WorldWideScience

Sample records for human clinical investigations

  1. Clinical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    Hiller, D.A., Elliott, J.P.: Tubal Ligation Syndrome Myth or Reality. Presented: Armed Forces Division of ACOG, New Orleans, Louisiana, October 1977...Molecular Weight Immunoreactive Glucagon Levels in Patients with the Post Prandial Syndrome . (Abst.) Western Society for Clinical Research, 1979. (3...Glucagon Levels in Patients witl the Post Prandial Syndrome . Presented: Western Society Meetings, Western Society for Clinical Research, February 1979. (3

  2. Performance of line-scanning confocal microscopy in human skin: investigation of potential for clinical translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Bjorg; Peterson, Gary; Abeytunge, Sanjeewa; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2011-03-01

    Line-scanning, using 8-10 optical components, linear-array detectors and custom-FPGA electronics, may enable smaller, simpler and lower-cost confocal microscopes to accelerate translation to the clinic. The adaptability of commercially available low-cost array detectors for confocal microscopy is being investigated. Measurements of optical sectioning and lateral resolution showed good agreement with theory, and are comparable to that of point-scanning systems. LSFs through full thickness of human epidermis show a two-fold degradation in sectioning performance. Imaging of human epidermis in vivo demonstrates nuclear and cellular detail down to the basal layer with a bench top setup and also a compact clinical prototype. Blood flow in oral mucosa can be imaged using the clinical prototype. However, speckle and background noise degrade contrast and resolution of the image.

  3. Future requirements. Clinical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.

    2002-01-01

    Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics......Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics...

  4. Clinical Investigator Inspector List (CLIIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Clinical Investigator Inspection List (CLIIL) contains names, addresses, and other pertinent information gathered from inspections of clinical investigators who...

  5. A Pilot Clinical Study to Investigate the Human Whole Blood Spectrum Characteristics in the Sub-THz Region

    CERN Document Server

    Tseng, Tzu-Fang; Gao, Hao-Cheng; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    We have conducted a pilot clinical study to not only investigate the THz spectra of ex-vivo fresh human whole blood of 28 patients following 8-hours fasting guideline, but also to find out the critical blood ingredients of which the concentration dominantly affects those THz spectra. A great difference between the THz absorption properties of human blood among different people was observed, while the difference can be up to ~15% of the averaged absorption coefficient of the 28 samples. Our pilot clinical study indicates that triglyceride and red blood cell were two dominant factors to have significant clinically defined negative correlation to the sub-THz absorption coefficients.

  6. Investigation of the mechanical properties of the human crural fascia and their possible clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, Carla; Pavan, Piero; Pachera, Paola; De Caro, Raffaele; Natali, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of deep fasciae strongly affect muscular actions, development of pathologies, such as acute and chronic compartment syndromes, and the choice of the various fascial flaps. Actually, a clear knowledge of the mechanical characterization of these tissues still lacks. This study focuses attention on experimental tests of different regions of human crural fascia taken from an adult frozen donor. Tensile tests along proximal-distal and medial-lateral direction at a strain rate of 120 %/s were performed at the purpose of evaluating elastic properties. Viscous phenomena were investigated by applying incremental relaxation tests at total strain of 7, 9 and 11 % and observing stress decay for a time interval of 240 s. The elastic response showed that the fascia in the anterior compartment is stiffer than in the posterior compartment, both along the proximal-distal and medial-lateral directions. This result can explain why the compartment syndromes are more frequent in this compartment with respect to posterior one. Furthermore, the fascia is stiffer along the proximal-distal than along medial-lateral direction. This means that the crural fascia can adapt to the muscular variation of volume in a transversal direction, while along the main axis it could be considered as a structure that contributes to transmitting the muscular forces at a distance and connecting the different segments of the limb. The stress relaxation tests showed that the crural fascia needs 120 s to decrease stress of 40 %, suggesting a similar time also in the living so that the static stretching could have an effect on the fascia.

  7. Epidemiological Investigation of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men Attending a Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic in Hangzhou Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men attending a sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinic in Hangzhou area. Methods Male subjects (n=375) aged 18-70 years,attending the STD clinic were recruited. Urethral swabs were assessed for HPV DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)with the consensus primers MY09/11. HPV genotypes of positive PCR products were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms and direct sequence analysis. Results Of the 375 swabs collected, 305 (81.3%) yielded sufficient DNA for the subsequent HPV analysis. Among the 305 subjects, the prevalence of HPV was 13.8%. Nononcogenic HPV types were found in 8.5% (26/305) of subjects, oncogenic types in 4.3% (13/305), and multiple types in 1.0% (3/305). The prevalence of HPV infection was higher in subjects from urban area than in those from rural area (P<0.05). The prevalence was also higher in those who received fewer years of education (P<0.05) and those who had more sex partners (P<0.05). Conclusions HPV infection among men at high risk is not uncommon. The detection rate of HPV DNA is significantly related to some sociodemographic factors, such as residence, educational level and the number of sex partners.

  8. Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-30

    Houston Gerald B. Merenstein, MD, Univ. of Colo. Health Sciences Center (9) Dept of Pediatri -cs" . . . (10) Associate Investigators (11) Key Words...Patsology (10) Assoc’f ef Js1gators Willis Rieker, CPT, MC (11) Key Words: Rick E. Martinez , DAC blood component removal Judy Barber, DAC Patricia...89 Markowski, J.------------------------- 174 Martinez , R.-------------------------- 273 McCubbin, J.A.------------------------ 143 McCullen

  9. Clinical investigation program, fiscal year 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schydlower, Manuel

    1992-02-01

    Subject report identifies the research activities conducted at William Beaumont Army Medical Center by investigators who had protocols approved by the Clinical Investigation Committee, the Institutional Review Board, and the Animal Use Committee. This report includes all protocols registered with the Department of Clinical Investigation during FY 1991. All known presentations and publications are also included. The research protocols described were conducted under the provisions of AR 40-38 (Clinical Investigation Program); AR 40-7 (Use of Investigational Drugs in Humans and the Use of Schedule 1 Controlled Substances); AR 70-25 (Usle of Volunteers as Subjects of Research); HSC 40-32 (Management of Clinical Investigation Protocols and Reports); and AR 70-18 (The Use of Animals in DOS programs).

  10. 78 FR 63988 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... investigators on issues of greatest importance for successful clinical research. Date and Time: The training... FDA to communicate directly with clinical investigators on issues of greatest importance for... medicine; Promote communication between clinical investigators and FDA; Enhance...

  11. Medical Services: Clinical Investigation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    epidemiological surveys that involve tests or procedures of no more than minimal risk. (See the glossary for the definition of an epidemiological survey... definite criteria.) b. Who will be notified. G–10. Adverse reactions Include— a. Definition of subject reactions. b. Immediate reporting. c. Routine...some laser and hemodialysis systems. Subinvestigator See associate investigator. Test A p r o c e s s b y w h i c h d a t a a c c u m u l a t e d t o

  12. 76 FR 45577 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... that FDA is not responsible for providing access to electrical outlets. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I... of clinical investigators with knowledge, experience, and commitment to investigational medicine...'s role in experimental medicine; and Improve the quality of data while enhancing subject...

  13. 77 FR 60440 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... clinical investigators on issues of greatest importance for successful clinical research. Date and Time... importance for successful clinical research. II. Description of the Training Course A. Purpose The training... and comprised of approximately 26 lectures, each lasting between 30 and ] 45 minutes. The course...

  14. 75 FR 57472 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... outlets. If you need special accommodations due to a disability, please contact Nancy Masiello at least 7 days in advance. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Clinical trial investigators play a critical role in the... studies, and chemistry/manufacturing information) that supports initial clinical trials in...

  15. Investigation on a focus of human trichinellosis revealed by an atypical clinical case after wild-boar (Sus scrofa pork consumption in northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano F.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Trichinellosis is one of the most serious foodborne parasitic zoonoses in Europe. Wild carnivorous and omnivorous hosts are the main reservoirs of Trichinella spp. nematodes in nature. In the winter of 2008-2009, an atypical clinical case of trichinellosis occurred for the consumption of pork from a wild boar (Sus scrofa hunted in southwestern Alps in Italy. The symptomatic individual showed delayed development of oedemas in the lower limbs and eosinophilia, which appeared three months after infection. Muscle samples harboured 3.8 larvae/g, which were identified as Trichinella britovi. During the epidemiological investigation, anti-Trichinella IgG were detected in five hunters.

  16. Pooled human platelet lysate versus fetal bovine serum—investigating the proliferation rate, chromosome stability and angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells intended for clinical use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trojahn Kølle, Stig-Frederik; Oliveri, Roberto S; Glovinski, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    Because of an increasing focus on the use of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) in clinical trials, the culture conditions for these cells are being optimized. We compared the proliferation rates and chromosomal stability of ASCs that had been cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM......) supplemented with either pooled human platelet lysate (pHPL) or clinical-grade fetal bovine serum (FBS) (DMEM(pHPL) versus DMEM(FBS))....

  17. Investigation of standing wave formation in a human skull for a clinical prototype of a large-aperture, transcranial MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) phased array: An experimental and simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Junho; Pulkkinen, Aki; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    Standing wave formation in an ex vivo human skull was investigated using a clinical prototype of a 30 cm diameter with 15 cm radius of curvature, low frequency (230 kHz), hemispherical transcranial Magnetic Resonance guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) phased-array. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted with changing aperture size and f-number configurations of the phased array, and qualitatively and quantitatively examined the acoustic pressure variation at the focus due to stand...

  18. The clinical investigator-subject relationship: a contextual approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resnik David B

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nature of the relationship between a clinical investigator and a research subject has generated considerable debate because the investigator occupies two distinct roles: clinician and scientist. As a clinician, the investigator has duties to provide the patient with optimal care and undivided loyalty. As a scientist, the investigator has duties to follow the rules, procedures and methods described in the protocol. Results and conclusion In this article, I present a contextual approach to the investigator-subject relationship. The extent of the investigator's duty to provide the patient/subject with clinical care can vary from one situation to the next, as a function of several factors, including: the research design, benefits and risks of the research; the subject's reasonable expectations, motivations, and vulnerabilities; the investigator's ability to benefit the subject; and the investigator's prior relationship with the subject. These and other factors need to be considered when determining the clinical investigator's obligations to provide clinical care to human research subjects. In some research contexts, the investigator has extensive clinical obligations to the patient/subject; in others, the investigator has minimal ones.

  19. 77 FR 76049 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... guidance entitled ``Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations.'' The document was published with an... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice;...

  20. Investigating the productivity model for clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Hooshmand Bahabadi, Abbas; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives of quantitative researches is assessment of models developed by qualitative studies. Models validation through their testing implies that the designed model is representative of the existed facts. Hence, this study was conducted to assess the clinical nurses' productivity model presented for Iranian nurses' productivity. The sample of the study consisted of 360 nurses of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The research tool was a questionnaire for measuring the components of clinical nurses' productivity. After completing all steps of instrument psychometric and getting answers from the participants, the factors introduced in the questionnaire were named and then Lisrel Path Analysis tests were performed to analyze the components of the model. The results of the model test revealed there is an internal relationship among different components of the model. Regression Analysis showed that each increasing unit in components of the model was to be added to central variable of productivity model -human resource. Model components altogether explained 20 % of clinical nurses' productivity variance. This study found that the important component of productivity is human resources that are reciprocally related to other components of the model. Therefore, it can be stated that the managers can promote the productivity by using efficient strategies to correct human resource patterns.

  1. Investigations of Human Question Answering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    Aiello, & Miller, 1975; Graesser & Black, 1985; Graesser & Golding, 1988; Norman, 1973; Norman & Rumelhart, 1975; Piaget , 1952; Shanon, 1983; Trabasso...Rumelhart, D. E. (1975). Explorations in cognition. San Francisco: Freeman. Piaget , J. (1952). The origins of intelligence in children. New York...California 5825 Callaghan, Suite 225 Santa Barbara, CA 93106 San Antonio, TX 78228 Dr. Ralph Dusek Dr. Jean -Claude Falmagne V-P Human Factors Irvine

  2. 21 CFR 312.40 - General requirements for use of an investigational new drug in a clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... new drug in a clinical investigation. 312.40 Section 312.40 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Administrative Actions § 312.40 General requirements for use of an investigational new drug in...

  3. A clinical and investigational study of donovanosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeranna S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A clinical and investigational study of 25 cases of Donovanosis was undertaken. The incidence was found to be 1.53% of all STD cases and 2.9% of GUD. M:F ratio was 2.12:1. Incidence was more in unmarried people. Fleshy exuberant type was seen in 88% of cases. Two patients (8% had extragenital ulcers. Donovan bodies were found in 88%. Pseudo elephantiasis was seen in 8 patients. Biopsy was done in 8 cases and showed ocanthosis, plasma cell infiltration and pseudo epitheliomatous hyperplasia. One patient developed squamous cell carcinoma of vulva.

  4. Trypophobia: an investigation of clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlok-Barnard, Michelle; Stein, Dan J

    2017-04-13

    Trypophobia refers to the fear of, or aversion to, clusters of holes. We assessed clinical features of trypophobia and investigated whether it most resembled a specific phobia or obsessive-compulsive disorder. An online survey was conducted to gather information on sociodemographic variables, course and duration, severity, associated features, comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, and levels of psychological distress and impairment in individuals with trypophobia. The survey also explored whether such individuals experienced more fear or disgust, and whether symptoms showed more resemblance to a specific phobia or to obsessive-compulsive disorder. Associations of symptom severity and duration with degree of impairment were investigated. One hundred and ninety-five individuals completed the questionnaire. Symptoms were chronic and persistent. The most common associated comorbidities were major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. Trypophobia was associated with significant psychological distress and impairment. The majority of individuals experienced disgust rather than fear when confronted with clusters of holes, but were more likely to meet DSM-5 criteria for specific phobia than for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Symptom severity and duration were associated with functional impairment. Given that individuals with trypophobia suffer clinically significant morbidity and comorbidity, this condition deserves further attention from clinicians and researchers.

  5. [Hyperandrogenism: clinical aspects, investigation and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, A; Parotte, M C; Gaspard, U; Khalife, A

    1999-04-01

    Androgen excess (AE) is one of the most common endocrine disorders, affecting 10% of adult women before the menopause. The clinical picture varies widely depending on the etiology of AE. Most of these women are suffering from hirsutism, acne, menstrual disturbances, anovulation and obesity. Virilization is unusual, except in patients with ovary or adrenal cancer. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and idiopathic hirsutism (IH) are the most frequent causes of androgen excess, accounting for more than 90% of the cases. The pathogenesis of PCOS is still an unresolved problem. A hereditary predisposition has been suggested. Enzymatic deficiency is a less frequent cause of AE, the most common deficiency being the non classic 21-OH deficiency (NCAH). AE has been implicated as a side effect of many drugs. Ovary and adrenal tumours are unusual, however, they must be considered especially in case of severe hirsutism or virilization. Complementary investigations are selected based on the result of clinical examination. Pharmacologic therapy, usually with anti-androgens, is the most widely used treatment for PCOS, IH and NCAH. Surgical therapy should be considered only when there is a particular indication such as Cushing's syndrome, ovary or adrenal tumours.

  6. Investigating human infant anthropomorphism in products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellen, K.; Saaksjarvi, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we set out to investigate the nature and effects of infant anthropomorphism in products, i.e. products that share features of human infants. Across four studies, evidence suggests that infant anthropomorphism comprise four dimensions: sweetness, simplicity, sympathy, and smallness. We

  7. Implementing human factors in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Methods Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have received aviation-derived human factors training. Results The human factors training was evaluated positively, and thought to be both acceptable and relevant to practice. However, the staff found it harder to implement what they had learned in their own clinical areas, and this was principally attributed to features of the informal organisational cultures. Conclusions In order to successfully apply human factors approaches in hospital, careful consideration needs to be given to the local context and informal culture of clinical practice. PMID:24631959

  8. Clinical science and human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaud, J J

    2001-09-01

    The debate between mentalism/cognitivism and behaviorism is analyzed, and it is concluded that behaviorism is the philosophy more closely associated with psychology as a behavioral science, the cognitive approach being more closely aligned with biological science. Specific objections to mentalistic interpretations of behavioral phenomena are detailed, and examples from clinical psychology are used to show the importance of behavioral approaches in applied domains. It is argued that the relation between behavior theory and clinical psychology is critical to the continued advancement of applied psychology. Behavior analysis is offered as a direct, applied extension of behavior theory as well as a highly practical and effective approach for understanding, explaining, and modifying the factors that contribute to and maintain maladaptive behaviors.

  9. 76 FR 20575 - Disqualification of a Clinical Investigator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ...., drugs) later conducted a clinical investigation studying a different type of test article (e.g., devices... article or conduct any clinical investigation that supports an application for a research or marketing... test articles''; ``continuation of the investigation'' to ``continuation of any investigation'';...

  10. Clinical Investigation Program. Annual Research Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-30

    Stereoscope 79/118 $6149.00 Ion Generator 78/116 $5000.00 Poultry Cages 79/301 $2929.00 Microtome/Cryostat 79/304 $5494.72 Tissue Embedder 79/300... Mycology : Assessment of bacteriologic and seroligic parameters of clinically-important mycoses normal and immunologic comprised host. Presented: American

  11. 76 FR 80948 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards, and Food and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... developed to promote the initiation of clinical investigations to evaluate the medical devices under FDA's... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration Decisions...

  12. Clinical Investigation Program. Annual Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-30

    Ethics of Newborn ICU. Presented: Chautauqua Colorado Nurses’ Association, Vail, CO, 11-12 July 1981. Ellis, C.: High Risk Pregnancy. Presented: Chautauqua...detail the anatomical development embryologically of the flexor tendon sheaths of the human fectus to 20 weeks of age and to correlate this development

  13. Clinical Investigation Program, Fiscal Year 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-03

    Clinic at WBAMC with a complaint of sore throat ’ who receive a throat culture will automatically be Included in the study., It will be conducted over...intubate 2 cats employing a laryngoscope and endotracheal tube. Animals will be anesthetized with ketamine HCL (22 mg/kg, given intramuscularly), with...atropine (0.04 mg/kg, subcutaneously). Up to 2 additional half-doses (11 mg/kg) of ketamine may be given if needed. Pre- anesthesia with tranquilizer

  14. Clinical features of dysthymia and age: a clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, S; Patria, L; Ziero, S; Rocca, G; Bogetto, F

    2001-09-20

    A few authors have described the clinical picture of dysthymia in groups of elderly patients and pointed out differences from literature reports of dysthymia in younger adults. The present study, an attempt to analyze age effects on clinical characteristics of dysthymia throughout a lifetime, was performed in a sample of 106 patients, all aged > or =18 years, who were diagnosed according to DSM-IV. The patients were evaluated using: (1) a semistructured interview to assess clinical features, family history and previous treatments; (2) the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; (3) the Interview for Recent Life Events; and (4) the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Statistical analysis with stepwise logistic regression revealed that age was positively related to concomitant medical illnesses and to the total score of recent life events, but negatively related to the presence of avoidant or dependent personality disorders. The data suggested different etiologic pathways in older and younger patients. Dysthymia appeared to be associated in younger adults with abnormalities of personality; in the elderly, with a history of health problems and life losses.

  15. CLINICAL AND INVESTIGATIONAL STUDY OF DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasimham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To compare the clinical features and biochemical profile in DKA. To assess the response in the patients with standard treatment of DKA. Clinical descriptions of polyuric states resembling diabetes mellitus have been described in the Ebers papyrus of Egypt in 15th century BC . 1,2 A yurvedic literature from the times of Charaka and Sushrutha, the ancient Indian physicians identified two forms of “MadhuMeha” ( H oneyed Urine in 400 BC . 3 John Rolo of England in 1797 was one of 1st who coined the term diabetes mellitus. William Prout of E ngland described diabetic coma during 1810 – 20. In 1886, Dreschfeld8 described DKA and HHNS (Hyper osmolar Hyperglycemic Non - ketotic Syndrome. In 1922 Banting , Best, Collip and Macleod isolated and clinically used insulin and later won Nobel prize for that memorable invention. SETTING: Inpatients of king George Hospital attached to Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam . METHODS: Diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made according to the inclusion criteria. Hyperglycemia >250 mg/dl, acidosis with blood pH <7.3, serum bicarbonate <15 mEq/l, urine positive for ketones. RESULTS: Of the 100 patients admitted for diabetic ketoacidosis; 84 had type 2 diabetes (84% and 16(16% were type I diabetes. Average age at the time of presentation was 42.9±12.9 years. Th e commonest precipitating factor was infection (56% followed by other factors (28% and irregular treatment (16%. The most common clinical features at the time of presentation were vomiting, abdominal pain, acidotic breathing and dehydration. The values for RBS, HCO3, and pH were 355.3±69.1, 14.9±3.4 and 7.2±0.1 respectively. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSION: Most common precipitating factors are infection and omission of insulin or irregular treatment. Most common clinical features at the time of presentati on are vomiting, abdominal pain, dehydration, acidotic breathing and tachycardia. Mortality rate in diabetic

  16. Oligocone trichromacy: clinical and molecular genetic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mette K G; Christoffersen, Nynne L B; Sander, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    of congenital nystagmus, and subjectively normal or near-normal color vision; five patients reported photophobia. Clinical examinations revealed largely normal fundi, normal Goldmann visual field results with the IV/4e target, and normal color discrimination or mild color vision deficiency. Electrophysiological...... of unknown significance in CNGB3 and PDE6C in two other patients. CONCLUSIONS: Oligocone trichromacy is a heterogeneous condition with respect to both phenotypic appearance and genetic background. The finding of mutations in genes known to be involved in complete and incomplete achromatopsia supports...

  17. Azoospermia: clinical, hormonal, and biochemical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimas, J; Papadopoulou, F; Ioannidis, S; Spanos, E; Tarlatzis, B; Bontis, J; Mantalenakis, S

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, hormonal and biochemical characteristics of infertile men with azoospermia. A total of 187 azoospermic out of 2610 infertile men (7.2%) were studied. Mean testicular volume and basal plasma levels of FSH were the most useful parameters concerning the evaluation of azoospermia. Basal plasma levels of LH and T were useful only in azoospermic men with hypogonadism, whereas plasma PRL levels, semen volume, and seminal plasma fructose levels were not found to be of common use except in selected cases.

  18. Clinical investigation of "people-oriented, humanization with teaching" for student-nurse%对实习护士进行人性化带教的临床探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effect of "people-oriented,humanization with teaching"on the student-nurse.Methods Two hundred student-nurses in our hospital during July 2007 to July 2009 were choosed.The 200 nurses were divided into two groups:patients with internship during July 2007 to July 2008 were in the control group,during July 2008 to July 2009 were in the experiment group and 100 nurses in each group.The experimental group was implemented by user-friendly teaching,the control group was implemented by traditional clinical teaching.At the end of practiceed the same survey was corried out,and the results was evaluated and andly.Results After clinical teaching,the experimental group was significantly better than the control group.There were significant differences in performance and awareness of the clinical practice between the two groups ( P < 0.05 ).Conclusions "People-oriented,humanization with teaching" is an important measure in modern nursing education.Teachers with extensive experience in clinical care,professional ethics and the spirit of working hard.They can provide good learning platform for the studentnurses.It can improve their practical ability,express ability and the skills of analyzing and solving problems.A solid foundation is made for graduating student-nurse able to gain a job and can become a highly qualified nurse.%目的 探讨人性化带教对实习护士的临床影响.方法 选择2007年7月至2009年7月山东省莱州市人民医院实习学生200名,2007年7月至2008年7月实习护生100名为对照组实施传统临床带教,2008年7月至2009年7月实习护士100名为实验组实施人性化带教,分别于实习期末进行相同问卷调查,对其调查结果进行评价分析.结果 经过临床带教后,实验组明显优于对照组,两组护生对在临床实践的认识程度及临床实践成绩存在明显差异(P<0.05).结论 以人为本实施人性化带教是现代护理教育的重要措施,带教

  19. Clinical Investigation of Benign Asbestos Pleural Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Aoe, Keisuke; Kato, Katsuya; Yokoyama, Takako; Usami, Ikuji; Onishi, Kazuo; Mizuhashi, Keiichi; Yusa, Toshikazu; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    There is no detailed information about benign asbestos pleural effusion (BAPE). The aim of the study was to clarify the clinical features of BAPE. The criteria of enrolled patients were as follows: (1) history of asbestos exposure; (2) presence of pleural effusion determined by chest X-ray, CT, and thoracentesis; and (3) the absence of other causes of effusion. Clinical information was retrospectively analysed and the radiological images were reviewed. There were 110 BAPE patients between 1991 and 2012. All were males and the median age at diagnosis was 74 years. The median duration of asbestos exposure and period of latency for disease onset of BAPE were 31 and 48 years, respectively. Mean values of hyaluronic acid, adenosine deaminase, and carcinoembryonic antigen in the pleural fluid were 39,840 ng/mL, 23.9 IU/L, and 1.8 ng/mL, respectively. Pleural plaques were detected in 98 cases (89.1%). Asbestosis was present in 6 (5.5%) cases, rounded atelectasis was detected in 41 (37.3%) cases, and diffuse pleural thickening (DPT) was detected in 30 (27.3%) cases. One case developed lung cancer (LC) before and after BAPE. None of the cases developed malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) during the follow-up.

  20. Clinical Investigation of Benign Asbestos Pleural Effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobukazu Fujimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no detailed information about benign asbestos pleural effusion (BAPE. The aim of the study was to clarify the clinical features of BAPE. The criteria of enrolled patients were as follows: (1 history of asbestos exposure; (2 presence of pleural effusion determined by chest X-ray, CT, and thoracentesis; and (3 the absence of other causes of effusion. Clinical information was retrospectively analysed and the radiological images were reviewed. There were 110 BAPE patients between 1991 and 2012. All were males and the median age at diagnosis was 74 years. The median duration of asbestos exposure and period of latency for disease onset of BAPE were 31 and 48 years, respectively. Mean values of hyaluronic acid, adenosine deaminase, and carcinoembryonic antigen in the pleural fluid were 39,840 ng/mL, 23.9 IU/L, and 1.8 ng/mL, respectively. Pleural plaques were detected in 98 cases (89.1%. Asbestosis was present in 6 (5.5% cases, rounded atelectasis was detected in 41 (37.3% cases, and diffuse pleural thickening (DPT was detected in 30 (27.3% cases. One case developed lung cancer (LC before and after BAPE. None of the cases developed malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM during the follow-up.

  1. Investigation of standing-wave formation in a human skull for a clinical prototype of a large-aperture, transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) phased array: an experimental and simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Junho; Pulkkinen, Aki; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-02-01

    Standing-wave formation in an ex vivo human skull was investigated using a clinical prototype of a 30-cm diameter with 15-cm radius of curvature, low-frequency (230 kHz), hemispherical transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound phased array. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted with changing aperture size and f -number configurations of the phased array and qualitatively and quantitatively examined the acoustic pressure variation at the focus due to standing waves. The results demonstrated that the nodes and antinodes of standing wave produced by the small-aperture array were clearly seen at approximately every 3 mm. The effect of the standing wave became more pronounced as the focus was moved closer to skull base. However, a sharp focus was seen for the full array, and there was no such standing-wave pattern in the acoustic plane or near the skull base. This study showed that the fluctuation pressure amplitude would be greatly reduced by using a large-scale, hemispherical phased array with a low f-number.

  2. Human Motion Video Analysis in Clinical Practice (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    V.V. Borzikov; N.N. Rukina; O.V. Vorobyova; A.N. Kuznetsov; A. N. Belova

    2015-01-01

    The development of new rehabilitation approaches to neurological and traumatological patients requires understanding of normal and pathological movement patterns. Biomechanical analysis of video images is the most accurate method of investigation and quantitative assessment of human normal and pathological locomotion. The review of currently available methods and systems of optical human motion analysis used in clinical practice is presented here. Short historical background is provi...

  3. Investigation of Human Nail Microstructure with Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeva, A. R.; Bakulin, E. Y.; Denisova, L. A.; Maev, R. Gr.

    Investigation of a human fingernail and the extraction of the data on its microstructure and elastic properties is important in three main aspects. First of all, various diseases of the nail can be differentiated more precisely; second of all, it is possible to non-invasively track during time the effects of a cosmetic product upon the nail; third of all, because various processes in the organism have a strong influence upon the nail plate growth, the monitoring of the nail morphology and its mechanical properties may be used as additional information for the diagnosis of a number of medical disorders, such as systemic sclerosis, psoriasis, chronic hand eczema, anemia etc. The aim of the present study was to carry out a detailed ultrasound investigation in the high-frequency range (25-50 MHz) of a human nail including micro-anatomical structure imaging and ultrasound velocity evaluation, using B-scans obtained with a scanning acoustic microscope. On the images, exact topology of the nail, nail matrix and the underlying bone have been revealed. Additionally, a certain type of inclined internal layering along the nails of some individuals has been found, which was not reported in previous ultrasonic studies of the nail.

  4. Clinical Investigation Program Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    Neonates (C) 9A89 Kueser, T. J. Pediatric Intubatlon Training 115 Utlizing the Feline Model (0) xiii Protocol Number Page 361187 Lehman, R. M...3,309. Periodic Review Date: Sep 89 Gifts: None Decision: Continue OBJECTIVE: The objective of this proposed study is to elucidate the ecology of...Sheet m Prot No: 9A89 . Status: Ongoing m TITLE: Pediatric Intubation Training Utillzing the Feline Model Principal Investigator: COL Richard A. tIanks

  5. Clinical Investigation Program Annual Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-30

    The Acute Scrotum in Childhood: A Review. In press - World J Urol. Wilson, T.M.: Retroperitoneal Fibrosis in Association with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm...p2. .- I,-. -. % (C) Direct result of approved registered protocol. 󈧬, ~022 ;. Wilson, T.M.: Retroperitoneal Fibrosis in Association with Abdcminal...Michael Perry, COL, MC (9) Dept/Svc: Medicine/ Pulmonar (10) Assoc Investigators: (11) Key Words: Dead Space High Frequency Ventilation Carbon Dioxide (12

  6. Clinical investigation on gastric oxalate absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志强; 叶章群; 曾令启; 杨为民

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the stomach role in exogenous oxalate absorption.Methods The kinetic variation of urinary oxalate excretion (mg/min) in 10 healthy adults and 8 patients who underwent total gastrectomy was investigated before and after an oral spinach oxalate load. The bioavailability of the oxalate load in the healthy adults was calculated and compared with that in the patients.Results The oxalate content in the oral spinach load was 2567-2670 mg. The urinary oxalate excretion (mg/min) in the 10 healthy adults increased significantly 20 minutes after loading (this increase was compared against their basic oxalate excretion level of 0.0331±0.0203). Further observations after loading include: a first peak of oxalate excretion 40 minutes after loading; an oxalate excretion level double that of the basic level after 60 minutes (0.0732±0.0294) and a second peak appearing at 3 hours (P<0.01). A "first peak" (0.063%±0.062%) was not in any of the patients who underwent a total gastrectomy. Furthermore, a bioavailability of oxalate, which was 50% lower than that in the healthy subjects, appeared 60 minutes after loading (0.098%±0.071%, P<0.01). Conclusions The stomach is a powerful oxalate absorption organ under normal physiological conditions. Further investigation on the relationship between stomach dysfunction and urinary calcium oxalate formation is needed.

  7. Clinical investigation of surgery for intermittent exotropia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-qing YANG; Ye SHEN; Yang-shun GU; Wei HAN

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the time and postoperative binocular vision of strabismus surgery for children with intermittent exotropia (X (T)). Methods: A retrospective investigation was conducted in 80 child patients with intermittent exotropia. Pre- and postoperative angles of deviation fixating at near (33cm) and distant targets (6m) were measured with the prolonged alternate cover testing. The binocular function was assessed with synoptophore. Twenty-one patients took the postoperative synoptophore exercise. Results: (1) A week after surgery, 96.2% of the 80 patients had binocular normotopia, while a year after surgery, 91.3% of the 80 patients had binocular normotopia; (2) Preoperatively, 58 patients had near stereoacuity, while postoperatively, 72 patients achieved near stereoacuity (P<0.05); (3) Preoperatively, 64 patients had Grade I for the synoptophore evaluation and postoperatively, 76 patients achieved Grade I. Meanwhile, 55 patients had Grade Ⅱpreoperatively and 72 achieved Grade Ⅱ postoperatively. For Grade Ⅲ, there were 49 patients preoperatively and 64 patients postoperatively (P<0.05); (4) Patients of 5~8 years old had a significantly better recovery rate of binocular vision than those of 9~18 years old (P<0.05); (5)Patients taking postoperative synoptophore exercise had a better binocular vision than those taking no exercise (P<0.05). Conclusions: (1) Strabismus surgery can help to preserve or restore the binocular vision for intermittent exotropia; (2) Receiving the surgery at young ages may develop better postoperative binocular vision; (3) The postoperative synoptophore exercise can help to restore the binocular vision.

  8. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research Past ... the forefront of human health research today are clinical trials—studies that use human volunteers to help medical ...

  9. Clinical investigation of fatty liver by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Katsumoto; Takayama, Tetsuo; Sano, Hiroshi; Katada, Naoyuki; Takeichi, Masayuki

    1984-09-01

    Of CT 6800 studies 56 cases of diffuse fatty infiltration confirmed by liver biopsy were investigated and compared with those of chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. It was found that CT diagnosis of severe fatty infiltration (fatty liver) is specific when the ratios of CT values of liver to those of spleen are less than 0.85. This criterion was satisfied in 169 cases with fatty liver (diffuse: 141 cases, focal: 28 cases). Obesity, diabetes and alcohol abuse were the main causative factors in both diffuse and focal fatty liver. The percentage of cases showing no abnormal blood chemistry was high as compared with those in previous reports based on liver biopsy. The changes in CT values of the liver faithfully reflected the improvement of each causal factor and reciprocal changes were observed between diffuse and focal fatty liver in repeated CT examinationns. It was concluded that CT is useful in estimating the effect of treatment as well as in diagnosis of fatty liver.

  10. Human Polymorphisms as Clinical Predictors in Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Prado Montes de Oca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and serum markers in human host can predict leprosy susceptibility per se as well as be useful in classification and/or prediction of clinical variants and immunological responses in leprosy. Adequate and timely assessment of potential risks associated with these 38 host leprosy genes could diminish epidemiological burden and improve life quality of patients with this still prevalent mycobacterial disease.

  11. Postmortem Investigations Following Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Bychkov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV/AIDS is a global disease and despite intensive research it is one of the main causes of human death. Postmortem studies have proven accurate in determining the various pathologies in these patients. Aims & Objectives: Our aim was to analyze the post mortem results of individuals who died after HIV infection in the same geographical region. We evaluated the most frequent opportunistic diseases and their clinical and morphological outcomes. Methods: We studied case reports and autopsy research data from 32 patients who died after HIV infection in Smolensk, Russian Federation, between 2003 and 2008. All patients had been diagnosed with HIV infection before death, using HIV-specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunoblotting. Autopsy specimens of various organs were examined histologically and microbiologically. Findings: The mean survival period from the moment of detection of seropositivity in all the patients was less than five years. Twelve patients had a parenteral mode of contact, six had been infected by sexual contact, and 14 patients had unknown modes of infection. Most patients (69% had chronic hepatitis C. The main causes of death were various infectious diseases. The most common were generalized miliary tuberculosis and progressive secondary tuberculosis of the lungs. Three (9% patients had tuberculosis of the meninges and five (16% had peritoneal infections, but tuberculous peritonitis had not been diagnosed before death. Six patients had pulmonary tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonia simultaneously. Two (6% patients died from bacterial sepsis as a result of cervical lymphadenitis, and eight (12.5% from abscess-forming pneumonia. The opportunistic infections revealed were Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (eight patients, cytomegaloviral pneumonia (three, bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (one and mucosal candidiasis (three. In three patients, the causes of death were advanced neoplastic processes: two cases

  12. Disclosure of investigators' recruitment performance in multicenter clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Moher, David; Gluud, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends.......Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends....

  13. Assessment of technical documentation of medical devices for clinical investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roszek B; Bruijn ACP de; Drongelen AW van; Geertsma RE; BMT

    2007-01-01

    The technical documentation on non-market approved medical devices intended for clinical investigation contains major shortcomings. This could imply increased risks which could affect patient safety. The investigation described here focused on the availability and quality of the technical documentat

  14. Does Inhumanity Breed Humanity? Investigation of a Paradox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Baets, A.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    This essay investigates the thesis that inhumanity breeds humanity. Many questions arise when we try to corroborate it: Can we say anything at all about the inhumanity of human beings? Why did large-scale inhumanity occurring before 1700 not elicit a human rights regime? Was the human rights take-of

  15. HUMAN OCULAR DIROFILARIOSIS: CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Trenkić-Božinović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilarioses are zoonoses caused by filaria of the genus Dirofilaria, the parasites of domestic and wild animals. People are just random carriers of this parasite. In Europe, human dirofilariosis is caused by two species: Dirofilaria repens ( D. repens, also known as a species of The Old World , usually with the superficial localization of infection, and D. immitis, which is present throughout the world, and causes, beside superficial, visceral dirofilariosis. So far, based on the data from reference literature, it can be observed that in Serbia about 34 cases of human dirofilariosis have been diagnosed and published. It is assumed that the prevalence of this parasitosis is significantly higher as our country is an endemic area for dirofilariosis in dogs and the region where species of mosquitoes, which are transitory hosts and vectors of Dirofilaria spp., are present. The clinical picture of dirofilariosis depends on the type and location of the parasite in the human body. In our country, patients diagnosed with dirofilariosis had subcutaneous or subconjunctival infection in the majority of cases. Ocular dirofilariosis may affect the orbit and the periorbital region, the skin of the eyelids, the conjunctiva, the Tenon membrane, a retrobulbar space or has an intrabulbar localization. These patients may have a severe disability, and surgery alone can be complicated due to localization. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of this unexpected important zoonoses, with special emphasis on the importance within the ophthalmic practice.

  16. Investigating Human Evolution Using Digital Imaging & Craniometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Human evolution is an important and intriguing area of biology. The significance of evolution as a component of biology curricula, at all levels, can not be overstated; the need to make the most of opportunities to effectively educate students in evolution as a central and unifying realm of biology is paramount. Developing engaging laboratory or…

  17. Investigating Human Evolution Using Digital Imaging & Craniometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Human evolution is an important and intriguing area of biology. The significance of evolution as a component of biology curricula, at all levels, can not be overstated; the need to make the most of opportunities to effectively educate students in evolution as a central and unifying realm of biology is paramount. Developing engaging laboratory or…

  18. Recombinant human thrombopoietin: basic biology and evaluation of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuter, David J; Begley, C Glenn

    2002-11-15

    Thrombocytopenia is a common medical problem for which the main treatment is platelet transfusion. Given the increasing use of platelets and the declining donor population, identification of a safe and effective platelet growth factor could improve the management of thrombocytopenia. Thrombopoietin (TPO), the c-Mpl ligand, is the primary physiologic regulator of megakaryocyte and platelet development. Since the purification of TPO in 1994, 2 recombinant forms of the c-Mpl ligand--recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) and pegylated recombinant human megakaryocyte growth and development factor (PEG-rHuMGDF)--have undergone extensive clinical investigation. Both have been shown to be potent stimulators of megakaryocyte growth and platelet production and are biologically active in reducing the thrombocytopenia of nonmyeloablative chemotherapy. However, neither TPO has demonstrated benefit in stem cell transplantation or leukemia chemotherapy. Other clinical studies have investigated the use of TPO in treating chronic nonchemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia associated with myelodysplastic syndromes, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, thrombocytopenia due to human immunodeficiency virus, and liver disease. Based solely on animal studies, TPO may be effective in reducing surgical thrombocytopenia and bleeding, ex vivo expansion of pluripotent stem cells, and as a radioprotectant. Ongoing and future studies will help define the clinical role of recombinant TPO and TPO mimetics in the treatment of chemotherapy- and nonchemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia.

  19. Investigating antibiotic resistance in non-clinical environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona eWalsh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There have been many calls for more information about the natural resistome and these have also highlighted the importance of understanding the soil resistome in the preservation of antibiotics for the treatment of infections. However, to date there have been few studies which have investigated the culturable soil resistome, which highlights the difficulties faced by microbiologists in designing these experiments to produce meaningful data. The World Health Organization definition of resistance is the most fitting to non-clinical environmental studies: Antimicrobial resistance is resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial medicine to which it was previously sensitive. The ideal investigation of non-clinical environments for antibiotic resistance of clinical relevance would be using standardized guidelines and breakpoints. This review outlines different definitions and methodologies used to understand antibiotic resistance and suggests how this can be performed outside of the clinical environment.

  20. Investigating Bimodal Clustering in Human Mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrow, James P; 10.1109/CSE.2009.283

    2009-01-01

    We apply a simple clustering algorithm to a large dataset of cellular telecommunication records, reducing the complexity of mobile phone users' full trajectories and allowing for simple statistics to characterize their properties. For the case of two clusters, we quantify how clustered human mobility is, how much of a user's spatial dispersion is due to motion between clusters, and how spatially and temporally separated clusters are from one another.

  1. Human RAG mutations: biochemistry and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kim, Min-Sung; Walter, Jolan E; Lee, Yu Nee

    2016-04-01

    The recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) and RAG2 proteins initiate the V(D)J recombination process, which ultimately enables the generation of T cells and B cells with a diversified repertoire of antigen-specific receptors. Mutations of the RAG genes in humans are associated with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes, ranging from severe combined immunodeficiency to autoimmunity. Recently, novel insights into the phenotypic diversity of this disease have been provided by resolving the crystal structure of the RAG complex, by developing novel assays to test recombination activity of the mutant RAG proteins and by characterizing the molecular and cellular basis of immune dysregulation in patients with RAG deficiency.

  2. Molecular markers for human placental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Berthold

    2006-01-01

    The human placenta is a source for a variety of growth factors, hormones, and other proteins. The cellular source of the proteins can be best determined by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry can also be used to identify a specific cell type and to differentiate it from other types of cells. Thus, there is the need for specific markers of those cell types that are present in the placenta. In this chapter, the basic protocols for the identification of proteins in a tissue section are described. This chapter focuses on methods that are available in the majority of laboratories, and therefore concentrates on methods that are used together with light microscopy.

  3. Investigation of Tear Biomarkers as an Indicator of Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Stephen; Tucker, Bethany; Crucian, Brian; Steinberg, Susan; Hagan, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    Scientific literature suggests that tear biomarkers can be used as a guide towards clinical diagnosis of human health (Hagan et al., 2016). This study will investigate whether tear biomarkers represents a research and clinical opportunity to assess human health prior to, during, and after exposure to the spaceflight environment. The focus of this study is to compare biomarkers previously identified as potentially relevant to both ocular and brain health against unique physiological outcomes of exposure to the space flight environment. Study subjects suffering from terrestrial conditions thought to be similar to Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (SANS: formerly VIIP), e.g. patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and optic neuritis may be relevant to conditions associated with spaceflight. This study will review methodologies, tear biomarkers related to state of ocular and brain health, the strengths and weakness of using tear fluid biomarkers versus other body fluid samples, and will survey current tear fluid biomarker knowledge in research and clinical practice. A strength of using tear biomarkers is that sampling is non-invasive and used as a guide in understanding pathologies, including ocular and systemic inflammatory conditions (Cocho et al., 2016)., Salvisberg et al., 2014). Moreover, tear biomarkers may reflect diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS) (Salvisberg et al., 2014). For example, in multiple sclerosis (MS), the concordance rate between tear biomarkers versus cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is approximately 83%, indicating that, in the majority of cases, tears are at least as effective as CSF in potentially identifying novel MS biomarkers (Devos et al., 2001).

  4. Rhodococcus equi human clinical isolates enter and survive within human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Vivas, J; Pilares-Ortega, L; Remuzgo-Martínez, S; Padilla, D; Gutiérrez-Díaz, J L; Navas-Méndez, J

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an emerging opportunistic human pathogen associated with immunosuppressed people, especially those infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathogen resides primarily within lung macrophages of infected patients, which may explain in part its ability to escape normal pulmonary defense mechanisms. Despite numerous studies as a pulmonary pathogen in foals, where a plasmid seems to play an important role in virulence, information on the pathogenesis of this pathogen in humans is still scarce. In this study, fluorescence microscopy and vancomycin protection assays were used to investigate the ability of R. equi human isolates to adhere to and to invade the human alveolar epithelial cell line A549. Our findings indicate that some R. equi clinical strains are capable of adhering, entering and surviving within the alveolar cell line, which may contribute to the pathogen persistence in lung tissues. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The value of formal clinical research training in initiating a career as a clinical investigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Karan; Wu, Bechien U; Banks, Peter A

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether formal clinical research training is of value in the initiation of a successful career as a clinical investigator. We conducted a retrospective review of the career choices of all 25 fellows who entered the Academic Clinical Research Track at Brigham and Women's Hospital since its inception in 1995 and examined the impact of formal clinical research training during their fellowship on their career choice. The primary measure of a successful career as a clinical investigator was the obtainment of external funding for clinical research within 3 years of completion of fellowship. Thirteen of the 25 fellows (52%) received a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree at the Harvard School of Public Health during their fellowship. Ten of these 13 fellows (77%) obtained external funding for clinical research within 3 years of completion of their fellowship. None of the 5 fellows who had already obtained an MPH degree prior to their fellowship and none of the 7 fellows who completed a 7-week summer Program in Clinical Effectiveness but did not complete an MPH degree attempted to receive external funding for clinical research within 3 years of completion of their fellowship. We conclude that formal clinical research training culminating in an MPH degree was extremely valuable in the initiation of a successful career as a clinical investigator.

  6. Emotion understanding in clinically anxious children: A preliminary investigation.

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Patrick K; Francisco ePons; Harris, Paul L.; Barbara H. Esbjørn; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Children’s understanding of the nature, origins and consequences of emotions has been intensively investigated over the last 30–40 years. However, few empirical studies have looked at the relation between emotion understanding and anxiety in children and their results are mixed. The aim of the present study was to perform a preliminary investigation of the relationships between emotion understanding, anxiety, emotion dysregulation, and attachment security in clinically anxious children. A sam...

  7. Malignant mesothelioma, clinical, diagnostic and cell biological investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Versnel (Marjan)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to improve the diagnosis of human malignant mesothelioma on the one hand and to investigate the growth regulation and transformation of normal and malignant mesothelial cells on the other hand. In this thesis improvement of diagnosis was approached by the se

  8. Clinical investigations for SUS, the Brazilian public health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patrícia de Paula

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Scientific and technological development is crucial for advancing the Brazilian health system and for promoting quality of life. The way in which the Brazilian Ministry of Health has supported clinical research to provide autonomy, self-sufficiency, competitiveness and innovation for the healthcare industrial production complex, in accordance with the National Policy on Science, Technology and Innovation in Healthcare, was analyzed. DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive investigation, based on secondary data, conducted at the Department of Science and Technology, Ministry of Health. METHODS: The Ministry of Health's research management database, PesquisaSaúde, was analyzed from 2002 to 2009, using the key word "clinical research" in the fields "primary sub-agenda" or "secondary sub-agenda". The 368 projects retrieved were sorted into six categories: basic biomedical research, preclinical studies, expanded clinical research, clinical trials, infrastructure support and health technology assessment. From a structured review on "clinical research funding", results from selected countries are presented and discussed. RESULTS: The amount invested was R$ 140 million. The largest number of projects supported "basic biomedical research", while the highest amounts invested were in "clinical trials" and "infrastructure support". The southeastern region had the greatest proportion of projects and financial resources. In some respects, Brazil is ahead of other BRICS countries (Russia, India, China and South Africa, especially with regard to establishing a National Clinical Research Network. CONCLUSION: The Ministry of Health ensured investments to encourage clinical research in Brazil and contributed towards promoting cohesion between investigators, health policies and the healthcare industrial production complex.

  9. 76 FR 30175 - Draft Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators; Availability AGENCY... FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators.'' This draft guidance is intended to assist... governing financial disclosure by clinical investigators. This guidance provides FDA's responses to the...

  10. The role of human leukocyte antigen in susceptibility and clinical manifestations of sarcoidosis.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) with susceptibility and clinical manifestations of sarcoidosis, fifty-five patients with sarcoidosis were studied by using allele group specific polymerase chain reaction technique (PCR). Our data

  11. Clinical impact of human breast milk metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Dessì, Angelica; Corbu, Sara; Reali, Alessandra; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomics is a research field concerned with the analysis of metabolome, the complete set of metabolites in a given cell, tissue, or biological sample. Being able to provide a molecular snapshot of biological systems, metabolomics has emerged as a functional methodology in a wide range of research areas such as toxicology, pharmacology, food technology, nutrition, microbial biotechnology, systems biology, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the applications of metabolomics in investigating the human breast milk (HBM) metabolome. HBM is the recommended source of nutrition for infants since it contains the optimal balance of nutrients for developing babies, and it provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity, and development. The molecular mechanisms beyond the inter- and intra-variability of HBM that make its composition unique are yet to be well-characterized. Although still in its infancy, the study of HBM metabolome has already proven itself to be of great value in providing insights into this biochemical variability in relation to mother phenotype, diet, disease, and lifestyle. The results of these investigations lay the foundation for further developments useful to identify normal and aberrant biochemical changes as well as to develop strategies to promote healthy infant feeding practices.

  12. A history of the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joel D

    2009-04-01

    One hundred years ago, in 1909, the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) held its first annual meeting. The founding members based this new society on a revolutionary approach to research that emphasized newer physiological methods. In 1924 the ASCI started a new journal, the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The ASCI has also held an annual meeting almost every year. The society has long debated who could be a member, with discussions about whether members must be physicians, what sorts of research they could do, and the role of women within the society. The ASCI has also grappled with what else the society should do, especially whether it ought to take a stand on policy issues. ASCI history has reflected changing social, political, and economic contexts, including several wars, concerns about the ethics of biomedical research, massive increases in federal research funding, and an increasingly large and specialized medical environment.

  13. A history of the American Society for Clinical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred years ago, in 1909, the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) held its first annual meeting. The founding members based this new society on a revolutionary approach to research that emphasized newer physiological methods. In 1924 the ASCI started a new journal, the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The ASCI has also held an annual meeting almost every year. The society has long debated who could be a member, with discussions about whether members must be physicians, what sorts of research they could do, and the role of women within the society. The ASCI has also grappled with what else the society should do, especially whether it ought to take a stand on policy issues. ASCI history has reflected changing social, political, and economic contexts, including several wars, concerns about the ethics of biomedical research, massive increases in federal research funding, and an increasingly large and specialized medical environment. PMID:19348041

  14. 78 FR 13070 - Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ..., Industry, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators..., Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators.'' This guidance is intended to... governing financial disclosure by clinical investigators. This guidance provides FDA's responses to the...

  15. 77 FR 69632 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... entitled ``Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations.'' This document revises and updates the draft... in FDA- regulated clinical investigations. The revised draft guidance promotes capturing source data... draft guidance for industry entitled ``Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations.''...

  16. 78 FR 57395 - Guidance for Industry on Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... ``Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations.'' This document provides guidance to sponsors, contract... retention of electronic source data in FDA-regulated clinical investigations. This guidance promotes... a guidance for industry entitled ``Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations.''...

  17. Curvature affects Doppler investigation of vessels: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbis, S; Roatta, S; Guiot, C

    2005-01-01

    In clinical practice, blood velocity estimations from Doppler examination of curved vascular segments are normally different from those of nearby straight segments. The observed "accelerations," sometimes considered as a sort of stochastic disturbances, can actually be related to very specific physical effects due to vessel curvature (i.e., the development of nonaxial velocity [NAV] components) and the spreading of the axial velocity direction in the Doppler sample volume with respect to the insonation axis. The relevant phenomena and their dependence on the radius of curvature of the vessels and on the insonation angle are investigated with a beam-vessel geometry as close as possible to clinical setting, with the simplifying assumptions of steady flow, mild vessel curvature, uniform ultrasonic beam and complete vessel insonation. The insonation angles that minimize the errors are provided on the basis of the study results.

  18. 76 FR 32367 - Draft Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... Staff: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators.''The document was published with an incorrect docket...

  19. Scanning conductance microscopy investigations on fixed human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Jensen, Linda Boye;

    2008-01-01

    Scanning conductance microscopy investigations were carried out in air on human chromosomes fixed on pre-fabricated SiO2 surfaces with a backgate. The point of the investigation was to estimate the dielectric constant of fixed human chromosomes in order to use it for microfluidic device...... optimization. The phase shift caused by the electrostatic forces, together with geometrical measurements of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and the chromosomes were used to estimate a value,for the dielectric constant of different human chromosomes....

  20. Evaluating the first-in-human clinical trial of a human embryonic stem cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Audrey R; Scala, Courtney C

    2012-09-01

    Phase I clinical trials generally raise greater ethical and human protection challenges than later stage clinical trials, suggesting a need to proceed cautiously. This is particularly the case for Phase I trials with a novel therapy being tested in humans for the first time, usually termed first-in-human (FIH) trials. In January 2009, the Food and Drug Administration approved the Investigational New Drug application of Geron Corporation, a small California-based biopharmaceutical company, to initiate a clinical trial to assess GRNOPC1, a human embryonic stem cell-derived candidate therapy for severe spinal cord injuries. This article evaluates the ethical and human subject protection issues raised by the Geron FIH trial. It identifies problems with the approval process and with the conduct of the trial, and then recommends ways to improve review of future proposed trials with novel and high-risk therapies.

  1. Physician to investigator: clinical practice to clinical research--ethical, operational, and financial considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Physicians who participate in clinical research studies gain benefits for themselves, their practice, and their patients. Historically, private practice physicians have chosen to defer to their counterparts in academic medicine when it comes to contributing to scientific advancement through clinical studies. A growing number of private practice physicians are now taking a serious second look and deciding that there are unique benefits for both the practice and the patient. Physicians who decide to participate in clinical research should give serious consideration to the time and resources that are required to meet both federal regulations and industry standards. In addition, ethical and scientific principles for assuring the protection of human research subjects must be a paramount commitment.

  2. Emotion understanding in clinically anxious children: A preliminary investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick K. Bender

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Children’s understanding of the nature, origins and consequences of emotions has been intensively investigated over the last 30-40 years. However, few empirical studies have looked at the relation between emotion understanding and anxiety in children and their results are mixed. The aim of the present study was to perform a preliminary investigation of the relationships between emotion understanding, anxiety, emotion dysregulation, and attachment security in clinically anxious children. A sample of 16 clinically anxious children (age 8-12, 8 girls/boys was assessed for emotion understanding (Test of Emotion Comprehension, anxiety (Screening for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders-Revised and Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule, emotion dysregulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale and attachment security (Security Scale. Children who reported more overall anxiety also reported greater difficulties in regulating their emotions, and were less securely attached to their parents. The results also showed that more specific symptoms of anxiety (i.e., OCD and PTSD correlated not only with emotion dysregulation and attachment insecurity but also with emotion understanding. Finally, there were interrelations among emotion understanding, attachment security, and emotion dysregulation. The present results provide the first comprehensive evidence for a socio-emotional framework and its relevance to childhood anxiety.

  3. Emotion Understanding in Clinically Anxious Children: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Patrick K; Pons, Francisco; Harris, Paul L; Esbjørn, Barbara H; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie L

    2015-01-01

    Children's understanding of the nature, origins and consequences of emotions has been intensively investigated over the last 30-40 years. However, few empirical studies have looked at the relation between emotion understanding and anxiety in children and their results are mixed. The aim of the present study was to perform a preliminary investigation of the relationships between emotion understanding, anxiety, emotion dysregulation, and attachment security in clinically anxious children. A sample of 16 clinically anxious children (age 8-12, eight girls/boys) was assessed for emotion understanding (Test of Emotion Comprehension), anxiety (Screening for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders-Revised and Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule), emotion dysregulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale) and attachment security (Security Scale). Children who reported more overall anxiety also reported greater difficulties in regulating their emotions, and were less securely attached to their parents. The results also showed that more specific symptoms of anxiety (i.e., OCD and PTSD) correlated not only with emotion dysregulation and attachment insecurity but also with emotion understanding. Finally, there were interrelations among emotion understanding, attachment security, and emotion dysregulation. The present results provide the first comprehensive evidence for a socio-emotional framework and its relevance to childhood anxiety.

  4. Human Defensins: Potential Tools for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wenghoefer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As components of the innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides in the form of human defensins play an important role in host defense by serving as the epithelial layer’s biochemical barrier against local infections. Recent studies have shown these molecules to have far more additional cellular functions besides their antimicrobial activity. Defensins play a role in cell division, attraction and maturation of immune cells, differentiation and reorganization of epithelial tissues, wound healing and tumor suppression. This multitude of function makes human defensins appear to be excellent tools for therapeutic approaches. These antimicrobial peptides may be used directly as a remedy against bacterial and viral infections. Furthermore, the application of human defensins can be used to promote wound healing and epithelial reorganization. In particular, human β-defensins have a strong impact on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Human β-defensins have already been applied as a vaccination against HIV-1. Another potentially useful characteristic of defensins is their suitability as diagnostic markers in cancer therapy. In particular, α-defensins have already been used for this purpose. Human α-defensin-3, for example, has been described as a tumor marker for lymphocytes. High gene expression levels of α-defensin-3 and -4 have been detected in benign oral neoplasia, α-defensin-6 is considered to be a tumor marker for colon cancer.

  5. Bacteria, Yeast, Worms, and Flies: Exploiting Simple Model Organisms to Investigate Human Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Shane L.; Graham, Brett H.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kar, Adwitiya; Falk, Marni J.

