WorldWideScience

Sample records for human clinical investigations

  1. Clinical Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-30

    conducted at WBAV’S is categorized as t basic experimental medicine or trials and testing of clinical medicine pro- cedures using the indigenous population...Unit No. 77/20 (FY77, 0) An Analysis of Ameloblastic Fibro-odontoma ....................... 27 Department of Medicine Nork Unit No, 69/338 (FY69, T...Unit No. 71/38 (FY71, T) Injected Marihuana : Effects of Cannabinol ....................... 71 Department of Pediatrics Wfork Unit No. 74/23 (FY74, T

  2. Anatomical-clinical investigations of variations of the human coronary arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Aida Hasanović; Faruk Dilberović; Fehim Ovčina

    2003-01-01

    Variations of the human coronary arteries have always attracted the attention of many researchers. A review of the literature shows that variations can cause ischemic heart disease or sudden cardiac death. The aim of the investigations was to examine the existence and clinical significance of variations of the human coronary arteries. Special attention has been focused on myocardial bridging of the coronary arteries and coronary arteriovenous fistula. Our investigations were carried out on th...

  3. Clinical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    Zbylski, LaRossa, Cullington: A Simple Method of Rapid Assessment of Malar Depression . Annals of Plastic Surgery, Aug 79. Urology Service Fauver, H.E...J.R.: ST Depression Suggesting Subendocardial Ischemia in Neonates with PDA. Presented: Eighth Annual Army Association of Cardiok yy tt,eting, Tacoma...79/100 Investigation of the Tumor Reduction Effect of Combined Sodium-L-Ascorbate and 5FU Chemotherapy in Transplanted B16 Melanoma of Mice. (O

  4. Future requirements. Clinical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.

    2002-01-01

    Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics......Biocompatability, Cariology, Clinical trials, Dental materials, Helath services research, Human, Pedodontics...

  5. Clinical Investigator Inspector List (CLIIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Clinical Investigator Inspection List (CLIIL) contains names, addresses, and other pertinent information gathered from inspections of clinical investigators who...

  6. 78 FR 63988 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... communication between clinical investigators and FDA; Enhance investigators' understanding of FDA's role in... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-1214... support regulatory decisions. This course is intended to assist clinical investigators in understanding...

  7. 75 FR 57472 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... days in advance. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Clinical trial investigators play a critical role in the... toxicological, pharmacological, and manufacturing data to support investigational use in humans; Fundamental issues in the design and conduct of clinical trials; Statistical and analytic considerations in the...

  8. Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    0. Effect of VaStUS Medialis £1 Obliquus Strength on Chondromalacia Patella. (0) 17,󈨒 Kearney, J. 3. Human Irplantation of Intraocular q, Lenses. (C...to: . 8i I - rot rlo Sat : Te (,t- i ricl teo TI~i:I valuation of Iowor caitruiitctiral leediro (I o occpy Wie v,, I(V O V as an /’.,i~nct Lu Lori!;i...ntrations. Pht [l /, ’A ,,T-: ipididyral fat pads arc re ovcd fr . ra ;vit’ rI.1 . I -l fat cells are -repared Ly shakir c at 7 t for (f, "i. ,tcs iv

  9. Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-30

    J.J., Collins, M.T., Mc’Clatchy, J.K.: Urease Testing of Mycobacteria with BPCTK Radiometric Instrumentation. J Clin Micro 15:478-480, 1982.(C) Darato...on mnrT male dops. Three week-, later a two layer microsurgical anastr~mo-is isini 1l)-O nylon is completed. Three weeks later the dog i sacrific-ee...Human tumor cell lines are established in mono- layer culture. After purification and cell type varification, replicate cultures are subjected to

  10. Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    Tracheoesophageal Fistula: Diagnosis with CT. Pediatr Radiol 15:134-135, 1985 Sueoka BL, Johnson JF, Enzenauer RW, Kolina JS: Infantile Infectious Sacroiliitis...C) Stokes WS: Spontaneous Diabetes Mellitus in a Baboon (Papio anubis). 35th Annual Session, American Association for Laboratory Animal Science...Summary Sheet Prot No: 21H/85 Status: Ongoing TITLE: Efficacy of Cholestyramine in Acute Infantile Diarrhea Principal Investigator: CPT George M. Maher

  11. Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.

    1991-01-01

    The Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP) is a systematic method for use by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel investigating incidents that include human error. The combination of techniques into an investigation procedure is designed to help investigators (for example, a typical resident inspector with little human factors training) find the root causes of human performance problems that contributed to the incident. This summary briefly outlines the process and the techniques. The full paper provides a more in-depth description of the process, the techniques, and their development and evaluation. The complete documentation of the process will be presented in NUREG/CR-5455, Development of the NRC Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP) to be published late in 1991

  12. Clinical characteristics of abnormal savda syndrome type in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients: A cross-sectional investigation in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peierdun, Mi-ji-ti; Liu, Wen-xian; Renaguli, Ai-ze-zi; Nurmuhammat, Amat; Li, Xiao-chun; Gulibaier, Ka-ha-er; Ainivaer, Wu-la-mu; Halmurat, Upur

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the distribution of abnormal hilit syndromes in traditional Uighur medicine (TUM) among human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) patients, and to find out the clinical characteristics of abnormal savda syndrome type HIV/AIDS patients. Between June and July in 2012, 307 eligible HIV/AIDS patients from in-patient department and out-patient clinics of Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region the Sixth People's Hospital in Urumqi were investigated. TUM syndrome differentiation was performed by a senior TUM physician. Each participant completed a Sign and Symptom Check-List for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS (SSC-HIV) questionnaire. Depression was evaluated by using Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression Questionnaire. Blood specimen was collected from each participant to test the levels of blood chemicals. Of 307 HIV/AIDS patients, 189 (61.6%) were abnormal savda syndrome type, 118 (38.4%) were non-abnormal-savda syndrome type. Mean CD4 counts of abnormal savda syndrome type patients was (227.61±192.93) cells/µL, and the prevalence of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated cystatin C were 49.7%, 28.6%, and 44.7%, which were significantly higher than those in the non-abnormal-savda syndrome type patients (26.3%, 16.0% and 25.0%,PHIV/AIDS-related symptoms such as fatigue (42.3%), back aches (40.7%), lack of appetite (33.9%), night sweats (31.7%) were more common among abnormal savda syndrome patients (PHIV/AIDS patients, and they present a more sever clinical manifestation.

  13. 77 FR 60440 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... concerns, adverse event monitoring, compliance with the legal and ethical obligations of clinical research... with knowledge, experience, and commitment to investigational medicine; Promote communication between clinical investigators and FDA; Enhance investigators' understanding of FDA's role in experimental medicine...

  14. 76 FR 45577 - Clinical Investigator Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... concerns, adverse event monitoring, compliance with the legal and ethical obligations of clinical research... knowledge, experience, and commitment to investigational medicine; Promote communication between clinical investigators and FDA; Enhance investigators' understanding of FDA's role in experimental medicine; and Improve...

  15. Clinical investigation of thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Current investigations of thyroid dysfunction available to the clinician are reviewed and correlated with disease processes. The aim is to provide a simplified guide to the investigation of thyroid disorders

  16. Clinical investigation in Wilson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Naoki; Maehara, Mitsuo; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    1983-01-01

    Wilson's disease of cerebral type with a chief complaint of tremor occurred in 3 brothers and sisters of a certain family line. Treatment with D-penicillamine produced remarkable clinical improvement as shown by the disappearance of tremor and Kayser-Fleischer ring. Cranial CT scans made before the treatment revealed abnormal findings such as low density areas in the (bilateral) thalamus and the lenticular nucleus, atrophy of the cerebral cortex, and enlargement of the ventricles. After the treatment, cranial CT revealed that the low density areas in the thalamus and the lenticular nucleus disappeared corresponding to the clinical improvement. However, the atrophy of the cerebral cortex and the enlargement of the ventricles were not ameliorated. (Ueda, J.)

  17. Clinical-scale investigation of stable isotopes in human blood: delta13C and delta15N from 406 patients at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Rebecca A; Jahren, A Hope; Saudek, Christopher D

    2008-11-01

    Objective chemical biomarkers are needed in clinical studies of diet-related diseases to supplement subjective self-reporting methods. We report on several critical experiments for the development of clinically legitimate dietary stable isotope biomarkers within human blood. Our examination of human blood revealed the following: (1) Within blood clot and serum from anonymous individuals (201 males, 205 females) we observed: mean serum delta13C = -19.1 +/- 0.8 per thousand (standard deviation, SD); clot, -19.3 +/- 0.8 per thousand (SD); range = -15.8 per thousand to -23.4 per thousand. Highly statistically significant differences are observed between clot and serum, males and females for both clot and serum. For 15N (n = 206), mean serum = +8.8 +/- 0.5 per thousand (SD); clot +7.4 +/- 0.4 per thousand (SD); range = +6.3 per thousand to +10.5 per thousand. Blood serum is enriched in 15N relative to blood clot by +1.4 per thousand on average, which may reflect differing protein amino acid content. Serum nitrogen is statistically significantly different for males and females, however, clot shows no statistical difference. (2) Relative to clot, capillary blood is marginally different for 13C, but not 15N. Clot 13C is not significantly different from serum; however, it is depleted in 15N by 1.5 per thousand relative to serum. (3) We assessed the effect of blood additives (sodium fluoride and polymerized acrylamide resin) and laboratory process (autoclaving, freeze drying) commonly used to preserve or prepare venous blood. On average, no alteration in delta13C or delta15N is detected compared with unadulterated blood from the same individual. (4) Storage of blood with and without the additives described above for a period of up to 115 days exhibits statistically significant differences for 13C and 15N for sodium fluoride. However, storage for unadulterated blood and blood preserved with polymerized acrylamide resin does not change the delta13C or delta15N isotopic

  18. Pooled human platelet lysate versus fetal bovine serum—investigating the proliferation rate, chromosome stability and angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells intended for clinical use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trojahn Kølle, Stig-Frederik; Oliveri, Roberto S; Glovinski, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    Because of an increasing focus on the use of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) in clinical trials, the culture conditions for these cells are being optimized. We compared the proliferation rates and chromosomal stability of ASCs that had been cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) ......) supplemented with either pooled human platelet lysate (pHPL) or clinical-grade fetal bovine serum (FBS) (DMEM(pHPL) versus DMEM(FBS))....

  19. Comparative studies on the human serum albumin binding of the clinically approved EGFR inhibitors gefitinib, erlotinib, afatinib, osimertinib and the investigational inhibitor KP2187.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dömötör, Orsolya; Pelivan, Karla; Borics, Attila; Keppler, Bernhard K; Kowol, Christian R; Enyedy, Éva A

    2018-05-30

    Binding interactions between human serum albumin (HSA) and four approved epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors gefitinib (GEF), erlotinib (ERL), afatinib (AFA), osimertinib (OSI), as well as the experimental drug KP2187, were investigated by means of spectrofluorometric and molecular modelling methods. Steady-state and time resolved spectrofluorometric techniques were carried out, including direct quenching of protein fluorescence and site marker displacement measurements. Proton dissociation processes and solvent dependent fluorescence properties were investigated as well. The EGFR inhibitors were predominantly presented in their single protonated form (HL + ) at physiological pH except ERL, which is charge-neutral. Significant solvent dependent fluorescence properties were found for GEF, ERL and KP2187, namely their emission spectra show strong dependence on the polarity and the hydrogen bonding ability of the solvents. The inhibitors proved to be bound at site I of HSA (in subdomain IIA) in a weak-to-moderate fashion (logK' 3.9-4.9) using spectrofluorometry. OSI (logK' 4.3) and KP2187 can additionally bind in site II (in subdomain IIIA), while GEF, ERL and AFA clearly show no interaction here. Docking methods qualitatively confirmed binding site preferences of compounds GEF and KP2187, and indicated that they probably bind to HSA in their neutral forms. Binding constants calculated on the basis of the various experimental data indicate a weak-to-moderate binding on HSA, only OSI exhibits somewhat higher affinity towards this protein. However, model calculations performed at physiological blood concentrations of HSA resulted in high (ca. 90%) bound fractions for the inhibitors, highlighting the importance of plasma protein binding. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Human Factors in Cabin Accident Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chute, Rebecca D.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Human factors has become an integral part of the accident investigation protocol. However, much of the investigative process remains focussed on the flight deck, airframe, and power plant systems. As a consequence, little data has been collected regarding the human factors issues within and involving the cabin during an accident. Therefore, the possibility exists that contributing factors that lie within that domain may be overlooked. The FAA Office of Accident Investigation is sponsoring a two-day workshop on cabin safety accident investigation. This course, within the workshop, will be of two hours duration and will explore relevant areas of human factors research. Specifically, the three areas of discussion are: Information transfer and resource management, fatigue and other physical stressors, and the human/machine interface. Integration of these areas will be accomplished by providing a suggested checklist of specific cabin-related human factors questions for investigators to probe following an accident.

  1. Clinical Investigation Program, RCS MED-300 (RI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    protocol is a clinical validation study uti - lizing the BIOTRONIK DIPLOS 04 Dual Chamber Pulse Generator. This study is being conducted under an...recurrence-rates, survival-rates, and pattern of recurrence for patients receiving therapy uti - lizing surgery and postoperative radiation vs combined...placed in the treatment qroup or control aroup by the pharmacist . Progress: Terminate. Both the principal and associate investigators have ETS d. 7

  2. Clinical investigation of radioallergosorbent test (RAST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Minoru; Usami, Atsushi

    1974-01-01

    Relationship of radioallergosorbent test (RAST), intracutaneous reaction, serum IgE determination and RMCD (Rat Mast Cell Degranulation Test) in subjects with tick allergy was compared in order to investigate clinical application for nasal allergy. 1. RAST is suitable for clinical examinations as determination of IgE. Because it is simple in technique, a technical expert can treat many subjects within a short time, and the result can be decleared within 2 days. 2. RAST was high in specificity and was consistent with clinical findings. RAST positive was thought to be allergy by the antigen, but RAST negative could not deny allergy by the antigen. 3. Correlation of some degree was found to exist between RAST and intracutaneous reaction or degree of induced reaction or threshold value of antigen intracutaneous reaction. But degree of intracutaneous reaction and induced reaction and threshold value of intracutaneous reaction could not be determined from the result of RAST. 4. Determination of IgE antibody by RAST was more useful in clinical study than that of IgE or IgE antibody by RMCD. (Oyama, S.)

  3. A clinical and investigational study of donovanosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeranna S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A clinical and investigational study of 25 cases of Donovanosis was undertaken. The incidence was found to be 1.53% of all STD cases and 2.9% of GUD. M:F ratio was 2.12:1. Incidence was more in unmarried people. Fleshy exuberant type was seen in 88% of cases. Two patients (8% had extragenital ulcers. Donovan bodies were found in 88%. Pseudo elephantiasis was seen in 8 patients. Biopsy was done in 8 cases and showed ocanthosis, plasma cell infiltration and pseudo epitheliomatous hyperplasia. One patient developed squamous cell carcinoma of vulva.

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques in clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currà, A; Modugno, N; Inghilleri, M; Manfredi, M; Hallett, M; Berardelli, A

    2002-12-24

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technique that can activate cortical motor areas and the corticospinal tract without causing the subject discomfort. Since TMS was introduced, numerous applications of the technique have been developed for the evaluation of neurologic diseases. Standard TMS applications (central motor conduction time, threshold and amplitude of motor evoked potentials) allow the evaluation of motor conduction in the CNS. Conduction studies provide specific information in neurologic conditions characterized by clinical and subclinical upper motor neuron involvement. In addition, they have proved useful in monitoring motor abnormalities and the recovery of motor function. TMS also gives information on the pathophysiology of the processes underlying the various clinical conditions. More complex TMS applications (paired-pulse stimulation, silent period, ipsilateral silent period, input-output curve, and evaluation of central fatigue) allow investigation into the mechanisms of diseases causing changes in the excitability of cortical motor areas. These techniques are also useful in monitoring the effects of neurotrophic drugs on cortical activity. TMS applications have an important place among the investigative tools to study patients with motor disorders.

  5. Pooled human platelet lysate versus fetal bovine serum-investigating the proliferation rate, chromosome stability and angiogenic potential of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells intended for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojahn Kølle, Stig-Frederik; Oliveri, Roberto S; Glovinski, Peter V; Kirchhoff, Maria; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Andersen, Peter Stemann; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof Tadeusz; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne

    2013-09-01

    Because of an increasing focus on the use of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) in clinical trials, the culture conditions for these cells are being optimized. We compared the proliferation rates and chromosomal stability of ASCs that had been cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) supplemented with either pooled human platelet lysate (pHPL) or clinical-grade fetal bovine serum (FBS) (DMEM(pHPL) versus DMEM(FBS)). ASCs from four healthy donors were cultured in either DMEM(pHPL) or DMEM(FBS), and the population doubling time (PDT) was calculated. ASCs from two of the donors were expanded in DMEM(pHPL) or DMEM(FBS) and cultured for the final week before harvesting with or without the addition of vascular endothelial growth factor. We assessed the chromosomal stability (through the use of array comparative genomic hybridization), the expression of ASC and endothelial surface markers and the differentiation and angiogenic potential of these cells. The ASCs that were cultured in pHPL exhibited a significantly shorter PDT of 29.6 h (95% confidence interval, 22.3-41.9 h) compared with those cultured in FBS, for which the PDT was 123.9 h (95% confidence interval, 95.6-176.2 h). Comparative genomic hybridization analyses revealed no chromosomal aberrations. Cell differentiation, capillary structure formation and cell-surface marker expression were generally unaffected by the type of medium supplement that was used or by the addition of vascular endothelial growth factor. We observed that the use of pHPL as a growth supplement for ASCs facilitated a significantly higher proliferation rate compared with FBS without compromising genomic stability or differentiation capacity. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Implementing human factors in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Methods Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have received aviation-derived human factors training. Results The human factors training was evaluated positively, and thought to be both acceptable and relevant to practice. However, the staff found it harder to implement what they had learned in their own clinical areas, and this was principally attributed to features of the informal organisational cultures. Conclusions In order to successfully apply human factors approaches in hospital, careful consideration needs to be given to the local context and informal culture of clinical practice. PMID:24631959

  7. Clinical investigation of proximate exposed group, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako; Hasegawa, Kazuyo; Kato, Masafumi; Kumasawa, Toshihiko

    1984-01-01

    In order to investigate effects of the A-bombing on prevalence of diabetes mellitus, follow-up studies were made on 5907 A-bomb survivors who received glucose tolerance test (GTT) during 20 years between 1963 and 1983. The A-bomb survivors were divided into the group A (1899 men and 1165 women exposed within 1.9 km from the hypocenter) and the group B (1725 men and 1118 women exposed 3.0 km or farther from it). Among non-obese survivors, 21.9% and 21.8% were being treated for diabetes mellitus or were evaluated as having diabetic type on GTT in the group A and the group B, respectively; while this was seen in 52.1% of obese survivors in the group A and 49.9% in the group B. There was no difference between the groups. In non-obese survivors, the annual development rate from the normal type to the diabetic type was 0.89% in the group A and 0.65% in the group B; the annual development rate from the borderline type to the diabetic type was 5.73% in the group A and 5.49% in the group B, showing no differences between the groups. The annual development rate from the normal or borderline type to the diabetic type was two times or higher in obese survivors than in non-obese survivors irrespective of exposure status. Regarding the number of diabetic survivors who became non-diabetic type in spite of having no treatment, and prevalence of diabetic complications, no difference was seen between the groups. These results suggest that the A-bombing has scarcely influenced the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and clinical course. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. Investigating the virtual representation of human resources

    OpenAIRE

    Canko, Mert

    2015-01-01

    Despite all the advancements of software technologies to increase the productivity of companies, their capabilities to find solutions for certain problem domains are still limited. For the purpose of collaboratively addressing problems, which cannot be solved by algorithms alone, humans as computational units that are connected in a network of hardware and software resources, are therefore becoming increasingly popular. In this diploma thesis we investigate virtual representations of huma...

  9. Implementing human factors in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2015-05-01

    To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have received aviation-derived human factors training. The human factors training was evaluated positively, and thought to be both acceptable and relevant to practice. However, the staff found it harder to implement what they had learned in their own clinical areas, and this was principally attributed to features of the informal organisational cultures. In order to successfully apply human factors approaches in hospital, careful consideration needs to be given to the local context and informal culture of clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. 76 FR 70151 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards, and Food and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0790] Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration Decisions for Investigational Device Exemption Clinical...

  11. Clinical Investigation of Benign Asbestos Pleural Effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobukazu Fujimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no detailed information about benign asbestos pleural effusion (BAPE. The aim of the study was to clarify the clinical features of BAPE. The criteria of enrolled patients were as follows: (1 history of asbestos exposure; (2 presence of pleural effusion determined by chest X-ray, CT, and thoracentesis; and (3 the absence of other causes of effusion. Clinical information was retrospectively analysed and the radiological images were reviewed. There were 110 BAPE patients between 1991 and 2012. All were males and the median age at diagnosis was 74 years. The median duration of asbestos exposure and period of latency for disease onset of BAPE were 31 and 48 years, respectively. Mean values of hyaluronic acid, adenosine deaminase, and carcinoembryonic antigen in the pleural fluid were 39,840 ng/mL, 23.9 IU/L, and 1.8 ng/mL, respectively. Pleural plaques were detected in 98 cases (89.1%. Asbestosis was present in 6 (5.5% cases, rounded atelectasis was detected in 41 (37.3% cases, and diffuse pleural thickening (DPT was detected in 30 (27.3% cases. One case developed lung cancer (LC before and after BAPE. None of the cases developed malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM during the follow-up.

  12. Clinical Investigation Program: Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-30

    Diamminedichloroplatinum (II), Methotrexate and Bleomycin in the Treatment of Advanced Epidermoid Carcinoma of the Penis , Phase II...II), Methotrexate and Bleomycin in the Treatment of Advanced Epidermoid Carcinoma of the Penis , Phase II (5) Start Date: (6) Est Compl Date: (7...Associate Investigators (11) Key Words: constitutional delay delayed puberty (12) Accumulative MEDCASE:* (13) Est Accum OKA Cost:* *Refer to Unit Summary

  13. Clinical Investigation Program Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-30

    The assigned staff of the Molecular Biology Service are Dr. Anthony G. Gutierrez , Chef , GSl3, Ph. D. in Molecular Genetics, and Ms. Judith O’Brien...Node-Negative Breast Cancer Patients Using a Panel of Prognostic Factors. A Companion Protocol to SWOG 8897 ................................ . 103 91...of Prog- nostic Factors. A companion protocol to 8897 (5) Start Date: 1991 (6) Est Compl Date: (7) Principal Investigator: (8) Facility: FAMC Thomas

  14. Clinical Investigation Program Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-20

    Presented: Interna- tional Symposium on Orthopedics, Mexico , September 1987. Publications: In preparation. 147 FAMC A.P.R. (RCS MED 300) Detail Summary...Infection: A Prospective Study. Presented: 2nd Annual Symposium of the Rocky Moun- tain Flow Cytometry Users Group, Albuquerque, New Mexico , 10-11...Podgore, COL, MC (9) Dept/ISvc: Pediatrics (10) Associate Investigators (11) Key Words: Myron J. Levin, M.D. varicella vaccine U Co. HSC (12

  15. Measurements of body protein for clinical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, J.R.; Harrison, J.E.; McNeill, M.G.; Jeejeebhoy, K.N.; Krishnan, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    Body protein (nitrogen) is determined by bilaterally irradiating the body with neutrons using Pu-Be sources and measuring the resultant 10.8 MeV gamma rays from the reaction 14 N(n,8) 15 N. In the authors lab the whole body can be scanned or separate segments of the body can be measured independently. A nitrogen index has been developed based on body size and is used as a predictor of normal total body nitrogen (TBN). They have found that TBN, when normalized to body size in this way, provides a reliable index of protein status which cannot be accurately determined by body weight, anthropometry, or body potassium measurements. Changes in body composition with age were studied by measuring the composition of 56 healthy female volunteers aged 20-80. Measurements were made for K( 40 K), Ca and N. It was shown that protein and bone mineral decrease with age but that this is not reflected in K or anthropometry measurements. Results of other studies to be presented include: body protein measurements pre and post TPN (total parenteral nutrition), nutritional status of patients on long term CAPD (continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis) and changes in body composition as a result of TPN in patients with small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy. Clinical results show that indirect measurements of body protein based on weight, potassium, or anthropometry, do not give an accurate measure of body protein. For an accurate measurement, direct measurement of body protein is necessary

  16. Human Polymorphisms as Clinical Predictors in Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Prado Montes de Oca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and serum markers in human host can predict leprosy susceptibility per se as well as be useful in classification and/or prediction of clinical variants and immunological responses in leprosy. Adequate and timely assessment of potential risks associated with these 38 host leprosy genes could diminish epidemiological burden and improve life quality of patients with this still prevalent mycobacterial disease.

  17. [Support Team for Investigator-Initiated Clinical Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hisako

    2017-07-01

    Investigator-initiated clinical research is that in which investigators plan and carry out their own clinical research in academia. For large-scale clinical research, a team should be organized and implemented. This team should include investigators and supporting staff, who will promote smooth research performance by fulfilling their respective roles. The supporting staff should include project managers, administrative personnel, billing personnel, data managers, and clinical research coordinators. In this article, I will present the current status of clinical research support and introduce the research organization of the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) study, an investigator-initiated international clinical research study, with particular emphasis on the role of the project management staff and clinical research coordinators.

  18. Clinical investigation of fatty liver by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Katsumoto; Takayama, Tetsuo; Sano, Hiroshi; Katada, Naoyuki; Takeichi, Masayuki

    1984-01-01

    CT findings of 56 cases of diffuse fatty infiltration comfirmed by liver biopsy were investigated and compared with those of chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. We found that the diagnosis of severe fatty infiltration (fatty liver) can be specifically possible when the ratios of CT values of liver to those of spleen are less than 0.85 and it is reasonable criterion for diagnosis of fatty liver by CT. This criterion was satisfied by 197 studies (2.9%), 169 cases with fatty liver (diffuse: 141 cases, focal: 28 cases) of 6800 CT studies of liver. Obesity, diabetes and alcohol abuse were main causative factors in both diffuse and focal fatty liver. The percentage of cases showing no abnormal results in blood chemistry tests was great compared with the previous report based on liver biopsy. The changes of CT values of liver faithfully reflected the improvement of each causal factor and reciprocal changes were observed between diffuse and focal fatty liver in repeated CT examination. So, CT is useful in estimating the effect of treatment as well as in diagnosis of fatty liver. Focal fatty liver is temporary manifestation during the proscess of development or improvement of fatty liver. (author)

  19. Development of the NRC's Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.; Haas, P.; Terranova, M.

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause event at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, is a field manual for use by investigators when performing event investigations. Volume II includes the HPIP Procedure, the HPIP Modules, and Appendices that provide extensive documentation of each investigation technique

  20. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... Javascript on. Photo: PhotoDisc At the forefront of human health research today are clinical trials—studies that use ...

  1. Development of the NRC's Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.; Haas, P.; Terranova, M.

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause events at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume I is a concise description of the need for the human performance investigation process, the process' components, the methods used to develop the process, the methods proposed to test the process, and conclusions on the process' usefulness

  2. Clinical Investigation of Treatment Failure in Type 2 Diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical Investigation of Treatment Failure in Type 2 Diabetic Patients ... Purpose: To examine body mass index (BMI), occupation, sex, age, and ... development of secondary failure in type 2 diabetics receiving metformin and glibenclamide.

  3. Disclosure of investigators' recruitment performance in multicenter clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Moher, David; Gluud, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends.......Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends....

  4. Development of the NRC's Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.; Haas, P.; Terranova, M.

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause events at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume III, is a detailed documentation of the development effort and the pilot training program

  5. Clinical investigations for SUS, the Brazilian public health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Ana Patrícia de; Giozza, Silvana Pereira; Pereira, Michelle Zanon; Boaventura, Patrícia Souza; Santos, Leonor Maria Pacheco; Sachetti, Camile Giaretta; Tamayo, César Omar Carranza; Kowalski, Clarissa Campos Guaragna; Elias, Flavia Tavares Silva; Serruya, Suzanne Jacob; Guimarães, Reinaldo

    2012-01-01

    Scientific and technological development is crucial for advancing the Brazilian health system and for promoting quality of life. The way in which the Brazilian Ministry of Health has supported clinical research to provide autonomy, self-sufficiency, competitiveness and innovation for the healthcare industrial production complex, in accordance with the National Policy on Science, Technology and Innovation in Healthcare, was analyzed. Descriptive investigation, based on secondary data, conducted at the Department of Science and Technology, Ministry of Health. The Ministry of Health's research management database, PesquisaSaúde, was analyzed from 2002 to 2009, using the key word "clinical research" in the fields "primary sub-agenda" or "secondary sub-agenda". The 368 projects retrieved were sorted into six categories: basic biomedical research, preclinical studies, expanded clinical research, clinical trials, infrastructure support and health technology assessment. From a structured review on "clinical research funding", results from selected countries are presented and discussed. The amount invested was R$ 140 million. The largest number of projects supported "basic biomedical research", while the highest amounts invested were in "clinical trials" and "infrastructure support". The southeastern region had the greatest proportion of projects and financial resources. In some respects, Brazil is ahead of other BRICS countries (Russia, India, China and South Africa), especially with regard to establishing a National Clinical Research Network. The Ministry of Health ensured investments to encourage clinical research in Brazil and contributed towards promoting cohesion between investigators, health policies and the healthcare industrial production complex.

  6. Investigating antibiotic resistance in non-clinical environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona eWalsh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There have been many calls for more information about the natural resistome and these have also highlighted the importance of understanding the soil resistome in the preservation of antibiotics for the treatment of infections. However, to date there have been few studies which have investigated the culturable soil resistome, which highlights the difficulties faced by microbiologists in designing these experiments to produce meaningful data. The World Health Organization definition of resistance is the most fitting to non-clinical environmental studies: Antimicrobial resistance is resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial medicine to which it was previously sensitive. The ideal investigation of non-clinical environments for antibiotic resistance of clinical relevance would be using standardized guidelines and breakpoints. This review outlines different definitions and methodologies used to understand antibiotic resistance and suggests how this can be performed outside of the clinical environment.

  7. 59th Medical Wing Clinical Research Division Clinical Investigations Program Pathology Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-28

    59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 1. Your paper, entitled 59th Medical Wing Clinical Research Division Clinical Investigations...Program Pathology Poster presented at/published to For hanging in a hallway of the 591h Medical Wing Clinical Research Division, Bldg 4430 in...Graduate Health Sciences Education student and your department has told you they cannot fund your publication, the 59th Clinical Research Division may

  8. Metabonomic investigation of human Schistosoma mansoni infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Crina I.A.; Meissner, Axel; Göraler, Sibel

    2011-01-01

    in their urinary profiles. The potential molecular markers of S. mansoni infection were found to be primarily linked to changes in gut microflora, energy metabolism and liver function. These findings are in agreement with data from earlier studies on S. mansoni infection in experimental animals and thus provide....... Investigation of the host-parasite interaction at the molecular level and identification of biomarkers of infection and infection-related morbidity would be of value for improved strategies for treatment and morbidity control. To this end, we conducted a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabonomics study...... corroborating evidence for the existence of metabolic response specific for this infection....

  9. Clinical Investigation Program Report, RCS MED-300 (R1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-31

    handpieces . Technical Approach: The study will be conducted in vitro using the palatal roots of human maxillary molar teeth which previously extracted due...109 1985 Histoplasmosis Seroconversion Study. (T) 110 1986 A Comparative Study of Fetal Movement Perceptions in the Third Trimester of Multiparous and...Hartwell G, Portell FR: Clinical management of middle mesial root canals in mandibular molars : Two case reports. Submitted to J Am Dent Assn. DeFiore

  10. Theoretical investigation of aberrations upon ametropic human eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bo; Chen, Ying-Ling; Lewis, J. W. L.; Baker, Kevin

    2003-11-01

    The human eye aberrations are important for visual acuity and ophthalmic diagnostics and surgical procedures. Reported monochromatic aberration data of the normal 20/20 human eyes are scarce. There exist even fewer reports of the relation between ametropic conditions and aberrations. We theoretically investigate the monochromatic and chromatic aberrations of human eyes for refractive errors of -10 to +10 diopters. Schematic human eye models are employed using optical design software for axial, index, and refractive types of ametropia.

  11. 75 FR 1790 - Draft Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: IRB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-D-0605... clinical investigators and sponsors better understand their responsibilities related to continuing review...-463-6332 or 301-796-3400); or the Office of Communication, Outreach and Development (HFM-40), Center...

  12. 77 FR 11555 - Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: Institutional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ..., Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) and FDA have been actively working to harmonize the Agencies... criteria, process, and frequency of continuing review to assure the protection of the rights and welfare of... review to assure the protection of the rights and welfare of subjects in clinical investigations. The...

  13. 76 FR 12742 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Clinical Investigations of Devices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2008-D-0457] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Clinical Investigations of Devices Indicated... other electrical continence devices; protective garment for incontinence; surgical mesh; electrosurgical...

  14. 76 FR 20575 - Disqualification of a Clinical Investigator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... research or marketing permit for products regulated by FDA. This proposal is based in part upon.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Contents I. Introduction II. Background III. Description of the Proposed.... References I. Introduction Under current regulations, a clinical investigator disqualified by the...

  15. Clinical Investigation Program. Annual Progress Report. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-20

    Components Surgical Day, Bethesda, MD, in April 1993. 2. Planned for FY-94 The Department of Clinical Investigation hopes to maintain the essence of the...sclerosing cholangitis after choledochojejun- ostomy : radiographic and biochemical improvement with antibiotic therapN. Am J Gastroenterol 1993;88:1635

  16. [An Investigation of the Role Responsibilities of Clinical Research Nurses in Conducting Clinical Trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chi-Yin; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Dai, Yu-Tzu; Pai, Ya-Ying; Hu, Wen-Yu

    2015-06-01

    Clinical research nurses (CRNs) play an important role in improving the quality of clinical trials. In Taiwan, the increasing number of clinical trials has increased the number of practicing CRNs. Understanding the role responsibilities of CRNs is necessary to promote professionalism in this nursing category. This study investigates the role responsibilities of CRNs in conducting clinical trials / research. A questionnaire survey was conducted in a medical center in Taipei City, Taiwan. Eighty CRNs that were registered to facilitate and conduct clinical trials at this research site completed the survey. "Subject protection" was the CRN role responsibility most recognized by participants, followed by "research coordination and management", "subject clinical care", and "advanced professional nursing". Higher recognition scores were associated with higher importance scores and lower difficulty scores. Participants with trial training had significantly higher difficulty scores for "subject clinical care" and "research coordination and management" than their peers without this training (p research coordination and management" (p clinical practice.

  17. Clinical investigations for SUS, the Brazilian public health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patrícia de Paula

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Scientific and technological development is crucial for advancing the Brazilian health system and for promoting quality of life. The way in which the Brazilian Ministry of Health has supported clinical research to provide autonomy, self-sufficiency, competitiveness and innovation for the healthcare industrial production complex, in accordance with the National Policy on Science, Technology and Innovation in Healthcare, was analyzed. DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive investigation, based on secondary data, conducted at the Department of Science and Technology, Ministry of Health. METHODS: The Ministry of Health's research management database, PesquisaSaúde, was analyzed from 2002 to 2009, using the key word "clinical research" in the fields "primary sub-agenda" or "secondary sub-agenda". The 368 projects retrieved were sorted into six categories: basic biomedical research, preclinical studies, expanded clinical research, clinical trials, infrastructure support and health technology assessment. From a structured review on "clinical research funding", results from selected countries are presented and discussed. RESULTS: The amount invested was R$ 140 million. The largest number of projects supported "basic biomedical research", while the highest amounts invested were in "clinical trials" and "infrastructure support". The southeastern region had the greatest proportion of projects and financial resources. In some respects, Brazil is ahead of other BRICS countries (Russia, India, China and South Africa, especially with regard to establishing a National Clinical Research Network. CONCLUSION: The Ministry of Health ensured investments to encourage clinical research in Brazil and contributed towards promoting cohesion between investigators, health policies and the healthcare industrial production complex.

  18. A history of the American Society for Clinical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred years ago, in 1909, the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) held its first annual meeting. The founding members based this new society on a revolutionary approach to research that emphasized newer physiological methods. In 1924 the ASCI started a new journal, the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The ASCI has also held an annual meeting almost every year. The society has long debated who could be a member, with discussions about whether members must be physicians, what sorts of research they could do, and the role of women within the society. The ASCI has also grappled with what else the society should do, especially whether it ought to take a stand on policy issues. ASCI history has reflected changing social, political, and economic contexts, including several wars, concerns about the ethics of biomedical research, massive increases in federal research funding, and an increasingly large and specialized medical environment. PMID:19348041

  19. Investigation of cytogenetic activity of radioprotectors in human lymphocyte culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egiazaryan, S.V.; Arutyunyan, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    Studied are the effects of the F-11 and F-37 indene preparations on chromosome aberrations induced in lymphocyte culture of peripheral human blood by thioTEP. Investigation into the action of the substance in euqimolar concentrations has not shown their protective effect. Indene preparations did not change the spectrum of chromosome aberrations induced by thioTEP as well as did not increase the level of chromosome aberrations in lumphocyte culture of human peripheral human blood

  20. Comparative clinical, roentgenological, scintigraphic and thermographic investigations in psoriasis arthropathica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loreck, D.; Lips, H.; Schulze, P.

