamidou Togo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We report here the main characteristics of “Veillonella massiliensis” strain Marseille-P3594T (CSUR P3594T that was isolated from two human colostrum samples from two different mothers. Keywords: Culturomics, Taxonomy, Colostrum, Human Breast Milk, Veillonella massiliensis

  15. Beta-cell function in isolated human pancreatic islets in long-term tissue culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1981-01-01

    Human pancreatic islets were isolated by collagenase treatment of pancreatic tissue obtained from 27 individuals aged 12 to 69 years. The islets were maintained free floating in tissue culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with calf or human serum. In two cases the insulin production was followed...

  16. Exploring the contribution of efflux on the resistance to fluoroquinolones in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costa, Sofia SANTOS

    2011-10-27

    Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance mediated by efflux systems is still poorly characterized in Staphylococcus aureus, despite the description of several efflux pumps (EPs) for this bacterium. In this work we used several methodologies to characterize the efflux activity of 52 S. aureus isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin collected in a hospital in Lisbon, Portugal, in order to understand the role played by these systems in the resistance to fluoroquinolones. Results Augmented efflux activity was detected in 12 out of 52 isolates and correlated with increased resistance to fluoroquinolones. Addition of efflux inhibitors did not result in the full reversion of the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype, yet it implied a significant decrease in the resistance levels, regardless of the type(s) of mutation(s) found in the quinolone-resistance determining region of grlA and gyrA genes, which accounted for the remaining resistance that was not efflux-mediated. Expression analysis of the genes coding for the main efflux pumps revealed increased expression only in the presence of inducing agents. Moreover, it showed that not only different substrates can trigger expression of different EP genes, but also that the same substrate can promote a variable response, according to its concentration. We also found isolates belonging to the same clonal type that showed different responses towards drug exposure, thus evidencing that highly related clinical isolates may diverge in the efflux-mediated response to noxious agents. The data gathered by real-time fluorometric and RT-qPCR assays suggest that S. aureus clinical isolates may be primed to efflux antimicrobial compounds. Conclusions The result