    2010-01-01

    The extensive conservation of mitochondrial structure, composition, and function across evolution offers a unique opportunity to expand our understanding of human mitochondrial biology and disease. By investigating the biology of much simpler model organisms, it is often possible to answer questions that are unreachable at the clinical level.…

  6. Bacteria, Yeast, Worms, and Flies: Exploiting Simple Model Organisms to Investigate Human Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Shane L.; Graham, Brett H.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kar, Adwitiya; Falk, Marni J.

    2010-01-01

    The extensive conservation of mitochondrial structure, composition, and function across evolution offers a unique opportunity to expand our understanding of human mitochondrial biology and disease. By investigating the biology of much simpler model organisms, it is often possible to answer questions that are unreachable at the clinical level.…

  7. Muscle pain: animal and human experimental and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchettini, P

    1993-10-01

    The search for the identification of the sensory apparatus encoding muscle pain sensation in humans is recounted. Basic neurophysiologic animal studies, leading to a description of slowly conducting afferent from muscle and definition of high threshold polymodal muscle nociceptors, and pioneer psychophysic human studies together with recent microneurographic experiments in humans are described. The phenomena of muscle pain broad localization and distant referral are discussed, and clinical implications are extrapolated to interpret muscle pain as a localizing sign of mononeuropathy or radiculopathy. The identification of human muscle nociceptors has defined the scientific standard to test emerging clinical descriptions having muscle pain as a symptom.

  8. Investigative Journalism and Human Trafficking in West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Gyuracz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigative journalism that aims to prise out information that the state or certain businesses want to keep undisclosed has been unthinkable under many postcolonial African regimes. However, since the promulgation of democratic constitutions, a generation of ambitious investigative journalists has grown up in Africa. In order to show how journalism has changed, the paper brings Anas Aremeyaw Anas’s activities into focus. Anas’s single-minded mission to bring justice has targeted organisations involved in human trafficking, smuggling, and forced labour in West African countries since 2010. Although his team’s way of gathering information raises moral concerns about undercover journalism, their efforts illustrate that human trafficking is widespread among the countries of West and Central Africa. Therefore, the author suggests that both the AU and ECOWAS must create a more stable legal environment for investigative journalists, as their reports can help these institutions and national governments protect human rights.

  9. [Air conducted ocular VEMP: II. First clinical investigations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, L E; Schaaf, H; Sommer, D; Hörmann, K

    2011-10-01

    Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are widely used to assess vestibular function. Air conducted (AC) cervical VEMP (cVEMP) reflect sacculus and inferior vestibular nerve function. Ocular VEMP (oVEMP) however has been hardly examined up to now. In recent studies it has been assumed that AC oVEMP probably reflects superior vestibular nerve function. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate clinical application of the AC oVEMP. AC oVEMP were recorded in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders (n=21). In addition thermal irritation and head impulse test were performed and AC cVEMP were recorded. For intense AC-sound stimulation tone bursts (500 Hz) with 100 dB nHL were used. In peripheral vestibular disorders AC oVEMP and AC cVEMP could be classified into: • type 1 (inferior vestibular neuritis) with loss of AC oVEMP but normal AC cVEMP, • type 2, probable type of superior vestibular neuritis, showing present AC cVEMP but loss of AC oVEMP, • type 3, probable complete vestibular neuritis, without AC oVEMP and AC cVEMP. AC oVEMP may be used as an appropriate test for clinical investigation in patients with vestibular disorders. AC oVEMP is an additional, essential test for assessing otolith function beside AC cVEMP. Further vestibular test are necessary for precise clinical interpretation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Sesame seed allergy: Clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlollahi MR.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant-origin foods are among the most important sources of food allergic reactions. An increase in the incidence of sesame seed allergy among children and adults has been reported in recent years. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the prevalence, importance and clinical manifestations of sesame allergy among Iranian patients.Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 250 patients with suspected IgE-mediated food allergies completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick tests with sesame extract as well as cross-reacting foods (walnut, soya and peanut. Total IgE and sesame-specific IgE levels were measured. Patients with positive skin test reactions and/or IgE specific for sesame without clinical symptoms were considered sensitive to sesame. The patients who also had clinical symptoms with sesame consumption were diagnosed as allergic to sesame.Results: Of the 250 patients enrolled in this study, 129 were male and 121 female, with a mean age of 11.7 years. The most common food allergens were cow's milk, egg, curry, tomato and sesame. Sesame sensitivity was found in 35 patients (14.1%. Only five patients (2% had sesame allergy. Sesame-sensitive patients had a significantly higher frequency of positive prick test to cross-reacting foods when compared to non-sensitized patients (p=0.00. The type of symptom was independent of gender and age of the patients, but urticaria and dermatitis-eczema were significantly more frequent in sensitized patients (p=0.008.Conclusions: This is the first study addressing the prevalence of sesame seed allergy in Iranian population. We found sesame to be a common and important cause of food allergy. The panel of foods recommended for use in diagnostic allergy tests should be adjusted.

  11. Editorial: Process to progress? Investigative trials, mechanism and clinical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    In 2002 Helena Kraemer and colleagues published an important article on the analysis of clinical trials in mental health, which advocated a planned focus on mechanisms to investigate the processes behind treatment effects. Kraemer et al. considered not only new approaches to mediation analysis, but also a theoretical approach to factors, both pre-treatment and during treatment, that might moderate this mediation. Trials should not just be about whether a treatment 'worked', but how it worked; with the results informing modification of the intervention for the next trial by discarding aspects that were not effective and reinforcing aspects that were - an iterative procedure towards greater effectiveness. Can we enjoy similar ambitions for complex interventions within mental health? It is not so long ago when the received wisdom within the clinical and much of the research community was that it was simply impossible in practice to mount randomised controlled trials relevant to the kind of psychosocial interventions we use in child and adolescent mental health (CAMHS). How different the situation is now, with burgeoning interest in a systematic evidence base for psychological treatment and the possibilities for unexpected advances (as well as unexpected harms). Nevertheless it is probably still fair to say that the systematic use of process and mechanism study within trials in our field is the exception rather than the rule. What are the possibilities and implications for our field?

  12. Therapeutic Role of Rifaximin in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Clinical Implication of Human Pregnane X Receptor Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Jie; Yatrik M. Shah; Ma, Xiaochao; Pang, Xiaoyan; Tanaka, Toshiya; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Human pregnane X receptor (PXR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a human PXR activator, is in clinical trials for treatment of IBD and has demonstrated efficacy in Crohn's disease and active ulcerative colitis. In the current study, the protective and therapeutic role of rifaximin in IBD and its respective mechanism were investigated. PXR-humanized (hPXR), wild-type, and Pxr-null mice were treated with rifaximin in the dextran sulfate sod...

  13. Clinical significance of human alpha-fetoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yachnin, S.

    1978-01-01

    Deviations from the normal of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) concentrations in fetal serum, amniotic fluid, maternal serum and adult human serum can be explained by understanding the normal physiology and the pathophysiology of AFP synthesis and metabolism. AFP is the prototype of oncofetal markers. Emphasis is given to the usefulness of elevated serum AFP levels in the diagnosis and management of primary hepatomas and tumors of germ cell origin. The ability to detect neural tube defects early in gestation by monitoring maternal serum and amniotic fluid AFP concentrations is discussed.

  14. Human computer interaction issues in Clinical Trials Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starren, Justin B; Payne, Philip R O; Kaufman, David R

    2006-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly rely upon web-based Clinical Trials Management Systems (CTMS). As with clinical care systems, Human Computer Interaction (HCI) issues can greatly affect the usefulness of such systems. Evaluation of the user interface of one web-based CTMS revealed a number of potential human-computer interaction problems, in particular, increased workflow complexity associated with a web application delivery model and potential usability problems resulting from the use of ambiguous icons. Because these design features are shared by a large fraction of current CTMS, the implications extend beyond this individual system.

  15. Culturing and expansion of "clinical grade" precursors cells from the fetal human central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelati, Maurizio; Profico, Daniela; Projetti-Pensi, Massimo; Muzi, Gianmarco; Sgaravizzi, Giada; Vescovi, Angelo Luigi

    2013-01-01

    NSCs have been demonstrated to be very useful in grafts into the mammalian central nervous system to investigate the exploitation of NSC for the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. To push cell therapy in CNS on stage of clinical application, it is necessary to establish a continuous and standardized, clinical grade (i.e., produced following the good manufacturing practice guidelines) human neural stem cell lines. In this chapter, we illustrate some of the protocols routinely used into our GMP cell bank for the production of "clinical grade" human neural stem cell lines.

  16. Preliminary clinical investigations of a new noninvasive venous pulse oximeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel; Smith, Peter R.; Caine, Michael P.; Spyt, Tomasz; Boehm, Maria; Machin, David

    2003-10-01

    For decades, the monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation, SvO2 has been performed invasively using fibre-optic catheters. This procedure is not without risk as complications may arise from catheterisation. The group has devised a new non-invasive venous oximetry method which involves inducing regular modulations of the venous blood volume and associated measurement of those modulations using optical means. A clinical investigation was conducted in Glenfield Hospital, UK to evaluate the sensitivity of the new technique to haemodynamic changes such as Cardiac Output (CO) in intraoperative and postoperative cardiac patients. Preliminary trials on patients recovering from cardiac surgery yielded an average correlation of r = 0.72 between CO at different Intra Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP) augmentation levels and SvO2 measured by the new venous oximeter. In intraoperative patients undergoing off-pump cardiac surgery, SvO2 recorded by the new technique responded to unplanned events such as a cardiac arrest. CONCLUSION: The new venous oximetry technique is a promising technique which responds to haemodynamic changes such as CO and with further development might offer an alternative means of monitoring SvO2 non-invasively.

  17. Investigation of plasmid profile, antibiotic susceptibility pattern multiple antibiotic resistance index calculation of Escherichia coli isolates obtained from different human clinical specimens at tertiary care hospital in Bareilly-India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Francis Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Escherichia coli is well known as noninvasive commensal and has been established as etiological agent of various human infections. E. coli also contributes to high rate of resistance to several antibiotics due to multiresistant antibiotic plasmid genes e.g., extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL. Material and Methods: To analyse the situation of antibiotic resistance, a total of 77 E.coli isolates from urine, pus, sputum and endotracheal aspirate were screened for their antibiograms for antibiotic resistance, multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR index for evaluating the spread of resistance and plasmid profiles for the presence and characterization of plasmids. Results: Very high resistance level (> 90% was detected against ampicillin, amoxycillin, ceftazidime, norfloxacin, tetracycline while imipenem and amikacin recorded the least resistance levels of 2.3% and 13.9%, respectively, among the isolates. An increased resistance to amoxycillin, tetracycline, cotrimoxazole and norfloxacin were observed in this geographical area which however displayed a lower resistance in other countries. The MAR index varied considerably, the lowest was 0.18 and the highest was 0.89. Plasmids of 10 size ranges were detected in the isolates. Some isolates possessed single-sized plasmid while other possessed multiple plasmids. Isolates with high MAR profiles were found to possess multiple plasmids. Conclusion: Regular antimicrobial sensitivity surveillance is necessary and acquisition of plasmid could greatly contribute in the antibiotic resistance and poses a significant risk of the spread of microbial resistance in this community. Also, it was observed that route of administration of antibiotics perhaps reduced its misuse and hence led to the reduction in the emergence of resistant bacterial strains.

  18. Serum α-klotho concentrations during preimplantation can predict aging or quality of human oocytes and clinical pregnancy rates

    OpenAIRE

    Takemura, Takashi; Okabe, Midori

    2016-01-01

    Background To discover simple biomarkers to evaluate the aging or quality of human oocytes and clinical pregnancy rates is needed. However, the association among serum α-klotho concentrations during preimplantation, the aging or quality of human oocytes and clinical pregnancy rates has not been investigated. Findings The serum α-klotho concentrations during preimplantation decreased due to aging (p 

  19. Physiopathology of human embryonic implantation: clinical incidences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Demailly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation consists of a series of events promoting the invasion of the endometrium and then the uterine arterial system by the extra-embryonic trophoblast. In order for this semi-heterologous implantation to succeed, the endometrium has to first undergo a number of structural and biochemical changes (decidualization. The decidua's various constituents subsequently play a role in the embryonic implantation. The third step is the transformation of the uterine vascular system and the growth of the placenta, which will provide the foetoplacental unit with nutrients. Several physiopathological aspects will be discussed: 1 the implantation window, regulated by maternal and embryonic hormonal secretions and thus influenced by any defects in the latter: dysharmonic luteal phase, 21-hydroxylase block, abnormal integrin expression, 2 the successive trophoblast invasions of uterine vessels which, when defective, lead to early embryo loss or late-onset vascular pathologies, as preeclampsia, 3 the pregnancy's immunological equilibrium, with a spontaneously tolerated semi-allogeneic implant, 4 the impact of pro-coagulant factors (thrombophilia on the pregnancy's progression, 5 the environment of the uterus, ranging from hydrosalpinx to uterine contractions. In summary, the least anatomical or physiological perturbation can interfere with human embryonic implantation - a very particular phenomenon and a true biological paradox.

  20. Translating chimpanzee personality to humans: Investigating the transportability of chimpanzee-derived personality scales to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D; Sauvigné, Katheryn C; Hopkins, William D

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of personality in chimpanzees with repeated findings of a similar structure of personality in apes to that found in humans. To date, however, the direct translational value of instruments used to assess chimpanzee personality to humans has yet to be explicitly tested. As such, in the current study we sought to determine the transportability of factor analytically-derived chimpanzee personality scales to humans in a large human sample (N = 301). Human informants reporting on target individuals they knew well completed chimpanzee-derived and human-derived measures of personality from the two most widely studied models of human personality: Big Five and Big Three. The correspondence between informant-reported chimpanzee- and human-derived personality scales was then investigated. Results indicated high convergence for corresponding scales across most chimpanzee- and human-derived personality scales. Findings from the current study provide evidence that chimpanzee-derived scales translate well to humans and operate quite similarly to the established human-derived personality scales in a human sample. This evidence of transportability lends support to the translational nature of chimpanzee personality research suggesting clear relevance of this growing literature to humans. Am. J. Primatol. 78:601-609, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Correlating preclinical animal studies and human clinical trials of a multifunctional, polymeric nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasof, Scott; Lazarus, Douglas; Peters, Christian G; Case, Roy I; Cole, Roderic O; Hwang, Jungyeon; Schluep, Thomas; Chao, Joseph; Lin, James; Yen, Yun; Han, Han; Wiley, Devin T; Zuckerman, Jonathan E; Davis, Mark E

    2013-09-10

    Nanoparticles are currently being investigated in a number of human clinical trials. As information on how nanoparticles function in humans is difficult to obtain, animal studies that can be correlative to human behavior are needed to provide guidance for human clinical trials. Here, we report correlative studies on animals and humans for CRLX101, a 20- to 30-nm-diameter, multifunctional, polymeric nanoparticle containing camptothecin (CPT). CRLX101 is currently in phase 2 clinical trials, and human data from several of the clinical investigations are compared with results from multispecies animal studies. The pharmacokinetics of polymer-conjugated CPT (indicative of the CRLX101 nanoparticles) in mice, rats, dogs, and humans reveal that the area under the curve scales linearly with milligrams of CPT per square meter for all species. Plasma concentrations of unconjugated CPT released from CRLX101 in animals and humans are consistent with each other after accounting for differences in serum albumin binding of CPT. Urinary excretion of polymer-conjugated CPT occurs primarily within the initial 24 h after dosing in animals and humans. The urinary excretion dynamics of polymer-conjugated and unconjugated CPT appear similar between animals and humans. CRLX101 accumulates into solid tumors and releases CPT over a period of several days to give inhibition of its target in animal xenograft models of cancer and in the tumors of humans. Taken in total, the evidence provided from animal models on the CRLX101 mechanism of action suggests that the behavior of CRLX101 in animals is translatable to humans.

  2. [AIDS: ethics and scientific investigation on human beings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedj, R

    2008-04-01

    The experimentation on human beings of one or several therapeutic molecules discovered in laboratory is necessary and important because it helps to find new treatments or new diagnostic methods. But, it presents serious ethical problems. In this article we are analysing the example of the HIV infection. We are succinctly describing the research methods in laboratory for therapeutic molecules, first the experimentation on animals and then on human being in clinical trials. We will then try to show, with several examples, how during these last 25 years of HIV infection, the research of new molecules has not always respected the ethical rules set out in Helsinki declaration, "Code de la santé publique" or "Guide de bonnes pratiques cliniques-ICH" etc. We are discussing here the way to avoid these irregularities.

  3. Air temperature investigation in microenvironment around a human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Sekhar, Chandra;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the temperature boundary layer around a human body in a quiescent indoor environment. The air temperature, mean in time and standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations around a breathing thermal manikin are examined in relation to the room temperature......, body posture and human respiratory flow. To determine to what extent the experiments represent the realistic scenario, the additional experiments were performed with a real human subject. The results show that at a lower room air temperature (20°C), the fluctuations of air temperature increased close...... to the surface of the body. The large standard deviation of air temperature fluctuations, up to 1.2°C, was recorded in the region of the chest, and up to 2.9°C when the exhalation was applied. The manikin leaned backwards increased the air temperature in the breathing zone, which was opposite from the forward...

  4. Challenges for Preclinical Investigations of Human Biofield Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Bengston, William

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical models for studying the effects of the human biofield have great potential to advance our understanding of human biofield modalities, which include external qigong, Johrei, Reiki, therapeutic touch, healing touch, polarity therapy, pranic healing, and other practices. A short history of Western biofield studies using preclinical models is presented and demonstrates numerous and consistent examples of human biofields significantly affecting biological systems both in vitro and in vivo. Methodological issues arising from these studies and practical solutions in experimental design are presented. Important questions still left unanswered with preclinical models include variable reproducibility, dosing, intentionality of the practitioner, best preclinical systems, and mechanisms. Input from the biofield practitioners in the experimental design is critical to improving experimental outcomes; however, the development of standard criteria for uniformity of practice and for inclusion of multiple practitioners is needed. Research in human biofield studies involving preclinical models promises a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of biofield therapies and will be important in guiding clinical protocols and integrating treatments with conventional medical therapies. PMID:26665042

  5. Challenges for Preclinical Investigations of Human Biofield Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Bengston, William; Yount, Garret

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical models for studying the effects of the human biofield have great potential to advance our understanding of human biofield modalities, which include external qigong, Johrei, Reiki, therapeutic touch, healing touch, polarity therapy, pranic healing, and other practices. A short history of Western biofield studies using preclinical models is presented and demonstrates numerous and consistent examples of human biofields significantly affecting biological systems both in vitro and in vivo. Methodological issues arising from these studies and practical solutions in experimental design are presented. Important questions still left unanswered with preclinical models include variable reproducibility, dosing, intentionality of the practitioner, best preclinical systems, and mechanisms. Input from the biofield practitioners in the experimental design is critical to improving experimental outcomes; however, the development of standard criteria for uniformity of practice and for inclusion of multiple practitioners is needed. Research in human biofield studies involving preclinical models promises a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of biofield therapies and will be important in guiding clinical protocols and integrating treatments with conventional medical therapies.

  6. Investigation into Seasonal Scavenging Patterns of Raccoons on Human Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yangseung; Jantz, Lee Meadows; Smith, Jake

    2016-03-01

    Although raccoons are known as one of the most common scavengers in the U.S., scavenging by these animals has seldom been studied in terms of forensic significance. In this research, the seasonal pattern of raccoon scavenging and its effect on human decomposition was investigated using 178 human cadavers placed at the Anthropological Research Facility (ARF) of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) between February 2011 and December 2013. The results reveal that (i) the frequency of scavenging increases during summer, (ii) scavenging occurs relatively immediately and lasts shorter in summer months, and (iii) scavenging influences the decomposition process by hollowing limbs and by disturbing insect activities, both of which eventually increases the chance of mummification on the affected body. This information is expected to help forensic investigators identify raccoon scavenging as well as make a more precise interpretation of the effect of raccoon scavenging on bodies at crime scenes. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Efficient Generation of Bispecific Murine Antibodies for Pre-Clinical Investigations in Syngeneic Rodent Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labrijn, Aran F.; Meesters, Joyce I.; Bunce, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic concepts exploiting tumor-specific antibodies are often established in pre-clinical xenograft models using immuno-deficient mice. More complex therapeutic paradigms, however, warrant the use of immuno-competent mice, that more accurately capture the relevant biology that is being...... for the generation of therapeutic human IgG1 bispecific antibodies (bsAb). To facilitate the investigation of dual-Targeting concepts in immuno-competent mice, we now applied and optimized our method for the generation of murine bsAbs. We show that the optimized combinations of matched point-mutations enabled...

  8. 78 FR 66941 - Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices; Guidance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... for Medical Devices; Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards and... entitled ``Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices.'' This document... premarket submissions for medical devices and for FDA staff who review those submissions. This...

  9. Development of the NRC`s Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP). Volume 2, Investigators`s Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L. [System Improvements, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Haas, P.; Terranova, M. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause event at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, is a field manual for use by investigators when performing event investigations. Volume II includes the HPIP Procedure, the HPIP Modules, and Appendices that provide extensive documentation of each investigation technique.

  10. Human bite of the hand: clinical and surgical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Simancas-Pereira Hernán; Fonseca-Caro John Fredy; Acevedo-Granados Camilo Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: human bites of the hand carries a risk of infection and functional and/oraesthetic complications, according to the mechanism of trauma, duration and specificfactors of the victim and the aggressor. The management of acute episodes isessential and must be an interdisciplinary care.Objective: to review human bites of the hand.Methodology: Thematic review which included the evaluation of clinical casereports published in the last fifteen years in English and Spanish, obtained by el...

  11. Optoelectronic investigation of nanodiamond interactions with human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Wróbel, M. S.; Wasowicz, M.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present optoelectronic investigation of in vitro interactions of whole human blood with different nanodiamond biomarkers. Plasmo-chemical modifications of detonation nanodiamond particles gives the possibility for controlling their surface for biological applications. Optical investigations reveal the biological activity of nanodiamonds in blood dependent on its surface termination. We compare different types of nanodiamonds: commercial non-modified detonation nanodiamonds, and nanodiamonds modified by MW PACVD method with H2-termination, and chemically modified nanodiamond with O2-termination. The absorption spectra, and optical microscope investigations were conducted. The results indicate haemocompatibility of non-modified detonation nanodiamond as well as modified nanodiamonds, which enables their application for drug delivery, as well as sensing applications.

  12. Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Intraoral Grafting of Human Tissue-Engineered Oral Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Engineered Oral Mucosa   PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stephen E. Feinberg DDS, MS, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 4810...September 29, 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Phase II Clinical Trial of Intraoral Grafting of Human Tissue-Engineered Oral Mucosa   5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...human EVPOME for soft tissue intraoral grafting procedures compared to the “gold standard” palatal oral mucosa (POM) graft. The study will determine

  13. Investigation of the clinical features and therapeutic methods for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clinical effects of the various therapeutic strategies were documented. . Results: ... drops were used for acute inflammation, while chronic inflammation was treated with antibiotic eye drops ... out in accordance with the Guidelines of the.

  14. A fluid collection system for dermal wounds in clinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfer, Michael; Banyard, Derek; Li, G-P; Widgerow, Alan; Bachman, Mark

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of a thin, self adherent, and clinically durable patch device that can collect fluid from a wound site for analysis. This device is manufactured from laminated silicone layers using a novel all-silicone double-molding process. In vitro studies for flow and delivery were followed by a clinical demonstration for exudate collection efficiency from a clinically presented partial thickness burn. The demonstrated utility of this device lends itself for use as a research implement used to clinically sample wound exudate for analysis. This device can serve as a platform for future integration of wearable technology into wound monitoring and care. The demonstrated fabrication method can be used for devices requiring thin membrane construction.

  15. Proteogenomic Investigation of Strain Variation in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Heunis, Tiaan

    2017-08-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis consists of a large number of different strains that display unique virulence characteristics. Whole-genome sequencing has revealed substantial genetic diversity among clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and elucidating the phenotypic variation encoded by this genetic diversity will be of utmost importance to fully understand M. tuberculosis biology and pathogenicity. In this study we integrated whole-genome sequencing and mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) to reveal strain-specific characteristics in the proteomes of two clinical M. tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean isolates. Using this approach we identified 59 peptides containing single amino acid variants, which covered ~9% of all total coding nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants detected by whole-genome sequencing. Furthermore, we identified 29 distinct peptides that mapped to a hypothetical protein not present in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference proteome. Here we provide evidence for the expression of this protein in the clinical M. tuberculosis SAWC3651 isolate. The strain-specific databases enabled confirmation of genomic differences (i.e. large genomic regions of difference and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants) in these two clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and allowed strain differentiation at the proteome level. Our results contribute to the growing field of clinical microbial proteogenomics and can improve our understanding of phenotypic variation in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  16. Can clinical tests help monitor human papillomavirus vaccine impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meites, Elissa; Lin, Carol; Unger, Elizabeth R; Steinau, Martin; Patel, Sonya; Markowitz, Lauri E; Hariri, Susan

    2013-09-01

    As immunization programs for human papillomavirus (HPV) are implemented more widely around the world, interest is increasing in measuring their impact. One early measurable impact of HPV vaccine is on the prevalence of specific HPV types in a population. In low-resource settings, a potentially attractive strategy would be to monitor HPV prevalence using clinical cervical cancer screening test results to triage specimens for HPV typing. We assessed this approach in a nationally representative population of U.S. females aged 14-59 years. Using self-collected cervico-vaginal swab specimens from 4,150 women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2003-2006, we evaluated type-specific HPV prevalence detected by the Roche linear array (LA) research test on all specimens, compared with type-specific HPV prevalence detected by LA conducted only on specimens positive by the digene hybrid capture 2 (HC-2) clinical test. We calculated weighted prevalence estimates and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and examined relative type-specific HPV prevalence according to the two testing approaches. The population prevalence of oncogenic HPV vaccine types 16/18 was 6.2% (CI:5.4-7.1) by LA if all specimens were tested, and 2.4% (CI:1.9-3.0) if restricted to positive HC-2. Relative prevalence of individual HPV types was similar for both approaches. Compared with typing all specimens, a triage approach would require testing fewer specimens, but a greater reduction in HPV prevalence or a larger group of specimens would be needed to detect vaccine impact. Further investigation is warranted to inform type-specific HPV monitoring approaches around the world.

  17. Clinical and molecular characterisation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, M.H.F.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the results are described of clinical and molecular investigation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations as a hallmark feature, with emphasis on nail patella syndrome, small patella syndrome, isolated patellar aplasia or hypoplasia, and Meier-Gorlin syndrome. The el

  18. Clinical and molecular characterisation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, M.H.F.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the results are described of clinical and molecular investigation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations as a hallmark feature, with emphasis on nail patella syndrome, small patella syndrome, isolated patellar aplasia or hypoplasia, and Meier-Gorlin syndrome. The

  19. Investigation of the Impedance Characteristic of Human Arm for Development of Robots to Cooperate with Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mozasser; Ikeura, Ryojun; Mizutani, Kazuki

    In the near future many aspects of our lives will be encompassed by tasks performed in cooperation with robots. The application of robots in home automation, agricultural production and medical operations etc. will be indispensable. As a result robots need to be made human-friendly and to execute tasks in cooperation with humans. Control systems for such robots should be designed to work imitating human characteristics. In this study, we have tried to achieve these goals by means of controlling a simple one degree-of-freedom cooperative robot. Firstly, the impedance characteristic of the human arm in a cooperative task is investigated. Then, this characteristic is implemented to control a robot in order to perform cooperative task with humans. A human followed the motion of an object, which is moved through desired trajectories. The motion is actuated by the linear motor of the one degree-of-freedom robot system. Trajectories used in the experiments of this method were minimum jerk (the rate of change of acceleration) trajectory, which was found during human and human cooperative task and optimum for muscle movement. As the muscle is mechanically analogous to a spring-damper system, a simple second-order equation is used as models for the arm dynamics. In the model, we considered mass, stiffness and damping factor. Impedance parameter is calculated from the position and force data obtained from the experiments and based on the “Estimation of Parametric Model”. Investigated impedance characteristic of human arm is then implemented to control a robot, which performed cooperative task with human. It is observed that the proposed control methodology has given human like movements to the robot for cooperating with human.

  20. [Clinical research XXIV. From clinical judgment to ethics in research on humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Marcela; Palacios-Cruz, Lino; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Talavera, Juan O

    2014-01-01

    Bioethics in research is an essential part of the structured review process of an article and it is based on three fundamental principles: respect for persons, beneficence and justice. In addition to not providing valid knowledge, a research with inadequate design, execution and statistical analysis is not ethical either, since these methodological deficiencies will produce information that will not be useful and, therefore, the risks that the participants were exposed to will have been in vain. Beyond scientific validity, there are other aspects that outline if an investigation is ethical, such as the clinical and social value of a study, a fair selection of participants, favorable risk-benefit balance, an independent review, the informed consent and respect for participants and potential participants. Throughout the article here presented, the documents that profile the behavior of investigators to protect the participants, such as the Declaration of Helsinki, the national regulations that rule us and the differences between research without risk, with minimal risk and with greater than minimal risk are discussed. That like in daily life, behavior in research involving human participants must be self-regulated, ie, people with knowledge of the existence of the law discover that the man is outside the realm of nature where work is done under the necessity of natural causality, and falls within the scope of the will; only if the man is free to decide their actions may be a law regulating their action.

  1. Anaerococcus nagyae sp. nov., isolated from human clinical specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A C M; Vries , de E. D.; Jean-Pierre, H; van Winkelhoff, A J

    We describe a new Anaerococcus species isolated from human clinical specimens. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences of three strains showed <98% similarity with its closest relative Anaerococcus octavius. Phylogenetically the isolated strains form a cluster and can be differentiated from other

  2. Anal human papillomavirus DNA in women at a colposcopy clinic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauwers, K.W.M. d'

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the type-specific prevalence of anal and cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and the cytology in HIV-negative women without a history of cervical cancer, attending a colposcopy clinic. To examine if an HPV positive anal smear is related to anal pathology and

  3. Anal human papillomavirus DNA in women at a colposcopy clinic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauwers, K.W.M. d'

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the type-specific prevalence of anal and cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and the cytology in HIV-negative women without a history of cervical cancer, attending a colposcopy clinic. To examine if an HPV positive anal smear is related to anal pathology and conseq

  4. Anaerococcus degenerii sp nov., isolated from human clinical specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A. C. M.; Elgersma, P. E.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    Four clinical isolates of gram-positive strict anaerobic cocci were isolated from four different human mixed anaerobic infections. The taxonomical status of the four strains could not be established using standard identification techniques. The biochemical features of the strains were established

  5. Clinical classification of chronic prostatitis: a preliminary investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-DongHUANG; PeiLIU; Wen-JieHUANG

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To propose a practical clinical classification for the chronic prostatitis (CP). Methods: The clinical features and the findings in the expressed prostatic secretion (EPS) in 804 cases of CP patients were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Four types of CP were identified based on the clinical manifestations and the amounts of white blood cells (WBC) and lecithin in EPS. They were the latent type (85 cases; 10.6%), the common type (423 cases;52.6%), the persisting type (104 cases; 12.9%), and the active type (192 cases, 23.9%). The therapeutic efficacy for these 4 subtypes were 40.4%, 76.8%, 30.8% and 37%, respectively; a statistical difference was noticed between the common type and the persisting type (P<0.01). Conclusion: The method of classification proposed by the authors may help clinicians in the diagnosis and predicting the prognosis of CP. (Asian J Androl 2000 Dec;2:311-313)

  6. The survey of clinical human experimentation research in ethical review of postgraduates students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifan; Zhu, Zheng; Wang, Liyu

    2012-06-01

    An anonymous questionnaire was used to investigate the status quo of ethics review of human subject experiments among postgraduate students in clinical practice with the main conclusions as follows: Human subject experiments make up a large ratio of clinical research; the construction of an ethics review has been initially formulated, but there exists a gap in ethics awareness between advisors and the postgraduates with the desperate need to receive ethics review. It is necessary to realize the importance of informed consent and to strengthen the strict supervision of placebo application.

  7. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganova, Inna [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Ponomarev, Vladimir [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Blasberg, Ronald [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: blasberg@neuro1.mskcc.org

    2007-10-15

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  8. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    sequences in clinical samples. We used this method to conduct an investigation for novel retrovirus in samples from three cancer types. In accordance with recent studies our investigation revealed no retroviral infections in human B-cell lymphoma cells, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma or colorectal cancer...

  9. Pavlovian conditioning of immune function: animal investigation and the challenge of human application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exton, M S; von Auer, A K; Buske-Kirschbaum, A; Stockhorst, U; Göbel, U; Schedlowski, M

    2000-06-01

    Pavlovian conditioning of immune functions provided early impetus to the rapidly expanding knowledge of bi-directional communication among the immune, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Since these early investigations, the phenomenology of this response has been well characterized. However the neural mechanisms and biological relevance of conditioned immunomodulation remain unclear. To this end, we present here data from our laboratories that have: (1) revealed some of the neural mechanisms and biological relevance of an animal model of conditioned immunomodulation; (2) demonstrated the conditionability and potential mechanisms of conditioned immune responses in healthy humans, and (3) investigated conditioned immunomodulation in a clinical sample. Together, these data demonstrate that animal models provide a basis for investigating mechanisms whereby conditioned changes in immune function may modulate health status in a clinical realm.

  10. Clinical Investigations and Management of Refractive Changes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    observed that all women who complained of visual ... pregnancy, there was no history of hypertension ... Visual acuity became worse with – 1.00Ds 20/160. ..... archive for clinical and experimental ophthalmology. 2003; 24 (6): 484-492. 6.

  11. 21 CFR 312.70 - Disqualification of a clinical investigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... are essential to the continuation of the investigation or essential to the approval of any marketing... Research or the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research will furnish the investigator written notice... but not accepted by the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research or the Center for Biologics...

  12. Noninvasive topographical investigation of functional parameters in the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Manfred D.; Krug, Alfons; Hoeper, Jens

    1996-04-01

    A rapid micro-lightguide spectrometer (EMPHO II) coupled to an automatic three axis positioning system enables very precise and fast 2D-scans at the surface of human skin. The positioning accuracy amounts to 1 micrometer. This allows measurements with excellent spatial reproducibility. With this system examinations of local distribution of HbO2 and Hb have been performed in human skin. For this purpose at the back of the hand areas of 5 by 5 mm to 5 by 10 mm were scanned in defined steps of 100 micrometers. Functional images of local hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygenation of microscopical structures have been resolved by use of 250 micrometer lightguide sensors. Two-dimensional-images of local oxygen supply parameters corresponding directly to morphological structures of human skin have been gained. The local pattern matches the distribution of the papillas of the corium. In the papillas the capillary loops supplying the lower part of the epidermis are situated. The measured parameters describe very exactly the local oxygen supply situation of the area under investigation.

  13. Human cysticercosis: parasitology, pathology, clinical manifestations and available treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbe, G

    1994-10-01

    Human cysticercosis is a global health problem and neurocysticercosis a serious clinical syndrome. The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis can now be made with a high degree of accuracy by scrutiny of clinical signs and symptoms in combination with X-ray, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, serological tests and laboratory examinations. Differential clinical diagnosis with tumor, and vascular and inflammatory conditions, may however, prove difficult in nonendemic areas. The management of cysticercosis has been radically changed by the advent of effective chemotherapy. Both the heterocyclic pyrazinoisoquinoline compound, praziquantel and the benzimidazole carbamate, albendazole, have now been extensively tested and successfully used for treatments of neurocysticercosis, usually in combination with corticosteroids. The definition of appropriate criteria and guidelines for the use of chemotherapy, may however, require further research. Surgical interventions continue to play an important role in certain clinical presentations. Recent advances in immunological research hold realistic promise for the development of a vaccine against Taenia solium.

  14. [Investigation on cognition of zoonosis among veterinary clinical staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takinami, Kenji

    2005-10-01

    We conducted a survey to determine how much veterinary clinic staff, including veterinary surgeon and veterinary technicians, know about zoonosis. Response was 52.5%. All staff members knew of zoonosis. Staff members who knew what zoonosis meant accounted for 98%. Staff members trained in zoonosis accounted for 75% among veterinary surgeons and 66% among veterinary technicians. Staff members who thought that zoonosis would increase in future accounted for 92% among veterinary surgeons and 79% among veterinary technicians. Staff members who were asked by pet owners about zoonosis accounted for 87% among veterinary surgeons and 51% among veterinary technicians. Staff members who thought veterinary surgeons must report zoonosis to public health centers accounted for 96% among veterinary surgeons and 88% among veterinary technicians. Veterinary clinic staffs thus had correct knowledge and were aware of zoonosis. The network of medical staff and veterinary staff could therefore build on this result.

  15. Investigation of G72 (DAOA expression in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsch Steven

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms at the G72/G30 locus on chromosome 13q have been associated with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in more than ten independent studies. Even though the genetic findings are very robust, the physiological role of the predicted G72 protein has thus far not been resolved. Initial reports suggested G72 as an activator of D-amino acid oxidase (DAO, supporting the glutamate dysfunction hypothesis of schizophrenia. However, these findings have subsequently not been reproduced and reports of endogenous human G72 mRNA and protein expression are extremely limited. In order to better understand the function of this putative schizophrenia susceptibility gene, we attempted to demonstrate G72 mRNA and protein expression in relevant human brain regions. Methods The expression of G72 mRNA was studied by northern blotting and semi-quantitative SYBR-Green and Taqman RT-PCR. Protein expression in human tissue lysates was investigated by western blotting using two custom-made specific anti-G72 peptide antibodies. An in-depth in silico analysis of the G72/G30 locus was performed in order to try and identify motifs or regulatory elements that provide insight to G72 mRNA expression and transcript stability. Results Despite using highly sensitive techniques, we failed to identify significant levels of G72 mRNA in a variety of human tissues (e.g. adult brain, amygdala, caudate nucleus, fetal brain, spinal cord and testis human cell lines or schizophrenia/control post mortem BA10 samples. Furthermore, using western blotting in combination with sensitive detection methods, we were also unable to detect G72 protein in a number of human brain regions (including cerebellum and amygdala, spinal cord or testis. A detailed in silico analysis provides several lines of evidence that support the apparent low or absent expression of G72. Conclusion Our results suggest that native G72 protein is not normally present in the tissues that we analysed

  16. Clinical investigations for SUS, the Brazilian public health system

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Patrícia Paula; Silvana Pereira Giozza; Michelle Zanon Pereira; Patrícia Souza Boaventura; Leonor Maria Pacheco Santos; Camile Giaretta Sachetti; César Omar Carranza Tamayo; Clarissa Campos Guaragna Kowalski; Flavia Tavares Silva Elias; Suzanne Jacob Serruya; Reinaldo Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Scientific and technological development is crucial for advancing the Brazilian health system and for promoting quality of life. The way in which the Brazilian Ministry of Health has supported clinical research to provide autonomy, self-sufficiency, competitiveness and innovation for the healthcare industrial production complex, in accordance with the National Policy on Science, Technology and Innovation in Healthcare, was analyzed. DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive inves...

  17. Clinical Investigation Program. Annual Progress Report. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-20

    conducting, and publishing ethical, scientific inquiry into clinical health problems of beneficiaries of the military health care system, to include... Acromegaly and 173 Intermediate Markers of Neoplasia (5/90) 1417 Wong, Roy COL MC. Incidence of Gastric Mucosal Injury in 174 Patients Ingesting Liquid Versus... Respiratory 225 Control Mechanisms and Nocturnal Desaturation in Diffuse Pulmonary Fibrosis (2/81) 1714 Dillard, Thomas LTC MC. Mechanisms Limiting Exercise

  18. Clinical investigation of set-shifting subtypes in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Buzzichelli, Sara; Marzola, Enrica; Amianto, Federico; Fassino, Secondo

    2014-11-30

    While evidence continues to accumulate on the relevance of cognitive inflexibility in anorexia nervosa (AN), its clinical correlates remain unclear. We aimed at examining the relationship between set-shifting and clinical variables (i.e., eating psychopathology, depression, and personality) in AN. Ninety-four individuals affected by AN and 59 healthy controls (HC) were recruited. All participants were assessed using: Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The AN group scored worse than HCs on set-shifting. According to their neuropsychological performances, AN patients were split into two groups corresponding to poor (N=30) and intact (N=64) set-shifting subtypes. Interoceptive awareness, impulse regulation, and maturity fears on the EDI-2 and depression on the BDI differed across all groups (HC, intact, and poor set-shifting subtype). Self-directedness on the TCI differed significantly among all groups. Cooperativeness and reward dependence differed instead only between HC and AN poor set-shifting subtype. After controlling for depression, only interoceptive awareness remained significant with reward dependence showing a trend towards statistical significance. These findings suggest that multiple clinical variables may be correlated with set-shifting performances in AN. The factors contributing to impaired cognitive inflexibility could be more complex than heretofore generally considered.

  19. Sample sizes in dosage investigational clinical trials: a systematic evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Huang JH; Su QM; Yang J; Lv YH; He YC; Chen JC; Xu L; Wang K; Zheng QS

    2015-01-01

    Ji-Han Huang,1,* Qian-Min Su,2,* Juan Yang,1 Ying-Hua Lv,1 Ying-Chun He,1 Jun-Chao Chen,1 Ling Xu,1 Kun Wang,1 Qing-Shan Zheng11Center for Drug Clinical Research, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Computer, College of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: T...

  20. Clinical value of isotope methods in adrenal morphology investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowski, W.; Feltynowski, T.; Graban, W. (Akademia Medyczna, Warsaw (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    In the years 1976-1980 in 105 patients 124 adrenal scintigrams were obtained, including 50 in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism syndrome, 27 with Cushings syndrome, 8 after bilateral total adrenalectomy, 4 with adrenal virilizing tumours, 6 with phaeochromocytoma, 10 with normal adrenal function. The results of scintigraphy were compared with those of arteriography, phlebography, computer tomography and postoperative findings. The clinical value of scintigraphy was found to be greatest in cases of adrenocortical disease. In cases of phaeochromocytoma isotope angioscintigraphy is a useful method for localizing the tumour since it makes possible demonstration of the vascular bed of the tumour. A close correlation was demonstrated between the results of scintigraphy and those of computer tomography. In the group of 27 patients treated surgically for adrenocortical disease in 87% of cases an agreement was found between the results of scintigraphy and the result of the operation. For different adrenocortical diseases this per cent was: 77% for Cushings syndrome, 91% for primary hyperaldosteronism, 100% for adrenal virilizing tumours. The study showed that adrenal scintigraphy is a very valuable diagnostic method of high clinical usefulness in adrenocortical diseases.

  1. 78 FR 60291 - Investigational Device Exemptions for Early Feasibility Medical Device Clinical Studies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... ``Investigational Device Exemptions (IDEs) for Early Feasibility Medical Device Clinical Studies, Including Certain... facilitate early feasibility studies of medical devices, using appropriate risk mitigation strategies, under the IDE regulations. Early feasibility studies allow for limited early clinical evaluations of...

  2. 21 CFR 812.119 - Disqualification of a clinical investigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, or the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research will... submitted unreliable data that are essential to the continuation of the investigation or essential to the approval or clearance of any marketing application. (d) If the Commissioner determines, after...

  3. Pre-clinical Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahryari, Varahram; Nip, Hannah; Saini, Sharanjot; Dar, Altaf A; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Colden, Melissa; Bucay, Nathan; Tabatabai, Laura Z; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir; Majid, Shahana

    2016-08-29

    To study the multifaceted biology of prostate cancer, pre-clinical in vivo models offer a range of options to uncover critical biological information about this disease. The human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model provides a useful alternative approach for understanding the specific interactions between genetically and molecularly altered tumor cells, their organ microenvironment, and for evaluation of efficacy of therapeutic regimens. This is a well characterized model designed to study the molecular events of primary tumor development and it recapitulates the early events in the metastatic cascade prior to embolism and entry of tumor cells into the circulation. Thus it allows elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the initial phase of metastatic disease. In addition, this model can annotate drug targets of clinical relevance and is a valuable tool to study prostate cancer progression. In this manuscript we describe a detailed procedure to establish a human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model.

  4. Anaerococcus nagyae sp. nov., isolated from human clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloo, A C M; de Vries, E D; Jean-Pierre, H; van Winkelhoff, A J

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new Anaerococcus species isolated from human clinical specimens. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences of three strains showed octavius. Phylogenetically the isolated strains form a cluster and can be differentiated from other species of the genus Anaerococcus based on its phenotypic characteristics and its MALDI-TOF MS profile. We propose the name Anaerococcus nagyae, with A. nagyae DSM101193 (accession number KU043522) as the type strain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identities of Microbacterium spp. Encountered in Human Clinical Specimens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The is...

  6. PERSPECTIVE: Is acuity enough? Other considerations in clinical investigations of visual prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepri, Bernard P.

    2009-06-01

    Visual impairing eye diseases are the major frontier facing ophthalmic research today in light of our rapidly aging population. The visual skills necessary for improving the quality of daily function and life are inextricably linked to these impairing diseases. Both research and reimbursement programs are emphasizing outcome-based results. Is improvement in visual acuity alone enough to improve the function and quality of life of visually impaired persons? This perspective summarizes the types of effectiveness endpoints for clinical investigations of visual prostheses that go beyond visual acuity. The clinical investigation of visual prostheses should include visual function, functional vision and quality of life measures. Specifically, they encompass contrast sensitivity, orientation and mobility, activities of daily living and quality of life assessments. The perspective focuses on the design of clinical trials for visual prostheses and the methods of determining effectiveness above and beyond visual acuity that will yield outcomes that are measured by improved function in the visual world and quality of life. The visually impaired population is the primary consideration in this presentation with particular emphases on retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Clinical trials for visual prostheses cannot be isolated from the need for medical rehabilitation in order to obtain measurements of effectiveness that produce outcomes/evidence-based success. This approach will facilitate improvement in daily function and quality of life of patients with diseases that cause chronic vision impairment. The views and opinions are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the US Food and Drug Administration, the US Department of Health and Human Services or the Public Health Service.

  7. An experimental investigation of the combustion performance of human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onabanjo, Tosin; Kolios, Athanasios J; Patchigolla, Kumar; Wagland, Stuart T; Fidalgo, Beatriz; Jurado, Nelia; Hanak, Dawid P; Manovic, Vasilije; Parker, Alison; McAdam, Ewan; Williams, Leon; Tyrrel, Sean; Cartmell, Elise

    2016-11-15

    Poor sanitation is one of the major hindrances to the global sustainable development goals. The Reinvent the Toilet Challenge of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is set to develop affordable, next-generation sanitary systems that can ensure safe treatment and wide accessibility without compromise on sustainable use of natural resources and the environment. Energy recovery from human excreta is likely to be a cornerstone of future sustainable sanitary systems. Faeces combustion was investigated using a bench-scale downdraft combustor test rig, alongside with wood biomass and simulant faeces. Parameters such as air flow rate, fuel pellet size, bed height, and fuel ignition mode were varied to establish the combustion operating range of the test rig and the optimum conditions for converting the faecal biomass to energy. The experimental results show that the dry human faeces had a higher energy content (∼25 MJ/kg) than wood biomass. At equivalence ratio between 0.86 and 1.12, the combustion temperature and fuel burn rate ranged from 431 to 558 °C and 1.53 to 2.30 g/min respectively. Preliminary results for the simulant faeces show that a minimum combustion bed temperature of 600 ± 10 °C can handle faeces up to 60 wt.% moisture at optimum air-to-fuel ratio. Further investigation is required to establish the appropriate trade-off limits for drying and energy recovery, considering different stool types, moisture content and drying characteristics. This is important for the design and further development of a self-sustained energy conversion and recovery systems for the NMT and similar sanitary solutions.

  8. Preliminary clinical pharmacological investigations of tylosin and tiamulin in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, G

    1980-10-15

    The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of tiamulin and tylosin for mycoplasma, Gram-positive, and Gram-negative micro-organisms isolated from chickens were determinated by the agar dilution method. Median MIC values for tiamulin against Mycoplasma gallisepticum (0.05 microgram/ml) and Mycoplasma synoviae (0.10 microgram/ml) were 2 to 4 times lower than the corresponding values for tylosin. Tiamulin was also slightly more effective in vitro in inhibiting Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, and beta-haemolytic streptococci than was tylosin. Groups of chicken were offered tiamulin medicated drinking water at rates of 125 and 250 mg/litre for 48 hours. Average serum tiamulin concentrations were 0.38 and 0.78 microgram/ml, respectively. When tylosin tartrate was added to the drinking water at 500 and 700 mg/litre, average serum drug levels were 0.12 and 0.17 microgram/ml, respectively. Tiamulin was 45% bound in chicken serum, as against 30% serum protein binding for tylosin. Correlations were made between free (non protein bound) serum drug levels and the MIC values of the two drugs. Such comparisons suggest that when tiamulin is given in the drinking water at rates of 125 to 250 mg/litre, better antimycoplasmal activity is to be expected in vivo than by giving tylosin tartrate in the drinking water at 500 to 700 mg/litre. Based on these data, no clinical efficacy of these dose rates can be expected in flocks infected by gram-negative micro-organisms such as E. coli or P. multocida. The tylosin tartrate rate of 500 to 700 mg/litre, may be clinical ineffective the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  9. Identities of Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The isolation of strains belonging to M. hydrocarbonoxydans (n = 2), M. esteraromaticum (n = 1), M. oleivorans (n = 1), M. phyllosphaerae (n = 1), and M. thalassium (n = 1) from humans is reported for the first time. Microbacterium sp. strain VKM Ac-1389 (n = 1) and the previously uncultured Microbacterium sp. clone YJQ-29 (n = 1) probably represent new species. Comprehensive antimicrobial susceptibility data are given for the 50 Microbacterium isolates. This study is, so far, the largest on Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens and outlines the heterogeneity of clinical Microbacterium strains.

  10. Identities of Microbacterium spp. Encountered in Human Clinical Specimens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneiding, Kathrina; Frodl, Reinhard; Funke, Guido

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, 50 strains of yellow-pigmented gram-positive rods that had been isolated from human clinical specimens and collected over a 5-year period were further characterized by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. All 50 strains belonged to the genus Microbacterium, and together they represented 18 different species. Microbacterium oxydans (n = 11), M. paraoxydans (n = 9), and M. foliorum (n = 7) represented more than half of the strains included in the present study. The isolation of strains belonging to M. hydrocarbonoxydans (n = 2), M. esteraromaticum (n = 1), M. oleivorans (n = 1), M. phyllosphaerae (n = 1), and M. thalassium (n = 1) from humans is reported for the first time. Microbacterium sp. strain VKM Ac-1389 (n = 1) and the previously uncultured Microbacterium sp. clone YJQ-29 (n = 1) probably represent new species. Comprehensive antimicrobial susceptibility data are given for the 50 Microbacterium isolates. This study is, so far, the largest on Microbacterium spp. encountered in human clinical specimens and outlines the heterogeneity of clinical Microbacterium strains. PMID:18799696

  11. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ken eRosslau; Daniel eSteinwede; Christine eSchröder; Sibylle eHerholz; Claudia eLappe; Christian eDobel; Eckart eAltenmüller

    2015-01-01

    There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions) or expression (music production abilities), and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in...

  12. [The clinical use of cryopreserved human skin allografts for transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Chacón-Gómez, María; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio; Barrera-Lopez, Araceli; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Querevalu-Murillo, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The biological recovery of human skin allografts is the gold standard for preservation in Skin Banks. However, there is no worldwide consensus about specific allocation criteria for preserved human skin allografts with living cells. A report is presented on the results of 5 years of experience of using human skin allografts in burned patient in the Skin and Tissue Bank at the "Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" The human skin allografts were obtained from multi-organ donors. processed and preserved at -80 °C for 12 months. Allocation criteria were performed according to blood type match, clinical history, and burned body surface. Up to now, the Skin and Tissue Bank at 'Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" has processed and recovered 125,000 cm(2) of human skin allografts. It has performed 34 surgical implants on 21 burned patients. The average of burn body surface was 59.2%. More than two-thirds (67.7%) of recipients of skin allografts were matched of the same to type blood of the donor, and 66.6% survived after 126 days hospital stay. It is proposed to consider recipient's blood group as allocation criteria to assign tissue; and use human skin allografts on patiens affected with burns over 30% of body surface (according the "rule of the 9"). Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Human transcriptome array for high-throughput clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weihong; Seok, Junhee; Mindrinos, Michael N; Schweitzer, Anthony C; Jiang, Hui; Wilhelmy, Julie; Clark, Tyson A; Kapur, Karen; Xing, Yi; Faham, Malek; Storey, John D; Moldawer, Lyle L; Maier, Ronald V; Tompkins, Ronald G; Wong, Wing Hung; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2011-03-01

    A 6.9 million-feature oligonucleotide array of the human transcriptome [Glue Grant human transcriptome (GG-H array)] has been developed for high-throughput and cost-effective analyses in clinical studies. This array allows comprehensive examination of gene expression and genome-wide identification of alternative splicing as well as detection of coding SNPs and noncoding transcripts. The performance of the array was examined and compared with mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) results over multiple independent replicates of liver and muscle samples. Compared with RNA-Seq of 46 million uniquely mappable reads per replicate, the GG-H array is highly reproducible in estimating gene and exon abundance. Although both platforms detect similar expression changes at the gene level, the GG-H array is more sensitive at the exon level. Deeper sequencing is required to adequately cover low-abundance transcripts. The array has been implemented in a multicenter clinical program and has generated high-quality, reproducible data. Considering the clinical trial requirements of cost, sample availability, and throughput, the GG-H array has a wide range of applications. An emerging approach for large-scale clinical genomic studies is to first use RNA-Seq to the sufficient depth for the discovery of transcriptome elements relevant to the disease process followed by high-throughput and reliable screening of these elements on thousands of patient samples using custom-designed arrays.

  14. Atlas of the clinical genetics of human dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Jan; Frese, Karen S; Peil, Barbara;

    2015-01-01

    : This is to our knowledge, the first study that comprehensively investigated the genetics of DCM in a large-scale cohort and across a broad gene panel of the known DCM genes. Our results underline the high analytical quality and feasibility of Next-Generation Sequencing in clinical genetic diagnostics and provide...... a sound database of the genetic causes of DCM....

  15. Clinical investigation of risk factors in ectopic pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-yun HU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To discuss the relative and independent risk factors in ectopic pregnancy. Methods  The clinical data of 870 patients with ectopic pregnancy, admitted from 2005 to 2012, were retrospectively analyzed, with 800 cases of normal pregnancy serving as control. Monofactorial correlation analysis was used to analyze the related risk factor, and logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the independent risk factor. Results  Pelvic adhesion, previous operation, cesarean section delivery, number of pregnancy, artificial abortion, medical abortion, in vitrofertilization and embryo replacement (IVF-ER, and placement of intrauterine device (IUD are the risk factors of ectopic pregnancy, pelvic adhesion, artificial abortion, operation, number of pregnancies and IUD are the independent risk factors, and pelvic adhesion is the major risk factor. Conclusion  Avoidance of unexpected pregnancy as possible, reduction of the number of artificial abortion, prevention and treatment of genital duct inflammation, and standardization of pelvic operation may reduce the incidence of ectopic pregnancy.

  16. Investigation of Tinnitus Patients in Italy: Clinical and Audiological Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Martines

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. 312 tinnitus sufferers were studied in order to analyze: the clinical characteristics of tinnitus; the presence of tinnitus-age correlation and tinnitus-hearing loss correlation; the impact of tinnitus on subjects' life and where possible the etiological/predisposing factors of tinnitus. Results. There is a slight predominance of males. The highest percentage of tinnitus results in the decades 61–70. Of the tinnitus sufferers, 197 (63.14% have a hearing deficit (light hearing loss in 37.18% of cases. The hearing impairment results of sensorineural type in 74.62% and limited to the high frequencies in 58.50%. The tinnitus is referred as unilateral in 59.93%, a pure tone in 66.99% and 10 dB above the hearing threshold in 37.7%. It is limited to high frequencies in 72.10% of the patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL while the 88.37% of the patients with high-frequency SNHL have a high-pitched tinnitus (2=66.26;<.005. Conclusion. Hearing status and age represent the principal tinnitus related factors; there is a statistically significant association between high-pitched tinnitus and high-frequency SNHL. There is no significant correlation between tinnitus severity and tinnitus loudness confirming the possibility that neural connection involved in evoking tinnitus-related negative reactions are governed by conditioned reflexes.

  17. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eRosslau

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions or expression (music production abilities, and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a right-sided stroke, patients with a left-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits.

  18. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslau, Ken; Steinwede, Daniel; Schröder, C; Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Dobel, Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions) or expression (music production abilities), and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a left-sided stroke, patients with a right-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits.

  19. Investigation of human hair fibers using lateral force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, R L; Kelty, S P

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and lateral force microscopy (LFM) were used to investigate the morphologic and surface changes associated with various surface modifications to human hair. These included extraction with a series of solvents, bleaching, and treatment with a cationic copolymer. The study assessed the ability of these techniques to distinguish the changes in surface properties, including morphology and friction coefficient, as manifested in changes brought about by the indicated surface modifications. While topographic morphology can easily be investigated with contact AFM. LFM offers an additional tool for probing the surface distribution of oils and waxes. The removal of surface lipids from the fiber surface was accomplished using soxhlet extraction with t-butanol and n-hexane, while the free internal lipids (within the fiber structure) were removed by extraction with a mixture of chloroform and methanol (70:30, v/v). In addition, the surface of hair was modified with the cationic polymer, co(vinyl pyrrolidone-methacrylamidopropyl trimethylammonium chloride [PVP/MAPTAC]), and its distribution on the surface was monitored. Ambient AFM and LFM studies of surface modified and native fibers clearly indicate that when investigated as a function of tip loading force, the different modifications result in changes of the friction coefficient, which increase in this order: native, bleached, solvent extracted, and polymer-treated hair. Friction images show surface variations that are interpreted as areas of varying lipid film coverage. In addition, topographic images of the fibers show the presence of small pores, which become increasingly prevalent upon solvent extraction.