    1988-01-01

    20 patients with psoriasis arthropatica and different duration of the articular symptoms were examined. Besides clinical investigation radiographs of both hands and feet (central and phalanges), scintigraphy of hands, feet and the sacroiliac joints as well as liquid crystal thermograhy of both hands were performed and the results are compared. The conclusions drawn characterize the diagnostic value of the methods. Scintigraphy as well as thermography are very good means for the early detection of psoriasis arthropathica. (author)

  1. An Investigation into the Clinical Reasoning Development of Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinten, Claire E K; Cobb, Kate A; Freeman, Sarah L; Mossop, Liz H

    Clinical reasoning is a fundamental skill for veterinary clinicians and a competency required of graduates by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. However, it is unknown how veterinary students develop reasoning skills and where strengths and shortcomings of curricula lie. This research aimed to use the University of Nottingham School of Veterinary Medicine and Science (SVMS) as a case study to investigate the development of clinical reasoning among veterinary students. The analysis was framed in consideration of the taught, learned, and declared curricula. Sixteen staff and sixteen students from the SVMS participated separately in a total of four focus groups. In addition, five interviews were conducted with recent SVMS graduates. Audio transcriptions were used to conduct a thematic analysis. A content analysis was performed on all curriculum documentation. It was found that SVMS graduates feel they have a good level of reasoning ability, but they still experience a deficit in their reasoning capabilities when starting their first job. Overarching themes arising from the data suggest that a lack of responsibility for clinical decisions during the program and the embedded nature of the clinical reasoning skill within the curriculum could be restricting development. In addition, SVMS students would benefit from clinical reasoning training where factors influencing "real life" decisions (e.g., finances) are explored in more depth. Integrating these factors into the curriculum could lead to improved decision-making ability among SVMS graduates and better prepare students for the stressful transition to practice. These findings are likely to have implications for other veterinary curricula.

  2. Scanning conductance microscopy investigations on fixed human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Jensen, Linda Boye

    2008-01-01

    Scanning conductance microscopy investigations were carried out in air on human chromosomes fixed on pre-fabricated SiO2 surfaces with a backgate. The point of the investigation was to estimate the dielectric constant of fixed human chromosomes in order to use it for microfluidic device...... optimization. The phase shift caused by the electrostatic forces, together with geometrical measurements of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and the chromosomes were used to estimate a value,for the dielectric constant of different human chromosomes....

  3. Investigation of evaluation methods for human factors education effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Seiichi; Fujimoto, Junzo; Sasou Kunihide; Hasegawa, Naoko

    2004-01-01

    Education effectiveness in accordance with investment is required in the steam of electric power regulation alleviation. Therefore, evaluation methods for human factors education effectiveness which can observe human factors culture pervading process were investigated through research activities on education effectiveness in universities and actual in house education in industry companies. As a result, the contents of evaluation were found to be the change of feeling for human factors and some improving proposals in work places when considering the purpose of human factors education. And, questionnaire is found to be suitable for the style of evaluation. In addition, the timing of evaluation is desirable for both just after education and after some period in work places. Hereafter, data will be collected using these two kinds of questionnaires in human factors education courses in CRIEPI and some education courses in utilities. Thus, education effectiveness evaluation method which is suitable for human factors will be established. (author)

  4. Human papillomavirus genotypes and clinical management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted viral disease in the world. HPV infection of the genital epithelium is associated with genital warts and malignancies of the lower genital tract. Objectives. To describe the distribution, phenotypic appearance and HPV type ...

  5. Clinical epidemiology of human AE in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuitton, D A; Demonmerot, F; Knapp, J; Richou, C; Grenouillet, F; Chauchet, A; Vuitton, L; Bresson-Hadni, S; Millon, L

    2015-10-30

    This review gives a critical update of the situation regarding alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in Europe in humans, based on existing publications and on findings of national and European surveillance systems. All sources point to an increase in human cases of AE in the "historic endemic areas" of Europe, namely Germany, Switzerland, Austria and France and to the emergence of human cases in countries where the disease had never been recognised until the end of the 20th century, especially in central-eastern and Baltic countries. Both increase and emergence could be only due to methodological biases; this point is discussed in the review. One explanation may be given by changes in the animal reservoir of the parasite, Echinococcus multilocularis (increase in the global population of foxes in Europe and its urbanisation, as well as a possible increased involvement of pet animals as definitive infectious hosts). The review also focuses onto 2 more original approaches: (1) how changes in therapeutic attitudes toward malignant and chronic inflammatory diseases may affect the epidemiology of AE in the future in Europe, since a recent survey of such cases in France showed the emergence of AE in patients with immune suppression since the beginning of the 21st century; (2) how setting a network of referral centres in Europe based on common studies on the care management of patients might contribute to a better knowledge of AE epidemiology in the future. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Utilizing the Human, Machine, and Environment Matrix in investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curry, David; McKinney, John M.

    2006-01-01

    'How did we get into this situation?' How many times has this question been asked at the outset of an investigation, or more importantly, at the completion of an investigation? If the answer is not readily and thoroughly apparent, the investigation is not complete. Subsequently, those who will have the responsibility for correction of the conditions leading to the incident will not have all the information necessary to properly complete their task. For many years, in many writings, the Human/Machine interaction and its impact on process design has been discussed. The same impact should be examined when performing incident investigations. Consideration of the interaction of human and machine along with the environment in which they are used has long been recommended by the National Safety Council, in both design and investigation

  7. Clinical investigation on RBE estimation for heavy particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Yanagi, Takeshi; Mizoe, Junetsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of the clinical updated data of the prostate cancer patients treated with carbon-ions was performed for the purpose of investigating the clinical relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of carbon ion beams. Most of the patients received the carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) with the dose of 66.0 GyE/20 fractions. Probabilities of the late urethral morbidity and biochemical tumor control with this dose fractionation were calculated using the actual updated clinical data. The linear energy transfer (LET) values and physical carbon ion doses of urethra were obtained from treatment planning data. RBE values were calculated from the ratio of average carbon physical doses and photon doses which cause the same grade of urethra reaction with the same probabilities. Obtained RBE values were compared with the values that are being used in actual carbon ion radiotherapy in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). In addition, relative RBE of carbon ion beams for biochemical tumor control was calculated using the data from the literature. As a result, the RBE values being used for the treatment were thought to be proper enough for both the urethra reaction and tumor control. (author)

  8. Physician to investigator: clinical practice to clinical research--ethical, operational, and financial considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Physicians who participate in clinical research studies gain benefits for themselves, their practice, and their patients. Historically, private practice physicians have chosen to defer to their counterparts in academic medicine when it comes to contributing to scientific advancement through clinical studies. A growing number of private practice physicians are now taking a serious second look and deciding that there are unique benefits for both the practice and the patient. Physicians who decide to participate in clinical research should give serious consideration to the time and resources that are required to meet both federal regulations and industry standards. In addition, ethical and scientific principles for assuring the protection of human research subjects must be a paramount commitment.

  9. An interactive data management and analysis system for clinical investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, G F; Hopwood, M D; Palley, N A; Sibley, W L; Baker, W R; Christopher, T G; Thompson, H K

    1978-09-01

    An interactive minicomputer-based system has been developed that enables the clinical research investigator to personally explore and analyze his research data and, as a consequence of these explorations, to acquire more information. This system, which does not require extensive training or computer programming, enables the investigator to describe his data interactively in his own terms, enter data values while having them checked for validity, store time-oriented patient data in a carefully controlled on-line data base, retrieve data by patient, variable, and time, create subsets of patients with common characteristics, perform statistical analyses, and produce tables and graphs. It also permits data to be transferred to and from other computers. The system is well accepted and is being used by a variety of medical specialists at the three clinical research centers where it is operational. Reported benefits include less elapsed and nonproductive time, more thorough analysis of more data, greater and earlier insight into the meaning of research data, and increased publishable results.

  10. Bacteria, Yeast, Worms, and Flies: Exploiting Simple Model Organisms to Investigate Human Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Shane L.; Graham, Brett H.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kar, Adwitiya; Falk, Marni J.

    2010-01-01

    The extensive conservation of mitochondrial structure, composition, and function across evolution offers a unique opportunity to expand our understanding of human mitochondrial biology and disease. By investigating the biology of much simpler model organisms, it is often possible to answer questions that are unreachable at the clinical level.…

  11. Clinical trials in orthopaedics and the future direction of clinical investigations for femoroacetabular impingement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clohisy, John C; Kim, Young-Jo; Lurie, Jon

    2013-01-01

    to be further defined. To date, clinical research reports have included primarily surgical case series. Future clinical investigations are needed to establish improved clinical evidence to guide patient care. Most urgent is the need to better understand the potential role of standardized nonsurgical treatment......Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) represents a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect a diverse patient population. The natural history of the disease, the role of nonsurgical management, the indications for surgery, optimal surgical techniques, and the predictors of treatment outcomes need...... options for FAI and to define the predictors of surgical and nonsurgical outcomes. Future randomized controlled trials and large observational cohort studies targeted at these clinical research deficiencies will strengthen the evidence and improve informed decision making regarding the management...

  12. Clinical Relevance of KRAS in Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Jančík

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The KRAS gene (Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog is an oncogene that encodes a small GTPase transductor protein called KRAS. KRAS is involved in the regulation of cell division as a result of its ability to relay external signals to the cell nucleus. Activating mutations in the KRAS gene impair the ability of the KRAS protein to switch between active and inactive states, leading to cell transformation and increased resistance to chemotherapy and biological therapies targeting epidermal growth factor receptors. This review highlights some of the features of the KRAS gene and the KRAS protein and summarizes current knowledge of the mechanism of KRAS gene regulation. It also underlines the importance of activating mutations in the KRAS gene in relation to carcinogenesis and their importance as diagnostic biomarkers, providing clues regarding human cancer patients' prognosis and indicating potential therapeutic approaches.

  13. Sample handling for mass spectrometric proteomic investigations of human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Anette Lykke; Høgdall, Claus; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; T'jampens, Davy; Hellmann, Marja-Leena; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Fung, Eric T; Høgdall, Estrid

    2008-09-01

    Because of its non-invasive sample collection method, human urine is an attractive biological material both for discovering biomarkers and for use in future screening trials for different diseases. Before urine can be used for these applications, standardized protocols for sample handling that optimize protein stability are required. In this explorative study, we examine the influence of different urine collection methods, storage temperatures, storage times, and repetitive freeze-thaw procedures on the protein profiles obtained by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Prospectively collected urine samples from 11 women were collected as either morning or midday specimens. The effects of storage temperature, time to freezing, and freeze-thaw cycles were assessed by calculating the number, intensity, and reproducibility of peaks visualized by SELDI-TOF-MS. On the CM10 array, 122 peaks were detected and 28 peaks were found to be significantly different between urine types, storage temperature and time to freezing. On the IMAC-Cu array, 65 peaks were detected and 1 peak was found to be significantly different according to time to freezing. No significant differences were demonstrated for freeze-thaw cycles. Optimal handling and storage conditions are necessary in clinical urine proteomic investigations. Collection of urine with a single and consistently performed protocol is needed to reduce analytical bias. Collecting only one urine type, which is stored for a limited period at 4°C until freezing at -80°C prior to analysis will provide the most stable profiles. Copyright © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Clinical potentials of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Cristina; Serzanti, Marialaura; Consiglio, Antonella; Memo, Maurizio; Dell'Era, Patrizia

    2017-08-01

    Aging, injuries, and diseases can be considered as the result of malfunctioning or damaged cells. Regenerative medicine aims to restore tissue homeostasis by repairing or replacing cells, tissues, or damaged organs, by linking and combining different disciplines including engineering, technology, biology, and medicine. To pursue these goals, the discipline is taking advantage of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), a peculiar type of cell possessing the ability to differentiate into every cell type of the body. Human PSCs can be isolated from the blastocysts and maintained in culture indefinitely, giving rise to the so-called embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, since 2006, it is possible to restore in an adult cell a pluripotent ESC-like condition by forcing the expression of four transcription factors with the rejuvenating reprogramming technology invented by Yamanaka. Then the two types of PSC can be differentiated, using standardized protocols, towards the cell type necessary for the regeneration. Although the use of these derivatives for therapeutic transplantation is still in the preliminary phase of safety and efficacy studies, a lot of efforts are presently taking place to discover the biological mechanisms underlying genetic pathologies, by differentiating induced PSCs derived from patients, and new therapies by challenging PSC-derived cells in drug screening.

  15. Sesame seed allergy: Clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlollahi MR.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant-origin foods are among the most important sources of food allergic reactions. An increase in the incidence of sesame seed allergy among children and adults has been reported in recent years. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the prevalence, importance and clinical manifestations of sesame allergy among Iranian patients.Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 250 patients with suspected IgE-mediated food allergies completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick tests with sesame extract as well as cross-reacting foods (walnut, soya and peanut. Total IgE and sesame-specific IgE levels were measured. Patients with positive skin test reactions and/or IgE specific for sesame without clinical symptoms were considered sensitive to sesame. The patients who also had clinical symptoms with sesame consumption were diagnosed as allergic to sesame.Results: Of the 250 patients enrolled in this study, 129 were male and 121 female, with a mean age of 11.7 years. The most common food allergens were cow's milk, egg, curry, tomato and sesame. Sesame sensitivity was found in 35 patients (14.1%. Only five patients (2% had sesame allergy. Sesame-sensitive patients had a significantly higher frequency of positive prick test to cross-reacting foods when compared to non-sensitized patients (p=0.00. The type of symptom was independent of gender and age of the patients, but urticaria and dermatitis-eczema were significantly more frequent in sensitized patients (p=0.008.Conclusions: This is the first study addressing the prevalence of sesame seed allergy in Iranian population. We found sesame to be a common and important cause of food allergy. The panel of foods recommended for use in diagnostic allergy tests should be adjusted.

  16. [Clinical investigation of the positioning accuracy of acute pulpitis pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Sun, Wei; Ji, Aiping

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the positioning accuracy of acute pulpitis pain and its possible factors. The clinical symptoms and physical signs of 3 432 cases of acute pulpitis were recorded and analyzed by using questionnaire forms, which included age, gender, tooth position, infection origin, pain history, time of acute attack, duration and nature of pain, pain frequency, referred pain areas, percussion examination, temperature pulp test, pulp bleeding, and positioning accuracy. Univariate analysis and multivariate stepwise regression analysis were used for data processing. Pain location was accurately identified by 39.1% of the patients with acute pulpitis. Referred pain could reduce the positioning accuracy of pain (P 0.05). Some cases of acute pulpitis pain can be located accurately. Referred pain and periodontium infection origin are related to the positioning accuracy of acute pulpitis pain. The exact cause of this correlation needs further study.

  17. Clinical Investigation of Radiation Retinopathy Fundus and Fluorescein Angiographic Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiMei; QiuGT

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:To investigate the fundus and fluorescein angiographic features in the patients with radiation retinopathy.Clinical Materials:Color fundus photography and/or fluorescein angiography from 13 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinomas received external beam radiation were retrospectively analyzed.Reslts:In this study,26 damaged eyes of 13 patients eveloped some degree of radiation retinopathy.The earliest and most common finding was macular microvascular changes (microaneurysms and/or telangiectasia),which was observed in 100%(26/26)of the eyes.Intraretinal hemorrhages,macular capillary nonperfusion,and macular edema were noted in 84%,50%,and 42% of the eyes,respectively.Conclusions:Radiation retinopathy is common after external beam radiation of nasopharyngeal carcinomas.The prominent changes include maular microvascular changes,intraretinal hemorrhages and macular capillary nonperfusion.

  18. [The role of gonadal peptides in clinical investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahlou, N; Bouvattier, C; Linglart, A; Rodrigue, D; Teinturier, C

    2009-01-01

    Inhibins, activins, and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) are gonadal dimeric peptides produced in ovaries and testes by homologous cells, granulosa cells and Sertoli cells, respectively. The production of inhibins is driven by FSH, that of AMH may indirectly depends on FSH, while it is down regulated, at least in the male, by testosterone. In the past decade, measurements of serum inhibin and AMH have provided useful tools for clinical investigation in gonadal disorders: pseudohermaphroditism, androgen insensitivity, anorchidism, gonadal dysgenesis, disorders of pubertal developpement. Inhibins, activins, and AMH are also reliable markers of gonadal tumors. They are extensively used as indexes of fertility: in the male the production of inhibin B reflects the spermatogenetic activity, in women both inhibin B and AMH levels are correlated with the number of preantral and early antral follicles and reflect the ovarian reserve of follicles available for recruitment.

  19. Clinical investigation of 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yongli; Zhu Ruisen; Ji Hong; Luo Quanyong

    2000-01-01

    To investigate clinical value of 14 C-urea breath test ( 14 C-UBT) for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori(Hp), 70 patients were both performed gastroscopy (taking gastric mucosae biopsy for rapid urease test and histology) and 14 C-UBT (some patients by Hp-IgG or DNAHp test also) within two days. The positive cases of both rapid urease test and histology was defined as 'gold standard' of Hp-positive, whereas the negative cases of both rapid urease test and histology as 'gold standard' of Hp-negative. The sensitivity of 14 C-UBT was 93.2%, the specificity 73.1%, and the diagnostic accuracy 85.7%. The difference (comparing with 'gold standard') was not marked (x 2 = 0.9 0.05(1) 2 = 3.84, P>0.05). But the diagnostic accuracy of 14 C-UBT (85.7%) and Hp-IgG (50%) had a marked difference (x 2 13.80>x 0.01(1) 2 = 6.64, P 14 C-UBT was easy to operate, reliable and suitable for clinical application

  20. Basic and clinical investigation of T3 immunoassay kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Junji; Nakajima, Akiko; Morita, Rikushi; Endo, Keigo; Ikekubo, Katsuji

    1976-01-01

    T 3 immunoassay kit was investigated basically and clinically. A good result was obtained at the prescribed incubation temperature and for 16 hours of incubation time. Moreover, it was thought to be possible that incubation time could be shortened to 1 - 4 hours at 37 0 C. Specificity of antibody was good. Recovery of added T 3 was 100+-5 (S.D.) % on an average and parallel of dilution curve of high T 3 serum was also good. Variation coefficient of accuracy of this kit was 1.5 - 2.1 % and that of reproducibility was 1.3 - 6.6 %. Mild hemolysis did not affect measurement value. Serum T 3 level in normals, untreated patients with Basedow's disease and patients with primary hypothyroidism was 142+-21 ng/100 ml, 452+-156 ng/100 ml and 67+-17 ng/100 ml, respectively. Serum T 3 level in patients with Hashimoto's disease was distributed to a wide extent, but that of patients with goiter and simple goiter ranged within normal range. On the other side, serum T 3 level of normal pregnant woman was high and that of patients with anorexia nervosa showed low level. From the above mentioned results, it was concluded that this kit was simple in method and good in sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility and it was also useful for clinical applications. (M. Tsunoda)

  1. An investigation on factors influencing on human resources productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Seifi Divkolaii

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Human resources development is one of the most important components of any organization and detecting important factors influencing on human resources management plays essential role on the success of the firms. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to determine different factors influencing productivity of human resources of Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB in province of Mazandaran, Iran. The study uses analytical hierarchy process (AHP to rank 17 important factors and determines that personal characteristics were the most important factors followed by management related factors and environmental factors. In terms of personal characteristics, job satisfaction plays essential role on human resources development. In terms of managerial factors, paying attention on continuous job improvement by receiving appropriate training is the most important factor followed by welfare facilities for employees and using a system of reward/punishment in organization. Finally, in terms of environmental factors, occupational safety is number one priority followed by organizational rules and regulations.

  2. Investigation of clinical pharmacokinetic variability of an opioid antagonist through physiologically based absorption modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuan; He, Minxia; Kulkarni, Rajesh; Patel, Nita; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2013-08-01

    Identifying the source of inter- and/or intrasubject variability in pharmacokinetics (PK) provides fundamental information in understanding the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics relationship of a drug and project its efficacy and safety in clinical populations. This identification process can be challenging given that a large number of potential causes could lead to PK variability. Here we present an integrated approach of physiologically based absorption modeling to investigate the root cause of unexpectedly high PK variability of a Phase I clinical trial drug. LY2196044 exhibited high intersubject variability in the absorption phase of plasma concentration-time profiles in humans. This could not be explained by in vitro measurements of drug properties and excellent bioavailability with low variability observed in preclinical species. GastroPlus™ modeling suggested that the compound's optimal solubility and permeability characteristics would enable rapid and complete absorption in preclinical species and in humans. However, simulations of human plasma concentration-time profiles indicated that despite sufficient solubility and rapid dissolution of LY2196044 in humans, permeability and/or transit in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may have been negatively affected. It was concluded that clinical PK variability was potentially due to the drug's antagonism on opioid receptors that affected its transit and absorption in the GI tract. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Expression and clinical value of EGFR in human meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus B. Arnli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Meningiomas are common intracranial tumors in humans that frequently recur despite having a predominantly benign nature. Even though these tumors have been shown to commonly express EGFR/c-erbB1 (epidermal growth factor receptor, results from previous studies are uncertain regarding the expression of either intracellular or extracellular domains, cellular localization, activation state, relations to malignancy grade, and prognosis. Aims This study was designed to investigate the expression of the intracellular and extracellular domains of EGFR and of the activated receptor as well as its ligands EGF and TGFα in a large series of meningiomas with long follow-up data, and investigate if there exists an association between antibody expression and clinical and histological data. Methods A series of 186 meningiomas consecutively operated within a 10-year period was included. Tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemically analyzed with antibodies targeting intracellular and extracellular domains of EGFR, phosphorylated receptor, and EGF and TGFα. Expression levels were recorded as a staining index (SI. Results Positive immunoreactivity was observed for all antibodies in most cases. There was in general high SIs for the intracellular domain of EGFR, phosphorylated EGFR, EGF, and TGFα but lower for the extracellular domain. Normal meninges were negative for all antibodies. Higher SIs for the phosphorylated EGFR were observed in grade II tumors compared with grade I (p = 0.018. Survival or recurrence was significantly decreased in the time to recurrence analysis (TTR with high SI-scores of the extracellular domain in a univariable survival analysis (HR 1.152, CI (1.036–1.280, p = 0.009. This was not significant in a multivariable analysis. Expression of the other antigens did not affect survival. Conclusion EGFR is overexpressed and in an activated state in human meningiomas. High levels of ligands also support this

  4. Atomoxetine for hoarding disorder: A pre-clinical and clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Giacomo; Micheli, Laura; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Compagno, Elisa; Righi, Lorenzo; Ghelardini, Carla; Pallanti, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    Despite several studies suggested that inattention and impulsivity-compulsivity could represent two core dimensions of hoarding disorder (HD), only a small case series study investigated the effectiveness of attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder (ADHD) medications in HD. The aim of the present study was to target attentional and inhibitory control networks in HD patients through the ADHD medication atomoxetine, moving from a preclinical investigation on an animal model of compulsive-like behavior (marble burying test) to a clinical investigation on both medicated and unmedicated patients with a primary diagnosis of HD without ADHD. Our preclinical investigation showed that acute administration of atomoxetine significantly reduced the compulsive-like behaviours of mice in the marble burying test without affecting neither locomotor activity and coordination nor exploration behaviours. When compared, atomoxetine and fluoxetine showed similar effects on the marble burying test. However, fluoxetine impaired both locomotor and exploratory activity. In our clinical investigation 12 patients were enrolled and 11 patients completed an open trial with atomoxetine at flexible dose (40-80 mg) for 12 weeks. At the endpoint the mean UCLA Hoarding Severity Scale score decreased by 41.3% for the whole group (p = 0003). Six patients were classified as full responders (mean symptom reduction of 57.2%) and three patients as partial responders (mean symptom reduction of 27.3%). Inattentive and impulsivity symptoms showed a significant mean score reduction of 18.5% from baseline to the endpoint (F (1,9) = 20.9, p = 0.0013). Hoarding symptoms improvement was correlated to reduction of patients' disability and increased in their global functioning. These preclinical and clinical data suggest that atomoxetine may be effective for HD and therefore should be considered for future controlled trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Translating chimpanzee personality to humans: Investigating the transportability of chimpanzee-derived personality scales to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D; Sauvigné, Katheryn C; Hopkins, William D

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of personality in chimpanzees with repeated findings of a similar structure of personality in apes to that found in humans. To date, however, the direct translational value of instruments used to assess chimpanzee personality to humans has yet to be explicitly tested. As such, in the current study we sought to determine the transportability of factor analytically-derived chimpanzee personality scales to humans in a large human sample (N = 301). Human informants reporting on target individuals they knew well completed chimpanzee-derived and human-derived measures of personality from the two most widely studied models of human personality: Big Five and Big Three. The correspondence between informant-reported chimpanzee- and human-derived personality scales was then investigated. Results indicated high convergence for corresponding scales across most chimpanzee- and human-derived personality scales. Findings from the current study provide evidence that chimpanzee-derived scales translate well to humans and operate quite similarly to the established human-derived personality scales in a human sample. This evidence of transportability lends support to the translational nature of chimpanzee personality research suggesting clear relevance of this growing literature to humans. Am. J. Primatol. 78:601-609, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Dosimetry investigation of MOSFET for clinical IMRT dose verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Kumar, Rajesh; Ghadi, Yogesh; Neharu, R M; Kannan, V

    2013-06-01

    In IMRT, patient-specific dose verification is followed regularly at each centre. Simple and efficient dosimetry techniques play a very important role in routine clinical dosimetry QA. The MOSFET dosimeter offers several advantages over the conventional dosimeters such as its small detector size, immediate readout, immediate reuse, multiple point dose measurements. To use the MOSFET as routine clinical dosimetry system for pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT, a comprehensive set of experiments has been conducted, to investigate its linearity, reproducibility, dose rate effect and angular dependence for 6 MV x-ray beam. The MOSFETs shows a linear response with linearity coefficient of 0.992 for a dose range of 35 cGy to 427 cGy. The reproducibility of the MOSFET was measured by irradiating the MOSFET for ten consecutive irradiations in the dose range of 35 cGy to 427 cGy. The measured reproducibility of MOSFET was found to be within 4% up to 70 cGy and within 1.4% above 70 cGy. The dose rate effect on the MOSFET was investigated in the dose rate range 100 MU/min to 600 MU/min. The response of the MOSFET varies from -1.7% to 2.1%. The angular responses of the MOSFETs were measured at 10 degrees intervals from 90 to 270 degrees in an anticlockwise direction and normalized at gantry angle zero and it was found to be in the range of 0.98 ± 0.014 to 1.01 ± 0.014. The MOSFETs were calibrated in a phantom which was later used for IMRT verification. The measured calibration coefficients were found to be 1 mV/cGy and 2.995 mV/cGy in standard and high sensitivity mode respectively. The MOSFETs were used for pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT. Nine dosimeters were used for each patient to measure the dose in different plane. The average variation between calculated and measured dose at any location was within 3%. Dose verification using MOSFET and IMRT phantom was found to quick and efficient and well suited for a busy radiotherapy

  7. Clinical dosimetry in photon radiotherapy. A Monte Carlo based investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Practical clinical dosimetry is a fundamental step within the radiation therapy process and aims at quantifying the absorbed radiation dose within a 1-2% uncertainty. To achieve this level of accuracy, corrections are needed for calibrated and air-filled ionization chambers, which are used for dose measurement. The procedures of correction are based on cavity theory of Spencer-Attix and are defined in current dosimetry protocols. Energy dependent corrections for deviations from calibration beams account for changed ionization chamber response in the treatment beam. The corrections applied are usually based on semi-analytical models or measurements and are generally hard to determine due to their magnitude of only a few percents or even less. Furthermore the corrections are defined for fixed geometrical reference-conditions and do not apply to non-reference conditions in modern radiotherapy applications. The stochastic Monte Carlo method for the simulation of radiation transport is becoming a valuable tool in the field of Medical Physics. As a suitable tool for calculation of these corrections with high accuracy the simulations enable the investigation of ionization chambers under various conditions. The aim of this work is the consistent investigation of ionization chamber dosimetry in photon radiation therapy with the use of Monte Carlo methods. Nowadays Monte Carlo systems exist, which enable the accurate calculation of ionization chamber response in principle. Still, their bare use for studies of this type is limited due to the long calculation times needed for a meaningful result with a small statistical uncertainty, inherent to every result of a Monte Carlo simulation. Besides heavy use of computer hardware, techniques methods of variance reduction to reduce the needed calculation time can be applied. Methods for increasing the efficiency in the results of simulation were developed and incorporated in a modern and established Monte Carlo simulation environment

  8. Air temperature investigation in microenvironment around a human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Sekhar, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the temperature boundary layer around a human body in a quiescent indoor environment. The air temperature, mean in time and standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations around a breathing thermal manikin are examined in relation to the room temperature......, body posture and human respiratory flow. To determine to what extent the experiments represent the realistic scenario, the additional experiments were performed with a real human subject. The results show that at a lower room air temperature (20°C), the fluctuations of air temperature increased close...... to the surface of the body. The large standard deviation of air temperature fluctuations, up to 1.2°C, was recorded in the region of the chest, and up to 2.9°C when the exhalation was applied. The manikin leaned backwards increased the air temperature in the breathing zone, which was opposite from the forward...

  9. Investigation into Seasonal Scavenging Patterns of Raccoons on Human Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yangseung; Jantz, Lee Meadows; Smith, Jake

    2016-03-01

    Although raccoons are known as one of the most common scavengers in the U.S., scavenging by these animals has seldom been studied in terms of forensic significance. In this research, the seasonal pattern of raccoon scavenging and its effect on human decomposition was investigated using 178 human cadavers placed at the Anthropological Research Facility (ARF) of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) between February 2011 and December 2013. The results reveal that (i) the frequency of scavenging increases during summer, (ii) scavenging occurs relatively immediately and lasts shorter in summer months, and (iii) scavenging influences the decomposition process by hollowing limbs and by disturbing insect activities, both of which eventually increases the chance of mummification on the affected body. This information is expected to help forensic investigators identify raccoon scavenging as well as make a more precise interpretation of the effect of raccoon scavenging on bodies at crime scenes. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Challenges for Preclinical Investigations of Human Biofield Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Bengston, William

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical models for studying the effects of the human biofield have great potential to advance our understanding of human biofield modalities, which include external qigong, Johrei, Reiki, therapeutic touch, healing touch, polarity therapy, pranic healing, and other practices. A short history of Western biofield studies using preclinical models is presented and demonstrates numerous and consistent examples of human biofields significantly affecting biological systems both in vitro and in vivo. Methodological issues arising from these studies and practical solutions in experimental design are presented. Important questions still left unanswered with preclinical models include variable reproducibility, dosing, intentionality of the practitioner, best preclinical systems, and mechanisms. Input from the biofield practitioners in the experimental design is critical to improving experimental outcomes; however, the development of standard criteria for uniformity of practice and for inclusion of multiple practitioners is needed. Research in human biofield studies involving preclinical models promises a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of biofield therapies and will be important in guiding clinical protocols and integrating treatments with conventional medical therapies. PMID:26665042

  11. Best of friends? Investigating the dog-human relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Rehn, Therese

    2013-01-01

    Dogs are commonly referred to as man's best friend, but the main focus of this thesis was to investigate how the dog experiences the relationship. The first part of the thesis dealt with methodology currently used to assess the dog-human relationship: the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) and the Monash Dog Owner Relationship Scale (MDORS). In one experiment, possible associations between the dog's bond to its owner (using the SSP) and the strength of the owner's relationship to the dog (...

  12. Investigations of Human and Organizational Factors in hazardous vapor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanfu; Faghih Roohi, Shahrzad; Hu Xiuming; Xie Min

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → HFACS provides a systematic guideline in accident investigations. The hierarchal structure of HFACS forces investigators to seek out latent HOFs. → Bayesian Network enhances the ability of the HFACS by allowing experts to quantify the degree of relationships among the HOFs. → The fuzzy AHP helps to reduce the subjective biases by avoiding the need to give explicit probability values for the variables' states. - Abstract: This paper presents a model to assess the contribution of Human and Organizational Factor (HOF) to accidents. The proposed model is made up of two phases. The first phase is the qualitative analysis of HOF responsible for accidents, which utilizes Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) to seek out latent HOFs. The hierarchy of HOFs identified in the first phase provides inputs for the analysis in the second phase, which is a quantitative analysis using Bayesian Network (BN). BN enhances the ability of HFACS by allowing investigators or domain experts to measure the degree of relationships among the HOFs. In order to estimate the conditional probabilities of BN, fuzzy analytical hierarchy process and decomposition method are applied in the model. Case studies show that the model is capable of seeking out critical latent human and organizational errors and carrying out quantitative analysis of accidents. Thereafter, corresponding safety prevention measures are derived.

  13. Human based roots of failures in nuclear events investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziedelis, Stanislovas; Noel, Marc; Strucic, Miodrag [Commission of the European Communities, Petten (Netherlands). European Clearinghouse on Operational Experience Feedback for Nuclear Power Plants

    2012-10-15

    This paper aims for improvement of quality of the event investigations in the nuclear industry through analysis of the existing practices, identifying and removing the existing Human and Organizational Factors (HOF) and management related barriers. It presents the essential results of several studies performed by the European Clearinghouse on Operational Experience. Outcomes of studies are based on survey of currently existing event investigation practices typical for nuclear industry of 12 European countries, as well as on insights from analysis of numerous event investigation reports. System of operational experience feedback from information based on event investigation results is not enough effective to prevent and even to decrease frequency of recurring events due to existing methodological, HOF-related and/or knowledge management related constraints. Besides that, several latent root causes of unsuccessful event investigation are related to weaknesses in safety culture of personnel and managers. These weaknesses include focus on costs or schedule, political manipulation, arrogance, ignorance, entitlement and/or autocracy. Upgrades in safety culture of organization's personnel and its senior management especially seem to be an effective way to improvement. Increasing of competencies, capabilities and level of independency of event investigation teams, elaboration of comprehensive software, ensuring of positive approach, adequate support and impartiality of management could also facilitate for improvement of quality of the event investigations. (orig.)

  14. Human based roots of failures in nuclear events investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziedelis, Stanislovas; Noel, Marc; Strucic, Miodrag

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims for improvement of quality of the event investigations in the nuclear industry through analysis of the existing practices, identifying and removing the existing Human and Organizational Factors (HOF) and management related barriers. It presents the essential results of several studies performed by the European Clearinghouse on Operational Experience. Outcomes of studies are based on survey of currently existing event investigation practices typical for nuclear industry of 12 European countries, as well as on insights from analysis of numerous event investigation reports. System of operational experience feedback from information based on event investigation results is not enough effective to prevent and even to decrease frequency of recurring events due to existing methodological, HOF-related and/or knowledge management related constraints. Besides that, several latent root causes of unsuccessful event investigation are related to weaknesses in safety culture of personnel and managers. These weaknesses include focus on costs or schedule, political manipulation, arrogance, ignorance, entitlement and/or autocracy. Upgrades in safety culture of organization's personnel and its senior management especially seem to be an effective way to improvement. Increasing of competencies, capabilities and level of independency of event investigation teams, elaboration of comprehensive software, ensuring of positive approach, adequate support and impartiality of management could also facilitate for improvement of quality of the event investigations. (orig.)

  15. Analysis of APC mutation in human ameloblastoma and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Liu, Bing; Sui, Chengguang; Jiang, Youhong

    2016-01-01

    As a highly conserved signaling pathway, Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway plays an important role in many processes. Either in the occurrence or development of tumor, activation of this pathway takes an important place. APC inhibits Wnt/β-catenin pathway to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. This study aimed to investigate the function of cancer suppressor gene. PCR amplification and sequencing method was used to analyze APC mutations of human clinical specimens. The pathological specimens were collected for PCR and clear electrophoretic bands were obtained after electrophoresis. The gene sequence obtained after purification and sequencing analysis was compared with the known APC gene sequence (NM_000038.5). Base mutations at APC 1543 (T → C), APC-4564 (G → A), APC-5353 (T → G), APC-5550 (T → A) and APC-5969 (G → A) locus existed in 22 (27.5 %), 12 (15 %), 5 (6.25 %), 13 (16.25 %) and 12 patients (15 %), respectively. Gene mutations existed in ameloblastoma, and the mutation loci were 1543 locus (T → C), 4564 locus (G → A), 5353 locus (T → G), 5550 locus (T → A) and 5969 locus (G → A) 15 %, respectively. APC mutation plays a certain role in monitoring the tumor malignant degree as it may indicate the transition process of ameloblastoma malignant phenotype.

  16. Development of the NRC`s Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP). Volume 2, Investigators`s Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L. [System Improvements, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Haas, P.; Terranova, M. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause event at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, is a field manual for use by investigators when performing event investigations. Volume II includes the HPIP Procedure, the HPIP Modules, and Appendices that provide extensive documentation of each investigation technique.

  17. Optoelectronic investigation of nanodiamond interactions with human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Wróbel, M. S.; Wasowicz, M.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present optoelectronic investigation of in vitro interactions of whole human blood with different nanodiamond biomarkers. Plasmo-chemical modifications of detonation nanodiamond particles gives the possibility for controlling their surface for biological applications. Optical investigations reveal the biological activity of nanodiamonds in blood dependent on its surface termination. We compare different types of nanodiamonds: commercial non-modified detonation nanodiamonds, and nanodiamonds modified by MW PACVD method with H2-termination, and chemically modified nanodiamond with O2-termination. The absorption spectra, and optical microscope investigations were conducted. The results indicate haemocompatibility of non-modified detonation nanodiamond as well as modified nanodiamonds, which enables their application for drug delivery, as well as sensing applications.