  20. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Preetinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student's t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student's t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes.

  1. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill PS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Preetinder Singh Gill College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA Background: Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Methods: Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Results: Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student's t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student's t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. Conclusion: A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes. Keywords: patient engagement, health outcomes, communication, provider effectiveness, patient incentive

  2. Review of clinical and laboratory features of human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantur B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Brucella spp. continues to pose a human health risk globally despite strides in eradicating the disease from domestic animals. Brucellosis has been an emerging disease since the discovery of Brucella melitensis by Sir David Bruce in 1887. Although many countries have eradicated B. abortus from cattle, in some areas B. melitensis and B. suis have emerged as causes of this infection in cattle, leading to human infections. Currently B. melitensis remains the principal cause of human brucellosis worldwide including India. The recent isolation of distinct strains of Brucella from marine mammals as well as humans is an indicator of an emerging zoonotic disease. Brucellosis in endemic and non-endemic regions remains a diagnostic puzzle due to misleading non-specific manifestations and increasing unusual presentations. Fewer than 10% of human cases of brucellosis may be clinically recognized and treated or reported. Routine serological surveillance is not practiced even in Brucella - endemic countries and we suggest that this should be a part of laboratory testing coupled with a high index of clinical suspicion to improve the level of case detection. The screening of family members of index cases of acute brucellosis in an endemic area should be undertaken to pick up additional unrecognised cases. Rapid and reliable, sensitive and specific, easy to perform and automated detection systems for Brucella spp. are urgently needed to allow early diagnosis and adequate antibiotic therapy in time to decrease morbidity / mortality. The history of travel to endemic countries along with exposure to animals and exotic foods are usually critical to making the clinical diagnosis. Laboratory testing is indispensable for diagnosis. Therefore alertness of clinician and close collaboration with microbiologist are essential even in endemic areas to correctly diagnose and treat this protean human infection. Existing treatment options, largely based on

  3. Clinical investigation on application of water swallowing to MR esophagography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinping, E-mail: zjpmri@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China); Hu, Weijian; Zang, Lin [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China); Yao, Yibin; Tang, Yongxiang; Qian, Zhen; Gao, Ping; Wu, Xiaoyan; Li, Shijian [Department of Radiology, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China); Xie, Zhenlan; Yuan, Xiaoqing [Department of Pathology, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To verify the clinical outcomes of applying water swallowing to MR esophagography. Methods: Thirty patients confirmed postoperatively or histopathologically with thoracic esophageal carcinoma by endoscopic biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers with normal esophagus underwent respectively conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection and water swallowing MR esophagography. Of those patients, 4 underwent second examination after radiotherapy. Assessment on imaging effects of MR esophagography was performed. Assessment on definition on MR esophagography of the tumor in both upper and lower ends, specific localization, tumor size finally measured, coincidence with the gross pathologic types and tumor staging were respectively performed by comparison with conventional MRI. Additionally, we evaluated the outcomes of radiotherapy by comparing the previous MR esophagography with the second one with interventional technique. Results: Of the total 44 images of MR esophagography, 97.7% (43/44) were in high resolution by sagittal view and 81.8% (36/44) by cross-section. 93.3% (56/60) of the MR esophagography were clearly defined with the neoplastic lesion ends in the 30 patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma, compared with 11.7% (7/60) by conventional MRI. The results were totally different in statistics (P < 0.005). Preoperative conventional MRI detection of the 22 cases in 25 undergone radical resection suggested vague diameter of the primary tumor and impossibly identified it at middle-lower thoracic esophagus in 5, and even failed to confirm gross pathologic types in 19 cases. Yet, MR esophagography with water swallowing represented accurate tumor length (graded as excellent) in 88% (22/25), localization in 100% (25/25), exact gross pathologic types in 88% (22/25), and accuracy for tumor staging in 80.8% (21/26) compared to 92.3% (24/26) by conventional MRI. Therapeutic effects achieved in 4 patients with radiotherapy. Conclusions: MR esophagography

  4. Annual Progress Report FY 93 (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Department of Clinical Investigation). Clinical Investigation Program. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    13,141 Total: $ 13,141 STUDY OBJECTIVE To examine the potential role for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the regulation of respiration . TECHNICAL...Association of Acromegaly and Intermediate Markers of Neoplasia KEYWORDS: acromegaly , colonic neoplasia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Murphy, Joseph MAJ MC...acromegalics, to identify risk factors, and to determine if there is a correlation between disease activity in acromegaly and intermediate markers of

  5. Local Rheology of Human Neutrophils Investigated Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong J. Lee, Dipika Patel, Soyeun Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the immune response, neutrophils display localized mechanical events by interacting with their environment through the micro-vascular transit, trans-endothelial, and trans-epithelial migration. Nano-mechanical studies of human neutrophils on localized nano-domains could provide the essential information for understanding their immune responsive functions. Using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM - based micro-rheology, we have investigated rheological properties of the adherent human neutrophils on local nano-domains. We have applied the modified Hertz model to obtain the viscoelastic moduli from the relatively thick body regions of the neutrophils. In addition, by using more advanced models to account for the substrate effects, we have successfully characterized the rheological properties of the thin leading and tail regions as well. We found a regional difference in the mechanical compliances of the adherent neutrophils. The central regions of neutrophils were significantly stiffer (1,548 ± 871 Pa than the regions closer to the leading edge (686 ± 801 Pa, while the leading edge and the tail (494 ± 537 Pa regions were mechanically indistinguishable. The frequency-dependent elastic and viscous moduli also display a similar regional difference. Over the studied frequency range (100 to 300 Hz, the complex viscoelastic moduli display the partial rubber plateau behavior where the elastic moduli are greater than the viscous moduli for a given frequency. The non-disparaging viscous modulus indicates that the neutrophils display a viscoelastic dynamic behavior rather than a perfect elastic behavior like polymer gels. In addition, we found no regional difference in the structural damping coefficient between the leading edge and the cell body. Thus, we conclude that despite the lower loss and storage moduli, the leading edges of the human neutrophils display partially elastic properties similar to the cell body. These results suggest that the

  6. Mapping gene associations in human mitochondria using clinical disease phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Scharfe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects

  7. Clinical investigation of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Shinji; Araki, Hiroshi; Takada, Jun; Watanabe, Naoki; Asano, Takahiko; Iwashita, Masahide; Tagami, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Hiroo; Hayashi, Takao; Maeda, Teruo; Saito, Koshiro

    2010-07-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is sometimes reported as one of the serious complications. Our purpose was to clarify the cause of upper GI hemorrhage after PEG. We retrospectively investigated the causes of upper GI hemorrhage among a total of 416 patients out of 426 consecutive patients who underwent PEG in our institution, excluding 10 patients who showed upper GI tumors on PEG placement. Among 17 patients who developed upper GI hemorrhage after PEG, three and four patients showed PEG tube placement and replacement-related hemorrhage, respectively; these lesions were vascular or mucosal tears around the gastrostomy site. Ten patients experienced 12 episodes of upper GI hemorrhage during PEG tube feeding. The lesions showing bleeding were caused by reflux esophagitis (five patients), gastric ulcer (two patients), gastric erosion due to mucosal inclusion in the side hole of the internal bolster (two patients), and duodenal diverticular hemorrhage (one patient). Anticoagulants were administered in six patients, including four patients with replacement-related hemorrhage and one patient each with reflux esophagitis and gastric ulcer. Reflux esophagitis was the most frequent reason for upper GI hemorrhage after PEG. The interruption of anticoagulants should be considered for the prevention of hemorrhage on the placement as well as replacement of a gastrostomy tube.

  8. Good clinical practice regulatory inspections: Lessons for Indian investigator sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Marwah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory inspections are important to evaluate the integrity of the data submitted to health authorities (HAs, protect patient safety, and assess adequacy of site/sponsor quality systems to achieve the same. Inspections generally occur after submission of data for marketing approval of an investigational drug. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in number of inspections by different HAs, including in India. The assessors/inspectors generally do a thorough review of site data before inspections. All aspects of ICH-GCP, site infrastructure, and quality control systems are assessed during the inspection. Findings are discussed during the close out meeting and a detailed inspection report issued afterward, which has to be responded to within 15-30 days with effective Corrective and Preventive Action Plan (CAPA. Protocol noncompliance, inadequate/inaccurate records, inadequate drug accountability, informed consent issues, and adverse event reporting were some of the most common findings observed during recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA inspections. Drug development is being increasingly globalized and an increased number of patients enrolled in studies submitted as part of applications come from all over the world including India. Because of the steep increase in research activity in the country, inexperienced sites, and more stakeholders, increased efforts will be required to ensure continuous quality and compliance. HAs have also made clear that enforcement will be increased and be swift, aggressive, and effective.

  9. Investigation of DNA repair in human oocytes and preimplantation embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroudi, S.

    2010-01-01

    DNA repair genes are expressed in mammalian embryos and in human germinal vesicles, however, little is known about DNA repair in human preimplantation embryos. This project had three aims: 1) to produce a DNA repair profile of human MII oocytes and blastocysts using expression arrays and identify repair pathways that may be active before and after embryonic genome activation; 2) to design an in vitro functional assay that targeted mismatch repair and which could be applied to human oocytes...

  10. 76 FR 70151 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards, and Food and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... to evaluate medical devices under FDA's IDE regulations. In an effort to promote timely clinical... available at http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/GuidanceDocuments/default.htm... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical...

  11. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  12. The Impact of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) on Clinical Innovation: A Survey of Investigators and IRB Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewski, Tomasz P; Kalish, Brian T; Silverman, Benjamin; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a survey to assess the perspectives of principal investigators and Institutional Review Board (IRB) members on the impact of the IRB structure on the conduct of research and innovative therapy, defined as a nonstandard treatment intended to enhance the well-being of an individual patient. Although investigators and IRB members agreed that the IRB provides adequate protection to study subjects (97% vs. 100%) and an ethically insightful review (88% vs. 100%), a third of clinical investigators felt that the IRB review process limits clinical innovation, in comparison with only 4% of IRB representatives. Limitations of the current IRB review process were explored. We propose several measures to improve the IRB review process while maintaining the protection of human research subjects, including the use of centralized IRBs, the opening of IRB meetings to investigators, the development of metrics and outcome measures for the IRB, and the promotion of guidelines that distinguish research and innovative therapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. General issues and precautions in the design for clinical trials of investigational new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang-ping; Bao, Xiao-lei

    2011-02-01

    The general problems existing in the clinical trials of investigational new drugs involve some key aspects such as the guiding principles, research designs, quality controls and statistical analyses. This paper explores the eight general issues in the clinical trials of investigational new drugs and presents precautionary measures with high operability. Research on the clinical trials of investigational new drugs is a complex project, which should be carried out strictly according to the policies, laws, criteria and operating rules set by related agencies. The neglect of research designs and data analyses will lead clinical trials to failure.

  14. Improvement of human dendritic cell culture for immunotoxicological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymery, N; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2006-07-01

    A toxic injury such as a decrease in the number of immature dendritic cells caused by a cytotoxic effect or a disturbance in their maturation process can be responsible for immunodepression. There is a need to improve in vitro assays on human dendritic cells used to detect and evaluate adverse effects of xenobiotics. Two aspects were explored in this work: cytotoxic effects of xenobiotics on immature dendritic cells, and the interference of xenobiotics with dendritic cell maturation. Dendritic cells of two different origins were tested. Dendritic cells obtained either from umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells or, for the first time, from umbilical cord blood monocytes. The cytotoxicity assay on immature dendritic cells has been improved. For the study of the potential adverse effects of xenobiotics on the maturation process of dendritic cells, several parameters were selected such as expression of markers (CD86, CD83, HLA-DR), secretion of interleukins 10 and 12, and proliferation of autologous lymphocytes. The relevance and the efficiency of the protocol applied were tested using two mycotoxins, T-2 toxin and deoxynivalence, DON, which are known to be immunosuppressive, and one phycotoxin, domoic acid, which is known not to have any immunotoxic effect. Assays using umbilical cord monocyte dendritic cell cultures with the protocol defined in this work, which involves a cytotoxicity study followed by evaluation of several markers of adverse effects on the dendritic cell maturation process, revealed their usefulness for investigating xenobiotic immunotoxicity toward immune primary reactions.

  15. Preclinical and Clinical Investigation of the Impact of Obesity on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0426 TITLE: Preclinical and Clinical Investigation of the Impact of Obesity on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis PRINCIPAL...ANNUAL 25 Sep 2013 - 24 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Pre-clinical and Clinical Investigation of the Impact of Obesity on Ovarian...metabolic consequences of obesity may be critical in the development of ovarian cancer (OC), resulting in biologically different cancers than those that

  16. Parasitological and clinical studies on human scabies in Cairo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwat, M A; el Okbi, L M; el Sayed, M M; el Okbi, S M; el Deeb, H K

    1993-12-01

    This study is a parasitological and clinical study on human scabies. This study was carried out on 100 patients attending the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic at Ain Shams University Hospitals, including 54 males and 46 females. All patients were subjected to detailed history taking, complete dermatological examination including Skin Scraping Test and Burrow Ink Test. Younger patients attended the dermatology clinic earlier than older patients, who usually delayed their visits until complications occurred. Scratching, erythematous papules and secondary infected lesions were the commonest lesions. The hands, wrist and external genitalia were the most frequently affected sites while the feet, ankles, knees and back were the least affected. Burrows could only be detected in 40% of patients. The most frequent sites were the web spaces, external genitalia, and finger sides. Burrow Ink Test was positive among 85% of patients with burrows while mites could be identified by Skin Scraping Test in 55% of patients. The most frequent clinical manifestations in the parasitologically positive patients were itching, burrows, and papules, and the most frequent sites were the web spaces, and the finger sides. Multiple sites affection was the characteristic feature among the preschool age children who represented 14% of cases.

  17. Pathogenesis, developmental consequences, and clinical correlations of human embryo fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Victor Y; Browne, Richard W; Bloom, Michael S; Sakkas, Denny; Alikani, Mina

    2011-03-15

    This narrative review summarizes the current state of knowledge about human embryo fragmentation during IVF. The clinical relevance of fragmentation is discussed and evidence supporting a central role for the oocyte in the pathogenesis of fragmentation is presented. A mechanism of fragmentation as aberrant cell division involving the cytoskeleton is described along with the novel concept of membrane instability in relation to follicular high-density lipoprotein metabolism and cholesterol transport. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The human genome project: Prospects and implications for clinical medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.D.; Waterston, R.H. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1991-10-09

    The recently initiated human genome project is a large international effort to elucidate the genetic architecture of the genomes of man and several model organisms. The initial phases of this endeavor involve the establishment of rough blueprints (maps) of the genetic landscape of these genomes, with the long-term goal of determining their precise nucleotide sequences and identifying the genes. The knowledge gained by these studies will provide a vital tool for the study of many biologic processes and will have a profound impact on clinical medicine.

  19. Fluorescence properties of human teeth and dental calculus for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent emission of human teeth and dental calculus is important for the esthetic rehabilitation of teeth, diagnosis of dental caries, and detection of dental calculus. The purposes of this review were to summarize the fluorescence and phosphorescence of human teeth by ambient ultraviolet (UV) light, to investigate the clinically relevant fluorescence measurement methods in dentistry, and to review the fluorescence of teeth and dental calculus by specific wavelength light. Dentine was three times more phosphorescent than enamel. When exposed to light sources containing UV components, the fluorescence of human teeth gives them the quality of vitality, and fluorescent emission with a peak of 440 nm is observed. Esthetic restorative materials should have fluorescence properties similar to those of natural teeth. Based on the fluorescence of teeth and restorative materials as determined with a spectrophotometer, a fluorescence parameter was defined. As to the fluorescence spectra by a specific wavelength, varied wavelengths were investigated for clinical applications, and several methods for the diagnosis of dental caries and the detection of dental calculus were developed. Since fluorescent properties of dental hard tissues have been used and would be expanded in diverse fields of clinical practice, these properties should be investigated further, embracing newly developed optical techniques.

  20. Fluorescence properties of human teeth and dental calculus for clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent emission of human teeth and dental calculus is important for the esthetic rehabilitation of teeth, diagnosis of dental caries, and detection of dental calculus. The purposes of this review were to summarize the fluorescence and phosphorescence of human teeth by ambient ultraviolet (UV) light, to investigate the clinically relevant fluorescence measurement methods in dentistry, and to review the fluorescence of teeth and dental calculus by specific wavelength light. Dentine was three times more phosphorescent than enamel. When exposed to light sources containing UV components, the fluorescence of human teeth gives them the quality of vitality, and fluorescent emission with a peak of 440 nm is observed. Esthetic restorative materials should have fluorescence properties similar to those of natural teeth. Based on the fluorescence of teeth and restorative materials as determined with a spectrophotometer, a fluorescence parameter was defined. As to the fluorescence spectra by a specific wavelength, varied wavelengths were investigated for clinical applications, and several methods for the diagnosis of dental caries and the detection of dental calculus were developed. Since fluorescent properties of dental hard tissues have been used and would be expanded in diverse fields of clinical practice, these properties should be investigated further, embracing newly developed optical techniques.

  1. Spirulina in Clinical Practice: Evidence-Based Human Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Karkos, P. D.; Leong, S. C.; C. D. Karkos; Sivaji, N.; Assimakopoulos, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and sy...

  2. Bridging Autism Spectrum Disorders and Schizophrenia through inflammation and biomarkers - pre-clinical and clinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Joana; Santos, Susana G; Almeida, Maria Inês; Coelho, Rui; Barbosa, Mário A

    2017-09-04

    In recent years, evidence supporting a link between inflammation and neuropsychiatric disorders has been mounting. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia share some clinical similarities which we hypothesize might reflect the same biological basis, namely, in terms of inflammation. However, the diagnosis of ASD and schizophrenia relies solely on clinical symptoms, and to date, there is no clinically useful biomarker to diagnose or monitor the course of such illnesses.The focus of this review is the central role that inflammation plays in ASD and schizophrenia. It spans from pre-clinical animal models to clinical research and excludes in vitro studies. Four major areas are covered: (1) microglia, the inflammatory brain resident myeloid cells, (2) biomarkers, including circulating cytokines, oxidative stress markers, and microRNA players, known to influence cellular processes at brain and immune levels, (3) effect of anti-psychotics on biomarkers and other predictors of response, and (4) impact of gender on response to immune activation, biomarkers, and response to anti-psychotic treatments.

  3. Efficient Generation of Bispecific Murine Antibodies for Pre-Clinical Investigations in Syngeneic Rodent Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrijn, Aran F; Meesters, Joyce I; Bunce, Matthew; Armstrong, Anthony A; Somani, Sandeep; Nesspor, Tom C; Chiu, Mark L; Altintaş, Işil; Verploegen, Sandra; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2017-05-30

    Therapeutic concepts exploiting tumor-specific antibodies are often established in pre-clinical xenograft models using immuno-deficient mice. More complex therapeutic paradigms, however, warrant the use of immuno-competent mice, that more accurately capture the relevant biology that is being exploited. These models require the use of (surrogate) mouse or rat antibodies to enable optimal interactions with murine effector molecules. Immunogenicity is furthermore decreased, allowing longer-term treatment. We recently described controlled Fab-arm exchange (cFAE) as an easy-to-use method for the generation of therapeutic human IgG1 bispecific antibodies (bsAb). To facilitate the investigation of dual-targeting concepts in immuno-competent mice, we now applied and optimized our method for the generation of murine bsAbs. We show that the optimized combinations of matched point-mutations enabled efficient generation of murine bsAbs for all subclasses studied (mouse IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b; rat IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG2c). The mutations did not adversely affect the inherent effector functions or pharmacokinetic properties of the corresponding subclasses. Thus, cFAE can be used to efficiently generate (surrogate) mouse or rat bsAbs for pre-clinical evaluation in immuno-competent rodents.

  4. Immortalization of human alveolar epithelial cells to investigate nanoparticle uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Sarah J; Thorley, Andrew J; Gorelik, Julia; Seckl, Michael J; O'Hare, Michael J; Arcaro, Alexandre; Korchev, Yuri; Goldstraw, Peter; Tetley, Teresa D

    2008-11-01

    Primary human alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells were immortalized by transduction with the catalytic subunit of telomerase and simian virus 40 large-tumor antigen. Characterization by immunochemical and morphologic methods demonstrated an AT1-like cell phenotype. Unlike primary AT2 cells, immortalized cells no longer expressed alkaline phosphatase, pro-surfactant protein C, and thyroid transcription factor-1, but expressed increased caveolin-1 and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Live cell imaging using scanning ion conductance microscopy showed that the cuboidal primary AT2 cells were approximately 15 microm and enriched with surface microvilli, while the immortal AT1 cells were attenuated more than 40 microm, resembling these cells in situ. Transmission electron microscopy highlighted the attenuated morphology and showed endosomal vesicles in some immortal AT1 cells (but not primary AT2 cells) as found in situ. Particulate air pollution exacerbates cardiopulmonary disease. Interaction of ultrafine, nano-sized particles with the alveolar epithelium and/or translocation into the cardiovasculature may be a contributory factor. We hypothesized differential uptake of nanoparticles by AT1 and AT2 cells, depending on particle size and surface charge. Uptake of 50-nm and 1-microm fluorescent latex particles was investigated using confocal microscopy and scanning surface confocal microscopy of live cells. Fewer than 10% of primary AT2 cells internalized particles. In contrast, 75% immortal AT1 cells internalized negatively charged particles, while less than 55% of these cells internalized positively charged particles; charge, rather than size, mattered. The process was rapid: one-third of the total cell-associated negatively charged 50-nm particle fluorescence measured at 24 hours was internalized during the first hour. AT1 cells could be important in translocation of particles from the lung into the circulation.

  5. Investigation of Human Albumin-Induced Circular Dichroism in Dansylglycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciani, Fernanda S.; Ximenes, Valdecir F.

    2013-01-01

    Induced circular dichroism (ICD), or induced chirality, is a phenomenon caused by the fixation of an achiral substance inside a chiral microenvironment, such as the hydrophobic cavities in proteins. Dansylglycine belongs to a class of dansylated amino acids, which are largely used as fluorescent probes for the characterization of the binding sites in albumin. Here, we investigated the ICD in dansylglycine provoked by its binding to human serum albumin (HSA). We found that the complexation of HSA with dansylglycine resulted in the appearance of an ICD band centred at 346 nm. Using this ICD signal and site-specific ligands of HSA, we confirmed that dansylglycine is a site II ligand. The intensity of the ICD signal was dependent on the temperature and revealed that the complexation between the protein and the ligand was reversible. The induced chirality of dansylglycine was susceptive to the alteration caused by the oxidation of the protein. A comparison was made between hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypobromous acid (HOBr), and revealed that site II in the protein is more susceptible to alteration provoked by the latter oxidant. These findings suggest the relevance of the aromatic amino acids in the site II, since HOBr is a more efficient oxidant of these residues in proteins than HOCl. The three-dimensional structure of HSA is pH-dependent, and different conformations have been characterised. We found that HSA in its basic form at pH 9.0, which causes the protein to be less rigid, lost the capacity to bind dansylglycine. At pH 3.5, HSA retained almost all of its capacity for binding to dansylglycine. Since the structure of HSA at pH 3.5 is expanded, separating the domain IIIA from the rest of the molecule, we concluded that this separation did not alter its binding capacity to dansylglycine. PMID:24146932

  6. Investigation of human albumin-induced circular dichroism in dansylglycine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda S Graciani

    Full Text Available Induced circular dichroism (ICD, or induced chirality, is a phenomenon caused by the fixation of an achiral substance inside a chiral microenvironment, such as the hydrophobic cavities in proteins. Dansylglycine belongs to a class of dansylated amino acids, which are largely used as fluorescent probes for the characterization of the binding sites in albumin. Here, we investigated the ICD in dansylglycine provoked by its binding to human serum albumin (HSA. We found that the complexation of HSA with dansylglycine resulted in the appearance of an ICD band centred at 346 nm. Using this ICD signal and site-specific ligands of HSA, we confirmed that dansylglycine is a site II ligand. The intensity of the ICD signal was dependent on the temperature and revealed that the complexation between the protein and the ligand was reversible. The induced chirality of dansylglycine was susceptive to the alteration caused by the oxidation of the protein. A comparison was made between hypochlorous acid (HOCl and hypobromous acid (HOBr, and revealed that site II in the protein is more susceptible to alteration provoked by the latter oxidant. These findings suggest the relevance of the aromatic amino acids in the site II, since HOBr is a more efficient oxidant of these residues in proteins than HOCl. The three-dimensional structure of HSA is pH-dependent, and different conformations have been characterised. We found that HSA in its basic form at pH 9.0, which causes the protein to be less rigid, lost the capacity to bind dansylglycine. At pH 3.5, HSA retained almost all of its capacity for binding to dansylglycine. Since the structure of HSA at pH 3.5 is expanded, separating the domain IIIA from the rest of the molecule, we concluded that this separation did not alter its binding capacity to dansylglycine.

  7. Clinical Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-30

    Pregnancy with Fetal Intrauteri-ne Death, Missed Abortion or Hydatidiform ... 54 Work Unit No. 76/17 (FY76, T) The Effect of Uterine Blood Flow on...79920 DETAIL SHEET Prostaglandin E2, Efficacy Study for Termination of Pregnancy with TITLE: Fetal Intrauterine Death, Missed Abortion or Hydatidiform...Cryptococcus neoformans strains ............................. 19 Work Unit No. 75/27 (Fy74, C) Assessment of Ilediation Factors Involved in Chemical Pain

  8. Digital communication to support clinical supervision: considering the human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Marlow, Annette; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    During the last three years the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Tasmania has used a needs assessment survey to explore the needs of organizations and nursing professionals that facilitate and clinically supervise Bachelor of Nursing students in the workplace. Findings from the survey indicated that staff at healthcare organizations wanted a communication strategy that was easily accessible by clinicians who supervised students during work integrated learning placements. In particular they wanted to receive timely information related to the role and function of supervisors in practice. The development of the digital strategy to strengthen the development of a community of practice between the University, organizations, facilities and clinical supervisors was identified as the key method of improving communication. Blogging and micro blogging were selected as methods of choice for the implementation of the digital strategy because they were easy to set up, use and enable equity of access to geographically dispersed practitioners in urban and rural areas. Change champions were identified to disseminate information about the strategy within their workplaces. Although clinicians indicated electronic communication as their preferred method, there were a number of human factors at a systems and individual level identified to be challenges when communicating with clinical supervisors who were based off-campus. Information communication technology policies and embedded culture towards social presence were impediments to using this approach in some organizations. Additionally, it was found that it is necessary for this group of clinicians to be educated about using digital methods to undertake their role as clinical supervisors in their varied clinical practice environments.

  9. Clinical human brucellosis in Malaysia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagita Hartady

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Clinical human brucellosis is quite rare in Malaysia although seroconverters are relatively more. This report describes a case of clinical human brucellosis in Malaysia. This case involved a 29-year-old research assistant in a veterinary microbiology laboratory. She complained of intermittent fever, anorexia, profuse sweating, malaise, headache, normotensive (110/60 mm Hg, muscle pain, and arthralgia for 3 d. Blood tests against dengue and malaria were negative thus she was prescribed vitamin C, paracetamol and cough syrup for common flu. The complaints, however, persisted on and off for the next 1 month. She eventually developed anemia and hypotension (90/50 mm Hg and started to show reduced body weight. Abdominal palpations revealed hepatomegaly and splenomegaly with pain. Thus, brucellosis was suspected before the Rose-Bengal plate test was performed, which revealed the presence of high level of antibody against Brucella. The same test was repeated after 14 d and the results confirmed the presence of high antibody level against Brucella. Following serum agglutination test, a diagnosis of brucellosis was made and she was eventually prescribed rifampicine p.o. once a day combined with doxycycline p.o. twice a day for 6 consecutive weeks before she made a full recovery.

  10. Inhibitory Interneurons of The Human Neocortex after Clinical Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Akulinin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the human neocortex interneurons (areas 4, 10, 17 and 21 by Brodmann after cardiac arrest (clinical death.Materials and methods. The main group included patients (n=7, men who survived 7—10 days and 70—90 days after cardiac arrest and later died due to heart failure. The control group (n=4, men included individuals after sudden fatal accidents. The morphometric and histological analysis of 420 neocortical fields (Nissl#staining,calbindin D28k, neuropeptide Y was performed using light and confocal microscopy.Results. We verified all main types of interneurons (Basket, Martinotti, and neurogliaform interneurons in neocortex based on the morphology of their bodies and dendritic processes in both groups. The number of calbindin- and NPY-positive neurons in the neocortex was similar in the control and in the postoperative period.However, calbindin- and NPY-immunopositive structure fields including neuronal cell bodies and their dendrites were significantly more represented in neocortex of patients from the main group. Maximum increase in common square in the relative areas of calbindin-immunopositive structures was observed 90 days after ischemia. The squares of NPY#immunopositive fields became larger seven days after resuscitation and remained increased on 90th day post-resuscitation.Conclusion. Our findings demonstrate an increase of calbindin and NPY expression in human neocortex after clinical death, which can be explained by a compensatory  eaction of undamaged inhibitory cortical interneurons directed to protectbrain from ischemia.

  11. Isolation, cryopreservation and culture of human amnion epithelial cells for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean V; Kidyoor, Amritha; Reid, Tanya; Atala, Anthony; Wallace, Euan M; Lim, Rebecca

    2014-12-21

    Human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) derived from term or pre-term amnion membranes have attracted attention from researchers and clinicians as a potential source of cells for regenerative medicine. The reason for this interest is evidence that these cells have highly multipotent differentiation ability, low immunogenicity, and anti-inflammatory functions. These properties have prompted researchers to investigate the potential of hAECs to be used to treat a variety of diseases and disorders in pre-clinical animal studies with much success. hAECs have found widespread application for the treatment of a range of diseases and disorders. Potential clinical applications of hAECs include the treatment of stroke, multiple sclerosis, liver disease, diabetes and chronic and acute lung diseases. Progressing from pre-clinical animal studies into clinical trials requires a higher standard of quality control and safety for cell therapy products. For safety and quality control considerations, it is preferred that cell isolation protocols use animal product-free reagents. We have developed protocols to allow researchers to isolate, cryopreserve and culture hAECs using animal product-free reagents. The advantage of this method is that these cells can be isolated, characterized, cryopreserved and cultured without the risk of delivering potentially harmful animal pathogens to humans, while maintaining suitable cell yields, viabilities and growth potential. For researchers moving from pre-clinical animal studies to clinical trials, these methodologies will greatly accelerate regulatory approval, decrease risks and improve the quality of their therapeutic cell population.

  12. A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Human Performance Technology Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelu, Ramaswamy N.

    2010-01-01

    Human Performance Technology (HPT) is a field of practice that has evolved from advancements in organizational development, instructional design, strategic human resource management and cognitive psychology. As globalization and trends like outsourcing and off-shoring start to dominate the way organizations grow, HPT practitioners are managing the…

  13. Further investigations on the macromolecular complex in human bile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, J.C.M.; Wael, J. de; Mijnlieff, P.F.

    1956-01-01

    The formation of complexes in human bile was further studied by the preparation of various synthetic complexes and extracts. These were compared for a number of properties with the natural complex of human gall bladder bile. It appeared that protein is probably and bilirubin quite definitely a const

  14. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics and analyses of serum: a primer for the clinical investigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, V A; Stone, J H

    2003-01-01

    The vocabulary of proteomics and the swiftly-developing, technological nature of the field constitute substantial barriers to clinical investigators. In recent years, mass spectrometry has emerged as the most promising technique in this field. The purpose of this review is to introduce the field of mass spectrometry-based proteomics to clinical investigators, to explain many of the relevant terms, to introduce the equipment employed in this field, and to outline approaches to asking clinical questions using a proteomic approach. Examples of clinical applications of proteomic techniques are provided from the fields of cancer and vasculitis research, with an emphasis on a pattern recognition approach.

  15. Resistance to antivirals in human cytomegalovirus: mechanisms and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J L

    1997-09-01

    Long term therapies needed for managing human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections in immunosupressed patients provided the background for the emergence of the resistance to antivirals active against HCMV. In addition, laboratory selected mutants have also been readily achieved. Both clinical and laboratory resistant strains share the same determinants of resistance. Ganciclovir resistance may be due to a few mutations in the HCMV UL97 gene and/or viral DNA pol gene, the former being responsible for about 70% of clinical resistant isolates. Among them, V464, V594, S595 and F595 are the most frequent mutations. Because of their less extensive clinical use, much less is known about resistance to foscarnet and cidofovir (formerly, HPMPC) but in both cases, it has been associated to mutations in the DNA pol. Ganciclovir resistant strains showing DNA pol mutations are cross-resistant to cidofovir and their corresponding IC50 are normally higher than those from strains harboring only mutations at the UL97 gene. To date, foscarnet resistance seems to be independent of both ganciclovir and cidofovir resistance.

  16. Clinical investigation of TROP-2 as an independent biomarker and potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Yu, Hai-Zheng; Cai, Jian-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is associated with a severe demographic and economic burden worldwide. The pathogenesis of colon cancer is highly complex and involves sequential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation, the pathogenesis of colon cancer remains to be elucidated. As the third most common type of cancer worldwide, the treatment options for colon cancer are currently limited. Human trophoblast cell‑surface marker (TROP‑2), is a cell‑surface transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by several types of epithelial carcinoma. In addition, TROP‑2 has been demonstrated to be associated with tumorigenesis and invasiveness in solid types of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression of TROP‑2 in colon cancer tissues, and further explore the association between the expression of TROP‑2 and clinicopathological features of patients with colon cancer. The expression and localization of the TROP‑2 protein was examined using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the expression of TROP‑2 expression was correlated to conventional clinicopathological features of colon cancer using a χ2 test. The results revealed that TROP‑2 protein was expressed at high levels in the colon cancer tissues, which was associated with the development and pathological process of colon cancer. Therefore, TROP‑2 may be used as a biomarker to determine the clinical prognosis, and as a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  17. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E. M. Vickers

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM, diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM. Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM, while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM, terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM, and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM. Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%, CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%–11%, and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%–6%. Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%, while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%. Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%, ETM (66%, DCF, TBF, MMI (61%–60%, APAP, CBZ (57%–56%, and DTL (48%. Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%, CBZ and ETM (44%–43%, APAP and DCF (40%–38%, MMI, TBF and CSA (37%–35%. This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  18. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Alison E M; Ulyanov, Anatoly V; Fisher, Robyn L

    2017-03-07

    Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM), diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM) and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM). Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM) and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM), while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM), terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM), and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM). Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%), CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%-11%), and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%-6%). Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%), while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%). Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%), ETM (66%), DCF, TBF, MMI (61%-60%), APAP, CBZ (57%-56%), and DTL (48%). Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%), CBZ and ETM (44%-43%), APAP and DCF (40%-38%), MMI, TBF and CSA (37%-35%). This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  19. Comparative clinical and haematological investigations in lactating cows with subclinical and clinical ketosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Marutsova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ketosis of lactating cows is among the most common metabolic diseases in modern dairy farms. The economic importance of the disease is caused by the reduced milk yield and body weight loss, poor feed conversion, lower conception rates, culling and increased mortality of affected animals. In the present study, a total of 47 high-yielding dairy cows up to 45 days in milk (DIM are included. All animals were submitted to physical examination wich included checking the rectal body temperature, heart rate, respiratory and rumen contraction rates, and inspection of visible mucous coats. The body condition was scored, and blood β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA concentrations were assayed. The cows were divided into 3 groups: first group (control (n=24 with blood β-hydroxybutyrate level 2.6 mmol/l (clinical ketosis. Whole blood samples were obtained and analyzed for Red Blood Cell (RBC, 1012/l, Hemoglobin (HGB, g/l, Hematocrit (HCT, %, Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV, fl, Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH, pg, Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC, g/l, White Blood Cell (WBC, 109/l, Lymphocytes (LYM, 109/l, Monocytes (MON, 109/l, Granulocytes (GRA, 109/l, Red Blood Distribution Width (RDW, %, Red Blood Cell Distribution Width Absolute (RDWa, fl, Platelets (PLT, 109/l and Mean Platelet Volume (MPV, fl. In this study, deviations in the clinical parameters in the control group and in those with subclinical ketosis were not identified. The cows from the third group (clinical ketosis exhibited hypotonia, anorexia and body weight loss vs. control group. Hematological analysis showed leukocytosis and lymphocytosis in cows with subclinical ketosis vs. control group. In cows with clinical ketosis WBC counts decreased (leukopenia, while hemoglobin content and hematocrit values are higher vs. control group. Blood BHBA values are higher in both groups of ketotic cows vs. the control group. The other analyzed parameters (RBC, MCH, MCHC, MCV, RDW, RDWa, MON, GRA, PLT

  20. 59th Medical Wing Clinical Research Division Clinical Investigations Program Posters (Count: 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-08

    publication, the 59th Clinical Research Division may pay for your basic journal publishing charges (to include costs for tables and black and white photos...Health Sciences Education (GHSE) {SGS O&M); SGS R&D; Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP): Defense Medical Research & Development Program (DMRDP...should be accomplished no later than 30 days before final clearance is required to publish/present your materials. If you have any questions or

  1. Cost and effectiveness of clinical investigation: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R M; Mason, B; Leeder, S R

    1980-10-01

    Clinical investigation by means of special technical tests has increased in clinical practice during recent years. Pressures causing this increase are said to include: rapid technological change making many more tests available, clinical uncertainty, peer pressure, greater patient awareness, and concern for diagnostic completeness. Cost factors do not appear to have influenced test-ordering behaviour to any large extent, and those ordering investigations are frequently ignorant of the cost of the test which they are ordering, both to the patient and the community. The relation of clinical investigational activity to quality of outcome of patient care remains largely unestablished. Studies of the possible modification of test-ordering behaviour through educational and institutional policy pressures are reviewed. A rational approach to investigating the effectiveness of techniques designed to encourage the more economic and effective use of investigations is presented in brief on the basis of this review of previously published work.

  2. Acid etching of human enamel in clinical applications: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia Jun; Tang, Alexander T H; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Hägg, Urban

    2014-08-01

    The laboratory-based enamel acid-etching doctrine with 30% to 50% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds to generate the maximum amount of Type 1 and/or Type 2 etch pattern has been established for more than 30 years. However, this recommendation may not be clinically relevant. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare clinically accepted protocols of enamel acid etching with the laboratory protocol. Studies were identified by searching 4 electronic databases: Medline, CINAHL Plus, Embase, and Cochrane Library. The final search was run on November 8, 2012. All clinical studies published in English that investigated enamel acid pretreatment methods on human permanent teeth were included. Additional publications were obtained from the reference lists of the included studies. The clinical evidence of all included studies was tabulated. Initially, 4543 publications were retrieved from the databases. A total of 4508 articles were excluded, including 2285 duplicates, 1805 publications according to exclusion criteria by their titles and abstracts, 368 laboratory articles, 49 reviews, and 1 pilot study. Only 1 study was added from reference lists of the included studies. Finally, 36 clinical publications were included. The included clinical studies provided different levels of clinical evidence on the efficacy of acid-etching protocols to enable successful enamel adhesion. Clinical protocols of enamel acid etching differ from the laboratory-generated doctrine, which may imply that maximization of the Type 1 and/or Type 2 etch pattern is not important in the clinical acid etching of human enamel. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bridging clinical investigators and statisticians: writing the statistical methodology for a research proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams-Huet, Beverley; Ahn, Chul

    2009-12-01

    Clinical investigators often find the thought of writing the statistical analysis plan daunting. Early collaboration between the clinical investigator and statistician can improve the study design and validity of the results by developing the statistical methodology that specifically addresses the research hypothesis. With the clinical investigator, a statistician often writes the statistical methods section that includes sample size and power analyses, randomization and blinding procedures, interim analysis, and data monitoring plans, in addition to the statistical analysis plan. To make this process less mysterious, we describe how the statistical methods section is developed in collaboration with a statistician.

  4. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome: experimental and clinical investigations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsing I Chen

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be associated with various disorders.Recent investigation has involved clinical studies in collaboration with clinical investigators and pathologists on the pathogenetic mechanisms of ALl or ARDS caused by various disorders.This literature review includes a brief historical retrospective of ALI/ARDS, the neurogenic pulmonary edema due to head injury, the long-term experimental studies and clinical investigations from our laboratory, the detrimental role of NO, the risk factors, and the possible pathogenetic mechanisms as well as therapeutic regimen for ALI/ARDS.

  5. Investigation of the direct effects of salmon calcitonin on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Christian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcitonin has been demonstrated to have chondroprotective effects under pre-clinical settings. It is debated whether this effect is mediated through subchondral-bone, directly on cartilage or both in combination. We investigated possible direct effects of salmon calcitonin on proteoglycans and collagen-type-II synthesis in osteoarthritic (OA cartilage. Methods Human OA cartilage explants were cultured with salmon calcitonin [100 pM-100 nM]. Direct effects of calcitonin on articular cartilage were evaluated by 1 measurement of proteoglycan synthesis by incorporation of radioactive labeled 35SO4 [5 μCi] 2 quantification of collagen-type-II formation by pro-peptides of collagen type II (PIINP ELISA, 3 QPCR expression of the calcitonin receptor in OA chondrocytes using four individual primer pairs, 4 activation of the cAMP signaling pathway by EIA and, 5 investigations of metabolic activity by AlamarBlue. Results QPCR analysis and subsequent sequencing confirmed expression of the calcitonin receptor in human chondrocytes. All doses of salmon calcitonin significantly elevated cAMP levels (P 35SO4 incorporation, with a 96% maximal induction at 10 nM (P Conclusion Calcitonin treatment increased proteoglycan and collagen synthesis in human OA cartilage. In addition to its well-established effect on subchondral bone, calcitonin may prove beneficial to the management of joint diseases through direct effects on chondrocytes.

  6. Applicable or non-applicable: investigations of clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Chess

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical heterogeneity can be defined as differences in participant characteristics, types or timing of outcome measurements and intervention characteristics. Clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews has the possibility to significantly affect statistical heterogeneity leading to inaccurate conclusions and misled decision making. The aim of this study is to identify to what extent investigators are assessing clinical heterogeneity in both Cochrane and non-Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods The most recent 100 systematic reviews from the top five journals in medicine—JAMA, Archives of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, The Lancet, and PLOS Medicine—and the 100 most recently published and/or updated systematic reviews from Cochrane were collected. Various defined items of clinical heterogeneity were extracted from the included reviews. Investigators used chi-squared tests, logarithmic modeling and linear regressions to determine if the presence of such items served as a predictor for clinical heterogeneity when comparing Cochrane to non-Cochrane reviews. Extracted variables include number of studies, number of participants, presence of quantitative synthesis, exploration of clinical heterogeneity, heterogeneous characteristics explored, basis and methods used for investigating clinical heterogeneity, plotting/visual aids, author contact, inferences from clinical heterogeneity investigation, reporting assessment, and the presence of a priori or post-hoc analysis. Results A total of 317 systematic reviews were considered, of which 199 were in the final analysis. A total of 81 % of Cochrane reviews and 90 % of non-Cochrane reviews explored characteristics that are considered aspects of clinical heterogeneity and also described the methods they planned to use to investigate the influence of those characteristics. Only 1 % of non-Cochrane reviews and 8 % of Cochrane reviews explored the clinical

  7. Investigators' viewpoint of clinical trials in India: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallath, Mohandas K; Chawla, Tanuj

    2017-01-01

    India's success in producing food and milk for its population (Green Revolution and White Revolution) happened because of scientific research and field trials. Likewise improving the health of Indians needs clinical research and clinical trials. A Large proportion of the sick Indians are poor, illiterate with no access to good health care. They are highly vulnerable to inducement and exploitation in clinical trials. The past two decades saw the rise and fall of clinical trials in India. The rise happened when our regulators created a favorable environment, and Indian investigators were invited to participate in global clinical trials. The gap between the demand and supply resulted in inadequate protection of the trial participants. Reports of abuses of the vulnerable trial participants followed by public interest litigations led to strengthening of regulations by the regulators. The stringent new regulations made the conduct of clinical trials more laborious and increased the cost of clinical trials in India. There was a loss of interest in sponsored clinical trials resulting in the fall in global clinical trials in India. Following repeated appeals by the investigators, the Indian regulators have recently relaxed some of the stringent regulations, while continuing to ensure the adequate patient protection. Clinical trials that are relevant to our population and conducted by well-trained investigators and monitored by trained and registered Ethics Committees will increase in the future. We must remain vigilant, avoid previous mistakes, and strive hard to protect the trial participants in the future trials.

  8. Investigators' viewpoint of clinical trials in India: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallath, Mohandas K.; Chawla, Tanuj

    2017-01-01

    India's success in producing food and milk for its population (Green Revolution and White Revolution) happened because of scientific research and field trials. Likewise improving the health of Indians needs clinical research and clinical trials. A Large proportion of the sick Indians are poor, illiterate with no access to good health care. They are highly vulnerable to inducement and exploitation in clinical trials. The past two decades saw the rise and fall of clinical trials in India. The rise happened when our regulators created a favorable environment, and Indian investigators were invited to participate in global clinical trials. The gap between the demand and supply resulted in inadequate protection of the trial participants. Reports of abuses of the vulnerable trial participants followed by public interest litigations led to strengthening of regulations by the regulators. The stringent new regulations made the conduct of clinical trials more laborious and increased the cost of clinical trials in India. There was a loss of interest in sponsored clinical trials resulting in the fall in global clinical trials in India. Following repeated appeals by the investigators, the Indian regulators have recently relaxed some of the stringent regulations, while continuing to ensure the adequate patient protection. Clinical trials that are relevant to our population and conducted by well-trained investigators and monitored by trained and registered Ethics Committees will increase in the future. We must remain vigilant, avoid previous mistakes, and strive hard to protect the trial participants in the future trials.

  9. Investigators' viewpoint of clinical trials in India: Past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohandas K Mallath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available India's success in producing food and milk for its population (Green Revolution and White Revolution happened because of scientific research and field trials. Likewise improving the health of Indians needs clinical research and clinical trials. A Large proportion of the sick Indians are poor, illiterate with no access to good health care. They are highly vulnerable to inducement and exploitation in clinical trials. The past two decades saw the rise and fall of clinical trials in India. The rise happened when our regulators created a favorable environment, and Indian investigators were invited to participate in global clinical trials. The gap between the demand and supply resulted in inadequate protection of the trial participants. Reports of abuses of the vulnerable trial participants followed by public interest litigations led to strengthening of regulations by the regulators. The stringent new regulations made the conduct of clinical trials more laborious and increased the cost of clinical trials in India. There was a loss of interest in sponsored clinical trials resulting in the fall in global clinical trials in India. Following repeated appeals by the investigators, the Indian regulators have recently relaxed some of the stringent regulations, while continuing to ensure the adequate patient protection. Clinical trials that are relevant to our population and conducted by well-trained investigators and monitored by trained and registered Ethics Committees will increase in the future. We must remain vigilant, avoid previous mistakes, and strive hard to protect the trial participants in the future trials.

  10. Spirulina in clinical practice: evidence-based human applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkos, P D; Leong, S C; Karkos, C D; Sivaji, N; Assimakopoulos, D A

    2011-01-01

    Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews suggest that this alga may improve several symptoms and may even have an anticancer, antiviral and antiallergic effects. Current and potential clinical applications, issues of safety, indications, side-effects and levels of evidence are addressed in this review. Areas of ongoing and future research are also discussed.

  11. Spirulina in Clinical Practice: Evidence-Based Human Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Karkos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews suggest that this alga may improve several symptoms and may even have an anticancer, antiviral and antiallergic effects. Current and potential clinical applications, issues of safety, indications, side-effects and levels of evidence are addressed in this review. Areas of ongoing and future research are also discussed.

  12. Phage display-derived human antibodies in clinical development and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 3 decades, monoclonal antibodies have become the most important class of therapeutic biologicals on the market. Development of therapeutic antibodies was accelerated by recombinant DNA technologies, which allowed the humanization of murine monoclonal antibodies to make them more similar to those of the human body and suitable for a broad range of chronic diseases like cancer and autoimmune diseases. In the early 1990s in vitro antibody selection technologies were developed that enabled the discovery of "fully" human antibodies with potentially superior clinical efficacy and lowest immunogenicity. Antibody phage display is the first and most widely used of the in vitro selection technologies. It has proven to be a robust, versatile platform technology for the discovery of human antibodies and a powerful engineering tool to improve antibody properties. As of the beginning of 2016, 6 human antibodies discovered or further developed by phage display were approved for therapy. In 2002, adalimumab (Humira®) became the first phage display-derived antibody granted a marketing approval. Humira® was also the first approved human antibody, and it is currently the best-selling antibody drug on the market. Numerous phage display-derived antibodies are currently under advanced clinical investigation, and, despite the availability of other technologies such as human antibody-producing transgenic mice, phage display has not lost its importance for the discovery and engineering of therapeutic antibodies. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview about phage display-derived antibodies that are approved for therapy or in clinical development. A selection of these antibodies is described in more detail to demonstrate different aspects of the phage display technology and its development over the last 25 years.

  13. [Clinical use of recombinant human thrombopoietin. Status and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, P B; Hasselbalch, H C

    2001-05-07

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is primarily produced by hepatocytes and regulates the production and differentiation of megakaryocytes and platelets in the bone marrow. The endogenous TPO level is increased when the megakaryocyte count is low, and high in aplastic anaemia and after myeloablative chemotherapy. TPO is cloned and manufactured by a recombinant technique for clinical use. Treatment with recombinant human TPO (rhTPO) after intensive chemotherapy may reduce the need for platelet transfusions. Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in combination with rhTPO has enhanced the mobilisation and harvest product of haematopoietic stem cells. Whether rhTPO is effective in the treatment of the myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anaemia, and other conditions with bone marrow insufficiency (including AIDS) is not yet known. In liver cirrhosis, the endogenous TPO level rapidly increases after liver transplantation. Accordingly, substitution of rhTPO may be indicated in advanced liver failure complicated by thrombocytopenia and bleeding.

  14. Hepcidin modulation in human diseases: From research to clinic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Piperno; Raffaella Mariani; Paola Trombini; Domenico Girelli

    2009-01-01

    By modulating hepcidin production, an organism controls intestinal iron absorption, iron uptake and mobilization from stores to meet body iron need. In recent years there has been important advancement in our knowledge of hepcidin regulation that also has implications for understanding the physiopathology of some human disorders. Since the discovery of hepcidin and the demonstration of its pivotal role in iron homeostasis, there has been a substantial interest in developing a reliable assay of the hormone in biological fluids. Measurement of hepcidin in biological fluids can improve our understanding of iron diseases and be a useful tool for diagnosis and clinical management of these disorders. We reviewed the literature and our own research on hepcidin to give an updated status of the situation in this rapidly evolving field.

  15. Risk groups for clinical complications of norovirus infections: an outbreak investigation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattner, F; Sohr, D; Heim, A; Gastmeier, P; Vennema, H; Koopmans, M

    2006-01-01

    Norovirus infections have been described as self-limiting diseases of short duration. An investigation of a norovirus outbreak in a university hospital provided evidence for severe clinical features in patients with several underlying diseases. Clinical outcomes of norovirus infection were defined.

  16. 76 FR 50484 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices.'' This document is intended to provide... medical devices and for FDA staff who review those submissions. This guidance document describes different study design principles relevant to the development of medical device clinical studies that can be...

  17. Phylogeography helps with investigating the building of human parasite communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, Serge

    2012-12-01

    Phylogeography of parasites and microbes is a recent field. Phylogeographic studies have been performed mostly to test three major hypotheses that are not mutually exclusive on the origins and distributions of human parasites and microbes: (1) the "out of Africa" pattern where parasites are supposed to have followed the dispersal and expansion of modern humans in and out of Africa, (2) the "domestication" pattern where parasites were captured in the domestication centres and dispersed through them and (3) the "globalization" pattern, in relation to historical and more recent trade routes. With some exceptions, such studies of human protozoans, helminths and ectoparasites are quite limited. The conclusion emphasizes the need to acquire more phylogeographic data in non-Occidental countries, and particularly in Asia where all the animal domestications took place.

  18. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Aimee M.; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota encode multiple critical functions impacting human health, including metabolism of dietary substrate, prevention of pathogen invasion, immune system modulation, and provision of a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes accessible to pathogens. The complexity...... microorganisms, but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community, independent of identity to known genes, by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host....... Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex...

  19. Crime Scene Investigation: Clinical Application of Chemical Shift Imaging as a Problem Solving Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approva l 26 FEB 2016 1. Your paper, entitled Crime Scene Investigation: Clinical Aoolication of...or technical information as a publication/presentation, a new 59 MDW Form 3039 must be submitted for review and approval.] Crime Scene Investiga...tion: Clinical Application of Chemical Shift Imaging as a Problem Solving Tool 1. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED Crime Scene

  20. Development of the NRC`s Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP). Volume 3, Development documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L. [System Improvements, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Haas, P.; Terranova, M. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause events at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume III, is a detailed documentation of the development effort and the pilot training program.

  1. Human tolerogenic DC-10: perspectives for clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amodio Giada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are critically involved in inducing either immunity or tolerance. During the last decades efforts have been devoted to the development of ad hoc methods to manipulate DCs in vitro to enhance or stabilize their tolerogenic properties. Addition of IL-10 during monocyte-derived DC differentiation allows the induction of DC-10, a subset of human tolerogenic DCs characterized by high IL-10/IL-12 ratio and co-expression of high levels of the tolerogenic molecules HLA-G and immunoglobulin-like transcript 4. DC-10 are potent inducers of adaptive type 1 regulatory T cells, well known to promote and maintain peripheral tolerance. In this review we provide an in-depth comparison of the phenotype and mechanisms of suppression mediated by DC-10 and other known regulatory antigen-presenting cells currently under clinical development. We discuss the clinical therapeutic application of DC-10 as inducers of type 1 regulatory T cells for tailoring regulatory T-cell-based cell therapy, and the use of DC-10 as adoptive cell therapy for promoting and restoring tolerance in T-cell-mediated diseases.

  2. Human Right and Internet Access : A philosophical investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    As of December 2014, there are three billion Internet users worldwide, of which 649 million are Chinese. This number will grow in the years to come. This technology, of course, possesses immense significance in our everyday life. What is currently new in international human rights practice is the tr

  3. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Marguerite Moore

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The human intestinal microbiota encode multiple critical functions impacting human health, including, metabolism of dietary substrate, prevention of pathogen invasion, immune system modulation, and provision of a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes accessible to pathogens. The complexity of this microbial community, its recalcitrance to standard cultivation and the immense diversity of its encoded genes has necessitated the development of novel molecular, microbiological, and genomic tools. Functional metagenomics is one such culture-independent technique used for decades to study environmental microorganisms but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community independent of identity to known genes by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host. Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex community and its human host.

  4. The Human Thioredoxin System: Modifications and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Isaac Hashemy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin system, comprising thioredoxin (Trx, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR and NADPH, is one of the major cellular antioxidant systems, implicated in a large and growing number of biological functions. Trx acts as an oxidoreductase via a highly conserved dithiol/disulfide motif located in the active site (-Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-Lys-. Different factors are involved in the regulation of Trx activity, including its expression level, localization, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications and some chemical inhibitors. Mammalian TrxRs are selenoproteins which have a –Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- N-terminal active site, as well as a C-terminal selenium-containing active site. Besides two Cys-residues in the redox-regulatory domain of cytosolic Trx (Trx1, human Trx1 has three additional Cys-residues. Post-translational modifications of human Trx1 which are involved in the regulation of its activity can happen via modification of Cys-residues including thiol oxidation, glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation or via modification of other amino acid residues such as nitration of Tyr-49. Because of the numerous functions of the thioredoxin system, its inhibition (mainly happens via the targeting TrxR can result in major cellular consequences, which are potentially pro-oxidant in nature, leading to cell death via necrosis or apoptosis if overexpression of Trx and other antioxidative enzymes can not recuperate cell response. Considering this feature, several anticancer drugs have been used which can inhibit TrxR. Elevated levels of Trx and/or TrxR have been reported in many different human malignancies, positively correlated with aggressive tumor growth and poor prognosis. Moreover, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects of Trx are reasons to study its clinical application as a drug.

  5. Comparative study of clinical grade human tolerogenic dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Cáceres E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of tolerogenic DCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for transplantation and autoimmune disorders. Immunomodulatory DCs are primarily generated from monocytes (MDDCs for in vitro experiments following protocols that fail to fulfil the strict regulatory rules of clinically applicable products. Here, we compared the efficacy of three different tolerance-inducing agents, dexamethasone, rapamycin and vitamin D3, on DC biology using GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice or clinical grade reagents with the aim of defining their use for human cell therapy. Methods Tolerogenic MDDCs were generated by adding tolerogenic agents prior to the induction of maturation using TNF-α, IL-β and PGE2. We evaluated the effects of each agent on viability, efficiency of differentiation, phenotype, cytokine secretion and stability, the stimulatory capacity of tol-DCs and the T-cell profiles induced. Results Differences relevant to therapeutic applicability were observed with the cellular products that were obtained. VitD3-induced tol-DCs exhibited a slightly reduced viability and yield compared to Dexa-and Rapa-tol-DCs. Phenotypically, while Dexa-and VitD3-tol-DCs were similar to immature DCs, Rapa-tol-DCs were not distinguishable from mature DCs. In addition, only Dexa-and moderately VitD3-tol-DCs exhibited IL-10 production. Interestingly, in all cases, the cytokine secretion profiles of tol-DCs were not modified by a subsequent TLR stimulation with LPS, indicating that all products had stable phenotypes. Functionally, clearly reduced alloantigen T cell proliferation was induced by tol-DCs obtained using any of these agent. Also, total interferon-gamma (IFN-γ secretion by T cells stimulated with allogeneic tol-DCs was reduced in all three cases, but only T cells co-cultured with Rapa-tol-DCs showed impaired intracellular IFN-γ production. In addition, Rapa-DCs promoted CD4+ CD127 low/negative CD25high and Foxp3+ T cells. Conclusions Our

  6. [THE RESULTS OF CLINICAL AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC INVESTIGATIONS EMPLOYEES OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS WHICH WERE IDENTIFIED NEUROTIC DISORDERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyova, M

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the results of the clinical and psychopathological and psychological diagnostic, investigations mental health employees of financial institutions, description and analysis of clinical forms identified disorders.

  7. Investigation of ultrasound axially traversing the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, R C; Round, W H; Zieniuk, J K

    1984-01-01

    A ray tracing model for ultrasonic propagation through the human eye, including the lens, has been developed on the assumptions of lossless media and non-reflecting interfaces. Measurement of the distribution of an ultrasonic beam before and after traversing specimens of human eyes in vitro, and of the velocity of ultrasound in the various dissected media, has permitted some comparison of the predictions of the model with experiment. The agreement is good although there are significant limitations involved and these are discussed. For imaging systems the effect of the eye arises largely from the lens which acts as a defocussing lens of focal length approx. 13.5 cm. Although the experiments were performed at approx. 4 MHz, the validity of the ray tracing model is largely frequency independent and will be appropriate at the higher frequencies commonly used in ophthalmology.

  8. 75 FR 1790 - Draft Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: IRB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... of February 3, 2006 (71 FR 5861), which describes FDA's intention to update the process for... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  9. Postphenomenological Investigations: Essays on Human-Technology Relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberger, Robert; Verbeek, Peter-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Postphenomenological Investigations: Essays on Human–Technology Relations provides an introduction to the school of thought called postphenomenology and showcases projects at the cutting edge of this perspective. Postphenomenology presents a unique blend of insights from the philosophical traditions

  10. Investigation of human-robot interface performance in household environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Sven; Mirza, Fahad; Tuladhar, Yathartha; Alonzo, Rommel; Hingeley, Anthony; Popa, Dan O.

    2016-05-01

    Today, assistive robots are being introduced into human environments at an increasing rate. Human environments are highly cluttered and dynamic, making it difficult to foresee all necessary capabilities and pre-program all desirable future skills of the robot. One approach to increase robot performance is semi-autonomous operation, allowing users to intervene and guide the robot through difficult tasks. To this end, robots need intuitive Human-Machine Interfaces (HMIs) that support fine motion control without overwhelming the operator. In this study we evaluate the performance of several interfaces that balance autonomy and teleoperation of a mobile manipulator for accomplishing several household tasks. Our proposed HMI framework includes teleoperation devices such as a tablet, as well as physical interfaces in the form of piezoresistive pressure sensor arrays. Mobile manipulation experiments were performed with a sensorized KUKA youBot, an omnidirectional platform with a 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) arm. The pick and place tasks involved navigation and manipulation of objects in household environments. Performance metrics included time for task completion and position accuracy.

  11. Investigation of kinetic interactions between approved oximes and human acetylcholinesterase inhibited by pesticide carbamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Timo; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2013-12-05

    Carbamates are widely used for pest control and act primarily by inhibition of insect and mammalian acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Accidental or intentional uptake of carbamates may result in typical signs and symptoms of cholinergic overstimulation which cannot be discriminated from those of organophosphorus pesticide poisoning. There is an ongoing debate whether standard treatment with atropine and oximes should be recommended for human carbamate poisoning as well, since in vitro and in vivo animal data indicate a deleterious effect of oximes when used in combination with the N-methyl carbamate carbaryl. Therefore, we performed an in vitro kinetic study to investigate the effect of clinically used oximes on carbamoylation and decarbamoylation of human AChE. It became evident that pralidoxime and obidoxime in therapeutic concentrations aggravate the inhibition of AChE by carbaryl and propoxur, with obidoxime being substantially more potent compared to 2-PAM. However, obidoxime had no impact on the decarbamoylation kinetics. Hence, the administration of 2-PAM and especially of obidoxime to severely propoxur and carbaryl poisoned humans cannot be recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative wound healing--are the small animal veterinarian's clinical patients an improved translational model for human wound healing research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Susan W; Bohling, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts into understanding the pathophysiology of both chronic wounds and scar formation, and the development of wound care strategies to target both healing extremes, problematic wounds in human health care remain a formidable challenge. Although valuable fundamental information regarding the pathophysiology of problematic wounds can be gained from in vitro investigations and in vivo studies performed in laboratory animal models, the lack of concordance with human pathophysiology has been cited as a major impediment to translational research in human wound care. Therefore, the identification of superior clinical models for both chronic wounds and scarring disorders should be a high priority for scientists who work in the field of human wound healing research. To be successful, translational wound healing research should function as an intellectual ecosystem in which information flows from basic science researchers using in vitro and in vivo models to clinicians and back again from the clinical investigators to the basic scientists. Integral to the efficiency of this process is the incorporation of models which can accurately predict clinical success. The aim of this review is to describe the potential advantages and limitations of using clinical companion animals (primarily dogs and cats) as translational models for cutaneous wound healing research by describing comparative aspects of wound healing in these species, common acute and chronic cutaneous wounds in clinical canine and feline patients, and the infrastructure that currently exists in veterinary medicine which may facilitate translational studies and simultaneously benefit both veterinary and human wound care patients.

  13. Investigation and analysis of human body thermal comfort in classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xue

    2017-05-01

    In this survey, we selected the 11th building of North China Electric Power University as the research object. Data were measured and distributed on each floor. We record the temperature of the classroom, humidity, wind speed, average radiation temperature and other environmental parameters. And we used spare time to create a questionnaire survey of the subjective feeling of the survey, to get everyone in the classroom TSV (hot feeling vote value) and TCV (thermal comfort vote). We analyzed the test data and survey data. What's more we discuss and reflect on the thermal comfort of the human body in different indoor temperature atmospheres.

  14. International Conference on Harmonisation; guidance on E11 clinical investigation of medicinal products in the pediatric population; availability. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "E11 Clinical Investigation of Medicinal Products in the Pediatric Population." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance sets forth critical issues in pediatric drug development and approaches to the safe, efficient, and ethical study of medicinal products in the pediatric population. The guidance is intended to encourage and facilitate the timely development of pediatric medicinal products internationally.

  15. Three-dimensional cell culture models for investigating human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Chen, Guomin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are physiologically relevant, as they provide reproducible results, experimental flexibility and can be adapted for high-throughput experiments. Moreover, these models bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures and animal models. 3D culture systems have significantly advanced basic cell science and tissue engineering, especially in the fields of cell biology and physiology, stem cell research, regenerative medicine, cancer research, drug discovery, and gene and protein expression studies. In addition, 3D models can provide unique insight into bacteriology, virology, parasitology and host-pathogen interactions. This review summarizes and analyzes recent progress in human virological research with 3D cell culture models. We discuss viral growth, replication, proliferation, infection, virus-host interactions and antiviral drugs in 3D culture models.

  16. 75 FR 63189 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Investigational New Drug Applications-Determining Whether Human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Investigational New Drug... Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled... draft guidance for industry entitled ``Investigational New Drug Applications (INDs)--Determining...

  17. Obesity induction in hamster that mimics the human clinical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordania da Silva, Vivian; Dias, Sílvia Regina Costa; Maioli, Tatiani Uceli; Serafim, Luciana Ribeiro; Furtado, Luis Fernando Viana; Quintão Silva, Maria da Gloria; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano de; Rabelo, Élida Mara Leite

    2017-08-05

    Although obesity is well established in hamsters, studies using diets with high levels of simple carbohydrate associated with lipids are necessary to assess the impact of this type of food in the body. In this study a high sugar and butter diet (HSB) and high temperature were employed towards this end. Obesity was successfully induced at a temperature of 30.3°C to 30.9°C after 38 days feeding the animals an HSB diet. It was shown that although diet is important for the induction of obesity, temperature is also essential because at a temperature slightly below the one required, obesity was not induced, even when the animals were fed for a longer period (150 days).The obese clinical condition was accompanied by biochemical and hematological changes, as increased cholesterol and triglyceride levels and increased leukocyte numbers, similar to alterations observed in obese humans. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that increasing the intake of simple carbohydrates associated with lipids provided evidence of inflammation in obese animals.

  18. Clinical features of human intestinal capillariasis in Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jong Bair; Kao-Pin Hwang; Tsang-En Wang; Tai-Cherng Liou; Shee-Chan Lin; Chin-Roa Kao; Tao-Yeuan Wang; Kwok-Kuen Pang

    2004-01-01

    Human intestinal capillariasis is a rare parasitosis that was first recognized in the Philippines in the 1960 s. Parasitosis is a life threatening disease and has been reported from Thailand, Japan, South of Taiwan (Kaoh-Siung), Korea,Tran, Egypt, Italy and Spain. Its clinical symptoms are characterized by chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain,borborygmus, marked weight loss, protein and electrolyte loss and cachexia. Capillariasis may be fatal if early treatment is not given. We reported 14 cases living in rural areas of Taiwan. Three cases had histories of travelling to Thailand. They might have been infected in Thailand while stayed there. Two cases had the diet of raw freshwater fish before. Three cases received emergency laparotomy due to peritonitis and two cases were found of enteritis cystica profunda. According to the route of transmission,freshwater and brackish-water fish may act as the intermediate host of the parasite. The most simple and convenient method of diagnosing capillariasis is stool examination. Two cases were diagnosed by histology.Mebendazole or albendezole 200 mg orally twice a day for 20-30 d is the treatment of choice. All the patients were cured, and relapses were not observed within 12 mo.

  19. Clinical Characteristics and Genetic Variability of Human Rhinovirus in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Montero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is a leading cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI in young children and infants worldwide and has a high impact on morbidity and mortality in this population. Initially, HRV was classified into two species: HRV-A and HRV-B. Recently, a species called HRV-C and possibly another species, HRV-D, were identified. In Mexico, there is little information about the role of HRV as a cause of ARI, and the presence and importance of species such as HRV-C are not known. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and genetic variability of HRV in Mexican children. Genetic characterization was carried out by phylogenetic analysis of the 5′-nontranslated region (5′-NTR of the HRV genome. The results show that the newly identified HRV-C is circulating in Mexican children more frequently than HRV-B but not as frequently as HRV-A, which was the most frequent species. Most of the cases of the three species of HRV were in children under 2 years of age, and all species were associated with very mild and moderate ARI.

  20. Therapeutic role of rifaximin in inflammatory bowel disease: clinical implication of human pregnane X receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Shah, Yatrik M; Ma, Xiaochao; Pang, Xiaoyan; Tanaka, Toshiya; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Krausz, Kristopher W; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2010-10-01

    Human pregnane X receptor (PXR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a human PXR activator, is in clinical trials for treatment of IBD and has demonstrated efficacy in Crohn's disease and active ulcerative colitis. In the current study, the protective and therapeutic role of rifaximin in IBD and its respective mechanism were investigated. PXR-humanized (hPXR), wild-type, and Pxr-null mice were treated with rifaximin in the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced IBD models to determine the protective function of human PXR activation in IBD. The therapeutic role of rifaximin was further evaluated in DSS-treated hPXR and Pxr-null mice. Results demonstrated that preadministration of rifaximin ameliorated the clinical hallmarks of colitis in DSS- and TNBS-treated hPXR mice as determined by body weight loss and assessment of diarrhea, rectal bleeding, colon length, and histology. In addition, higher survival rates and recovery from colitis symptoms were observed in hPXR mice, but not in Pxr-null mice, when rifaximin was administered after the onset of symptoms. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) target genes were markedly down-regulated in hPXR mice by rifaximin treatment. In vitro NF-κB reporter assays demonstrated inhibition of NF-κB activity after rifaximin treatment in colon-derived cell lines expressing hPXR. These findings demonstrated the preventive and therapeutic role of rifaximin on IBD through human PXR-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB signaling cascade, thus suggesting that human PXR may be an effective target for the treatment of IBD.

  1. AMPA workshop on challenges faced by investigators conducting Alzheimer's disease clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellas, Bruno; Pesce, Alain; Robert, Philippe H; Aisen, Paul S; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Andrieu, Sandrine; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Dubois, Bruno; Siemers, Eric; Spire, Jean-Paul; Weiner, Michael W; May, Thomas S

    2011-07-01

    The recruitment and retention of patients are among the greatest challenges currently being faced by researchers who conduct Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials. To discuss these challenges and other major issues associated with clinical research in AD, an international workshop was organized by the Association Monégasque pour la recherche sur la Maladie d'Alzheimer at Monte Carlo, Monaco, in February 2010, with the participation of leading research experts in the field of Alzheimer's. Key topics discussed were as follows: (1) the selection, recruitment, and retention of clinical trial subjects; (2) international co-operation among researchers; and (3) patient rights and informed consent for participants in clinical trials. This article highlights some of the challenges faced by investigators when conducting clinical trials in AD, and it also offers some recommendations aimed at overcoming these challenges.

  2. Music and health. Phenomenological investigation of a medical humanity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lucy; McLachlan, Emma; Perkins, Laurence; Dornan, Tim

    2013-05-01

    In response to the tendency for music to be under-represented in the discourse of medical humanities, we framed the question 'how can music heal?' We answered it by exploring the lived experiences of musicians with lay or professional interests in health. Two medical students and a medically qualified educationalist, all musicians, conducted a co-operative inquiry with a professional musician interested in health. All researchers and six respondents kept audio or written diaries. Three respondents were interviewed in depth. A medical school head (and experienced musician) critiqued the phenomenological analysis of respondents' accounts of music, health, and its relationship with undergraduate medical education. Respondents experienced music as promoting health, even in seriously diseased people. Music affected people's identity and emotions. Through the medium of structure and harmony, it provided a means of self-expression that adapted to whatever condition people were in. Music was a communication medium, which could make people feel less isolated. Immersion in music could change negative states of mind to more positive ones. A transport metaphor was commonly used; music 'taking people to better places'. Exercising control by becoming physically involved in music enhanced diseased people's self-esteem. Music was able to bring the spiritual, mental, and physical elements of their lives into balance, to the benefit of their wellbeing. Music could help medical students appreciate holistically that the state of health of people who are either well or diseased can be enhanced by a 'non-technical' intervention.

  3. Human Cytomegalovirus UL138 Open Reading Frame Is Highly Conserved in Clinical Strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Qi; Rong He; Yan-ping Ma; Zheng-rong Sun; Yao-hua Ji; Qiang Ruan

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the variability of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL138 open reading flame (ORF) in clinical strains.Methods HCMV UL138 ORF was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR amplification products were sequenced directly, and the data were analyzed in 19 clinical strains.Results UL138 ORF in all 30 clinical strains was amplified successfully. Compared with that of Toledo strain, the nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities of UL138 ORF in all strains were 97.41% to 99.41% and 98.24% to 99.42%, respectively. All of the nucleotide mutations were substitutions. The spatial structure and post-translational modification sites of UL138 encoded proteins were conserved. The result of phylogenetic tree showed that HCMV UL138 sequence variations were not definitely related with different clinical symptoms.Conclusion HCMV UL138 ORF in clinical strains is high conservation, which might be helpful for UL138 encoded protein to play a role in latent infection of HCMV.

  4. Protocol-writing support conferences for investigator-initiated clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Masaya Goto,1 Yoshihiro Muragaki,2 Atsushi Aruga1 1Cooperative Major in Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Joint Graduate School of Tokyo Women's Medical University and Waseda University, 2Intelligent Clinical Research and Innovation Center, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: In investigator-initiated clinical trials, protocols with inappropriate methods might cause bias. However, insufficient data are available to determine which items are important or difficult to discuss in protocol development. We recorded protocol-writing support conferences to determine what items methodologists and investigators discussed. We obtained approval from all applicants to attend our Intelligent Clinical Research and Innovation Center writing support conferences, recorded all the discussions, characterized them, and sorted the items iteratively. In 1 year, we had 18 conferences: nine early protocol conferences and nine rejected protocol conferences. The latter were rejected by the institutional review board, which requested consultation. The most discussed item was outcomes, accounting for ~20% of the total discussion time. In three trials, the main problem was multiple primary outcomes. The second most discussed item was control. Early protocol conferences had more non-preliminary proposal items than rejected ones (P<0.001. This study showed important items (especially outcomes and control for investigators to write protocols. Early protocol-writing conferences helped investigators find questionable items. Keywords: investigator-initiated clinical trials, support, protocol-writing, conferences, recording

  5. Health, human rights, and the conduct of clinical research within oppressed populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills Edward J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials evaluating interventions for infectious diseases require enrolling participants that are vulnerable to infection. As clinical trials are conducted in increasingly vulnerable populations, issues of protection of these populations become challenging. In settings where populations are forseeably oppressed, the conduct of research requires considerations that go beyond common ethical concerns and into issues of international human rights law. Discussion Using examples of HIV prevention trials in Thailand, hepatitis-E prevention trials in Nepal and malaria therapeutic trials in Burma (Myanmar, we address the inadequacies of current ethical guidelines when conducting research within oppressed populations. We review existing legislature in the United States and United Kingdom that may be used against foreign investigators if trial hardships exist. We conclude by making considerations for research conducted within oppressed populations.

  6. Investigating the Attitude of Graduate Psychiatrists towards Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE and Conventional Clinical Interview Examination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazeri Astaneh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the attitude of psychiatrists who graduated in 2002-2009 towards Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE and conventional clinical interview examination (Individual Patient Assessment.We studied 134 psychiatrists graduated; half of whom were examined with conventional clinical interview and the others with OSCE. A questionnaire was prepared by a specialist workgroup to assess the participants' attitude towards the exams. The questionnaire was initially examined in a pilot study. The findings of the questionnaire were used to assess the graduates' attitude towards each examination, as well as to compare the examinations.The OSCE group indicated a significantly more positive attitude compared to the conventional group (p = 0.03. Furthermore, the OSCE group believed the role of theoretical knowledge (p = 0.01 and pre-test practice (p = 0.03 to be significantly greater for success compared to the other group. The structure of OSCE was reported to be superior to conventional examination in terms of fairness and homogeneity (p = 0.004. First participation in exam (p = 0.04 and ultimate success in the exam (p = 0.009 were predictors of graduates' attitude.Based on examinees 'attitudes, OSCE may be a more appropriate choice for graduation examinations of psychiatry compared to the conventional clinical interview examination.

  7. Inability of positive phase II clinical trials of investigational treatments to subsequently predict positive phase III clinical trials in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob J; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Patel, Akash J; Cachia, David; Liu, Diane; Park, Minjeong; Yuan, Ying; A Kent, Thomas; de Groot, John F

    2017-07-31

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults, but effective therapies are lacking. With the scarcity of positive phase III trials, which are increasing in cost, we examined the ability of positive phase II trials to predict statistically significant improvement in clinical outcomes of phase III trials. A PubMed search was conducted to identify phase III clinical trials performed in the past 25 years for patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent glioblastoma. Trials were excluded if they did not examine an investigational chemotherapy or agent, if they were stopped early owing to toxicity, if they lacked prior phase II studies, or if a prior phase II study was negative. Seven phase III clinical trials in newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 4 phase III clinical trials in recurrent glioblastoma met the inclusion criteria. Only 1 (9%) phase III study documented an improvement in overall survival and changed the standard of care. The high failure rate of phase III trials demonstrates the urgent need to increase the reliability of phase II trials of treatments for glioblastoma. Strategies such as the use of adaptive trial designs, Bayesian statistics, biomarkers, volumetric imaging, and mathematical modeling warrant testing. Additionally, it is critical to increase our expectations of phase II trials so that positive findings increase the probability that a phase III trial will be successful.

  8. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Ito

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR, a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi. Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR, and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold. Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications.

  9. [Vasculogenic mimicry in human primary gallbladder carcinoma and clinical significance thereof].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yue-zu; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Wen-zhong; Ge, Chun-yan

    2007-01-16

    To investigate if there is vasculogenic mimicry (VM) in human primary gallbladder carcinoma and clinical significance thereof. Seventy-four specimens of primary gallbladder carcinoma obtained from operation underwent HE staining and double staining of CD(31) and PAS to observe the existence of VM. The correlation of pathological examination and clinical outcomes was analyzed. VM was seen in 10 of the 74 (13.5%) specimens. VM was not correlated with age, sex, location, diameter, differentiation degree, Nevin stage, and invasion depth of tumor, and existence of lymph node metastasis; but was associated with histological type (chi(2) = 10.241, P = 0.017), hepatic metastasis (chi(2) = 11.904, P = 0.01), and poor overall survival (chi(2) = 5.771, P = 0.016). Cox analysis showed that existence of VM, invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, hepatic metastasis, and operational method were independent risk factors of the prognosis of primary gallbladder carcinoma. VM exists in human primary gallbladder carcinoma. Those cases of human primary gallbladder carcinoma with VM have a poorer prognosis.

  10. Translating dosages from animal models to human clinical trials--revisiting body surface area scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Otis L; Smoliga, James M

    2015-05-01

    Body surface area (BSA) scaling has been used for prescribing individualized dosages of various drugs and has also been recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as one method for using data from animal model species to establish safe starting dosages for first-in-human clinical trials. Although BSA conversion equations have been used in certain clinical applications for decades, recent recommendations to use BSA to derive interspecies equivalents for therapeutic dosages of drug and natural products are inappropriate. A thorough review of the literature reveals that BSA conversions are based on antiquated science and have little justification in current translational medicine compared to more advanced allometric and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. Misunderstood and misinterpreted use of BSA conversions may have disastrous consequences, including underdosing leading to abandonment of potentially efficacious investigational drugs, and unexpected deadly adverse events. We aim to demonstrate that recent recommendations for BSA are not appropriate for animal-to-human dosage conversions and use pharmacokinetic data from resveratrol studies to demonstrate how confusion between the "human equivalent dose" and "pharmacologically active dose" can lead to inappropriate dose recommendations. To optimize drug development, future recommendations for interspecies scaling must be scientifically justified using physiologic, pharmacokinetic, and toxicology data rather than simple BSA conversion.

  11. How to avoid risks for patients in minimal-access trials: Avoiding complications in clinical first-in-human studies by example of the ADBEE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezar, Cristina; Korell, Matthias; Tchartchian, Garri; Ziegler, Nicole; Senshu, Kazuhisa; Herrmann, Anja; Larbig, Angelika; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-08-01

    A clinical trial is a prospective study designed to establish the safety and efficacy of investigational devices in humans, in accordance with the strict guidelines of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA; USA) or European Medicines Agency (EMA; Europe). Before a clinical first-in-human study is initiated, preclinical studies of the investigational product are mandatory, and the results should be sufficient to indicate that the investigational device is acceptably safe for the proposed evaluation in human subjects. The present paper describes an experience of clinical trials, highlighting ways of avoiding possible complications in clinical first-in-human studies. For a better approach to our aim, we exemplified a prospective, randomized, single-blind study, ADBEE. The primary objective was to assess the safety of the ADBLOCK system when used as an adjunct to laparoscopic primary removal of myomas in women wishing to improve pregnancy outcomes.

  12. A tracer bolus method for investigating glutamine kinetics in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Mori

    Full Text Available Glutamine transport between tissues is important for the outcome of critically ill patients. Investigation of glutamine kinetics is, therefore, necessary to understand glutamine metabolism in these patients in order to improve future intervention studies. Endogenous glutamine production can be measured by continuous infusion of a glutamine tracer, which necessitates a minimum measurement time period. In order to reduce this problem, we used and validated a tracer bolus injection method. Furthermore, this method was used to measure the glutamine production in healthy volunteers in the post-absorptive state, with extra alanine and with glutamine supplementation and parenteral nutrition. Healthy volunteers received a bolus injection of [1-13C] glutamine, and blood was collected from the radial artery to measure tracer enrichment over 90 minutes. Endogenous rate of appearance (endoRa of glutamine was calculated from the enrichment decay curve and corrected for the extra glutamine supplementation. The glutamine endoRa of healthy volunteers was 6.1±0.9 µmol/kg/min in the post-absorptive state, 6.9±1.0 µmol/kg/min with extra alanyl-glutamine (p = 0.29 versus control, 6.1±0.4 µmol/kg/min with extra alanine only (p = 0.32 versus control, and 7.5±0.9 µmol/kg/min with extra alanyl-glutamine and parenteral nutrition (p = 0.049 versus control. In conclusion, a tracer bolus injection method to measure glutamine endoRa showed good reproducibility and small variation at baseline as well as during parenteral nutrition. Additionally, we showed that parenteral nutrition including alanyl-glutamine increased glutamine endoRa in healthy volunteers, which was not attributable to the alanine part of the dipeptide.

  13. Investigating Students’ Achievements in Computing Science Using Human Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel U. Okike

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the role of personality traits, motivation for career choice and study habits in students’ academic achievements in the computing sciences. A quantitative research method was employed. Data was collected from 60 computing science students using the Myer Briggs Type indicator (MBTI with additional questionnaires. A model of the form y_(ij=ß_0+ß_1 x_(1j+ ß_2 x_(2j+ ß_3 x_(3j+ ß_4 x_(4j+ …ß_n x_nj was used, where y_ij represents a dependent variable, ß_0+ß_1 x_(1j+ ß_2 x_(2j+ ß_3 x_(3j+ ß_4 x_(4j+ …ß_n x_nj the independent variables. Data analysis was performed on the data using the Statistical Package for the social sciences (SPSS. Linear regression was done in order to fit the model and justify its significance or none significance at the 0.05 level of significance. Result of regression model was also used to determine the impact of the independent variable on students’ performance. Results from this study suggests that the strongest motivator for a choice of career in the computing sciences is the desire to become a computing professional. Students’ achievements especially in the computing sciences do not depend only on students temperamental ability or personality traits, motivations for choice of course of study and reading habit, but also on the use of Internet based sources more than going to the university library to read book materials available in all areas

  14. Molecular identification of nocardia isolates from clinical samples and an overview of human nocardiosis in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Victor Pereira Baio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nocardia sp. causes a variety of clinical presentations. The incidence of nocardiosis varies geographically according to several factors, such as the prevalence of HIV infections, transplants, neoplastic and rheumatic diseases, as well as climate, socio-economic conditions and laboratory procedures for Nocardia detection and identification. In Brazil the paucity of clinical reports of Nocardia infections suggests that this genus may be underestimated as a cause of human diseases and/or either neglected or misidentified in laboratory specimens. Accurate identification of Nocardia species has become increasingly important for clinical and epidemiological investigations. In this study, seven clinical Nocardia isolates were identified by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA and their antimicrobial susceptibility was also determined. Most Nocardia isolates were associated to pulmonary disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The majority of Brazilian human isolates in cases reported in literature were identified as Nocardia sp. Molecular characterization was used for species identification of Nocardia nova, Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, Nocardia asiatica and Nocardia exalbida/gamkensis. Data indicated that molecular analysis provided a different Nocardia speciation than the initial biochemical identification for most Brazilian isolates. All Nocardia isolates showed susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, the antimicrobial of choice in the treatment nocardiosis. N. nova isolated from different clinical specimens from one patient showed identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and two distinct clones. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although Brazil is the world's fifth-largest country in terms of land mass and population, pulmonary, extrapulmonary and systemic forms of nocardiosis were reported in only 6 of the 26 Brazilian states from 1970 to 2013. A least 33.8% of these 46 cases of nocardiosis proved fatal. Interestingly, coinfection

  15. Clinical FDG PET CT in the Investigation of Suspected Inflammatory and Infective Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Eleanor; Wig, Surabhi; Prakash, Vineet

    PURPOSE          F18 FDG PET CT is an established molecular imaging technique most commonly used in the diagnosis and staging of oncological conditions. A rapidly growing clinical application of PET CT is in the investigation of inflammatory and infectious diseases. A review of PET CT scans perfo...

  16. An academic writing needs assessment of English-as-a-second-language clinical investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Fen; Bakken, Lori L

    2004-01-01

    Academic writing for publication is competitive and demanding for researchers. For the novice English-as-a-second-language (ESL) researcher, the pressure to publish compounds the difficulties of mastering the English language. Very few studies have used ESL graduate and post-graduate students as academic writing research subjects. The purpose of this project was to assess the learning needs of ESL clinical investigators regarding academic writing for English scholarly publication. A qualitative evaluation approach was used to examine the gap between the current and desired proficiency level for the academic writing of ESL clinical investigators. We considered the perspectives of seven ESL clinical investigators plus three mentors and three writing instructors. Semi-structured questions were asked. Field notes were organized using a field-work recording system. They were analyzed using the constant comparative method. ESL clinical investigators do not accurately perceive their writing deficiencies. They have little knowledge of criteria for academic writing and they are influenced by their prior English learning experiences in their home culture, which engender passive attitudes toward seeking appropriate writing resources. Adequate time is especially needed to develop successful writing skills. Four basic steps are recommended to guide program planners in developing ESL writing activities for professional learning: (1) recognize discrepancies, (2) establish clear standards and performance criteria for scholarly writing, (3) develop individual plans, and (4) organize long-term writing assistance.

  17. Using Hermeneutic Phenomenology to Investigate How Experienced Practitioners Learn to Communicate Clinical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajjawi, Rola; Higgs, Joy

    2007-01-01

    This paper is primarily targeted at doctoral students and other researchers considering using hermeneutic phenomenology as a research strategy. We present interpretive paradigm research designed to investigate how experienced practitioners learn to communicate their clinical reasoning in professional practice. Twelve experienced physiotherapy…

  18. Naa Technique for Clinical Investigation of Mice Immunized with BOTHROP Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, C. B.; Aguiar, R. O.; Kovacs, L.; Suzuki, M.; Sant'Anna, O. A.

    2009-06-01

    In the present study Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique was used to determine sodium concentration in whole blood of mice immunized with Bothrops venom. With this value it was possible to perform clinical investigation in this animal model using whole blood.

  19. Investigation and analysis of clinical trial research nurse to perform standard operating procedures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Lin; Yan-Yun Wu; Mei-Hua Wu; Xiu-Yu Yang; Ming Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the situations and factors that cause nurses not to follow standard operating procedures (SOPs) during the clinical trial process. Methods: Five cases involving patients enrolled in a clinical trial were divided into two groups, pre-SOP training and post-SOP training, to compare and observe the process problems and whether nurses fol-lowed SOPs in clinical trials. The causes of problems were analyzed and corrective measures were proposed. Results: Our results indicate significant improvement in compliance with SOPs after training. There were three occurrences of irregular behavior after training compared with 21 occurrences of irregular behavior before training. Conclusions: The quality of clinical trials can be improved if nurses strictly follow SOPs.

  20. CLINICAL AND VIROLOGIC FOUNDATION FOR PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS TYPE 6 INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Myukke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about an infection caused by human herpes virus type 6, its' epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical variants, is reviewed. Clinical cases, diagnosed at a time of study, are briefly reviewed.Key words: human herpes virus type 6, exanthema subitum (roseola infantum, fever of unknown origin, mononucleosis like syndrome, meningoencephalitis, children.

  1. The relationship between senior management team culture and clinical governance: Empirical investigation and managerial implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenestini, Anna; Calciolari, Stefano; Lega, Federico; Grilli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Health care organizations are pressured to improve the cost-effectiveness of service delivery. Clinical governance is an important trigger to improve care quality and safety and rank high in the reform agenda of health systems. The senior management team culture plays a major role in establishing clinical governance practices, because it strongly influences the values, attitudes, and behaviors of the members of an organization. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between senior management team culture and clinical governance in the public health care organizations of three Italian regions. The assessment of senior management culture was conducted using the Competing Values Framework and a corresponding instrument adapted for the Italian context. Clinical governance was assessed using an ad hoc instrument focused on the senior management team's perception and attitude toward clinical governance. The survey achieved a 54% response rate. The results of four different models demonstrate that organizations characterized by different dominant cultures are associated with significant differences in attitudes toward clinical governance. In particular, on average, dominant cultures with a prevailing external focus are associated with a more positive attitude toward clinical governance. The selection and appointments of top managers should consider the style of leadership that is most apt to facilitate the growth of rational and developmental cultures. Furthermore, the training of top managers and leading doctors should reinforce leadership aptitude and approaches that are consistent with the desired organizational cultures.

  2. Clinical research: business opportunities for pharmacy-based investigational drug services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnocha, R M

    1999-02-01

    The application by an academic health center of business principles to the conduct of clinical research is described. Re-engineering of the infrastructure for clinical research at the University of Wisconsin and University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics began in 1990 with the creation of the Center for Clinical Trials (CCT) and the restructuring of the investigational drug services (IDS). Strategies to further improve the institution's clinical research activities have been continually assessed and most recently have centered on the adaptation of a business philosophy within the institution's multidisciplinary research infrastructure. Toward that end, the CCT and IDS have introduced basic business principles into operational activities. Four basic business concepts have been implemented: viewing the research protocol as a commodity, seeking payment for services rendered, tracking investments, and assessing performance. It is proposed that incorporation of these basic business concepts is not only compatible with the infrastructure for clinical research but beneficial to that infrastructure. The adaptation of a business mindset is likely to enable an academic health center to reach its clinical research goals.

  3. Investigation Clinical Competence and Its Relationship with Professional Ethics and Spiritual Health in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Ramezanzade Tabriz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Study of clinical competence in nursing helps determine the quality of health care delivered to patients. Given the priority of observance of principles over caretaking and necessity of spirituality existence at the core of health care provision, this study was conducted to investigate clinical competence and its relationship with professional ethics and spiritual health in nurses. Methods: In this cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational study, 281 nurses were enrolled by consensus sampling. Sampling was conducted from February, 2016 till June, 2016. The data were gathered by a demographics questionnaire, a self-assessment scale of clinical competence, a nursing ethics questionnaire, and a spiritual health questionnaire, and analyzed by descriptive statistics and t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, ANOVA, and linear regression analysis in SPSS 21. Results: The total scores for self-assessment scale of nurses' clinical competence, professional ethics, and spiritual health were moderate. In the light of the results of Spearman's correlation coefficient, there was a significant and positive correlation between clinical competence and spiritual health. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was observed between professional ethics and spiritual health but there was no correlation between professional ethics and clinical competence. Conclusion: Managers' and personnel's Knowledge about the level of nurses clinical competence, professional ethics, and spiritual health in teaching health care centers provides valuable information to develop in-service and efficacious education programs and ultimately to improve the quality of nursing services.

  4. A comprehensive clinical review of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (INFUSE® Bone Graft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Steven M.; Badura, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    The combination of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) carrier has been shown to induce bone formation in a number of preclinical and clinical investigations. In 2002, rhBMP-2/ACS at a 1.5-mg/cc concentration (INFUSE® Bone Graft, Medtronic Spinal and Biologics, Memphis, TN) was FDA-approved as an autograft replacement for certain interbody spinal fusion procedures. In 2004, INFUSE® Bone Graft was approved for open tibial fractures with an intermedullary (IM) nail fixation. Most recently, in March 2007, INFUSE® Bone Graft was approved as an alternative to autogenous bone grafts for sinus augmentations, and for localised alveolar ridge augmentations for defects associated with extraction sockets. The culmination of extensive preclinical and clinical research and three FDA approvals makes rhBMP-2 one of the most studied, published and significant advances in orthopaedics. This review article summarises a number of clinical findings of rhBMP-2/ACS, including the FDA-approved investigational device exemption (IDE) studies used in gaining the aforementioned approvals. PMID:17639384

  5. Using human simulation to prepare physical therapy students for acute care clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Nicki J; Panzarella, Karen J; Melzer, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    The acute care setting requires a unique skill set for all health care providers, including Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students. This study explores high-fidelity human simulation (HFHS) training in a DPT education program to achieve learning objectives specific to preparation of DPT students for acute care clinical practice. Twenty-three DPT students participated in a HFHS acute care experience, provided feedback about the learning experience, and completed a survey regarding preparedness for clinical practice. Student feedback was interpreted to gain content validity of the learning experience, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze survey results. In this pilot study, students identified four learning objectives met during the simulation experience: interprofessional communication, preparation of the treatment environment, patient safety, and discharge planning. Following the experience, 91.5% of the students reported more confidence in interprofessional communication, and 67% were more knowledgeable in discharge disposition. All students agreed that simulations should be part of the curriculum, and 95.2% reported simulation valuable in preparation for clinical practice. As a result of HFHS training in the DPT program, students' educational objectives were met, and simulation was deemed valuable in integrating prior learning and providing an enhanced understanding of the acute care setting. The findings support continued investigation of the effectiveness of simulation to prepare DPT students for acute care clinical practice.

  6. 3D Computer Simulations of Pulsatile Human Blood Flows in Vessels and in the Aortic Arch: Investigation of Non-Newtonian Characteristics of Human Blood

    CERN Document Server

    Sultanov, Renat A; Engelbrekt, Brent; Blankenbecler, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Methods of Computational Fluid Dynamics are applied to simulate pulsatile blood flow in human vessels and in the aortic arch. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the human blood is investigated in simple vessels of actual size. A detailed time-dependent mathematical convergence test has been carried out. The realistic pulsatile flow is used in all simulations. Results of computer simulations of the blood flow in vessels of two different geometries are presented. For pressure, strain rate and velocity component distributions we found significant disagreements between our results obtained with realistic non-Newtonian treatment of human blood and widely used method in literature: a simple Newtonian approximation. A significant increase of the strain rate and, as a result, wall sear stress distribution, is found in the region of the aortic arch. We consider this result as theoretical evidence that supports existing clinical observations and those models not using non-Newtonian treatment underestimate the risk of disru...

  7. [Standard Cancer Therapy Are Established by the Investigator-Initiated Post-Marketing Clinical Trials, Not by the Indication-Directed Clinical Trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    The financial supports for investigator-initiated post-marketing clinical trial in clinical oncology are reduced after scandals related to the other fields of clinical trials in Japan. These clinical trials are the essential final steps of clinical development in newer cancer therapy, which should be conducted in the investigator-initiated clinical trial groups with well-organized infrastructure and continuous financial supports. The present problems are discussed and summarized. Future perspectives with the national viewpoints needed to be included the idea of "health technology assessment".

  8. Traceable working standards with SI units of radiance for characterizing the measurement performance of investigational clinical NIRF imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Litorja, Maritoni; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2017-03-01

    All medical devices for Food and Drug market approval require specifications of performance based upon International System of Units (SI) or units derived from SI for reasons of traceability. Recently, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging devices of a variety of designs have emerged on the market and in investigational clinical studies. Yet the design of devices used in the clinical studies vary widely, suggesting variable device performance. Device performance depends upon optimal excitation of NIRF imaging agents, rejection of backscattered excitation and ambient light, and selective collection of fluorescence emanating from the fluorophore. There remains no traceable working standards with SI units of radiance to enable prediction that a given molecular imaging agent can be detected in humans by a given NIRF imaging device. Furthermore, as technologies evolve and as NIRF imaging device components change, there remains no standardized means to track device improvements over time and establish clinical performance without involving clinical trials, often costly. In this study, we deployed a methodology to calibrate luminescent radiance of a stable, solid phantom in SI units of mW/cm2/sr for characterizing the measurement performance of ICCD and IsCMOS camera based NIRF imaging devices, such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast. The methodology allowed determination of superior SNR of the ICCD over the IsCMOS system; comparable contrast of ICCD and IsCMOS depending upon binning strategies.

  9. Clinical and laboratory features of human dirofilariasis in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Ermakova

    2017-01-01

    Our data are consistent with the opinion of KI Skriabin about that human as «dual facultative host» for dirofiliaria. It is rare that parasite in human body is able to develop to the imago stage (according to our observations – 11.4%. The immune response to invasion by dirofiliaria in human is manifested as dense connective tissue which forms a capsule. According to our study the rare cases (22 of detection the sexual mature D. repens (10.4% were localized inside the capsule. Observations of patients with D. repens infection allowed concluding that human for this helminth is «a biological deadend».

  10. 3D virtual human atria: A computational platform for studying clinical atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanidi, Oleg V; Colman, Michael A; Stott, Jonathan; Dobrzynski, Halina; Boyett, Mark R; Holden, Arun V; Zhang, Henggui

    2011-10-01

    Despite a vast amount of experimental and clinical data on the underlying ionic, cellular and tissue substrates, the mechanisms of common atrial arrhythmias (such as atrial fibrillation, AF) arising from the functional interactions at the whole atria level remain unclear. Computational modelling provides a quantitative framework for integrating such multi-scale data and understanding the arrhythmogenic behaviour that emerges from the collective spatio-temporal dynamics in all parts of the heart. In this study, we have developed a multi-scale hierarchy of biophysically detailed computational models for the human atria--the 3D virtual human atria. Primarily, diffusion tensor MRI reconstruction of the tissue geometry and fibre orientation in the human sinoatrial node (SAN) and surrounding atrial muscle was integrated into the 3D model of the whole atria dissected from the Visible Human dataset. The anatomical models were combined with the heterogeneous atrial action potential (AP) models, and used to simulate the AP conduction in the human atria under various conditions: SAN pacemaking and atrial activation in the normal rhythm, break-down of regular AP wave-fronts during rapid atrial pacing, and the genesis of multiple re-entrant wavelets characteristic of AF. Contributions of different properties of the tissue to mechanisms of the normal rhythm and arrhythmogenesis were investigated. Primarily, the simulations showed that tissue heterogeneity caused the break-down of the normal AP wave-fronts at rapid pacing rates, which initiated a pair of re-entrant spiral waves; and tissue anisotropy resulted in a further break-down of the spiral waves into multiple meandering wavelets characteristic of AF. The 3D virtual atria model itself was incorporated into the torso model to simulate the body surface ECG patterns in the normal and arrhythmic conditions. Therefore, a state-of-the-art computational platform has been developed, which can be used for studying multi

  11. Exploring brainstem function in multiple sclerosis by combining brainstem reflexes, evoked potentials, clinical and MRI investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnano, Immacolata; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Pilurzi, Giovanna; Cabboi, Maria Paola; Ginatempo, Francesca; Giaconi, Elena; Tolu, Eusebio; Achene, Antonio; Salis, Antonio; Rothwell, John C; Conti, Maurizio; Deriu, Franca

    2014-11-01

    To investigate vestibulo-masseteric (VMR), acoustic-masseteric (AMR), vestibulo-collic (VCR) and trigemino-collic (TCR) reflexes in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS); to relate abnormalities of brainstem reflexes (BSRs) to multimodal evoked potentials (EPs), clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings. Click-evoked VMR, AMR and VCR were recorded from active masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles, respectively; TCR was recorded from active sternocleidomastoid muscles, following electrical stimulation of the infraorbital nerve. EPs and MRI were performed with standard techniques. Frequencies of abnormal BSRs were: VMR 62.1%, AMR 55.1%, VCR 25.9%, TCR 58.6%. Brainstem dysfunction was identified by these tests, combined into a four-reflex battery, in 86.9% of cases, by EPs in 82.7%, MRI in 71.7% and clinical examination in 37.7% of cases. The sensitivity of paired BSRs/EPs (93.3%) was significantly higher than combined MRI/clinical testing (70%) in patients with disease duration ⩽6.4years. BSR alterations significantly correlated with clinical, EP and MRI findings. The four-BSR battery effectively increases the performance of standard EPs in early detection of brainstem impairment, otherwise undetected by clinical examination and neuroimaging. Multiple BSR assessment usefully supplements conventional testing and monitoring of brainstem function in MS, especially in newly diagnosed patients. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An Investigation of Job Stress and Job Burnout in Iranian Clinical Pharmacist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armaghan Eslami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress is an important element of organization ineffectiveness and since it leads to sickness, eventually it reduces quality and quantity of health care, lead to expansion of it costs and low job satisfaction. Stress comes along with consequences, one of this reactions which comes along with horrible effects is job burnout. Health care are more exposed for job burnout. We examined the relationship between job stress and job burnout in Iranian clinical pharmacist.Methods: Sample was 50 of men and women of clinical pharmacist. Parker and De cotiis  scale (1983 and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, 1981 were used to asses clinical pharmacist stress and burnout. Data were analyzed by applying regression method.Results: Results indicated that there is strong relationship between stress and burnout and its three dimensions. The result also indicated that stress have the highest impact on emotional exhaustion and the least on the depersonalization.Conclusion: Burnout is a result of stress in human services career. Human service needs are vary from other professions since in these jobs in order to fulfill the clients’ needs, employees should use themselves as the required technology, and in return they do not receive gratitude or appreciation.

  13. Eph/ephrin profiling in human breast cancer reveals significant associations between expression level and clinical outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M Brantley-Sieders

    Full Text Available Pre-clinical studies provide compelling evidence that Eph family receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs and ligands promote cancer growth, neovascularization, invasion, and metastasis. Tumor suppressive roles have also been reported for the receptors, however, creating a potential barrier for clinical application. Determining how these observations relate to clinical outcome is a crucial step for translating the biological and mechanistic data into new molecularly targeted therapies. We investigated eph and ephrin expression in human breast cancer relative to endpoints of overall and/or recurrence-free survival in large microarray datasets. We also investigated protein expression in commercial human breast tissue microarrays (TMA and Stage I prognostic TMAs linked to recurrence outcome data. We found significant correlations between ephA2, ephA4, ephA7, ephB4, and ephB6 and overall and/or recurrence-free survival in large microarray datasets. Protein expression in TMAs supported these trends. While observed no correlation between ephrin ligand expression and clinical outcome in microarray datasets, ephrin-A1 and EphA2 protein co-expression was significantly associated with recurrence in Stage I prognostic breast cancer TMAs. Our data suggest that several Eph family members are clinically relevant and tractable targets for intervention in human breast cancer. Moreover, profiling Eph receptor expression patterns in the context of relevant ligands and in the context of stage may be valuable in terms of diagnostics and treatment.

  14. Genetics in endocrinology: genetic variation in deiodinases: a systematic review of potential clinical effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloop, Herman; Dekkers, Olaf M; Peeters, Robin P; Schoones, Jan W; Smit, Johannes W A

    2014-09-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinases represent a family of selenoproteins involved in peripheral and local homeostasis of thyroid hormone action. Deiodinases are expressed in multiple organs and thyroid hormone affects numerous biological systems, thus genetic variation in deiodinases may affect multiple clinical endpoints. Interest in clinical effects of genetic variation in deiodinases has clearly increased. We aimed to provide an overview for the role of deiodinase polymorphisms in human physiology and morbidity. In this systematic review, studies evaluating the relationship between deiodinase polymorphisms and clinical parameters in humans were eligible. No restrictions on publication date were imposed. The following databases were searched up to August 2013: Pubmed, EMBASE (OVID-version), Web of Science, COCHRANE Library, CINAHL (EbscoHOST-version), Academic Search Premier (EbscoHOST-version), and ScienceDirect. Deiodinase physiology at molecular and tissue level is described, and finally the role of these polymorphisms in pathophysiological conditions is reviewed. Deiodinase type 1 (D1) polymorphisms particularly show moderate-to-strong relationships with thyroid hormone parameters, IGF1 production, and risk for depression. D2 variants correlate with thyroid hormone levels, insulin resistance, bipolar mood disorder, psychological well-being, mental retardation, hypertension, and risk for osteoarthritis. D3 polymorphisms showed no relationship with inter-individual variation in serum thyroid hormone parameters. One D3 polymorphism was associated with risk for osteoarthritis. Genetic deiodinase profiles only explain a small proportion of inter-individual variations in serum thyroid hormone levels. Evidence suggests a role of genetic deiodinase variants in certain pathophysiological conditions. The value for determination of deiodinase polymorphism in clinical practice needs further investigation. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  15. Methodological problems with clinical functional MRI investigations; Methodische Probleme klinischer funktioneller MRT-Untersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foki, T.; Beisteiner, R. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, AG Klinische fMRT, Universitaetsklinik fuer Neurologie, Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-MR, Wien (Austria)

    2010-02-15

    During presurgical diagnostics clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly being performed to improve the management of epilepsy and tumor patients. Rapid technical developments in fMRI technology continuously further new diagnostic applications. Safe clinical application requires a profound and critical handling of the various methodological problems inherent with this complex technique. This article reviews relevant problems and solutions for patient investigations up to the preparation of an individual clinical fMRI report. (orig.) [German] Die klinische funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) hat als individuelles Untersuchungsverfahren v. a. in der praeoperativen Diagnostik bei Epilepsie- und Tumorpatienten einen zunehmenden Stellenwert, da sie hier zu einer klinischen Entscheidung beitragen kann. Die rasche Entwicklung der fMRT-Technologie eroeffnet dabei kontinuierlich neue diagnostische Moeglichkeiten, erfordert aber auch einen kritischen Umgang mit den zahlreichen methodischen Problemen dieses komplexen Verfahrens. Dieser Artikel beschreibt patientenrelevante Probleme und Loesungsmoeglichkeiten von der Untersuchung bis zur Erstellung des individuellen fMRT-Befundes. (orig.)

  16. Vasoprotective effects of human CD34+ cells: towards clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerman Amir

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of cell-based therapeutics for humans requires preclinical testing in animal models. The use of autologous animal products fails to address the efficacy of similar products derived from humans. We used a novel immunodeficient rat carotid injury model in order to determine whether human cells could improve vascular remodelling following acute injury. Methods Human CD34+ cells were separated from peripheral buffy coats using automatic magnetic cell separation. Carotid arterial injury was performed in male Sprague-Dawley nude rats using a 2F Fogarty balloon catheter. Freshly harvested CD34+ cells or saline alone was administered locally for 20 minutes by endoluminal instillation. Structural and functional analysis of the arteries was performed 28 days later. Results Morphometric analysis demonstrated that human CD34+ cell delivery was associated with a significant reduction in intimal formation 4 weeks following balloon injury as compared with saline (I/M ratio 0.79 ± 0.18, and 1.71 ± 0.18 for CD34, and saline-treated vessels, respectively P Conclusion Delivery of human CD34+ cells limits neointima formation and improves arterial reactivity after vascular injury. These studies advance the concept of cell delivery to effect vascular remodeling toward a potential human cellular product.

  17. Bacteriophage Therapy: Advances in Formulation Strategies and Human Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Lavigne, Rob; Brüssow, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a number of phage therapy phase I and II safety trials have been concluded, showing no notable safety concerns associated with the use of phage. Though hurdles for efficient treatment remain, these trials hold promise for future phase III clinical trials. Interestingly, most phage formulations used in these clinical trials are straightforward phage suspensions, and not much research has focused on the processing of phage cocktails in specific pharmaceutical dosage forms. Additional research on formulation strategies and the stability of phage-based drugs will be of key importance, especially with phage therapy advancing toward phase III clinical trials.

  18. The sinusoidal lining cells in "normal" human liver. A scanning electron microscopic investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Christoffersen, P

    1986-01-01

    The scanning electron microscopic was used to study the fenestrations of human liver sinusoids. Thirteen biopsies, where light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed normal sinusoidal architecture, were investigated. The number of fenestrae was calculated in acinar zone 3...

  19. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  20. Automated radiosynthesis of [{sup 11}C]morphine for clinical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Jinda [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Meissner, Konrad [Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Gaehle, Gregory G.; Li Shihong [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Kharasch, Evan D. [Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Mach, Robert H. [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Tu Zhude, E-mail: tuz@mir.wustl.ed [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    To meet a multiple-dose clinical evaluation of the P-gp modulation of [{sup 11}C]morphine delivery into the human brain, radiosynthesis of [{sup 11}C]morphine was accomplished on an automated system by N-methylation of normorphine with [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I. A methodology employing optimized solid phase extraction of the HPLC eluent was developed. Radiosynthesis took 45 min with a radiochemical yield ranging from 45% to 50% and specific activity ranging from 20 to 26 Ci/{mu}mol (decay corrected to end-of-bombardment); radiochemical and chemical purities were >95% (n=28).

  1. Is acuity enough? Other considerations in clinical investigations of visual prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepri, Bernard P

    2009-06-01

    Visual impairing eye diseases are the major frontier facing ophthalmic research today in light of our rapidly aging population. The visual skills necessary for improving the quality of daily function and life are inextricably linked to these impairing diseases. Both research and reimbursement programs are emphasizing outcome-based results. Is improvement in visual acuity alone enough to improve the function and quality of life of visually impaired persons? This perspective summarizes the types of effectiveness endpoints for clinical investigations of visual prostheses that go beyond visual acuity. The clinical investigation of visual prostheses should include visual function, functional vision and quality of life measures. Specifically, they encompass contrast sensitivity, orientation and mobility, activities of daily living and quality of life assessments. The perspective focuses on the design of clinical trials for visual prostheses and the methods of determining effectiveness above and beyond visual acuity that will yield outcomes that are measured by improved function in the visual world and quality of life. The visually impaired population is the primary consideration in this presentation with particular emphases on retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Clinical trials for visual prostheses cannot be isolated from the need for medical rehabilitation in order to obtain measurements of effectiveness that produce outcomes/evidence-based success. This approach will facilitate improvement in daily function and quality of life of patients with diseases that cause chronic vision impairment.

  2. Investigation of dental pulp stem cells isolated from discarded human teeth extracted due to aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai-Hua; Chen, Bo; Zhu, Qing-Lin; Kong, Hui; Li, Qi-Hong; Gao, Li-Na; Xiao, Min; Chen, Fa-Ming; Yu, Qing

    2014-11-01

    contain putative stem cells with certain MSC properties, as long as the vitality of the pulp has not been totally damaged. Whether these cells can serve as a source of autologous multipotent MSCs for clinical regenerative therapies warrants further investigation with larger sample sizes and various types of periodontitis.

  3. Catalog of Completed Studies, US Army Health Care Studies and Clinical Investigation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-10

    Environment Substudy: AD A139001 Effects of Chemical Protective Clothing on the Performance of Basic Medical Tasks (HCSD Report #83-001) 8 DATE TITLE...Contact urticaria to parabens , Arch. Dermatol, 1979, 115:1231-1232. *13 Smith, E. B., Padilla, R. S., McCabe, J. M., Becker, L. E., Benzoyl...Chemical Environment . --3-Report #83-001. Ft. Sam Houston, TX: Health Care Studies and Clinical Investigation Activity, December 1982. 19 Penetar, D. M

  4. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy investigation on the clinical lifetime of ProTaper rotary file system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penta, Virgil; Pirvu, Cristian; Demetrescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the current paper is to show that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) could be a method for evaluating and predicting of ProTaper rotary file system clinical lifespan. This particular aspect of everyday use of the endodontic files is of great importance in each dental practice and has profound clinical implications. The method used for quantification resides in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy theory and has in its main focus the characteristics of the surface titanium oxide layer. This electrochemical technique has been adapted successfully to identify the quality of the Ni-Ti files oxide layer. The modification of this protective layer induces changes in corrosion behavior of the alloy modifying the impedance value of the file. In order to assess the method, 14 ProTaper sets utilized on different patients in a dental clinic have been submitted for testing using EIS. The information obtained in regard to the surface oxide layer has offered an indication of use and proves that the said layer evolves with each clinical application. The novelty of this research is related to an electrochemical technique successfully adapted for Ni-Ti file investigation and correlation with surface and clinical aspects.

  5. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Investigation on the Clinical Lifetime of ProTaper Rotary File System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirvu, Cristian; Demetrescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the current paper is to show that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) could be a method for evaluating and predicting of ProTaper rotary file system clinical lifespan. This particular aspect of everyday use of the endodontic files is of great importance in each dental practice and has profound clinical implications. The method used for quantification resides in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy theory and has in its main focus the characteristics of the surface titanium oxide layer. This electrochemical technique has been adapted successfully to identify the quality of the Ni-Ti files oxide layer. The modification of this protective layer induces changes in corrosion behavior of the alloy modifying the impedance value of the file. In order to assess the method, 14 ProTaper sets utilized on different patients in a dental clinic have been submitted for testing using EIS. The information obtained in regard to the surface oxide layer has offered an indication of use and proves that the said layer evolves with each clinical application. The novelty of this research is related to an electrochemical technique successfully adapted for Ni-Ti file investigation and correlation with surface and clinical aspects. PMID:24605336

  6. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Investigation on the Clinical Lifetime of ProTaper Rotary File System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgil Penta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the current paper is to show that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS could be a method for evaluating and predicting of ProTaper rotary file system clinical lifespan. This particular aspect of everyday use of the endodontic files is of great importance in each dental practice and has profound clinical implications. The method used for quantification resides in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy theory and has in its main focus the characteristics of the surface titanium oxide layer. This electrochemical technique has been adapted successfully to identify the quality of the Ni-Ti files oxide layer. The modification of this protective layer induces changes in corrosion behavior of the alloy modifying the impedance value of the file. In order to assess the method, 14 ProTaper sets utilized on different patients in a dental clinic have been submitted for testing using EIS. The information obtained in regard to the surface oxide layer has offered an indication of use and proves that the said layer evolves with each clinical application. The novelty of this research is related to an electrochemical technique successfully adapted for Ni-Ti file investigation and correlation with surface and clinical aspects.

  7. In vitro investigation of ultrasound-induced oxidative stress on human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwei, Patrick; Alex Gong, Cihun-Siyong; Luo, Li-Jyuan; Lin, Meng-Bo; Lai, Jui-Yang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2017-01-22

    The effect of ultrasound exposure on human lens epithelial cells (HLE-B3) was investigated in vitro, specifically on the generation of oxidative stress upon ultrasound application using various clinically-relevant settings. In addition to ultrasound-induced heat effects, oxidative stress has been recently proposed as one of the main mechanisms for ultrasound-induced effects on human cells. In this work, the levels of biocompatibility and generation of oxidative stress by exposure of ultrasound to HLE-B3 were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively by the MTT assay, Live/Dead assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular calcium level. Oxidative stress induction is traditionally achieved through administrations of H2O2 and thus the administration of H2O2 was used as the positive control group for comparison herein. Concerning the administrations of H2O2 are considered invasive and may potentially have side effects, ultrasound as physical stimulation could be a safer and non-invasive method to induce similar oxidative stress environments. The effect of ultrasound on cell viability and induction of oxidative stress increases with ultrasound intensity. The result reveals that the continuous ultrasound has a positive impact on the oxidative stress levels but does negatively on the cell viability, as compared to the pulsed ultrasound. Furthermore, our work demonstrates that the exposure of 58 kPa continuous ultrasound without microbubbles can maintain acceptable cell viability and produce oxidative stress effects similar to the traditional administrations of H2O2. In summary, exposure of ultrasound can generate oxidative stress comparable to traditional administrations of H2O2. The effect of generating oxidative stress is adjustable through ultrasound parameters, including the pulsed or continuous wave, the intensity of ultrasound and addition of microbubbles.