  18. Potential use of recombinant human interleukin-6 in clinical oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, GJ; Willemse, PHB; Mulder, NH; Limburg, PC; deVries, EGE

    Recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine with stimulatory actions on the hematopoietic system, the immune system and hepatocytes. Clinical interest in the use of this cytokine was raised because of its thrombopoietic properties and also because of its anti-tumor activity, which was

  19. [Clinical research XXIV. From clinical judgment to ethics in research on humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Marcela; Palacios-Cruz, Lino; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Talavera, Juan O

    2014-01-01

    Bioethics in research is an essential part of the structured review process of an article and it is based on three fundamental principles: respect for persons, beneficence and justice. In addition to not providing valid knowledge, a research with inadequate design, execution and statistical analysis is not ethical either, since these methodological deficiencies will produce information that will not be useful and, therefore, the risks that the participants were exposed to will have been in vain. Beyond scientific validity, there are other aspects that outline if an investigation is ethical, such as the clinical and social value of a study, a fair selection of participants, favorable risk-benefit balance, an independent review, the informed consent and respect for participants and potential participants. Throughout the article here presented, the documents that profile the behavior of investigators to protect the participants, such as the Declaration of Helsinki, the national regulations that rule us and the differences between research without risk, with minimal risk and with greater than minimal risk are discussed. That like in daily life, behavior in research involving human participants must be self-regulated, ie, people with knowledge of the existence of the law discover that the man is outside the realm of nature where work is done under the necessity of natural causality, and falls within the scope of the will; only if the man is free to decide their actions may be a law regulating their action.

  20. Investigation of the Impedance Characteristic of Human Arm for Development of Robots to Cooperate with Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Mozasser; Ikeura, Ryojun; Mizutani, Kazuki

    In the near future many aspects of our lives will be encompassed by tasks performed in cooperation with robots. The application of robots in home automation, agricultural production and medical operations etc. will be indispensable. As a result robots need to be made human-friendly and to execute tasks in cooperation with humans. Control systems for such robots should be designed to work imitating human characteristics. In this study, we have tried to achieve these goals by means of controlling a simple one degree-of-freedom cooperative robot. Firstly, the impedance characteristic of the human arm in a cooperative task is investigated. Then, this characteristic is implemented to control a robot in order to perform cooperative task with humans. A human followed the motion of an object, which is moved through desired trajectories. The motion is actuated by the linear motor of the one degree-of-freedom robot system. Trajectories used in the experiments of this method were minimum jerk (the rate of change of acceleration) trajectory, which was found during human and human cooperative task and optimum for muscle movement. As the muscle is mechanically analogous to a spring-damper system, a simple second-order equation is used as models for the arm dynamics. In the model, we considered mass, stiffness and damping factor. Impedance parameter is calculated from the position and force data obtained from the experiments and based on the “Estimation of Parametric Model”. Investigated impedance characteristic of human arm is then implemented to control a robot, which performed cooperative task with human. It is observed that the proposed control methodology has given human like movements to the robot for cooperating with human.

  1. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganova, Inna [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Ponomarev, Vladimir [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Blasberg, Ronald [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: blasberg@neuro1.mskcc.org

    2007-10-15

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  2. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serganova, Inna; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Blasberg, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  3. Investigation and Modeling of Capacitive Human Body Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Qi; Guo, Yong-Xin; Wu, Wen

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a systematic investigation of the capacitive human body communication (HBC). The measurement of HBC channels is performed using a novel battery-powered system to eliminate the effects of baluns, cables and instruments. To verify the measured results, a numerical model incorporating the entire HBC system is established. Besides, it is demonstrated that both the impedance and path gain bandwidths of HBC channels is affected by the electrode configuration. Based on the analysis of the simulated electric field distribution, an equivalent circuit model is proposed and the circuit parameters are extracted using the finite element method. The transmission capability along the human body is also studied. The simulated results using the numerical and circuit models coincide very well with the measurement, which demonstrates that the proposed circuit model can effectively interpret the operation mechanism of the capacitive HBC.

  4. 77 FR 69631 - Draft Guidance for IRBs, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: IRB Responsibilities for Reviewing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ...) is needed in order to assure the protection of the rights and welfare of human subjects in clinical... responsibilities. To enhance human subject protection and reduce regulatory burden, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) and FDA have been actively working to...

  5. 78 FR 13070 - Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... marketing applications, (2) what is meant by ``due diligence'' in obtaining financial disclosures from...: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by...

  6. Human resource configurations: investigating fit with the organizational context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Soo Min; Morgeson, Frederick P; Campion, Michael A

    2008-07-01

    The present study investigated how key organizational contextual factors relate to bundles of human resource (HR) practices. In a two-phase study of a sample of 661 organizations representing a full range of industries and organizational size, the authors found that organizations use 1 of 5 HR bundles: cost minimizers, contingent motivators, competitive motivators, resource makers, and commitment maximizers. In addition, the authors showed that the organizations that use a given type of HR bundle may be distinguished by the organizational values they pursue and their organizational structure, thus suggesting that HR choices are related to the context within which organizations operate.

  7. Clinical Investigations and Management of Refractive Changes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Pregnancy: A Case Report ... condition therefore requires clinical observation and monitoring until the resolution of the serous detachment is ... bilateral involvement in 40% cases of CSCR. .... edema, acute hypertensive retinopathy, retinal.

  8. Proteogenomic Investigation of Strain Variation in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Heunis, Tiaan; Dippenaar, Anzaan; Warren, Robin M.; van Helden, Paul D.; van der Merwe, Ruben G.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Pain, Arnab; Sampson, Samantha L.; Tabb, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis consists of a large number of different strains that display unique virulence characteristics. Whole-genome sequencing has revealed substantial genetic diversity among clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and elucidating the phenotypic variation encoded by this genetic diversity will be of utmost importance to fully understand M. tuberculosis biology and pathogenicity. In this study we integrated whole-genome sequencing and mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) to reveal strain-specific characteristics in the proteomes of two clinical M. tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean isolates. Using this approach we identified 59 peptides containing single amino acid variants, which covered ~9% of all total coding nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants detected by whole-genome sequencing. Furthermore, we identified 29 distinct peptides that mapped to a hypothetical protein not present in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference proteome. Here we provide evidence for the expression of this protein in the clinical M. tuberculosis SAWC3651 isolate. The strain-specific databases enabled confirmation of genomic differences (i.e. large genomic regions of difference and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants) in these two clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and allowed strain differentiation at the proteome level. Our results contribute to the growing field of clinical microbial proteogenomics and can improve our understanding of phenotypic variation in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  9. Proteogenomic Investigation of Strain Variation in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Heunis, Tiaan

    2017-08-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis consists of a large number of different strains that display unique virulence characteristics. Whole-genome sequencing has revealed substantial genetic diversity among clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and elucidating the phenotypic variation encoded by this genetic diversity will be of utmost importance to fully understand M. tuberculosis biology and pathogenicity. In this study we integrated whole-genome sequencing and mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) to reveal strain-specific characteristics in the proteomes of two clinical M. tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean isolates. Using this approach we identified 59 peptides containing single amino acid variants, which covered ~9% of all total coding nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants detected by whole-genome sequencing. Furthermore, we identified 29 distinct peptides that mapped to a hypothetical protein not present in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference proteome. Here we provide evidence for the expression of this protein in the clinical M. tuberculosis SAWC3651 isolate. The strain-specific databases enabled confirmation of genomic differences (i.e. large genomic regions of difference and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants) in these two clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and allowed strain differentiation at the proteome level. Our results contribute to the growing field of clinical microbial proteogenomics and can improve our understanding of phenotypic variation in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  10. Proteogenomic Investigation of Strain Variation in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heunis, Tiaan; Dippenaar, Anzaan; Warren, Robin M; van Helden, Paul D; van der Merwe, Ruben G; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Pain, Arnab; Sampson, Samantha L; Tabb, David L

    2017-10-06

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis consists of a large number of different strains that display unique virulence characteristics. Whole-genome sequencing has revealed substantial genetic diversity among clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, and elucidating the phenotypic variation encoded by this genetic diversity will be of the utmost importance to fully understand M. tuberculosis biology and pathogenicity. In this study, we integrated whole-genome sequencing and mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) to reveal strain-specific characteristics in the proteomes of two clinical M. tuberculosis Latin American-Mediterranean isolates. Using this approach, we identified 59 peptides containing single amino acid variants, which covered ∼9% of all coding nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants detected by whole-genome sequencing. Furthermore, we identified 29 distinct peptides that mapped to a hypothetical protein not present in the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference proteome. Here, we provide evidence for the expression of this protein in the clinical M. tuberculosis SAWC3651 isolate. The strain-specific databases enabled confirmation of genomic differences (i.e., large genomic regions of difference and nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants) in these two clinical M. tuberculosis isolates and allowed strain differentiation at the proteome level. Our results contribute to the growing field of clinical microbial proteogenomics and can improve our understanding of phenotypic variation in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  11. Beyond Readability: Investigating Coherence of Clinical Text for Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Scott; Dalrymple, Prudence; Keselman, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Background A basic tenet of consumer health informatics is that understandable health resources empower the public. Text comprehension holds great promise for helping to characterize consumer problems in understanding health texts. The need for efficient ways to assess consumer-oriented health texts and the availability of computationally supported tools led us to explore the effect of various text characteristics on readers’ understanding of health texts, as well as to develop novel approaches to assessing these characteristics. Objective The goal of this study was to compare the impact of two different approaches to enhancing readability, and three interventions, on individuals’ comprehension of short, complex passages of health text. Methods Participants were 80 university staff, faculty, or students. Each participant was asked to “retell” the content of two health texts: one a clinical trial in the domain of diabetes mellitus, and the other typical Visit Notes. These texts were transformed for the intervention arms of the study. Two interventions provided terminology support via (1) standard dictionary or (2) contextualized vocabulary definitions. The third intervention provided coherence improvement. We assessed participants’ comprehension of the clinical texts through propositional analysis, an open-ended questionnaire, and analysis of the number of errors made. Results For the clinical trial text, the effect of text condition was not significant in any of the comparisons, suggesting no differences in recall, despite the varying levels of support (P = .84). For the Visit Note, however, the difference in the median total propositions recalled between the Coherent and the (Original + Dictionary) conditions was significant (P = .04). This suggests that participants in the Coherent condition recalled more of the original Visit Notes content than did participants in the Original and the Dictionary conditions combined. However, no difference was seen

  12. Investigation of the rheological properties of human semen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, P.F. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN); Picologlou, B.F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the previously undetermined rheological properties of human semen using a modified, multiple-point capillary viscometer are presented. The design of a viscometer, specifically constructed to give accurate, instantaneous pressure gradient and material flow rate records of biological viscoelastic fluids whose rheological properties are possibly changing with time is given. Using this device, measurements are made on human semen immediately following ejaculation. An analytical scheme for the data reduction, suitable for non-linear viscoelastic fluids of the Maxwell-type, is offered. An expression is developed for a non-linear Maxwell-type viscoelastic fluid flow in a circular tube, relating the material's elastic properties to the distance of recoil and the pressure gradient. In the case of a power-law elastic behavior this relation couples the wall shear stress with the recoil distance through an apparent shear modulus. Previously established procedures for the viscous response analysis are utilized and an approximate non-dimensional parameter is introduced allowing one to ascertain the relative contributions of the elastic and viscous components to the rate of flow. Results show the elastic and viscous properties of human semen to be functions of time following ejaculation and frequency of ejaculation. The elastic component is found to have a linear response over the shear stress range investigated, whereas the viscous component is found to exhibit a power-law behavior. The final equilibrium state is characterized by Newtonian behavior, with mean absolute viscosity of 3.37 centipoise. Finally, similarity among all cases examined is found for each material property through consideration of a non-dimensional time, t*, determined from semen liquefaction time and time post ejaculation.

  13. Hurdles to clinical translation of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neofytou, Evgenios; O'Brien, Connor Galen; Couture, Larry A; Wu, Joseph C

    2015-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells are known to have the capacity to renew indefinitely, being intrinsically able to differentiate into many different cell types. These characteristics have generated tremendous enthusiasm about the potential applications of these cells in regenerative medicine. However, major challenges remain with the development and testing of novel experimental stem cell therapeutics in the field. In this Review, we focus on the nature of the preclinical challenges and discuss potential solutions that could help overcome them. Furthermore, we discuss the use of allogeneic versus autologous stem cell products, including a review of their respective advantages and disadvantages, major clinical requirements, quality standards, time lines, and costs of clinical grade development.

  14. Investigation of G72 (DAOA expression in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsch Steven

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms at the G72/G30 locus on chromosome 13q have been associated with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in more than ten independent studies. Even though the genetic findings are very robust, the physiological role of the predicted G72 protein has thus far not been resolved. Initial reports suggested G72 as an activator of D-amino acid oxidase (DAO, supporting the glutamate dysfunction hypothesis of schizophrenia. However, these findings have subsequently not been reproduced and reports of endogenous human G72 mRNA and protein expression are extremely limited. In order to better understand the function of this putative schizophrenia susceptibility gene, we attempted to demonstrate G72 mRNA and protein expression in relevant human brain regions. Methods The expression of G72 mRNA was studied by northern blotting and semi-quantitative SYBR-Green and Taqman RT-PCR. Protein expression in human tissue lysates was investigated by western blotting using two custom-made specific anti-G72 peptide antibodies. An in-depth in silico analysis of the G72/G30 locus was performed in order to try and identify motifs or regulatory elements that provide insight to G72 mRNA expression and transcript stability. Results Despite using highly sensitive techniques, we failed to identify significant levels of G72 mRNA in a variety of human tissues (e.g. adult brain, amygdala, caudate nucleus, fetal brain, spinal cord and testis human cell lines or schizophrenia/control post mortem BA10 samples. Furthermore, using western blotting in combination with sensitive detection methods, we were also unable to detect G72 protein in a number of human brain regions (including cerebellum and amygdala, spinal cord or testis. A detailed in silico analysis provides several lines of evidence that support the apparent low or absent expression of G72. Conclusion Our results suggest that native G72 protein is not normally present in the tissues that we analysed

  15. 77 FR 25353 - Disqualification of a Clinical Investigator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    .... * * * * * Sec. 312.70, relating to whether an investigator is eligible to receive test articles under part 312... ineligible to receive one kind of test article (drugs, devices or new animal drugs), the investigator also... marketing permit for other kinds of products regulated by FDA. This final rule is based in part upon...

  16. [The clinical use of cryopreserved human skin allografts for transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Chacón-Gómez, María; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio; Barrera-Lopez, Araceli; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Querevalu-Murillo, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The biological recovery of human skin allografts is the gold standard for preservation in Skin Banks. However, there is no worldwide consensus about specific allocation criteria for preserved human skin allografts with living cells. A report is presented on the results of 5 years of experience of using human skin allografts in burned patient in the Skin and Tissue Bank at the "Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" The human skin allografts were obtained from multi-organ donors. processed and preserved at -80 °C for 12 months. Allocation criteria were performed according to blood type match, clinical history, and burned body surface. Up to now, the Skin and Tissue Bank at 'Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" has processed and recovered 125,000 cm(2) of human skin allografts. It has performed 34 surgical implants on 21 burned patients. The average of burn body surface was 59.2%. More than two-thirds (67.7%) of recipients of skin allografts were matched of the same to type blood of the donor, and 66.6% survived after 126 days hospital stay. It is proposed to consider recipient's blood group as allocation criteria to assign tissue; and use human skin allografts on patiens affected with burns over 30% of body surface (according the "rule of the 9"). Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk factors for human-directed canine aggression in a referral level clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, M; Casey, R A; Loftus, B A; Blackwell, E J

    2017-07-07

    Risk factors for human-directed aggression were investigated using retrospective analysis of data from a referral-level clinical behaviour population in the UK. A sample of 200 cases involving human-directed canine aggression and 200 control cases involving no instance of human-directed aggression were selected at random from a population of 746 cases. The final model suggested that clinical cases with human-directed aggression were significantly younger than those presenting with other undesired behaviours (P=0.008) and that male dogs were 1.4 times more likely to be aggressive towards human beings than female dogs (P=0.019). Dogs were 1.7 times more likely to be aggressive towards people if they had attended more than five puppy classes than if they had never attended puppy class (P=0.015) and that dogs were 2.8 times more likely to be aggressive towards human beings if there was another dog between 0 months and 24 months of age in the home (P=0.004). These factors only account for 7 per cent to 10 per cent of the variance between the human-directed aggression population and the control population, but factors such as attendance at puppy classes and numbers of dogs in the household suggest the need for longitudinal studies to investigate temporal relationships.

  18. Clinical Investigation Service Annual Research Progress Report Fiscal Year 1980,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    piror to stimulation will be 3tudied. The amount of DNA synthesis will be measured by incorporation of tritiated thymidine (3HT). The time of optimum...required for optimal DNA synthesis by nitrogen- stimulated T-lymphocytes. Most human beings are far from being saturated with PLP, and, therefore, their...splenectomy, immediate and remote, including fulminating infections, and (e) effective- ness of penicillin prophylaxis in the prevention of post

  19. Department of Clinical Investigation Annual Research Progress Report, FY 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-30

    parameters in a group of residents over the course of their first year Graduate Medical Education training to follow changes in diet and exercise habits... hypocaloric state. This study would analyze the serum from these nine men collected before and after their training to correlate declines in body...ideal body weight, and % usual body weight. A clinical assessment (history and physical exam) will be done and a diet history taken. Patients will be

  20. Clinical investigation of set-shifting subtypes in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Buzzichelli, Sara; Marzola, Enrica; Amianto, Federico; Fassino, Secondo

    2014-11-30

    While evidence continues to accumulate on the relevance of cognitive inflexibility in anorexia nervosa (AN), its clinical correlates remain unclear. We aimed at examining the relationship between set-shifting and clinical variables (i.e., eating psychopathology, depression, and personality) in AN. Ninety-four individuals affected by AN and 59 healthy controls (HC) were recruited. All participants were assessed using: Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The AN group scored worse than HCs on set-shifting. According to their neuropsychological performances, AN patients were split into two groups corresponding to poor (N=30) and intact (N=64) set-shifting subtypes. Interoceptive awareness, impulse regulation, and maturity fears on the EDI-2 and depression on the BDI differed across all groups (HC, intact, and poor set-shifting subtype). Self-directedness on the TCI differed significantly among all groups. Cooperativeness and reward dependence differed instead only between HC and AN poor set-shifting subtype. After controlling for depression, only interoceptive awareness remained significant with reward dependence showing a trend towards statistical significance. These findings suggest that multiple clinical variables may be correlated with set-shifting performances in AN. The factors contributing to impaired cognitive inflexibility could be more complex than heretofore generally considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 76 FR 30175 - Draft Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... consider public release of financial disclosure information related to an approved marketing application...] (Formerly FDA-1999-D-0792) Draft Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial... entitled ``Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by Clinical...

  2. Review of clinical and laboratory features of human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantur B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Brucella spp. continues to pose a human health risk globally despite strides in eradicating the disease from domestic animals. Brucellosis has been an emerging disease since the discovery of Brucella melitensis by Sir David Bruce in 1887. Although many countries have eradicated B. abortus from cattle, in some areas B. melitensis and B. suis have emerged as causes of this infection in cattle, leading to human infections. Currently B. melitensis remains the principal cause of human brucellosis worldwide including India. The recent isolation of distinct strains of Brucella from marine mammals as well as humans is an indicator of an emerging zoonotic disease. Brucellosis in endemic and non-endemic regions remains a diagnostic puzzle due to misleading non-specific manifestations and increasing unusual presentations. Fewer than 10% of human cases of brucellosis may be clinically recognized and treated or reported. Routine serological surveillance is not practiced even in Brucella - endemic countries and we suggest that this should be a part of laboratory testing coupled with a high index of clinical suspicion to improve the level of case detection. The screening of family members of index cases of acute brucellosis in an endemic area should be undertaken to pick up additional unrecognised cases. Rapid and reliable, sensitive and specific, easy to perform and automated detection systems for Brucella spp. are urgently needed to allow early diagnosis and adequate antibiotic therapy in time to decrease morbidity / mortality. The history of travel to endemic countries along with exposure to animals and exotic foods are usually critical to making the clinical diagnosis. Laboratory testing is indispensable for diagnosis. Therefore alertness of clinician and close collaboration with microbiologist are essential even in endemic areas to correctly diagnose and treat this protean human infection. Existing treatment options, largely based on

  3. Current good manufacturing practice and investigational new drugs intended for use in clinical trials. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations for human drugs, including biological products, to exempt most phase 1 investigational drugs from complying with the regulatory CGMP requirements. FDA will continue to exercise oversight of the manufacture of these drugs under FDA's general statutory CGMP authority and through review of the investigational new drug applications (IND). In addition, elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of a guidance document entitled "Guidance for Industry: CGMP for Phase 1 Investigational Drugs" dated November 2007 (the companion guidance). This guidance document sets forth recommendations on approaches to compliance with statutory CGMP for the exempted phase 1 investigational drugs. FDA is taking this action to focus a manufacturer's effort on applying CGMP that is appropriate and meaningful for the manufacture of the earliest stage investigational drug products intended for use in phase 1 clinical trials while ensuring safety and quality. This action will also streamline and promote the drug development process.

  4. Preliminary clinical pharmacological investigations of tylosin and tiamulin in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, G

    1980-10-15

    The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of tiamulin and tylosin for mycoplasma, Gram-positive, and Gram-negative micro-organisms isolated from chickens were determinated by the agar dilution method. Median MIC values for tiamulin against Mycoplasma gallisepticum (0.05 microgram/ml) and Mycoplasma synoviae (0.10 microgram/ml) were 2 to 4 times lower than the corresponding values for tylosin. Tiamulin was also slightly more effective in vitro in inhibiting Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, and beta-haemolytic streptococci than was tylosin. Groups of chicken were offered tiamulin medicated drinking water at rates of 125 and 250 mg/litre for 48 hours. Average serum tiamulin concentrations were 0.38 and 0.78 microgram/ml, respectively. When tylosin tartrate was added to the drinking water at 500 and 700 mg/litre, average serum drug levels were 0.12 and 0.17 microgram/ml, respectively. Tiamulin was 45% bound in chicken serum, as against 30% serum protein binding for tylosin. Correlations were made between free (non protein bound) serum drug levels and the MIC values of the two drugs. Such comparisons suggest that when tiamulin is given in the drinking water at rates of 125 to 250 mg/litre, better antimycoplasmal activity is to be expected in vivo than by giving tylosin tartrate in the drinking water at 500 to 700 mg/litre. Based on these data, no clinical efficacy of these dose rates can be expected in flocks infected by gram-negative micro-organisms such as E. coli or P. multocida. The tylosin tartrate rate of 500 to 700 mg/litre, may be clinical ineffective the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  5. Clinical Investigation Program RCS-MED-300 (R1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-30

    deprivation noted in the history or physical. Subjects agree to participate in the study. The independent variable is touch which if present is administered...INVESTIGATORS: MAJ Lynn Whittington , MC KEY WORDS: Intubation, pediatric training Study Objective: This training is designed to teach physicians and other health...with a high stress job are medical interns. Interns are sleep deprived , eat poorly, and have a high degree of emotional stress due to the novelty of

  6. Investigating microenvironmental regulation of human chordoma cell behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Patel

    Full Text Available The tumour microenvironment is complex and composed of many different constituents, including matricellular proteins such as connective tissue growth factor (CCN2, and is characterized by gradients in oxygen levels. In various cancers, hypoxia and CCN2 promote stem and progenitor cell properties, and regulate the proliferation, migration and phenotype of cancer cells. Our study was aimed at investigating the effects of hypoxia and CCN2 on chordoma cells, using the human U-CH1 cell line. We demonstrate that under basal conditions, U-CH1 cells express multiple CCN family members including CCN1, CCN2, CCN3 and CCN5. Culture of U-CH1 cells in either hypoxia or in the presence of recombinant CCN2 peptide promoted progenitor cell-like characteristics specific to the notochordal tissue of origin. Specifically, hypoxia induced the most robust increase in progenitor-like characteristics in U-CH1 cells, including increased expression of the notochord-associated markers T, CD24, FOXA1, ACAN and CA12, increased cell growth and tumour-sphere formation, and a decrease in the percentage of vacuolated cells present in the heterogeneous population. Interestingly, the effects of recombinant CCN2 peptide on U-CH1 cells were more pronounced under normoxia than hypoxia, promoting increased expression of CCN1, CCN2, CCN3 and CCN5, the notochord-associated markers SOX5, SOX6, T, CD24, and FOXA1 as well as increased tumour-sphere formation. Overall, this study highlights the importance of multiple factors within the tumour microenvironment and how hypoxia and CCN2 may regulate human chordoma cell behaviour.

  7. Clinical-grade production of human mesenchymal stromal cells: occurrence of aneuploidy without transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarte, Karin; Gaillard, Julien; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Fouillard, Loic; Becker, Martine; Mossafa, Hossein; Tchirkov, Andrei; Rouard, Hélène; Henry, Catherine; Splingard, Marie; Dulong, Joelle; Monnier, Delphine; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Sensebé, Luc

    2010-02-25

    Clinical-grade human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been expanded in vitro for tissue engineering or immunoregulatory purposes without standardized culture conditions or release criteria. Although human MSCs show poor susceptibility for oncogenic transformation, 2 recent studies described their capacity to accumulate chromosomal instability and to give rise to carcinoma in immunocompromised mice after long-term culture. We thus investigated the immunologic and genetic features of MSCs expanded with fetal calf serum and fibroblast growth factor or with platelet lysate in 4 cell-therapy facilities during 2 multicenter clinical trials. Cultured MSCs showed a moderate expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR without alteration of their low immunogenicity or their immunomodulatory capacity. Moreover, some transient and donor-dependent recurring aneuploidy was detected in vitro, independently of the culture process. However, MSCs with or without chromosomal alterations showed progressive growth arrest and entered senescence without evidence of transformation either in vitro or in vivo.

  8. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eRosslau

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions or expression (music production abilities, and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a right-sided stroke, patients with a left-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits.

  9. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslau, Ken; Steinwede, Daniel; Schröder, C; Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Dobel, Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions) or expression (music production abilities), and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a left-sided stroke, patients with a right-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits.

  10. Melatonin: a chemical photoperiodic signal with clinical significance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, S F; Pang, C S; Poon, A M; Lee, P P; Liu, Z M; Shiu, S Y

    1998-03-01

    Secretion of pineal melatonin exhibits a diumal rhythm and a seasonal rhythm in humans. Night-time melatonin is high at 3-5 year-old and decreases with age. Many drugs and pathological conditions also change melatonin levels in the circulation. Melatonin has a mild sedative effect and has been used effectively in synchronizing the sleep-wake cycle of patients with sleep disorders. Immunoenhancing, anti-cancer, anti-aging and anti-oxidant effects of melatonin have been proposed. Recent studies suggest that melatonin receptors are present in central and peripheral tissues. The importance of melatonin receptors on the nervous, reproductive, immune and renal functions is implicated. Studies on the molecular biology, physiology and pathology of melatonin receptors in different tissues are progressing rapidly. The physiological and pathological changes in melatonin secretion, multifarious melatonin actions, and diverse melatonin receptors reported suggest that melatonin is a photoperiodic signal with clinical significance in humans.

  11. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  12. The development of human visual cortex and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu CR

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Caitlin R Siu,1 Kathryn M Murphy1,2 1McMaster Integrative Neuroscience Discovery and Study (MiNDS Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 2Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Abstract: The primary visual cortex (V1 is the first cortical area that processes visual information. Normal development of V1 depends on binocular vision during the critical period, and age-related losses of vision are linked with neurobiological changes in V1. Animal studies have provided important details about the neurobiological mechanisms in V1 that support normal vision or are changed by visual diseases. There is very little information, however, about those neurobiological mechanisms in human V1. That lack of information has hampered the translation of biologically inspired treatments from preclinical models to effective clinical treatments. We have studied human V1 to characterize the expression of neurobiological mechanisms that regulate visual perception and neuroplasticity. We have identified five stages of development for human V1 that start in infancy and continue across the life span. Here, we describe these stages, compare them with visual and anatomical milestones, and discuss implications for translating treatments for visual disorders that depend on neuroplasticity of V1 function. Keywords: development, human visual cortex, amblyopia, synaptic plasticity, glutamatergic, GABAergic, receptors

  13. Annual Progress Report FY 93 (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Department of Clinical Investigation). Clinical Investigation Program. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    129 REPORT DATE: 03/04/93 WORK UNIT a 1332-91 DETAIL SUMMARY SHEET TITLE: Thermogenic Agent Promotion of Weight Loss in Obese Soldiers KEYWORDS...thermogenic, promotion, obese PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Solomon, Barbara DNSc DEPARTMENT: Department of Medicine STATUS: Completed SERVICE: Endocrine...are: possible variance between adult and chilhood forms of HD, patterns of previous infectious disease exposure, socioeconomic patterns, familial

  14. Clinical application of antibody monoclonal humanized anti-EGFrnimotuzumab labeled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera Pintado, Alejandro; Peña Quián, Yamilé; Batista Cuéllar, Juan F.; Prats Capote, Anaís; Torres Aroche, Leonel A.; Casacó Santana, Caridad; Sánchez Mendosa, Elvia L.; Sánchez González, Yolaine; Romero Collado, Susana; Quesada Pozo, Rodobaldo; Valladares Oviedo, Lourdes; Masquida García, Elsa M.; Leyva Montaña, René; Casacó, Angel; Ramos Suzarte, Mayra; Crombet, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Most malignant tumors are of epithelial origin. These are characterized by overexpression of the receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR), which the neoplastic cells escape the regulatory mechanisms are allowed, so its high concentration of membrane is generally associated with a poor prognosis . By binding an antibody specifically to this receptor, preventing binding of EGF latter and activation mechanism tyrosine kinase inhibiting cell mitosis and apoptosis causing tumor cell. For this reason, the EGFr has been considered as an attractive target for anti-tumor therapy. The humanized monoclonal antibody anti-EGFr nimotuzumab was developed by the Center of Molecular Immunology (Havana, Cuba). Numerous clinical trials have been developed in the Department of Clinical Research Center Isotopes (Cuba), in which it has been applied this antibody, both labeled with 99mTc for immuno gammagraphic detection of tumors, as labeled with 188 Re for radioimmunotherapy of gliomas high degree of malignancy. The aim of this paper is to show the experience of the Department of Clinical Research of CENTIS in various clinical trials with marking for both immuno gammagraphics detection of tumors, such as for radioimmunotherapy nimotuzumab. (author)

  15. Investigation of human system interface design in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan; Zhang Yunbo; Wang Zhongqiu

    2012-01-01

    The paper introduces the importance of HFE in designing nuclear power plant, and introduces briefly the content and scope of HFE, discusses human system interface design of new built nuclear power plants. This paper also describes human system interface design of foreign nuclear power plant, and describes in detail human system interface design of domestic nuclear power plant. (authors)

  16. Patient engagement: an investigation at a primary care clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Preetinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background Engaged employees are an asset to any organization. They are instrumental in ensuring good commercial outcomes through continuous innovation and incremental improvement. A health care facility is similar to a regular work setting in many ways. A health care provider and a patient have roles akin to a team leader and a team member/stakeholder, respectively. Hence it can be argued that the concept of employee engagement can be applied to patients in health care settings in order to improve health outcomes. Methods Patient engagement data were collected using a survey instrument from a primary care clinic in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Canonical correlation equations were formulated to identify combinations which were strongly related to each other. In addition, the cause-effect relationship between patient engagement and patient-perceived health outcomes was described using structural equation modeling. Results Canonical correlation analysis showed that the first set of canonical variables had a fairly strong relationship, ie, a magnitude > 0.80 at the 95% confidence interval, for five dimensions of patient engagement. Structural equation modeling analysis yielded a β ≥ 0.10 and a Student’s t statistic ≥ 2.96 for these five dimensions. The threshold Student’s t statistic was 1.99. Hence it was found the β values were significant at the 95% confidence interval for all census regions. Conclusion A scaled reliable survey instrument was developed to measured patient engagement. Better patient engagement is associated with better patient-perceived health outcomes. This study provides preliminary evidence that patient engagement has a causal relationship with patient-perceived health outcomes. PMID:23515133

  17. Electron probe microanalysis for clinical investigations: Microdrop and soft tissue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, M.J.; Ingram, F.D.

    1984-01-01

    The most important advantage offered by electron probe microanalysis (EPA) for clinical investigations is the ability to analyze smaller volumes of tissue than is possible with conventional techniques. The sample can be a biological soft tissue specimen, which involves subcellular localization, or a picoliter fluid droplet. In either case, the analysis can be nondestructive and permit multiple analyses for a number of elements in a given sample. The most highly developed electron microprobe analytical technique is fluid drop analysis, popularly referred to as microdrop analysis. This method provides the investigator with an analytic capability that has an accuracy of measurement often 1% or better on 20 to 30 picoliter fluid droplets. Electron microprobe techniques have been used for studies of animal hard tissue and for studies that involve insoluble inclusions. However, the development of techniques for studies of labile constituents in animal soft tissue has been much slower. It has been necessary not only to develop appropriate methods of tissue preparation, but also to establish sound techniques for tissue collection. Although there are adequate methods for collection of most types of tissue from laboratory animals, many of these methods are not suitable for human subjects. In order to provide the reader with a better understanding of the capabilities and potential for the application of electron microprobe methodology to problems in clinical medicine, the authors discuss some of their experiences with liquid droplet analysis and quantitative electrolyte distribution measurements in animal soft tissue

  18. Epidemiology, Clinical Characteristics, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of Human Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Melanie L; Lainhart, William; Burnham, C A

    2018-03-01

    The veterinary pathogens in the Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG) are increasingly recognized as causes of human infection. Shared features between SIG and Staphylococcus aureus may result in the misidentification of SIG in human clinical cultures. This study examined the clinical and microbiological characteristics of isolates recovered at a tertiary-care academic medical center. From 2013 to 2015, 81 SIG isolates were recovered from 62 patients. Patients were commonly ≥50 years old, diabetic, and/or immunocompromised. Documentation of dog exposure in the electronic medical record was not common. Of the 81 SIG isolates, common sites of isolation included 37 (46%) isolates from wound cultures and 17 (21%) isolates from respiratory specimens. Although less common, 10 (12%) bloodstream infections were documented in 7 unique patients. The majority of SIG (65%) isolates were obtained from polymicrobial cultures. In comparison to S. aureus isolates from the same time period, significant differences were noted in proportion of SIG isolates that were susceptible to doxycycline (74% versus 97%, respectively; P SIG isolates. All MR isolates detected by an oxacillin disk diffusion test would have been misclassified as methicillin susceptible using a cefoxitin disk diffusion test. Thus, SIG is recovered from human clinical specimens, and distinction of SIG from S. aureus is critical for the accurate characterization of MR status in these isolates. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Clinical investigation on application of water swallowing to MR esophagography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinping, E-mail: zjpmri@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China); Hu, Weijian; Zang, Lin [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China); Yao, Yibin; Tang, Yongxiang; Qian, Zhen; Gao, Ping; Wu, Xiaoyan; Li, Shijian [Department of Radiology, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China); Xie, Zhenlan; Yuan, Xiaoqing [Department of Pathology, Tongling People' s Hospital, Bijiashan Road 468, Tongling 244000, Anhui (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To verify the clinical outcomes of applying water swallowing to MR esophagography. Methods: Thirty patients confirmed postoperatively or histopathologically with thoracic esophageal carcinoma by endoscopic biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers with normal esophagus underwent respectively conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection and water swallowing MR esophagography. Of those patients, 4 underwent second examination after radiotherapy. Assessment on imaging effects of MR esophagography was performed. Assessment on definition on MR esophagography of the tumor in both upper and lower ends, specific localization, tumor size finally measured, coincidence with the gross pathologic types and tumor staging were respectively performed by comparison with conventional MRI. Additionally, we evaluated the outcomes of radiotherapy by comparing the previous MR esophagography with the second one with interventional technique. Results: Of the total 44 images of MR esophagography, 97.7% (43/44) were in high resolution by sagittal view and 81.8% (36/44) by cross-section. 93.3% (56/60) of the MR esophagography were clearly defined with the neoplastic lesion ends in the 30 patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma, compared with 11.7% (7/60) by conventional MRI. The results were totally different in statistics (P < 0.005). Preoperative conventional MRI detection of the 22 cases in 25 undergone radical resection suggested vague diameter of the primary tumor and impossibly identified it at middle-lower thoracic esophagus in 5, and even failed to confirm gross pathologic types in 19 cases. Yet, MR esophagography with water swallowing represented accurate tumor length (graded as excellent) in 88% (22/25), localization in 100% (25/25), exact gross pathologic types in 88% (22/25), and accuracy for tumor staging in 80.8% (21/26) compared to 92.3% (24/26) by conventional MRI. Therapeutic effects achieved in 4 patients with radiotherapy. Conclusions: MR esophagography

  20. Good clinical practice regulatory inspections: Lessons for Indian investigator sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Marwah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory inspections are important to evaluate the integrity of the data submitted to health authorities (HAs, protect patient safety, and assess adequacy of site/sponsor quality systems to achieve the same. Inspections generally occur after submission of data for marketing approval of an investigational drug. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in number of inspections by different HAs, including in India. The assessors/inspectors generally do a thorough review of site data before inspections. All aspects of ICH-GCP, site infrastructure, and quality control systems are assessed during the inspection. Findings are discussed during the close out meeting and a detailed inspection report issued afterward, which has to be responded to within 15-30 days with effective Corrective and Preventive Action Plan (CAPA. Protocol noncompliance, inadequate/inaccurate records, inadequate drug accountability, informed consent issues, and adverse event reporting were some of the most common findings observed during recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA inspections. Drug development is being increasingly globalized and an increased number of patients enrolled in studies submitted as part of applications come from all over the world including India. Because of the steep increase in research activity in the country, inexperienced sites, and more stakeholders, increased efforts will be required to ensure continuous quality and compliance. HAs have also made clear that enforcement will be increased and be swift, aggressive, and effective.