  8. HIGH VARIABILITY OF HUMAN CYTOMEGALOVIRUS UL150 OPEN READING FRAME IN LOW-PASSAGED CLINICAL ISOLATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the polymorphism of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL150 open reading frame(ORF) in low-passaged clinical isolates, and to study the relationship between the polymorphism and different pathogenesis of congenital HCMV infection.Methods PCR was performed to amplify the entire HCMV UL150 ORF region of 29 clinical isolates, which hadbeen proven containing detectable HCMV-DNA using fluorescence quantitative PCR. PCR amplifcation products weresequenced directly, and the data were analyzed.Results Totally 25 among 29 isolates were amplified, and 18 isolates were sequenced successfully. HCMVUL150 ORF sequences derived from congenitally infected infants were high variability. The UL150 ORF in all 18 clinical isolates shifted backward by 8 nucleotides leading to frame-shift, and contained a single nucleotide deletion at nucleotide position 226 compared with that of Toledo strain. The nucleotide diversity was 0. 1% to 6. 8% and the amino acid diversity was 0. 2% to 19. 2% related to Toledo strain. However, the nucleotide diversity was 0. 1% to 6.4% and amino acid diversity was 0. 2% to 8.3% by compared with Merlin strain. Compared with Toledo, 4 new cysteine residues and 13 additional posttranslational modification sites were observed in UL150 putative proteins of clinical isolates. Moreover, the UL150 putative protein contained an additional transmembrane helix at position of 4-17 amino acid related to Toledo.Conclusion HCMV UL150 ORF and deduced amino acid sequences of clinical strains are hypervariability. No obvious linkage between the polymorphism and different pathogenesis of congenital HCMV infection is found.

  9. Large-Scale Investigation of Human TF-miRNA Relations Based on Coexpression Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Chien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncoding, endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs are fairly well known for regulating gene expression rather than protein coding. Dysregulation of miRNA gene, either upregulated or downregulated, may lead to severe diseases or oncogenesis, especially when the miRNA disorder involves significant bioreactions or pathways. Thus, how miRNA genes are transcriptionally regulated has been highlighted as well as target recognition in recent years. In this study, a large-scale investigation of novel cis- and trans-elements was undertaken to further determine TF-miRNA regulatory relations, which are necessary to unravel the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. Based on miRNA and annotated gene expression profiles, the term “coTFBS” was introduced to detect common transcription factors and the corresponding binding sites within the promoter regions of each miRNA and its coexpressed annotated genes. The computational pipeline was successfully established to filter redundancy due to short sequence motifs for TFBS pattern search. Eventually, we identified more convinced TF-miRNA regulatory relations for 225 human miRNAs. This valuable information is helpful in understanding miRNA functions and provides knowledge to evaluate the therapeutic potential in clinical research. Once most expression profiles of miRNAs in the latest database are completed, TF candidates of more miRNAs can be explored by this filtering approach in the future.

  10. Towards Investigating Global Warming Impact on Human Health Using Derivatives of Photoplethysmogram Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Norton, Ian; Brearley, Matt; Fletcher, Richard R; Abbott, Derek; Lovell, Nigel H; Schuurmans, Dale

    2015-10-14

    Recent clinical studies show that the contour of the photoplethysmogram (PPG) wave contains valuable information for characterizing cardiovascular activity. However, analyzing the PPG wave contour is difficult; therefore, researchers have applied first or higher order derivatives to emphasize and conveniently quantify subtle changes in the filtered PPG contour. Our hypothesis is that analyzing the whole PPG recording rather than each PPG wave contour or on a beat-by-beat basis can detect heat-stressed subjects and that, consequently, we will be able to investigate the impact of global warming on human health. Here, we explore the most suitable derivative order for heat stress assessment based on the energy and entropy of the whole PPG recording. The results of our study indicate that the use Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 7 12777 of the entropy of the seventh derivative of the filtered PPG signal shows promising results in detecting heat stress using 20-second recordings, with an overall accuracy of 71.6%. Moreover, the combination of the entropy of the seventh derivative of the filtered PPG signal with the root mean square of successive differences, or RMSSD (a traditional heart rate variability index of heat stress), improved the detection of heat stress to 88.9% accuracy.

  11. First human rabies case in French Guiana, 2008: epidemiological investigation and control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Meynard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Until 2008, human rabies had never been reported in French Guiana. On 28 May 2008, the French National Reference Center for Rabies (Institut Pasteur, Paris confirmed the rabies diagnosis, based on hemi-nested polymerase chain reaction on skin biopsy and saliva specimens from a Guianan, who had never travelled overseas and died in Cayenne after presenting clinically typical meningoencephalitis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Molecular typing of the virus identified a Lyssavirus (Rabies virus species, closely related to those circulating in hematophagous bats (mainly Desmodus rotundus in Latin America. A multidisciplinary Crisis Unit was activated. Its objectives were to implement an epidemiological investigation and a veterinary survey, to provide control measures and establish a communications program. The origin of the contamination was not formally established, but was probably linked to a bat bite based on the virus type isolated. After confirming exposure of 90 persons, they were vaccinated against rabies: 42 from the case's entourage and 48 healthcare workers. To handle that emergence and the local population's increased demand to be vaccinated, a specific communications program was established using several media: television, newspaper, radio. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This episode, occurring in the context of a Department far from continental France, strongly affected the local population, healthcare workers and authorities, and the management team faced intense pressure. This observation confirms that the risk of contracting rabies in French Guiana is real, with consequences for population educational program, control measures, medical diagnosis and post-exposure prophylaxis.

  12. Large-scale investigation of human TF-miRNA relations based on coexpression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chia-Hung; Chiang-Hsieh, Yi-Fan; Tsou, Ann-Ping; Weng, Shun-Long; Chang, Wen-Chi; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding, endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) are fairly well known for regulating gene expression rather than protein coding. Dysregulation of miRNA gene, either upregulated or downregulated, may lead to severe diseases or oncogenesis, especially when the miRNA disorder involves significant bioreactions or pathways. Thus, how miRNA genes are transcriptionally regulated has been highlighted as well as target recognition in recent years. In this study, a large-scale investigation of novel cis- and trans-elements was undertaken to further determine TF-miRNA regulatory relations, which are necessary to unravel the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. Based on miRNA and annotated gene expression profiles, the term "coTFBS" was introduced to detect common transcription factors and the corresponding binding sites within the promoter regions of each miRNA and its coexpressed annotated genes. The computational pipeline was successfully established to filter redundancy due to short sequence motifs for TFBS pattern search. Eventually, we identified more convinced TF-miRNA regulatory relations for 225 human miRNAs. This valuable information is helpful in understanding miRNA functions and provides knowledge to evaluate the therapeutic potential in clinical research. Once most expression profiles of miRNAs in the latest database are completed, TF candidates of more miRNAs can be explored by this filtering approach in the future.

  13. Investigating the mechanical properties of zona pellucida of whole human oocytes by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Masiero, Elena; Giolo, Elena; Martinelli, Monica; Luppi, Stefania; Dal Zilio, Simone; Delfino, Ines; Bortul, Roberta; Zweyer, Marina; Ricci, Giuseppe; Lazzarino, Marco

    2016-08-08

    The role of mechanics in numerous biological processes is nowadays recognized, while in others, such as the fertilization process, it is still neglected. In the case of oocytes the description of their mechanical properties could improve the comprehension of the oocyte-spermatozoon interaction and be helpful for application in in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. Herein the mechanical properties of whole human oocytes (HOs) immediately after retrieval are investigated by indentation measurements with atomic force spectroscopy under physiological conditions. Measurements are performed on immature (metaphase I - MI) and mature (metaphase II - MII) HOs. According to their morphological characteristics MII-HOs are classified as "suitable" and "rejected"; these latter would be usually rejected for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). For all maturation stages we observe that the elastic response of the zona pellucida (ZP) outer layer was different and distinguishable from the rest of the ZP-HO. The elasticity of this ZP outer layer varies with maturation and quality: stiffness decreases from immature MI to good quality MII, up to poor-quality rejected MII. An indirect analysis with IVF outcome indicates that the ZP outer layer of analysed HOs donated by women who achieved pregnancy is stiffer than that of HOs from women with negative outcome. Our findings suggest that mechanical properties can represent important oocyte quality indicators that may be exploited for the design of innovative ICSI dedicated cell sorters.

  14. A Clinically Meaningful Interpretation of the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) Scintigraphic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Paul; Dwamena, Ben A

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Diagnostic test characteristics reported in terms of sensitivity and specificity are difficult to translate at the clinical level. More relevant measures are likelihood ratios (LRs), which can convert a pretest into a posttest probability. The aim of our study was to calculate the LRs and posttest probabilities for multiple-level test result for ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) lung scintigraphy and for perfusion scintigraphy combined with chest radiography using modified Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) II and the Prospective Investigative Study of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PISAPED) criteria for each clinical probability level for the most commonly used clinical prediction rules (CPR) using the PIOPED data. PE pretest probability was estimated for the most commonly used CPRs (Wells, Geneva, Miniati, and Charlotte) at each clinical probability level (two-, three-, and four-level). Multiple-level LRs (high, indeterminate, low, very low probability, and normal) and the positive, indeterminate, and negative results for V/Q scintigraphy, and the positive, indeterminate, and negative results for perfusion scintigraphy were generated and used to calculate posttest probabilities based on the sensitivity and specificity data from PIOPED for each clinical probability level (low, intermediate, and high) for each CPR. Nomograms were also created. The LRs for a positive V/Q and perfusion scintigraphy test using modified PIOPED II and PISAPED criteria were 20.6, 11, and 23.7, and for a negative test result were 0.15, 0.16, and 0.2, respectively. In the three-level Wells score, the posttest probability for an initial low clinical probability PE for a positive, indeterminate, and negative test result, respectively, for V/Q scintigraphy is 56, 5, and 0.9; for perfusion scintigraphy with modified PIOPED 40, 7, and 0.9, and with PISAPED 59, not

  15. Human rhinovirus infections in hospitalized children: clinical, epidemiological and virological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, D N; Trinh, Q D; Pham, N T K; Pham, T M H; Ha, M T; Nguyen, T Q N; Okitsu, S; Shimizu, H; Hayakawa, S; Mizuguchi, M; Ushijima, H

    2016-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology and clinical impact of human rhinovirus (HRV) are not well documented in tropical regions. This study compared the clinical characteristics of HRV to other common viral infections and investigated the molecular epidemiology of HRV in hospitalized children with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in Vietnam. From April 2010 to May 2011, 1082 nasopharyngeal swabs were screened for respiratory viruses by PCR. VP4/VP2 sequences of HRV were further characterized. HRV was the most commonly detected virus (30%), in which 70% were diagnosed as either pneumonia or bronchiolitis. Children with single HRV infections presented with significantly higher rate of hypoxia than those infected with respiratory syncytial virus or parainfluenza virus (PIV)-3 (12·4% vs. 3·8% and 0%, respectively, P < 0·05), higher rate of chest retraction than PIV-1 (57·3% vs. 34·5%, P = 0·028), higher rate of wheezing than influenza A (63·2% vs. 42·3%, P = 0·038). HRV-C did not differ to HRV-A clinically. The genetic diversity and changes of types over time were observed and may explain the year-round circulation of HRV. One novel HRV-A type was discovered which circulated locally for several years. In conclusion, HRV showed high genetic diversity and was associated with significant morbidity and severe ARIs in hospitalized children.

  16. A methodological approach to investigating a nationwide clinical specimen contamination problem in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, L; Campbell, C; Lamagni, T L; Johnson, E; Saei, A; Duckworth, G

    2009-06-11

    Outbreaks of pseudo-infection due to contamination of specimens have been described, often as localised incidents. From August 2006, several English hospital laboratories began to refer an unusually high number of isolates of the fungus Paecilomyces variotii from clinical specimens to the national mycology reference laboratory for microbiological testing. We describe the methods used during the outbreak investigation in order to provide infection control specialists with an overview of how such national incidents may be investigated. We surveyed the hospitals reporting the contamination problem and conducted microbiological and environmental sampling. We applied analytical epidemiology to supply chain data, comparing the supply lines of key equipment to affected and unaffected hospitals in England. The survey was useful to describe procedures and equipment in use in the hospitals reporting the problem. The microbiological aspects of the investigation helped us understand how the fungal spores were distributed in the hospital environment. In the supply chain investigation we used data that was previously only used for logistical purposes. Overall the investigation was methodologically challenging, with no existing protocol to guide the investigators. To our knowledge, this is a novel approach to the investigation of such a widespread contamination problem, affecting geographically disparate hospitals at the same time.

  17. Genotypic characterisation and cluster analysis of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from domestic pets, human clinical cases and retail food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acke Els

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic similarity of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from pets, compared to human clinical cases and retail food isolates collected in Ireland over 2001-2006 was investigated by cluster analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE fingerprinting profiles. Comparison of the PFGE profiles of 60 pet isolates and 109 human isolates revealed that seven (4.1% profiles were grouped in clusters including at least one human and one pet C. jejuni isolate. In total six (1.6% of 60 pet and 310 food profiles were in clusters with at least one food and one pet C. jejuni isolate. The detection of only a small number of genetically indistinguishable isolates by PFGE profile cluster analysis from pets and from humans with enteritis in this study suggests that pets are unlikely to be an important reservoir for human campylobacteriosis in Ireland. However, genetically indistinguishable isolates were detected and C. jejuni from pets may circulate and may contribute to clinical infections in humans. In addition, contaminated food fed to pets may be a potential source of Campylobacter infection in pets, which may subsequently pose a risk to humans.

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigation on the interaction between cyclovirobuxine D and human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Ren; Liu, Jianming; Dong, Qiao; Fan, Jing

    2014-07-01

    Cyclovirobuxine D is an active compound extracted from the plant Buxux microphylla, and widely available as medications; however, its abuse may casts potential detrimental effects on human health. By using multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling, the interaction of cyclovirobuxine D with human serum albumin was investigated. The fluorescence results manifested that static type was the operative mechanism for the interaction with human serum albumin. The structural investigation of the complexed HSA through CD, three-dimensional, FT-IR and synchronous fluorescence shown the polypeptide chain of HSA partially destabilizing. Docking studies revealed the molecule to be bound in the subdomain IIA. Finally, we investigated the distance between the bound ligand and Trp-214 of human serum albumin.

  19. Supporting human interaction and human resources coordination in distributed clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrighi, Alessio; Torchio, Mauro; Montani, Stefania; Molino, Gianpaolo; Terenziani, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Clinical guidelines (GL) play an important role in medical practice: the one of optimizing the quality of patient care on the basis of the best and most recent evidence based medicine. In order to achieve this goal, the interaction between different actors, who cooperate in the execution of the same GL, is a crucial issue. As a matter of fact, in many cases (e.g. in chronic disease treatment) the GL execution requires that patient treatment is not performed/completed in the hospital, but is continued in different contexts (e.g. at home, or in the general practitioner's ambulatory), under the responsibility of different actors. In this situation, the correct interaction and communication between the actors themselves is critical for the quality of care, and human resources coordination is a key issue to be addressed by the managers of the involved healthcare service. In this paper we describe how computerized GL management can be extended in order to support such needs, and we illustrate our approach by means of a practical case study.

  20. Clinical investigation of an outbreak of alveolitis and asthma in a car engine manufacturing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, W; Robertson, A S; Burge, C B S G; Moore, V C; Jaakkola, M S; Dawkins, P A; Burd, M; Rawbone, R; Gardner, I; Kinoulty, M; Crook, B; Evans, G S; Harris-Roberts, J; Rice, S; Burge, P S

    2007-11-01

    Exposure to metal working fluid (MWF) has been associated with outbreaks of extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) in the USA, with bacterial contamination of MWF being a possible cause, but is uncommon in the UK. Twelve workers developed EAA in a car engine manufacturing plant in the UK, presenting clinically between December 2003 and May 2004. This paper reports the subsequent epidemiological investigation of the whole workforce. The study had three aims: (1) to measure the extent of the outbreak by identifying other workers who may have developed EAA or other work-related respiratory diseases; (2) to provide case detection so that those affected could be treated; and (3) to provide epidemiological data to identify the cause of the outbreak. The outbreak was investigated in a three-phase cross-sectional survey of the workforce. In phase I a respiratory screening questionnaire was completed by 808/836 workers (96.7%) in May 2004. In phase II 481 employees with at least one respiratory symptom on screening and 50 asymptomatic controls were invited for investigation at the factory in June 2004. This included a questionnaire, spirometry and clinical opinion. 454/481 (94.4%) responded and 48/50 (96%) controls. Workers were identified who needed further investigation and serial measurements of peak expiratory flow (PEF). In phase III 162 employees were seen at the Birmingham Occupational Lung Disease clinic. 198 employees returned PEF records, including 141 of the 162 who attended for clinical investigation. Case definitions for diagnoses were agreed. 87 workers (10.4% of the workforce) met case definitions for occupational lung disease, comprising EAA (n = 19), occupational asthma (n = 74) and humidifier fever (n = 7). 12 workers had more than one diagnosis. The peak onset of work-related breathlessness was Spring 2003. The proportion of workers affected was higher for those using MWF from a large sump (27.3%) than for those working all over the manufacturing area (7

  1. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  2. Pathobiology of human cerebrovascular malformations: basic mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, Judith; Sarin, Hemant; Awadallah, Nabil A; Shenkar, Robert; Awad, Issam A

    2004-07-01

    Cerebrovascular malformations affect more than 3% of the population, exposing them to a lifetime risk of hemorrhagic stroke, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) exhibit an immature vessel wall, a brittle hemorrhagic tendency, and epileptogenesis, whereas arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) lack capillary beds and manifest apoplectic bleeding under high-flow conditions. There are also more benign venous anomalies, capillary malformations, and lesions with mixed and transitional features. Advances have been made toward understanding the natural history, radiological and pathological correlates, and clinical management. Yet, mechanisms of lesion genesis and clinical manifestations remain largely unknown, and the clinical behavior in individual patients is highly unpredictable. Lesion pathogenesis likely involves abnormal assembly or maintenance of blood vessels, resulting in dysmorphic vessel phenotypes. Familial CCM disease is in part caused by mutations in a cytoskeletal-related protein that is likely integral to interendothelial cell connectivity and maturation of the vascular wall. Rare familial forms of AVM disease have been correlated with two different transforming growth factor-beta receptor components, possibly causing disturbance in signaling during vascular assembly. Relevance of these mechanisms to the more common and otherwise identical sporadic CCM and AVM lesions is being explored. In this report, basic mechanisms of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and how they possibly relate to the common cerebrovascular malformation lesions are reviewed. Novel concepts are discussed related to the cellular, molecular, and genetic substrates in CCM and AVM as well as to how this knowledge can be applied to predict, explain, and possibly modify clinical disease manifestations.

  3. Human Rights and the Regulation of Transnational Clinical Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the more worrying trends in globalization today is the growing practice of western companies relocating clinical trials to impoverished countries. This paper starts by providing a comprehensive description of the practice and its current regulatory oversight. It argues that this regulatory

  4. Clinical neurophysiology and quantitative sensory testing in the investigation of orofacial pain and sensory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Satu K

    2004-01-01

    Chronic orofacial pain represents a diagnostic and treatment challenge for the clinician. Some conditions, such as atypical facial pain, still lack proper diagnostic criteria, and their etiology is not known. The recent development of neurophysiological methods and quantitative sensory testing for the examination of the trigeminal somatosensory system offers several tools for diagnostic and etiological investigation of orofacial pain. This review presents some of these techniques and the results of their application in studies on orofacial pain and sensory dysfunction. Clinical neurophysiological investigation has greater diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity than clinical examination in the detection of the neurogenic abnormalities of either peripheral or central origin that may underlie symptoms of orofacial pain and sensory dysfunction. Neurophysiological testing may also reveal trigeminal pathology when magnetic resonance imaging has failed to detect it, so these methods should be considered complementary to each other in the investigation of orofacial pain patients. The blink reflex, corneal reflex, jaw jerk, sensory neurography of the inferior alveolar nerve, and the recording of trigeminal somatosensory-evoked potentials with near-nerve stimulation have all proved to be sensitive and reliable in the detection of dysfunction of the myelinated sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve or its central connections within the brainstem. With appropriately small thermodes, thermal quantitative sensory testing is useful for the detection of trigeminal small-fiber dysfunction (Adelta and C). In neuropathic conditions, it is most sensitive to lesions causing axonal injury. By combining different techniques for investigation of the trigeminal system, an accurate topographical diagnosis and profile of sensory fiber pathology can be determined. Neurophysiological and quantitative sensory tests have already highlighted some similarities among various orofacial pain conditions

  5. Human mesenchymal stromal cells : biological characterization and clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the characterization of the biological and functional properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), isolated from different tissue sources. The differentiation capacity of MSCs from fetal and adult tissues has been tested and compared. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has be

  6. Translation of the human genome into clinical allergy, part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Saito

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available After completion of sequencing of the human genome, you will no longer be able to discover a new gene and may not be able to find a new molecule in the human body. Instead, you may find many new molecule networks. It will be possible to select information obtained from animal models just where orthologous genes are functioning similarly. Mouse disease models will not be used any longer where key orthologous genes are working differently than in humans. Analysis of cell type-selective transcripts from database searches is now available to minimize the efforts required for drug discovery. As such, it will soon be possible to use computational modeling to analyze integrative biological function and to test hypotheses without performing any in vivo or in vitro experimentation. However, before establishing a system simulating the human body, which consists of a variety of organs, which further consist of various types of cells, which then consist of various types of proteins, which consist of 20 types of amino acids, there are many steps that need to be understood.

  7. Clinical, histopathologic, and genetic investigation in two large families with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, B; Lindskog, S; Elgadi, A; Norgren, S

    2004-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) type II, an inherited disorder affecting dentin, has been linked to mutations in the dentin sialophosphoprotein ( DSPP) gene on chromosome 4q21. The gene product is cleaved into two dentin-specific matrix proteins, dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein. The aim of this investigation was to study genotypes and phenotypes in two affected families with special reference to clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic manifestations. Seven affected members of Family A and five of Family B were documented clinically and radiographically; 14 and 10 teeth, respectively, were available for histopathologic investigation and prepared for ground sections, which were assessed semiquantitatively for dysplastic manifestations in the dentin according to the scoring system, dysplastic dentin score (DDS). Venous blood samples were collected from six affected and ten unaffected members of Family A, and from eight affected and six unaffected members of Family B. Genomic DNA was extracted and used for sequence analyses. The two families presented with different missense mutations. An Arg68Trp missense mutation in the DSP part of the gene was revealed in all six analyzed affected individuals in Family A. This mutation was not present in any of the ten healthy members. In Family B, an Ala15Val missense mutation involving the last residue of the signal peptide was found in all eight affected but in none of the six healthy members. The clinical and radiographic disturbances and DDS were more severe in Family B. The data indicate the presence of a genotype-phenotype correlation in DI type II.

  8. Teaching clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills using human patient simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vyas, Deepti; Ottis, Erica J; Caligiuri, Frank J

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses using human patient simulation (HPS) to expose students to complex dynamic patient cases that require clinical judgment, problem-solving skills, and teamwork skills for success...

  9. Clinical trials and E-health: impact of new information technology applied to clinical trials (including source data-medical records) and to human and drug research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhier, Jehan-Michel; Reynier, Jean-Charles; Bertoye, Pierre-Henri; Vray, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    Within the last few years, new technology has come to play an important part in our professional and private daily environment. Healthcare has not escaped this progressive mutation with computers reaching the bedside. Clinical research has also shown growing interest in these new tools available to the clinical investigator, the patient, as well as to specialist departments for diagnosis and follow-up of patients, and to the different professions in clinical research. If the use of new technology seems to make life easier, by centralizing data or by simplifying data-sharing between different teams, it is still a matter of private data which must remain reliable, confidential and secure, whether it is being used in ordinary healthcare or in academic or industrial research. The aim of the round table was to estimate the impact of new information technology applied to clinical trials (including source data-medical records) and to human and drug research. First, an inventory was made of the development of these new technologies in the healthcare system. The second point developed was identification of expected benefits in order to issue guidelines for their good use and hazard warnings in clinical trials. Finally, the impact of these new technologies on the investigator as well as the project manager was analysed.

  10. Histological, ultrastructural and quantitative investigations on the response of healthy human pulps to experimental capping with mineral trioxide aggregate: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, P N R; Duncan, H F; Pitt Ford, T. R.; Luder, H U

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pulpal response to direct pulp capping in healthy human teeth with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as against calcium hydroxide cement (Dycal) as control. METHODOLOGY: Twenty healthy human third molars had iatrogenic pulpotomy and direct pulp capping with MTA. Another 13 teeth were capped with Dycal as controls. The teeth were restored, with IRM, clinically reviewed and extracted after a number of pre-determined intervals (1 week, 1 month and 3 months). The specimens ...

  11. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Atul Kumar [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo [Tissue Bank, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400012 (India); Rai, Ratan Kumar [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Khan, Mohd Parvez [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Singh, Chandan [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Barbhuyan, Tarun [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Vijayalakshmi, S. [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Chattopadhyay, Naibedya [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Sinha, Neeraj, E-mail: neerajcbmr@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: ashutoshk@iitb.ac.in [Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bellare, Jayesh R., E-mail: jb@iitb.ac.in [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-05-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS® (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. Cross-correlation between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all

  12. Investigational new drug safety reporting requirements for human drug and biological products and safety reporting requirements for bioavailability and bioequivalence studies in humans. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing safety reporting requirements for human drug and biological products subject to an investigational new drug application (IND). The final rule codifies the agency's expectations for timely review, evaluation, and submission of relevant and useful safety information and implements internationally harmonized definitions and reporting standards. The revisions will improve the utility of IND safety reports, reduce the number of reports that do not contribute in a meaningful way to the developing safety profile of the drug, expedite FDA's review of critical safety information, better protect human subjects enrolled in clinical trials, subject bioavailability and bioequivalence studies to safety reporting requirements, promote a consistent approach to safety reporting internationally, and enable the agency to better protect and promote public health.

  13. Investigating the connections between health lean management and clinical risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate connections and overlaps between health lean management (HLM) and clinical risk management (CRM) understanding whether and how these two approaches can be combined together to pursue efficiency and patient safety improvements simultaneously. A systematic literature review has been carried out. Searching in academic databases, papers that focus not only on HLM, but also on clinical errors and risk reduction, were included. The general characteristics of the selected papers were analysed and a content analysis was conducted. In most of the papers, pursing objectives of HLM and CRM and adopting tools and practices of both approaches, results of quality and, particularly, of safety improvements were obtained. A two-way arrow between HLM and CRM emerged but so far, none of the studies has been focused on the relationship between HLM and CRM. Results highlight an emerging research stream, with many useful theoretical and practical implications and opportunities for further research.

  14. [Questionnaire investigation of incidence of Trichophyton tonsurans infection in dermatology clinics in the Kanto area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruma, Masataro; Shiraki, Yumi; Nihei, Nozomi; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Suganami, Morio

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a questionnaire investigation to learn the incidence of T. tonsurans infection. Subjects of this investigation were 1,060 dermatologists in 1,060 dermatology clinics in the Kanto area to whom questionnaires were mailed. We asked each dermatologist whether he/she had experienced T. tonsurans infection cases (including suspected cases) and if so, we further asked; a. time of onset, b. number of cases, c. sexuality of the patient, d. club that the subject had joined (judo club, wrestling club or other), e. age of the subject, and f. number of cases suspected of having familial infection, the response rate was 47.5% (504 of the 1060 doctors), and 25.8% (130 of the 504) had handled T. tonsurans infection cases. The total number of patients was 707 (657 males and 50 females), with 400 (56.6%) of those in the 18 high-ranking clinics. The number of cases had increased rapidly from around 2002; 72.9% of the patients were students in high schools and universities and in 8 cases familial infection was suspected. 96.5% of the patients were in a judo or wrestling club. Our investigation revealed that this infectious disease had spread more than we had expected. It is important to develop more reliable infection control measures and to determine the actual conditions of this infection using mycological examinations.

  15. Clinical investigations of the therapeutic potential of ayahuasca: rationale and regulatory challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dennis J

    2004-05-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic beverage that is prominent in the ethnomedicine and shamanism of indigenous Amazonian tribes. Its unique pharmacology depends on the oral activity of the hallucinogen, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), which results from inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO) by beta-carboline alkaloids. MAO is the enzyme that normally degrades DMT in the liver and gut. Ayahuasca has long been integrated into mestizo folk medicine in the northwest Amazon. In Brazil, it is used as a sacrament by several syncretic churches. Some of these organizations have incorporated in the United States. The recreational and religious use of ayahuasca in the United States, as well as "ayahuasca tourism" in the Amazon, is increasing. The current legal status of ayahuasca or its source plants in the United States is unclear, although DMT is a Schedule I controlled substance. One ayahuasca church has received favorable rulings in 2 federal courts in response to its petition to the Department of Justice for the right to use ayahuasca under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. A biomedical study of one of the churches, the Uñiao do Vegetal (UDV), indicated that ayahuasca may have therapeutic applications for the treatment of alcoholism, substance abuse, and possibly other disorders. Clinical studies conducted in Spain have demonstrated that ayahuasca can be used safely in normal healthy adults, but have done little to clarify its potential therapeutic uses. Because of ayahuasca's ill-defined legal status and variable botanical and chemical composition, clinical investigations in the United States, ideally under an approved Investigational New Drug (IND) protocol, are complicated by both regulatory and methodological issues. This article provides an overview of ayahuasca and discusses some of the challenges that must be overcome before it can be clinically investigated in the United States.

  16. Teaching clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills using human patient simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Deepti; Ottis, Erica J; Caligiuri, Frank J

    2011-11-10

    This paper discusses using human patient simulation (HPS) to expose students to complex dynamic patient cases that require clinical judgment, problem-solving skills, and teamwork skills for success. An example of an HPS exercise used to teach multifaceted clinical concepts in a therapeutics course also is provided.

  17. A descriptive survey investigating pre-registration student nurses' perceptions of clinical skill development in clinical placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stayt, Louise C; Merriman, Clair

    2013-04-01

    Clinical skill development is essential to nurse education. Clinical skills are frequently taught in higher education institutions using clinical simulation. It is unclear if clinical skills are subsequently consolidated and developed in clinical placements. The aim of this survey was to evaluate pre-registration student nurses perceptions of the frequency of opportunities to practise, the level of supervision and assessment of, clinical skills in their clinical placements. This was a cross-sectional survey design using an online, self-report questionnaire including a Likert-type scale and open ended comments. Four hundred and twenty one students, from all year groups, from a university in the south of England on a wide variety of clinical placements participated. Participants evaluated the frequency of opportunity to practise, level of supervision and assessment of and feedback on performance of specific clinical skills. Clinical skills evaluated were measurement of vital signs, aseptic non-touch technique, assisting with eating and drinking, and assisting with comfort and hygiene. Data were analysed utilising Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 19. The frequency of opportunities to practise skills in clinical placement was variable with some participants reporting that they never had opportunity to practise essential skills. Similarly the level of supervision and assessment was also inconsistent suggesting that participants frequently practised clinical skills unsupervised without being assessed as competent. Inconsistencies in clinical skill development may lead to graduates who are not work ready and as a result, insufficient clinical competence potentially leads to unsafe practice and poor patient care. This calls for stronger partnerships between educators and clinical areas and the prioritisation of mentor preparation and education as well as organisational support in terms of mentor workload planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. DNA damage in human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA light used in clinical PUVA treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredberg, A.

    1981-06-01

    Human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with a clinically used UVA light source. The doses (1.1 and 3 J/cm2) were similar to those reaching the dermis during clinical PUVA treatment of psoriasis. DNA strand breaks, as determined by alkaline elution, were formed in a dose-dependent way and disappeared within 1 hr of postincubation at 37 degrees C. These findings have clinical implications since UVA-induced DNA damage may be accompanied by mutagenic and tumor promoting effects.

  19. XB130 expression in human osteosarcoma: a clinical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Ruiguo; Liu, Zhaolong; Hao, Fengyun; Huang, Hai; Guo, Wenchen

    2015-01-01

    Identifying prognostic factors for osteosarcoma (OS) aids in the selection of patients who require more aggressive management. XB130 is a newly characterized adaptor protein that was reported to be a prognostic factor of certain tumor types. However, the association between XB130 expression and the prognosis of OS remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the association between XB130 expression and clinicopathologic features and prognosis in patients suffering OS, and further investigated its potential role on OS cells in vitro and vivo. A retrospective immunohistochemical study of XB130 was performed on archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens from 60 pairs of osteosarcoma and noncancerous bone tissues, and compared the expression of XB130 with clinicopathological parameters. We then investigate the effect of XB130 sliencing on invasion in vitro and lung metastasis in vivo of the human OS cell line. Immunohistochemical assays revealed that XB130 expression in OS tissues was significantly higher than that in corresponding noncancerous bone tissues (P=0.001). In addition, high XB130 expression more frequently occurred in OS tissues with advanced clinical stage (P=0.002) and positive distant metastasis (P=0.001). Moreover, OS patients with high XB130 expression had significantly shorter overall survival and disease-free survival (both Ptreatments. Furthermore, XB130 is the potential molecular target for OS therapy.

  20. An investigation about the effects of strategic human resources management on organization

    OpenAIRE

    TAJDAR, Samira; TAHERI LARI, Masoud; NAKHAIE, Shirin; JAVDANI, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Undoubtedly in today’s modern era only those organizations which have a competitive advantage can hold on their position on current intensive competition. in today’ s complicated and competitive world, strategic human resources management have a unique and special value. human resources as one of main principles of any organization can have only been effectively utilized, when it’s managed in a strategic manner. The main goal of this article is to investigate the effect of strategic...

  1. Investigation of signs of attachment disorders in sheltered children using human figure drawing

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Hottum Melani

    2010-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate signs of Attachment Disorders in sheltered children using the Human Figure Drawing. 25 children (15 males and 10 female), aged 4 to 12 years living in a sheltered home in São Paulo metropolitan area were assessed. The instrument used for assessment was the Human Figure Drawing (HFD), following Koppitz‟s 30 emotional indicators. Results showed that 48% of the assessed children present shyness, withdrawal and lack of aggression, as well as poor social in...

  2. Clinical significance of vasculogenic mimicry in human gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Qing-ping; Mu, Yong-gao; Zhang, Xiang-hen; Sai, Ke; Pang, Jesse Chung-Sean; Ng, Ho-Keung; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2011-11-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is known as non-endothelial tumor cell-lined microvascular channels in aggressive tumors. We have previously found the presence of VM in high-grade gliomas. In this study, we aimed to identify VM patterns in gliomas and to explore their clinical significance. Tumor samples as well as their detailed clinical/prognostic data were collected from 101 patients. Vasculogenic mimicry in the glioma samples was determined by dual staining for endothelial marker CD34 and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). Tumor samples were also immunohistochemically stained for Ki-67, VEGF, COX-2 and MMP-9. The association between VM and the clinical characteristics of the patients were analyzed. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were performed to compare survival times of the patients. Vasculogenic mimicry was present in 13 out of 101 samples. The higher grade gliomas had a higher incidence of VM than that of lower grade gliomas (P = 0.006). Vasculogenic mimicry channels were associated with the expression of COX-2 and MMP-9 (P age and preoperative epilepsy of the patients, or expression of Ki-67 and VEGF. However, patients with VM-positive gliomas survived a shorter period of time than those with VM negative gliomas (P = 0.027). Interestingly, in high-grade gliomas, the level of microvascular density was lower in VM positive tumors than those VM negative tumors (P = 0.039). Our results suggest that VM channels in gliomas correlate with increasing malignancy and higher aggressiveness, and may provide a complementation to the tumor's blood supply, especially in less vascularized regions, which may aid in the identification of glioma patients with a poorer prognosis.

  3. Clinical uses of melatonin: evaluation of human trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Barceló, E J; Mediavilla, M D; Tan, D X; Reiter, R J

    2010-01-01

    During the last 20 years, numerous clinical trials have examined the therapeutic usefulness of melatonin in different fields of medicine. The objective of this article is to review, in depth, the science regarding clinical trials performed to date. The efficacy of melatonin has been assessed as a treatment of ocular diseases, blood diseases, gastrointestinal tract diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infectious diseases, neurological diseases, sleep disturbances, aging and depression. Melatonin has been also used as a complementary treatment in anaesthesia, hemodialysis, in vitro fertilization and neonatal care. The conclusion of the current review is that the use of melatonin as an adjuvant therapy seems to be well funded for macular degeneration, glaucoma, protection of the gastric mucosa, irritable bowel syndrome, arterial hypertension, diabetes, side effects of chemotherapy and radiation in cancer patients or hemodialysis in patients with renal insufficiency and, especially, for sleep disorders of circadian etiology (jet lag, delayed sleep phase syndrome, sleep deterioration associated with aging, etc.) as well as in those related with neurological degenerative diseases (Alzheimer, etc.,) or Smith-Magenis syndrome. The utility of melatonin in anesthetic procedures has been also confirmed. More clinical studies are required to clarify whether, as the preliminary data suggest, melatonin is useful for treatment of fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infectious diseases, neoplasias or neonatal care. Preliminary data regarding the utility of melatonin in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis are either ambiguous or negative. Although in a few cases melatonin seems to aggravate some conditions, the vast majority of studies document the very low toxicity of melatonin over a wide range of doses.

  4. Human C-peptide. Part II: Clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beischer, W; Heinze, E; Keller, L; Raptis, S; Kerner, W; Pfeiffer, E F

    1976-08-01

    Human C-peptide is determined by radioimmunoassay. On gel filtration of serum from a healthy subject and from a patient with islet cell carcinoma, C-peptide (MW 3025) appears ahead of insulin (MW 5808) and shows much higher molar concentrations than the hormone. Human proinsulin cross-reacts with our antiserum to synthetic human C-peptide. On direct determination of immunomeasurable C-peptide (IMCP) in fasting serum of 25 healthy subjects we find an average of 1.8 (+/- 0.4) ng/ml, corresponding to 60.4 X 10(-11) Mol/l. The molar concentration is about five-fold as compared to IMI (immuno-measurable insulin). IMCP and IMI patterns are not identical on stimulation of beta-cell secretion in healthy subjects by i.v. glucose or glucose-glibenclamide. This is probably due to differences in peripheral metabolism of both compounds. We conclude from our results that C-peptide determined in peripheral venous serum is a better indicator of beta-cell secretion than is insulin. Among 26 insulin-treated juvenile diabetics 15 show not measurable and 11 subnormal IMCP levels in fasting serum. No rise in IMCP is found 1-2 h following breakfast. Four juvenile patients receiving no insulin in a phase of total diabetes remission have normal or raised fasting IMCP concentrations. Only 2 out of 24 adult diabetics (16 treated with insulin and 8 with tablets) show non-measurable fasting IMCP concentrations, in another 4 patients values are below and in the remaining 18 cases above 1 ng/ml serum. Stimulation of beta-cell secretion through glucose-glibenclamide is more or less impaired in all adult diabetics compared to the healthy subjects.

  5. Comparative investigations of Klebsiella species of clinical origin: plasmid patterns, biochemical reactions, antibiotic resistances and serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podschun, R; Heineken, P; Ullmann, U; Sonntag, H G

    1986-09-01

    A total of 124 K. pneumoniae and 52 K. oxytoca isolates obtained from clinical specimens was investigated for plasmid patterns, biochemical reactions, antibiotic resistances and serotypes regarding to the distribution and relationships of these characters. A great diversity of plasmid patterns, bio/serotypes and resistance patterns was revealed. About 90% of strains contained plasmid DNA and up to seven plasmid bands per isolate could be shown. For K. pneumoniae, serotype 7 and for K. oxytoca, type 55 were most common. In general, little difference between both species was found and characters were similarly distributed. With respect to the site of isolation, serotype 7 was predominating in K. pneumoniae strains from the respiratory tract. Highly multiple-resistant organism were found in the largest number in specimens from the urogenital tract, in the lowest in specimens from wounds. Extensive statistical analyses did not detect any relationship among the characters investigated.

  6. Technologies for Clinical Diagnosis Using Expired Human Breath Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalakkotur Lazar Mathew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review elucidates the technologies in the field of exhaled breath analysis. Exhaled breath gas analysis offers an inexpensive, noninvasive and rapid method for detecting a large number of compounds under various conditions for health and disease states. There are various techniques to analyze some exhaled breath gases, including spectrometry, gas chromatography and spectroscopy. This review places emphasis on some of the critical biomarkers present in exhaled human breath, and its related effects. Additionally, various medical monitoring techniques used for breath analysis have been discussed. It also includes the current scenario of breath analysis with nanotechnology-oriented techniques

  7. American alligator proximal pedal phalanges resemble human finger bones: Diagnostic criteria for forensic investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Joseph V; Binetti, Katie M

    2014-07-01

    A scientific approach to bone and tooth identification requires analysts to pursue the goal of empirical falsification. That is, they may attribute a questioned specimen to element and taxon only after having ruled out all other possible attributions. This requires analysts to possess a thorough understanding of both human and non-human osteology, particularly so for remains that may be morphologically similar across taxa. To date, forensic anthropologists have identified several potential 'mimics' for human skeletal remains, including pig teeth and bear paws. Here we document another possible mimic for isolated human skeletal elements--the proximal pedal phalanges of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) closely resemble the proximal and intermediate hand phalanges of adult humans. We detail morphological similarities and differences between these elements, with the goal of providing sufficient information for investigators to confidently falsify the hypothesis that a questioned phalanx is derived from an American alligator.

  8. The relevance of mouse models for investigating age-related bone loss in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilka, Robert L

    2013-10-01

    Mice are increasingly used for investigation of the pathophysiology of osteoporosis because their genome is easily manipulated, and their skeleton is similar to that of humans. Unlike the human skeleton, however, the murine skeleton continues to grow slowly after puberty and lacks osteonal remodeling of cortical bone. Yet, like humans, mice exhibit loss of cancellous bone, thinning of cortical bone, and increased cortical porosity with advancing age. Histologic evidence in mice and humans alike indicates that inadequate osteoblast-mediated refilling of resorption cavities created during bone remodeling is responsible. Mouse models of progeria also show bone loss and skeletal defects associated with senescence of early osteoblast progenitors. Additionally, mouse models of atherosclerosis, which often occurs in osteoporotic participants, also suffer bone loss, suggesting that common diseases of aging share pathophysiological pathways. Knowledge of the causes of skeletal fragility in mice should therefore be applicable to humans if inherent limitations are recognized.

  9. Investigation of human body potential measured by a non-contact measuring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Norimitsu

    2016-12-07

    A human body is occasionally electrified in a room. This charged object will be a source of electrostatic accidents, including the malfunction of electronic equipment. Hence, prevention of these accidents is required. Accidents occasionally occur, even though antistatic clothes and shoes are used. One of the causes for these accidents is that there is a lack of the preventive measures. This situation occurs when using, for example, unconductive wax. In this study, human body potential (voltage) is measured using a non-contact measuring system. An investigation of the human body's voltage when using this system is conducted. The result demonstrates that the voltage of a human body wearing antistatic clothes and shoes or light clothes and slippers exceeds a malfunctioning voltage of a microelectronics device when the body walks on floors. Thus, accidents may occur even if a human body wearing the antistatic clothes walks on flooring. These results will be useful in estimating determination whether electrostatic accidents occur or not.

  10. Clinical manifestations of human papillomavirus infection in nongenital sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, J L; Rasmussen, J E

    1991-04-01

    Our knowledge of warts dates thousands of years. Most warts represent no more than a transient infection in the hands and feet of children and adults. With the relatively recent medical advances permitting the prolonged survival of immunocompromised hosts, however, HPV-induced lesions have become an important problem. In these patients, lesions represent a recurring, intractable infection that predisposes the patient to the development of skin cancer. Such problems have been appreciated for some time in patients with EV. Newer laboratory techniques have led to an increasing number of clinical entities linked with an HPV cause in the nonimmunosuppressed host. Although evidence incriminating HPV as a causative factor for genital cancers of the cervix and the skin continues to mount, such evidence for nongenital Bowen's disease, certain squamous cell carcinomas of the skin, keratoacanthomas, and other tumors of the skin also has begun to grow. It is to be hoped that continued advances in molecular biologic techniques will further delineate the relationship between HPV and these conditions, lead to an HPV classification scheme that is more utilitarian from a clinical point of view, and ultimately lead to improved treatment.

  11. Advances in understanding of mammalian penile evolution, human penile anatomy and human erection physiology: clinical implications for physicians and surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Liu, Shih-Ping; Hsu, Geng-Long; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Molodysky, Eugen; Chen, Ying-Hui; Yu, Hong-Jeng

    2012-07-01

    Recent studies substantiate a model of the tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa as a bi-layered structure with a 360° complete inner circular layer and a 300° incomplete outer longitudinal coat spanning from the bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus proximally and extending continuously into the distal ligament within the glans penis. The anatomical location and histology of the distal ligament invites convincing parallels with the quadrupedal os penis and therefore constitutes potential evidence of the evolutionary process. In the corpora cavernosa, a chamber design is responsible for facilitating rigid erections. For investigating its venous factors exclusively, hemodynamic studies have been performed on both fresh and defrosted human male cadavers. In each case, a rigid erection was unequivocally attainable following venous removal. This clearly has significant ramifications in relation to penile venous surgery and its role in treating impotent patients. One deep dorsal vein, 2 cavernosal veins and 2 pairs of para-arterial veins (as opposed to 1 single vein) are situated between Buck's fascia and the tunica albuginea. These newfound insights into penile tunical, venous anatomy and erection physiology were inspired by and, in turn, enhance clinical applications routinely encountered by physicians and surgeons, such as penile morphological reconstruction, penile implantation and penile venous surgery.

  12. Analysis of Safety from a Human Clinical Trial with Pterostilbene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Riche

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the safety of long-term pterostilbene administration in humans. Methodology. The trial was a prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial enrolling patients with hypercholesterolemia (defined as a baseline total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL and/or baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥100 mg/dL. Eighty subjects were divided equally into one of four groups: (1 pterostilbene 125 mg twice daily, (2 pterostilbene 50 mg twice daily, (3 pterostilbene 50 mg + grape extract (GE 100 mg twice daily, and (4 matching placebo twice daily for 6–8 weeks. Safety markers included biochemical and subjective measures. Linear mixed models were used to estimate primary safety measure treatment effects. Results. The majority of patients completed the trial (91.3%. The average age was 54 years. The majority of patients were females (71% and Caucasians (70%. There were no adverse drug reactions (ADRs on hepatic, renal, or glucose markers based on biochemical analysis. There were no statistically significant self-reported or major ADRs. Conclusion. Pterostilbene is generally safe for use in humans up to 250 mg/day.

  13. Analysis of safety from a human clinical trial with pterostilbene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Daniel M; McEwen, Corey L; Riche, Krista D; Sherman, Justin J; Wofford, Marion R; Deschamp, David; Griswold, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the safety of long-term pterostilbene administration in humans. Methodology. The trial was a prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial enrolling patients with hypercholesterolemia (defined as a baseline total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL and/or baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥100 mg/dL). Eighty subjects were divided equally into one of four groups: (1) pterostilbene 125 mg twice daily, (2) pterostilbene 50 mg twice daily, (3) pterostilbene 50 mg + grape extract (GE) 100 mg twice daily, and (4) matching placebo twice daily for 6-8 weeks. Safety markers included biochemical and subjective measures. Linear mixed models were used to estimate primary safety measure treatment effects. Results. The majority of patients completed the trial (91.3%). The average age was 54 years. The majority of patients were females (71%) and Caucasians (70%). There were no adverse drug reactions (ADRs) on hepatic, renal, or glucose markers based on biochemical analysis. There were no statistically significant self-reported or major ADRs. Conclusion. Pterostilbene is generally safe for use in humans up to 250 mg/day.

  14. Adenocarcinoma in situ and associated human papillomavirus type distribution observed in two clinical trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ault, Kevin A; Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K;

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysis...

  15. Clinical comparison of human and canine atopic dermatitis using human diagnostic criteria (Japanese Dermatological Association, 2009): proposal of provisional diagnostic criteria for canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Yuri; Nagata, Masahiko; Murayama, Nobuo; Nanko, Hiroko; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease encountered in both humans and dogs. Canine AD can be used in the analysis of naturally occurring AD; however, details of clinical comparison have been lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare those clinical features using the human diagnostic criteria (Japanese Dermatological Association, 2009). Fifty-one dogs with canine AD were evaluated by the human criteria. Prior to this study, canine AD was basically diagnosed by the fulfillment of two authentic canine AD criteria and a positive reaction against Dermatophagoides farinae in serum immunoglobulin E levels and/or in intradermal tests. Among the human AD criteria items, behavior corresponding to pruritus was observed in all 51 dogs. Skin lesions corresponding to eczematous dermatitis were seen in 50 dogs, and symmetrical distribution of skin lesions was noted in all 51 dogs. A chronic or chronically relapsing course was observed in 50 dogs. Based on these results, the concordance rate for the criteria was 96% (49/51). Differential diagnoses of AD were also investigated in the same manner. The concordance rate for the criteria was 0% (0/69) in scabies, 2% (1/50) in pyoderma, 0% (0/50) in demodicosis, 0% (0/9) in cutaneous lymphoma, 0% (0/2) in ichthyosis, 25% (2/7) in flea allergy, 48% (24/50) in seborrheic dermatitis and 75% (3/4) in food allergy. Canine AD is thus indicated as a valuable counterpart to human AD in clinical aspects. In addition, the human AD criteria could be applicable, with some modification, as provisional diagnostic criteria for canine AD.

  16. [Introduction of neuroethics: out of clinic, beyond academia in human brain research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Tamami; Sakura, Osamu

    2008-11-01

    Higher cognitive function in human brain is one of well-developed fields of neuroscience research in the 21st century. Especially functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near infrared recording system have brought so many non-clinical researchers whose background is such as cognitive psychology, economics, politics, pedagogy, and so on, to the human brain mapping study. Authors have introduced the ethical issues related to incidental findings during the fMRI recording for non-clinical purpose, which is a typical problem derived from such expanded human brain research under non clinical condition, that is, neuroethics. In the present article we would introduce neuroethical issues in contexts of "out of clinic" and "beyond academia".

  17. Investigation of paramedics' compliance with clinical practice guidelines for the management of chest pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Figgis, Ken

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Acute coronary syndromes remain a leading cause of preventable early deaths. However, previous studies have indicated that paramedics\\' compliance with chest pain protocols is suboptimal and that many patients do not receive the benefits of appropriate prehospital treatment. AIMS: To evaluate paramedics\\' level of compliance with national clinical practice guidelines and to investigate why, in certain circumstances, they may deviate from the clinical guidelines. SETTING: The Health Service Executive Mid-Western Regional Ambulance Service which serves a mixed urban and rural population across three counties in the west of Ireland. METHOD: A retrospective review of completed ambulance Patient Care Report Forms was conducted for all adult patients with non-traumatic chest pain treated between 1 December 2007 and 31 March 2008. During the same study period, paramedics were asked to complete a prospective questionnaire survey investigating the rationale behind their treatment decisions, their estimation of patient risk and their attitudes towards the clinical practice guidelines and training. RESULTS: 382 completed Patient Care Report Forms were identified for patients with chest pain, of whom 84.8% received ECG monitoring, 75.9% were given oxygen, 44.8% were treated with sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and 50.8% were treated with aspirin. Only 20.4% of patients had a prehospital 12-lead ECG recorded. 58 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 15%); 64% of respondents said they had received insufficient training to identify ECG abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: Prehospital treatment with oxygen, aspirin, sublingual GTN and ECG monitoring remains underused by paramedics, even though only a small number of patients had documented contraindications to their use. The small number of patients who received a prehospital 12-lead ECG is a cause of particular concern and suggests that incomplete patient assessment may contribute to undertreatment

  18. Effect of human papilloma virus expression on clinical course of laryngeal papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Moon; Cho, Nam Hoon; Choi, Hong Shik; Kim, Young Ho; Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Min, Hyun Jin; Kim, Se-Heon

    2008-10-01

    Our observations suggest that human papilloma virus (HPV) 6/11 is the main causative agent of laryngeal papilloma and that detection of active HPV DNA expression may be helpful in identifying patients with aggressive recurrent laryngeal papilloma. HPV is assumed to be the main causative agent of this disease. We investigated the expression of the entire genotype of HPV in cases of laryngeal papilloma and correlated their expression with the clinical course of the disease. Seventy cases of laryngeal papilloma were evaluated for the presence of the HPV genome by in situ hybridization (ISH) using wide-spectrum HPV DNA probe. Specific types of HPV infection were determined by DNA ISH using type-specific HPV DNA probes (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33). Separate analyses were conducted comparing viral types, frequency of recurrences and duration of disease-free periods. We detected HPV DNA in 40 of the 70 laryngeal papilloma cases (57%). In particular, HPV DNA was detected in 75% of the juvenile types. There were significant associations between HPV and laryngeal papilloma (p<0.01). Among the HPV-positive cases, major specific types were HPV 6/11 (97%). Significant associations were also noted between viral expression and clinical course.

  19. Pericyte plasticity - comparative investigation of the angiogenic and multilineage potential of pericytes from different human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, M; Bara, J J; Sprecher, C M; Menzel, U; Jalowiec, J M; Osinga, R; Scherberich, A; Alini, M; Verrier, S

    2016-04-10

    Pericyte recruitment is essential for the stability of newly formed vessels. It was also suggested that pericytes represent common ancestor cells giving rise to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the adult. Here, we systematically investigated pericytes and MSCs from different human tissues in terms of their angiogenic and multilineage differentiation potential in vitro in order to assess the suitability of the different cell types for the regeneration of vascularised tissues. Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS®) was used to enrich CD34-CD146+ pericytes from adipose tissue (AT) and bone marrow (BM). The multilineage potential of pericytes was assessed by testing their capability to differentiate towards osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineage in vitro. Pericytes and endothelial cells were co-seeded on Matrigel™ and the formation of tube-like structures was examined to study the angiogenic potential of pericytes. MSCs from AT and BM were used as controls. CD34-CD146+ cells were successfully enriched from AT and BM. Only BM-derived cells exhibited trilineage differentiation potential. AT-derived cells displayed poor chondrogenic differentiation upon stimulation with transforming growth factor-β1. Interestingly, osteogenic differentiation was more efficient in AT-PC and BM-PC compared to the respective full MSC population. Matrigel™ assays revealed that pericytes from all tissues integrated into tube-like structures. We show that MACS®-enriched pericytes from BM and AT have the potential to regenerate tissues of different mesenchymal lineages and support neovascularisation. MACS® represents a simple enrichment strategy of cells, which is of particular interest for clinical application. Finally, our results suggest that the regenerative potential of pericytes depends on their tissue origin, which is an important consideration for future studies.

  20. The research subject advocate at minority Clinical Research Centers: an added resource for protection of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easa, David; Norris, Keith; Hammatt, Zoë; Kim, Kari; Hernandez, Esther; Kato, Kambrie; Balaraman, Venkataraman; Ho, Tammy; Shomaker, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    In early 2001, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) created the research subject advocate (RSA) position as an additional resource for human subjects protection at NIH-funded Clinical Research Centers (CRCs) to enhance the protection of human participants in clinical research studies. We describe the RSA position in the context of clinical research, with a particular emphasis on the role of the RSA in two of the five CRCs funded by the NIH Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) program. Through participation in protocol development, informed consent procedures, study implementation and follow-up with adverse events, the RSA works closely with research investigators and their staff to protect study participants. The RSA also conducts workshops, training and education sessions, and consultation with investigators to foster enhanced communication and adherence to ethical standards and safety regulations. Although we cannot yet provide substantive evidence of positive outcomes, this article illuminates the value of the RSA position in ensuring that safety of research participants is accorded the highest priority at CRCs. On the basis of initial results, we conclude that the RSA is an effective mechanism for achieving the NIH goal of maintaining the utmost scrutiny of protocols involving human subjects.

  1. Enhanced expression of resistin-like molecule beta in human colon cancer and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Duan; Tong, Qiang-Song; Weng, Mi-Xia; He, Jun; Lv, Qing; Pu, Jia-Rui; Jiang, Guo-Song; Cai, Jia-Bin; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Xiao-Hua

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated that resistin-like molecule beta (RELM beta), an intestinal goblet cell-specific protein, is markedly increased in the intestinal tumors of min mice and over-expressed in a human colon cancer cell line. We hypothesized that RELM beta might be enhanced in human colon cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical importance of RELM beta expression in colon cancer patients and to correlate its expression with various clinicopathological parameters, upstream regulatory molecule expression, tumor proliferative capacity, and patients' survival. Of the 80 colon cancer patients studied, 65 (81.25%) tested positive for RELM beta, mainly in the cytoplasm of colon mucosa. Contrasting sharply with the strongly RELM beta-positive tumors, normal colon mucous membrane was negative or weakly positive. RELM beta positivity in colon cancer was correlated with histological grade of differentiation and lymph node metastasis, but not with age, gender, tumor location and size, tumor infiltration, Dukes' stage, liver metastasis, and venous invasion. RELM beta expression was significantly correlated with the expression of transcription factor CDX-2 (P 0.05). The mean postoperative survival time (2.76 years) of RELM beta-positive patients was significantly longer than that (1.26 years) of RELM beta-negative patients (P = 0.032). These findings support evidence of the enhanced RELM beta expression in colon cancer patients and suggest that further investigation is warranted to explore the role of RELM beta in colon cancer.