  1. Fluorescence properties of human teeth and dental calculus for clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent emission of human teeth and dental calculus is important for the esthetic rehabilitation of teeth, diagnosis of dental caries, and detection of dental calculus. The purposes of this review were to summarize the fluorescence and phosphorescence of human teeth by ambient ultraviolet (UV) light, to investigate the clinically relevant fluorescence measurement methods in dentistry, and to review the fluorescence of teeth and dental calculus by specific wavelength light. Dentine was three times more phosphorescent than enamel. When exposed to light sources containing UV components, the fluorescence of human teeth gives them the quality of vitality, and fluorescent emission with a peak of 440 nm is observed. Esthetic restorative materials should have fluorescence properties similar to those of natural teeth. Based on the fluorescence of teeth and restorative materials as determined with a spectrophotometer, a fluorescence parameter was defined. As to the fluorescence spectra by a specific wavelength, varied wavelengths were investigated for clinical applications, and several methods for the diagnosis of dental caries and the detection of dental calculus were developed. Since fluorescent properties of dental hard tissues have been used and would be expanded in diverse fields of clinical practice, these properties should be investigated further, embracing newly developed optical techniques.

  2. Inhibitory Interneurons of The Human Neocortex after Clinical Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Akulinin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the human neocortex interneurons (areas 4, 10, 17 and 21 by Brodmann after cardiac arrest (clinical death.Materials and methods. The main group included patients (n=7, men who survived 7—10 days and 70—90 days after cardiac arrest and later died due to heart failure. The control group (n=4, men included individuals after sudden fatal accidents. The morphometric and histological analysis of 420 neocortical fields (Nissl#staining,calbindin D28k, neuropeptide Y was performed using light and confocal microscopy.Results. We verified all main types of interneurons (Basket, Martinotti, and neurogliaform interneurons in neocortex based on the morphology of their bodies and dendritic processes in both groups. The number of calbindin- and NPY-positive neurons in the neocortex was similar in the control and in the postoperative period.However, calbindin- and NPY-immunopositive structure fields including neuronal cell bodies and their dendrites were significantly more represented in neocortex of patients from the main group. Maximum increase in common square in the relative areas of calbindin-immunopositive structures was observed 90 days after ischemia. The squares of NPY#immunopositive fields became larger seven days after resuscitation and remained increased on 90th day post-resuscitation.Conclusion. Our findings demonstrate an increase of calbindin and NPY expression in human neocortex after clinical death, which can be explained by a compensatory  eaction of undamaged inhibitory cortical interneurons directed to protectbrain from ischemia.

  3. Digital communication to support clinical supervision: considering the human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Marlow, Annette; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    During the last three years the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Tasmania has used a needs assessment survey to explore the needs of organizations and nursing professionals that facilitate and clinically supervise Bachelor of Nursing students in the workplace. Findings from the survey indicated that staff at healthcare organizations wanted a communication strategy that was easily accessible by clinicians who supervised students during work integrated learning placements. In particular they wanted to receive timely information related to the role and function of supervisors in practice. The development of the digital strategy to strengthen the development of a community of practice between the University, organizations, facilities and clinical supervisors was identified as the key method of improving communication. Blogging and micro blogging were selected as methods of choice for the implementation of the digital strategy because they were easy to set up, use and enable equity of access to geographically dispersed practitioners in urban and rural areas. Change champions were identified to disseminate information about the strategy within their workplaces. Although clinicians indicated electronic communication as their preferred method, there were a number of human factors at a systems and individual level identified to be challenges when communicating with clinical supervisors who were based off-campus. Information communication technology policies and embedded culture towards social presence were impediments to using this approach in some organizations. Additionally, it was found that it is necessary for this group of clinicians to be educated about using digital methods to undertake their role as clinical supervisors in their varied clinical practice environments.

  4. Laboratory and Clinical Aspects of Human Herpesvirus 6 Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnafous, Pascale; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a widespread betaherpesvirus which is genetically related to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and now encompasses two different species: HHV-6A and HHV-6B. HHV-6 exhibits a wide cell tropism in vivo and, like other herpesviruses, induces a lifelong latent infection in humans. As a noticeable difference with respect to other human herpesviruses, genomic HHV-6 DNA is covalently integrated into the subtelomeric region of cell chromosomes (ciHHV-6) in about 1% of the general population. Although it is infrequent, this may be a confounding factor for the diagnosis of active viral infection. The diagnosis of HHV-6 infection is performed by both serologic and direct methods. The most prominent technique is the quantification of viral DNA in blood, other body fluids, and organs by means of real-time PCR. Many active HHV-6 infections, corresponding to primary infections, reactivations, or exogenous reinfections, are asymptomatic. However, the virus may be the cause of serious diseases, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. As emblematic examples of HHV-6 pathogenicity, exanthema subitum, a benign disease of infancy, is associated with primary infection, whereas further virus reactivations can induce severe encephalitis cases, particularly in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Generally speaking, the formal demonstration of the causative role of HHV-6 in many acute and chronic human diseases is difficult due to the ubiquitous nature of the virus, chronicity of infection, existence of two distinct species, and limitations of current investigational tools. The antiviral compounds ganciclovir, foscarnet, and cidofovir are effective against active HHV-6 infections, but the indications for treatment, as well as the conditions of drug administration, are not formally approved to date. There are still numerous pending questions about HHV-6 which should stimulate future research works on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and

  5. Radio sterilized human ligaments and their clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna Z, D.; Reyes F, M. L.; Diaz M, I.; Hernandez R, G.

    2009-10-01

    The ligaments are human tissues that are used in the transplantation area. A ligament is an anatomical structure in band form, composed by resistant fibers that connect the tissues that unite the bones with the articulations. In an articulation, the ligaments allow and facilitate the movement inside the natural anatomical directions, while it restricts those movements that are anatomically abnormal, impeding lesions that could arise of this type of movements. The kneecap ligament is a very important tissue in the knee mobility and of walking in the human beings. This ligament can injure it because of automobile accidents, for sport lesions or illnesses, and in many cases the only form of recovering the knee movement is carried out a transplant with the purpose of replacing the damage ligament by allo gen kneecap ligament processed in specialized Tissue Banks where the tissue is sterilized with gamma radiation of 60 Co at very low temperatures, obtaining high quality ligaments for clinical application in injured patients. The kneecap ligaments are processed in the Tissue Banks with a segment of kneecap bone, a segment of tibial bone, the contained ligament between both bones and in some cases a fraction of the quadriceps tendon. In this work is given a description of the selection method of the tissue that includes the donor's serologic control, the kneecap ligament processing in the Radio Sterilized Tissues Bank, its sterilization with gamma radiation of 60 Co, also it is indicated like the clinical application of the allo gen ligament was realized in a hasty patient and whose previous crossed ligament was injured. Finally the results are presented from the tissue obtaining until the clinical application of it is, and in this case is observed a favorable initial evolution of the transplantation patient. (Author)

  6. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E. M. Vickers

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM, diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM. Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM, while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM, terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM, and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM. Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%, CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%–11%, and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%–6%. Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%, while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%. Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%, ETM (66%, DCF, TBF, MMI (61%–60%, APAP, CBZ (57%–56%, and DTL (48%. Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%, CBZ and ETM (44%–43%, APAP and DCF (40%–38%, MMI, TBF and CSA (37%–35%. This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  7. Resistance to antivirals in human cytomegalovirus: mechanisms and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J L

    1997-09-01

    Long term therapies needed for managing human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections in immunosupressed patients provided the background for the emergence of the resistance to antivirals active against HCMV. In addition, laboratory selected mutants have also been readily achieved. Both clinical and laboratory resistant strains share the same determinants of resistance. Ganciclovir resistance may be due to a few mutations in the HCMV UL97 gene and/or viral DNA pol gene, the former being responsible for about 70% of clinical resistant isolates. Among them, V464, V594, S595 and F595 are the most frequent mutations. Because of their less extensive clinical use, much less is known about resistance to foscarnet and cidofovir (formerly, HPMPC) but in both cases, it has been associated to mutations in the DNA pol. Ganciclovir resistant strains showing DNA pol mutations are cross-resistant to cidofovir and their corresponding IC50 are normally higher than those from strains harboring only mutations at the UL97 gene. To date, foscarnet resistance seems to be independent of both ganciclovir and cidofovir resistance.

  8. A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Human Performance Technology Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelu, Ramaswamy N.

    2010-01-01

    Human Performance Technology (HPT) is a field of practice that has evolved from advancements in organizational development, instructional design, strategic human resource management and cognitive psychology. As globalization and trends like outsourcing and off-shoring start to dominate the way organizations grow, HPT practitioners are managing the…

  9. Investigation of human performance events at French power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghertman, F.; Griffon-Fouco, M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the collection of data on human errors that occur at operating power plants. Three collection methods are used, each relating to a difference level of analysis. (1) Simplified statistical analysis of the causes of human errors: Events which have occurred at operating power plants and which are attributable to human errors are selected. The errors thus identified are analysed briefly and are described by a simplified classification, statistical analysis then being applied to find the principal factors underlying these errors. By way of example, an analysis is given of data on emergency shut-downs involving a human error component that occurred at 900 MW(e) PWR plants during 1982, 1983, 1984. (2) In-depth statistical analysis of the causes of certain human errors: The errors selected are analysed and described by means of a detailed classification. By way of example, the collection and evaluation of data on human errors occurring during periodic tests at a 900 MW(e) power plant over a period of six months are described. (3) In-depth analysis of certain events due to human errors: The events selected are analysed by means of a method which reconstitutes the multicausal aspect of the event and of each human error. By way of example, a description is given of an emergency core cooling required at a 900 MW(e) PWR plant. In conclusion, it is explained how these three methods of collection play complementary roles

  10. Clinical trials using a radiopharmaceutical investigational drug: What legal environment and what authorizations required?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Deeb, G.; Nguon, B.; Tibi, A.; Rizzo-Padoin, N.

    2009-01-01

    Recent revision of the legal environment for clinical research in France provided an opportunity to review what a hospital needs to carry out clinical trials using a radiopharmaceutical investigational drug. Legal measures concerning radiopharmaceutical investigational drugs are indeed more complex than those of classical clinical trials because of the additional legal provisions governing the use of ionizing radiation. Thus, requirements by the concerned staff (sponsor, pharmacist, person in charge of the nuclear activity) are described here. (authors) [fr

  11. Investigation of the human spleen by X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopani, M.; Jakubovsky, J.; Polak, S.

    2001-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative topographic analysis using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy was performed in tissue samples of rat and human spleens. The presence of silico-aluminium and silico-calcareous particles of various sizes could be seen. The presence of the inorganic substances mentioned in the human red pulp cords is assumed to be a consequence of the purifying function of the spleen. (Authors)

  12. Preliminary Investigation of Beagle Dog as Substitute for Humans in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetics, Ranbaxy Research ... Keywords: Cetirizine, Beagle dog, Bioavailability, Bioequivalence, Pharmacokinetics, Non- .... validated method based on the Food and Drug ... determined using high-performance liquid .... Sequence effect, if any, was tested at the 10 %.

  13. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    -stringency in-solution hybridization method enables detection of discovery of hitherto unknown viral sequences by high-throughput sequencing. The sensitivity was sufficient to detect retroviral...... sequences in clinical samples. We used this method to conduct an investigation for novel retrovirus in samples from three cancer types. In accordance with recent studies our investigation revealed no retroviral infections in human B-cell lymphoma cells, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma or colorectal cancer...

  14. Human errors and system variability in safety investigations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Until OJ January 2010, the IMO Code for casualty investigation was annexed to an Assembly Resolution and therefore enjoyed only the status of soft law. However, whilst the legal status then was different, the philosophy of safety investigations remains the same i.e. an investigation should not apportion blame and/or ...

  15. The Effect of Noise on Human Performance: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Nassiri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noise is defined as unwanted or meaningless sound that apart from auditory adverse health effects may distract attention from cues that are important for task performance. Human performance is influenced by many job-related factors and workplace conditions including noise level. Objective: To study the effect of noise on human performance. Methods: The participants included 40 healthy male university students. The experimental design consisted of 3 (sound pressure level x 3 (noise schedule x 2 (noise type factors. To investigate occupational skill performance, some specific test batteries were used: 1 steadiness test, 2 Minnesota manual dexterity test, 3 hand tool dexterity test, and 4 two-arm coordination test. Time duration of test completion was measured as speed response; to determine error response, the time taken during committing an error by participants while performing a task was measured. Results: Speed response obtained from the 4 tests in combined conditions of noise schedule, harmonic index, and sound pressure level was highest for (intermittent, treble, 95 dB, (continuous, treble, 95 dB, (continuous, treble, 85 dB and (intermittent, treble, 95 dB, respectively. Conclusion: Treble noise was found significant in reducing human performance; also, intermittent noise, especially at high pressure levels, was responsible for worsening environmental conditions during performing a task.

  16. Chronic microelectrode investigations of normal human brain physiology using a hybrid depth electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, M A; Volkov, I O; Noh, M D; Granner, M A; Mirsky, R; Garell, P C

    1997-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have unique access to in vivo human brain tissue, and in the course of clinical treatment important scientific advances have been made that further our understanding of normal brain physiology. In the modern era, microelectrode recordings have been used to systematically investigate the cellular properties of lateral temporal cerebral cortex. The current report describes a hybrid depth electrode (HDE) recording technique that was developed to enable neurosurgeons to simultaneously investigate normal cellular physiology during chronic intracranial EEG recordings. The HDE combines microelectrode and EEG recordings sites on a single shaft. Multiple microelectrode recordings are obtained from MRI defined brain sites and single-unit activity is discriminated from these data. To date, over 60 HDEs have been placed in 20 epilepsy surgery patients. Unique physiologic data have been gathered from neurons in numerous brain regions, including amygdala, hippocampus, frontal lobe, insula and Heschl's gyrus. Functional activation studies were carried out without risking patient safety or comfort.

  17. Investigation of the direct effects of salmon calcitonin on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Christian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcitonin has been demonstrated to have chondroprotective effects under pre-clinical settings. It is debated whether this effect is mediated through subchondral-bone, directly on cartilage or both in combination. We investigated possible direct effects of salmon calcitonin on proteoglycans and collagen-type-II synthesis in osteoarthritic (OA cartilage. Methods Human OA cartilage explants were cultured with salmon calcitonin [100 pM-100 nM]. Direct effects of calcitonin on articular cartilage were evaluated by 1 measurement of proteoglycan synthesis by incorporation of radioactive labeled 35SO4 [5 μCi] 2 quantification of collagen-type-II formation by pro-peptides of collagen type II (PIINP ELISA, 3 QPCR expression of the calcitonin receptor in OA chondrocytes using four individual primer pairs, 4 activation of the cAMP signaling pathway by EIA and, 5 investigations of metabolic activity by AlamarBlue. Results QPCR analysis and subsequent sequencing confirmed expression of the calcitonin receptor in human chondrocytes. All doses of salmon calcitonin significantly elevated cAMP levels (P 35SO4 incorporation, with a 96% maximal induction at 10 nM (P Conclusion Calcitonin treatment increased proteoglycan and collagen synthesis in human OA cartilage. In addition to its well-established effect on subchondral bone, calcitonin may prove beneficial to the management of joint diseases through direct effects on chondrocytes.

  18. Development and clinical application of human gastrin radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginabreda, M.G.P.; Borghi, V.C.; Bettarello, A.

    1988-08-01

    The determination of human gastrin levels in the blood is very important for diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. This work describes the radioimmunoassay of gastrin developed according to Russell et al. and its clinical application measuring fasting levels of this hormone in normal subjects, gastrectomized, chagasics, patients with chronic renal failure (CRF), pernicious anemia (PA) and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES). Synthetic human gastrin was used for radioiodination and as standard, while the specific antibody was raised in rabbits. Gastrin was radioiodinated by a modification of the chloramine T technique and purified by anion exchange chromatography in QAE-Sephadex A-25 to a specific activity around 200 uCi/ug. The assays were performed by incubation of 125 I-gastrin, standard gastrin (zero to 500 pmol/l) or unknown samples with the antiserum for 4 days at 4 0 C. The antibody bound and free 125 I-gastrin was separated by adsorption of the latter to the charcoal. The basal gastrin values of normal subjects ranged from 2 to 74 pmol/l, being these levels higher in the chagasics (from 6 to 261 pmol/l). Higher levels of gastrin were determined in patients with CRF (from 12 to 350 pmol/l), PA (from 160 to 680 pmol/l) and with ZES(1010 pmol/l), while very low levels were confirmed in gastrectomized (from 1 to 8 pmol/l). (author) [pt

  19. Relevance of human anatomy in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arráez-Aybar, Luis-Alfonso; Sánchez-Montesinos, Indalecio; Mirapeix, Rosa-M; Mompeo-Corredera, Blanca; Sañudo-Tejero, Jose-Ramón

    2010-12-20

    the aim of this study has been to evaluate the relevance of gross human anatomy in daily clinical practice and to compare it to that of other basic sciences (biochemistry, bioethics, cytohistology, microbiology, pharmacology, physiology, psychology). a total of 1250 questionnaires were distributed among 38 different medical speciality professionals. Answers were analyzed taking into account speciality (medical, surgery and others), professional status (training physician or staff member) and professional experience. the response rate was 42.9% (n=536). Gross human anatomy was considered the most relevant basic discipline for surgical specialists, while pharmacology and physiology were most relevant for medical specialists. Knowledge of anatomy was also considered fundamental for understanding neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. In undergraduate programmes, the most important focuses in teaching anatomy were radiological, topographical and functional anatomy followed by systematic anatomy. In daily medical practice anatomy was considered basic for physical examination, symptom interpretation and interpretation of radiological images. When professional status or professional experience was considered, small variations were shown and there were no significant differences related to gender or community. our results underline the relevance of basic sciences (gross anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology) in daily professional activity. Evidence-based studies such as ours, lend greater credibility and objectivity to the role of gross anatomy in the undergraduate training of health professionals and should help to establish a more appropriate curriculum for future professionals. 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Pre-Clinical and Clinical Investigation of the Impact of Obesity on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    clinical cancer drug discovery , including 10 years as a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at Duke University Medical Center...cancer therapy. Nature chemical biology . 2015;11(1):9-15. Epub 2014/12/18. doi: 10.1038/nchembio.1712. PubMed PMID: 25517383; PubMed Central PMCID...Assistant Professor of Nutrition, a member of the Nutrition Obesity Research Center, Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, McCallister Heart

  1. Comparative clinical and haematological investigations in lactating cows with subclinical and clinical ketosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Marutsova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ketosis of lactating cows is among the most common metabolic diseases in modern dairy farms. The economic importance of the disease is caused by the reduced milk yield and body weight loss, poor feed conversion, lower conception rates, culling and increased mortality of affected animals. In the present study, a total of 47 high-yielding dairy cows up to 45 days in milk (DIM are included. All animals were submitted to physical examination wich included checking the rectal body temperature, heart rate, respiratory and rumen contraction rates, and inspection of visible mucous coats. The body condition was scored, and blood β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA concentrations were assayed. The cows were divided into 3 groups: first group (control (n=24 with blood β-hydroxybutyrate level 2.6 mmol/l (clinical ketosis. Whole blood samples were obtained and analyzed for Red Blood Cell (RBC, 1012/l, Hemoglobin (HGB, g/l, Hematocrit (HCT, %, Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV, fl, Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH, pg, Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC, g/l, White Blood Cell (WBC, 109/l, Lymphocytes (LYM, 109/l, Monocytes (MON, 109/l, Granulocytes (GRA, 109/l, Red Blood Distribution Width (RDW, %, Red Blood Cell Distribution Width Absolute (RDWa, fl, Platelets (PLT, 109/l and Mean Platelet Volume (MPV, fl. In this study, deviations in the clinical parameters in the control group and in those with subclinical ketosis were not identified. The cows from the third group (clinical ketosis exhibited hypotonia, anorexia and body weight loss vs. control group. Hematological analysis showed leukocytosis and lymphocytosis in cows with subclinical ketosis vs. control group. In cows with clinical ketosis WBC counts decreased (leukopenia, while hemoglobin content and hematocrit values are higher vs. control group. Blood BHBA values are higher in both groups of ketotic cows vs. the control group. The other analyzed parameters (RBC, MCH, MCHC, MCV, RDW, RDWa, MON, GRA, PLT

  2. The Human Thioredoxin System: Modifications and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Isaac Hashemy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin system, comprising thioredoxin (Trx, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR and NADPH, is one of the major cellular antioxidant systems, implicated in a large and growing number of biological functions. Trx acts as an oxidoreductase via a highly conserved dithiol/disulfide motif located in the active site (-Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-Lys-. Different factors are involved in the regulation of Trx activity, including its expression level, localization, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications and some chemical inhibitors. Mammalian TrxRs are selenoproteins which have a –Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- N-terminal active site, as well as a C-terminal selenium-containing active site. Besides two Cys-residues in the redox-regulatory domain of cytosolic Trx (Trx1, human Trx1 has three additional Cys-residues. Post-translational modifications of human Trx1 which are involved in the regulation of its activity can happen via modification of Cys-residues including thiol oxidation, glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation or via modification of other amino acid residues such as nitration of Tyr-49. Because of the numerous functions of the thioredoxin system, its inhibition (mainly happens via the targeting TrxR can result in major cellular consequences, which are potentially pro-oxidant in nature, leading to cell death via necrosis or apoptosis if overexpression of Trx and other antioxidative enzymes can not recuperate cell response. Considering this feature, several anticancer drugs have been used which can inhibit TrxR. Elevated levels of Trx and/or TrxR have been reported in many different human malignancies, positively correlated with aggressive tumor growth and poor prognosis. Moreover, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects of Trx are reasons to study its clinical application as a drug.

  3. Clinical investigation of TROP-2 as an independent biomarker and potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Yu, Hai-Zheng; Cai, Jian-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is associated with a severe demographic and economic burden worldwide. The pathogenesis of colon cancer is highly complex and involves sequential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation, the pathogenesis of colon cancer remains to be elucidated. As the third most common type of cancer worldwide, the treatment options for colon cancer are currently limited. Human trophoblast cell‑surface marker (TROP‑2), is a cell‑surface transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by several types of epithelial carcinoma. In addition, TROP‑2 has been demonstrated to be associated with tumorigenesis and invasiveness in solid types of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression of TROP‑2 in colon cancer tissues, and further explore the association between the expression of TROP‑2 and clinicopathological features of patients with colon cancer. The expression and localization of the TROP‑2 protein was examined using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the expression of TROP‑2 expression was correlated to conventional clinicopathological features of colon cancer using a χ2 test. The results revealed that TROP‑2 protein was expressed at high levels in the colon cancer tissues, which was associated with the development and pathological process of colon cancer. Therefore, TROP‑2 may be used as a biomarker to determine the clinical prognosis, and as a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  4. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Aimee M.; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The human intestinal microbiota encode multiple critical functions impacting human health, including metabolism of dietary substrate, prevention of pathogen invasion, immune system modulation, and provision of a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes accessible to pathogens. The complexity...... microorganisms, but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community, independent of identity to known genes, by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host....... Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex...

  5. Investigation of human locomotion using Penny & Giles electrogoniometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworek, Krzysztof; Derlatka, Marcin; Dominikowski, Mateusz

    1999-04-01

    This paper deals with the experimental measurements, data filtering and theoretical representation of the angular position of a human led in 3D space during normal and pathological walking. The angular position of a human leg during walking in sagittal plane was measured by a new electrogoniometer made by a UK company named Penny & Giles. This system is a spatial mechanism made of a group of links which are coupled by proper angular sensor. This instrument enables an indirect evaluation of the angular position of a human leg in the 3D space from knowledge of the system geometry and from the angular value readings. This instrument is light, small-sized technologically new and is easy to use. However, its dynamics features have not been analyzed in the literature. Therefore we decided to analyze the instrument in order to built a DWT (Discrete Wavelets Transform) filter for filtering data recorded by a electrogoniometer Penny & Giles. We built filter corresponding to Daubechies wavelets, DAUB #20. The DWT filter is sufficient for filtering high frequency noise which exists during experimental measurement of the angular position of a human leg during normal and pathological gait. Filtering using Daubechies wavelets--DAUB #20 is more efficient than commercial numerical filtering delivered by Penny & Giles company.

  6. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Marguerite Moore

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The human intestinal microbiota encode multiple critical functions impacting human health, including, metabolism of dietary substrate, prevention of pathogen invasion, immune system modulation, and provision of a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes accessible to pathogens. The complexity of this microbial community, its recalcitrance to standard cultivation and the immense diversity of its encoded genes has necessitated the development of novel molecular, microbiological, and genomic tools. Functional metagenomics is one such culture-independent technique used for decades to study environmental microorganisms but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community independent of identity to known genes by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host. Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex community and its human host.

  7. Theoretical backgrounds of investigating of intellectual and human capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Nikiforovich Belkin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the theoretical aspects of a company's intellectual capital. This capital consists of stock and movement of knowledge which is useful for organizing. There are three components of intellectual capital - human, social and organizational capital. The differences of intellectual and human capital are established. In particular, if human capital is characterized by mundane knowledge, the intellectual one - by the new, and if the products of human capital are the usual goods and services, the products of intellectual capital are the result of translating and implementing new knowledge. The coincidence of research subjects of the theory of intellectual capital and the theory of innovative enterprise development is shown. The concept of "intellectual potential of the enterprise" is introduced and the building structure is discussed. This potential consists of intellectual capital, patents and licenses unrealized by the enterprises, formalized ideas and hypotheses and undiscovered creative potential of the staff. Finally, a realization model of the intellectual potential of the company is proposed.

  8. Human Right and Internet Access : A philosophical investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    As of December 2014, there are three billion Internet users worldwide, of which 649 million are Chinese. This number will grow in the years to come. This technology, of course, possesses immense significance in our everyday life. What is currently new in international human rights practice is the

  9. [Methods of investigation in clinical cardiology. VIII. Socioeconomic evaluation of clinical cardiology practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro de Mercado, P

    1997-06-01

    Health services are systems whose mission is to improve the health status of both individuals and society in general. In recent decades, these systems have faced challenges such as their increasing complexity, limited resources, rapid innovation and diffusion of medical technologies, pressures on demand from society and professionals, and the lack of knowledge of the effects of these factors on costs and society's health. In addition, health care expenditures have grown twice as fast as wealth in industrialized countries during the last 25 years. These problems have prompted cost containment as a key issue in health policy and, at the same time, have promoted the development of socioeconomic evaluation as a scientific activity in the frame of health services research. Socioeconomic evaluation tries to determine if the sacrifice made by society, which devotes part of its limited resources to health care, maximizes the outcomes for population. This article describes basic concepts and methods of economic appraisal in health services which are illustrated with examples of clinical practice in cardiology. Common methods of evaluation are described; the relation between the clinical outcome of a procedure and its associated costs is emphasized in explaining the types of efficiency analysis (cost-efficacy, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit); and finally a guide for socioeconomic evaluation is provided.

  10. Applicable or non-applicable: investigations of clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Chess

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical heterogeneity can be defined as differences in participant characteristics, types or timing of outcome measurements and intervention characteristics. Clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews has the possibility to significantly affect statistical heterogeneity leading to inaccurate conclusions and misled decision making. The aim of this study is to identify to what extent investigators are assessing clinical heterogeneity in both Cochrane and non-Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods The most recent 100 systematic reviews from the top five journals in medicine—JAMA, Archives of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, The Lancet, and PLOS Medicine—and the 100 most recently published and/or updated systematic reviews from Cochrane were collected. Various defined items of clinical heterogeneity were extracted from the included reviews. Investigators used chi-squared tests, logarithmic modeling and linear regressions to determine if the presence of such items served as a predictor for clinical heterogeneity when comparing Cochrane to non-Cochrane reviews. Extracted variables include number of studies, number of participants, presence of quantitative synthesis, exploration of clinical heterogeneity, heterogeneous characteristics explored, basis and methods used for investigating clinical heterogeneity, plotting/visual aids, author contact, inferences from clinical heterogeneity investigation, reporting assessment, and the presence of a priori or post-hoc analysis. Results A total of 317 systematic reviews were considered, of which 199 were in the final analysis. A total of 81 % of Cochrane reviews and 90 % of non-Cochrane reviews explored characteristics that are considered aspects of clinical heterogeneity and also described the methods they planned to use to investigate the influence of those characteristics. Only 1 % of non-Cochrane reviews and 8 % of Cochrane reviews explored the clinical

  11. Development of the NRC`s Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP). Volume 3, Development documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L. [System Improvements, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Haas, P.; Terranova, M. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause events at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume III, is a detailed documentation of the development effort and the pilot training program.

  12. Investigators' viewpoint of clinical trials in India: Past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohandas K Mallath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available India's success in producing food and milk for its population (Green Revolution and White Revolution happened because of scientific research and field trials. Likewise improving the health of Indians needs clinical research and clinical trials. A Large proportion of the sick Indians are poor, illiterate with no access to good health care. They are highly vulnerable to inducement and exploitation in clinical trials. The past two decades saw the rise and fall of clinical trials in India. The rise happened when our regulators created a favorable environment, and Indian investigators were invited to participate in global clinical trials. The gap between the demand and supply resulted in inadequate protection of the trial participants. Reports of abuses of the vulnerable trial participants followed by public interest litigations led to strengthening of regulations by the regulators. The stringent new regulations made the conduct of clinical trials more laborious and increased the cost of clinical trials in India. There was a loss of interest in sponsored clinical trials resulting in the fall in global clinical trials in India. Following repeated appeals by the investigators, the Indian regulators have recently relaxed some of the stringent regulations, while continuing to ensure the adequate patient protection. Clinical trials that are relevant to our population and conducted by well-trained investigators and monitored by trained and registered Ethics Committees will increase in the future. We must remain vigilant, avoid previous mistakes, and strive hard to protect the trial participants in the future trials.

  13. 59th Medical Wing Clinical Research Division Clinical Investigations Program Posters (Count: 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-08

    Investigations Program Posters (Count: 2) presented at/published to Graduate School Faculty Development and Research Symposium, Gateway Club, JBSA...copy of your abstract, paper. poster and other supporting documentation. 5. Save and forward, via email, the processing form and all supporting...you a final letter of approval or disapproval. g, Once your manuscript, poster or presentation has been approved for a one-lime public release, you may

  14. Investigation of an emotional virtual human modelling method

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yue

    2008-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. In order to simulate virtual humans more realistically and enable them life-like behaviours, several exploration research on emotion calculation, synthetic perception, and decision making process have been discussed. A series of sub-modules have been designed and simulation results have been presented with discussion. A visual based synthetic perception system has been proposed in this th...

  15. Human Locomotion in Hypogravity: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Lacquaniti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We have considerable knowledge about the mechanisms underlying compensation of Earth gravity during locomotion, a knowledge obtained from physiological, biomechanical, modeling, developmental, comparative, and paleoanthropological studies. By contrast, we know much less about locomotion and movement in general under sustained hypogravity. This lack of information poses a serious problem for human space exploration. In a near future humans will walk again on the Moon and for the first time on Mars. It would be important to predict how they will move around, since we know that locomotion and mobility in general may be jeopardized in hypogravity, especially when landing after a prolonged weightlessness of the space flight. The combination of muscle weakness, of wearing a cumbersome spacesuit, and of maladaptive patterns of locomotion in hypogravity significantly increase the risk of falls and injuries. Much of what we currently know about locomotion in hypogravity derives from the video archives of the Apollo missions on the Moon, the experiments performed with parabolic flight or with body weight support on Earth, and the theoretical models. These are the topics of our review, along with the issue of the application of simulated hypogravity in rehabilitation to help patients with deambulation problems. We consider several issues that are common to the field of space science and clinical rehabilitation: the general principles governing locomotion in hypogravity, the methods used to reduce gravity effects on locomotion, the extent to which the resulting behavior is comparable across different methods, the important non-linearities of several locomotor parameters as a function of the gravity reduction, the need to use multiple methods to obtain reliable results, and the need to tailor the methods individually based on the physiology and medical history of each person.

  16. Human Locomotion in Hypogravity: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yury P; Sylos-Labini, Francesca; La Scaleia, Valentina; La Scaleia, Barbara; Willems, Patrick A; Zago, Myrka

    2017-01-01

    We have considerable knowledge about the mechanisms underlying compensation of Earth gravity during locomotion, a knowledge obtained from physiological, biomechanical, modeling, developmental, comparative, and paleoanthropological studies. By contrast, we know much less about locomotion and movement in general under sustained hypogravity. This lack of information poses a serious problem for human space exploration. In a near future humans will walk again on the Moon and for the first time on Mars. It would be important to predict how they will move around, since we know that locomotion and mobility in general may be jeopardized in hypogravity, especially when landing after a prolonged weightlessness of the space flight. The combination of muscle weakness, of wearing a cumbersome spacesuit, and of maladaptive patterns of locomotion in hypogravity significantly increase the risk of falls and injuries. Much of what we currently know about locomotion in hypogravity derives from the video archives of the Apollo missions on the Moon, the experiments performed with parabolic flight or with body weight support on Earth, and the theoretical models. These are the topics of our review, along with the issue of the application of simulated hypogravity in rehabilitation to help patients with deambulation problems. We consider several issues that are common to the field of space science and clinical rehabilitation: the general principles governing locomotion in hypogravity, the methods used to reduce gravity effects on locomotion, the extent to which the resulting behavior is comparable across different methods, the important non-linearities of several locomotor parameters as a function of the gravity reduction, the need to use multiple methods to obtain reliable results, and the need to tailor the methods individually based on the physiology and medical history of each person.

  17. Investigation of human-robot interface performance in household environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Sven; Mirza, Fahad; Tuladhar, Yathartha; Alonzo, Rommel; Hingeley, Anthony; Popa, Dan O.

    2016-05-01

    Today, assistive robots are being introduced into human environments at an increasing rate. Human environments are highly cluttered and dynamic, making it difficult to foresee all necessary capabilities and pre-program all desirable future skills of the robot. One approach to increase robot performance is semi-autonomous operation, allowing users to intervene and guide the robot through difficult tasks. To this end, robots need intuitive Human-Machine Interfaces (HMIs) that support fine motion control without overwhelming the operator. In this study we evaluate the performance of several interfaces that balance autonomy and teleoperation of a mobile manipulator for accomplishing several household tasks. Our proposed HMI framework includes teleoperation devices such as a tablet, as well as physical interfaces in the form of piezoresistive pressure sensor arrays. Mobile manipulation experiments were performed with a sensorized KUKA youBot, an omnidirectional platform with a 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) arm. The pick and place tasks involved navigation and manipulation of objects in household environments. Performance metrics included time for task completion and position accuracy.

  18. 78 FR 66941 - Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices; Guidance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    .... 66, rm. 2110, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301- 796-5750. For devices regulated by CBER: Stephen... the best clinical and statistical practices for investigational medical device studies. A medical...

  19. Clinical investigation of CT-guided ozone-blowing and fumigation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical investigation of CT-guided ozone-blowing and fumigation therapy for the chronic ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... In control group, seven patients were completely cured in 45 days after being treated by traditional surgery.

  20. A Novel Electronic Device for Measuring Urine Flow Rate: A Clinical Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Aliza Goldman; Hagar Azran; Tal Stern; Mor Grinstein; Dafna Wilner

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Currently, most vital signs in the intensive care unit (ICU) are electronically monitored. However, clinical practice for urine output (UO) measurement, an important vital sign, usually requires manual recording of data that is subject to human errors. In this study, we assessed the ability of a novel electronic UO monitoring device to measure real-time hourly UO versus current clinical practice. Design: Patients were connected to the RenalSense Clarity RMS Sensor Kit with a sensor...

  1. Clinical Characteristics and Genetic Variability of Human Rhinovirus in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Montero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is a leading cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI in young children and infants worldwide and has a high impact on morbidity and mortality in this population. Initially, HRV was classified into two species: HRV-A and HRV-B. Recently, a species called HRV-C and possibly another species, HRV-D, were identified. In Mexico, there is little information about the role of HRV as a cause of ARI, and the presence and importance of species such as HRV-C are not known. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and genetic variability of HRV in Mexican children. Genetic characterization was carried out by phylogenetic analysis of the 5′-nontranslated region (5′-NTR of the HRV genome. The results show that the newly identified HRV-C is circulating in Mexican children more frequently than HRV-B but not as frequently as HRV-A, which was the most frequent species. Most of the cases of the three species of HRV were in children under 2 years of age, and all species were associated with very mild and moderate ARI.