  2. Clinical features of pure red cell aplasia associated with human parvovirus B19 infection after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Dali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features of patients with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA associated with human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19 infection after liver transplantation. MethodsThe clinical data of 420 patients who underwent liver transplantation in 302 Hospital of PLA from July 2007 to July 2016 and were followed up regularly were collected, and among these patients, five had a progressive reduction in hemoglobin (Hb level within a short period of time. Bone marrow cytological examination showed erythropoiesis disorders and positive HPV B19 IgM, and the patients were diagnosed with PRCA after the exclusion of other causes. The patients were given human gamma-globulin, glucocorticoids, and adjustment of immunosuppressants. The patients′ clinical manifestations during treatment and the changes in reticulocyte count (RC, Hb, white blood cell count (WBC, platelet count (PLT, and myelogram findings determined by peripheral blood cell analysis were observed, as well as the changes in liver and renal function parameters. ResultsAfter the multimodality therapy using human gamma-globulin, glucocorticoids, and red blood cell infusion, the five patients had significant alleviation in the symptoms of weakness, short breath, and dizziness, and the peripheral blood cell analysis showed recovery of Hb and RC, suggesting that anemia was corrected. ConclusionAs for patients with PRCA associated with HPV B19 infection, early diagnosis and treatment with human gamma-globulin and glucocorticoids can achieve a good therapeutic effect.

  3. Study of an investigation on factors influencing human resources productivity in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ghasemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human resources development is one of the most important components of any organization and detecting important factors influencing human resources management plays an essential role in the success of the firms. In this study, we investigated different factors influencing human resources productivity of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences staff. Method: The present research was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was calculated 208 individuals. To access information about the human resource productivity, a valid and reliable questionnaire was used. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Pearson correlation was used for statistical analysis of the data (p=0.05. Results:The results showed that there was a statistically significant relationship (p-value<0.001 between human resources productivity and factors affecting the productivity of human resources (motivational factors, leadership style, creativity and innovation, general and applied education, and competitive spirit. Motivational factors (r =0.89 and general education (r =0.65 had the most and the least effects on human resources productivity. Conclusion: Considering the fact that motivational factors were the most effective factors on human resource productivity, we recommend that managers should care more than before about this factor; also, in order to motivate the employees, they should consider the staff’s individual differences.

  4. Social Engineering: I-E based Model of Human Weakness for Attack and Defense Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Social engineering is the attack aimed to manipulate dupe to divulge sensitive information or take actions to help the adversary bypass the secure perimeter in front of the information-related resources so that the attacking goals can be completed. Though there are a number of security tools, such as firewalls and intrusion detection systems which are used to protect machines from being attacked, widely accepted mechanism to prevent dupe from fraud is lacking. However, the human element is often the weakest link of an information security chain, especially, in a human-centered environment. In this paper, we reveal that the human psychological weaknesses result in the main vulnerabilities that can be exploited by social engineering attacks. Also, we capture two essential levels, internal characteristics of human nature and external circumstance influences, to explore the root cause of the human weaknesses. We unveil that the internal characteristics of human nature can be converted into weaknesses by external circumstance influences. So, we propose the I-E based model of human weakness for social engineering investigation. Based on this model, we analyzed the vulnerabilities exploited by different techniques of social engineering, and also, we conclude several defense approaches to fix the human weaknesses. This work can help the security researchers to gain insights into social engineering from a different perspective, and in particular, enhance the current and future research on social engineering defense mechanisms.

  5. A Formal Investigation of Human Spatial Control Skills: Mathematical Formalization, Skill Development, and Skill Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin

    Spatial control behaviors account for a large proportion of human everyday activities from normal daily tasks, such as reaching for objects, to specialized tasks, such as driving, surgery, or operating equipment. These behaviors involve intensive interactions within internal processes (i.e. cognitive, perceptual, and motor control) and with the physical world. This dissertation builds on a concept of interaction pattern and a hierarchical functional model. Interaction pattern represents a type of behavior synergy that humans coordinates cognitive, perceptual, and motor control processes. It contributes to the construction of the hierarchical functional model that delineates humans spatial control behaviors as the coordination of three functional subsystems: planning, guidance, and tracking/pursuit. This dissertation formalizes and validates these two theories and extends them for the investigation of human spatial control skills encompassing development and assessment. Specifically, this dissertation first presents an overview of studies in human spatial control skills encompassing definition, characteristic, development, and assessment, to provide theoretical evidence for the concept of interaction pattern and the hierarchical functional model. The following, the human experiments for collecting motion and gaze data and techniques to register and classify gaze data, are described. This dissertation then elaborates and mathematically formalizes the hierarchical functional model and the concept of interaction pattern. These theories then enables the construction of a succinct simulation model that can reproduce a variety of human performance with a minimal set of hypotheses. This validates the hierarchical functional model as a normative framework for interpreting human spatial control behaviors. The dissertation then investigates human skill development and captures the emergence of interaction pattern. The final part of the dissertation applies the hierarchical

  6. Benchmarking human protein complexes to investigate drug-related systems and evaluate predicted protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wu

    Full Text Available Protein complexes are key entities to perform cellular functions. Human diseases are also revealed to associate with some specific human protein complexes. In fact, human protein complexes are widely used for protein function annotation, inference of human protein interactome, disease gene prediction, and so on. Therefore, it is highly desired to build an up-to-date catalogue of human complexes to support the research in these applications. Protein complexes from different databases are as expected to be highly redundant. In this paper, we designed a set of concise operations to compile these redundant human complexes and built a comprehensive catalogue called CHPC2012 (Catalogue of Human Protein Complexes. CHPC2012 achieves a higher coverage for proteins and protein complexes than those individual databases. It is also verified to be a set of complexes with high quality as its co-complex protein associations have a high overlap with protein-protein interactions (PPI in various existing PPI databases. We demonstrated two distinct applications of CHPC2012, that is, investigating the relationship between protein complexes and drug-related systems and evaluating the quality of predicted protein complexes. In particular, CHPC2012 provides more insights into drug development. For instance, proteins involved in multiple complexes (the overlapping proteins are potential drug targets; the drug-complex network is utilized to investigate multi-target drugs and drug-drug interactions; and the disease-specific complex-drug networks will provide new clues for drug repositioning. With this up-to-date reference set of human protein complexes, we believe that the CHPC2012 catalogue is able to enhance the studies for protein interactions, protein functions, human diseases, drugs, and related fields of research. CHPC2012 complexes can be downloaded from http://www1.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/xlli/CHPC2012/CHPC2012.htm.

  7. [Participation and support of clinical studies and other scientific investigations. Statement of the German Society for Pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röcken, C; Höfler, H; Hummel, M; Meyermann, R; Zietz, C; Schirmacher, P

    2013-09-01

    Clinical studies and preclinical investigations are essential in order to test new therapies and diagnostics with the aim of sustained improvement in the treatment of patients. Fortunately, the number of clinical studies is continuously increasing and pathology and tissue-based research are included more often. The German Society for Pathology (DGP) and the pathologists it represents want to and can support this process and our clinical partners as best as possible as an equal partner. With our technologies and our specific expertise we can make a substantial contribution to the quality and the success of preclinical investigations, clinical studies and implementation of the results into clinical pathological diagnostics. In order to support this process the DGP has formulated a statement on the participation and support of clinical studies and other scientific investigations.

  8. Clinical trials of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor in human periodontal disease. SDD Clinical Research Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, R A

    1999-06-30

    After demonstration by Golub et al. of the ability of the tetracyclines to inhibit elevated collagenolytic activity in animal models of periodontal diseases, a clinical development program was initiated to demonstrate the potential of a subantimicrobial dose of doxycycline (SDD) to augment and maintain the improvements in clinical parameters of adult periodontitis (AP) afforded by conventional nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Clinical trials were carried out in which a number of different SDD dosing regimens and placebo were compared in patients administered a variety of adjunctive nonsurgical therapies. Measured parameters included levels of collagenase activity in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and gingival specimens, clinical attachment levels (cALv), probing pocket depths (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and subtraction radiographic measurements of alveolar bone height. When used as an adjunct to either scaling and root planing or supragingival scaling and dental prophylaxis, SDD was shown to reduce collagenase levels in both GCF and gingival biopsies, to augment and maintain cALv gains and PD reductions, to reduce BOP, and to prevent loss of alveolar bone height. These clinical responses arose in the absence of any significant effects on the subgingival microflora and without evidence of an increase in the incidence or severity of adverse reactions relative to the control groups. It is proposed that one of the mechanisms of action of SDD is as an inhibitor of pathologically elevated MMPs, including neutrophil and bone cell collagenases (MMP-8 and MMP-13), which are associated with the host response in chronic AP, and that SDD provides a novel systemic approach to the management of AP.

  9. New paleoradiological investigations of ancient human remains from North West Lombardy archaeological excavations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Marta; Borgo, Melania; Armocida, Giuseppe; Nicosia, Luca; Ferioli, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Since its birth in 1895, radiology has been used to study ancient mummies. The purpose of this article is to present paleoradiological investigations conducted on several medieval human remains in Varese province. Anthropological (generic identification) and paleopathological analyses were carried out with the support of diagnostic imaging (X-ray and CT scans). Human remains were discovered during excavations of medieval archaeological sites in northwest Lombardy. Classical physical anthropological methods were used for the macroscopic identification of the human remains. X-ray and CT scans were performed on the same scanner (16-layer Hitachi Eclos 16 X-ray equipment). Results Radiological analysis permitted investigating (1) the sex, (2) age of death, (3) type of trauma, (4) therapeutic interventions and (5) osteomas in ancient human remains. In particular, X-ray and CT examinations showed dimorphic facial traits on the mummified skull, and the same radiological approaches allowed determining the age at death from a mummified lower limb. CT analyses allow investigating different types of traumatic lesions in skulls and postcranial skeleton portions and reconstructing the gait and functional outcomes of a fractured femur. Moreover, one case of possible Gardner’s syndrome (GS) was postulated from observing multiple osteomas in an ancient skull. Among the medical tests available to the clinician, radiology is the most appropriate first-line procedure for a diagnostic approach to ancient human remains because it can be performed without causing any significant damage to the specimen.

  10. New paleoradiological investigations of ancient human remains from North West Lombardy archaeological excavations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licata, Marta; Borgo, Melania; Armocida, Giuseppe; Nicosia, Luca; Ferioli, Elena [University of Insubria (Varese), Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, Varese (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Since its birth in 1895, radiology has been used to study ancient mummies. The purpose of this article is to present paleoradiological investigations conducted on several medieval human remains in Varese province. Anthropological (generic identification) and paleopathological analyses were carried out with the support of diagnostic imaging (X-ray and CT scans). Human remains were discovered during excavations of medieval archaeological sites in northwest Lombardy. Classical physical anthropological methods were used for the macroscopic identification of the human remains. X-ray and CT scans were performed on the same scanner (16-layer Hitachi Eclos 16 X-ray equipment). Radiological analysis permitted investigating (1) the sex, (2) age of death, (3) type of trauma, (4) therapeutic interventions and (5) osteomas in ancient human remains. In particular, X-ray and CT examinations showed dimorphic facial traits on the mummified skull, and the same radiological approaches allowed determining the age at death from a mummified lower limb. CT analyses allow investigating different types of traumatic lesions in skulls and postcranial skeleton portions and reconstructing the gait and functional outcomes of a fractured femur. Moreover, one case of possible Gardner's syndrome (GS) was postulated from observing multiple osteomas in an ancient skull. Among the medical tests available to the clinician, radiology is the most appropriate first-line procedure for a diagnostic approach to ancient human remains because it can be performed without causing any significant damage to the specimen. (orig.)

  11. Clinical implications of microRNAs in human glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eMizoguchi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is one of the most common and dismal brain tumors in adults. Further elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of GBM is mandatory to improve the overall survival of patients. A novel small non-coding RNA molecule, microRNA (miRNA, appears to represent one of the most attractive target molecules contributing to the pathogenesis of various types of tumors. Recent global analyses have revealed that several miRNAs are clinically implicated in GBM, with some reports indicating the association of miRNA dysregulation with acquired temozolomide (TMZ resistance. More recent studies have revealed that miRNAs could play a role in cancer stem cell (CSC properties, contributing to treatment resistance. In addition, greater impact might be expected from miRNA-targeted therapies based on tumor-derived exosomes that contain numerous functional miRNAs, which could be transferred between tumor cells and surrounding structures. Tumor-derived miRNAs are now considered to be a novel molecular mechanism promoting the progression of GBM. Establishment of miRNA-targeted therapies based on miRNA dysregulation of CSCs could provide effective therapeutic strategies for TMZ-resistant GBM. Recent progress has revealed that miRNAs are not only putative biological markers for diagnosis, but also one of the most promising targets for GBM treatment. Herein, we summarize the translational aspects of miRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of GBM.

  12. CLINICAL OBSERVATION ON VERTICAL TRANSMISSION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐倏燊; 刘兰青; 吕绳敏; 任舒月

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To observe the possibility of maternal-fetal vertical transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV)via amniotic fluid. Subjects and methods. Specimens of cervical secretions from 30 pregnant women were obtained during the third trimester before rupture of membrane, and specimens of pharyngeal secretsions of their neonates weee obtained 12-48 h after birth. Amniotic fluids were collected in 13 pregnant women during cesarean section. The presence of HPV types 6,11,16,18,31,33,35,38 deoxyribonucleic acid were detected by consensus polymerase chain reaction. Remits. HPV deoxyribonucleic acid was found in 18 cervical secretions, 14 pharyngeal secretions and in 8 amniotic fluids, the positive rate was 53. 3%, 46.7%, 23. 1% respectively. The pharyngeal secretion was also HPV positive in one of the three neonates from the amnlotic fluid positive mothers. Conclusion. The results indic.am that HPV can be transmitted in utezo through amniotic fluid and cesarean section can not protect the neonates against vertical transmission completely.

  13. Clinical Features, Presence of Human Herpesvirus-8 and Treatment Results in Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Su

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Classic Kaposi sarcoma (KS occurs predominantly among the elderly, with Jews, Italians and Greeks. Classic KS has been seen relatively frequently in Turkey. Our aim was to evaluate the demographic, clinical features of Kaposi sarcoma and etiopathological role of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8. Treatment results of 18 classic Kaposi’s sarcoma were also concluded.Material and Method: Eighteen cases of classic Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed as clinically and histopathologically between January 2001 and August 2008 in our dermatology department were taken to this study. Demographic, clinical features and treatment results were reviewed retrospectively in all patients. HHV-8 was investigated in the lesional skin of 7 patients.Results: A male/female ratio of 2/1 was found. Mean age at diagnosis was 67.2 (37-94 years. Bilaterally lower extremities were involved in 15 patients (83.3%, the trunk was involved in 3 patients (16.6%. Plaques and nodules were the common type of lesions (66.6% and 55.5%. Nine patients had no symptoms (50%. Edema was the most common symptom (38.8%. A second primary malignancy was found in 2 patients (11.1%. HHV-8 was detected in 6 of the 7 patients(85.7%. Majority of the patients were treated with interferon alfa (subcutaneously and cryotherapy as a monotherapy or a combination therapy. Imiquimod was the second agent in combined treatment (27.7%. Conclusion: We suggest that interferon alfa and imiquimod can be used as first line therapy agents with their antiviral and immunmodulatuar features in the treatment of KKS. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 122-6

  14. How to achieve safe, high-quality clinical studies with non-Medicinal Investigational Products? A practical guideline by using intra-bronchial carbon nanoparticles as case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M; Kooyman, P J; Makkee, M; van der Zee, J S; Sterk, P J; van Dijk, J; Kemper, E M

    2016-08-19

    Clinical studies investigating medicinal products need to comply with laws concerning good clinical practice (GCP) and good manufacturing practice (GMP) to guarantee the quality and safety of the product, to protect the health of the participating individual and to assure proper performance of the study. However, there are no specific regulations or guidelines for non-Medicinal Investigational Products (non-MIPs) such as allergens, enriched food supplements, and air pollution components. As a consequence, investigators will avoid clinical research and prefer preclinical models or in vitro testing for e.g. toxicology studies. 1) briefly review the current guidelines and regulations for Investigational Medicinal Products; 2) present a standardised approach to ensure the quality and safety of non-MIPs in human in vivo research; and 3) discuss some lessons we have learned. We propose a practical line of approach to compose a clarifying product dossier (PD), comprising the description of the production process, the analysis of the raw and final product, toxicological studies, and a thorough risk-benefit-analysis. This is illustrated by an example from a human in vivo research model to study exposure to air pollutants, by challenging volunteers with a suspension of carbon nanoparticles (the component of ink cartridges for laser printers). With this novel risk-based approach, the members of competent authorities are provided with standardised information on the quality of the product in relation to the safety of the participants, and the scientific goal of the study.

  15. Epidemiological investigation of a human leptospirosis case reported in a suburban area near Marseille

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dupouey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has been re-emerging in both developed and developing countries, including in Europe, where the phenomenon has notably been associated with urban transmission. In this work, we describe an epidemiological investigation that demonstrated a case of human infection due to peri-urban transmission of Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae in southeastern France.

  16. THE DOLMEN KOLIKHO, WESTERN CAUCASUS : ISOTOPIC INVESTIGATION OF FUNERAL PRACTICE AND HUMAN MOBILITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifonov, V. A.; Zaitseva, G. I.; van der Plicht, J.; Burova, N. D.; Bogomolov, E. S.; Sementsov, A. A.; Lokhova, O. V.; Boaretto, E.; Rebollo Franco, N.R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the dolmen known as Kolikho (Black Sea coast, Russia), discovered accidentally in 2008. It is a unique, undisturbed megalithic structure. The burial chamber contains disarticulated human remains from about 70 individuals. Radiocarbon dating shows that the dolmen was in use between ro

  17. Stable lead isotopes in environmental health with emphasis on human investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulson, Brian [Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia); CSIRO Exploration and Mining North Ryde NSW 1670 (Australia)], E-mail: bgulson@gse.mq.edu.au

    2008-08-01

    There has been widespread use of stable lead isotopes in the earth sciences for more than 40 years focussed on the origin and age of rocks and minerals with lesser application in environmental investigations where the emphasis has been directed typically to the source of lead in environmental media such as air, water and soils. In contrast, the number of environmental health investigations focussed on humans (and primates) is limited in spite of the demonstrated utility of the approach in pioneering studies in the early 1970's. This paper reviews the status of lead isotopes in human investigations especially over the past 2 decades, the period over which most activity has taken place. Following a brief introduction to the method, examples are provided illustrating the use of lead isotopes in a wide spectrum of activities including sources and pathways of lead in diverse environments from urban to mining communities, various applications associated with pregnancy, the contribution of bone lead to blood lead including in the elderly, the half-life of lead in blood, and lead in bones and other media. A brief outline of critical research on non-human primates is also given. The lead isotope method is a powerful technique for tracing lead and could be employed more widely in human investigations.

  18. Investigating the Effectiveness of an Educational Card Game for Learning How Human Immunology Is Regulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, TzuFen; Cheng, Meng-Tzu; Lin, Shu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in an attempt to investigate the effectiveness of an educational card game we developed for learning human immunology. Two semesters of evaluation were included to examine the impact of the game on students' understanding and perceptions of the game-based instruction. Ninety-nine senior high school students (11th graders)…

  19. The clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with human granulocytic anaplasmosis in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyu; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Wenjie; Guo, Dongmei; Huang, Shiang; Jie, Shenghua

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), a tick-borne disease caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum, has increased across the world. However, information on HGA is lacking in China. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical features and outcomes of HGA patients in China. A total of 83 patients with HGA from the provinces of Hubei and Henan in China, who were admitted to Union Hospital between March 2009 and September 2010, were included in this study. We investigated the epidemiology, clinical features, laboratory markers, and therapeutic effects in these patients. We also analyzed life-threatening complications such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)/multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) following HGA and assessed the risk factors for a poor clinical outcome. In our study, an HGA outbreak peak was observed for the months May to August. The highest age-specific incidence occurred among the group of patients aged 50-59 years. With regard to patient occupation and pathological origin, we found that 73 of the 83 patients with HGA had a peasant occupation. With respect to symptoms, 45 patients had no complications and 38 patients diagnosed with HGA met SIRS criteria, of whom 25 rapidly developed MODS. The mortality for the entire cohort was 26.5%. The factors predictive of patients developing MODS and an adverse outcome were advanced age, disturbance of consciousness, highly elevated lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine, and aspartate aminotransferase levels, and the presence of SIRS. Moreover, MODS was found to be an independent predictor of death. In China, HGA patients had severe clinical symptoms and high rates of complications and mortality. These findings may provide useful information so that physicians will be on the alert for severe complications after a diagnosis of HGA; they will also be useful for optimizing supportive care for HGA-related critical illness. Prompt treatment

  20. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer: Prospects and Disappointments in Human Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William N. Rom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Decreasing the risk of lung cancer, or preventing its development in high-risk individuals, would have a huge impact on public health. The most effective means to decrease lung cancer incidence is to eliminate exposure to carcinogens. However, with recent advances in the understanding of pulmonary carcinogenesis and the identification of intermediate biomarkers, the prospects for the field of chemoprevention research have improved dramatically. Here we review the most recent research in lung cancer chemoprevention—focusing on those agents that have been investigated in human clinical trials. These agents fall into three major categories. First, oxidative stress plays an important role in pulmonary carcinogenesis; and therefore, antioxidants (including vitamins, selenium, green tea extracts, and isothiocyanates may be particularly effective in preventing the development of lung cancer. Second, inflammation is increasingly accepted as a crucial factor in carcinogenesis, and many investigators have focused on anti-inflammatory agents, such as glucocorticoids, NSAIDs, statins, and PPARγ agonists. Finally, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is recognized to play a central role in tobacco-induced carcinogenesis, and inhibitors of this pathway, including myoinositol and metformin, are promising agents for lung cancer prevention. Successful chemoprevention will likely require targeting of multiple pathways to carcinogenesis—both to minimize toxicity and maximize efficacy.

  1. Human tibial torsion - Morphometric assessment and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Gandhi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibial torsion is an important anatomical parameter in clinical practice and displays variability among individuals. These variations are extremely significant in view of alignment guides such as those related to rotational landmarks of tibia in total knee arthroplasty. Further, precise knowledge and information pertaining to angle of tibial torsion also helps in correction of traumatic malunion or congenital maltorsion of tibia. Methods: The present study was carried out to determine the angle of tibial torsion in 100 adult dry tibia bones in the Department of Anatomy, Government Medical College, Amritsar. The study group comprised 50 males and 50 females with equal number of right- and left-sided bones. The measurements were meticulously recorded and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The results were analyzed and discussed in the light of existing literature. Results: On the right side, it was found to be 29.84° ± 4.86°° (range = 22.00° -38.00° in males and 28.92° ± 5.10°° (range = 15.00°-38.00° in females. On the left side, it was found to be 28.00° ± 4.94°° (range = 20.00°-40.00°° in males and 28.12° ± 4.28°° (range = 20.00°-37.00°° in females. Conclusion: The present study is an endeavor to provide baseline data with reference to the angle of tibial torsion in the Indian population. The results of the study assume special importance in view of the technical advancements in reconstructive surgical procedures in orthopedic practice.

  2. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) of the human brain: technique, findings and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscox, Lucy V.; Johnson, Curtis L.; Barnhill, Eric; McGarry, Matt D. J.; Huston 3rd, John; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Starr, John M.; Roberts, Neil

    2016-12-01

    Neurological disorders are one of the most important public health concerns in developed countries. Established brain imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and x-ray computerised tomography (CT) have been essential in the identification and diagnosis of a wide range of disorders, although usually are insufficient in sensitivity for detecting subtle pathological alterations to the brain prior to the onset of clinical symptoms—at a time when prognosis for treatment is more favourable. The mechanical properties of biological tissue provide information related to the strength and integrity of the cellular microstructure. In recent years, mechanical properties of the brain have been visualised and measured non-invasively with magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), a particularly sensitive medical imaging technique that may increase the potential for early diagnosis. This review begins with an introduction to the various methods used for the acquisition and analysis of MRE data. A systematic literature search is then conducted to identify studies that have specifically utilised MRE to investigate the human brain. Through the conversion of MRE-derived measurements to shear stiffness (kPa) and, where possible, the loss tangent (rad), a summary of results for global brain tissue and grey and white matter across studies is provided for healthy participants, as potential baseline values to be used in future clinical investigations. In addition, the extent to which MRE has revealed significant alterations to the brain in patients with neurological disorders is assessed and discussed in terms of known pathophysiology. The review concludes by predicting the trends for future MRE research and applications in neuroscience.

  3. Human REM sleep: influence on feeding behaviour, with clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, James A

    2015-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep shares many underlying mechanisms with wakefulness, to a much greater extent than does non-REM, especially those relating to feeding behaviours, appetite, curiosity, exploratory (locomotor) activities, as well as aspects of emotions, particularly 'fear extinction'. REM is most evident in infancy, thereafter declining in what seems to be a dispensable manner that largely reciprocates increasing wakefulness. However, human adults retain more REM than do other mammals, where for us it is most abundant during our usual final REM period (fREMP) of the night, nearing wakefulness. The case is made that our REM is unusual, and that (i) fREMP retains this 'dispensability', acting as a proxy for wakefulness, able to be forfeited (without REM rebound) and substituted by physical activity (locomotion) when pressures of wakefulness increase; (ii) REM's atonia (inhibited motor output) may be a proxy for this locomotion; (iii) our nocturnal sleep typically develops into a physiological fast, especially during fREMP, which is also an appetite suppressant; (iv) REM may have 'anti-obesity' properties, and that the loss of fREMP may well enhance appetite and contribute to weight gain ('overeating') in habitually short sleepers; (v) as we also select foods for their hedonic (emotional) values, REM may be integral to developing food preferences and dislikes; and (vii) REM seems to have wider influences in regulating energy balance in terms of exercise 'substitution' and energy (body heat) retention. Avenues for further research are proposed, linking REM with feeding behaviours, including eating disorders, and effects of REM-suppressant medications.

  4. Declaration of the 2nd Meeting of the Committee on Clinical Application of Human Organ Transplantation of China and National Summit of Clinical Application and Management of Human Organ Transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ We, medical practitioners of human organ transplantation, met in the 2nd Meeting of the People's Republic of China Ministry of Health Committee on Clinical Application of Human Organ Transplantation and National Summit of Clinical Application and Management of Human Organ Transplantation in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China, on 13 and 14 November 2006.

  5. Application of objective clinical human reliability analysis (OCHRA) in assessment of technical performance in laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J D; Miskovic, D; Allison, A S; Conti, J A; Ockrim, J; Cooper, E J; Hanna, G B; Francis, N K

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopic rectal resection is technically challenging, with outcomes dependent upon technical performance. No robust objective assessment tool exists for laparoscopic rectal resection surgery. This study aimed to investigate the application of the objective clinical human reliability analysis (OCHRA) technique for assessing technical performance of laparoscopic rectal surgery and explore the validity and reliability of this technique. Laparoscopic rectal cancer resection operations were described in the format of a hierarchical task analysis. Potential technical errors were defined. The OCHRA technique was used to identify technical errors enacted in videos of twenty consecutive laparoscopic rectal cancer resection operations from a single site. The procedural task, spatial location, and circumstances of all identified errors were logged. Clinical validity was assessed through correlation with clinical outcomes; reliability was assessed by test-retest. A total of 335 execution errors identified, with a median 15 per operation. More errors were observed during pelvic tasks compared with abdominal tasks (p technical performance of laparoscopic rectal surgery.

  6. Distinct clinical characteristics of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in patients in Southern Taiwan: A multicenter investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ching Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is an extremely rare acquired disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate the demographics, clinical manifestations, and outcomes of PNH patients in southern Taiwan. Data on PNH patients diagnosed over a 30-year period (1985–2015 were retrospectively collected from four tertiary medical centers in southern Taiwan. Blood samples were collected for hematologic panel testing and flow cytometry detection of PNH clones. Radiologic studies were performed to assess the frequency of complications. Twenty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The median duration of disease in the study participants was 10.8 years. The median granulocyte PNH clone size was 92.5% (range, 1.3%–99.8%, and the median lactate dehydrogenase (LDH level was 2920.2 ± 1462.0 IU/L. The incidence of thromboembolism and impaired renal function was 16.7% and 29.2%, respectively. The primary treatment strategies included steroids (79.2%, androgens (42.0%, eculizumab (33.3%, immunosuppressants (16.7%, and anticoagulants (4.2%. In eight patients treated with eculizumab, there was a marked reduction in the LDH levels of 14.89-fold–1.63-fold that of the upper limit of normal; seven patients exhibited decreased transfusion requirements. Twenty-one patients were alive with regular follow-up at the time of publication. Our study demonstrates that PNH patients in southern Taiwan may exhibit different clinical characteristics and outcomes relative to patients in other countries. There was a trend toward a greater PNH granulocyte clone size, which may lead to more hemolysis. In our study, the percentage of patients with impaired renal function, but not the percentage of patients with thrombotic events, was higher than values reported worldwide and in the observational cross-sectional International PNH Registry. More large-scale studies with comprehensive data on the clinical response to different treatments are needed.

  7. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Nurses' Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Yang, Jinqiu; Liu, Lingying; Ye, Benlan

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the influencing factors on nurses' clinical decision-making (CDM) skills. A cross-sectional nonexperimental research design was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency departments of two university hospitals, between May and June 2014. We used a quantile regression method to identify the influencing factors across different quantiles of the CDM skills distribution and compared the results with the corresponding ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates. Our findings revealed that nurses were best at the skills of managing oneself. Educational level, experience, and the total structural empowerment had significant positive impacts on nurses' CDM skills, while the nurse-patient relationship, patient care and interaction, formal empowerment, and information empowerment were negatively correlated with nurses' CDM skills. These variables explained no more than 30% of the variance in nurses' CDM skills and mainly explained the lower quantiles of nurses' CDM skills distribution.

  8. The contribution of clinical phonetics to the investigation of oracy problems in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahilly, Joan

    2003-01-01

    This paper explains how insights from clinical linguistics can be applied to the investigation of oracy problems in the classroom. While the importance of oracy skills at school and beyond is undisputed, there is often a lack of conveniently manageable frameworks for assessing these skills. It is suggested here that methods from phonetics and phonology can be easily and profitably adopted into routine language profiling in schools and that they offer one means of uncovering potential speech difficulties in children. Two main areas are addressed: speech acquisition and speech production skills. The main focus is on the assessment of oracy in the UK, although the role of assessment in US Curriculum Framework is also considered.

  9. Driving Organizational Change From the Bedside: The AACN Clinical Scene Investigator Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Susan R; Goodyear-Bruch, Caryl; Olney, Adrienne; Hanson, Dave; Altman, Marian S; Varn-Davis, Natasha S; Brinker, Debbie; Lavandero, Ramón; Cox, Karen S

    2017-08-01

    Staff nurses are pivotal in leading change related to quality improvement efforts, although many lack skills to steer change from the bedside. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) staff nurse leadership program, Clinical Scene Investigator (CSI) Academy, teaches and empowers staff nurses in leadership skills and change concepts to translate evidence into practice affecting patient outcomes. To describe the curriculum of the AACN CSI Academy that provides staff nurses with the leadership skills required to create unit-based change projects that positively impact patient/family outcomes. The curriculum of the Academy included leadership topics, communication, change concepts, quality improvement methods, project management, and data management and analysis. Each team of participants collected project data to show improvements in patient care. The program evaluation used many data sources to assess the program effectiveness, relating to the professional growth of the participant nurses. The participants assessed project patient outcomes, sustainability, and spread. The first cohort of CSI participants included 164 direct care nurses from 42 hospitals in 6 cities. They rated the Academy highly in the program evaluation, and they reported that the Academy contributed to their professional development. The individual hospital quality improvement projects resulted in positive patient and estimated fiscal outcomes that were generally sustained 1 year after the program. With the skills, tools, and support obtained from participation in the CSI Academy, staff nurses can make substantial contributions to their organizations in clinical and possibly fiscal outcomes. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  10. Clinical Relevance of the Advanced Microbiologic and Biochemical Investigations in Periodontal Diagnosis: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishakha Grover

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New approaches to periodontal diagnosis, including advanced microbiologic, biochemical, and genetic tests, have been shown to provide the clinician with the information not available by traditional means. The purpose of a diagnostic test is to confirm, exclude, classify, or monitor disease to guide treatment. Their clinical value depends on whether the information they provide leads to improved patient outcomes. This can be assessed by randomized trials, which compare patient outcomes from the new diagnostic test versus the old test strategy. Being nonmandatory for marketing approval, such trials are not always feasible because of large sample sizes requirements. So, many diagnostic tests enter the practice without being critically analysed for any additional benefits. Effective diagnosis is just as essential as the selection of effective treatments for the success of periodontal therapy. So, the current paper aims to focus on the practical utility of this rapidly emerging plethora of periodontal diagnostic tools, emphasizing the critical issues surrounding the clinical application of microbiologic and biochemical investigations, employed for periodontal diagnosis.

  11. Juvenile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis: clinical and molecular investigation in a large family in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugênia Ribeiro Valadares

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinosis (JNCL, CLN 3, Batten Disease (OMIM #204200 belongs to the most common group of neurodegenerative disorders of childhood. We report the clinical data and molecular analysis of a large Brazilian family. METHOD: Family composed of two consanguineous couples and thirty-two children. Clinical data of ten JNCL patients and molecular analyses on 13 participants were obtained. RESULTS: The large 1.02 kb deletion was detected. The most severe phenotype, with autistic behavior, tics and parkinsonism was seen in a 12-year-old female and a milder phenotype in a 14-year-old male. Nyctalopia was the first symptom in one deceased child. The visual loss of six patients has been first observed in the school and not at home. CONCLUSION: The report highlights the phenotypical intrafamily variation in 10 affected children of this family. The molecular investigation of this large family in our metabolic center turned possible the diagnosis, right approach and genetic counseling.

  12. A prospective 9-month human clinical evaluation of Laser-Assisted New Attachment Procedure (LANAP) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevins, Marc; Kim, Soo-Woo; Camelo, Marcelo; Martin, Ignacio Sanz; Kim, David; Nevins, Myron

    2014-01-01

    This investigation was designed and implemented as a single-center, prospective study to evaluate the clinical response to the Laser-Assisted New Attachment Procedure (LANAP). Eight patients with advanced periodontitis were enrolled and treated with full-mouth LANAP therapy and monitored for 9 months. Fullmouth clinical measurements, including clinical attachment level (CAL), probing depth (PD), and recession, were provided at baseline and after 9 months of healing by a single calibrated examiner, including a total of 930 sites and 444 sites with initial PD equal to or greater than 5 mm. Clinical results for the 930 sites measured pre- and postoperatively revealed that mean PD was reduced from 4.62 ± 2.29 mm to 3.14 ± 1.48 mm after 9 months (P LANAP therapy should be further investigated with long-term clinical trials to compare the stability of clinical results with conventional therapy.

  13. Population and clinical genetics of human transposable elements in the (post) genomic era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishishwar, Lavanya; Wang, Lu; Clayton, Evan A.; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; McDonald, John F.; Jordan, I. King

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent technological developments—in genomics, bioinformatics and high-throughput experimental techniques—are providing opportunities to study ongoing human transposable element (TE) activity at an unprecedented level of detail. It is now possible to characterize genome-wide collections of TE insertion sites for multiple human individuals, within and between populations, and for a variety of tissue types. Comparison of TE insertion site profiles between individuals captures the germline activity of TEs and reveals insertion site variants that segregate as polymorphisms among human populations, whereas comparison among tissue types ascertains somatic TE activity that generates cellular heterogeneity. In this review, we provide an overview of these new technologies and explore their implications for population and clinical genetic studies of human TEs. We cover both recent published results on human TE insertion activity as well as the prospects for future TE studies related to human evolution and health.

  14. Male sexual function and its disorders: physiology, pathophysiology, clinical investigation, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandeel, F R; Koussa, V K; Swerdloff, R S

    2001-06-01

    This review is designed to help the reproductive endocrinologist integrate his or her professional activity with those of other disciplines including urology, radiology, neurology, and psychology in order to successfully manage all of the inseparable aspects of male sexual and reproductive functioning. Significant advances in the field of male sexual physiology and pathophysiology and new methods of investigation and treatment of male sexual disorders are outlined. The review synthesizes available data on the following: norms of sexual organs, aging and sexuality, role of central and peripheral neurochemicals in each stage of the sexual cycle, role of corporeal smooth muscles in the hemodynamic control of erection and detumescence, influence of psychological factors, drugs, and disease on all aspects of sexual functioning, and use of nocturnal penile tumescence monitoring, imaging investigations, and neurophysiologic studies in the diagnostic workup of males with sexual dysfunction. Clinical algorithms are presented where appropriate. Extensive discussions on newly developed strategies in psychological and behavioral counseling, drug therapy, tissue engineering, nonsurgical devices, and surgical treatments for all forms of sexual disorders are also provided. Lastly, the effect of sexual dysfunction and its treatment on quality of life in affected men is addressed, along with recommendations for future research endeavors.

  15. Investigation of Function of Novel Sperm Binding Protein HBRP in Human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biology function of novel protein related to bovie seminal plasma protein in human testis.Methods Recombination pcDNA3/HBRP was constructed and transfected to HEK293 cell and permanently expression cell line was established.The activity of protein kinase C (PKC) of the cell line was detected by autoradiography method.Results The stable expression cell line of HBRP was obtained.The HBRP inhibited the activity of PKC significantly.Conclusion One of the newfunctions of novel sperm binding protein in human is the inhibitor action on activity of PKC.It may be involved in the sperm capacitation,and acrosome reaction.

  16. Human bartonellosis: seroepidemiological and clinical features with an emphasis on data from Brazil - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lamas

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Bartonellae are fastidious Gram-negative bacteria that are widespread in nature with several animal reservoirs (mainly cats, dogs, and rodents and insect vectors (mainly fleas, sandflies, and human lice. Thirteen species or subspecies of Bartonella have been recognized as agents causing human disease, including B. bacilliformis, B. quintana, B. vinsonii berkhoffii, B. henselae, B. elizabethae, B. grahamii, B. washoensis, B. koehlerae, B. rocha-limaea, and B. tamiae. The clinical spectrum of infection includes lymphadenopathy, fever of unknown origin, endocarditis, neurological and ophthalmological syndromes, Carrion's disease, and others. This review provides updated information on clinical manifestations and seroepidemiological studies with an emphasis on data available from Brazil.

  17. Use of the human patient simulator to teach clinical judgment skills in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Mattie L; Curran, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Nurse educators are finding it increasingly more challenging to prepare undergraduate students for the ever-changing and more acute clinical environment. As an answer to this dilemma, the human patient simulator can provide students with the opportunity to enhance knowledge, to facilitate skill acquisition, to decrease anxiety, and to promote clinical judgment in a safe environment. These experiences assist the novice nursing student to progress to the advanced beginner stage of practice. This article describes how faculty used the human patient simulator in creating a case scenario that enhanced critical thinking in senior nursing students.

  18. Pharmacological Investigation of Voltage-dependent Ca2+ Channels in Human Ejaculatory Sperm in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lu; LIU Jihong; LI Jiagui; YE Zhangqun

    2006-01-01

    The types of the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in human ejaculatory sperm and the effects of calcium channel blocker (CCB) on human sperm motility parameters in vitro were investigated. The human sperm motility parameters in vitro in response to the pharmacological agents nifedipine (NIF, inhibitor of L-type VDCC) and ω-conotoxin (GVIA, inhibitor of N-type VDCC) were compared and analyzed statistically. The results showed that NIF (1, 5, 10 μmol/L)could not only significantly affect human sperm's shape but also spermatozoa motility after incubated at least 10 min in vitro (P<0.001). GVIA (0.1, 0.5 and 1 μmol/L) could just only significantly affect human sperm's progressive motility (a %+b %) after incubated for 20 min in vitro (P<0.01), but they both could not significantly affect spermic abnormality rate. It is suggested that L-type VDCC, non L-type VDCCs and isoform of L-type VDCC exist in the cell membrane of human sperm solely or together, and they participate in the spermic physiological processes especially the spermic motility.

  19. Clinical studies involving probiotics: when FDA's investigational new drug rubric applies-and when it may not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, Fred H

    2012-01-01

    Researchers from a diverse array of scientific disciplines have focused and continue to focus on opportunities and areas for responsible clinical research involving the possible beneficial health effects of "probiotics." Investigators and researchers should be aware that not all clinical research involving probiotics reasonably falls within the requirements of the "investigational new drug" (IND) rubric administered and enforced by the US Food and Drug Administration. In determining whether an IND application is required before a clinical study may lawfully commence, investigators and researchers as well as institutional review boards should consider the regulatory classification, e.g., "drug," "new drug," "food," "food additive," "dietary supplement," etc. that applies to the substance under investigation. A potential probiotic product can fall along a continuum of regulatory classifications, each having implications on the nature and degree of regulatory requirements for clinical research and, ultimately, for claim substantiation and market access.

  20. First-in-human clinical trials of imaging devices: an example from optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L; Rosenberg, Mireille; Clough, Barbara L; Troyan, Susan L; Frangioni, John V

    2009-01-01

    Clinical translation of scientific discoveries is often the long-term goal of academic medical research. However, this goal is not always realized due to the complicated path between bench research and clinical use. In this review, we outline the fundamental steps required for first-in-human testing of a new imaging device, and use the FLARE() (Fluorescence-Assisted Resection and Exploration) near-infrared fluorescence optical imaging platform as an example.

  1. Clinical characteristics and lung function in older children vertically infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Mwalukomo, Thandie; Rylance, Sarah; Webb, Emily; Anderson, Suzanne; O'Hare, Bernadette Ann-Marie; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Ferrand, Rashida A.; Corbett, Elizabeth L; Rylance, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    T. M. was funded by the Commonwealth scholarship, with research costs from a grant fom Helse Nord Northern Norway Regional Health Authority. E. L. C., R. A. F., and J. R. are supported by Wellcome Trust Fellowships (Senior Fellowship in Clinical Sciences WT091769, Career Development Fellowship WT095878 and Clinical PhD Fellowship 086756/B/08/Z, respectively). Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to increased survival of children with vertically acquired human immunodeficiency vi...

  2. Stress and coping in patients with clinical manifestation of Human papillomavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Hrvoje Cvitanovic; Mirna Šitum; Jelena Meštrović-Štefekov; Liborija Lugović-Mihić

    2017-01-01

    Stressful life events in response to a psychosocial trigger have been reported to negatively affect the course of infections. This study was based on patients with clinical manifestations of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and a control group of patients with psoriasis who were admitted over a period of one year to the Dermatology Department of Karlovac General Hospital. A total of 122 patients participated in the study, either with a confirmed diagnosis of clinical manifestations of HP...

  3. Typical investigational medicinal products follow relatively uniform regulations in 10 European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Kubiak, Christine; Whitfield, Kate

    2012-01-01

    In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe.......In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe....

  4. A functional and structural investigation of the human fronto-basal volitional saccade network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan F W Neggers

    Full Text Available Almost all cortical areas are connected to the subcortical basal ganglia (BG through parallel recurrent inhibitory and excitatory loops, exerting volitional control over automatic behavior. As this model is largely based on non-human primate research, we used high resolution functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to investigate the functional and structural organization of the human (prefrontal cortico-basal network controlling eye movements. Participants performed saccades in darkness, pro- and antisaccades and observed stimuli during fixation. We observed several bilateral functional subdivisions along the precentral sulcus around the human frontal eye fields (FEF: a medial and lateral zone activating for saccades in darkness, a more fronto-medial zone preferentially active for ipsilateral antisaccades, and a large anterior strip along the precentral sulcus activating for visual stimulus presentation during fixation. The supplementary eye fields (SEF were identified along the medial wall containing all aforementioned functions. In the striatum, the BG area receiving almost all cortical input, all saccade related activation was observed in the putamen, previously considered a skeletomotor striatal subdivision. Activation elicited by the cue instructing pro or antisaccade trials was clearest in the medial FEF and right putamen. DTI fiber tracking revealed that the subdivisions of the human FEF complex are mainly connected to the putamen, in agreement with the fMRI findings. The present findings demonstrate that the human FEF has functional subdivisions somewhat comparable to non-human primates. However, the connections to and activation in the human striatum preferentially involve the putamen, not the caudate nucleus as is reported for monkeys. This could imply that fronto-striatal projections for the oculomotor system are fundamentally different between humans and monkeys. Alternatively, there could be a bias in published reports of

  5. Correlating animal and human phase Ia/Ib clinical data with CALAA-01, a targeted, polymer-based nanoparticle containing siRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Gritli, Ismael; Tolcher, Anthony; Heidel, Jeremy D.; Lim, Dean; Morgan, Robert; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Ribas, Antoni; Davis, Mark E.; Yen, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based experimental therapeutics are currently being investigated in numerous human clinical trials. CALAA-01 is a targeted, polymer-based nanoparticle containing small interfering RNA (siRNA) and, to our knowledge, was the first RNA interference (RNAi)–based, experimental therapeutic to be administered to cancer patients. Here, we report the results from the initial phase I clinical trial where 24 patients with different cancers were treated with CALAA-01 and...

  6. Clinical investigation of large perfusion defect cases with {sup 201}Tl exercise myocardial scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morota, Motoi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    We investigated retrospectively the clinical significance of large perfusion defect on {sup 201}Thallium myocardial scintigraphy from the records of 833 patients during the past 3 years from 1991 to 1994. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to the extent of perfusion defect; cases with normal perfusion (n=561), with small perfusion defect (n=211) and with large perfusion defect (n=61). We found that the proportions of cases with large perfusion defect was significantly larger than that of cases with small perfusion defect in myocardial disease (MD; hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and post myocarditis combined) (P<0.001). Analyzing patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD; angina pectoris and myocardial infarction) according to the severity of coronary artery lesion, the proportion of cases with large perfusion defect was significantly larger than that of cases with small perfusion defect in 3 vessel disease (P<0.001). Incidence of diabetes mellitus was significantly higher in patients with IHD than in those with MD in large perfusion defect group (P<0.01). As for symptoms in large perfusion defect group, the incidences of chest pain, chest oppression, and chest discomfort were significantly higher in patients with IHD than in those with MD (P<0.001), whereas the incidences of palpitation and shortness of breath were significantly higher in patients with MD (P<0.001). These results suggest that IHD with multiple artery lesions and MD underlie large perfusion defect on {sup 201}Thallium myocardial scintigraphy and that complication of diabetes mellitus and clinical symptoms may be useful in differentiating IHD from MD. (author)

  7. ISFG: Recommendations regarding the use of non-human (animal) DNA in forensic genetic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linacre, A.; Gusmão, L.; Hecht, W.;

    2010-01-01

    The use of non-human DNA typing in forensic science investigations, and specifically that from animal DNA, is ever increasing. The term animal DNA in this document refers to animal species encountered in a forensic science examination but does not include human DNA. Non-human DNA may either be......: the trade and possession of a species, or products derived from a species, which is contrary to legislation; as evidence where the crime is against a person or property; instances of animal cruelty; or where the animal is the offender. The first instance is addressed by determining the species present......, and the other scenarios can often be addressed by assigning a DNA sample to a particular individual organism. Currently there is little standardization of methodologies used in the forensic analysis of animal DNA or in reporting styles. The recommendations in this document relate specifically to animal DNA...

  8. Three-dimensional scaffolding to investigate neuronal derivatives of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Pranav; Tobe, Brian T D; Lee, Jin Woo; Winquist, Alicia A M; Singec, Ilyas; Vecchio, Kenneth S; Snyder, Evan Y; Chen, Shaochen

    2012-10-01

    Access to unlimited numbers of live human neurons derived from stem cells offers unique opportunities for in vitro modeling of neural development, disease-related cellular phenotypes, and drug testing and discovery. However, to develop informative cellular in vitro assays, it is important to consider the relevant in vivo environment of neural tissues. Biomimetic 3D scaffolds are tools to culture human neurons under defined mechanical and physico-chemical properties providing an interconnected porous structure that may potentially enable a higher or more complex organization than traditional two-dimensional monolayer conditions. It is known that even minor variations in the internal geometry and mechanical properties of 3D scaffolds can impact cell behavior including survival, growth, and cell fate choice. In this report, we describe the design and engineering of 3D synthetic polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based and biodegradable gelatin-based scaffolds generated by a free form fabrication technique with precise internal geometry and elastic stiffnesses. We show that human neurons, derived from human embryonic stem (hESC) cells, are able to adhere to these scaffolds and form organoid structures that extend in three dimensions as demonstrated by confocal and electron microscopy. Future refinements of scaffold structure, size and surface chemistries may facilitate long term experiments and designing clinically applicable bioassays.

  9. Brief of the Canadian Society for Clinical Investigation to the science and technology review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    In the context of new realities, perceptions, and concerns, it is fitting that the government has undertaken this Science and Technology Review, questioning not only how much to spend but also the justification and the best ways to carry out federally-funded research. We share the government's concern about the lack of economic competitiveness of our industries and agree that government-sponsored research should make a bigger contribution to the nation's global economic position. The CSCI, which represents the clinical investigators/scientists in this country, is grateful for having been given the opportunity to make this "tour d'horizon" of Canadian clinical research. In this brief, we have attempted to articulate the needs for, and the benefits of, basic biomedical research because it is the only type of research which will provide us with final answers. However, it should be more closely articulated with applied research, as well as with epidemiological, evaluative, and operational approaches which have been neglected. This brief has emphasized that CSCI is committed to PUTTING MORE SCIENCE INTO MEDICINE by encouraging a greater flow of discoveries from the laboratory research bench to the bedside and the community. We made the point that there is a crisis in patient-oriented research and a decrease of young physicians opting for research careers. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the MRC are responsive to this situation, which may compromise our capacity to discharge our broader mission. The MRC has given itself valid instruments to foster the creation of wealth through special programs such as the NCE, the University/Industry program, and the MRC-PMAC partnership. Some refining is in order, and close scrutiny of outcome is essential. Both the academic community and industry have their share of responsibility for the less-than-optimal transfer of knowledge to the market place. Lack of venture capital is also a serious issue. A unified

  10. Twenty years of human immunodeficiency virus care at the Mayo Clinic: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Nathan W; Badley, Andrew D; Kasten, Mary J; Sampath, Rahul; Temesgen, Zelalem; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Wilson, John W; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Rizza, Stacey A

    2016-01-01

    The Mayo human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Clinic has been providing patient centered care for persons living with HIV in Minnesota and beyond for the past 20 years. Through multidisciplinary engagement, vital clinical outcomes such as retention in care, initiation of antiretroviral therapy and virologic suppression are maximized. In this commentary, we describe the history of the Mayo HIV Clinic and its best practices, providing a “Mayo Model” of HIV care that exceeds national outcomes and may be applicable in other settings. PMID:27175350

  11. Investigating Human Neurovascular Coupling Using Functional Neuroimaging: A Critical Review of Dynamic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneau, Clément; Benali, Habib; Chabriat, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that link a transient neural activity to the corresponding increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF) are termed neurovascular coupling (NVC). They are possibly impaired at early stages of small vessel or neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of NVC in humans has been made possible with the development of various neuroimaging techniques based on variations of local hemodynamics during neural activity. Specific dynamic models are currently used for interpreting these data that can include biophysical parameters related to NVC. After a brief review of the current knowledge about possible mechanisms acting in NVC we selected seven models with explicit integration of NVC found in the literature. All these models were described using the same procedure. We compared their physiological assumptions, mathematical formalism, and validation. In particular, we pointed out their strong differences in terms of complexity. Finally, we discussed their validity and their potential applications. These models may provide key information to investigate various aspects of NVC in human pathology.

  12. Investigating human neurovascular coupling using functional neuroimaging: a critical review of dynamic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément eHuneau

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that link a transient neural activity to the corresponding increase of cerebral blood flow (CBF are termed neurovascular coupling (NVC. They are possibly impaired at early stage of small vessel or neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of NVC in human has been made possible since the development of various neuroimaging techniques based on variations of local hemodynamics during neural activity. Specific dynamic models are currently used for interpreting these data that can include biophysical parameters related to NVC. We reviewed the seven models with explicit integration of NVC found in the literature and described their physiological assumption, mathematical formalism and validation. All models were described regarding a constant schematic formalism. Differences between them, particularly regarding their complexity, and hence, their potential use were finally evaluated. These models may provide key information to investigate various aspects of NVC in human pathology.

  13. Amide-type local anesthetics and human mesenchymal stem cells: clinical implications for stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregalla, Ryan C; Lyons, Nicolette F; Reischling, Patrick D; Centeno, Christopher J

    2014-03-01

    In the realm of regenerative medicine, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are gaining attention as a cell source for the repair and regeneration of tissues spanning an array of medical disciplines. In orthopedics, hMSCs are often delivered in a site-specific manner at the area of interest and may require the concurrent application of local anesthetics (LAs). To address the implications of using hMSCs in combination with anesthetics for intra-articular applications, we investigated the effect that clinically relevant doses of amide-type LAs have on the viability of bone marrow-derived hMSCs and began to characterize the mechanism of LA-induced hMSC death. In our study, culture-expanded hMSCs from three donors were exposed to the amide-type LAs ropivacaine, lidocaine, bupivacaine, and mepivacaine. To replicate the physiological dilution of LAs once injected into the synovial capsule, each anesthetic was reduced to 12.5%, 25%, and 50% of the stock solution and incubated with each hMSC line for 40 minutes, 120 minutes, 360 minutes, and 24 hours. At each time point, cell viability assays were performed. We found that extended treatment with LAs for 24 hours had a significant impact on both hMSC viability and adhesion. In addition, hMSC treatment with three of the four anesthetics resulted in cell death via apoptosis following brief exposures. Ultimately, we concluded that amide-type LAs induce hMSC apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner that may threaten clinical outcomes, following a similar trend that has been established between these particular anesthetics and articular chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Amide-Type Local Anesthetics and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Clinical Implications for Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Nicolette F.; Reischling, Patrick D.; Centeno, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    In the realm of regenerative medicine, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are gaining attention as a cell source for the repair and regeneration of tissues spanning an array of medical disciplines. In orthopedics, hMSCs are often delivered in a site-specific manner at the area of interest and may require the concurrent application of local anesthetics (LAs). To address the implications of using hMSCs in combination with anesthetics for intra-articular applications, we investigated the effect that clinically relevant doses of amide-type LAs have on the viability of bone marrow-derived hMSCs and began to characterize the mechanism of LA-induced hMSC death. In our study, culture-expanded hMSCs from three donors were exposed to the amide-type LAs ropivacaine, lidocaine, bupivacaine, and mepivacaine. To replicate the physiological dilution of LAs once injected into the synovial capsule, each anesthetic was reduced to 12.5%, 25%, and 50% of the stock solution and incubated with each hMSC line for 40 minutes, 120 minutes, 360 minutes, and 24 hours. At each time point, cell viability assays were performed. We found that extended treatment with LAs for 24 hours had a significant impact on both hMSC viability and adhesion. In addition, hMSC treatment with three of the four anesthetics resulted in cell death via apoptosis following brief exposures. Ultimately, we concluded that amide-type LAs induce hMSC apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner that may threaten clinical outcomes, following a similar trend that has been established between these particular anesthetics and articular chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24436443

  15. New clinically relevant, orthotopic mouse models of human chondrosarcoma with spontaneous metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dass Crispin R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondrosarcoma responds poorly to adjuvant therapy and new, clinically relevant animal models are required to test targeted therapy. Methods Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and FS090, were evaluated for proliferation, colony formation, invasion, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Cell lines were also investigated for VEGF, MMP-2, MMP-9, and RECK expression. JJ012 and FS090 were injected separately into the mouse tibia intramedullary canal or tibial periosteum. Animal limbs were measured, and x-rayed for evidence of tumour take and progression. Tibias and lungs were harvested to determine the presence of tumour and lung metastases. Results JJ012 demonstrated significantly higher proliferative capacity, invasion, and colony formation in collagen I gel. JJ012 conditioned medium stimulated endothelial tube formation and osteoclastogenesis with a greater potency than FS090 conditioned medium, perhaps related to the effects of VEGF and MMP-9. In vivo, tumours formed in intratibial and periosteal groups injected with JJ012, however no mice injected with FS090 developed tumours. JJ012 periosteal tumours grew to 3 times the non-injected limb size by 7 weeks, whereas intratibial injected limbs required 10 weeks to achieve a similar tumour size. Sectioned tumour tissue demonstrated features of grade III chondrosarcoma. All JJ012 periosteal tumours (5/5 resulted in lung micro-metastases, while only 2/4 JJ012 intratibial tumours demonstrated metastases. Conclusions The established JJ012 models replicate the site, morphology, and many behavioural characteristics of human chondrosarcoma. Local tumour invasion of bone and spontaneous lung metastasis offer valuable assessment tools to test the potential of novel agents for future chondrosarcoma therapy.

  16. Investigation of Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectra of Human Gallstones on Colloidal Silver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman scatterihg (SERS) spectra of human gallstones is investigated. Complicated Raman bands were due to multiple components that include bilirubin, bilirubinate salts, cholesterol, fatty salts and proteins. The results suggest that besides bilirubin and cholesterol, fatty salts and proteins may play an important role in the formation of gallstone. The experimental data supply an useful information for the research of the formation mechanism of gallstones.

  17. Investigation of Fe and Ca in non-stimulated human saliva using NAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, J. A. G.; Zamboni, C. B.; Kovacs, L.; Lewgoy, H. R.

    2015-07-01

    In this study we investigated non-stimulated human whole saliva of healthy subjects and patients with periodontal disease using Neutron Activation Analysis technique (NAA). The measurements were performed in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP. We found considerable metabolic changes mainly in Fe and Ca concentration in whole saliva of periodontal patients. These data are useful for identifying or preventing this oral disease in the Brazilian population.

  18. Clinical Manifestations of Cytomegalovirus-Associated Posterior Uveitis and Panuveitis in Patients Without Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathanapitoon, Kessara; Tesavibul, Nattaporn; Choopong, Pitipol; Boonsopon, Sutasinee; Kongyai, Natedao; Ausayakhun, Somsanguan; Kunavisarut, Paradee; Rothova, Aniki

    2013-01-01

    Importance: Little attention has been paid to clinical features of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in individuals without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Objective: To describe the clinical manifestations and comorbidities of patients without HIV infection who have CMV-associated posterior uvei

  19. Clinical system for non-invasive in situ monitoring of gases in the human paranasal sinuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewander, Märta; Guan, Zuguang; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune; Svensson, Tomas

    2009-06-22

    We present a portable system for non-invasive, simultaneous sensing of molecular oxygen (O(2)) and water vapor (H(2)O) in the human paranasal cavities. The system is based on high-resolution tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLAS) and digital wavelength modulation spectroscopy (dWMS). Since optical interference and non-ideal tuning of the diode lasers render signal processing complex, we focus on Fourier analysis of dWMS signals and procedures for removal of background signals. Clinical data are presented, and exhibit a significant improvement in signal-to-noise with respect to earlier work. The in situ detection limit, in terms of absorption fraction, is about 5x10(-5) for oxygen and 5x10(-4) for water vapor, but varies between patients due to differences in light attenuation. In addition, we discuss the use of water vapor as a reference in quantification of in situ oxygen concentration in detail. In particular, light propagation aspects are investigated by employing photon time-of-flight spectroscopy.

  20. The different functions and clinical significances of caveolin-1 in human adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Pin; Chen, Fuchun; Pan, Qi; Zhao, Xianda; Zhao, Chen; Cho, William Chi-Shing; Chen, Honglei

    2017-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a major structural protein of caveolae, is an integral membrane protein which plays an important role in the progression of carcinoma. However, whether Cav-1 acts as a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor still remains controversial. For example, the tumor-promoting function of Cav-1 has been found in renal cancer, prostate cancer, tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), lung SCC and bladder SCC. In contrast, Cav-1 also plays an inhibitory role in esophagus adenocarcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma and cutaneous SCC. The role of Cav-1 is still controversial in thyroid cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric adenocarcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, breast cancer, pancreas cancer, oral SCC, laryngeal SCC, head and neck SCC, esophageal SCC and cervical SCC. Besides, it has been reported that the loss of stromal Cav-1 might predict poor prognosis in breast cancer, gastric cancer, pancreas cancer, prostate cancer, oral SCC and esophageal SCC. However, the accumulation of stromal Cav-1 has been found to be promoted by the progression of tongue SCC. Taken together, Cav-1 seems playing a different role in different cancer subtypes even of the same organ, as well as acting differently in the same cancer subtype of different organs. Thus, we hereby explore the functions of Cav-1 in human adenocarcinoma and SCC from the perspective of clinical significances and pathogenesis. We envision that novel targets may come with the further investigation of Cav-1 in carcinogenesis. PMID:28243118

  1. Dogs'olfactory diagnostics applied on human species: state of the art and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, B; Nardo, B; Lippi, G; Palmieri, L; Vadalà, M; Laurino, C

    2016-01-01

    Dogs'smell ability is about 10000-100000 more developed than humans' one. Dogs smell is usually exploited in forensic medicine, to find missing people and specific substances showing peculiar sensorial features. In clinic, there is the possibility to take advantage of dogs smell, which are conveniently trained, for the screening of cancers and other diseases. The common feature is the presence of molecules in organic samples that may be considered as biomarkers of a specific pathology. In cancer, scientific evidences exist about screening of melanoma, lung, breast, rectum, ovarian, prostate and bladder cancer. Instead, other pathologies manifest the presence of organic volatile compounds in biologic materials, such as spit, faeces and urine that may be studied by dogs smell in order to identify the presence of a specific disease. This review shows the state of the art of actual dogs' olfactory ability based on scientific principles and the advantages and the disadvantages of this method. The authors also reveal some potential pathologies joined by the presence of organic volatile compounds, which may be investigated by dogs smell.

  2. An investigative laboratory course in human physiology using computer technology and collaborative writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A

    2004-12-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65 second-year students in sports medicine and biology at a small private comprehensive college. The course builds on skills and abilities first introduced in an introductory investigations course and introduces additional higher-level skills and more complex human experimental models. In four multiweek experimental modules, involving neuromuscular, reflex, and cardiovascular physiology, by use of computerized hardware/software with a variety of transducers, students carry out self-designed experiments with human subjects and perform data collection and analysis, collaborative writing, and peer editing. In assessments, including standard course evaluations and the Salgains Web-based evaluation, student responses to this approach are enthusiastic, and gains in their skills and abilities are evident in their comments and in improved performance.

  3. Human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities in Kathmandu, Nepal: a qualitative investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Nepal has experienced sporadic reports of human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities. Our objective was to identify a range of human rights that are enshrined in international law and/or are commonly reported by sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu, to be nonprotected or violated. Methods In September 2009 three focus group discussions were conducted by trained interviewers among a convenience sample of sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu Nepal. The modified Delphi technique was utilized to elicit and rank participant-generated definitions of human rights and their subsequent violations. Data was analyzed independently and cross checked by another investigator. Results Participants (n = 29) reported experiencing a range of human rights violations at home, work, educational, health care settings and in public places. Lack of adequate legal protection, physical and mental abuse and torture were commonly reported. Access to adequate legal protection and improvements in the family and healthcare environment were ranked as the most important priority areas. Conclusions Sexual and gender minorities in Nepal experienced a range of human rights violations. Future efforts should enroll a larger and more systematic sample of participants to determine frequency, timing, and/or intensity of exposure to rights violations, and estimate the population-based impact of these rights violations on specific health outcomes PMID:22591775

  4. Human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities in Kathmandu, Nepal: a qualitative investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sonal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nepal has experienced sporadic reports of human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities. Our objective was to identify a range of human rights that are enshrined in international law and/or are commonly reported by sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu, to be nonprotected or violated. Methods In September 2009 three focus group discussions were conducted by trained interviewers among a convenience sample of sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu Nepal. The modified Delphi technique was utilized to elicit and rank participant-generated definitions of human rights and their subsequent violations. Data was analyzed independently and cross checked by another investigator. Results Participants (n = 29 reported experiencing a range of human rights violations at home, work, educational, health care settings and in public places. Lack of adequate legal protection, physical and mental abuse and torture were commonly reported. Access to adequate legal protection and improvements in the family and healthcare environment were ranked as the most important priority areas. Conclusions Sexual and gender minorities in Nepal experienced a range of human rights violations. Future efforts should enroll a larger and more systematic sample of participants to determine frequency, timing, and/or intensity of exposure to rights violations, and estimate the population-based impact of these rights violations on specific health outcomes

  5. Clinical study on thermography, as modern investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosif, Laura; Preoteasa, Cristina Teodora; Murariu-Măgureanu, Cătălina; Preoteasa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is an infectious inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa, with frequent recurrences. The aim of this study was to assess the use of infrared thermography as investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis (as inflammatory disorder of the maxillary denture bearing area), by comparing disease and non-disease groups. An observational study was conducted on maxillary edentulous patients treated by acrylic dentures, with and without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Diagnostic test methods used were clinical examination for denture stomatitis and conventional microbiological culture method for oral candidiasis. Thermography analysis of the maxillary denture bearing area was made using the ThermaCAM PM350 infrared camera (Inframetrics, Flir Systems) and ThermaGram Pro 95 software, data being acquired by usage of standard protocol of thermographic registrations. The sample included 52 patients, 21 with and 31 without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. The temperature of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area was found to be statistically significantly higher in Candida-associated denture stomatitis (mean 36.20°C), compared to healthy oral mucosa (mean 34.85°C). The thermal threshold value of 35.44°C was identified as best differentiating a pathological from normal state of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area. In conclusion, infrared thermography, a rapid non-invasive investigation method, has the premises to bring valuable data in inflammatory disorders of the maxillary denture bearing area, as Candida-associated denture stomatitis that may be used for screening, diagnostic or monitoring purposes.

  6. Non-inflammatory destructive periodontal disease: a clinical, microbiological, immunological and genetic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Repeke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis comprises a group of multifactorial diseases in which periodontopathogens accumulate in dental plaque and trigger host chronic inflammatory and immune responses against periodontal structures, which are determinant to the disease outcome. Although unusual cases of non-inflammatory destructive periodontal disease (NIDPD are described, their pathogenesis remains unknown. A unique NIDPD case was investigated by clinical, microbiological, immunological and genetic tools. The patient, a non-smoking dental surgeon with excessive oral hygiene practice, presented a generalized bone resorption and tooth mobility, but not gingival inflammation or occlusion problems. No hematological, immunological or endocrine alterations were found. No periodontopathogens (A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, F. nucleatum and T. denticola or viruses (HCMV, EBV-1 and HSV-1 were detected, along with levels of IL-1β and TNF-a in GCF compatible with healthy tissues. Conversely ALP, ACP and RANKL GCF levels were similar to diseased periodontal sites. Genetic investigation demonstrated that the patient carried some SNPs, as well HLA-DR4 (*0404 and HLA-B27 alleles, considered risk factors for bone loss. Then, a less vigorous and diminished frequency of toothbrushing was recommended to the patient, resulting in the arrest of alveolar bone loss, associated with the return of ALP, ACP and RANKL in GCF to normality levels. In conclusion, the unusual case presented here is compatible with the previous description of NIDPD, and the results that a possible combination of excessive force and frequency of mechanical stimulation with a potentially bone loss prone genotype could result in the alveolar bone loss seen in NIDPD.

  7. Recontacting in clinical practice: an investigation of the views of healthcare professionals and clinical scientists in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Daniele; Dheensa, Sandi; Doheny, Shane; Clarke, Angus J; Turnpenny, Peter D; Lucassen, Anneke M; Kelly, Susan E

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the views and experiences of healthcare professionals and clinical scientists in genetics about the existence of a duty and/or responsibility to recontact former patients when the genetic information relevant to their health, or that of family members, changes in a potentially important manner. It is based on N=30 semi-structured interviews guided by vignettes of recontacting scenarios. The sample included healthcare professionals in the United Kingdom from different medical specialties (clinical genetics, other ‘mainstream' specialties now offering genetic testing), and scientists from regional genetics laboratories. While viewing recontacting as desirable under certain circumstances, most respondents expressed concerns about its feasibility within the current constraints of the National Health Service (NHS). The main barriers identified were insufficient resources (time, staff, and suitable IT infrastructures) and lack of clarity about role boundaries and responsibilities. All of these are further complicated by genetic testing being increasingly offered by mainstream specialties. Reaching a consensus about roles and responsibilities of clinical specialties with regard to recontacting former patients in the light of evolving genetic information, and about what resources and infrastructures would be needed, was generally seen as a pre-requisite to developing guidelines about recontact. PMID:28051074

  8. Pathogen inactivation of human serum facilitates its clinical use for islet cell culture and subsequent transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhle, Magnus U; Brandhorst, Daniel; Korsgren, Olle; Knutson, Folke

    2011-01-01

    Serum is regarded as an essential supplement to promote survival and growth of cells during culture. However, the potential risk of transmitting diseases disqualifies the use of serum for clinical cell therapy in most countries. Hence, most clinical cell therapy programs have replaced human serum with human serum albumin, which can result in inferior quality of released cell products. Photochemical treatment of different blood products utilizing Intercept® technology has been shown to inactivate a broad variety of pathogens of RNA and DNA origin. The present study assesses the feasibility of using pathogen-inactivated, blood group-compatible serum for use in human pancreatic islet culture. Isolated human islets were cultured at 37°C for 3-4 days in CMRL 1066 supplemented with 10% of either pathogen-inactivated or nontreated human serum. Islet quality assessment included glucose-stimulated insulin release (perifusion), ADP/ATP ratio, cytokine expression, and posttransplant function in diabetic nude mice. No differences were found between islets cultured in pathogen-inactivated or control serum regarding stimulated insulin release, intracellular insulin content, and ADP/ATP ratio. Whether media was supplemented with treated or nontreated serum, islet expression of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, or tissue factor was not affected. The final diabetes-reversal rate of mice receiving islets cultured in pathogen-inactivated or nontreated serum was 78% and 87%, respectively (NS). As reported here, pathogen-inactivated human serum does not affect viability or functional integrity of cultured human islets. The implementation of this technology for RNA- and DNA-based pathogen inactivation should enable reintroduction of human serum for clinical cell therapy.

  9. Clinical investigation of the lesions responsible for sensory disturbance in Minamata disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, M; Mita, S; Satoh, H; Hirano, T; Arimura, K; Nakagawa, M; Nakamura, M; Uyama, E; Ando, Y; Wakamiya, J; Futatsuka, M

    2001-11-01

    To clarify the lesions responsible for sensory disturbance in Minamata disease (MD), we clinically investigated the characteristics of sensory disturbance. In all patients with the classical type MD, two-point discrimination was severely disturbed, but the involvement of superficial sensation was relatively mild. On short-latency somatosensory evoked potential study, the component corresponding to N20 was completely absent with normal N9, N11, and N13 components. Although 14 of 38 chronic MD patients demonstrated intact superficial sensation, 10 of these 14 showed mild to moderate disturbance in two-point discrimination. The two-point discrimination in chronic MD patients was significantly high irrespective of the disturbance of superficial sensation. These findings suggest that the sensory disturbance of MD patients may mainly be caused by a lesion in the sensory cortex rather than in the peripheral nerves. However, other foci could be also responsible for the sensory impairment, since 9 of 38 chronic MD patients showed intact two-point discrimination.

  10. Clinical investigation of 41 patients with ischemic colitis accompanied by ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satohiro Matsumoto; Kenichiro Tsuji; Satoshi Shirahama

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship among the presence of ulcer lesions, underlying disease, and clinical course in patients with ischemic colitis.METHODS: The subjects were 41 patients (10 male and 31 female; mean age 70 years) with ischemic colitis who were admitted to and received treatment in our hospital from 2000 to 2006. We compared their characteristics and analyzed the mean lengths of admission and fasting for 9 patients with ulcer lesions (ulcer group) and 32 without (non-ulcer group).RESULTS: The groups with presence and absence of ulcer differed significantly only in white blood cell (WBC)count. Lengths of fasting and admission were 7.9 d and 17.9 d for the ulcer group and 4.4 d and 10.7 d for the non-ulcer group, respectively, and significantly longer in the ulcer group (P = 0.0057 and 0.0001). There was no correlation between presence of ulcer and presence of underlying diseases.CONCLUSION: Lengths of fasting and admission were significantly longer in patients with ischemic colitis with ulcer than for those without ulcer.

  11. Ischaemic memory imaging using metabolic radiopharmaceuticals: overview of clinical settings and ongoing investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Naya, Masanao [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Sapporo (Japan); Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    ''Ischaemic memory'' is defined as a prolonged functional and/or biochemical alteration remaining after a particular episode of severe myocardial ischaemia. The biochemical alteration has been reported as metabolic stunning. Metabolic imaging has been used to detect the footprint left by previous ischaemic episodes evident due to delayed recovery of myocardial metabolism (persistent dominant glucose utilization with suppression of fatty acid oxidation). β-Methyl-p-[{sup 123}I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer widely used for metabolic imaging in clinical settings in Japan. In patients with suspected coronary artery disease but no previous myocardial infarction, BMIPP has shown acceptable diagnostic accuracy. In particular, BMIPP plays an important role in the identification of prior ischaemic insult in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute chest pain syndrome. Recent data also show the usefulness of {sup 123}I-BMIPP SPECT for predicting cardiovascular events in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Similarly, SPECT or PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG injected during peak exercise or after exercise under fasting conditions shows an increase in FDG uptake in postischaemic areas. This article will overview the roles of ischaemic memory imaging both under established indications and in ongoing investigations. (orig.)

  12. Clinical investigation of oral findings in inherited disorders of platelet function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müjgan Güngör Hatipoğlu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bleeding disorders are a very important health problem due to the associated high risk of hemorrhage during dental procedures. The present study aimed to investigate oral manifestations of inherited disorders of platelet function (IDPF. Materials and Methods: The study included 20 IDPF patients (mean age: 31.90±10.71 years and 40 healthy controls (mean age: 31.63±9.07 years. Tooth brushing habits, level of education, and clinical index scores (Simplified Oral Hygiene Index [OHI-S], Decayed Missing Filled Teeth Index [DMFT] index, probing depth [PD] index, Gingival Bleeding Index [GBI], and Community Periodontal Index [CPI] were recorded. Results: There weren’t any significant differences between the 2 groups with respect to tooth brushing habit, level of education level, OHI-S, DMFT index, or CPI (p>0.05, whereas significant differences in PD index and GBI were observed between the groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: The present study’s findings show that IDPF has a negative effect on periodontal tissues.

  13. Coordination of International Risk-Reduction Investigations by the Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.; Bogomolov, Valery V.

    2015-01-01

    Effective use of the unique capabilities of the International Space Station (ISS) for risk reduction on future deep space missions involves preliminary work in analog environments to identify and evaluate the most promising techniques, interventions and treatments. This entails a consolidated multinational approach to biomedical research both on ISS and in ground analogs. The Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration (MHRPE) was chartered by the five ISS partners to recommend the best combination of partner investigations on ISS for risk reduction in the relatively short time available for ISS utilization. MHRPE will also make recommendations to funding agencies for appropriate preparatory analog work. In 2011, NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) and the Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) of the Russian Academy of Science, acting for MHRPE, developed a joint US-Russian biomedical program for the 2015 one-year ISS mission (1YM) of American and Russian crewmembers. This was to evaluate the possibilities for multilateral research on ISS. An overlapping list of 16 HRP, 9 IBMP, 3 Japanese, 3 European and 1 Canadian investigations were selected to address risk-reduction goals in 7 categories: Functional Performance, Behavioral Health, Visual Impairment, Metabolism, Physical Capacity, Microbial and Human Factors. MHRPE intends to build on this bilateral foundation to recommend more fully-integrated multilateral investigations on future ISS missions commencing after the 1YM. MHRPE has also endorsed an on-going program of coordinated research on 6-month, one-year and 6-week missions ISS expeditions that is now under consideration by ISS managers. Preparatory work for these missions will require coordinated and collaborative campaigns especially in the psychological and psychosocial areas using analog isolation facilities in Houston, Köln and Moscow, and possibly elsewhere. The multilateral Human Analogs research working group (HANA) is the focal point of those

  14. Characterization of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium spp. isolates and their interaction with human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Guirado

    Full Text Available Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC are naturally occurring bacteria in the environment. A link has been suggested between M. avium strains in drinking water and clinical isolates from infected individuals. There is a need to develop new screening methodologies that can identify specific virulence properties of M. avium isolates found in water that predict a level of risk to exposed individuals. In this work we have characterized 15 clinical and environmental M. avium spp. isolates provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA to improve our understanding of the key processes involved in the binding, uptake and survival of these isolates in primary human macrophages. M. avium serovar 8 was predominant among the isolates studied. Different amounts and exposure of mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM and glycopeptidolipids (GPLs, both major mycobacterial virulence factors, were found among the isolates studied. Reference clinical isolate 104 serovar 1 and clinical isolates 11 and 14 serovar 8 showed an increased association with macrophages. Serum opsonization increased the cell association and survival at 2 h post infection for all isolates. However, only the clinical isolates 104 and 3 among those tested showed an increased growth in primary human macrophages. The other isolates varied in their survival in these cells. Thus we conclude that the amounts of cell envelope ManLAM and GPL, as well as GPL serovar specificity are not the only important bacterial factors for dictating the early interactions of M. avium with human macrophages.

  15. Herniation pits in human mummies: a CT investigation in the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Sicily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Panzer

    Full Text Available Herniation pits (HPs of the femoral neck were first described in a radiological publication in 1982 as round to oval radiolucencies in the proximal superior quadrant of the femoral neck on anteroposterior radiographs of adults. In following early clinical publications, HPs were generally recognized as an incidental finding. In contrast, in current clinical literature they are mentioned in the context of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI of the hip joint, which is known to cause osteoarthritis (OA. The significance of HPs in chronic skeletal disorders such as OA is still unclear, but they are discussed as a possible radiological indicator for FAI in a large part of clinical studies.In this paleoradiological study we examined a sample of mummies from the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Sicily, by a mobile computed tomography (CT scanner. Evaluation of the CT examinations revealed HPs in six out of 16 (37.5% adult male mummies.The first aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of HPs shown in our mummy collection to the findings described in clinical literature. Thereby CT evaluation revealed that their osseous imaging characteristics are in accordance, consisting of round to oval subcortical lesions at the anterior femoral neck, clearly demarcated by a sclerotic margin.The second aim was to introduce HPs to the paleoradiological and paleopathological methodology as an entity that underwent a renaissance from an incidental finding to a possible radiological indicator of FAI in the clinical situation. As FAI plays an important role in the development of OA of the hip, which is a very common finding in human skeletal remains, HPs should always be considered in paleoradiological evaluation of hip joint diseases.

  16. 78 FR 48173 - Guidance for Industry on Oversight of Clinical Investigations-A Risk-Based Approach to Monitoring...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Investigations--A Risk-Based Approach to Monitoring; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Oversight of Clinical Investigations--A Risk-Based Approach to Monitoring.'' This guidance assists sponsors in developing risk-based monitoring strategies and plans for...

  17. First-in-Human Phase 1 Studies in Oncology: The New Challenge for Investigative Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Salzberg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Phase 1 first-in-human studies with anti-cancer products differ from other phase 1 studies in that they are evaluated in patients rather than healthy volunteers. The rationale design of targeted drugs triggers changes in the design of these studies. Patient populations are more precisely defined and pose a challenge to the efficient inclusion of study patients. Objectives shift from the definition of a maximum tolerated dose to the evaluation of a recommended phase 2 dose. Other challenges related to the efficacy and safety profile of novel targeted anti-cancer drugs call for changes in designing first-in-human studies, such as definitions of biological doses, collection of fresh tumor tissue for surrogate marker analyses, and the management of infusion-related reactions with monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, the conduct of phase 1 clinical trials in oncology requires changes. Corresponding education with particular focus on phase 1 trials and on the complex drug development process needs to be an integrated part of the medical oncology curriculum for physicians and nursing staff. This is a crucial element for institutions to remain or become clinical research sites for phase 1 studies, and to participate in the drug development process of novel anti-cancer compounds in the future.

  18. Clinical Trial Electronic Portals for Expedited Safety Reporting: Recommendations from the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative Investigational New Drug Safety Advancement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Raymond P; Finnigan, Shanda; Patel, Krupa; Whitney, Shanell; Forrest, Annemarie

    2016-12-15

    Use of electronic clinical trial portals has increased in recent years to assist with sponsor-investigator communication, safety reporting, and clinical trial management. Electronic portals can help reduce time and costs associated with processing paperwork and add security measures; however, there is a lack of information on clinical trial investigative staff's perceived challenges and benefits of using portals. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) sought to (1) identify challenges to investigator receipt and management of investigational new drug (IND) safety reports at oncologic investigative sites and coordinating centers and (2) facilitate adoption of best practices for communicating and managing IND safety reports using electronic portals. CTTI, a public-private partnership to improve the conduct of clinical trials, distributed surveys and conducted interviews in an opinion-gathering effort to record investigator and research staff views on electronic portals in the context of the new safety reporting requirements described in the US Food and Drug Administration's final rule (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21 Section 312). The project focused on receipt, management, and review of safety reports as opposed to the reporting of adverse events. The top challenge investigators and staff identified in using individual sponsor portals was remembering several complex individual passwords to access each site. Also, certain tasks are time-consuming (eg, downloading reports) due to slow sites or difficulties associated with particular operating systems or software. To improve user experiences, respondents suggested that portals function independently of browsers and operating systems, have intuitive interfaces with easy navigation, and incorporate additional features that would allow users to filter, search, and batch safety reports. Results indicate that an ideal system for sharing expedited IND safety information is through a central portal used by

  19. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...... used for MSC cultivation in animal studies simulating clinical stem cell therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Human mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from BM aspirates by density gradient centrifugation and cultivated in a GMP-accepted medium (EMEA medium) or in one of four other media. RESULTS: FACS...... conditions following good manufacturing practice (GMP). The aims of the study were first to establish culture conditions following GMP quality demands for human MSC expansion and differentiation for use in clinical trials, and second to compare these MSCs with MSCs derived from culture in four media commonly...

  20. Investigation of biomaterials by human epithelial gingiva cells: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neunzehn Jörg

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In modern medicine and dentistry the use of biomaterials is a fast developing field of increasing interest. Especially in dentistry the interaction between biomaterials like implant materials and the soft tissue in the oral cavity is in the focus of daily research. In this context the high importance of testing materials and their surfaces concerning their biocompatibility towards corresponding cells is very likely. For this purpose this study investigates cells derived from human gingival biopsies on different materials and surfaces. Methods Cells in this study were cultivated out of human biopsies by a grow out explant technique and were sub cultivated on titanium, zirconium dioxide and collagen membrane specimens. To characterise the cells on the material surfaces used in this study immunohistochemical and histological staining techniques as well as different methods of microscopy (light microscopy and SEM were applied. Results With the aid of the explant technique and the chosen cell cultivation method it was possible to investigate the human gingiva derived cells on different materials. The data of the present study show that the human gingival cells attach and proliferate on all three tested materials by exhibiting characteristic gingival keratinocyte protein expression even after long periods of culture e.g. up to 70 days. Conclusions It could be shown that the three tested materials titanium, zirconium dioxide and collagen membrane (and their special surfaces are good candidates for the application as materials in the dental gingival environment or, in the case of the collagen membrane as scaffold/cell-carrier for human gingival cells in tissue engineering.

  1. Clinical-Grade Human Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells Block CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessers, Jeroen; Dekimpe, Emily; Van Woensel, Matthias; Roobrouck, Valerie D; Bullens, Dominique M; Pinxteren, Jef; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2016-12-01

    : MultiStem cells are clinical-grade multipotent adult bone marrow-derived progenitor cells (MAPCs), with extensive replication potential and broader differentiation capacity compared with mesenchymal stem cells. Human MAPCs suppress T-cell proliferation induced by alloantigens and mutually interact with allogeneic natural killer cells. In this study, the interaction between MultiStem and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was addressed for the first time. In an in vitro setting, the immunogenicity of MultiStem, the susceptibility of MultiStem toward CTL-mediated lysis, and its effects on CTL function were investigated. MultiStem was nonimmunogenic for alloreactive CTL induction and was-even after major histocompatibility complex class I upregulation-insensitive to alloantigen-specific CTL-mediated lysis. Furthermore, MultiStem reduced CTL proliferation and significantly decreased perforin expression during the T-cell activation phase. As a consequence, MultiStem dose-dependently impaired the induction of CTL function. These effects of MultiStem were mediated predominantly through contact-dependent mechanisms. Moreover, MultiStem cells considerably influenced the expression of T-cell activation markers CD25, CD69, and human leukocyte antigen-DR. The MultiStem-induced CD8(-)CD69(+) T-cell population displayed a suppressive effect on the induction of CTL function during a subsequent mixed-lymphocyte culture. Finally, the killer activity of activated antigen-specific CTLs during their cytolytic effector phase was also diminished in the presence of MultiStem. This study confirms that these clinical-grade MAPCs are an immune-modulating population that inhibits CTL activation and effector responses and are, consequently, a highly valuable cell population for adoptive immunosuppressive therapy in diseases where damage is induced by CTLs. Because multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) are among the noteworthy adult mesenchymal stem cell populations for immune

  2. Expectations and experiences of investigators and parents involved in a clinical trial for Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peay, Holly L; Tibben, Aad; Fisher, Tyler; Brenna, Ethan; Biesecker, Barbara B

    2014-02-01

    The social context of rare disease research is changing, with increased community engagement around drug development and clinical trials. This engagement may benefit patients and families but may also lead to heightened trial expectations and therapeutic misconception. Clinical investigators are also susceptible to harboring high expectations. Little is known about parental motivations and expectations for clinical trials for rare pediatric disorders. We describe the experience of parents and clinical investigators involved in a phase II clinical trial for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy: their expectations, hopes, motivations, and reactions to the termination of the trial. This qualitative study was based on interviews with clinical investigators and parents of sons with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DBMD) who participated in the phase IIa or IIb ataluren clinical trial in the United States. Interviews were transcribed and coded for thematic analysis. Participants were 12 parents of affected boys receiving active drug and 9 clinical investigators. High trial expectations of direct benefit were reported by parents and many clinicians. Investigators described monitoring and managing parents' expectations; several worried about their own involvement in increasing parents' expectations. Most parents were able to differentiate their expectations from their optimistic hopes for a cure. Parents' expectations arose from other parents, advocacy organizations, and the sponsor. All parents reported some degree of clinical benefit to their children. Secondary benefits were hopefulness and powerful feelings associated with active efforts to affect the disease course. Parents and clinical investigators reported strong, close relationships that were mutually important. Parents and clinicians felt valued by the sponsor for the majority of the trial. When the trial abruptly stopped, they described loss of engagement, distress, and feeling unprepared for the

  3. Clinical experience with recombinant human thrombopoietin in chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadhan-Raj, S

    2000-04-01

    Since the identification and cloning of c-Mpl ligand, two forms of recombinant human thrombopoietin have undergone clinical development. Both the full-length molecule, known as rhTPO, and the truncated version of the molecule, known as pegylated recombinant human megakaryocyte growth and development factor (PEG-rHuMGDF), have been evaluated in phase I/II clinical trials in cancer patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Early clinical trials with PEG-rHuMGDF in cancer patients demonstrated its clinical safety and platelet-stimulating activity. However, the development of neutralizing antibodies and clinically significant thrombocytopenia in some patients and normal donors who received PEG-rHuMGDF have led to discontinuation of clinical trials with this molecule in the United States. Clinical experience with rhTPO so far indicates that this full-length glycosylated molecule is remarkably well tolerated and has a favorable safety profile. In these studies, rhTPO exhibited dose-dependent increases in circulating platelet counts and bone marrow megakaryocytes before chemotherapy. In addition, there was an increase in the frequency and proliferation of bone marrow progenitor cells and mobilization of progenitors into the peripheral blood. Early results also showed that rhTPO can attenuate chemotherapy-induced severe thrombocytopenia and reduce the need for platelet transfusions. However, in this setting, the optimal schedule of rhTPO administration may depend on the length of the regimen and anticipated timing of the platelet nadir. These initial results indicate that rhTPO is a safe and potentially useful agent in the prevention and management of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. Results of larger randomized clinical trials will determine the therapeutic potential of this novel growth factor in various clinical settings.

  4. Investigating the role of feedback and motivation in clinical reaction time assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckner, James T.; Chandran, SriKrishna; Richardson, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of performance feedback and motivation during two tests of simple visuo-motor reaction time. Design Cross-sectional, observational study. Setting Outpatient academic physiatry clinic. Participants 31 healthy adults aged 54 ± 15 years. Methods Participants completed a clinical test of reaction time (RTclin) and a computerized test of reaction time with and without performance feedback (RTcompFB and RTcompNoFB, respectively) in randomly assigned order. They then ranked their degree of motivation during each test. RTclin measured the time required to catch a suspended vertical shaft by hand closure after its release by the examiner. RTcompFB and RTcompNoFB both measured the time required to press a computer key in response to a visual cue displayed on a computer monitor. Performance feedback (visual display of the previous trial and summary results) was provided for RTcompFB, but not for RTcompNoFB. Main Outcome Measurements Means and standard deviations of RTclin, RTcompFB, and RTcompNoFB; Participants’ self-reported motivation on a 5-point Likert scale for each test. Results There were significant differences in both the means and standard deviations of RTclin, RTcompFB, and RTcompNoFB (F2,60 = 81.66, p < 0.0001; F2,60 = 32.46, p < 0.0001, respectively) with RTclin being both the fastest and least variable of the reaction time measures. RTclin was more strongly correlated with RTcompFB (r = 0.449, p = 0.011) than with RTcompNoFB (r = 0.314, p = 0.086). Participants reported similar levels of motivation between RTclin and RTcompFB, both of which were reported to be more motivating than RTcompNoFB. Conclusions The stronger correlation between RTclin and RTcompFB as well as the higher reported motivation during RTclin and RTcompFB testing suggest that performance feedback is a positive motivating factor that is implicit to RTclin testing. RTclin is a simple, inexpensive technique for measuring reaction time and appears to be an

  5. A tool to facilitate clinical biomarker studies - a tissue dictionary based on the Human Protein Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampf Caroline

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complexity of tissue and the alterations that distinguish normal from cancer remain a challenge for translating results from tumor biological studies into clinical medicine. This has generated an unmet need to exploit the findings from studies based on cell lines and model organisms to develop, validate and clinically apply novel diagnostic, prognostic and treatment predictive markers. As one step to meet this challenge, the Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to produce antibodies towards human protein targets corresponding to all human protein coding genes and to map protein expression in normal human tissues, cancer and cells. Here, we present a dictionary based on microscopy images created as an amendment to the Human Protein Atlas. The aim of the dictionary is to facilitate the interpretation and use of the image-based data available in the Human Protein Atlas, but also to serve as a tool for training and understanding tissue histology, pathology and cell biology. The dictionary contains three main parts, normal tissues, cancer tissues and cells, and is based on high-resolution images at different magnifications of full tissue sections stained with H & E. The cell atlas is centered on immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy images, using different color channels to highlight the organelle structure of a cell. Here, we explain how this dictionary can be used as a tool to aid clinicians and scientists in understanding the use of tissue histology and cancer pathology in diagnostics and biomarker studies.

  6. Investigation on the Maternal-Infantile Infection with Human Parvovirus B19

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王净; 窦骏; 过志君; 许桦; 任慕兰; 蒋黎

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the maternal-infantile infection with human parvovirus B19, the IgG and IgM antibodies against human parvovirus and the B19-DNA in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of pregnant women as well as the serum IgM antibody against B19 and the B19-DNA in serum and cord blood nucleated cells (CBNC) of newborns were determined by ELISA and nested PCR respectively. It was found that the positive rate of the IgG antibody against human parvovirus B19 in sera of 92 pregnant women was 38.04% (35/92), and that of the IgM antibody in 720 pregnant women was 9.03% (65/720). However, the IgM antibody against human parvoviras B19 was negative in the cord blood sera of 95 newborns. As to the human parvoviras B19 DNA, none of 720 pregnant women and 95 newborns was proved to be positive in their sera, Nevertheless, the positive rate of the parvoviras B19 DNA in PBMC was 3.06% (3/98) in98 pregnant women and 1.12% (1/89) in CBNC of 89 newborns. It is concluded that the history of infection with human parvoviras B19 exists in certain pregnant women with a small percentage of pregnant women infected with recent or acute infections of B19 virus. The detection rates of the B19 viral DNA in PBMC of pregnant women and CBNC of newborns were higher than those in sera, indicating that the risk for vertical transmission is very low.

  7. Developing clinical skills in paediatric dysphagia management using human patient simulation (HPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Elizabeth C; Hill, Anne E; Nund, Rebecca L; Rumbach, Anna F; Walker-Smith, Katie; Wright, Sarah E; Kelly, Kris; Dodrill, Pamela

    2015-06-01

    The use of simulated learning environments to develop clinical skills is gaining momentum in speech-language pathology training programs. The aim of the current study was to examine the benefits of adding Human Patient Simulation (HPS) into the university curriculum in the area of paediatric dysphagia. University students enrolled in a mandatory dysphagia course (n = 29) completed two, 2-hour HPS scenarios: (a) performing a clinical feeding assessment with a medically complex infant; and (b) conducting a clinical swallow examination (CSE) with a child with a tracheostomy. Scenarios covered technical and non-technical skills in paediatric dysphagia management. Surveys relating to students' perceived knowledge, skills, confidence and levels of anxiety were conducted: (a) pre-lectures; (b) post-lectures, but pre-HPS; and (c) post-HPS. A fourth survey was completed following clinical placements with real clients. Results demonstrate significant additive value in knowledge, skills and confidence obtained through HPS. Anxiety about working clinically reduced following HPS. Students rated simulation as very useful in preparing for clinical practice. Post-clinic, students indicated that HPS was an important component in their preparation to work as a clinician. This trial supports the benefits of incorporating HPS as part of clinical preparation for paediatric dysphagia management.

  8. Using a System Identification Approach to Investigate Subtask Control during Human Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, David; Kiemel, Tim; Jeka, John J

    2016-01-01

    Here we apply a control theoretic view of movement to the behavior of human locomotion with the goal of using perturbations to learn about subtask control. Controlling one's speed and maintaining upright posture are two critical subtasks, or underlying functions, of human locomotion. How the nervous system simultaneously controls these two subtasks was investigated in this study. Continuous visual and mechanical perturbations were applied concurrently to subjects (n = 20) as probes to investigate these two subtasks during treadmill walking. Novel application of harmonic transfer function (HTF) analysis to human motor behavior was used, and these HTFs were converted to the time-domain based representation of phase-dependent impulse response functions (ϕIRFs). These ϕIRFs were used to identify the mapping from perturbation inputs to kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) outputs throughout the phases of the gait cycle. Mechanical perturbations caused an initial, passive change in trunk orientation and, at some phases of stimulus presentation, a corrective trunk EMG and orientation response. Visual perturbations elicited a trunk EMG response prior to a trunk orientation response, which was subsequently followed by an anterior-posterior displacement response. This finding supports the notion that there is a temporal hierarchy of functional subtasks during locomotion in which the control of upper-body posture precedes other subtasks. Moreover, the novel analysis we apply has the potential to probe a broad range of rhythmic behaviors to better understand their neural control.

  9. Auditory Contagious Yawning in Humans: An Investigation into Affiliation and Status Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg J.M. Massen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available While comparative research on contagious yawning has grown substantially in the past few years, both the interpersonal factors influencing this response and the sensory modalities involved in its activation in humans remain relatively unknown. Extending upon previous studies showing various in-group and status effects in non-human great apes, we performed an initial study to investigate how the political affiliation (Democrat versus Republican and status (high versus low of target stimuli influences auditory contagious yawning, as well as the urge to yawn, in humans. Self-report responses and a subset of video recordings were analyzed from 118 undergraduate students in the US following exposure to either breathing (control or yawning (experimental vocalizations paired with images of former US Presidents (high status and their respective Cabinet Secretaries of Commerce (low status. The overall results validate the use of auditory stimuli to prompt yawn contagion, with greater response in the experimental than the control condition. There was also a negative effect of political status on self-reported yawning and the self-reported urge to yawn irrespective of the condition. In contrast, we found no evidence for a political affiliation bias in this response. These preliminary findings are discussed in terms of the existing comparative evidence, though we highlight limitations in the current investigation and we provide suggestions for future research in this area.

  10. Dynamic transcriptional signatures and network responses for clinical symptoms in influenza-infected human subjects using systems biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linel, Patrice; Wu, Shuang; Deng, Nan; Wu, Hulin

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that human blood transcriptional signatures may be used to support diagnosis and clinical decisions for acute respiratory viral infections such as influenza. In this article, we propose to use a newly developed systems biology approach for time course gene expression data to identify significant dynamically response genes and dynamic gene network responses to viral infection. We illustrate the methodological pipeline by reanalyzing the time course gene expression data from a study with healthy human subjects challenged by live influenza virus. We observed clear differences in the number of significant dynamic response genes (DRGs) between the symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects and also identified DRG signatures for symptomatic subjects with influenza infection. The 505 common DRGs shared by the symptomatic subjects have high consistency with the signature genes for predicting viral infection identified in previous works. The temporal response patterns and network response features were carefully analyzed and investigated.

  11. Identification of some benproperine metabolites in humans and investigation of their antitussive effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan LI; Da-fang ZHONG; Si-wei CHEN; Isamu MAEBA

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To identify 4 unknown metabolites of benproperine (BPP, 1) in human urine after a po dose, and to investigate the antitussive effect of monohydroxylate metabolites. Methods: The putative metabolite references were prepared using chemical synthesis. Their structures were identified using 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry. The metabolites in human urine were separated and assayed using liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), and further confirmed by comparison of their mass spectra and chromatographic retention times with those of synthesized reference substances. The antitussive effects of metabolites were evaluated on coughs induced by 7.5% citric acid in conscious guinea pigs. Results: 1-[1-Methyl-2-[2-(phenylmethyl)phenoxy] -ethyl] -4-piperidinol (2), 1- [ 1-methyl-2- [2-(phenylmethyl)phenoxy] ethyl]-3-piperidinol (3) and their glucuronides 4 and 5 were obtained from chemical synthesis. Four urinary metabolites in human urine showed peaks with the same chromatographic retention times and mass spectra in LC/MS/MS as synthetic substances 2, 3, 4 and 5. Phosphates of compounds 2 and 3 prolonged the latency of cough and reduced the number of coughs during the 3 min test using citric acid, but did not reduce the number of coughs during the 5 min immediately after the test in conscious guinea pigs. Conclusion: Compounds 2, 3, 4,and 5 were identified as the metabolites of BPP in human urine. Among them,compounds 2 and 3 are inactive in the antitussive effect.

  12. Investigations of micron and submicron wear features of diseased human cartilage surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Baena, Juan C; Wang, Meiling

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common disease. However, its causes and morphological features of diseased cartilage surfaces are not well understood. The purposes of this research were (a) to develop quantitative surface characterization techniques to study human cartilages at a micron and submicron scale and (b) to investigate distinctive changes in the surface morphologies and biomechanical properties of the cartilages in different osteoarthritis grades. Diseased cartilage samples collected from osteoarthritis patients were prepared for image acquisition using two different techniques, that is, laser scanning microscopy at a micrometer scale and atomic force microscopy at a nanometer scale. Three-dimensional, digital images of human cartilages were processed and analyzed quantitatively. This study has demonstrated that high-quality three-dimensional images of human cartilage surfaces could be obtained in a hydrated condition using laser scanning microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Based on the numerical data extracted from improved image quality and quantity, it has been found that osteoarthritis evolution can be identified by specific surface features at the micrometer scale, and these features are amplitude and functional property related. At the submicron level, the spatial features of the surfaces were revealed to differ between early and advanced osteoarthritis grades. The effective indentation moduli of human cartilages effectively revealed the cartilage deterioration. The imaging acquisition and numerical analysis methods established allow quantitative studies of distinctive changes in cartilage surface characteristics and better understanding of the cartilage degradation process.

  13. Internal structure changes in bleached black human hair resulting from chemical treatments: A Raman spectroscopic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, Akio

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate in detail the influence of chemical treatments (reduction, hydrolyzed eggwhite protein (HEWP) treatment, and oxidation) on damaged hair keratin fibers, the structure of cross-sections at various depths of excessively bleached (damaged) black human hair resulting from a permanent waving process was directly analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. It was found that L-cysteine (CYS) largely reacted with the gauche-gauche-gauche (GGG) conformation of disulfide (-SS-) groups (while CYS did not react with the trans-gauche-trans (TGT) conformation). In particular, not only the GGG content, but also the cysteic acid content existing throughout the cortex region of the excessively bleached human hair remarkably decreased by performing the oxidation process after reduction. On the other hand, the GGG content of the excessively bleached black human hair increased, while the TGT content decreased by performing the oxidation process after reduction and then HEWP treatment processes. From these experiments, the authors concluded that some of the keratin associated protein (KAP), which has a rich -SS- content and cysteic acid content was eluted from the cortex region along with the disconnection of -SS- groups, thereby leading to the remarkable reduction in the reconnection of -SS- groups of the excessively bleached black human hair after the permanent waving process (the reduction and oxidation processes). Also, the authors concluded that the HEWP treatment process in the permanent waving process caused the reconstruction of the KAP, thereby contributing to the acceleration of the reconnection of -SS- groups during the oxidation process.

  14. Departmental of Clinical Investigation: Annual Research Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1992. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Human Veins. (t) 214 C-39-91 The Effects of Topical Oral Antiseptic Rinses on Bacterial 215 r Content of Saliva in Healthy Human Subjects. (c) C-40-91...Status: Completed Title: The Effects of Topical Oral Antiseptic Rinses on Bacterial Content of Saliva in Healthy Human Subjects. Start date: 6 Mar 91...rifampin IV: 1) active tuberculosis where the drug cannot be taken by mouth , patients who do not tolerate oral medication, and in comatose patients

  15. Mean Deviation of Inter-rater Scoring (MDIS): a simple tool for introducing conformity into groups of clinical investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourin, Michel; Deplanque, Dominique; Zins-Ritter, Marcel

    2004-07-01

    In spite of considerable progress over the past decade, training investigators for inter-rater reliability for clinical trials remains a major problem. The aim of the present study was to promote a new tool to increase data homogeneity by introducing conformity into groups of clinical investigators. The investigators scoring grid we are proposing-the Mean Deviation of Inter-rater Scoring (MDIS)-involves the calculation of the score deviation for each investigator relative to the median score of an expert group who had evaluated the same videotape-recorded clinical case. Whatever the scale, the score deviation is calculated as the absolute deviation value from the median score obtained by the experts for each item. The MDIS value is then evaluated from all the scores given by an investigator by dividing the total sum of the previously defined values by the number of items of the scale. Some examples from practice are given using several rating scales: (i) Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale; (ii) Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; (iii) Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale; and (iv) Positive And Negative Symptoms Scale. Finally, such a method could also be employed by experts to evaluate the quality of videotape-recorded clinical cases used in clinical trials, as well as by teachers to evaluate initial or continuous medical training.

  16. Investigation of a clinical PET detector module design that employs large-area avalanche photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao; Olcott, Peter D; Spanoudaki, Virginia; Levin, Craig S

    2011-06-21

    We investigated the feasibility of designing an Anger-logic PET detector module using large-area high-gain avalanche photodiodes (APDs) for a brain-dedicated PET/MRI system. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we systematically optimized the detector design with regard to the scintillation crystal, optical diffuser, surface treatment, layout of large-area APDs, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, defined as the 511 keV photopeak position divided by the standard deviation of noise floor in an energy spectrum) of the APD devices. A detector prototype was built comprising an 8 × 8 array of 2.75 × 3.00 × 20.0 mm3 LYSO (lutetium-yttrium-oxyorthosilicate) crystals and a 22.0 × 24.0 × 9.0 mm3 optical diffuser. From the four designs of the optical diffuser tested, two designs employing a slotted diffuser are able to resolve all 64 crystals within the block with good uniformity and peak-to-valley ratio. Good agreement was found between the simulation and experimental results. For the detector employing a slotted optical diffuser, the energy resolution of the global energy spectrum after normalization is 13.4 ± 0.4%. The energy resolution of individual crystals varies between 11.3 ± 0.3% and 17.3 ± 0.4%. The time resolution varies between 4.85 ± 0.04 (center crystal), 5.17 ± 0.06 (edge crystal), and 5.18 ± 0.07 ns (corner crystal). The generalized framework proposed in this work helps to guide the design of detector modules for selected PET system configurations, including scaling the design down to a preclinical PET system, scaling up to a whole-body clinical scanner, as well as replacing APDs with other novel photodetectors that have higher gain or SNR such as silicon photomultipliers.

  17. Effect of Low-Level Laser Therapy on Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Clinical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalaie, Kazem; Hamedi, Roya; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad; Mahdian, Mina; Bayat, Mehrdad

    2015-04-01

    One major drawback of orthodontic treatment is its long duration due to slow tooth movement and the pain at the onset of treatment following application of forces. There is controversy regarding the efficacy of laser for decreasing the treatment time and pain of orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low level diode laser on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and the associated pain. In this double blind randomized controlled clinical trial, 12 orthodontic patients referring to Shahid Beheshti School of Dentistry for first premolar extraction were randomly selected and allocated to gallium aluminum-arsenide laser (GA-AL-AS diode laser, 880 nm, 100 mW, 5 j/cm(2), 8 points, 80 seconds, continuous mode) or control group. The patients initially underwent leveling and alignment using the sectional system. Force (150 gr) was applied to each canine tooth via sectional closing loops. The loops were activated every month. The rate of tooth movement and pain were monitored over the treatment period and recorded on days 1, 3, 7, 30, 33, 37, 60, 63 and 67. Two-way ANOVA was used for comparison of groups. There was no significant difference in terms of tooth movement and pain scores between the irradiated and non-irradiated sides at any time point (P>0.05). Although laser enhanced orthodontic tooth movement in the upper jaw, we failed to provide solid evidence to support the efficacy of laser for expediting tooth movement or reducing the associated pain.

  18. Systems Biology Investigations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Evolution in Association with Human Airway Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Damkiær

    Most knowledge about evolutionary adaptation has been gained from experimental evolution studies, in which organisms have been allowed to evolve under simple, well-defined conditions in the laboratory. While these studies have provided novel insight into the fundamental processes of evolutionary...... environments. The model system used for these investigations has been long-term chronic airway infections in Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients caused by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Using a systems biology approach, we have monitored the adaptive development of the clinically important P....... aeruginosa DK2 clone lineage during 200,000 generations of evolution in the CF airways from its entrance in the clinic in the 1970’ies until the end of 2010. Genetic analysis showed that the DK2 lineage between 1973 and 2007 accumulated mutations in a near-linear manner with an overall genomic signature...

  19. [Recent knowledge on the linkage of strain specific genotypes with clinical manifestations of human citomegalovirus disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatelli, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Human citomegalovirus (CMV) is a beta-herpesvirus able to establish lifelong persistent infections which usually remain asymptomatic. However, severe diseases may develop in immunocompromised subjects (e.g., AIDS patients and transplant recipients) and if acquired in utero. Circulating CMV clinical strains display genetic polymorphisms in multiple genes, which may be implicated in CMV-induced immunopathogenesis, as well as strain-specific tissue-tropism, viral spread in the host cells and virulence, finally determining the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of CMV disease. Current literature report a number of studies regarding the main CMV polymorphic genes (UL55-gB, UL144, UL73-gN, UL74-gO), their diagnostic and therapeutic impact, their potential clinical relevance as prognostic markers. This paper aims to critically analyse the results of these studies and evaluate the linkage of strain-specific genotypes with clinical manifestations of CMV disease and their perspective implications.

  20. The Anti-tumour Agent, Cisplatin, and its Clinically Ineffective Isomer, Transplatin, Produce Unique Gene Expression Profiles in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Galea

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a DNA-damaging anti-cancer agent that is widely used to treat a range of tumour types. Despite its clinical success, cisplatin treatment is still associated with a number of dose-limiting toxic side effects. The purpose of this study was to clarify the molecular events that are important in the anti-tumour activity of cisplatin, using gene expression profi ling techniques. Currently, our incomplete understanding of this drug’s mechanism of action hinders the development of more efficient and less harmful cisplatin-based chemotherapeutics. In this study the effect of cisplatin on gene expression in human foreskin fibroblasts has been investigated using human 19K oligonucleotide microarrays. In addition its clinically inactive isomer, transplatin, was also tested. Dual-fluor microarray experiments comparing treated and untreated cells were performed in quadruplicate. Cisplatin treatment was shown to significantly up- or down-regulate a consistent subset of genes. Many of these genes responded similarly to treatment with transplatin, the therapeutically inactive isomer of cisplatin. However, a smaller proportion of these transcripts underwent differential expression changes in response to the two isomers. Some of these genes may constitute part of the DNA damage response induced by cisplatin that is critical for its anti-tumour activity. Ultimately, the identification of gene expression responses unique to clinically active compounds, like cisplatin, could thus greatly benefit the design and development of improved chemotherapeutics.

  1. Human cytomegalovirus UL145 gene is highly conserved among clinical strains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhengrong Sun; Ying Lu; Qiang Ruan; Yaohua Ji; Rong He; Ying Qi; Yanping Ma; Yujing Huang

    2007-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a ubiquitous human pathogen, is the leading cause of birth defects in newborns. A region (referred to as UL/b′) present in the Toledo strain of HCMV and low-passage clinical isolates) contains 22 additional genes, which are absent in the highly passaged laboratory strain AD169. One of these genes, UL145 open reading frame (ORF), is located between the highly variable genes UL144 and UL146. To assess the structure of the UL145 gene, the UL145 ORF was amplified by PCR and sequenced from 16 low-passage clinical isolates and 15 non-passage strains from suspected congenitally infected infants. Nine UL145 sequences previously published in the GenBank were used for sequence comparison. The identities of the gene and the similarities of its putative protein among all strains were 95.9–100% and 96.6–100%, respectively. The post-translational modification motifs of the UL145 putative protein in clinical strains were conserved, comprising the protein kinase C phosphorylation motif (PKC) and casein kinase II phosphorylation site (CK-II). We conclude that the structure of the UL145 gene and its putative protein are relatively conserved among clinical strains, irrespective of whether the strains come from patients with different manifestations, from different areas of the world, or were passaged or not in human embryonic lung fibroblast (HELF) cells.

  2. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so.

  3. Correlation of quantity of dental students' clinical experiences with faculty evaluation of overall clinical competence: a twenty-two-year retrospective investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Michael; Holmes, David C; Doering, John V

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the quantity of a student's clinical experiences in the final year of dental school and the student's overall clinical competence at graduation, as evaluated by faculty at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. Further, the authors sought to determine whether this correlation changed over time, as new generations of students come to dental school. Information including year of graduation, age at graduation, final grade in the course Clinical Competencies in Comprehensive Care, and final total Clinical Experience Units (CEUs) earned by each student in the D4 Family Dentistry Clinic was collected for 1987-2008 graduates of the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r(s)) was computed for the association of final clinical course grade and final CEU total for each graduation year. The correlation between final course grade and final CEU total was variable, ranging from moderately strong (r(s)=0.614, Class of 1991) to negligible (r(s)=-0.013, Class of 2008). This correlation generally tended to become weaker over time. The results of this study suggest that the terminal quality of a dental student's work is not solely a function of repetitions of prescribed procedures and that repetition of procedures may have even less influence on the quality of clinical performance for the new generation of dental students.

  4. Human genetics after the bomb: Archives, clinics, proving grounds and board rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindee, Susan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper I track the history of post-1945 human genetics and genomics emphasizing the importance of ideas about risk to the scientific study and medical management of human heredity. Drawing on my own scholarship as it is refracted through important new work by other scholars both junior and senior, I explore how radiation risk and then later disease risk mattered to the development of genetics and genomics, particularly in the United States. In this context I excavate one of the central ironies of post-war human genetics: while studies of DNA as the origin and cause of diseases have been lavishly supported by public institutions and private investment around the world, the day-to-day labor of intensive clinical innovation has played a far more important role in the actual human experience of genetic disease and genetic risk for affected families. This has implications for the archival record, where clinical interactions are less readily accessible to historians. This paper then suggests that modern genomics grew out of radiation risk; that it was and remains a risk assessment science; that it is temporally embedded as a form of both prediction and historical reconstruction; and that it has become a big business focused more on risk and prediction (which can be readily marketed) than on effective clinical intervention.

  5. The bereitschaftspotential paradigm in investigating voluntary movement organization in humans using magnetoencephalography (MEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristeva-Feige, R; Rossi, S; Feige, B; Mergner, T; Lücking, C H; Rossini, P M

    1997-02-01

    In 1965, Kornhuber and Deecke first described the bereitschaftspotential (BP), a paradigm for investigating the organization of voluntary movement in humans, using electroencephalography (EEG). This paradigm has since been used in many studies for investigating motor control in healthy humans and patients. Over the last years, the advantages of magnetoencephalography (MEG) have been applied to the BP paradigm by a number of researchers. The main advantage of magnetoencephalography over electroencephalography is that MEG has a higher localization accuracy. This is due to the fact that the different structures of the head (brain, liquor cerebrospinalis, skull and scalp) influence the magnetic fields less than the volume current flow that causes the EEG. Additionally, the MEG is reference free, so that the localization of sources with a given precision is easier for MEG than it is for EEG. The present protocol shows in detail how the bereitschaftspotential paradigm can be applied using MEG. Some additional paradigms for investigating motor plasticity, somatosensory gating, Parkinson disease, and the efference copy theory are suggested as well.

  6. Model for investigating the benefits of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test a model for analysing the possible benefits of clinical supervision. The model suggested a pathway from participation to effectiveness to benefits of clinical supervision, and included possible influences of individual and workplace factors. The study sample...... was 136 nursing staff members in permanent employment on nine general psychiatric wards and at four community mental health centres at a Danish psychiatric university hospital. Data were collected by means of a set of questionnaires. Participation in clinical supervision was associated...... with the effectiveness of clinical supervision, as measured by the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS). Furthermore, MCSS scores were associated with benefits, such as increased job satisfaction, vitality, rational coping and less stress, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization. Multivariate analyses...

  7. 21 CFR 50.54 - Clinical investigations not otherwise approvable that present an opportunity to understand...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., medicine, education, ethics, law) and following opportunity for public review and comment, determines... that present an opportunity to understand, prevent, or alleviate a serious problem affecting the health... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Safeguards for Children...

  8. Investigation of the effects of human body stability on joint angles’ prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasha Zanoosi, A. A., E-mail: aliakbar.pasha@yahoo.com, E-mail: aliakbar.pasha@qiau.ac.ir [Islamic Azad University, Faculty of Industrial & Mechanical Engineering, Qazvin Branch (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, D.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.; Feri, M. [Bu Ali-Sina University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beheshtiha, A. Sh. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Mechanics and Computational Mechanics (Germany); Fallahnejad, K. [Flinders University, Discipline of Mechanical Engineering, School of Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Loosing stability control in elderly or paralyzed has motivated researchers to study how a stability control system works and how to determine its state at every time instant. Studying the stability of a human body is not only an important problem from a scientific viewpoint, but also finally leads to new designs of prostheses and orthoses and rehabilitation methods. Computer modeling enables researchers to study and describe the reactions and propose a suitable and optimized motion pattern to strengthen the neuromuscular system and helps a human body maintain its stability. A perturbation as a tilting is exposed to an underfoot plate of a musculoskeletal model of the body to study the stability. The studied model of a human body included four links and three degrees of freedom with eight muscles in the sagittal plane. Lagrangian dynamics was used for deriving equations of motion and muscles were modeled using Hill’s model. Using experimental data of joint trajectories for a human body under tilting perturbation, forward dynamics has been applied to predict joint trajectories and muscle activation. This study investigated the effects of stability on predicting body joints’ motion. A new stability function for a human body, based on the zero moment point, has been employed in a forward dynamics procedure using a direct collocation method. A multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm has been proposed to employ stability as a robotic objective function along with muscle stresses as a biological objective function. The obtained results for joints’ motion were compared to experimental data. The results show that, for this type of perturbations, muscle stresses are in conflict with body stability. This means that more body stability requires more stresses in muscles and reverse. Results also show the effects of the stability objective function in better prediction of joint trajectories.