  2. Smoking cessation alters intestinal microbiota: insights from quantitative investigations on human fecal samples using FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Luc; Brülisauer, Karin; Zeitz, Jonas; Frei, Pascal; Scharl, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fried, Michael; Loessner, Martin J; Rogler, Gerhard; Schuppler, Markus

    2014-09-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in investigations on the potential mechanistic role of the intestinal microbiota in various diseases and factors modulating intestinal microbial composition. We recently reported on intestinal microbial shifts after smoking cessation in humans. In this study, we aimed to conduct further microbial analyses and verify our previous results obtained by pyrosequencing using a direct quantitative microbial approach. Stool samples of healthy smoking human subjects undergoing controlled smoking cessation during a 9-week observational period were analyzed and compared with 2 control groups, ongoing smoking and nonsmoking subjects. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to quantify specific bacterial groups. Intestinal microbiota composition was substantially altered after smoking cessation as characterized by an increase in key representatives from the phyla of Firmicutes (Clostridium coccoides, Eubacterium rectale, and Clostridium leptum subgroup) and Actinobacteria (HGC bacteria and Bifidobacteria) as well as a decrease in Bacteroidetes (Prevotella spp. and Bacteroides spp.) and Proteobacteria (β- and γ-subgroup of Proteobacteria). As determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization, an independent direct quantitative microbial approach, we could confirm that intestinal microbiota composition in humans is influenced by smoking. The characteristics of observed microbial shifts suggest a potential mechanistic association to alterations in body weight subsequent to smoking cessation. More importantly, regarding previously described microbial hallmarks of dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel diseases, a variety of observed microbial alterations after smoking cessation deserve further consideration in view of the divergent effect of smoking on the clinical course of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

  3. Critical role of bioanalytical strategies in investigation of clinical PK observations, a Phase I case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kun; Xu, Keyang; Liu, Luna; Hendricks, Robert; Delarosa, Reginald; Erickson, Rich; Budha, Nageshwar; Leabman, Maya; Song, An; Kaur, Surinder; Fischer, Saloumeh K

    2014-01-01

    RG7652 is a human immunoglobulin 1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and is designed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. A target-binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to measure RG7652 levels in human serum in a Phase I study. Although target-binding assay formats are generally used to quantify free therapeutic, the actual therapeutic species being measured are affected by assay conditions, such as sample dilution and incubation time, and levels of soluble target in the samples. Therefore, in the presence of high concentrations of circulating target, the choice of reagents and assay conditions can have a significant effect on the observed pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles. Phase I RG7652 PK analysis using the ELISA data resulted in a nonlinear dose normalized exposure. An investigation was conducted to characterize the ELISA to determine whether the assay format and reagents may have contributed to the PK observation. In addition, to confirm the ELISA results, a second orthogonal method, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using a signature peptide as surrogate, was developed and implemented. A subset of PK samples, randomly selected from half of the subjects in the 6 single ascending dose (SAD) cohorts in the Phase I clinical study, was analyzed with the LC-MS/MS assay, and the data were found to be comparable to the ELISA data. This paper illustrates the importance of reagent characterization, as well as the benefits of using an orthogonal approach to eliminate bioanalytical contributions when encountering unexpected observations. PMID:25484037

  4. [Investigation of human brucellosis diagnosis and report quality in medical institutions in key areas of Shanxi province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L J; Yang, W W; Tie, P; Liu, X R; Gao, X R; Li, Z Y; Hou, P; Zhi, Y; Bai, Y F; Geng, M J; Chen, Q L; Cui, B Y; Li, Z J; Wang, L P

    2017-11-10

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of human brucellosis diagnosis and reporting in medical institutions in Shanxi province, and understand the performance of clinical doctors to diagnose human brucellosis according to diagnostic criteria. Methods: Field investigation was conducted in 6 medical institutions in the key areas of human brucellosis in Shanxi province. The diagnosis data of the reported brucellosis cases in 2015 were collected and reviewed retrospectively for the evaluation of the diagnosis accuracy with systematic sampling method. The database was established with Excel 2010 and the descriptive analysis and statistical test were conducted with software R 3.3.2. Results: The diagnosis consistent rate of the 377 brucellosis cases reviewed was 70.8% (267/377), the diagnosis consistent rates in medical institutions at city-level and country-level were 77.0% (127/165) and 66.0% (140/212) respectively, the differences had significance ( χ (2)=5.4, P =0.02). Among the reviewed cases, the diagnosis consistent rate of laboratory diagnosis and clinical diagnosis were 87.1% (256/294) and 13.3% (11/83) respectively, and the differences had significance ( χ (2)=170.7, P brucellosis cases within 24 hours after diagnosis. Conclusion: The accuracy of human brucellosis diagnosis in key areas of human brucellosis in Shanxi was low, and the performance of the clinical doctors to diagnose human brucellosis according to diagnostic and case classification criteria was unsatisfied.

  5. Numerical and experimental investigations of human swimming motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideki; Nakashima, Motomu; Sato, Yohei; Matsuuchi, Kazuo; Sanders, Ross H

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews unsteady flow conditions in human swimming and identifies the limitations and future potential of the current methods of analysing unsteady flow. The capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been extended from approaches assuming steady-state conditions to consideration of unsteady/transient conditions associated with the body motion of a swimmer. However, to predict hydrodynamic forces and the swimmer's potential speeds accurately, more robust and efficient numerical methods are necessary, coupled with validation procedures, requiring detailed experimental data reflecting local flow. Experimental data obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this area are limited, because at present observations are restricted to a two-dimensional 1.0 m(2) area, though this could be improved if the output range of the associated laser sheet increased. Simulations of human swimming are expected to improve competitive swimming, and our review has identified two important advances relating to understanding the flow conditions affecting performance in front crawl swimming: one is a mechanism for generating unsteady fluid forces, and the other is a theory relating to increased speed and efficiency.

  6. Investigating Microadaptation in One-to-One Human Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, Stephanie Ann; VanLehn, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated whether some advantages of tutoring over other instructional methods are due to microadaptation, or, tutors basing their actions on assessments of tutees they develop during tutoring. In a 2 × 2 between-subjects experiment, independent variables were shared experience (tutors either worked with the same or a different…

  7. Sample handling for mass spectrometric proteomic investigations of human sera.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West-Nielsen, M.; Hogdall, E.V.; Marchiori, E.; Hogdall, C.K.; Schou, C.; Heegaard, N.H.H.

    2005-01-01

    Proteomic investigations of sera are potentially of value for diagnosis, prognosis, choice of therapy, and disease activity assessment by virtue of discovering new biomarkers and biomarker patterns. Much debate focuses on the biological relevance and the need for identification of such biomarkers

  8. Investigation of monocrotophos toxic effects on human lymphocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... aberrations induced by monocrotophos were determined using karyotyping. ... been extensively investigated on insects and animal mo- ... is, Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) as described by Singh et al. ... and connected to a computer with Medi-Image software containing .... Research on Cancer.

  9. A clinical scoring system to prioritise investigation for tuberculosis among adults attending HIV clinics in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Hanifa

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO recommendation for regular tuberculosis (TB screening of HIV-positive individuals with Xpert MTB/RIF as the first diagnostic test has major resource implications.To develop a diagnostic prediction model for TB, for symptomatic adults attending for routine HIV care, to prioritise TB investigation.Cohort study exploring a TB testing algorithm.HIV clinics, South Africa.Representative sample of adult HIV clinic attendees; data from participants reporting ≥1 symptom on the WHO screening tool were split 50:50 to derive, then internally validate, a prediction model.TB, defined as "confirmed" if Xpert MTB/RIF, line probe assay or M. tuberculosis culture were positive; and "clinical" if TB treatment started without microbiological confirmation, within six months of enrolment.Overall, 79/2602 (3.0% participants on ART fulfilled TB case definitions, compared to 65/906 (7.2% pre-ART. Among 1133/3508 (32.3% participants screening positive on the WHO tool, 1048 met inclusion criteria for this analysis: 52/515 (10.1% in the derivation and 58/533 (10.9% in the validation dataset had TB. Our final model comprised ART status (on ART > 3 months vs. pre-ART or ART 1 symptom. We converted this to a clinical score, using clinically-relevant CD4 and BMI categories. A cut-off score of ≥3 identified those with TB with sensitivity and specificity of 91.8% and 34.3% respectively. If investigation was prioritised for individuals with score of ≥3, 68% (717/1048 symptomatic individuals would be tested, among whom the prevalence of TB would be 14.1% (101/717; 32% (331/1048 of tests would be avoided, but 3% (9/331 with TB would be missed amongst those not tested.Our clinical score may help prioritise TB investigation among symptomatic individuals.

  10. Clinical Investigation of the Dopaminergic System with PET and FLUORINE-18-FLUORO-L-DOPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Terrence Rayford

    1995-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a tool that provides quantitative physiological information. It is valuable both in a clinical environment, where information is sought for an individual, and in a research environment, to answer more fundamental questions about physiology and disease states. PET is particularly attractive compared to other nuclear medicine imaging techniques in cases where the anatomical regions of interest are small or when true metabolic rate constants are required. One example with both of these requirements is the investigation of Parkinson's Disease, which is characterized as a presynaptic motor function deficit affecting the striatum. As dopaminergic neurons die, the ability of the striatum to affect motor function decreases. The extent of functional neuronal damage in the small sub-structures may be ascertained by measuring the ability of the caudate and putamen to trap and store dopamine, a neurotransmitter. PET is able to utilize a tracer of dopamine activity, ^ {18}F- scL-DOPA, to quantitate the viability of the striatum. This thesis work deals with implementing and optimizing the many different elements that compose a PET study of the dopaminergic system, including: radioisotope production; conversion of aqueous ^{18}F ^-into [^ {18}F]-F2; synthesis of ^{18}F- scL -DOPA; details of the PET scan itself; measurements to estimate the radiation dosimetry; accurate measurement of a plasma input function; and the quantitation of dopaminergic activity in normal human subjects as well as in Parkinson's Disease patients.

  11. [THE RESULTS OF CLINICAL AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC INVESTIGATIONS EMPLOYEES OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS WHICH WERE IDENTIFIED NEUROTIC DISORDERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyova, M

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the results of the clinical and psychopathological and psychological diagnostic, investigations mental health employees of financial institutions, description and analysis of clinical forms identified disorders.

  12. Diagnostic investigation of patients with chronic polyneuropathy: evaluation of a clinical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, N. R.; Portegies, P.; de Visser, M.; Vermeulen, M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: (1) To evaluate a clinical guideline for the diagnostic investigation of patients presenting with signs and symptoms (present for longer than 6 weeks) suggesting a chronic polyneuropathy. (2) To investigate the contribution of electrophysiological studies to a focused search for aetiology

  13. Preliminary clinical applications of DTI in human cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Ting; Mai Weiwen; Liang Biling; Shen Jun; Huang Suiqiao; Hu Chunhong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To condcut preliminary study of the value of DTI(diffusion tensor imaging) in human cervical spinal cord. Methods: Twenty-one patients suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy and twenty volunteers without any clinical symptoms underwent routine MRI and DTI examination. DTI was performed in six non-collinear directions with single-shot fast spin echo echo, planar imaging sequence(b value = 400 s·mm -2 ). ADC(apparent diffusion coefficient) and FA(fractional anisotropy)values were measured by ROIs(regions of interest) in 4 different level segment spinal cord (C 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 ) in normal volunteers, in lesions and normal segmental spinal cord in clinical cases respectively. DTI original images were automatically processed by using IDL (Version 5.6) soft- ware to produce color tensor images. SPSS11.0 software for windows was used for t-test and one-way ANOVA analysis. The difference was considered statistically significant if P 2/3 , C 3/4 , C 4/5 , C 5/6 , were analyzed and it was found that FA value between them had a significant difference by ANOVA, F=159.24, P 2/3 level. However, ADC value between 4 segments had no significant difference(F=2.191, P>0.05). (2)In patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, routine MRI T2WI showed abnormal signal in 9 cases, and showed no abnormal signal in 12 dases. In sixteen cases it was found that abnormal patchy green signal on colorized tensor maps appeared on the normal blue spinal cord. Also, in patients of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, there was significant difference in ADC and FA value between lesions and normal spinal cord (paired t test, for ADC, t=2.88, P 2/3 level segment spinal cord in normal volunteers (0.85 ± 0.03) is the highest among other segments. FA value decreases gradually along cervical spinal cord towards the caudal direction. However, the difference of ADC values amongst 4 segments is not significant. DTI colorized tensor maps can show more lesions than routine MRI

  14. Quality of clinical brain tumor MR spectra judged by humans and machine learning tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyathanahally, Sreenath P; Mocioiu, Victor; Pedrosa de Barros, Nuno; Slotboom, Johannes; Wright, Alan J; Julià-Sapé, Margarida; Arús, Carles; Kreis, Roland

    2018-05-01

    To investigate and compare human judgment and machine learning tools for quality assessment of clinical MR spectra of brain tumors. A very large set of 2574 single voxel spectra with short and long echo time from the eTUMOUR and INTERPRET databases were used for this analysis. Original human quality ratings from these studies as well as new human guidelines were used to train different machine learning algorithms for automatic quality control (AQC) based on various feature extraction methods and classification tools. The performance was compared with variance in human judgment. AQC built using the RUSBoost classifier that combats imbalanced training data performed best. When furnished with a large range of spectral and derived features where the most crucial ones had been selected by the TreeBagger algorithm it showed better specificity (98%) in judging spectra from an independent test-set than previously published methods. Optimal performance was reached with a virtual three-class ranking system. Our results suggest that feature space should be relatively large for the case of MR tumor spectra and that three-class labels may be beneficial for AQC. The best AQC algorithm showed a performance in rejecting spectra that was comparable to that of a panel of human expert spectroscopists. Magn Reson Med 79:2500-2510, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Music and health. Phenomenological investigation of a medical humanity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lucy; McLachlan, Emma; Perkins, Laurence; Dornan, Tim

    2013-05-01

    In response to the tendency for music to be under-represented in the discourse of medical humanities, we framed the question 'how can music heal?' We answered it by exploring the lived experiences of musicians with lay or professional interests in health. Two medical students and a medically qualified educationalist, all musicians, conducted a co-operative inquiry with a professional musician interested in health. All researchers and six respondents kept audio or written diaries. Three respondents were interviewed in depth. A medical school head (and experienced musician) critiqued the phenomenological analysis of respondents' accounts of music, health, and its relationship with undergraduate medical education. Respondents experienced music as promoting health, even in seriously diseased people. Music affected people's identity and emotions. Through the medium of structure and harmony, it provided a means of self-expression that adapted to whatever condition people were in. Music was a communication medium, which could make people feel less isolated. Immersion in music could change negative states of mind to more positive ones. A transport metaphor was commonly used; music 'taking people to better places'. Exercising control by becoming physically involved in music enhanced diseased people's self-esteem. Music was able to bring the spiritual, mental, and physical elements of their lives into balance, to the benefit of their wellbeing. Music could help medical students appreciate holistically that the state of health of people who are either well or diseased can be enhanced by a 'non-technical' intervention.

  16. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes for investigation of individual radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitzelsberger, H.; Bauchinger, M.

    2000-01-01

    Stable translocations and insertions which are not selected against during cell proliferation can be reliably scored by use of fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) which allows painting of selected chromosomes along their entire length. This temporal persistence makes them particulary valuable for quantifying post human radiation exposures ('biodosimetry'). A disadvantage of this approach is that for routine use only a partial genome analysis can be performed which is mostly based on triple combinations of DNA probes for particular chromosomes. Translocation frequencies from partial genome analysis are often scaled-up to equal the full genome. Basic assumptions for such scaling are, that double strand breaks leading to translocations must be distributed randomly throughout the genome and no preferential interaction between particular pairs of chromosomes occurs. Thus, the probability of a particular chromosome being involved in an exchange is proportional to its DNA content. However, this is not always supported by experimental findings and may thus indicate a differential radiosensitivity of particular chromosomes. Translocation measurements in peripheral blood of different healthy donors irradiated in vitro with the same dose revealed also some evidence for the existence of interindividual differences in radiosensitivity. Similar findings have been already demonstrated after therapeutic irradiation of tumour patients. Consequences thereof may result for long-term retrospective biodosimetry. In order to provide reliable estimates of an individual's exposure to ionising radiation, the extent, distribution and dose-dependence of the observed variability has to be carefully examined in larger groups of persons and larger sets of calibration data. (orig.) [de

  17. Variation in clinical phenotype of human infection among genetic groups of Blastomyces dermatitidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meece, Jennifer K.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Gruszka, Sarah; Sloss, Brian L.; Sullivan, Bradley; Reed, Kurt D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Blastomyces dermatitidis, the etiologic agent of blastomycosis, has 2 genetic groups and shows varied clinical presentation, ranging from silent infections to fulminant respiratory disease and dissemination. The objective of this study was to determine whether clinical phenotype and outcomes vary based on the infecting organism's genetic group.Methods. We used microsatellites to genotype 227 clinical isolates of B. dermatitidis from Wisconsin patients. For each isolate, corresponding clinical disease characteristics and patient demographic information were abstracted from electronic health records and Wisconsin Division of Health reportable disease forms and questionnaires.Results. In univariate analysis, group 1 isolates were more likely to be associated with pulmonary-only infections (P 1 month (P smoking status (P = .0001) remained predictors for group 2 infections.Conclusions. This study identified previously unknown associations between clinical phenotype of human infection and genetic groups of B. dermatitidis and provides a framework for further investigations of the genetic basis for virulence in B. dermatitidis.

  18. Investigation of osteosarcoma genomics and its impact on targeted therapy: an international collaboration to conquer human osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ji-Long

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a genetically unstable malignancy that most frequently occurs in children and young adults. The lack of progress in managing this devastating disease in the clinic has prompted international researchers to collaborate to profile key genomic alterations that define osteosarcoma. A team of researchers and clinicians from China, Finland, and the United States investigated human osteosarcoma by integrating transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), high-density genome-wide array comparat...

  19. Clinical evaluation of lumbar CT assisted discography in comparison with human cadaver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Shigehiko

    1988-04-01

    In order to estimate the clinical value of lumbar CT assisted discography (CTD), results obtained by this method were compared with histological findings of the cross section of the spine in fresh human cadavera. Based on these findings, preoperative CTD of lumbar disc herniation was investigated. In the discs of human cadavera, the contrast medium mainly invaded the fissures of nucleus pulposus and the ruptures of annulus fibrosus and then diffused to the surrounding tissues. These ruptures were classified into two categories: radial and circumferential. This indentification was possible only in CTD and was obscure in the usual discogram. Not all the ruptures could be dyed in a severe degenerative disc, and a rupture which was not communicated with nucleus pulposus was not dyed in a mild degenerative disc. In the preoperative CTD of lumbar disc herniation, the posterior radial ruptures representing the route of herniated nuclei were characteristic and the circumferential ruptures were found complicated.

  20. A metabolomic evaluation of the phytochemical composition of tomato juices being used in human clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichon, Morgan J; Riedl, Ken M; Schwartz, Steven J

    2017-08-01

    Juices from the traditional red tomato and a unique tangerine tomato variety are being investigated as health promoting foods in human clinical trials. However, it is unknown how the tangerine and red tomato juices differ in biologically relevant phytochemicals beyond carotenoids. Here liquid-chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry metabolomics was used to evaluate broadly the similarities and differences in carotenoids and other phytochemicals between red and tangerine tomato juices intended for clinical interventions. This untargeted approach was successful in the rapid detection and extensive characterization of phytochemicals belonging to various compound classes. The tomato juices were found to differ significantly in a number of phytochemicals, including carotenoids, chlorophylls, neutral lipids, and cinnamic acid derivatives. The largest differences were in carotenoids, including lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, neurosporene, and ζ-carotene. Smaller, but significant, differences were observed in polar phytochemicals, such as chlorogenic acid, hydroxyferulic acid, phloretin-di-C-glycoside, and isopropylmalic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Health, human rights, and the conduct of clinical research within oppressed populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills Edward J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials evaluating interventions for infectious diseases require enrolling participants that are vulnerable to infection. As clinical trials are conducted in increasingly vulnerable populations, issues of protection of these populations become challenging. In settings where populations are forseeably oppressed, the conduct of research requires considerations that go beyond common ethical concerns and into issues of international human rights law. Discussion Using examples of HIV prevention trials in Thailand, hepatitis-E prevention trials in Nepal and malaria therapeutic trials in Burma (Myanmar, we address the inadequacies of current ethical guidelines when conducting research within oppressed populations. We review existing legislature in the United States and United Kingdom that may be used against foreign investigators if trial hardships exist. We conclude by making considerations for research conducted within oppressed populations.

  2. Effect of cisplatin on the clinically relevant radiosensitivity of human cervical carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britten, Richard A.; Evans, Andrew J.; Allalunis-Turner, M. Joan; Pearcey, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of clinically relevant levels of cisplatin on the radiosensitivity of human cervical tumor cells, and to estimate what changes in local control rates might be expected to accrue from the concomitant use of cisplatin during fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The effects of concomitant cisplatin (1 μg/ml, a typical intratumor concentration) on the clinically relevant radiosensitivity, i.e., surviving fraction after 2 G (SF 2 ) values, was determined in 19 cloned human cervical tumor cell lines. These early passage cell lines had SF 2 values ranging from 0.26 to 0.87. Results: The concomitant administration of cisplatin reduced the clinically relevant radiosensitivity in the majority (11 out of 19) of the human tumor cell lines investigated. In only 4 out of 19 was any radiosensitization observed, and in 4 out of 19 cell lines there was no significant change in radiosensitivity. However, the sum of the independent cell killing by radiation and cisplatin, was approximately twofold higher than after radiation alone. There was no apparent dependence of the cisplatin-induced changes in SF 2 values upon the level of cell killing by cisplatin. However, there is a suggestion that concomitant cisplatin administration may have a differential effect in inherently radiosensitive and resistant human tumor cell lines. Conclusions: Our data suggest that concomitant cisplatin/radiotherapy regimens may result in a higher level of local tumor control, but primarily through additive toxicity and not through radiosensitization. Future improvements in local tumor control may, thus, be derived by increasing the total dose of cisplatin

  3. A multiplexed chip-based assay system for investigating the functional development of human skeletal myotubes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A S T; Long, C J; Pirozzi, K; Najjar, S; McAleer, C; Vandenburgh, H H; Hickman, J J

    2014-09-20

    This report details the development of a non-invasive in vitro assay system for investigating the functional maturation and performance of human skeletal myotubes. Data is presented demonstrating the survival and differentiation of human myotubes on microscale silicon cantilevers in a defined, serum-free system. These cultures can be stimulated electrically and the resulting contraction quantified using modified atomic force microscopy technology. This system provides a higher degree of sensitivity for investigating contractile waveforms than video-based analysis, and represents the first system capable of measuring the contractile activity of individual human muscle myotubes in a reliable, high-throughput and non-invasive manner. The development of such a technique is critical for the advancement of body-on-a-chip platforms toward application in pre-clinical drug development screens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative proteomic investigation of metastatic and non-metastatic osteosarcoma cells of human and canine origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnabi Roy

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in dogs and people. In order to improve clinical outcomes, it is necessary to identify proteins that are differentially expressed by metastatic cells. Membrane bound proteins are responsible for multiple pro-metastatic functions. Therefore characterizing the differential expression of membranous proteins between metastatic and non-metastatic clonal variants will allow the discovery of druggable targets and consequently improve treatment methodology. The objective of this investigation was to systemically identify the membrane-associated proteomics of metastatic and non-metastatic variants of human and canine origin. Two clonal variants of divergent in vivo metastatic potential from human and canine origins were used. The plasma membranes were isolated and peptide fingerprinting was used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Selected proteins were further validated using western blotting, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Over 500 proteins were identified for each cell line with nearly 40% of the proteins differentially regulated. Conserved between both species, metastatic variants demonstrated significant differences in expression of membrane proteins that are responsible for pro-metastatic functions. Additionally, CD147, CD44 and vimentin were validated using various biochemical techniques. Taken together, through a comparative proteomic approach we have identified several differentially expressed cell membrane proteins that will help in the development of future therapeutics.

  5. Comparative proteomic investigation of metastatic and non-metastatic osteosarcoma cells of human and canine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jahnabi; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Pondenis, Holly; Fan, Timothy M; Das, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in dogs and people. In order to improve clinical outcomes, it is necessary to identify proteins that are differentially expressed by metastatic cells. Membrane bound proteins are responsible for multiple pro-metastatic functions. Therefore characterizing the differential expression of membranous proteins between metastatic and non-metastatic clonal variants will allow the discovery of druggable targets and consequently improve treatment methodology. The objective of this investigation was to systemically identify the membrane-associated proteomics of metastatic and non-metastatic variants of human and canine origin. Two clonal variants of divergent in vivo metastatic potential from human and canine origins were used. The plasma membranes were isolated and peptide fingerprinting was used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Selected proteins were further validated using western blotting, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Over 500 proteins were identified for each cell line with nearly 40% of the proteins differentially regulated. Conserved between both species, metastatic variants demonstrated significant differences in expression of membrane proteins that are responsible for pro-metastatic functions. Additionally, CD147, CD44 and vimentin were validated using various biochemical techniques. Taken together, through a comparative proteomic approach we have identified several differentially expressed cell membrane proteins that will help in the development of future therapeutics.

  6. CLINICAL AND VIROLOGIC FOUNDATION FOR PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS TYPE 6 INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Myukke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about an infection caused by human herpes virus type 6, its' epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical variants, is reviewed. Clinical cases, diagnosed at a time of study, are briefly reviewed.Key words: human herpes virus type 6, exanthema subitum (roseola infantum, fever of unknown origin, mononucleosis like syndrome, meningoencephalitis, children.

  7. A short version of the revised 'experience of close relationships questionnaire': investigating non-clinical and clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongpakaran, Tinakon; Wongpakaran, Nahathai

    2012-01-01

    This study seeks to investigate the psychometric properties of the short version of the revised 'Experience of Close Relationships' questionnaire, comparing non-clinical and clinical samples. In total 702 subjects participated in this study, of whom 531 were non-clinical participants and 171 were psychiatric patients. They completed the short version of the revised 'Experience of Close Relationships' questionnaire (ECR-R-18), the Perceived Stress Scale-10(PSS-10), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and the UCLA Loneliness scale. A retest of the ECR-R-18 was then performed at four-week intervals. Then, confirmatory factor analyses were performed to test the validity of the new scale. The ECR-R-18 showed a fair to good internal consistency (α 0.77 to 0.87) for both samples, and the test-retest reliability was found to be satisfactory (ICC = 0.75). The anxiety sub-scale demonstrated concurrent validity with PSS-10 and RSES, while the avoidance sub-scale showed concurrent validity with the UCLA Loneliness Scale. Confirmatory factor analysis using method factors yielded two factors with an acceptable model fit for both groups. An invariance test revealed that the ECR-R-18 when used on the clinical group differed from when used with the non-clinical group. The ECR-R-18 questionnaire revealed an overall better level of fit than the original 36 item questionnaire, indicating its suitability for use with a broader group of samples, including clinical samples. The reliability of the ECR-R- 18 might be increased if a modified scoring system is used and if our suggestions with regard to future studies are followed up.

  8. System of automated processing of radionuclide investigations (SAPRI-01) in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivachenko, T.P.; Mechev, D.S.; Krupka, I.N.

    1988-01-01

    The author described the results of clinical testing of a system SAPRI-01 designed for automated collection, storage and processing of data on radionuclide investigations. He gave examples of automated processing of RCG and the results of positive scintigraphy of tumors of different sites using 67 Ga-citrate and 99m Tc pertechnetate in statistical and dynamic investigations. Short-comings and ways for updating 4 the system during its serial production were pointed out. The introduction of the system into clinical practice on a wide scale was shown to hold promise

  9. Clinical implication of elevated human cervical cancer oncogene-1 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Li, Ke; Ren, Zhonghai; Li, Shenglei; Zhang, Hongyan; Fan, Qingxia

    2012-07-01

    The human cervical cancer oncogene 1 (HCCR-1), a novel human oncoprotein, has been shown to be upregulated in various human tumors and plays a critical role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Here, the authors investigated HCCR-1 level in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues and assessed the correlation between HCCR-1 level and prognosis of the patients with ESCC. HCCR-1 levels were investigated by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting methods; Kaplan-Meier curve was used to evaluate the prognostic value of HCCR-1 level in patients with ESCC using log-rank test. HCCR-1 displayed high levels in ESCC tissues compared to squamous dysplasia tissues and normal esophageal epithelial tissues. No significant correlation was observed between the levels of HCCR-1 mRNA and protein and gender and age (all p>0.05) but obviously related to histological grade, clinical stage, and lymph node metastasis (all p<0.001). Moreover, the survival rate of the patients with low HCCR-1 levels was higher than that of the patients with high HCCR-1 levels (both p<0.05). These data demonstrate that HCCR-1 may be used as a novel predictor for the prognosis of the patients with ESCC.

  10. Investigations on human error hazards in recent unintended trip events of Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sa Kil; Jang, Tong Il; Lee, Yong Hee; Shin, Kwang Hyeon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    According to the Operational Performance Information System (OPIS) which has been operated to improve the public understanding by the KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), unintended trip events by mainly human errors counted up to 38 cases (18.7%) from 2000 to 2011. Although the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) industry in Korea has been making efforts to reduce the human errors which have largely contributed to trip events, the human error rate might keep increasing. Interestingly, digital based I and C systems is the one of the reduction factors of unintended reactor trips. Human errors, however, have occurred due to the digital based I and C systems because those systems require new or changed behaviors to the NPP operators. Therefore, it is necessary that the investigations of human errors consider a new methodology to find not only tangible behavior but also intangible behavior such as organizational behaviors. In this study we investigated human errors to find latent factors such as decisions and conditions in the all of the unintended reactor trip events during last dozen years. To find them, we applied the HFACS (Human Factors Analysis and Classification System) which is a commonly utilized tool for investigating human contributions to aviation accidents under a widespread evaluation scheme. The objective of this study is to find latent factors behind of human errors in nuclear reactor trip events. Therefore, a method to investigate unintended trip events by human errors and the results will be discussed in more detail.

  11. Investigations on human error hazards in recent unintended trip events of Korean nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sa Kil; Jang, Tong Il; Lee, Yong Hee; Shin, Kwang Hyeon

    2012-01-01

    According to the Operational Performance Information System (OPIS) which has been operated to improve the public understanding by the KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), unintended trip events by mainly human errors counted up to 38 cases (18.7%) from 2000 to 2011. Although the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) industry in Korea has been making efforts to reduce the human errors which have largely contributed to trip events, the human error rate might keep increasing. Interestingly, digital based I and C systems is the one of the reduction factors of unintended reactor trips. Human errors, however, have occurred due to the digital based I and C systems because those systems require new or changed behaviors to the NPP operators. Therefore, it is necessary that the investigations of human errors consider a new methodology to find not only tangible behavior but also intangible behavior such as organizational behaviors. In this study we investigated human errors to find latent factors such as decisions and conditions in the all of the unintended reactor trip events during last dozen years. To find them, we applied the HFACS (Human Factors Analysis and Classification System) which is a commonly utilized tool for investigating human contributions to aviation accidents under a widespread evaluation scheme. The objective of this study is to find latent factors behind of human errors in nuclear reactor trip events. Therefore, a method to investigate unintended trip events by human errors and the results will be discussed in more detail

  12. 3D virtual human atria: A computational platform for studying clinical atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanidi, Oleg V; Colman, Michael A; Stott, Jonathan; Dobrzynski, Halina; Boyett, Mark R; Holden, Arun V; Zhang, Henggui

    2011-10-01

    Despite a vast amount of experimental and clinical data on the underlying ionic, cellular and tissue substrates, the mechanisms of common atrial arrhythmias (such as atrial fibrillation, AF) arising from the functional interactions at the whole atria level remain unclear. Computational modelling provides a quantitative framework for integrating such multi-scale data and understanding the arrhythmogenic behaviour that emerges from the collective spatio-temporal dynamics in all parts of the heart. In this study, we have developed a multi-scale hierarchy of biophysically detailed computational models for the human atria--the 3D virtual human atria. Primarily, diffusion tensor MRI reconstruction of the tissue geometry and fibre orientation in the human sinoatrial node (SAN) and surrounding atrial muscle was integrated into the 3D model of the whole atria dissected from the Visible Human dataset. The anatomical models were combined with the heterogeneous atrial action potential (AP) models, and used to simulate the AP conduction in the human atria under various conditions: SAN pacemaking and atrial activation in the normal rhythm, break-down of regular AP wave-fronts during rapid atrial pacing, and the genesis of multiple re-entrant wavelets characteristic of AF. Contributions of different properties of the tissue to mechanisms of the normal rhythm and arrhythmogenesis were investigated. Primarily, the simulations showed that tissue heterogeneity caused the break-down of the normal AP wave-fronts at rapid pacing rates, which initiated a pair of re-entrant spiral waves; and tissue anisotropy resulted in a further break-down of the spiral waves into multiple meandering wavelets characteristic of AF. The 3D virtual atria model itself was incorporated into the torso model to simulate the body surface ECG patterns in the normal and arrhythmic conditions. Therefore, a state-of-the-art computational platform has been developed, which can be used for studying multi

  13. EM-GE-5 Regulation. Standard for the first-rate application clinical practices in the execution of the clinical investigations for medical teams' evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This guide has the following objectives: a) To guide methodologically the implementation of Good Clinical Practice for the execution of clinical research with medical devices that need to be evaluated, in addition to the Regulation E R-6. Requirements for the Conduct of Clinical Trials for Medical Devices , b) Provide the fundamental aspects to be taken into count for quality control to clinical investigations.

  14. Naa Technique for Clinical Investigation of Mice Immunized with BOTHROP Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, C. B.; Aguiar, R. O.; Kovacs, L.; Suzuki, M.; Sant'Anna, O. A.

    2009-06-01

    In the present study Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique was used to determine sodium concentration in whole blood of mice immunized with Bothrops venom. With this value it was possible to perform clinical investigation in this animal model using whole blood.

  15. Using Hermeneutic Phenomenology to Investigate How Experienced Practitioners Learn to Communicate Clinical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajjawi, Rola; Higgs, Joy

    2007-01-01

    This paper is primarily targeted at doctoral students and other researchers considering using hermeneutic phenomenology as a research strategy. We present interpretive paradigm research designed to investigate how experienced practitioners learn to communicate their clinical reasoning in professional practice. Twelve experienced physiotherapy…

  16. 21 CFR 50.54 - Clinical investigations not otherwise approvable that present an opportunity to understand...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... that present an opportunity to understand, prevent, or alleviate a serious problem affecting the health... opportunity to understand, prevent, or alleviate a serious problem affecting the health or welfare of children... clinical investigation presents a reasonable opportunity to further the understanding, prevention, or...

  17. Diagnosis of human fascioliasis in Arusha region, northern Tanzania by microscopy and clinical manifestations in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukambagire, Abdul-Hamid Settenda; Mchaile, Deborah N; Nyindo, Mramba

    2015-12-23

    Human fascioliasis (HF) is a zoonotic disease that has been identified in many countries worldwide. This report concerns the identification and clinical management of cases of human fascioliasis in the suburbs of Arusha city, northern Tanzania in 2013. Fascioliasis is included among the WHO's Neglected Tropical Diseases as a plant transmitted trematode infection. Human fascioliasis has not been described before in the East Africa region, including Tanzania. Patients presenting at a primary healthcare centre in Arusha Region, northern Tanzania provided fresh stool samples for routine ova and parasite screening (saline and iodine preparations). Subsequent stool samples were preserved in 5 % formalin in saline and subjected to ether sedimentation for examination. Out of 1460 patients, 305 (21 %) were diagnosed positive for fascioliasis based on the demonstration of brownish, oval eggs with inconspicuous opercula in stool. Two distinct egg sizes were identified; large 170-212.5 by 115-150 μm (mean 194.5 by 130.5 μm) and smaller eggs 120-150 by 87.5 - 112.5 μm (mean 138.8 by 101 μm). Clinically, patients presented with fever (39 - 40 °C) and abdominal pain. Some patients had pruritis around the mouth and their lips were swollen. 3 patients were treated and cured with single dose Triclabendazole. The remaining 302 patients were treated with Nitazoxanide and 122 (40 %) were cleared of infection with a single course. Snails of the genus Lymnaea were found in the surroundings. This report serves to remind medical professionals in East Africa that HF is a probable differential diagnosis in patients presenting with similar symptoms. It is possible to diagnose fascioliasis by light microscopy although specific antigen tests are required for confirmation. Human fascioliasis however, has not been described or reported in Tanzania before and begs further investigation.

  18. Genetics in endocrinology: genetic variation in deiodinases: a systematic review of potential clinical effects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloop, Herman; Dekkers, Olaf M; Peeters, Robin P; Schoones, Jan W; Smit, Johannes W A

    2014-09-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinases represent a family of selenoproteins involved in peripheral and local homeostasis of thyroid hormone action. Deiodinases are expressed in multiple organs and thyroid hormone affects numerous biological systems, thus genetic variation in deiodinases may affect multiple clinical endpoints. Interest in clinical effects of genetic variation in deiodinases has clearly increased. We aimed to provide an overview for the role of deiodinase polymorphisms in human physiology and morbidity. In this systematic review, studies evaluating the relationship between deiodinase polymorphisms and clinical parameters in humans were eligible. No restrictions on publication date were imposed. The following databases were searched up to August 2013: Pubmed, EMBASE (OVID-version), Web of Science, COCHRANE Library, CINAHL (EbscoHOST-version), Academic Search Premier (EbscoHOST-version), and ScienceDirect. Deiodinase physiology at molecular and tissue level is described, and finally the role of these polymorphisms in pathophysiological conditions is reviewed. Deiodinase type 1 (D1) polymorphisms particularly show moderate-to-strong relationships with thyroid hormone parameters, IGF1 production, and risk for depression. D2 variants correlate with thyroid hormone levels, insulin resistance, bipolar mood disorder, psychological well-being, mental retardation, hypertension, and risk for osteoarthritis. D3 polymorphisms showed no relationship with inter-individual variation in serum thyroid hormone parameters. One D3 polymorphism was associated with risk for osteoarthritis. Genetic deiodinase profiles only explain a small proportion of inter-individual variations in serum thyroid hormone levels. Evidence suggests a role of genetic deiodinase variants in certain pathophysiological conditions. The value for determination of deiodinase polymorphism in clinical practice needs further investigation. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  19. [Clinical aspects of human infection by the avian influenza virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubau, P

    2009-01-01

    The species barrier is not perfect for Influenza A and numerous transmissions of the virus from pigs or poultry to humans have been described these years. Appearing in 1997 and becoming epidemic in 2003, influenza A/H5N1 provoked many deadly enzootics in poultry batteries (highly pathogenic avian influenza of HPAI). Starting in Asia, many countries throughout Africa and Europe were affected. Sporadic human cases were described in direct contact with diseased chicken or other poultry. Half of the cases are lethal, but human to human transmission occurs with difficulty. From January 2003 to August 11th 2009, 438 cases were declared worldwide with 262 deaths. Many countries declared cases, but recently most cases occurred in Egypt. Measures in hospital were taken which were copied from the measures for SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), but these were probably excessive in this case, considering the low rate of secondary cases with A/H5N1. In many human infections, signs of severe respiratory distress develop and multi organ failure. It was feared that this deadly virus could become easily transmitted between humans, leading to a new pandemic. This was not the case up to now. The strong pathogenicity of the virus is still not completely explained, but the deep location of infection in the lungs and the deregulation of cytokine production by the target cells, particularly macrophages, may be part of the explanation.