  9. Animal models that best reproduce the clinical manifestations of human intoxication with organophosphorus compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Edna F R; Aracava, Yasco; DeTolla, Louis J; Beecham, E Jeffrey; Basinger, G William; Wakayama, Edgar J; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2014-08-01

    The translational capacity of data generated in preclinical toxicological studies is contingent upon several factors, including the appropriateness of the animal model. The primary objectives of this article are: 1) to analyze the natural history of acute and delayed signs and symptoms that develop following an acute exposure of humans to organophosphorus (OP) compounds, with an emphasis on nerve agents; 2) to identify animal models of the clinical manifestations of human exposure to OPs; and 3) to review the mechanisms that contribute to the immediate and delayed OP neurotoxicity. As discussed in this study, clinical manifestations of an acute exposure of humans to OP compounds can be faithfully reproduced in rodents and nonhuman primates. These manifestations include an acute cholinergic crisis in addition to signs of neurotoxicity that develop long after the OP exposure, particularly chronic neurologic deficits consisting of anxiety-related behavior and cognitive deficits, structural brain damage, and increased slow electroencephalographic frequencies. Because guinea pigs and nonhuman primates, like humans, have low levels of circulating carboxylesterases-the enzymes that metabolize and inactivate OP compounds-they stand out as appropriate animal models for studies of OP intoxication. These are critical points for the development of safe and effective therapeutic interventions against OP poisoning because approval of such therapies by the Food and Drug Administration is likely to rely on the Animal Efficacy Rule, which allows exclusive use of animal data as evidence of the effectiveness of a drug against pathologic conditions that cannot be ethically or feasibly tested in humans.

  10. Prospect of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells in Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs represent a transient and multipotent cell population that contributes to numerous anatomical structures such as peripheral nervous system, teeth, and cornea. NCSC maldevelopment is related to various human diseases including pigmentation abnormalities, disorders affecting autonomic nervous system, and malformations of teeth, eyes, and hearts. As human pluripotent stem cells including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs can serve as an unlimited cell source to generate NCSCs, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs can be a valuable tool to study the underlying mechanisms of NCSC-associated diseases, which paves the way for future therapies for these abnormalities. In addition, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs with the capability of differentiating to various cell types are highly promising for clinical organ repair and regeneration. In this review, we first discuss NCSC generation methods from human pluripotent stem cells and differentiation mechanism of NCSCs. Then we focus on the clinical application potential of hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs on peripheral nerve injuries, corneal blindness, tooth regeneration, pathological melanogenesis, Hirschsprung disease, and cardiac repair and regeneration.

  11. Prospect of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells in Clinical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian; Lu, Qiqi; Gao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) represent a transient and multipotent cell population that contributes to numerous anatomical structures such as peripheral nervous system, teeth, and cornea. NCSC maldevelopment is related to various human diseases including pigmentation abnormalities, disorders affecting autonomic nervous system, and malformations of teeth, eyes, and hearts. As human pluripotent stem cells including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can serve as an unlimited cell source to generate NCSCs, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs can be a valuable tool to study the underlying mechanisms of NCSC-associated diseases, which paves the way for future therapies for these abnormalities. In addition, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs with the capability of differentiating to various cell types are highly promising for clinical organ repair and regeneration. In this review, we first discuss NCSC generation methods from human pluripotent stem cells and differentiation mechanism of NCSCs. Then we focus on the clinical application potential of hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs on peripheral nerve injuries, corneal blindness, tooth regeneration, pathological melanogenesis, Hirschsprung disease, and cardiac repair and regeneration. PMID:28090209

  12. Investigation of the Interaction between Adenosine and Human Serum Albumin by Fluorescent Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Feng-Ling; WANG Jun-Li; LI Fang; FAN Jing; QU Gui-Rong; YAO Xiao-Jun; LEI Bei-Lei

    2008-01-01

    The binding interaction of adenosine with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated under simulative physiological conditions by fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with a molecular modeling method. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of adenosine to HSA was observed and the quenching mechanism was suggested as static quenching according to the Stern-Volmer equation. The binding constants (K) at different temperatures as well as thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS), were calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Vant'Hoff equation. The hydrophobic interaction was a predominant intermolecular force in order to stabilize the complex, which was in agreement with the results of molecular modeling study.

  13. Clinical relevance of infections with zoonotic and human oral species of Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soomin; Lee, Jeeyeon; Ha, Jimyeong; Choi, Yukyung; Kim, Sejeong; Lee, Heeyoung; Yoon, Yohan; Choi, Kyoung-Hee

    2016-07-01

    Genus Campylobacter has been recognized as a causative bacterial agent of animal and human diseases. Human Campylobacter infections have caused more concern. Campylobacters can be classified into two groups in terms of their original host: zoonotic and human oral species. The major zoonotic species are Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, which mostly reside in the intestines of avian species and are transmitted to humans via consumption of contaminated poultry products, thus causing human gastroenteritis and other diseases as sequelae. The other campylobacters, human oral species, include C. concisus, C. showae, C. gracilis, C. ureolyticus, C. curvus, and C. rectus. These species are isolated from the oral cavity, natural colonization site, but have potential clinical relevance in the periodontal region to varying extent. Two species, C. jejuni and C. coli, are believed to be mainly associated with intestinal diseases, but recent studies suggested that oral Campylobacter species also play a significant role in intestinal diseases. This review offers an outline of the two Campylobacter groups (zoonotic and human oral), their virulence traits, and the associated illnesses including gastroenteritis.

  14. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian.

  15. Investigation of osteosarcoma genomics and its impact on targeted therapy:an international collaboration to conquer human osteosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Long Yang

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a genetical y unstable malignancy that most frequently occurs in children and young adults. The lack of progress in managing this devastating disease in the clinic has prompted international researchers to collaborate to profile key genomic alterations that define osteosarcoma. A team of researchers and clinicians from China, Finland, and the United States investigated human osteosarcoma by integrating transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), high-density genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Sanger sequencing, cell culture, and molecular biological approaches. Systematic analysis of genetic/genomic alterations and further functional studies have led to several important findings, including novel rearrangement hotspots, osteosarcoma-specific LRP1-SNRNP25 and KCNMB4-CCND3 fusion genes, VEGF and Wnt signaling pathway alterations, deletion of the WWOX gene, and amplification of the APEX1 and RUNX2 genes. Importantly, these genetic events associate significantly with pathogenesis, prognosis, progression, and therapeutic activity in osteosarcoma, suggesting their potential impact on improved managements of human osteosarcoma. This international initiative provides opportunities for developing new treatment modalities to conquer osteosarcoma.

  16. Investigation of osteosarcoma genomics and its impact on targeted therapy: an international collaboration to conquer human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Long

    2014-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is a genetically unstable malignancy that most frequently occurs in children and young adults. The lack of progress in managing this devastating disease in the clinic has prompted international researchers to collaborate to profile key genomic alterations that define osteosarcoma. A team of researchers and clinicians from China, Finland, and the United States investigated human osteosarcoma by integrating transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), high-density genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Sanger sequencing, cell culture, and molecular biological approaches. Systematic analysis of genetic/genomic alterations and further functional studies have led to several important findings, including novel rearrangement hotspots, osteosarcoma-specific LRP1-SNRNP25 and KCNMB4-CCND3 fusion genes, VEGF and Wnt signaling pathway alterations, deletion of the WWOX gene, and amplification of the APEX1 and RUNX2 genes. Importantly, these genetic events associate significantly with pathogenesis, prognosis, progression, and therapeutic activity in osteosarcoma, suggesting their potential impact on improved managements of human osteosarcoma. This international initiative provides opportunities for developing new treatment modalities to conquer osteosarcoma.

  17. Doppler echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension in dogs: a retrospective clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradies, P; Spagnolo, P P; Amato, M E; Pulpito, D; Sasanelli, M

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) decreases resistance to fatigue and life expectancy. The aim of this study was to correlate some indirect Doppler indices of PH with tricuspid and pulmonary regurgitation criteria and to relate PH on different indices with the severity of clinical signs. Furthermore the pathogenetic mechanisms associated to PH development were discussed. Dogs with Doppler echocardiographic evidence of PH diagnosed by assessment of pulmonary and tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity were selected, their clinical records were reviewed and a clinical score was computed. Seventeen cases of PH were identified. The degree of PH was assessed based on systolic or diastolic pulmonary pressure and the indirect Doppler indices (AT/ET and Tei Index) were calculated; data were statistically evaluated. Indirect Doppler indices were calculated also in a control group of seven healthy dogs. The most common clinical signs were coughing, dyspnea and syncope; the most common condition associated to PH development was the left-sided valvular heart disease. A significant positive correlation was found between Tei Index and both the systolic pressure and the severity of PH while no correlations were found between PH on different indices and clinical score and/or severity of clinical signs. Results of this study suggest that Tei-index could be an useful support not only to reveal PH but also to give information on the severity of PH. The clinical picture in dogs with PH is apparently unpredictable and not strictly correlated with the severity of PH.

  18. A Formal Investigation of the Organization of Guidance Behavior: Implications for Humans and Autonomous Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhaodan

    symmetries and interaction patterns, is then elaborated on with the example of Dubins' vehicle's guidance behavior. The dissertation then describes the details of the agile human guidance experiments using miniature helicopters, the technique that is developed for the analysis of the experimental data and the analysis results. The results confirm that human guidance behavior indeed exhibits invariance as defined by interaction patterns. Subsequently, the behavior in each interaction pattern is investigated using piecewise affine model identification. Combined, the results provide a natural and formal decomposition of the behavior that can be unified under a hierarchical hidden Markov model. By employing the languages of dynamical system and control and by adopting algorithms from system identification and machine learning, the framework presented in this dissertation provides a fertile ground where these different disciplines can meet. It also promises multiple potential directions where future research can be headed.

  19. Typical investigational medicinal products follow relatively uniform regulations in 10 European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gluud Christian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe. Methods We conducted a survey in order to identify the national regulatory requirements for major categories of clinical research in ten European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN countries-Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and United Kingdom-covering approximately 70% of the EU population. Here we describe the results for regulatory requirements for typical investigational medicinal products, in the ten countries. Results Our results show that the ten countries have fairly harmonised definitions of typical investigational medicinal products. Clinical trials assessing typical investigational medicinal products require authorisation from a national competent authority in each of the countries surveyed. The opinion of the competent authorities is communicated to the trial sponsor within the same timelines, i.e., no more than 60 days, in all ten countries. The authority to which the application has to be sent to in the different countries is not fully harmonised. Conclusion The Directive 2001/20/EC defined the term 'investigational medicinal product' and all regulatory requirements described therein are applicable to investigational medicinal products. Our survey showed, however, that those requirements had been adopted in ten European countries, not for investigational medicinal products overall, but rather a narrower category which we term 'typical' investigational medicinal products. The result is partial EU harmonisation of requirements and a relatively navigable landscape for the sponsor regarding typical investigational medicinal products.

  20. A STUDY OF CLINICAL AND INVESTIGATIVE PROFILE OF CORTICAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwijal Patel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In 1825, Ribes, a French physician, described the foremost detailed explanation of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis (CVST. Infective causes, thrombophilic abnormalities, oral contraceptives, antithrombin III, protein C and protein S defects, antiphospholipid syndrome, high plasma concentrations of homocysteine, low plasma folate level are common causes of CVT. The prognosis after CVT during pregnancy and puerperium is probably better than after CVT from other causes. During the past decade, increased awareness of the diagnosis improved neuroimaging techniques and more effective treatment have improved the prognosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS 32 patients admitted to SSG Hospital from November 2012 to November 2013 with a confirmed diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis by imaging of brain (MR Veno were included. Meticulous history, clinical examination and laboratory investigations were carried out in all cases. Haemorrhagic thromboembolic stroke and metabolic encephalopathy were excluded from study. RESULTS The puerperal CVT group consisted of 17 women (53.125% and the non-puerperal group consisted of 25 patients (78.125% of which 10 were women and 15 were men. The present study showed 42.875% of patients presented within 10 days. Headache was the most common symptom in the present study accounting for 85% of patients. In the present study, 50% of cases had seizures, 31.25% of patients had focal deficit, 53.125% of patients had altered level of consciousness and 25% of patients had papilloedema. The most common finding in the present study is haemorrhagic infarction present in 59.375% of cases. The transverse sinus is most commonly involved accounting for 65.625% followed by sigmoid sinus with 59.375% and superior sagittal sinus with 56.25%. In our study, all the 32 patients were treated with anticoagulants. All patients were subjected to LMWH and then switched on to warfarin therapy maintaining the INR value 1.5 to 2 times normal

  1. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to investigate brain activity: clinical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichty, Wemara; Sakatania, Kaoru; Xie, Yuxiao; Zou, Huangcong

    2000-07-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy has recently been used to measure changes of optical parameters (i.e., light absorption or scattering) of brain tissue. The fact that the equipment is generally compact, portable, noninvasive, and reasonably prices makes it ideal for clinical and nonclinical evaluation and monitoring of brain function. Clinical and nonclinical studies evaluating changes related to light absorption are discussed, with an emphasis on cerebral blood oxygenation (CBO) changes and hemodynamic responses while performing cognitive tasks. With respect to the clinical studies, the focus is on variations in patterns of oxygenated hemoglobin (Oxy-Hb), deoxygentated hemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) and Total-Hb (sum of Oxy-Hb and Deoxy-Hb). The studies about clinical applications includes research we have conducted with older adults and aphasics. Implications regarding the use of NIRS for clincal purposes are considered.

  2. Recent Clinical History and Cognitive Dysfunction for Attention and Executive Function among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, David F.; DeLong, Allison; McCaffrey, Daniel E.; Kertesz, Kinga; Paul, Robert H.; Conley, Jared; Russell, Troy; Coop, Kathleen; Gillani, Fizza; Flanigan, Timothy; Tashima, Karen; Hogan, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the association between recent trends in CD4 and viral loads and cognitive test performance with the expectation that recent history could predict cognitive performance. Eighty-three human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with a mean CD4 count of 428 copies/ml were examined in this study (62% with undetectable plasma viral load [PVL]). We investigated the relationships between nadir CD4 cell count, 1-year trends in immunologic function/PVLs, and cognitive performance across several domains using linear regression models. Nadir CD4 cell count was predictive of current executive function (p = .004). One year clinical history for CD4 cell counts and/or PVLs were predictive of executive function, attention/working memory, and learning/memory measures (p < .05). Models that combined recent clinical history trends and nadir CD4 cell counts suggested that recent clinical trends were more important in predicting current cognitive performance for all domains except executive function. This research suggests that recent CD4 and viral load history is an important predictor of current cognitive function across several cognitive domains. If validated, clinical variables and cognitive dysfunction models may improve our understanding of the dynamic relationships between disease evolution and progression and CNS involvement. PMID:21873325

  3. [Draft of Guidelines for Human Body Dissection for Clinical Anatomy Education and Research and commentary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Ide, Chizuka; Higuchi, Norio; Aiso, Sadakazu; Sakai, Tatsuo; Matsumura, George; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kobayashi, Eiji; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Yaginuma, Hiroyuki; Hishikawa, Shuji; Sugimoto, Maki; Izawa, Yoshimitsu; Imanishi, Nobuaki

    2011-07-01

    This article analyses the Draft of Guidelines for Human Body Dissection for Clinical Anatomy Education and Research drawn by the Study Group for Future Training Systems of Surgical Skills and Procedures established by the Fiscal Year 2010 research program of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. The purpose of the Draft of Guidelines is: First, to lay out the required basic guidelines for human cadaver usage to allow medical and dental faculty to conduct clinical education and research in accordance with existing regulations. Second, the guidelines are expected to give physicians a regulatory framework to carry out cadaver training in accordance with the current legal framework. This article explains the Draft of Guidelines in detail, outlines the future of cadaver training, and describes issues which must still be solved.

  4. [Draft of guidelines for human body dissection for clinical anatomy education and research and commentary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Ide, Chizuka; Higuchi, Norio; Aiso, Sadakazu; Sakai, Tatsuo; Matsumura, George; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kobayashi, Eiji; Tatsumi, Haruyuki; Yaginuma, Hiroyuki; Hishikawa, Shuji; Sugimoto, Maki; Izawa, Yoshimitsu; Imanishi, Nobuaki

    2011-06-01

    This article analyses the Draft of Guidelines for Human Body Dissection for Clinical Anatomy Education and Research drawn by the Study Group for Future Training Systems of Surgical Skills and Procedures established by the Fiscal Year 2010 research program of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. The purpose of the Draft of Guidelines is: First, to lay out the required basic guidelines for human cadaver usage to allow medical and dental faculty to conduct clinical education and research in accordance with existing regulations. Second, the guidelines are expected to give physicians a regulatory framework to carry out cadaver training in accordance with the current legal framework. This article explains the Draft of Guidelines in detail, outlines the future of cadaver training, and describes issues which must still be solved.

  5. Computational and in vivo investigation of optical reflectance from human brain to assist neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, M; Giller, C; Liu, H

    1998-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive disease involving the globus pallidus (GP), which is a gray matter mass, surrounded by white matter deep within the brain. During a neurosurgery procedure, a thin probe is inserted into the GP to create a lesion that often relieves the cardinal symptoms of PD. The goal of this study is to develop an optical method to accurately locate the GP border. In theory, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to predict the optical reflectance from brain tissue. In experiment, a portable, real-time display spectrometer with a fiber optic reflectance probe was developed and used during human surgery. Optical reflectance values were recorded at 1 mm intervals to obtain a spatial profile of the tissue as the probe passed through regions of gray and white matter. The simulation and in vivo studies of the reflectance from the brain are in good agreement with one another. The clinical data show that the reflectance from gray matter is approximately 50% or less than that from white matter between 650 and 800 nm. A slope algorithm is developed to distinguish gray and white matter in vivo. This study provides previously unknown optical reflectance of the human brain. © 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  6. Investigating the role of Acanthamoeba polyphaga in protecting Human Adenovirus from water disinfection treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verani, Marco; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Tammaro, Carmine; Carducci, Annalaura

    2016-06-01

    Human adenoviruses are responsible for a wide range of clinical infections and are present in aquatic environments, including river, seawater, drinking-water and sewage. Free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba) in the same environments may internalize them and other microorganisms can act as a reservoir for the internalized viruses. In this study, we studied the interaction between Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Human Adenovirus type 5 (HAdV 5) to determine whether the amoeba played a role in protecting the internalized viruses from chemical disinfection. The efficacy of sodium hypochlorite disinfection against A. polyphaga and HAdV 5 either singly or in combination was assessed at three different concentrations. Individually, the amoeba were more resistant to chemical disinfection than HAdV 5 and remained alive after exposure to 5mg/l of sodium hypochlorite. In contrast, HAdV 5 lost infectivity following exposure to 2.5mg/l of sodium hypochlorite. When the amoeba and HAdV 5 were co-cultured, infectious virus was found in the cytoplasm of the amoeba at 5mg/l disinfectant concentration. These findings suggest that the A. polyphaga is providing protection for the HAdV 5.

  7. Human Papillomavirus (HPV Prevalence in Nasal and Antrochoanal Polyps and Association with Clinical Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Knör

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of sinonasal polyposis remains unclear, in spite of several investigative approaches. Antrochoanal polyps, a subgroup of sinonasal polyposis along with allergic- and chronic-inflammatory nasal polyps, mostly originate from the maxillary sinus and develop as a unilateral, pedunculated mass towards the nasopharynx. The human papillomavirus (HPV is discussed as a possible causative and influencing factor in development and progression of sinonasal polyposis. This study aims to elucidate HPV frequency in nasal polyps and antrochoanal polyps.Genomic DNA from 257 tissue specimens (166 nasal polyps, 39 antrochoanal polyps and 52 nasal turbinates was subjected to three different established HPV- polymerase chain reaction assays, testing for 37 low- and high-risk HPV. In addition, immunohistochemical analyses for HPV16 were carried out, as well as immunohistochemistry and western blots of p16, a biomarker for HPV induced cancer.HPV-DNA was detected in 53.8% of antrochoanal polyps, 15.1% of nasal polyps, and 5.8% of nasal turbinates. HPV16 was the predominant type with a detection rate of 76% in nasal polyps and 62% in antrochoanal polyps. Immunohistochemically, HPV positive tissues stained positive for HPV16 antigens and p16 in epithelial cell layers. No significant p16 overexpression was traceable in antrochoanal polyps, nasal polyps and nasal turbinates by western blot. There was no correlation of HPV-status with sex, age, smoking, alcohol consumption or allergic background.The present study shows a significant frequency of high-risk type HPV16 in antrochoanal polyps. Absence of oncogenic transformation or correlation of the HPV-status with clinical data suggests a latent superinfection, possibly because of anatomical proximity to the oropharynx.

  8. Genetic variation of human papillomavirus type 16 in individual clinical specimens revealed by deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Kukimoto

    Full Text Available Viral genetic diversity within infected cells or tissues, called viral quasispecies, has been mostly studied for RNA viruses, but has also been described among DNA viruses, including human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 present in cervical precancerous lesions. However, the extent of HPV genetic variation in cervical specimens, and its involvement in HPV-induced carcinogenesis, remains unclear. Here, we employ deep sequencing to comprehensively analyze genetic variation in the HPV16 genome isolated from individual clinical specimens. Through overlapping full-circle PCR, approximately 8-kb DNA fragments covering the whole HPV16 genome were amplified from HPV16-positive cervical exfoliated cells collected from patients with either low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL or invasive cervical cancer (ICC. Deep sequencing of the amplified HPV16 DNA enabled de novo assembly of the full-length HPV16 genome sequence for each of 7 specimens (5 LSIL and 2 ICC samples. Subsequent alignment of read sequences to the assembled HPV16 sequence revealed that 2 LSILs and 1 ICC contained nucleotide variations within E6, E1 and the non-coding region between E5 and L2 with mutation frequencies of 0.60% to 5.42%. In transient replication assays, a novel E1 mutant found in ICC, E1 Q381E, showed reduced ability to support HPV16 origin-dependent replication. In addition, partially deleted E2 genes were detected in 1 LSIL sample in a mixed state with the intact E2 gene. Thus, the methods used in this study provide a fundamental framework for investigating the influence of HPV somatic genetic variation on cervical carcinogenesis.

  9. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio; Formica, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application.

  10. Do Online Voting Patterns Reflect Evolved Features of Human Cognition? An Exploratory Empirical Investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Priestley

    Full Text Available Online votes or ratings can assist internet users in evaluating the credibility and appeal of the information which they encounter. For example, aggregator websites such as Reddit allow users to up-vote submitted content to make it more prominent, and down-vote content to make it less prominent. Here we argue that decisions over what to up- or down-vote may be guided by evolved features of human cognition. We predict that internet users should be more likely to up-vote content that others have also up-voted (social influence, content that has been submitted by particularly liked or respected users (model-based bias, content that constitutes evolutionarily salient or relevant information (content bias, and content that follows group norms and, in particular, prosocial norms. 489 respondents from the online social voting community Reddit rated the extent to which they felt different traits influenced their voting. Statistical analyses confirmed that norm-following and prosociality, as well as various content biases such as emotional content and originality, were rated as important motivators of voting. Social influence had a smaller effect than expected, while attitudes towards the submitter had little effect. This exploratory empirical investigation suggests that online voting communities can provide an important test-bed for evolutionary theories of human social information use, and that evolved features of human cognition may guide online behaviour just as it guides behaviour in the offline world.

  11. A short investigation of the effect of an energy harvesting backpack on the human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheou, Evangelos; Green, Peter; Racic, Vitomir; Brownjohn, James M. W.; Sims, Neil D.

    2012-04-01

    Exploiting human motion for the purpose of energy harvesting has been a popular idea for some time. Many of the approaches proposed can be uncomfortable or they impose a significant burden on the person's gait. In the current paper a hardware in-the-loop simulator of an energy harvesting backpack is employed in order to investigate the effect of a suspended-load backpack on the human gait. The idea is based on the energy produced by a suspended-load which moves vertically on a backpack while a person walks. The energy created from such a linear system can be maximised when it resonates with the walking frequency of the person. However, such a configuration can also cause great forces to be applied on the back of the user. The system which is presented here consists of a mass attached on a rucksack, which is controlled by a motor in order to simulate the suspended-load backpack. The advantage of this setup is the ability to test different settings, regarding the spring stiffness or the damping coefficient, of the backpack harvester, and study their effect on the energy harvesting potential, as well as on the human gait. The present contribution describes the preliminary results and analysis of the testing of the system with the help of nine male volunteers who carried it on a treadmill.

  12. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application. PMID:27612100

  13. Investigation of the Airflow inside Realistic and Semi-Realistic Replicas of Human Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizal Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of velocity in human lungs during breathing cycle is a challenging task for researchers, since the measuring location is accessible only with significant difficulties. A special measuring rig consisting of optically transparent replica of human lungs, breathing simulator, particle generator and Laser-Doppler anemometer was developed and used for investigation of the velocity in specific locations of lungs during simulated breathing cycle. Experiments were performed on two different replicas of human lungs in corresponding measuring points to facilitate the analysis of the influence of the geometry and its simplification on the flow. The analysis of velocity course and turbulence intensity revealed that special attention should be devoted to the modelling of vocal cords position during breathing, as the position of laryngeal jet created by vocal cords significantly influences velocity profiles in trachea. The shapes of velocity courses during expiration proved to be consistent for both replicas; however magnitudes of peak expiratory velocity differ between the corresponding measuring points in both the replicas.

  14. Human-Assisted Machine Information Exploitation: a crowdsourced investigation of information-based problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Sue E.; Vanni, Michelle; Caylor, Justine; Hoye, Jeff

    2017-05-01

    The Human-Assisted Machine Information Exploitation (HAMIE) investigation utilizes large-scale online data collection for developing models of information-based problem solving (IBPS) behavior in a simulated time-critical operational environment. These types of environments are characteristic of intelligence workflow processes conducted during human-geo-political unrest situations when the ability to make the best decision at the right time ensures strategic overmatch. The project takes a systems approach to Human Information Interaction (HII) by harnessing the expertise of crowds to model the interaction of the information consumer and the information required to solve a problem at different levels of system restrictiveness and decisional guidance. The design variables derived from Decision Support Systems (DSS) research represent the experimental conditions in this online single-player against-the-clock game where the player, acting in the role of an intelligence analyst, is tasked with a Commander's Critical Information Requirement (CCIR) in an information overload scenario. The player performs a sequence of three information processing tasks (annotation, relation identification, and link diagram formation) with the assistance of `HAMIE the robot' who offers varying levels of information understanding dependent on question complexity. We provide preliminary results from a pilot study conducted with Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) participants on the Volunteer Science scientific research platform.

  15. Investigation of the interaction of deltamethrin (DM) with human serum albumin by multi-spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaman; Ma, Liang; Zhang, Yuhao; Jiang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of Deltamethrin (DM) with human serum albumin (HSA) under the condition of simulating human blood pH environment (pH = 7.4) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis absorbance and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. It was shown that DM was a static quencher of HSA. The binding constants (Ka) are 3.598 × 104 L mol-1 (25 °C); the thermodynamic parameters (ΔH = -3.269 × 104 kJ mol-1, ΔS = -22.81 kJ mol-1 k-1, ΔG = -25889.8 kJ mol-1) obtained with the thermodynamic equation. The hydrogen bond and Vander Waals were the main driving force. The effect of DM on the conformation of HSA was observed by three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra, indicating that the interaction between DM and HSA was achieved through the binding of DM with the tryptophan and tyrosine residues of HSA. The study on the interaction of DM and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was researched and compared. Difference exists in the interactions of with each of the serum albumins. We will verify and supplement that DM residue in animals and human metabolism, toxicology and other mechanisms are different.

  16. Investigational drugs in phase I and phase II clinical trials for thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Irene; Scaramellini, Natalia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2017-07-01

    Regular transfusion and iron chelation are the current treatment of severe forms of thalassemia. As a consequence of this demanding supportive treatment, there are several unmet therapeutic needs. Due to a deeper understanding in the pathophysiology of thalassemia, new therapeutic strategies have been developed that are now in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Areas covered: Activin receptor ligand traps (luspatercept and sotatercept), drugs targeting ineffective erythropoiesis, showed encouraging results in Phase I and II clinical trials. A phase III clinical trial is currently ongoing. Ruxolitinib, a Jak2 inhibitor, has been tested to limit stress erythropoiesis in a phase II clinical trial. In addition, improvement in iron chelation has been developed. Moreover, several trials of gene therapy are currently active in different countries with different lentiviral vectors. Expert opinion: The most promising molecules are the activin receptor ligand traps. Together with gene therapy these could be an alternative to bone marrow transplant, aiming towards a curative strategy. The main limit to gene therapy seems to be the conditioning regimen, thus an in vivo gene therapy would be more suitable. At pre-clinical level gene editing is showing extremely encouraging results.

  17. Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation 1904: Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance during Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Shelby; Holden, Kritina; Ebert, Douglas; Root, Phillip; Adelstein, Bernard; Jones, Jeffery

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of the Short Duration Bioastronautics Investigation (SDBI) 1904 was to determine visual performance limits during Shuttle operational vibration and g-loads, specifically through the determination of minimal usable font sizes using Orion-type display formats. Currently there is little to no data available to quantify human visual performance under the extreme g- and vibration conditions of launch. Existing data on shuttle vibration magnitude and frequency is incomplete and does not address human visual performance. There have been anecdotal reports of performance decrements from shuttle crews, but no structured data have been collected. Previous work by NASA on the effects of vibration and linear g-loads on human performance was conducted during the Gemini era, but these experiments were performed using displays and controls that are dramatically different than current concepts being considered by the Constellation Program. Recently, three investigations of visual performance under vibration have been completed at NASA Ames Research Center: the first examining whole-body vibration, the second employing whole-body vibration coupled with a sustained g-load, and a third examining the effects of peak versus extended duration vibration. However, all of these studies were conducted using only a single x-axis direction (eyeballs in/out). Estimates of thrust oscillations from the Constellation Ares-I first stage are driving the need for realistic human performance requirements. SDBI 1904 was an opportunity to address the need for requirements by conducting a highly focused and applied evaluation in a relevant spaceflight environment. The SDBI was a companion effort to Detailed Test Objective (DTO) 695, which measured shuttle seat accelerations (vibration) during ascent. Data from the SDBI will serve an important role in interpreting the DTO vibration data. Both SDBI 1904 and DTO 695 were low impact with respect to flight resources, and combined, they

  18. A database of naturally occurring human urinary peptides and proteins for use in clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Zürbig; Joshua Coon; Hartwig Bauer; Georg Behrens; Mohammed Dakna; Anna Dominiczak; Stephane Decramer; Jochen Ehrich; Danilo Fliser; Moritz Frommberger; Arnold Ganser; Mark Giolami; Igor Golovko; David Good; Wilfried Gwinner

    2007-01-01

    Owing to its availability, ease of collection and correlation with (patho-) physiology, urine is an attractive source for clinical proteomics. However, the lack of comparable datasets from large cohorts has greatly hindered development in this field. Here we report the establishment of a high resolution proteome database of naturally occurring human urinary peptides and proteins - ranging from 800-17,000 Da - from over 3,600 individual samples using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass s...

  19. Investigation on the design of human-system interface for advanced nuclear plant control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, C. F.; Chou, H. P. [Dept. of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu Taiwan (China)

    2006-07-01

    The Lungmen Nuclear Power Project (LMNPP), under construction in Taiwan, consists of two GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) units, each with 1350 MW electrical output. Major Human-System Interfaces (HSIs) of LMNPP are different from traditional ones. Video display units (VDUs) are the main human-system interface for operators to manipulate and to know the status of the equipment and plant information. Based upon NUREG-0711, the applicable human factors engineering (HFE) guideline in the design of HSIs has been adopted. An important aspect of the Lungmen HFE program has been the direct involvement of the end user, Taiwan Power Company (TPC), throughout the design development and implementation to ensure not only that the process for the design is compliant with the HFE principles, but also that the necessary displays, control, and alarms are provided to support the identified personnel tasks. This paper reviews the applicable HFE principles and verification and validation (V and V) processes in the design of HSIs for the advanced LMNPP. This paper also presents three investigated topics of the LMNPP HSI design development and implementation process. From the perspective of licensing concern and experience feedback, the focus of this paper is on the topics of validation with simulator, alarm auto reset, and VDU operational configuration strategy. The objectives of investigating the latter topic were to ensure the VDU operational configuration strategy, after appropriate V and V, achieves its goals of reinforcing operation discipline and distributing operator crew task assignments and workload during typical operations, and to confirm the need for an intensive training program that addresses the knowledge and skill requirements of the operators to meet the task characteristics and the responses of the plant processes. The results to date and implications for going forward from this process are also presented. (authors)

  20. A chamber-experiment investigation of the interaction between perceptions of noise and odor in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhiwei; Kjaergaard, Søren K; Mølhave, Lars

    2003-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate human comfort and health effects following exposure to noise and odor and to explore the interaction between perceptions of noise and odor in humans. Nine healthy subjects were randomly exposed to noise, odor, and their combination, in a 3 x 3 Latin square design for 80 min in an exposure chamber. Continuous noise was broadcast at an average level of 75 dBA by a loudspeaker, and odor was provided by furfurylmercaptan (a coffee-aroma constituent). A standardized 28-item questionnaire, together with mood-scale ratings, nasal dimensions by acoustic rhinometry, addition tests for distraction, and skin humidity, were performed before and at the end of exposure. In the questionnaire investigation, the perceived "sound level" was significantly affected by noise and the combined exposures, while "odor intensity", "air quality", and "need more ventilation" was significantly affected by odor and the combined exposures. Perceptions of symptoms became worse with increasing exposure time, such as perceived "dry nose" and "sleepiness" by odor and combined exposures, "headache" by noise, "concentration difficulty", "general well being", and "stressed by being in the chamber" by noise, odor and combined exposures. In addition, the occurrence of interactions was analyzed by comparison of the ratings of perceived "sound level", "odor intensity", "air quality", and "need more ventilation" during the combined exposure with two single exposures. Insignificant interaction was found but it indicated a decreased tendency to perceptions of discomfort from "odor intensity", "air quality", and "need for more ventilation" when noise was added to odor exposure. It may be concluded that noise and odor cause discomfort in humans. Moreover, the study might indicate that additions of noise reduce (mask) the perception of discomfort from odor, and additions of odor have no or little affect on the perception of noise.

  1. Ultra-trace measurement of Dechloranes to investigate food as a route of human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Homme, Benjamin; Calaprice, Chiara; Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Zambonin, Carlo; Leardi, Riccardo; Focant, Jean-François

    2015-11-01

    Dechloranes, including Dechlorane Plus (syn- and anti-isomers), Dechlorane 602, Dechlorane 603, Dechlorane 604, Chlordene Plus, and Mirex are used as flame-retardants and were recently found in human serum of the European population. In order to investigate if food consumption would possibly be a significant route of exposure, we developed a method for the measurement of Dechloranes in food and feed. We showed that it was possible to extend the scope of the regular polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), dioxin like (DL-), and non-dioxin like (NDL-) regulated PCBs clean-up and fractionation procedure to Dechloranes and that no compound degradation occurred during the strong acidic treatments used for lipid digestion. Dechloranes were measured by gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QQQMS/MS). We optimized injection parameters by face centered experimental design (FCD). The electron ionization fragmentation was investigated to set appropriate multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions. Instrumental and method limits of quantitation (iLOQs and mLOQs) were determined following EU guidelines for dioxin analyses in food. A total of 88 samples were analyzed to assess the prevalence of this route of exposure to humans. Average levels of the sum of Dechloranes ranged from 10 to 31pg/g fat, with the exception of fish, feed additives, and corn that were reported in pg/g wet weight at average levels of 9, 12, and 2pg/g ww. Based on Belgian food habits, a dietary intake was estimated to be 136pg/day. The relatively low reported levels indicate that other routes of human exposure should be considered.

  2. The spectrum of genital human papillomavirus infection among men attending a Swedish sexually-transmitted infections clinic: human papillomavirus typing and clinical presentation of histopathologically benign lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström, Arne; Vassilaki, Ismini; Hedblad, Mari-Anne; Syrjänen, Stina

    2013-03-27

    There have been a number of Swedish studies on human papillomavirus (HPV) typing in men, most of which have used less sensitive HPV-typing techniques. The present study included male patients with genital HPV-induced lesions planned for surgery. Samples were prepared for histopathology and PCR. HPV was detected in 233/253 (92%) and HPV 6 or 11 in 89% of the HPV-positive lesions. There were statistically significant differences regarding morphology (p=0.002), location (p=0.000001) and colour (p=0.005) of the lesions for low- vs. mixed or high-risk HPV types. For example, acuminate lesions were mostly found among men with low-risk HPV types, whereas macular lesions were over-represented among them with mixed or high-risk types. The HPV type distribution is similar to that in earlier studies, but we also found correlations with some clinical parameters.

  3. Drug Insight: the role of leptin in human physiology and pathophysiology--emerging clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Aoife M; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2006-06-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with a key role in energy homeostasis. Studies in animal models, in humans with congenital complete leptin deficiency, and observational and interventional studies in humans with relative leptin deficiency (lower than normal leptin levels) have all indicated that leptin regulates multiple physiological functions, primarily in states of energy deficiency. This information led to proof-of-concept clinical trials involving leptin administration to individuals with relative or complete leptin deficiency. These conditions include congenital complete leptin deficiency, due to mutations in the leptin gene, and states of relative leptin deficiency including lipoatrophy and some forms of hypothalamic amenorrhea. Leptin, in replacement doses, normalizes neuroendocrine, metabolic and immune function in patients with these conditions, but further clinical studies are required to determine its long-term efficacy and safety. Management of leptin-deficient states with replacement doses of leptin holds promise as a therapeutic option. In addition, elucidation of the mechanisms underlying leptin resistance, which characterizes hyperleptinemic states such as human obesity and diabetes, might provide novel therapeutic targets for these prevalent clinical problems.

  4. Isolation and clinical sample typing of human leptospirosis cases in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiani, Yosena; Jacob, Paulina; Varni, Vanina; Landolt, Noelia; Schmeling, María Fernanda; Pujato, Nazarena; Caimi, Karina; Vanasco, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    Leptospira typing is carried out using isolated strains. Because of difficulties in obtaining them, direct identification of infective Leptospira in clinical samples is a high priority. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) proved highly discriminatory for seven pathogenic species of Leptospira, allowing isolate characterization and robust assignment to species, in addition to phylogenetic evidence for the relatedness between species. In this study we characterized Leptospira strains circulating in Argentina, using typing methods applied to human clinical samples and isolates. Phylogenetic studies based on 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences enabled typing of 8 isolates (6 Leptospira interrogans, one Leptospira wolffii and one Leptospira broomii) and 58 out of 85 (68.2%) clinical samples (55 L. interrogans, 2 Leptospira meyeri, and one Leptospira kirschneri). MLST results for the L. interrogans isolates indicated that five were probably Canicola serogroup (ST37) and one was probably Icterohaemorrhagiae serogroup (ST17). Eleven clinical samples (21.6%), provided MLST interpretable data: five were probably Pyrogenes serogroup (ST13), four Sejroe (ST20), one Autumnalis (ST22) and one Canicola (ST37). To the best of our knowledge this study is the first report of the use of an MLST typing scheme with seven loci to identify Leptospira directly from clinical samples in Argentina. The use of clinical samples presents the advantage of the possibility of knowing the infecting strain without resorting to isolates. This study also allowed, for the first time, the characterization of isolates of intermediate pathogenicity species (L. wolffii and L. broomii) from symptomatic patients.

  5. Clinical investigation of mucosal thickness stability after soft tissue grafting around implants: A 3-year retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Speroni Stefano; Cicciù Marco; Maridati Paolo; Grossi Giovanni; Maiorana Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term stability of gingival grafts placed around dental implants at the time of second surgery uncovering and to further investigate the association between mucosal thickness (MTh) by demographic variables and clinical investigation. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients with submerged dental implants covered by inadequate keratinized mucosa were studied. The subjects underwent a periimplant plastic surgery (PPS) at the second-stage dental implant surgery and fr...

  6. Initial investigation of the effects of an experimentally learned schema on spatial associative memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buuren, Mariët; Kroes, Marijn C W; Wagner, Isabella C; Genzel, Lisa; Morris, Richard G M; Fernández, Guillén

    2014-12-10

    Networks of interconnected neocortical representations of prior knowledge, "schemas," facilitate memory for congruent information. This facilitation is thought to be mediated by augmented encoding and accelerated consolidation. However, it is less clear how schema affects retrieval. Rodent and human studies to date suggest that schema-related memories are differently retrieved. However, these studies differ substantially as most human studies implement pre-experimental world-knowledge as schemas and tested item or nonspatial associative memory, whereas animal studies have used intraexperimental schemas based on item-location associations within a complex spatial layout that, in humans, could engage more strategic retrieval processes. Here, we developed a paradigm conceptually linked to rodent studies to examine the effects of an experimentally learned spatial associative schema on learning and retrieval of new object-location associations and to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying schema-related retrieval. Extending previous findings, we show that retrieval of schema-defining associations is related to activity along anterior and posterior midline structures and angular gyrus. The existence of such spatial associative schema resulted in more accurate learning and retrieval of new, related associations, and increased time allocated to retrieve these associations. This retrieval was associated with right dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral parietal activity, as well as interactions between the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial and lateral parietal regions, and between the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior midline regions, supporting the hypothesis that retrieval of new, schema-related object-location associations in humans also involves augmented monitoring and systematic search processes.

  7. Experimenting clinical pathways in general practice: a focus group investigation with Italian general practitioners

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    Lucia Zannini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB, Italy, to develop general practitioners’ (GPs care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs’ involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients’ and professionals’ satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods. Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results. Four major themes emerged: i clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs’ role; iii nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions. Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs’ adherence and commitment.

  8. The impact of early human data on clinical development: there is time to win.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Piet; Lozac'h, Frederic; Simon, Marjorie; van Duijn, Esther; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2016-06-01

    Modern accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) methods enable the routine application of this technology in drug development. By the administration of a (14)C-labelled microdose or microtrace, pharmacokinetic (PK) data, such as mass balance, metabolite profiling, and absolute bioavailability (AB) data, can be generated easier, faster, and at lower costs. Here, we emphasize the advances and impact of this technology for pharmaceutical companies. The availability of accurate intravenous (iv) PK and human absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) information, even before or during Phase I trials, can improve the clinical development plan. Moreover, applying the microtrace approach during early clinical development might impact the number of clinical pharmacology and preclinical safety pharmacology studies required, and shorten the overall drug discovery program.

  9. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N. J.; Dean, R. S.; Cobb, M.; Brennan, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  10. Clinical Symptoms of Human Rotavirus Infection Observed in Children in Sokoto, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Alkali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus has been identified among the most important causes of infantile diarrhoea, especially in developing countries. The present study was undertaken to determine the occurrence and clinical symptoms of human rotavirus disease among children presenting with varying degree of diarrhoea in selected urban hospitals in Sokoto metropolis, Nigeria. Diarrhoea samples were collected from 200 diarrheic children younger than 5 years of age and tested using a commercially available DAKO Rotavirus ELISA kit which detects the presence of human group A rotaviruses. A questionnaire, based on WHO generic protocol, was completed for each child to generate the primary data. Of the total number of samples collected, 51 were found to be positive for human group A rotavirus indicating 25.5% prevalence of the disease in Sokoto state. The symptoms associated with the disease were analyzed and discussed.

  11. Judgement bias in goats (Capra hircus): investigating the effects of human grooming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Animal emotional states can be investigated by evaluating their impact on cognitive processes. In this study, we used a judgement bias paradigm to determine if short-term positive human-animal interaction (grooming) induced a positive affective state in goats. We tested two groups of goats and trained them to discriminate between a rewarded and a non-rewarded location over nine training days. During training, the experimental group (n = 9) was gently groomed by brushing their heads and backs for five min over 11 days (nine training days, plus two testing days, total time 55 min). During training, the control group (n = 10) did not experience any direct interaction with the experimenter, but was kept unconstrained next to him for the same period of time. After successful completion of the training, the responses (latency time) of the two groups to reach ambiguous locations situated between the two reference locations (i.e., rewarded/non-rewarded) were compared over two days of testing. There was not a positive bias effect after the animals had been groomed. In a second experiment, 10 goats were tested to investigate whether grooming induced changes in physiological activation (i.e., heart rate and heart rate variability). Heart rate increased when goats were groomed compared to the baseline condition, when the same goats did not receive any contact with the experimenter. Also, subjects did not move away from the experimenter, suggesting that the grooming was positively accepted. The very good care and the regular positive contacts that goats received from humans at the study site could potentially account for the results obtained. Good husbandry outcomes are influenced by animals’ perception of the events and this is based on current circumstances, past experiences and individual variables. Taking into account animals’ individual characteristics and identifying effective strategies to induce positive emotions could increase the understanding and reliability of

  12. Judgement bias in goats (Capra hircus): investigating the effects of human grooming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baciadonna, Luigi; Nawroth, Christian; McElligott, Alan G

    2016-01-01

    Animal emotional states can be investigated by evaluating their impact on cognitive processes. In this study, we used a judgement bias paradigm to determine if short-term positive human-animal interaction (grooming) induced a positive affective state in goats. We tested two groups of goats and trained them to discriminate between a rewarded and a non-rewarded location over nine training days. During training, the experimental group (n = 9) was gently groomed by brushing their heads and backs for five min over 11 days (nine training days, plus two testing days, total time 55 min). During training, the control group (n = 10) did not experience any direct interaction with the experimenter, but was kept unconstrained next to him for the same period of time. After successful completion of the training, the responses (latency time) of the two groups to reach ambiguous locations situated between the two reference locations (i.e., rewarded/non-rewarded) were compared over two days of testing. There was not a positive bias effect after the animals had been groomed. In a second experiment, 10 goats were tested to investigate whether grooming induced changes in physiological activation (i.e., heart rate and heart rate variability). Heart rate increased when goats were groomed compared to the baseline condition, when the same goats did not receive any contact with the experimenter. Also, subjects did not move away from the experimenter, suggesting that the grooming was positively accepted. The very good care and the regular positive contacts that goats received from humans at the study site could potentially account for the results obtained. Good husbandry outcomes are influenced by animals' perception of the events and this is based on current circumstances, past experiences and individual variables. Taking into account animals' individual characteristics and identifying effective strategies to induce positive emotions could increase the understanding and reliability of using

  13. Judgement bias in goats (Capra hircus: investigating the effects of human grooming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Baciadonna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal emotional states can be investigated by evaluating their impact on cognitive processes. In this study, we used a judgement bias paradigm to determine if short-term positive human-animal interaction (grooming induced a positive affective state in goats. We tested two groups of goats and trained them to discriminate between a rewarded and a non-rewarded location over nine training days. During training, the experimental group (n = 9 was gently groomed by brushing their heads and backs for five min over 11 days (nine training days, plus two testing days, total time 55 min. During training, the control group (n = 10 did not experience any direct interaction with the experimenter, but was kept unconstrained next to him for the same period of time. After successful completion of the training, the responses (latency time of the two groups to reach ambiguous locations situated between the two reference locations (i.e., rewarded/non-rewarded were compared over two days of testing. There was not a positive bias effect after the animals had been groomed. In a second experiment, 10 goats were tested to investigate whether grooming induced changes in physiological activation (i.e., heart rate and heart rate variability. Heart rate increased when goats were groomed compared to the baseline condition, when the same goats did not receive any contact with the experimenter. Also, subjects did not move away from the experimenter, suggesting that the grooming was positively accepted. The very good care and the regular positive contacts that goats received from humans at the study site could potentially account for the results obtained. Good husbandry outcomes are influenced by animals’ perception of the events and this is based on current circumstances, past experiences and individual variables. Taking into account animals’ individual characteristics and identifying effective strategies to induce positive emotions could increase the understanding and

  14. Trueness investigation of routine creatinine assays on nine homogeneous systems in Beijing demonstrates an encouraging outcome that meets clinical requirements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan; XU Guo-bin

    2010-01-01

    Background Serum creatinine (Scr) measurement plays a key role in glomerular filtration rate estimation (eGFR),chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis as well as CKD treatment. However, the test results of Scr from different laboratories vary significantly. In order to get comparable results, the European in vitro diagnostic (IVD) directive requires traceability to reference methods and materials. The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of traceability implementation by investigating the trueness of creatinine measurement on nine homogenous systems in Beijing. Methods Commutable frozen human serum reference material, National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Material (SRM) 967, was used to verify the trueness of Scr measurement results from nine homogeneous analytical systems of seven companies which are the most widely used systems in Beijing's third-grade hospitals. The methods referred to the Jaffe's and Enzymatic methods. Results from nine routine measurement systems were assessed using two criteria: biological variability and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments' 88 (CLIA' 88).We simulated a series of broken lines representing the limits of SD and bias that would produce a relative increase (or decrease) of 10% and 20% in the measurement error when estimating GFR (MEeGFR) using the isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS)-traceable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation. Results of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) 2008-B LN24 Survey were compared with our investigation results. Results Compared with the total error criteria of biological variability, Ortho (traceable to IDMS) met the minimum acceptable criteria; Roche (Jaffe), Roche (Enzymatic), Shino and Daiichi met the desirable criteria at level Ⅰ. At level Ⅱ, Ortho (traceable to gas chromatography/isotope dilution mass spectrometry, GC/IDMS), Dade Behring and Beckman (traceable to rate Jaffe) met the minimum acceptable

  15. Induced Sputum for the Investigation of Airway Inflammation: Evidence for Its Clinical Application

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    Frederick E Hargreave

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway inflammation is considered to be the primary cause of airway diseases. Its prevention and reversal are the primary aims of treatment. Measurement of the inflammation is now possible relatively noninvasively and reliably by using induced sputum cell counts. The differential count indicates the presence and type of the inflammation (eosinophilic or neutrophilic and the total cell count the intensity. Sputum eosinophilia responds to treatment with corticosteroid, while there is increasing evidence that an isolated neutrophilia does not. Clinical judgement of airway inflammation is made difficult because of the different types of inflammation and their inconsistent correlation with the clinical features. Hence, reliable measurement of induced sputum cell counts may be useful to guide treatment in clinical practice. Consideration should now be given as to how to make it more available.

  16. Meteoric 10Be as a tool to investigate human induced soil fluxes: a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; De Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Minella, Jean; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The use of meteoric 10Be as a tool to understand long term landscape behavior is becoming increasingly popular. Due its high residence time, meteoric 10Be allows in principle to investigate in situ erosion rates over time scales exceeding the period studied with classical approaches such as 137Cs. The use of meteoric 10Be strongly contributes to the traditional interpretation of sedimentary archives which cannot be unequivocally coupled to sediment production and could provide biased information over longer time scales (Sadler, 1981). So far, meteoric 10Be has successfully been used in geochemical fingerprinting of sediments, to date soil profiles, to assess soil residence times and to quantify downslope soil fluxes using accumulated 10Be inventories along a hill slope. However, less attention is given to the potential use of the tracer to directly asses human induced changes in soil fluxes through deforestation, cultivation and reforestation. A good understanding of the processes governing the distribution of meteoric 10Be both within the soil profile and at landscape scale is essential before meteoric 10Be can be successfully applied to assess human impact. We developed a spatially explicit 2D-model (Be2D) in order to gain insight in meteoric 10Be movement along a hillslope that is subject to human disturbance. Be2D integrates both horizontal soil fluxes and vertical meteoric 10Be movement throughout the soil prolife. Horizontal soil fluxes are predicted using (i) well studied geomorphical laws for natural erosion and soil formation as well as (ii) human accelerated water and tillage erosion. Vertical movement of meteoric 10Be throughout the soil profile is implemented by inserting depth dependent retardation calculated using experimentally determined partition coefficients (Kd). The model was applied to different environments such as (i) the Belgian loess belt, characterized by aeolian deposits enriched in inherited meteoric 10Be, (ii) highly degraded and stony

  17. Investigating the Relationship of Organizational Commitment and Clinical Competence (Case study: Nurses Working in Montazeri Hospital, City of Najafabad, Iran, 2015

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    Neda Khodadadei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human resources committed to the organization not only reduces absence, delay, and replacement, but also causes the increase of organizational performance, employees’ mental freshness, better attainment to organizational excellent goals, and achieving individual’s objectives. Hence, organizational commitment has special importance among the employees of hospital. The nurses’ competence is an important criterion required for providing patients’ health-cares. The change in nurses’ roles and duties has changed the job to a complicated one and requires having various skills, and has caused the clinical competence to be considered more. The present study was performed with the aim of investigating the relationship of organizational commitment and clinical competence in nurses. The research was descriptive correlation type, and the statistical population was all nurses (176 persons working in Montazeri Hospital, Najafabad city, selected by Census method and 135 persons were investigated. The data collection tool included three questionnaires of personal information, Allen and Meyer’s questionnaire of organizational commitment, and questionnaire of clinical competence, that their validity and reliability were confirmed. Data was analyzed with independent t-test, ANOVA, Mann-Whitney, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient using the software SPSS 17. The average score of organizational commitment was 91± 10.76, and at medium level. The average score of clinical competence was 74.42±11.69, and at good level. There was no significant relationship between organizational commitment and clinical competence in the nurses. Only, the emotional commitment dimension had significant relationship with the quality assurance area of clinical competence (P<0.05. Organizational commitment of nurses did not have significant relationship with demographic variables under investigation, while their clinical competence had significant relationship with age

  18. A multinational investigation of time and traveling costs in attending anticoagulation clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, Sue; Bryan, Stirling; Mahé, Isabelle; Brieger, David; Carlsson, Jonas; Kartman, Bernt; Nevinson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Anticoagulation is used in patients with atrial fibrillation to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke. The therapy requires regular monitoring and, frequently, dose adjustment. This study aimed to determine the time and traveling costs that patients incur to themselves and society in attending anticoagulation clinics. A subset of patients from 105 primary and secondary care clinics allocated to the warfarin arm of SPORTIF III (patients from Australia, France, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the UK) completed a questionnaire. Patients indicated the type of transport used for clinic visits, and estimated traveling expenses. Patients were also asked to estimate total traveling and clinic attendance time, and to confirm whether they were currently employed and whether they had to give up time from work to attend the clinic. Time cost of companions was also taken into consideration. Cost per visit was calculated (euro, 2003 prices). Questionnaires for a total of 381 patients were analyzed, with the majority of patients from Sweden (n = 130) and the UK (n = 101). Mean cost to patients varied widely between countries, ranging from euro6.9 (France) to euro20.5 (Portugal) per visit. For most countries, time costs (value of lost working and leisure time) were the main driver of costs. Mean time cost to society ranged from euro5.6 (France) to euro31.7 (Portugal) per visit. Patients incur considerable costs when visiting anticoagulation clinics, and these costs vary by country. The results suggest the importance of taking a broad economic perspective when considering the cost-effectiveness of warfarin.

  19. Investigating nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and skills patterns towards clinical management system: results of a cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M F

    2006-09-01

    To determine whether definable subtypes exist within a cohort of Hong Kong nurses as related to the clinical management system use in their clinical practices based on their knowledge, attitudes, skills, and background factors. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire. The sample of 242 registered nurses was recruited from three hospitals in Hong Kong. The study employs personal and demographic variables, knowledge, attitudes, and skills scale. A cluster analysis yielded two clusters. Each cluster represents a different profile of Hong Kong nurses on the clinical management system use in their clinical practices. The first group (Cluster 1) was labeled 'lower attitudes, less skilful and average knowledge' group, and represented 55.4% of the total respondents. The second group (Cluster 2) was labeled as 'positive attitudes, good knowledge but less skilful'. They comprised almost 44.6% of this nursing sample. Cluster 2 had more older nurses, the majority were educated to the baccalaureate or above level, with more than 10 years working experience, and they held a more senior ranking then Cluster 1. A clear profile of Hong Kong nurses may benefit healthcare professionals in making appropriate education or assistance to prompt the use of the clinical management system by nurses an officially recognized profession. The findings were useful in determining nurse-users' specific needs and their preferences for modification of the clinical management system. Such findings should be used to formulate strategies to encourage nurses to resolve actual problems following computer training and to increase the depth and breadth of nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and skills toward such system.

  20. Investigating the effect of the reality gap on the human psychophysiological state in the context of human-swarm interaction

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    Gaëtan Podevijn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The reality gap is the discrepancy between simulation and reality—the same behavioural algorithm results in different robot swarm behaviours in simulation and in reality (with real robots. In this paper, we study the effect of the reality gap on the psychophysiological reactions of humans interacting with a robot swarm. We compare the psychophysiological reactions of 28 participants interacting with a simulated robot swarm and with a real (non-simulated robot swarm. Our results show that a real robot swarm provokes stronger reactions in our participants than a simulated robot swarm. We also investigate how to mitigate the effect of the reality gap (i.e., how to diminish the difference in the psychophysiological reactions between reality and simulation by comparing psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed on a computer screen and psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed in virtual reality. Our results show that our participants tend to have stronger psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed in virtual reality (suggesting a potential way of diminishing the effect of the reality gap.