  20. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Geographically Diverse Clinical Human Isolates of Leptospira▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ressner, Roseanne A.; Griffith, Matthew E.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Pimentel, Guillermo; Miller, R. Scott; Mende, Katrin; Fraser, Susan L.; Galloway, Renee L.; Hospenthal, Duane R.; Murray, Clinton K.

    2008-01-01

    Although antimicrobial therapy of leptospirosis has been studied in a few randomized controlled clinical studies, those studies were limited to specific regions of the world and few have characterized infecting strains. A broth microdilution technique for the assessment of antibiotic susceptibility has been developed at Brooke Army Medical Center. In the present study, we assessed the susceptibilities of 13 Leptospira isolates (including recent clinical isolates) from Egypt, Thailand, Nicarag...

  1. Genomic investigation of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bulk tank milk and dairy cows with clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Troels; Klaas, Ilka C; Stegger, Marc; Svennesen, Line; Astrup, Lærke B; Farre, Michael; Pedersen, Karl

    2018-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens that cause mastitis in dairy cows. Various subtypes, virulence genes and mobile genetic elements have been associated with isolates from bulk tank milk and clinical mastitis. So far, no Danish cattle associated S. aureus isolates have been whole-genome sequenced and further analyzed. Thus, the main objective was to investigate the population structure and genomic content of isolates from bulk tank milk and clinical mastitis, using whole-genome sequencing. This may reveal the origin of strains that cause clinical mastitis. S. aureus isolates from bulk tank milk (n = 94) and clinical mastitis (n = 63) were collected from 91 and 24 different farms, respectively and whole-genome sequenced. The genomic content was analyzed and a phylogenetic tree based on single nucleotide polymorphisms was constructed. In general, the isolates from both bulk tank milk and clinical mastitis were of similar genetic background. This suggests that dairy cows are natural carriers of the S. aureus subtypes that cause clinical mastitis if the right conditions are present and that a broad range of subtypes cause mastitis. A phylogenetic cluster that mostly consisted of ST151 isolates carried three mobile genetic elements that were primarily found in this group. The prevalence of resistance genes was generally low. However, the first ST398 methicillin resistant S. aureus isolate from a Danish dairy cow with clinical mastitis was detected. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation Clinical Competence and Its Relationship with Professional Ethics and Spiritual Health in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Ramezanzade Tabriz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Study of clinical competence in nursing helps determine the quality of health care delivered to patients. Given the priority of observance of principles over caretaking and necessity of spirituality existence at the core of health care provision, this study was conducted to investigate clinical competence and its relationship with professional ethics and spiritual health in nurses. Methods: In this cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational study, 281 nurses were enrolled by consensus sampling. Sampling was conducted from February, 2016 till June, 2016. The data were gathered by a demographics questionnaire, a self-assessment scale of clinical competence, a nursing ethics questionnaire, and a spiritual health questionnaire, and analyzed by descriptive statistics and t-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, ANOVA, and linear regression analysis in SPSS 21. Results: The total scores for self-assessment scale of nurses' clinical competence, professional ethics, and spiritual health were moderate. In the light of the results of Spearman's correlation coefficient, there was a significant and positive correlation between clinical competence and spiritual health. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was observed between professional ethics and spiritual health but there was no correlation between professional ethics and clinical competence. Conclusion: Managers' and personnel's Knowledge about the level of nurses clinical competence, professional ethics, and spiritual health in teaching health care centers provides valuable information to develop in-service and efficacious education programs and ultimately to improve the quality of nursing services.

  3. The relationship between senior management team culture and clinical governance: Empirical investigation and managerial implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenestini, Anna; Calciolari, Stefano; Lega, Federico; Grilli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Health care organizations are pressured to improve the cost-effectiveness of service delivery. Clinical governance is an important trigger to improve care quality and safety and rank high in the reform agenda of health systems. The senior management team culture plays a major role in establishing clinical governance practices, because it strongly influences the values, attitudes, and behaviors of the members of an organization. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between senior management team culture and clinical governance in the public health care organizations of three Italian regions. The assessment of senior management culture was conducted using the Competing Values Framework and a corresponding instrument adapted for the Italian context. Clinical governance was assessed using an ad hoc instrument focused on the senior management team's perception and attitude toward clinical governance. The survey achieved a 54% response rate. The results of four different models demonstrate that organizations characterized by different dominant cultures are associated with significant differences in attitudes toward clinical governance. In particular, on average, dominant cultures with a prevailing external focus are associated with a more positive attitude toward clinical governance. The selection and appointments of top managers should consider the style of leadership that is most apt to facilitate the growth of rational and developmental cultures. Furthermore, the training of top managers and leading doctors should reinforce leadership aptitude and approaches that are consistent with the desired organizational cultures.

  4. An investigation of nurse educator's perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Angela; Taylor, Cathy

    2008-11-01

    Educational policy (DOH, 1999. Making a difference: strengthening the nursing, midwifery and health visiting contribution to health and healthcare. Department of Health, London; UKCC, 1999. Fitness for Practice. United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, London; Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2006. Standards to support learning and assessment in practice. Nursing and Midwifery Council, London) and current nursing literature (Griscti, O., Jacono, B., Jacono, J., 2005. The nurse educator's clinical role. Journal of Advanced Nursing 50 (1), 84-92; Owen, S., Ferguson, K., Baguley, I., 2005. The clinical activity of mental health nurse lecturers. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing 12, 310-316), place increasing emphasis on nurse educators undertaking clinical practice to facilitate their clinical confidence and competence. This study investigated nurse educators' perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice. A qualitative design and descriptive, exploratory approach were used. A purposive sample of 11 nurse educators in one nursing department, took part in two focus group interviews, one with 5 and the other with 6 respondents, to identify and discuss their perceptions and experiences of undertaking clinical practice. A process of thematic content analysis revealed three broad themes relating to the meaning and importance of clinical practice, perceived benefits and barriers which are examined and discussed. The paper concludes that despite policy recommendations, barriers highlighted in this study such as insufficient time, heavy workload and a lack of valuing of the clinical role have been raised over the past few decades. The effect of undertaking clinical practice, particularly on the quality of teaching is argued to be valuable armoury in the battle to secure sufficient resources to support engagement in clinical practice. Financial and organisational commitment; valuing of clinical practice and research

  5. Pregnancy - associated human listeriosis: Virulence and genotypic analysis of Listeria monocytogenes from clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Dharmendra Kumar; Singh, Durg Vijai; Dubey, Suresh Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a life-threatening pathogen, poses severe risk during pregnancy, may cause abortion, fetal death or neonatal morbidity in terms of septicemia and meningitis. The present study aimed at characterizing L. monocytogenes isolated from pregnant women based on serotyping, antibiotic susceptibility, virulence genes, in vivo pathogenicity test and ERIC- and REP-PCR fingerprint analyses. The results revealed that out of 3700 human clinical samples, a total of 30 (0.81%) isolates [12 (0.80%) from placental bit (1500), 18 (0.81%) from vaginal swab (2200)] were positive for L. monocytogenes. All the isolates belonged to serogroup 4b, and were + ve for virulence genes tested i.e. inlA, inlC, inlJ, plcA, prfA, actA, hlyA, and iap. Based on the mice inoculation tests, 20 isolates showed 100% and 4 isolates 60% relative virulence while 6 isolates were non-pathogenic. Moreover, 2 and 10 isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and cefoxitin, respectively, while the rest susceptible to other antibiotics used in this study. ERIC- and REP-PCR collectively depicted that the isolates from placental bit and vaginal swab had distinct PCR fingerprints except a few isolates with identical patterns. This study demonstrates prevalence of pathogenic strains mostly resistant to cefoxitin and/or ciprofloxacin. The results indicate the importance of isolating and characterizing the pathogen from human clinical samples as the pre-requisite for accurate epidemiological investigations.

  6. The sinusoidal lining cells in "normal" human liver. A scanning electron microscopic investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Christoffersen, P

    1986-01-01

    The scanning electron microscopic was used to study the fenestrations of human liver sinusoids. Thirteen biopsies, where light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed normal sinusoidal architecture, were investigated. The number of fenestrae was calculated in acinar zone 3...

  7. Traceable working standards with SI units of radiance for characterizing the measurement performance of investigational clinical NIRF imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Litorja, Maritoni; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2017-03-01

    All medical devices for Food and Drug market approval require specifications of performance based upon International System of Units (SI) or units derived from SI for reasons of traceability. Recently, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging devices of a variety of designs have emerged on the market and in investigational clinical studies. Yet the design of devices used in the clinical studies vary widely, suggesting variable device performance. Device performance depends upon optimal excitation of NIRF imaging agents, rejection of backscattered excitation and ambient light, and selective collection of fluorescence emanating from the fluorophore. There remains no traceable working standards with SI units of radiance to enable prediction that a given molecular imaging agent can be detected in humans by a given NIRF imaging device. Furthermore, as technologies evolve and as NIRF imaging device components change, there remains no standardized means to track device improvements over time and establish clinical performance without involving clinical trials, often costly. In this study, we deployed a methodology to calibrate luminescent radiance of a stable, solid phantom in SI units of mW/cm2/sr for characterizing the measurement performance of ICCD and IsCMOS camera based NIRF imaging devices, such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast. The methodology allowed determination of superior SNR of the ICCD over the IsCMOS system; comparable contrast of ICCD and IsCMOS depending upon binning strategies.

  8. An Investigation of Job Stress and Job Burnout in Iranian Clinical Pharmacist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armaghan Eslami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress is an important element of organization ineffectiveness and since it leads to sickness, eventually it reduces quality and quantity of health care, lead to expansion of it costs and low job satisfaction. Stress comes along with consequences, one of this reactions which comes along with horrible effects is job burnout. Health care are more exposed for job burnout. We examined the relationship between job stress and job burnout in Iranian clinical pharmacist.Methods: Sample was 50 of men and women of clinical pharmacist. Parker and De cotiis  scale (1983 and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, 1981 were used to asses clinical pharmacist stress and burnout. Data were analyzed by applying regression method.Results: Results indicated that there is strong relationship between stress and burnout and its three dimensions. The result also indicated that stress have the highest impact on emotional exhaustion and the least on the depersonalization.Conclusion: Burnout is a result of stress in human services career. Human service needs are vary from other professions since in these jobs in order to fulfill the clients’ needs, employees should use themselves as the required technology, and in return they do not receive gratitude or appreciation.

  9. Human mesenchymal stromal cells : biological characterization and clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the characterization of the biological and functional properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), isolated from different tissue sources. The differentiation capacity of MSCs from fetal and adult tissues has been tested and compared. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has

  10. The humanization of catheter room design: its clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Hanying; Shi Fengxia; Guo Huiying

    2011-01-01

    American scholar Engeer has proposed biological, psychological and sociological medicine pattern, which has been well accepted by the society, It has manifested the medical arena humanism return and has made the profound influence on the nursing development. The idea, 'the human is a whole', has gradually become the mainstream of the nurse service concept, meanwhile, the environment has more and more become a beneficial part for diagnosing and treating in hospitalization. The improvement and more user-friendly design of the diagnosing and treating environment has already become an important ring linked with the whole nursing work. At the beginning of the fitting up design for the Catheter Lab Room of Interventional Radiology in General Hospital of PLA, the authors receive the idea 'the environment experience and admiration of the patient', put more attention to the humanization in the diagnosing and treating environmental construction. The functional compartments are separated clearly. The color, the background music as well as the video are designed to be coordinated with each other in order to produce a relaxing system. Practice for the past three years indicates that the use of humanization environment design can markedly reduce the patient intense and the anxious level in perioperative period, it can also significantly promote the patient to be restored to health. This article will describe user-friendly diagnosing and treating environmental construction practice in the Catheter Lab Room of Interventional Radiology in General Hospital of PLA. (authors)

  11. Influence of human papillomavirus on the clinical presentation of oropharyngeal carcinoma in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenmark, Matthew H; Shumway, Dean; Guo, Cui; Vainshtein, Jeffrey; Mierzwa, Michelle; Jagsi, Reshma; Griggs, Jennifer J; Banerjee, Mousumi

    2017-10-01

    Much of what is known about the significance of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is derived from single-institution retrospective studies, post hoc analyses of tissue specimens from clinical trials, and tissue bank studies with a small sample size. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of HPV on the frequency and clinical presentation of oropharyngeal carcinoma in a large, national sample with information from patients who underwent HPV testing. Retrospective, cross-sectional study. We identified a comprehensive national sample of 8,359 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma and known HPV status diagnosed between 2010 and 2011 within the National Cancer Database. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess correlates of patient and tumor characteristics on HPV status. Among patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma, the frequency of HPV-related squamous cell carcinoma in the United States was 65.4%. HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma was associated with younger age, male sex, and white race (P presentation (P clinical profile, supporting efforts to re-evaluate the staging and treatment paradigm for HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2270-2278, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Dosimetric Comparison of Simulated Human Eye And Water Phantom in Investigation of Iodine Source Effects on Tumour And Healthy Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadi, A.S.; Masoudi, F.S. K.N.Toosi University of Technology

    2011-01-01

    For better clinical analysis in ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry, there is a need for the dose determination in different parts of the eye, so simulating the eye and defining the material of any parts of that, is helpful for better investigating dosimetry in human eye. However in brachytherapy dosimetry, it is common to consider the water phantom as human eye globe. In this work, a full human eye is simulated with MCNP-4C code by considering all parts of the eye like; lens, cornea, retina, choroid, sclera, anterior chamber, optic nerve, bulk of the eye comprising vitreous body and tumour. The average dose in different parts of this full model of human eye is determined and the results are compared with the dose calculated in water phantom. The central axes depth dose and the dose in whole of the tumour for these two simulated eye model are calculated too, and the results are compared. At long last, as the aim of this work is comparing the result of investigating dosimetry between two water phantom as human eye and simulated eye globe, the ratios of the absorbed dose by the healthy tissues to the absorbed dose by the tumour are calculated in these simulations and the comparison between results is done eventually.

  13. Polymorphism of human haptoglobin and its clinical importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Peretti de Albuquerque Wobeto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Haptoglobin (Hp is a plasma glycoprotein, the main biological function of which is to bind free hemoglobin (Hb and prevent the loss of iron and subsequent kidney damage following intravascular hemolysis. Haptoglobin is also a positive acute-phase protein with immunomodulatory properties. In humans, the HP locus is polymorphic, with two codominant alleles (HP1 and HP2 that yield three distinct genotypes/phenotypes (Hp1-1, Hp2-1 and Hp2-2. The corresponding proteins have structural and functional differences that may influence the susceptibility and/or outcome in several diseases. This article summarizes the available data on the structure and functions of Hp and the possible effects of Hp polymorphism in a number of important human disorders.

  14. Functional MRI studies of human vision on a clinical imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Lewine, J.D.; Aine, C.J.; van Hulsteyn, D.; Wood, C.C.; Sanders, J.; Maclin, E.; Belliveau, J.W.; Caprihan, A.

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for imaging the anatomy of the human brain. Recently, Belliveau and colleagues have reported the use of echo planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to image patterns of neural activity. Here, we report functional MR imaging in response to visual stimulation without the use of contrast agents, and without the extensive hardware modifications required for EPI. Regions of activity were observed near the expected locations of V1, V2 and possibly V3 and another active region was observed near the parietal-occipital sulcus on the superior surface of the cerebrum. These locations are consistent with sources observed in neuromagnetic studies of the human visual response

  15. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  16. A highly invasive human glioblastoma pre-clinical model for testing therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Brian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Animal models greatly facilitate understanding of cancer and importantly, serve pre-clinically for evaluating potential anti-cancer therapies. We developed an invasive orthotopic human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM mouse model that enables real-time tumor ultrasound imaging and pre-clinical evaluation of anti-neoplastic drugs such as 17-(allylamino-17-demethoxy geldanamycin (17AAG. Clinically, GBM metastasis rarely happen, but unexpectedly most human GBM tumor cell lines intrinsically possess metastatic potential. We used an experimental lung metastasis assay (ELM to enrich for metastatic cells and three of four commonly used GBM lines were highly metastatic after repeated ELM selection (M2. These GBM-M2 lines grew more aggressively orthotopically and all showed dramatic multifold increases in IL6, IL8, MCP-1 and GM-CSF expression, cytokines and factors that are associated with GBM and poor prognosis. DBM2 cells, which were derived from the DBTRG-05MG cell line were used to test the efficacy of 17AAG for treatment of intracranial tumors. The DMB2 orthotopic xenografts form highly invasive tumors with areas of central necrosis, vascular hyperplasia and intracranial dissemination. In addition, the orthotopic tumors caused osteolysis and the skull opening correlated to the tumor size, permitting the use of real-time ultrasound imaging to evaluate antitumor drug activity. We show that 17AAG significantly inhibits DBM2 tumor growth with significant drug responses in subcutaneous, lung and orthotopic tumor locations. This model has multiple unique features for investigating the pathobiology of intracranial tumor growth and for monitoring systemic and intracranial responses to antitumor agents.

  17. Molecular investigation of virulence factors of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus strains isolated from clinical and non-clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnejad, Reza; Jazi, Faramarz Masjedian; Mostafaei, Shayan; Sedighi, Mansour

    2017-08-01

    Brucella is zoonotic pathogen that induces abortion and sterility in domestic mammals and chronic infections in humans called Malta fever. It is a facultative intracellular potential pathogen with high infectivity. The virulence of Brucella is dependent upon its potential virulence factors such as enzymes and cell envelope associated virulence genes. The aim of this study was to investigate the Brucella virulence factors among strains isolated from humans and animals in different parts of Iran. Seventy eight strains of Brucella species isolated from suspected human and animal cases from several provinces of Iran during 2015-2016 and identified by phenotypic and molecular methods. The multiplex-PCR (M-PCR) assay was performed in order to detect the ure, wbkA, omp19, mviN, manA and perA genes by using gene specific primers. Out of 78 isolates of Brucella spp., 57 (73%) and 21 (27%) isolates were detected as B. melitensis and B. abortus, respectively, by molecular method. The relative frequency of virulence genes ure, wbkA, omp19, mviN, manA and perA were 74.4%, 89.7%, 93.6%, 94.9%, 100% and 92.3%, respectively. Our results indicate that the most of Brucella strains isolated from this region possess high percent of virulence factor genes (ure, wbkA, omp19, mviN, manA and perA) in their genome. So, each step of infection can be mediated by a number of virulence factors and each strain may have a unique combination of these factors that affected the rate of bacterial pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Towards Investigating Global Warming Impact on Human Health Using Derivatives of Photoplethysmogram Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Norton, Ian; Brearley, Matt; Fletcher, Richard R; Abbott, Derek; Lovell, Nigel H; Schuurmans, Dale

    2015-10-14

    Recent clinical studies show that the contour of the photoplethysmogram (PPG) wave contains valuable information for characterizing cardiovascular activity. However, analyzing the PPG wave contour is difficult; therefore, researchers have applied first or higher order derivatives to emphasize and conveniently quantify subtle changes in the filtered PPG contour. Our hypothesis is that analyzing the whole PPG recording rather than each PPG wave contour or on a beat-by-beat basis can detect heat-stressed subjects and that, consequently, we will be able to investigate the impact of global warming on human health. Here, we explore the most suitable derivative order for heat stress assessment based on the energy and entropy of the whole PPG recording. The results of our study indicate that the use Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 7 12777 of the entropy of the seventh derivative of the filtered PPG signal shows promising results in detecting heat stress using 20-second recordings, with an overall accuracy of 71.6%. Moreover, the combination of the entropy of the seventh derivative of the filtered PPG signal with the root mean square of successive differences, or RMSSD (a traditional heart rate variability index of heat stress), improved the detection of heat stress to 88.9% accuracy.

  19. Towards Investigating Global Warming Impact on Human Health Using Derivatives of Photoplethysmogram Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elgendi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent clinical studies show that the contour of the photoplethysmogram (PPG wave contains valuable information for characterizing cardiovascular activity. However, analyzing the PPG wave contour is difficult; therefore, researchers have applied first or higher order derivatives to emphasize and conveniently quantify subtle changes in the filtered PPG contour. Our hypothesis is that analyzing the whole PPG recording rather than each PPG wave contour or on a beat-by-beat basis can detect heat-stressed subjects and that, consequently, we will be able to investigate the impact of global warming on human health. Here, we explore the most suitable derivative order for heat stress assessment based on the energy and entropy of the whole PPG recording. The results of our study indicate that the use of the entropy of the seventh derivative of the filtered PPG signal shows promising results in detecting heat stress using 20-second recordings, with an overall accuracy of 71.6%. Moreover, the combination of the entropy of the seventh derivative of the filtered PPG signal with the root mean square of successive differences, or RMSSD (a traditional heart rate variability index of heat stress, improved the detection of heat stress to 88.9% accuracy.

  20. First human rabies case in French Guiana, 2008: epidemiological investigation and control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Meynard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Until 2008, human rabies had never been reported in French Guiana. On 28 May 2008, the French National Reference Center for Rabies (Institut Pasteur, Paris confirmed the rabies diagnosis, based on hemi-nested polymerase chain reaction on skin biopsy and saliva specimens from a Guianan, who had never travelled overseas and died in Cayenne after presenting clinically typical meningoencephalitis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Molecular typing of the virus identified a Lyssavirus (Rabies virus species, closely related to those circulating in hematophagous bats (mainly Desmodus rotundus in Latin America. A multidisciplinary Crisis Unit was activated. Its objectives were to implement an epidemiological investigation and a veterinary survey, to provide control measures and establish a communications program. The origin of the contamination was not formally established, but was probably linked to a bat bite based on the virus type isolated. After confirming exposure of 90 persons, they were vaccinated against rabies: 42 from the case's entourage and 48 healthcare workers. To handle that emergence and the local population's increased demand to be vaccinated, a specific communications program was established using several media: television, newspaper, radio. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This episode, occurring in the context of a Department far from continental France, strongly affected the local population, healthcare workers and authorities, and the management team faced intense pressure. This observation confirms that the risk of contracting rabies in French Guiana is real, with consequences for population educational program, control measures, medical diagnosis and post-exposure prophylaxis.

  1. Towards Investigating Global Warming Impact on Human Health Using Derivatives of Photoplethysmogram Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Norton, Ian; Brearley, Matt; Fletcher, Richard R.; Abbott, Derek; Lovell, Nigel H.; Schuurmans, Dale

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical studies show that the contour of the photoplethysmogram (PPG) wave contains valuable information for characterizing cardiovascular activity. However, analyzing the PPG wave contour is difficult; therefore, researchers have applied first or higher order derivatives to emphasize and conveniently quantify subtle changes in the filtered PPG contour. Our hypothesis is that analyzing the whole PPG recording rather than each PPG wave contour or on a beat-by-beat basis can detect heat-stressed subjects and that, consequently, we will be able to investigate the impact of global warming on human health. Here, we explore the most suitable derivative order for heat stress assessment based on the energy and entropy of the whole PPG recording. The results of our study indicate that the use of the entropy of the seventh derivative of the filtered PPG signal shows promising results in detecting heat stress using 20-second recordings, with an overall accuracy of 71.6%. Moreover, the combination of the entropy of the seventh derivative of the filtered PPG signal with the root mean square of successive differences, or RMSSD (a traditional heart rate variability index of heat stress), improved the detection of heat stress to 88.9% accuracy. PMID:26473907

  2. Hurdles to clinical translation of human induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Neofytou, Evgenios; O’Brien, Connor Galen; Couture, Larry A.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells are known to have the capacity to renew indefinitely, being intrinsically able to differentiate into many different cell types. These characteristics have generated tremendous enthusiasm about the potential applications of these cells in regenerative medicine. However, major challenges remain with the development and testing of novel experimental stem cell therapeutics in the field. In this Review, we focus on the nature of the preclinical challenges and discuss p...

  3. Automated radiosynthesis of [{sup 11}C]morphine for clinical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Jinda [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Meissner, Konrad [Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Gaehle, Gregory G.; Li Shihong [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Kharasch, Evan D. [Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Mach, Robert H. [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Tu Zhude, E-mail: tuz@mir.wustl.ed [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    To meet a multiple-dose clinical evaluation of the P-gp modulation of [{sup 11}C]morphine delivery into the human brain, radiosynthesis of [{sup 11}C]morphine was accomplished on an automated system by N-methylation of normorphine with [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I. A methodology employing optimized solid phase extraction of the HPLC eluent was developed. Radiosynthesis took 45 min with a radiochemical yield ranging from 45% to 50% and specific activity ranging from 20 to 26 Ci/{mu}mol (decay corrected to end-of-bombardment); radiochemical and chemical purities were >95% (n=28).

  4. The next generation of sepsis clinical trial designs: what is next after the demise of recombinant human activated protein C?*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opal, Steven M; Dellinger, R Phillip; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Masur, Henry; Angus, Derek C

    2014-07-01

    The developmental pipeline for novel therapeutics to treat sepsis has diminished to a trickle compared to previous years of sepsis research. While enormous strides have been made in understanding the basic molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathophysiology of sepsis, a long list of novel agents have now been tested in clinical trials without a single immunomodulating therapy showing consistent benefit. The only antisepsis agent to successfully complete a phase III clinical trial was human recumbent activated protein C. This drug was taken off the market after a follow-up placebo-controlled trial (human recombinant activated Protein C Worldwide Evaluation of Severe Sepsis and septic Shock [PROWESS SHOCK]) failed to replicate the favorable results of the initial registration trial performed ten years earlier. We must critically reevaluate our basic approach to the preclinical and clinical evaluation of new sepsis therapies. We selected the major clinical studies that investigated interventional trials with novel therapies to treat sepsis over the last 30 years. Phase II and phase III trials investigating new treatments for sepsis and editorials and critiques of these studies. Selected manuscripts and clinical study reports were analyzed from sepsis trials. Specific shortcomings and potential pit falls in preclinical evaluation and clinical study design and analysis were reviewed and synthesized. After review and discussion, a series of 12 recommendations were generated with suggestions to guide future studies with new treatments for sepsis. We need to improve our ability to define appropriate molecular targets for preclinical development and develop better methods to determine the clinical value of novel sepsis agents. Clinical trials must have realistic sample sizes and meaningful endpoints. Biomarker-driven studies should be considered to categorize specific "at risk" populations most likely to benefit from a new treatment. Innovations in clinical trial design

  5. Department of Clinical Investigation: Annual Research Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1992. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    A-5-90 Production of Mouse Positive and Negative Control Slides for 295 Use in Rabies FRA Test. (0) A-7-90 Clinical Investigation on the...Dose Intensification of Methotrexate and 519 6- Mercaptopurine for ALL in Childhood. (0) POG 9006 ALinC 15: Up-Front 6-MP/MTX vs. Up-Front Alternating 520...for the mouse bioassay as a means for detecting Clostridium botulinum toxin in cultures, food products , serum and fecal specimens. Technical Approach

  6. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  7. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy investigation on the clinical lifetime of ProTaper rotary file system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penta, Virgil; Pirvu, Cristian; Demetrescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the current paper is to show that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) could be a method for evaluating and predicting of ProTaper rotary file system clinical lifespan. This particular aspect of everyday use of the endodontic files is of great importance in each dental practice and has profound clinical implications. The method used for quantification resides in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy theory and has in its main focus the characteristics of the surface titanium oxide layer. This electrochemical technique has been adapted successfully to identify the quality of the Ni-Ti files oxide layer. The modification of this protective layer induces changes in corrosion behavior of the alloy modifying the impedance value of the file. In order to assess the method, 14 ProTaper sets utilized on different patients in a dental clinic have been submitted for testing using EIS. The information obtained in regard to the surface oxide layer has offered an indication of use and proves that the said layer evolves with each clinical application. The novelty of this research is related to an electrochemical technique successfully adapted for Ni-Ti file investigation and correlation with surface and clinical aspects.

  8. [ISO 9001certification of a quality management system in a clinical investigation center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Jimmy; Fougerou-Leurent, Claire; Laforest, Claire; Renault, Alain; Bellissant, Eric; Laviolle, Bruno

    2018-05-03

    Beyond the application of legal requirements, clinical trials must have a permanent approach of quality control. The clinical investigation centers (CICs) are academic structures of clinical research certified by the French National institute of health and medical research (Inserm) and whose functioning relies on recommendations of good practice. It is important to accompany this standardization of practices by the implementation of a quality management system. This article presents the process that enabled the CIC of Rennes to become certified ISO 9001 by French standards association (Afnor) certification in May, 2016. The application of the fundamental principles of the standard ISO 9001 in the domain of clinical research is approached. The problem of the perimeter for the certification and the related process mapping are exposed. The activities of methodology, management and analysis of clinical studies were chosen for the initial certification of the CIC of Rennes. The perspectives for the extension of the perimeter of certification are also approached at the end of article. Copyright © 2018 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical uses of melatonin: evaluation of human trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Barceló, E J; Mediavilla, M D; Tan, D X; Reiter, R J

    2010-01-01

    During the last 20 years, numerous clinical trials have examined the therapeutic usefulness of melatonin in different fields of medicine. The objective of this article is to review, in depth, the science regarding clinical trials performed to date. The efficacy of melatonin has been assessed as a treatment of ocular diseases, blood diseases, gastrointestinal tract diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infectious diseases, neurological diseases, sleep disturbances, aging and depression. Melatonin has been also used as a complementary treatment in anaesthesia, hemodialysis, in vitro fertilization and neonatal care. The conclusion of the current review is that the use of melatonin as an adjuvant therapy seems to be well funded for macular degeneration, glaucoma, protection of the gastric mucosa, irritable bowel syndrome, arterial hypertension, diabetes, side effects of chemotherapy and radiation in cancer patients or hemodialysis in patients with renal insufficiency and, especially, for sleep disorders of circadian etiology (jet lag, delayed sleep phase syndrome, sleep deterioration associated with aging, etc.) as well as in those related with neurological degenerative diseases (Alzheimer, etc.,) or Smith-Magenis syndrome. The utility of melatonin in anesthetic procedures has been also confirmed. More clinical studies are required to clarify whether, as the preliminary data suggest, melatonin is useful for treatment of fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infectious diseases, neoplasias or neonatal care. Preliminary data regarding the utility of melatonin in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis are either ambiguous or negative. Although in a few cases melatonin seems to aggravate some conditions, the vast majority of studies document the very low toxicity of melatonin over a wide range of doses.

  10. [Clinical characteristics of human recombination activating gene 1 mutations in 8 immunodeficiency patients with diverse phenotypes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, G; Wang, W J; Liu, D R; Tao, Z F; Hui, X Y; Hou, J; Sun, J Q; Wang, X C

    2018-03-02

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics of 8 immunodeficiency cases caused by human recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations, and to explore the relationship among genotypes, clinical manifestations and immunophenotypes. Methods: Clinical data were collected and analyzed from patients with RAG1 mutations who visited the Department of Clinical Immunology, Children's Hospital of Fudan University between October 2013 and June 2017. The data included clinical manifestations, immunophenotypes and genotypes. Results: A total of 8 patients were diagnosed with RAG1 deficiency (6 boys and 2 girls). The minimum age of onset was 2 months, and the maximum age was 4 months. The minimum age of diagnosis was 2 months, and the maximum age was 13 years. Four patients had a family history of infant death due to severe infections. Two cases were born to the same consanguineous parents. All cases had recurrent infections, including involvement of respiratory tract (8 cases), digestive tract (6 cases), urinary tract (1 case), and central nervous system (1 case). The pathogens of infection included bacteria, viruses and fungi. Rotavirus was found in 3 cases, cytomegalovirus (CMV) in 5 cases, bacillus Calmette-Guérin adverse reaction in 2 cases (1 of whom had a positive acid-fast smear from lymph node puncture fluid), fungal infection in 3 cases. One case had multiple nodular space-occupying lesions in lungs and abdominal cavity complicated with multiple bone destruction. The peripheral blood lymphocyte counts of all patients ranged between 0.1 ×10(9)/L and 3.3×10(9)/L (median, 0.65×10(9)/L). Eosinophilia was found in 3 cases (range, (0.48-1.69) ×10(9)/L). The patients were classified according to immunophenotype as severe combined immunodeficiency phenotype (4 cases), leaky severe combined immunodeficiency (2 cases), Omenn syndrome (1 case) and combined immunodeficiency (1 case) . Decreased serum IgG levels were found in 3 cases, increased serum IgM levels in

  11. Clinical significance of melatonin receptors in the human myometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcese, James; Beesley, Stephen

    2014-08-01

    To review and update the research on melatonin receptor expression in the human myometrium, in particular as it pertains to uterine contractility at labor. Summary of previous studies with the addition of new data on the transcriptional regulation of melatonin receptor expression in human myometrial cells. Not applicable. Late-term pregnant volunteers. Biopsy collection for in vitro analyses provided the original data. More recently, uterine contractions in late-term pregnant volunteers were assessed before, during, and after acute white-light exposure. Melatonin receptor signaling in myometrial cells and uterine contractions in late-term pregnant volunteers. Melatonin acts through the MTNR1B melatonin receptor that is expressed in the myometrium at late term to synergistically enhance oxytocin-dependent signaling and contractions. Acute inhibition of endogenous melatonin levels with light reversibly suppresses uterine contractions. These results point to a significant role for circulating melatonin in the timing and degree of uterine contractions in late-term pregnancy. Understanding the regulation of melatonin receptors remains a future objective. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Nonlinear Laser Imaging of Human Skin: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential of being used in vivo as a noninvasive imaging modality for both epidermal and dermal imaging. This paper reviews the capabilities of nonlinear microscopy as a noninvasive high-resolution tool for clinical skin inspection. In particular, we show that two-photon fluorescence microscopy can be used as a diagnostic tool for characterizing epidermal layers by means of a morphological examination. Additional functional information on the metabolic state of cells can be provided by measuring the fluorescence decay of NADH. This approach allows differentiating epidermal layers having different structural and cytological features and has the potential of diagnosing pathologies in a very early stage. Regarding therapy follow-up, we demonstrate that nonlinear microscopy could be successfully used for monitoring the effect of a treatment. In particular, combined two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy were used in vivo for monitoring collagen remodeling after microablative fractional laser resurfacing and for quantitatively monitoring psoriasis on the basis of the morphology of epidermal cells and dermal papillae. We believe that the described microscopic modalities could find in the near future a stable place in a clinical dermatological setting for quantitative diagnostic purposes and as a monitoring method for various treatments. PMID:25250337

  13. Clinical Nonlinear Laser Imaging of Human Skin: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Cicchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential of being used in vivo as a noninvasive imaging modality for both epidermal and dermal imaging. This paper reviews the capabilities of nonlinear microscopy as a noninvasive high-resolution tool for clinical skin inspection. In particular, we show that two-photon fluorescence microscopy can be used as a diagnostic tool for characterizing epidermal layers by means of a morphological examination. Additional functional information on the metabolic state of cells can be provided by measuring the fluorescence decay of NADH. This approach allows differentiating epidermal layers having different structural and cytological features and has the potential of diagnosing pathologies in a very early stage. Regarding therapy follow-up, we demonstrate that nonlinear microscopy could be successfully used for monitoring the effect of a treatment. In particular, combined two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy were used in vivo for monitoring collagen remodeling after microablative fractional laser resurfacing and for quantitatively monitoring psoriasis on the basis of the morphology of epidermal cells and dermal papillae. We believe that the described microscopic modalities could find in the near future a stable place in a clinical dermatological setting for quantitative diagnostic purposes and as a monitoring method for various treatments.

  14. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Atul Kumar; Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Singh, Chandan; Barbhuyan, Tarun; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Sinha, Neeraj; Kumar, Ashutosh; Bellare, Jayesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS® (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. Cross-correlation between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all

  15. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Atul Kumar [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo [Tissue Bank, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400012 (India); Rai, Ratan Kumar [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Khan, Mohd Parvez [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Singh, Chandan [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Barbhuyan, Tarun [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Vijayalakshmi, S. [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Chattopadhyay, Naibedya [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Sinha, Neeraj, E-mail: neerajcbmr@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: ashutoshk@iitb.ac.in [Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bellare, Jayesh R., E-mail: jb@iitb.ac.in [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-05-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS® (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. Cross-correlation between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all

  16. Investigational new drug safety reporting requirements for human drug and biological products and safety reporting requirements for bioavailability and bioequivalence studies in humans. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing safety reporting requirements for human drug and biological products subject to an investigational new drug application (IND). The final rule codifies the agency's expectations for timely review, evaluation, and submission of relevant and useful safety information and implements internationally harmonized definitions and reporting standards. The revisions will improve the utility of IND safety reports, reduce the number of reports that do not contribute in a meaningful way to the developing safety profile of the drug, expedite FDA's review of critical safety information, better protect human subjects enrolled in clinical trials, subject bioavailability and bioequivalence studies to safety reporting requirements, promote a consistent approach to safety reporting internationally, and enable the agency to better protect and promote public health.

  17. Clinical usefulness of human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhito

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical usefulness of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) using the human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 (chA7Fab) for colorectal cancer patients. Whole murine monoclonal antibody A7 (whole A7) and chA7Fab were labelled with 125 I and 131 I, and their biodistributions were investigated experimentally and clinically. Radioactivities of the antibodies in the tissues were measured by a portable gamma detecting probe (GDP) purchased from Neoprobe Corp.. Of the four labelled antibodies used in a mouse model, 125 I-chA7Fab revealed the highest tumor/surrounding tissue ratio and all values were greater than 2.0. All tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 131 I-chA7Fab were greater than 1.5, but the values were lower than those of 125 I-chA7Fab. Due to the limited clinical use of 125 I in Japan, 131 I was used as a radio-tracer for chA7Fab in the clinical trial. RIGS using 131 I-chA7Fab was performed on ten colorectal cancer patients. Tumor localization was intraoperatively determined in four of ten patients using the GDP. Liver metastasis and lymph node metastasis were identified in two patients and one patient, respectively. The GDP revealed tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 1.5 or greater in eight of the ten resected tumors. Although radioimmunoguided surgery using chA7Fab is a promising tool to intraoperatively determine the tumor localization of colorectal cancer, 125 I and not 131 I should be used as a tracer for radioimmunoguided surgery to increase the accuracy of chA7Fab. (author)

  18. Biorepository regulatory frameworks: building parallel resources that both promote scientific investigation and protect human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko-Varga, György; Baker, Mark S; Boja, Emily S; Rodriguez, Henry; Fehniger, Thomas E

    2014-12-05

    Clinical samples contained in biorepositories represent an important resource for investigating the many factors that drive human biology. The biological and chemical markers contained in clinical samples provide important measures of health and disease that when combined with such medical evaluation data can aid in decision making by physicians. Nearly all disciplines in medicine and every "omic" depend upon the readouts obtained from such samples, whether the measured analyte is a gene, a protein, a lipid, or a metabolite. There are many steps in sample processing, storage, and management that need to understood by the researchers who utilize biorepositories in their own work. These include not only the preservation of the desired analytes in the sample but also good understanding of the moral and legal framework required for subject protection irrespective of where the samples have been collected. Today there is a great deal of effort in the community to align and standardize both the methodology of sample collection and storage performed in different locations and the necessary frameworks of subject protection including informed consent and institutional review of the studies being performed. There is a growing trend in developing biorepositories around the focus of large population-based studies that address both active and silent nonsymptomatic disease. Logistically these studies generate large numbers of clinical samples and practically place increasing demand upon health care systems to provide uniform sample handling, processing, storage, and documentation of both the sample and the subject as well to ensure that safeguards exist to protect the rights of the study subjects for deciding upon the fates of their samples. Currently the authority to regulate the entire scope of biorepository usage exists as national practice in law in only a few countries. Such legal protection is a necessary component within the framework of biorepositories, both now and in

  19. An Exploratory Study Investigating the Non-Clinical Benefits of Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Jackson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As little prior research exists about the non-clinical benefits of evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM, this exploratory study was conducted to identify non-clinical benefits of EBVM to veterinary practices, as well as highlighting the barriers to further implementation, and ways to overcome them.Background: A PICO-based literature review (Hauser and Jackson, 2016 was conducted to establish current knowledge about the non-clinical benefits of EBVM. It found that while there are some papers suggesting a link between the practice of EBVM and better non-clinical benefits such as client satisfaction and client retention, a single study, focusing on the non-clinical benefits of EBVM, had yet to be conducted.Evidentiary value: This exploratory study provides a solid basis for the further development of a confirmatory study of the themes identified in the interviews. The impact on practice from our findings is significant as it details the key areas where the use of EBVM can yield commercial benefits from the perspective of a group of EBVM experts via interview. It is entirely possible that international veterinary environments which mirror that of the UK will find this research beneficial.Methods: Due to the paucity of data about the non-clinical benefits of EBVM, an exploratory, qualitative approach was taken to this research in order to build a platform for further confirmatory, quantitative investigation (Zikmund, 2003. In February and March 2016 interviews with 16 RCVS Knowledge Group chairs[1] were conducted. The interview guide contained broad, open-ended questions to explore existing tacit knowledge about the non-commercial benefits of EBVM. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and subsequently analysed using NVivo 11 software.Results: This qualitative enquiry showed that the key areas where the use of EBVM can yield non-clinical benefits are through increased client satisfaction and retention, improved

  20. Clinical experience in humans with radiolabeled antibody for tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.T.; Lyster, D.M.; Szasz, I.; Alcorn, L.N.; Huckell, V.F.; Rhodes, B.; Breslow, K.; Burchiel, S.

    1982-01-01

    I-131 and Tc-99m labeled polyclonal or monoclonal antibody and fragments of antibody, specific to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or to a melanoma cell surface antigen (MCSA) were injected into proven cancer patients. Using standard homeostasis parameters, and scanning techniques, the safety and efficacy of each antibody was evaluated. Antibody fragments were expected to clear faster from the circulation allowing for earlier imaging and a better target-to-non-target ratio. The technetium label may perturb the antiboby's kinetics so that clearance is more rapid for both whole antibody and fragments. After a statistical evaluation of all parameters measured pre and post injection it was concluded that no acute toxicity reactions were present in any patient studied. Scan results were not acceptable for a tumor detecting procedure used in routine practice. Tumor upake was seen in less than 10% of scans

  1. Clinical Implication of Elevated Human Cervical Cancer Oncogene-1 Expression in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ying; Li, Ke; Ren, Zhonghai; Li, Shenglei; Zhang, Hongyan; Fan, Qingxia

    2012-01-01

    The human cervical cancer oncogene 1 (HCCR-1), a novel human oncoprotein, has been shown to be upregulated in various human tumors and plays a critical role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Here, the authors investigated HCCR-1 level in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues and assessed the correlation between HCCR-1 level and prognosis of the patients with ESCC. HCCR-1 levels were investigated by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, real-time quantit...

  2. Atlas of the clinical genetics of human dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Jan; Frese, Karen S; Peil, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Numerous genes are known to cause dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, until now technological limitations have hindered elucidation of the contribution of all clinically relevant disease genes to DCM phenotypes in larger cohorts. We now utilized next-generation sequencing to overcome...... these limitations and screened all DCM disease genes in a large cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this multi-centre, multi-national study, we have enrolled 639 patients with sporadic or familial DCM. To all samples, we applied a standardized protocol for ultra-high coverage next-generation sequencing of 84 genes...... disease variants, we find titin, plakophilin-2, myosin-binding protein-C 3, desmoplakin, ryanodine receptor 2, desmocollin-2, desmoglein-2, and SCN5A variants among the most commonly mutated genes. The overlap between DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and channelopathy causing mutations...

  3. Human pharmacology for addiction medicine: From evidence to clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quednow, Boris B; Herdener, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUD) are complex and often chronic diseases with negative health outcomes and social consequences. Pharmacological treatment options for SUD can be separated in medications for (i) intoxication, (ii) withdrawal, and (iii) reduction of use together with relapse prevention. This chapter will focus on approved or clinically established pharmacological strategies suited to manage symptoms of withdrawal, and to reduce substance use or to promote abstinence. Hereby SUD involving alcohol, nicotine, stimulants, and opioids are primarily discussed as these substances are considered most harmful for both the individual and the society. Moreover, the pharmacotherapy of SUD related to the use of cannabis, benzodiazepines, and gamma-hydroxybutyrate is also briefly reviewed. Since most approved pharmacological treatment options show only moderate effect sizes especially in the long term, the development of new treatment strategies including new drugs, new combinations of available compounds, and biomarkers for response prediction is still warranted. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical neurophysiology and quantitative sensory testing in the investigation of orofacial pain and sensory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Satu K

    2004-01-01

    Chronic orofacial pain represents a diagnostic and treatment challenge for the clinician. Some conditions, such as atypical facial pain, still lack proper diagnostic criteria, and their etiology is not known. The recent development of neurophysiological methods and quantitative sensory testing for the examination of the trigeminal somatosensory system offers several tools for diagnostic and etiological investigation of orofacial pain. This review presents some of these techniques and the results of their application in studies on orofacial pain and sensory dysfunction. Clinical neurophysiological investigation has greater diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity than clinical examination in the detection of the neurogenic abnormalities of either peripheral or central origin that may underlie symptoms of orofacial pain and sensory dysfunction. Neurophysiological testing may also reveal trigeminal pathology when magnetic resonance imaging has failed to detect it, so these methods should be considered complementary to each other in the investigation of orofacial pain patients. The blink reflex, corneal reflex, jaw jerk, sensory neurography of the inferior alveolar nerve, and the recording of trigeminal somatosensory-evoked potentials with near-nerve stimulation have all proved to be sensitive and reliable in the detection of dysfunction of the myelinated sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve or its central connections within the brainstem. With appropriately small thermodes, thermal quantitative sensory testing is useful for the detection of trigeminal small-fiber dysfunction (Adelta and C). In neuropathic conditions, it is most sensitive to lesions causing axonal injury. By combining different techniques for investigation of the trigeminal system, an accurate topographical diagnosis and profile of sensory fiber pathology can be determined. Neurophysiological and quantitative sensory tests have already highlighted some similarities among various orofacial pain conditions

  5. An empirical investigation of incompleteness in a large clinical sample of obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrava, Nicholas J; Boisseau, Christina L; Eisen, Jane L; Mancebo, Maria C; Rasmussen, Steven A

    2016-08-01

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a disorder with heterogeneous clinical presentations. To advance our understanding of this heterogeneity we investigated the prevalence and clinical features associated with incompleteness (INC), a putative underlying core feature of OCD. We predicted INC would be prominent in individuals with OCD and associated with greater severity and impairment. We examined the impact of INC in 307 adults with primary OCD. Participants with clinically significant INC (22.8% of the sample) had significantly greater OCD severity, greater rates of comorbidity, poorer ratings of functioning, lower quality of life, and higher rates of unemployment and disability. Participants with clinically significant INC were also more likely to be diagnosed with OCPD and to endorse symmetry/exactness obsessions and ordering/arranging compulsions than those who reported low INC. Our findings provide evidence that INC is associated with greater severity, comorbidity, and impairment, highlighting the need for improved assessment and treatment of INC in OCD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Clinical investigation of basophil activation test as a complementary test for house dust mite allergen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, H L; Li, J D; Miao, Y H; Xu, T

    2018-03-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical application of glass micro fiber basophil activation test (BAT) used as a complementary test for house dust mite allergen. Method: Forty patients with clinical diagnosed allergic rhinitis was test by three methods for house dust mite allergen, skin prick test(SPT),Immuno CAP sIgE, and BAT in vitro. The sensitivity and specificity of glass micro fiber were accessed, and the consistency between BAT, SPT, and Immuno sIgE was analyzed. As in vivo provocation was not performed, gold standard is regarded as the combination of medical history and positive reports of SPT and/or ImmunoCAP sIgE test. Result: Twentythree patients are diagnosed as house dust mite allergic rhinitis by gold standard. The sensitivity and specificity of glass micro fiber BAT were 60.9% and 88.2%, the sensitivity of SPT and sIgE was 87.0% and sIgE 73.9%. The correlation rates between BAT with SPT is 0.67( P house dust mite allergic rhinitis, BAT have a good consistency with SPT and sIgE, while as it has only moderate consistency with "gold standard", further studies are needed to prove its clinical significance. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

  7. [What role for paraclinical investigations within clinical trials conducted in psychiatric patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaladjian, A; Adida, M; Simon, N; Belzeaux, R; Blin, O; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2016-12-01

    As in the usual care of patients, paraclinical investigations have today only a very modest role in clinical trials in psychiatry, mainly to complete the pre-therapeutical assessments prior to inclusion of subjects or to monitor treatment tolerance. Yet, the accumulation of data in neurosciences suggests the next emergence of biomarkers, whose interest is that they are closely associated to the biological disturbances underlying psychiatric illnesses, and that they are accessible by means of technological tools such as imaging devices. These tools allow to explore the effects on brain of psychotropic medications, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, or mood stabilizers, in relation to their therapeutic action. The obtained results allow to consider the use of such biomarkers in clinical trials in addition to more conventional approaches. In particular, they could be used as targets to measure brain response to treatment in association with clinical response, to predict a therapeutic response from the neurofunctional characteristics of patients, or to establish the safety profile of drugs on the nervous system. The use of such biomarkers in clinical trials would help to better define the explored populations and their characteristics, as well as the variables to assess, and to better measure the impact of the treatments and their potential harmful effects on the nervous system. © L’Encéphale, Paris, 2016.

  8. An investigation of a human in the loop approach to object recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Razeghi, Orod

    2015-01-01

    For several decades researchers around the globe have been avidly investigating practical solutions to the enduring problem of understanding visual content within an image. One might think of the quest as an effort to emulate human visual system. Despite all the endeavours, the simplest of visual tasks to us humans, such as optical segmentation of objects, remain a significant challenge for machines. In a few occasions where a computer's processing power is adequate to accomplish the task, th...

  9. Investigation of human body potential measured by a non-contact measuring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Norimitsu

    2016-12-07

    A human body is occasionally electrified in a room. This charged object will be a source of electrostatic accidents, including the malfunction of electronic equipment. Hence, prevention of these accidents is required. Accidents occasionally occur, even though antistatic clothes and shoes are used. One of the causes for these accidents is that there is a lack of the preventive measures. This situation occurs when using, for example, unconductive wax. In this study, human body potential (voltage) is measured using a non-contact measuring system. An investigation of the human body's voltage when using this system is conducted. The result demonstrates that the voltage of a human body wearing antistatic clothes and shoes or light clothes and slippers exceeds a malfunctioning voltage of a microelectronics device when the body walks on floors. Thus, accidents may occur even if a human body wearing the antistatic clothes walks on flooring. These results will be useful in estimating determination whether electrostatic accidents occur or not.

  10. Teaching medical students to discern ethical problems in human clinical research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Laura Weiss; Warner, Teddy D; Green Hammond, Katherine A; Brody, Janet L; Kaminsky, Alexis; Roberts, Brian B

    2005-10-01

    Investigators and institutional review boards are entrusted with ensuring the conduct of ethically sound human studies. Assessing ethical aspects of research protocols is a key skill in fulfilling this duty, yet no empirically validated method exists for preparing professionals to attain this skill. The authors performed a randomized controlled educational intervention, comparing a criteria-based learning method, a clinical-research- and experience-based learning method, and a control group. All 300 medical students enrolled at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine in 2001 were invited to participate. After a single half-hour educational session, a written posttest of ability to detect ethical problems in hypothetical protocol vignettes was administered. The authors analyzed responses to ten protocol vignettes that had been evaluated independently by experts. For each vignette, a global assessment of the perceived significance of ethical problems and the identification of specific ethical problems were evaluated. Eighty-three medical students (27%) volunteered: 50 (60%) were women and 55 (66%) were first- and second-year students. On global assessments, the criteria-focused group perceived ethical problems as more significant than did the other two groups (p evaluation skills. This work supports the potential value of empirically derived methods for preparing professionals to discern ethical aspects of human studies.

  11. Effect of human papilloma virus expression on clinical course of laryngeal papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Moon; Cho, Nam Hoon; Choi, Hong Shik; Kim, Young Ho; Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Min, Hyun Jin; Kim, Se-Heon

    2008-10-01

    Our observations suggest that human papilloma virus (HPV) 6/11 is the main causative agent of laryngeal papilloma and that detection of active HPV DNA expression may be helpful in identifying patients with aggressive recurrent laryngeal papilloma. HPV is assumed to be the main causative agent of this disease. We investigated the expression of the entire genotype of HPV in cases of laryngeal papilloma and correlated their expression with the clinical course of the disease. Seventy cases of laryngeal papilloma were evaluated for the presence of the HPV genome by in situ hybridization (ISH) using wide-spectrum HPV DNA probe. Specific types of HPV infection were determined by DNA ISH using type-specific HPV DNA probes (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33). Separate analyses were conducted comparing viral types, frequency of recurrences and duration of disease-free periods. We detected HPV DNA in 40 of the 70 laryngeal papilloma cases (57%). In particular, HPV DNA was detected in 75% of the juvenile types. There were significant associations between HPV and laryngeal papilloma (p<0.01). Among the HPV-positive cases, major specific types were HPV 6/11 (97%). Significant associations were also noted between viral expression and clinical course.

  12. [Introduction of neuroethics: out of clinic, beyond academia in human brain research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Tamami; Sakura, Osamu

    2008-11-01

    Higher cognitive function in human brain is one of well-developed fields of neuroscience research in the 21st century. Especially functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near infrared recording system have brought so many non-clinical researchers whose background is such as cognitive psychology, economics, politics, pedagogy, and so on, to the human brain mapping study. Authors have introduced the ethical issues related to incidental findings during the fMRI recording for non-clinical purpose, which is a typical problem derived from such expanded human brain research under non clinical condition, that is, neuroethics. In the present article we would introduce neuroethical issues in contexts of "out of clinic" and "beyond academia".

  13. Using thermographic cameras to investigate eye temperature and clinical severity in depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maller, Jerome J.; George, Shefin Sam; Viswanathan, Rekha Puzhavakkathumadom; Fitzgerald, Paul B.; Junor, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies suggest that altered corneal temperature may be a feature of schizophrenia, but the association between major depressive disorder (MDD) and corneal temperature has yet to be assessed. The aim of this study is to investigate whether eye temperature is different among MDD patients than among healthy individuals. We used a thermographic camera to measure and compare the temperature profile across the corneas of 16 patients with MDD and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. We found that the average corneal temperature between the two groups did not differ statistically, although clinical severity correlated positively with right corneal temperature. Corneal temperature may be an indicator of clinical severity in psychiatric disorders, including depression.

  14. Clinical investigation of large perfusion defect cases with 201Tl exercise myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morota, Motoi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    1999-01-01

    We investigated retrospectively the clinical significance of large perfusion defect on 201 Thallium myocardial scintigraphy from the records of 833 patients during the past 3 years from 1991 to 1994. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to the extent of perfusion defect; cases with normal perfusion (n=561), with small perfusion defect (n=211) and with large perfusion defect (n=61). We found that the proportions of cases with large perfusion defect was significantly larger than that of cases with small perfusion defect in myocardial disease (MD; hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and post myocarditis combined) (P 201 Thallium myocardial scintigraphy and that complication of diabetes mellitus and clinical symptoms may be useful in differentiating IHD from MD. (author)

  15. Investigating the connections between health lean management and clinical risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate connections and overlaps between health lean management (HLM) and clinical risk management (CRM) understanding whether and how these two approaches can be combined together to pursue efficiency and patient safety improvements simultaneously. A systematic literature review has been carried out. Searching in academic databases, papers that focus not only on HLM, but also on clinical errors and risk reduction, were included. The general characteristics of the selected papers were analysed and a content analysis was conducted. In most of the papers, pursing objectives of HLM and CRM and adopting tools and practices of both approaches, results of quality and, particularly, of safety improvements were obtained. A two-way arrow between HLM and CRM emerged but so far, none of the studies has been focused on the relationship between HLM and CRM. Results highlight an emerging research stream, with many useful theoretical and practical implications and opportunities for further research.

  16. The human coronary collateral circulation: development and clinical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Christian; Stoller, Michael; Pitt, Bertram; Meier, Pascal

    2013-09-01

    Coronary collaterals are an alternative source of blood supply to myocardium jeopardized by ischaemia. In comparison with other species, the human coronary collateral circulation is very well developed. Among individuals without coronary artery disease (CAD), there are preformed collateral arteries preventing myocardial ischaemia during a brief vascular occlusion in 20-25%. Determinants of such anastomoses are low heart rate and the absence of systemic arterial hypertension. In patients with CAD, collateral arteries preventing myocardial ischaemia during a brief occlusion are present in every third individual. Collateral flow sufficient to prevent myocardial ischaemia during coronary occlusion amounts to one-fifth to one-fourth the normal flow through the open vessel. Myocardial infarct size, the most important prognostic determinant after such an event, is the product of coronary artery occlusion time, area at risk for infarction, and the inverse of collateral supply. Well-developed coronary collateral arteries in patients with CAD mitigate myocardial infarcts and improve survival. Approximately one-fifth of patients with CAD cannot be revascularized by percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting. Therapeutic promotion of collateral growth is a valuable treatment strategy in those patients. It should aim at growth of large conductive collateral arteries (arteriogenesis). Potential arteriogenic approaches include the treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, physical exercise training, and external counterpulsation.

  17. Estimating individual glomerular volume in the human kidney: clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puelles, Victor G; Zimanyi, Monika A; Samuel, Terence; Hughson, Michael D; Douglas-Denton, Rebecca N; Bertram, John F; Armitage, James A

    2012-05-01

    Measurement of individual glomerular volumes (IGV) has allowed the identification of drivers of glomerular hypertrophy in subjects without overt renal pathology. This study aims to highlight the relevance of IGV measurements with possible clinical implications and determine how many profiles must be measured in order to achieve stable size distribution estimates. We re-analysed 2250 IGV estimates obtained using the disector/Cavalieri method in 41 African and 34 Caucasian Americans. Pooled IGV analysis of mean and variance was conducted. Monte-Carlo (Jackknife) simulations determined the effect of the number of sampled glomeruli on mean IGV. Lin's concordance coefficient (R(C)), coefficient of variation (CV) and coefficient of error (CE) measured reliability. IGV mean and variance increased with overweight and hypertensive status. Superficial glomeruli were significantly smaller than juxtamedullary glomeruli in all subjects (P IGV mean and variability. Overall, mean IGV was particularly reliable with nine or more sampled glomeruli (R(C) > 0.95, IGV and estimated total glomerular number. Multiple comorbidities for CKD are associated with increased IGV mean and variance within subjects, including overweight, obesity and hypertension. Zonal selection and the number of sampled glomeruli do not represent drawbacks for future longitudinal biopsy-based studies of glomerular size and distribution.

  18. Clinical implications of microRNAs in human glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eMizoguchi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is one of the most common and dismal brain tumors in adults. Further elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of GBM is mandatory to improve the overall survival of patients. A novel small non-coding RNA molecule, microRNA (miRNA, appears to represent one of the most attractive target molecules contributing to the pathogenesis of various types of tumors. Recent global analyses have revealed that several miRNAs are clinically implicated in GBM, with some reports indicating the association of miRNA dysregulation with acquired temozolomide (TMZ resistance. More recent studies have revealed that miRNAs could play a role in cancer stem cell (CSC properties, contributing to treatment resistance. In addition, greater impact might be expected from miRNA-targeted therapies based on tumor-derived exosomes that contain numerous functional miRNAs, which could be transferred between tumor cells and surrounding structures. Tumor-derived miRNAs are now considered to be a novel molecular mechanism promoting the progression of GBM. Establishment of miRNA-targeted therapies based on miRNA dysregulation of CSCs could provide effective therapeutic strategies for TMZ-resistant GBM. Recent progress has revealed that miRNAs are not only putative biological markers for diagnosis, but also one of the most promising targets for GBM treatment. Herein, we summarize the translational aspects of miRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of GBM.

  19. Research Capacity at Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Centers in China: A Survey of Clinical Investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuo; Han, Mei; Lai, Lily; Wang, Si-Cheng; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Background. The development of an evidence-based approach to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), which depends on the generation of good quality evidence, requires an adequate workforce. However, the research capacity of TCM investigators is not known. Study Design. This cross-sectional study was conducted to describe the research capacity of TCM clinical investigators in China. Participants. A total of 584 participants from TCM hospitals and research centers were included. They were asked about the academic and research characteristics, needs for research capacity building, and barriers to clinical research. Results. The majority (80.82%) were qualified to at least a Master's degree, whilst a smaller proportion (40.24%) held a senior professional title. We found that academic outputs were low with the majority (62.16%) authoring less than five publications in total. The most pressing needs for building research capacity identified were training in research methodology (97.43%) and identification of research questions (86.81%), whilst the highest ranking barriers to conducting research were limited motivation, funding (40.72%), and time (37.15%). Conclusion. The methodology training, along with investment in the research workforce, needs to be urgently addressed to improve investigators' research capacity and the development of an evidence-based approach of TCM.

  20. Sustaining the Clinical and Translational Research Workforce: Training and Empowering the Next Generation of Investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Helen L; Gabrilove, Janice; Jackson, Rebecca; Sweeney, Carol; Fair, Alecia M; Toto, Robert

    2015-07-01

    There is mounting concern that clinician-scientists are a vanishing species and that the pipeline for clinical and translational research (CTR) investigators is in jeopardy. For the majority of current junior CTR investigators, the career path involves first obtaining a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded K-type career development award, particularly K08 and K23, and subsequently an NIH R01. This transition, popularly referred to as K2R, is a major hurdle with a low success rate and gaps in funding. In this Perspective, the authors identify factors that facilitate K2R transition and important aspects of increasing and sustaining the pipeline of CTR investigators. They also highlight significant differences in success rates of women and those underrepresented in biomedical research. Early career exposure to research methodology, protected time, multidisciplinary mentoring, and institutional "culture shift" are important for fostering and rewarding team science. Mentoring is the single most important contributor to K2R success, and emerging evidence suggests that formal mentor training and team mentoring are effective. Leadership training can empower junior investigators to thrive as independent CTR investigators. Future research should focus on delineating the difference between essential and supplemental factors to achieve this transition, and mentoring methods that foster success, including those that promote K2R transition of women and those underrepresented in biomedical research. The Clinical and Translational Science Awards National Consortium is well positioned to test existing models aimed at shortening the time frame, increasing the rate of K2R transition, and identifying strategies that improve success.

  1. Psychophysiological and other factors affecting human performance in accident prevention and investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinestiver, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    Psychophysiological factors are not uncommon terms in the aviation incident/accident investigation sequence where human error is involved. It is highly suspect that the same psychophysiological factors may also exist in the industrial arena where operator personnel function; but, there is little evidence in literature indicating how management and subordinates cope with these factors to prevent or reduce accidents. It is apparent that human factors psychophysological training is quite evident in the aviation industry. However, while the industrial arena appears to analyze psychophysiological factors in accident investigations, there is little evidence that established training programs exist for supervisors and operator personnel

  2. Clinical investigations of the therapeutic potential of ayahuasca: rationale and regulatory challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dennis J

    2004-05-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic beverage that is prominent in the ethnomedicine and shamanism of indigenous Amazonian tribes. Its unique pharmacology depends on the oral activity of the hallucinogen, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), which results from inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO) by beta-carboline alkaloids. MAO is the enzyme that normally degrades DMT in the liver and gut. Ayahuasca has long been integrated into mestizo folk medicine in the northwest Amazon. In Brazil, it is used as a sacrament by several syncretic churches. Some of these organizations have incorporated in the United States. The recreational and religious use of ayahuasca in the United States, as well as "ayahuasca tourism" in the Amazon, is increasing. The current legal status of ayahuasca or its source plants in the United States is unclear, although DMT is a Schedule I controlled substance. One ayahuasca church has received favorable rulings in 2 federal courts in response to its petition to the Department of Justice for the right to use ayahuasca under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. A biomedical study of one of the churches, the Uñiao do Vegetal (UDV), indicated that ayahuasca may have therapeutic applications for the treatment of alcoholism, substance abuse, and possibly other disorders. Clinical studies conducted in Spain have demonstrated that ayahuasca can be used safely in normal healthy adults, but have done little to clarify its potential therapeutic uses. Because of ayahuasca's ill-defined legal status and variable botanical and chemical composition, clinical investigations in the United States, ideally under an approved Investigational New Drug (IND) protocol, are complicated by both regulatory and methodological issues. This article provides an overview of ayahuasca and discusses some of the challenges that must be overcome before it can be clinically investigated in the United States.

  3. Human factors consideration in clinical applications of virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C H; Griffin, M J

    1997-01-01

    Virtual reality environments have many potential applications in medicine, including surgical training, tele-operated robotic surgery, assessment and rehabilitation of behavioural and neurological disorders and diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation of physical disabilities. Although there is much potential for the use of immersive virtual reality environments in clinical applications, there are problems which could limit their ultimate usability. Some users have experienced side-effects during and after exposure to virtual reality environments. The symptoms include ocular problems, disorientation and balance disturbances, and nausea. Susceptibility to side-effects can be affected by age, ethnicity, experience, gender and physical fitness, as well as the characteristics of the display, the virtual environment and the tasks. The characteristics of the virtual reality system have also been shown to affect the ability of users to perform tasks in a virtual environment. Many of these effects can be attributed to delays between the sampling of head and limb positions and the presentation of an appropriate image on the display. The introduction of patients to virtual reality environments, for assessment, therapy or rehabilitation, raises particular safety and ethical issues. Patients exposed to virtual reality environments for assessment and rehabilitation may have disabilities which increase their susceptibility to certain side-effects. Special precautions therefore need to be taken to ensure the safety and effectiveness of such virtual reality applications. These precautions include minimisation of possible side-effects at the design stage. Factors are identified which are likely to affect the incidence of side-effects during and after exposures, and which need to be understood in order to minimise undesirable consequences. There is also a need for the establishment of protocols for monitoring and controlling exposures of patients to virtual reality environments. Issues

  4. Human tibial torsion - Morphometric assessment and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Gandhi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tibial torsion is an important anatomical parameter in clinical practice and displays variability among individuals. These variations are extremely significant in view of alignment guides such as those related to rotational landmarks of tibia in total knee arthroplasty. Further, precise knowledge and information pertaining to angle of tibial torsion also helps in correction of traumatic malunion or congenital maltorsion of tibia. Methods: The present study was carried out to determine the angle of tibial torsion in 100 adult dry tibia bones in the Department of Anatomy, Government Medical College, Amritsar. The study group comprised 50 males and 50 females with equal number of right- and left-sided bones. The measurements were meticulously recorded and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The results were analyzed and discussed in the light of existing literature. Results: On the right side, it was found to be 29.84° ± 4.86°° (range = 22.00° -38.00° in males and 28.92° ± 5.10°° (range = 15.00°-38.00° in females. On the left side, it was found to be 28.00° ± 4.94°° (range = 20.00°-40.00°° in males and 28.12° ± 4.28°° (range = 20.00°-37.00°° in females. Conclusion: The present study is an endeavor to provide baseline data with reference to the angle of tibial torsion in the Indian population. The results of the study assume special importance in view of the technical advancements in reconstructive surgical procedures in orthopedic practice.

  5. Duplex investigations in children: Are clinical signs in children with venous disorders relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgitte Maessen-Visch, M; Smeets, L; van Vleuten, C

    2015-12-01

    Ultra sound colored duplex sonography is the preferred method in diagnosing chronic venous disease. Data in children on incidence, indications, and results are lacking. From the total of 9180 duplex investigations performed in our hospital from 2009 to 2012, data on indication and results of the investigation as well as patient characteristics were evaluated retrospectively for the proportion of pediatric patients. Duplex investigations were performed 49 times in 38 children (6-18 years), with an average of 1.3 times (1-6 times) per child. Forty percent showed abnormalities: 17 times deep venous thrombosis was suspected; deep venous thrombosis was objectified in 18%. In the 21 investigations performed for varicosis-related complaints, varicose veins or venous malformations were objectified in 57%. Edema was never a symptom of chronic venous disease. Duplex investigation is not often performed in children. In children with established deep venous thrombosis, a family history with deep venous thrombosis is common. In general, edema was not seen in children with varicose veins and, therefore, does not seem a reliable clinical sign at young age. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. A descriptive survey investigating pre-registration student nurses' perceptions of clinical skill development in clinical placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stayt, Louise C; Merriman, Clair

    2013-04-01

    Clinical skill development is essential to nurse education. Clinical skills are frequently taught in higher education institutions using clinical simulation. It is unclear if clinical skills are subsequently consolidated and developed in clinical placements. The aim of this survey was to evaluate pre-registration student nurses perceptions of the frequency of opportunities to practise, the level of supervision and assessment of, clinical skills in their clinical placements. This was a cross-sectional survey design using an online, self-report questionnaire including a Likert-type scale and open ended comments. Four hundred and twenty one students, from all year groups, from a university in the south of England on a wide variety of clinical placements participated. Participants evaluated the frequency of opportunity to practise, level of supervision and assessment of and feedback on performance of specific clinical skills. Clinical skills evaluated were measurement of vital signs, aseptic non-touch technique, assisting with eating and drinking, and assisting with comfort and hygiene. Data were analysed utilising Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 19. The frequency of opportunities to practise skills in clinical placement was variable with some participants reporting that they never had opportunity to practise essential skills. Similarly the level of supervision and assessment was also inconsistent suggesting that participants frequently practised clinical skills unsupervised without being assessed as competent. Inconsistencies in clinical skill development may lead to graduates who are not work ready and as a result, insufficient clinical competence potentially leads to unsafe practice and poor patient care. This calls for stronger partnerships between educators and clinical areas and the prioritisation of mentor preparation and education as well as organisational support in terms of mentor workload planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. Clinical and ECG investigations in subjects with acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capellini, A; Tomasini, M; Limonta, A

    1974-01-01

    Research carried out on more than 100 workers hospitalized for acute CO poisoning at the Milan Clinica del Lavoro and some 50 subjects undergoing treatment at the Milan polyclinic. The purpose of the research was to investigate the incidence and frequency of myocardial and coronary impairment in cases of acute CO poisoning. The authors concluded from their clinical and ECG findings that myocardial and coronary impairment in subjects suffering from acute CO poisoning was rarely serious or irreversible unless there was preexistent coronary disease. (CIS Abstr. Vol. 2)

  8. Department of Clinical Investigation Annual Research Progress Report, Fiscal Year 1993. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    A-5-90 Production of Mouse Positive and Negative Control Slides for 382 Use in Rabies FRA Test. (0) A-7-90 Clinical Investigation on the...Possible 402 Diagnostic and Therapeutic Manuever as Tested in a Mouse Model Utilizing PET Scanning. (0) A-93-04 Production of Monoclonal Antibodies to...xlv Project Page Number POG 9005 ALinC 15: Dose Intensification of Methotrexate and 583 6- Mercaptopurine for ALL in Childhood. (0) P00 9006 ALinC 15

  9. Hysterosalpingographic picture encountered during the investigation of female infertility clinic has Lemba of Saint Raphael

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitenge, N.; Nzeza, N.; Mbanzulu, P.; Ndaye, B.

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted at the St Raphael Lemba Clinic on a sample of 115 patients suspected of infertility during the period from june 1 1997 in 1 march 2003 (6 years). The technique of hysterosalpingography has allowed the identification of female infertility presents images that can diagnose one or more causes utero-tubal. Men also carry a significant responsibility in the genesis of the sterility of the couple: thus, they must also undergo exploration. Hormonal factors also have an important contribution in the investigation of infertility in women and must be taken in addition to hysterosalpingography

  10. Effects of curcumin consumption on human chronic diseases: A narrative review of the most recent clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzorou, Maria; Pavlidou, Eleni; Vasios, George; Tsagalioti, Eftychia; Giaginis, Constantinos

    2018-06-01

    Numerous clinical trials have investigated the potential beneficial effects of curcumin supplementation against several human chronic diseases. Up to now, it has been claimed that curcumin consumption may exert beneficial effects against several chronic diseases by promoting human health and preventing diseases. In this aspect, the present review aims to critically collect and in-depth summarize the most recent, well-designed clinical studies evaluating the potential beneficial effects of curcumin consumption on human health promotion and disease prevention. According to recent and well-designed clinical studies, curcumin consumption may benefit against obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Moreover, curcumin consumption seems to exert a positive effect on people suffering from various types of cancer, fatty liver disease, depression, arthritis, skin diseases, gut inflammation, and symptoms of premenstrual syndrome. Due to the strong heterogeneity among the clinical studies concerning the exact effective curcumin dose and formulation, as well as the recommended treatment duration for each chronic disease, no precise and definitive conclusions could be drawn. Further large-scale prospective studies are strongly recommended, being well-designed as far as follow-up times, dosage, formulation, and duration of curcumin supplementation are concerned. Moreover, potential confounders in each specific chronic disease should carefully be taken into account in future studies. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Study of an investigation on factors influencing human resources productivity in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ghasemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human resources development is one of the most important components of any organization and detecting important factors influencing human resources management plays an essential role in the success of the firms. In this study, we investigated different factors influencing human resources productivity of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences staff. Method: The present research was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was calculated 208 individuals. To access information about the human resource productivity, a valid and reliable questionnaire was used. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Pearson correlation was used for statistical analysis of the data (p=0.05. Results:The results showed that there was a statistically significant relationship (p-value<0.001 between human resources productivity and factors affecting the productivity of human resources (motivational factors, leadership style, creativity and innovation, general and applied education, and competitive spirit. Motivational factors (r =0.89 and general education (r =0.65 had the most and the least effects on human resources productivity. Conclusion: Considering the fact that motivational factors were the most effective factors on human resource productivity, we recommend that managers should care more than before about this factor; also, in order to motivate the employees, they should consider the staff’s individual differences.

  12. Clinical Features, Presence of Human Herpesvirus-8 and Treatment Results in Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Su

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Classic Kaposi sarcoma (KS occurs predominantly among the elderly, with Jews, Italians and Greeks. Classic KS has been seen relatively frequently in Turkey. Our aim was to evaluate the demographic, clinical features of Kaposi sarcoma and etiopathological role of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8. Treatment results of 18 classic Kaposi’s sarcoma were also concluded.Material and Method: Eighteen cases of classic Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed as clinically and histopathologically between January 2001 and August 2008 in our dermatology department were taken to this study. Demographic, clinical features and treatment results were reviewed retrospectively in all patients. HHV-8 was investigated in the lesional skin of 7 patients.Results: A male/female ratio of 2/1 was found. Mean age at diagnosis was 67.2 (37-94 years. Bilaterally lower extremities were involved in 15 patients (83.3%, the trunk was involved in 3 patients (16.6%. Plaques and nodules were the common type of lesions (66.6% and 55.5%. Nine patients had no symptoms (50%. Edema was the most common symptom (38.8%. A second primary malignancy was found in 2 patients (11.1%. HHV-8 was detected in 6 of the 7 patients(85.7%. Majority of the patients were treated with interferon alfa (subcutaneously and cryotherapy as a monotherapy or a combination therapy. Imiquimod was the second agent in combined treatment (27.7%. Conclusion: We suggest that interferon alfa and imiquimod can be used as first line therapy agents with their antiviral and immunmodulatuar features in the treatment of KKS. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 122-6

  13. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer: Prospects and Disappointments in Human Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William N. Rom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Decreasing the risk of lung cancer, or preventing its development in high-risk individuals, would have a huge impact on public health. The most effective means to decrease lung cancer incidence is to eliminate exposure to carcinogens. However, with recent advances in the understanding of pulmonary carcinogenesis and the identification of intermediate biomarkers, the prospects for the field of chemoprevention research have improved dramatically. Here we review the most recent research in lung cancer chemoprevention—focusing on those agents that have been investigated in human clinical trials. These agents fall into three major categories. First, oxidative stress plays an important role in pulmonary carcinogenesis; and therefore, antioxidants (including vitamins, selenium, green tea extracts, and isothiocyanates may be particularly effective in preventing the development of lung cancer. Second, inflammation is increasingly accepted as a crucial factor in carcinogenesis, and many investigators have focused on anti-inflammatory agents, such as glucocorticoids, NSAIDs, statins, and PPARγ agonists. Finally, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is recognized to play a central role in tobacco-induced carcinogenesis, and inhibitors of this pathway, including myoinositol and metformin, are promising agents for lung cancer prevention. Successful chemoprevention will likely require targeting of multiple pathways to carcinogenesis—both to minimize toxicity and maximize efficacy.

  14. New paleoradiological investigations of ancient human remains from North West Lombardy archaeological excavations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licata, Marta; Borgo, Melania; Armocida, Giuseppe; Nicosia, Luca; Ferioli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Since its birth in 1895, radiology has been used to study ancient mummies. The purpose of this article is to present paleoradiological investigations conducted on several medieval human remains in Varese province. Anthropological (generic identification) and paleopathological analyses were carried out with the support of diagnostic imaging (X-ray and CT scans). Human remains were discovered during excavations of medieval archaeological sites in northwest Lombardy. Classical physical anthropological methods were used for the macroscopic identification of the human remains. X-ray and CT scans were performed on the same scanner (16-layer Hitachi Eclos 16 X-ray equipment). Radiological analysis permitted investigating (1) the sex, (2) age of death, (3) type of trauma, (4) therapeutic interventions and (5) osteomas in ancient human remains. In particular, X-ray and CT examinations showed dimorphic facial traits on the mummified skull, and the same radiological approaches allowed determining the age at death from a mummified lower limb. CT analyses allow investigating different types of traumatic lesions in skulls and postcranial skeleton portions and reconstructing the gait and functional outcomes of a fractured femur. Moreover, one case of possible Gardner's syndrome (GS) was postulated from observing multiple osteomas in an ancient skull. Among the medical tests available to the clinician, radiology is the most appropriate first-line procedure for a diagnostic approach to ancient human remains because it can be performed without causing any significant damage to the specimen. (orig.)

  15. New paleoradiological investigations of ancient human remains from North West Lombardy archaeological excavations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licata, Marta; Borgo, Melania; Armocida, Giuseppe; Nicosia, Luca; Ferioli, Elena [University of Insubria (Varese), Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, Varese (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Since its birth in 1895, radiology has been used to study ancient mummies. The purpose of this article is to present paleoradiological investigations conducted on several medieval human remains in Varese province. Anthropological (generic identification) and paleopathological analyses were carried out with the support of diagnostic imaging (X-ray and CT scans). Human remains were discovered during excavations of medieval archaeological sites in northwest Lombardy. Classical physical anthropological methods were used for the macroscopic identification of the human remains. X-ray and CT scans were performed on the same scanner (16-layer Hitachi Eclos 16 X-ray equipment). Radiological analysis permitted investigating (1) the sex, (2) age of death, (3) type of trauma, (4) therapeutic interventions and (5) osteomas in ancient human remains. In particular, X-ray and CT examinations showed dimorphic facial traits on the mummified skull, and the same radiological approaches allowed determining the age at death from a mummified lower limb. CT analyses allow investigating different types of traumatic lesions in skulls and postcranial skeleton portions and reconstructing the gait and functional outcomes of a fractured femur. Moreover, one case of possible Gardner's syndrome (GS) was postulated from observing multiple osteomas in an ancient skull. Among the medical tests available to the clinician, radiology is the most appropriate first-line procedure for a diagnostic approach to ancient human remains because it can be performed without causing any significant damage to the specimen. (orig.)

  16. ISFG: recommendations regarding the use of non-human (animal) DNA in forensic genetic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linacre, A; Gusmão, L; Hecht, W; Hellmann, A P; Mayr, W R; Parson, W; Prinz, M; Schneider, P M; Morling, N

    2011-11-01

    The use of non-human DNA typing in forensic science investigations, and specifically that from animal DNA, is ever increasing. The term animal DNA in this document refers to animal species encountered in a forensic science examination but does not include human DNA. Non-human DNA may either be: the trade and possession of a species, or products derived from a species, which is contrary to legislation; as evidence where the crime is against a person or property; instances of animal cruelty; or where the animal is the offender. The first instance is addressed by determining the species present, and the other scenarios can often be addressed by assigning a DNA sample to a particular individual organism. Currently there is little standardization of methodologies used in the forensic analysis of animal DNA or in reporting styles. The recommendations in this document relate specifically to animal DNA that is integral to a forensic science investigation and are not relevant to the breeding of animals for commercial purposes. This DNA commission was formed out of discussions at the International Society for Forensic Genetics 23rd Congress in Buenos Aires to outline recommendations on the use of non-human DNA in a forensic science investigation. Due to the scope of non-human DNA typing that is possible, the remit of this commission is confined to animal DNA typing only. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. METHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO EXPERT EVALUATION OF PRECLINICAL AND CLINICAL TRIALS OF HUMAN IMMUNOGLOBULIN PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the experience of Russian and leading foreign regulatory agencies in organisation and conduction of preclinical and clinical trials of human immunoglobulin products. The authors suggest a classification of human immunoglobulins and provide updated information on authorization of these products in Russia. The article summarizes methodological approaches, basic scientific principles and criteria relating to expert evaluation of preclinical and clinical trials of blood products. The authors further define the expert body’s requirements for data on preclinical and clinical trials of human normal immuniglobulins and human specific immunoglobulins for the prevention and/or treatment of infectious and non-infectious diseases which are submitted as part of applications for marketing authorization or marketing authorization variation. The article suggests programs of preclinical and clinical trials for human normal immunoglobulins and human specific immunoglobulins for the prevention and/or treatment of infectious and non-infectious diseases that are aligned with the Russian legislation and Eurasian Economic Union’s regulations on medicines circulation, and have been elaborated with respect to the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency.

  18. Effect modification, interaction and mediation: an overview of theoretical insights for clinical investigators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corraini P

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Priscila Corraini,1 Morten Olsen,1 Lars Pedersen,1 Olaf M Dekkers,1,2 Jan P Vandenbroucke1–3 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; 3Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK Abstract: We revisited the three interrelated epidemiological concepts of effect modification, interaction and mediation for clinical investigators and examined their applicability when using research databases. The standard methods that are available to assess interaction, effect modification and mediation are explained and exemplified. For each concept, we first give a simple “best-case” example from a randomized controlled trial, followed by a structurally similar example from an observational study using research databases. Our explanation of the examples is based on recent theoretical developments and insights in the context of large health care databases. Terminology is sometimes ambiguous for what constitutes effect modification and interaction. The strong assumptions underlying the assessment of interaction, and particularly mediation, require clinicians and epidemiologists to take extra care when conducting observational studies in the context of health care databases. These strong assumptions may limit the applicability of interaction and mediation assessments, at least until the biases and limitations of these assessments when using large research databases are clarified. Keywords: methods, epidemiology, effect modifiers, stratified analyses, health care administrative claims

  19. Research Capacity at Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM Centers in China: A Survey of Clinical Investigators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The development of an evidence-based approach to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, which depends on the generation of good quality evidence, requires an adequate workforce. However, the research capacity of TCM investigators is not known. Study Design. This cross-sectional study was conducted to describe the research capacity of TCM clinical investigators in China. Participants. A total of 584 participants from TCM hospitals and research centers were included. They were asked about the academic and research characteristics, needs for research capacity building, and barriers to clinical research. Results. The majority (80.82% were qualified to at least a Master’s degree, whilst a smaller proportion (40.24% held a senior professional title. We found that academic outputs were low with the majority (62.16% authoring less than five publications in total. The most pressing needs for building research capacity identified were training in research methodology (97.43% and identification of research questions (86.81%, whilst the highest ranking barriers to conducting research were limited motivation, funding (40.72%, and time (37.15%. Conclusion. The methodology training, along with investment in the research workforce, needs to be urgently addressed to improve investigators’ research capacity and the development of an evidence-based approach of TCM.

  20. Methods to reduce medication errors in a clinical trial of an investigational parenteral medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian L. Fell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There are few evidence-based guidelines to inform optimal design of complex clinical trials, such as those assessing the safety and efficacy of intravenous drugs administered daily with infusion times over many hours per day and treatment durations that may span years. This study is a retrospective review of inpatient administration deviation reports for an investigational drug that is administered daily with infusion times of 8–24 h, and variable treatment durations for each patient. We report study design modifications made in 2007–2008 aimed at minimizing deviations from an investigational drug infusion protocol approved by an institutional review board and the United States Food and Drug Administration. Modifications were specifically aimed at minimizing errors of infusion rate, incorrect dose, incorrect patient, or wrong drug administered. We found that the rate of these types of administration errors of the study drug was significantly decreased following adoption of the specific study design changes. This report provides guidance in the design of clinical trials testing the safety and efficacy of study drugs administered via intravenous infusion in an inpatient setting so as to minimize drug administration protocol deviations and optimize patient safety.

  1. [Etiological, clinical and neuroradiological investigation of deaf children with additional neuropsychiatric disabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilosi, A M; Scusa, M F; Comparini, A; Genovese, E; Forli, F; Berrettini, S; Cipriani, P

    2012-04-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is complicated by additional disabilities in about 30% of cases, but the epidemiology of associated disorders, in terms of type, frequency and aetiology is still not clearly defined. Additional disabilities in a deaf child have important consequences in assessing and choosing a therapeutic treatment, in particular when considering cochlear implantation (CI) or hearing aids (HA). The aim of this paper was to evaluate frequency, type and severity of additional neurodevelopmental disabilities in children with profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and to investigate the relationship between disability and the etiology of deafness. Eighty children with profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (mean age 5.4 years) were investigated by means of a diagnostic protocol including clinical, neurodevelopmental, and audiological procedures together with genetic and neurometabolic tests and neuroradiological investigation by brain MRI. Fifty-five percent of the sample exhibited one or more disabilities in addition to deafness, with cognitive, behavioural-emotional and motor disorders being the most frequent. The risk of additional disabilities varied according to aetiology, with a higher incidence in hereditary syndromic deafness, in cases due to pre-perinatal pathology (in comparison to unknown and hereditary non syndromic forms) and in the presence of major brain abnormalities at MRI. Our results suggest that the aetiology of deafness may be a significant risk indicator for the presence of neuropsychiatric disorders. A multidimensional evaluation, including aetiological, neurodevelopmental and MRI investigation is needed for formulating prognosis and for planning therapeutic intervention, especially in those children candidated to cochlear implant.

  2. Quantification of human motion: gait analysis-benefits and limitations to its application to clinical problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sheldon R

    2004-12-01

    The technology supporting the analysis of human motion has advanced dramatically. Past decades of locomotion research have provided us with significant knowledge about the accuracy of tests performed, the understanding of the process of human locomotion, and how clinical testing can be used to evaluate medical disorders and affect their treatment. Gait analysis is now recognized as clinically useful and financially reimbursable for some medical conditions. Yet, the routine clinical use of gait analysis has seen very limited growth. The issue of its clinical value is related to many factors, including the applicability of existing technology to addressing clinical problems; the limited use of such tests to address a wide variety of medical disorders; the manner in which gait laboratories are organized, tests are performed, and reports generated; and the clinical understanding and expectations of laboratory results. Clinical use is most hampered by the length of time and costs required for performing a study and interpreting it. A "gait" report is lengthy, its data are not well understood, and it includes a clinical interpretation, all of which do not occur with other clinical tests. Current biotechnology research is seeking to address these problems by creating techniques to capture data rapidly, accurately, and efficiently, and to interpret such data by an assortment of modeling, statistical, wave interpretation, and artificial intelligence methodologies. The success of such efforts rests on both our technical abilities and communication between engineers and clinicians.

  3. Guess who? An interactive and entertaining game-like platform for investigating human emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, M.I.; Tariq, H.; Saeed, M.; Shahid, S.; Krahmer, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the design and the development of a highly customizable interactive platform ‘Guess Who’, which was designed as a tool for investigating human emotions in a variety of experimental setups. In its essence, ‘Guess Who?’ is actually a game, which includes typical game elements

  4. THE DOLMEN KOLIKHO, WESTERN CAUCASUS : ISOTOPIC INVESTIGATION OF FUNERAL PRACTICE AND HUMAN MOBILITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifonov, V. A.; Zaitseva, G. I.; van der Plicht, J.; Burova, N. D.; Bogomolov, E. S.; Sementsov, A. A.; Lokhova, O. V.; Boaretto, E.; Rebollo Franco, N.R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the dolmen known as Kolikho (Black Sea coast, Russia), discovered accidentally in 2008. It is a unique, undisturbed megalithic structure. The burial chamber contains disarticulated human remains from about 70 individuals. Radiocarbon dating shows that the dolmen was in use between

  5. Using Language Games as a Way to Investigate Interactional Engagement in Human-Robot Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    how students' engagement with a social robot can be systematically investigated and evaluated. For this purpose, I present a small user study in which a robot plays a word formation game with a human, in which engagement is determined by means of an analysis of the 'language games' played...

  6. Investigating the Effectiveness of an Educational Card Game for Learning How Human Immunology Is Regulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, TzuFen; Cheng, Meng-Tzu; Lin, Shu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in an attempt to investigate the effectiveness of an educational card game we developed for learning human immunology. Two semesters of evaluation were included to examine the impact of the game on students' understanding and perceptions of the game-based instruction. Ninety-nine senior high school students (11th graders)…

  7. Stable lead isotopes in environmental health with emphasis on human investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulson, Brian

    2008-01-01

    There has been widespread use of stable lead isotopes in the earth sciences for more than 40 years focussed on the origin and age of rocks and minerals with lesser application in environmental investigations where the emphasis has been directed typically to the source of lead in environmental media such as air, water and soils. In contrast, the number of environmental health investigations focussed on humans (and primates) is limited in spite of the demonstrated utility of the approach in pioneering studies in the early 1970's. This paper reviews the status of lead isotopes in human investigations especially over the past 2 decades, the period over which most activity has taken place. Following a brief introduction to the method, examples are provided illustrating the use of lead isotopes in a wide spectrum of activities including sources and pathways of lead in diverse environments from urban to mining communities, various applications associated with pregnancy, the contribution of bone lead to blood lead including in the elderly, the half-life of lead in blood, and lead in bones and other media. A brief outline of critical research on non-human primates is also given. The lead isotope method is a powerful technique for tracing lead and could be employed more widely in human investigations

  8. The Investigation of Human Values Perceived from the Use of Social Media of Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ahmet; Tekin, Hatice

    2017-01-01

    This research has been carried out to investigate the relation between social media usage of secondary school students and their perceived human values. The population of the research consisted of 1952 students, of which 48% were female and 52% were male, 7th and 8th grade students attending secondary schools in central Adiyaman in 2014-2015…

  9. Investigation of paramedics' compliance with clinical practice guidelines for the management of chest pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Figgis, Ken

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Acute coronary syndromes remain a leading cause of preventable early deaths. However, previous studies have indicated that paramedics\\' compliance with chest pain protocols is suboptimal and that many patients do not receive the benefits of appropriate prehospital treatment. AIMS: To evaluate paramedics\\' level of compliance with national clinical practice guidelines and to investigate why, in certain circumstances, they may deviate from the clinical guidelines. SETTING: The Health Service Executive Mid-Western Regional Ambulance Service which serves a mixed urban and rural population across three counties in the west of Ireland. METHOD: A retrospective review of completed ambulance Patient Care Report Forms was conducted for all adult patients with non-traumatic chest pain treated between 1 December 2007 and 31 March 2008. During the same study period, paramedics were asked to complete a prospective questionnaire survey investigating the rationale behind their treatment decisions, their estimation of patient risk and their attitudes towards the clinical practice guidelines and training. RESULTS: 382 completed Patient Care Report Forms were identified for patients with chest pain, of whom 84.8% received ECG monitoring, 75.9% were given oxygen, 44.8% were treated with sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and 50.8% were treated with aspirin. Only 20.4% of patients had a prehospital 12-lead ECG recorded. 58 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 15%); 64% of respondents said they had received insufficient training to identify ECG abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: Prehospital treatment with oxygen, aspirin, sublingual GTN and ECG monitoring remains underused by paramedics, even though only a small number of patients had documented contraindications to their use. The small number of patients who received a prehospital 12-lead ECG is a cause of particular concern and suggests that incomplete patient assessment may contribute to undertreatment

  10. Understanding Career Success and Its Contributing Factors for Clinical and Translational Investigators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgeanna F.W.B.; Schwartz, Lisa S.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Gabrilove, Janice L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To understand the factors that facilitate career success for career development awardees in clinical and translational science and to reconceptualize understanding of career success for this population. Method In 2013–2014, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with former NIH KL2 or K12 scholars from nine Clinical and Translational Science Award-funded institutions. Participants either had or had not secured independent funding at least two years after the end of their last K award. Questions covered the factors that facilitate or hinder junior investigators’ transition to independent funding. Interviews were recorded and transcribed and the transcripts analyzed thematically. Results Forty individuals participated, with equal representation by men and women and by independently and not independently funded investigators. Personal factors that facilitated success included: networks, persistence and resilience, initiative, autonomy, and personal and professional balance. Organizational factors included: appropriate mentorship, protected research time, and institutional resources and support. Even independently funded participants described challenges regarding career direction. Five participants without independent funding modeled a broad spectrum of successful career paths, having assumed leadership positions not reliant on grant funding. Alternative definitions of career success included: improving public health, enjoying work, seeing mentees succeed, and receiving external acknowledgement of successes. Conclusions Awareness of the factors that facilitate or hinder career success can help junior faculty, mentors, and institutional leaders support career development in clinical and translational science. New definitions of career success are needed, as are career paths for faculty who want to engage in research in roles other than principal investigator. PMID:26509600

  11. [Clinical and genetic investigation of families with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H S; Liao, X B; Liu, Y L; He, C F; Zhang, H; Jiang, L; Feng, Y; Mei, L Y

    2016-12-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical chacteration and molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 in seven families, and provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Method: Clinical data of seven families with WS2(14 patients)were collected. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF), sex-determining region Y-box 10(SOX10), snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) and endothelin receptor type B(EDNRB)were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Then the raw data was analyzed. Result: The most common manifestations of WS2 are sensorineural hearing loss(10/14,71.4%), freckle(7/14, 50.0%),heterochromia iridis(6/14, 42.9%) and premature greying(5/14,35.7%). All the deafness phenotype is congenital, bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss. Freckles phenotype is different from cutaneous pigment abnormalities of WS in Westerners. The heterozygous mutation, c.328C>T in exon 3 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 2. However, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (SOX10,SNAI2 and EDNRB) was detected in other pedigrees. Conclusion: There are obvious variations in clinical features of WS, while freckles may be a special subtype of cutaneous pigment disturbances. The MITF gene mutation, R110X,is therefore considered the disease causing mutation in pedigree WS02.However, there are novel disease causing genes or copy number variations in Waardenburg syndrome type 2, which require further research. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

  12. Application of objective clinical human reliability analysis (OCHRA) in assessment of technical performance in laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J D; Miskovic, D; Allison, A S; Conti, J A; Ockrim, J; Cooper, E J; Hanna, G B; Francis, N K

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopic rectal resection is technically challenging, with outcomes dependent upon technical performance. No robust objective assessment tool exists for laparoscopic rectal resection surgery. This study aimed to investigate the application of the objective clinical human reliability analysis (OCHRA) technique for assessing technical performance of laparoscopic rectal surgery and explore the validity and reliability of this technique. Laparoscopic rectal cancer resection operations were described in the format of a hierarchical task analysis. Potential technical errors were defined. The OCHRA technique was used to identify technical errors enacted in videos of twenty consecutive laparoscopic rectal cancer resection operations from a single site. The procedural task, spatial location, and circumstances of all identified errors were logged. Clinical validity was assessed through correlation with clinical outcomes; reliability was assessed by test-retest. A total of 335 execution errors identified, with a median 15 per operation. More errors were observed during pelvic tasks compared with abdominal tasks (p technical performance of laparoscopic rectal surgery.

  13. Investigation of Factors Affecting Body Temperature Changes During Routine Clinical Head Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong Seong

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulsed radiofrequency (RF) magnetic fields, required to produce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals from tissue during the MRI procedure have been shown to heat tissues. Objectives To investigate the relationship between body temperature rise and the RF power deposited during routine clinical MRI procedures, and to determine the correlation between this effect and the body’s physiological response. Patients and Methods We investigated 69 patients from the Korean national cancer center to identify the main factors that contribute to an increase in body temperature (external factors and the body’s response) during a clinical brain MRI. A routine protocol sequence of MRI scans (1.5 T and 3.0 T) was performed. The patient’s tympanic temperature was recorded before and immediately after the MRI procedure and compared with changes in variables related to the body’s physiological response to heat. Results Our investigation of the physiological response to RF heating indicated a link between increasing age and body temperature. A higher increase in body temperature was observed in older patients after a 3.0-T MRI (r = 0.07, P = 0.29 for 1.5-T MRI; r = 0.45, P = 0.002 for 3.0-T MRI). The relationship between age and body heat was related to the heart rate (HR) and changes in HR during the MRI procedure; a higher RF power combined with a reduction in HR resulted in an increase in body temperature. Conclusion A higher magnetic field strength and a decrease in the HR resulted in an increase in body temperature during the MRI procedure. PMID:27895872

  14. Degenerated human articular cartilage at autopsy represents preclinical osteoarthritic cartilage: comparison with clinically defined osteoarthritic cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Valburg, A. A.; Wenting, M. J.; Beekman, B.; te Koppele, J. M.; Lafeber, F. P.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    To investigate whether macroscopically fibrillated human articular knee cartilage observed at autopsy can be considered an early, preclinical phase of osteoarthritis (OA). Histological and biochemical characteristics of 3 types of articular knee cartilage were compared: macroscopically degenerated

  15. Human bartonellosis: seroepidemiological and clinical features with an emphasis on data from Brazil - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lamas

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Bartonellae are fastidious Gram-negative bacteria that are widespread in nature with several animal reservoirs (mainly cats, dogs, and rodents and insect vectors (mainly fleas, sandflies, and human lice. Thirteen species or subspecies of Bartonella have been recognized as agents causing human disease, including B. bacilliformis, B. quintana, B. vinsonii berkhoffii, B. henselae, B. elizabethae, B. grahamii, B. washoensis, B. koehlerae, B. rocha-limaea, and B. tamiae. The clinical spectrum of infection includes lymphadenopathy, fever of unknown origin, endocarditis, neurological and ophthalmological syndromes, Carrion's disease, and others. This review provides updated information on clinical manifestations and seroepidemiological studies with an emphasis on data available from Brazil.

  16. Adapting Cognitive Task Analysis to Investigate Clinical Decision Making and Medication Safety Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Alissa L; Militello, Laura G; Glassman, Peter A; Arthur, Karen J; Zillich, Alan J; Weiner, Michael

    2017-05-03

    Cognitive task analysis (CTA) can yield valuable insights into healthcare professionals' cognition and inform system design to promote safe, quality care. Our objective was to adapt CTA-the critical decision method, specifically-to investigate patient safety incidents, overcome barriers to implementing this method, and facilitate more widespread use of cognitive task analysis in healthcare. We adapted CTA to facilitate recruitment of healthcare professionals and developed a data collection tool to capture incidents as they occurred. We also leveraged the electronic health record (EHR) to expand data capture and used EHR-stimulated recall to aid reconstruction of safety incidents. We investigated 3 categories of medication-related incidents: adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug-disease interactions. Healthcare professionals submitted incidents, and a subset of incidents was selected for CTA. We analyzed several outcomes to characterize incident capture and completed CTA interviews. We captured 101 incidents. Eighty incidents (79%) met eligibility criteria. We completed 60 CTA interviews, 20 for each incident category. Capturing incidents before interviews allowed us to shorten the interview duration and reduced reliance on healthcare professionals' recall. Incorporating the EHR into CTA enriched data collection. The adapted CTA technique was successful in capturing specific categories of safety incidents. Our approach may be especially useful for investigating safety incidents that healthcare professionals "fix and forget." Our innovations to CTA are expected to expand the application of this method in healthcare and inform a wide range of studies on clinical decision making and patient safety.

  17. Immunohistochemical investigations of xenotransplanted human adenocarcinomas on nude mice: Correlation to radioimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejkova, E.

    1987-01-01

    Immunohistochemical investigations of xenotransplanted human adenocarcinomas on nude mice; correlation to radioimaging Human carcinomas were subcutanously grafted to nude mice (Balb/c-nu/nu) and were investigated in four passages by immunohistochemical methods and by the fluorochrome bisbenzimid. In this way there could be observed a successful differentiation between the nourishing murine stroma and the human tumor parenchym. Especially the use of a monoclonal antibody (rat/mouse fusion) directed against human tissue turned out to be a suitable method. Four adenocarcinomas were tested: Colon-, mamma-, stomach- and testicle carcinoma. During the first four passages atypical parts of murine connective tissue and some changes in the human parenchyma could be seen. These results demonstrate that also in nude mice variations of the transplanted tumor material could happen. They could be detected in time with a routine immunohistochemical test. The consequences of tumor morphological variations for the development of therapeutic and diagnostic tools were studied with the help of radioimaging by external scintigraphy. Furthermore the biodistribution, tumoruptake and the whole body counting were studied by means of radionuclid marked monoclonal antibodies. The morphological variations of the passages of mammary, testicle and colon carcinomas were not big enough to influence the results in a certain way. Therefore especially the relation between the activity uptake in the tissue, the size of the tumor and the whole body uptake was studied in view of immunoscintigraphy. (orig./MG) [de

  18. The interaction of escitalopram and R-citalopram at the human serotonin transporter investigated in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jacob P R; Plenge, Per; Sachs, Benjamin D; Pehrson, Alan L; Cajina, Manuel; Du, Yunzhi; Roberts, Wendy; Rudder, Meghan L; Dalvi, Prachiti; Robinson, Taylor J; O'Neill, Sharon P; Khoo, King S; Morillo, Connie Sanchez; Zhang, Xiaodong; Caron, Marc G

    2014-12-01

    Escitalopram appears to be a superior antidepressant to racemic citalopram. It has been hypothesized that binding of R-citalopram to the serotonin transporter (SERT) antagonizes escitalopram binding to and inhibition of the SERT, there by curtailing the elevation of extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HTExt), and hence anti-depressant efficacy. Further, it has been suggested that a putative allosteric binding site is important for binding of escitalopram to the primary, orthosteric, site, and for R-citalopram's inhibition here of. Primary: Investigate at the human (h)SERT, at clinical relevant doses, whether R-citalopram antagonizes escitalopram-induced 5-HTExt elevation. Secondary: Investigate whether abolishing the putative allosteric site affects escitalopram-induced 5-HTExt elevation and/or modulates the effect of R-citalopram. Recombinant generation of hSERT transgenic mice; in vivo microdialysis; SERT binding; pharmacokinetics; 5-HT sensitive behaviors (tail suspension, marble burying). We generated mice expressing either the wild-type human SERT (hSERT(WT)) or hSERT carrying amino acid substitutions (A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T and I575T) collectively abolishing the putative allosteric site (hSERT(ALI/VFL+SI/TT)). One mg/kg escitalopram yielded clinical relevant plasma levels and brain levels consistent with therapeutic SERT occupancy. The hSERT mice showed normal basal 5-HTExt levels. Escitalopram-induced 5-HTExt elevation was not decreased by R-citalopram co-treatment and was unaffected by loss of the allosteric site. The behavioral effects of the clinically relevant escitalopram dose were small and tended to be enhanced by R-citalopram co-administration. We find no evidence that R-citalopram directly antagonizes escitalopram or that the putative allosteric site is important for hSERT inhibition by escitalopram.

  19. How to achieve safe, high-quality clinical studies with non-Medicinal Investigational Products? A practical guideline by using intra-bronchial carbon nanoparticles as case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M; Kooyman, P J; Makkee, M; van der Zee, J S; Sterk, P J; van Dijk, J; Kemper, E M

    2016-08-19

    Clinical studies investigating medicinal products need to comply with laws concerning good clinical practice (GCP) and good manufacturing practice (GMP) to guarantee the quality and safety of the product, to protect the health of the participating individual and to assure proper performance of the study. However, there are no specific regulations or guidelines for non-Medicinal Investigational Products (non-MIPs) such as allergens, enriched food supplements, and air pollution components. As a consequence, investigators will avoid clinical research and prefer preclinical models or in vitro testing for e.g. toxicology studies. 1) briefly review the current guidelines and regulations for Investigational Medicinal Products; 2) present a standardised approach to ensure the quality and safety of non-MIPs in human in vivo research; and 3) discuss some lessons we have learned. We propose a practical line of approach to compose a clarifying product dossier (PD), comprising the description of the production process, the analysis of the raw and final product, toxicological studies, and a thorough risk-benefit-analysis. This is illustrated by an example from a human in vivo research model to study exposure to air pollutants, by challenging volunteers with a suspension of carbon nanoparticles (the component of ink cartridges for laser printers). With this novel risk-based approach, the members of competent authorities are provided with standardised information on the quality of the product in relation to the safety of the participants, and the scientific goal of the study.

  20. Investigation of the factors disguising radiation effects on the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzeneva, I.B.; Styazhkina, T.V.; Dubrova, Y.E.; Malinina, T.V.; Prokhorovskaya, V.D.; Kholod, O.N.

    1998-01-01

    Herein we have studied the effects of some hereditary and environmental factors on children's states of health. The factors under investigation, along with radiation, also impact the immunological status and human adaptivity, thus disguising hazardous radiation effects. The state-of-health criterion we have chosen are children's liability to a wide range of intrinsic diseases through the first three years of life. The analysis involved 626 children (326 male and 300 female) who's parents and grandparents lived in the vicinity of the Russian Federal Nuclear Centre (RFNC), a large-scale nuclear facility. Our results should preferably be taken into consideration when projecting radiation effects on the human body. (author)

  1. Protocols for the Investigation of Information Processing in Human Assessment of Fundamental Movement Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Brodie J; Thornton, Ashleigh; Lay, Brendan; Rosenberg, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental movement skill (FMS) assessment remains an important tool in classifying individuals' level of FMS proficiency. The collection of FMS performances for assessment and monitoring has remained unchanged over the last few decades, but new motion capture technologies offer opportunities to automate this process. To achieve this, a greater understanding of the human process of movement skill assessment is required. The authors present the rationale and protocols of a project in which they aim to investigate the visual search patterns and information extraction employed by human assessors during FMS assessment, as well as the implementation of the Kinect system for FMS capture.

  2. Cardioprotective effects of cocoa: clinical evidence from randomized clinical intervention trials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz, Sara; Valderas-Martinez, Palmira; Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Casas, Rosa; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M; Estruch, Ramon

    2013-06-01

    Cocoa is an important source of polyphenols, which comprise 12-18% of its total dry weight. The major phenolic compounds in cocoa and cocoa products are mainly flavonoids such as epicatechin, catechin, and proanthocyanidins. These products contain higher amounts of flavonoids than other polyphenol-rich foods. However, the bioavailability of these compounds depends on other food constituents and their interactions with the food matrix. Many epidemiological and clinical intervention trials have concluded that the ingestion of flavonoids reduces the risk factors of developing cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the new findings regarding the effects of cocoa and chocolate consumption on cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms involved in the cardioprotective effects of cocoa flavonoids include reduction of oxidative stress, inhibition of low-density lipoproteins oxidation and platelet aggregation, vasodilatation of blood vessels, inhibition of the adherence of monocytes to vascular endothelium, promotion of fibrinolysis, and immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activity. Scientific evidence supports a cause and effect relationship between consumption of cocoa flavonoids and the maintenance of normal endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which contributes to normal blood flow. However, larger randomized trials are required to definitively establish the impact of cocoa and cocoa products consumption on hard cardiovascular outcomes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Idiopathic Canalicular Inflammatory Disease: New Disease Description of Clinical Patterns, Investigations, Management, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad Javed

    2018-01-25

    The objective of this perspective is to present a separate disease description of "idiopathic canalicular inflammatory disease" and outline the diagnostic criteria and early experiences with its investigations and management. Retrospective case series of 44 canaliculi of 22 eyes of 11 patients presenting at a tertiary care Dacryology service over a period of 2 years with typical clinical patterns of inflammatory canaliculitis and its outcomes were studied. All the patients underwent microbiological work-up with culture and sensitivity, dacryoendoscopy imaging, serial Fourier domain ocular coherence tomography, and collagen vascular profiles. Stages in the evolution of the disease were studied. All patients were treated initially with topical steroids followed by punctal dilatation and placement of mini-monoka stents. Five patients in addition had a small biopsy from the inflamed portion of the vertical canaliculus. Stents were extubated at 6 weeks. Forty-four canaliculi were diagnosed to have idiopathic canalicular inflammatory disease during the study period. There was a female preponderance (81.8%, 9/11) and the mean age at presentation was 57 years. All patients presented with unilateral epiphora without any discharge, pain, or swelling. Collagen vascular profiles and screening for autoimmune diseases were negative. Clinical picture ranged from stages 1 to 5, consisting of edema, progressive centripetal vascularization, pouting of vascularized mucosa, membrane formation, and progressive scarring. The presentation begins in 1 eye and usually involves the other eye at a mean of 6 months. Ocular coherence tomography and dacryoendoscopy were of adjunctive value in the diagnosis. Histopathological examination was suggestive of a chronic inflammation. All patients had relentless progression to end-stage disease, although delayed significantly by steroids and monoka intubation. Idiopathic canalicular inflammatory disease has a distinct and typical clinical behavior and

  4. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Nurses' Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Yang, Jinqiu; Liu, Lingying; Ye, Benlan

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the influencing factors on nurses' clinical decision-making (CDM) skills. A cross-sectional nonexperimental research design was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency departments of two university hospitals, between May and June 2014. We used a quantile regression method to identify the influencing factors across different quantiles of the CDM skills distribution and compared the results with the corresponding ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates. Our findings revealed that nurses were best at the skills of managing oneself. Educational level, experience, and the total structural empowerment had significant positive impacts on nurses' CDM skills, while the nurse-patient relationship, patient care and interaction, formal empowerment, and information empowerment were negatively correlated with nurses' CDM skills. These variables explained no more than 30% of the variance in nurses' CDM skills and mainly explained the lower quantiles of nurses' CDM skills distribution. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. A Novel Electronic Device for Measuring Urine Flow Rate: A Clinical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliza Goldman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Currently, most vital signs in the intensive care unit (ICU are electronically monitored. However, clinical practice for urine output (UO measurement, an important vital sign, usually requires manual recording of data that is subject to human errors. In this study, we assessed the ability of a novel electronic UO monitoring device to measure real-time hourly UO versus current clinical practice. Design: Patients were connected to the RenalSense Clarity RMS Sensor Kit with a sensor integrated within a standard sterile urinary catheter drainage tube to monitor urine flow in real time. The Clarity RMS Sensor Kit was modified to incorporate a standard urinometer (Unomedical for the nursing staff to record UO as per their standard practice. The drainage bag was placed in a container on a scientific scale (Precisa BJ to be used as the gold standard. Interventions: Nursing records for hourly UO were collected and compared with the electronically recorded UO. Sensor measurements and nursing staff manual records of UO were compared with the scale data. Setting: The study setting was the ICU of Hadassah Hospital, Jerusalem. Patients: Data from 23 patients with a urinary catheter were observed in this study. Measurements and main results: A total of 1046 hours of UO were recorded from 23 subjects. Compared with the scale data, the measurements of hourly urine flow measured with the RenalSense system were closer, had a better correlation, and narrower limits of agreement to gravimetrically determined values than the measurements obtained by the nurses. In addition, continuous monitoring of UO provided graphical display of response to repeated diuretic administration. Conclusions: An electronic device for recording UO has been shown to provide more reliable information of UO records and patient fluid status than current practice. Future applications of this device will provide valuable information to help set protocol goals such as decisions for

  6. Investigation of Clinical Characteristics and Etiological Factors in Children with Molar Incisor Hypomineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Giuca

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical defects and etiological factors potentially involved in the onset of MIH in a pediatric sample. Methods. 120 children, selected from the university dental clinic, were included: 60 children (25 boys and 35 girls; average age: 9.8 ± 1.8 years with MIH formed the test group and 60 children (27 boys and 33 girls; average age: 10.1 ± 2 years without MIH constituted the control group. Distribution and severity of MIH defects were evaluated, and a questionnaire was used to investigate the etiological variables; chi-square, univariate, and multivariate statistical tests were performed (significance level set at p<0.05. Results. A total of 186 molars and 98 incisors exhibited MIH defects: 55 molars and 75 incisors showed mild defects, 91 molars and 20 incisors had moderate lesions, and 40 molars and 3 incisors showed severe lesions. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis showed a significant association (p<0.05 between MIH and ear, nose, and throat (ENT disorders and the antibiotics used during pregnancy (0.019. Conclusions. Moderate defects were more frequent in the molars, while mild lesions were more frequent in the incisors. Antibiotics used during pregnancy and ENT may be directly involved in the etiology of MIH in children.

  7. Investigation of Clinical Characteristics and Etiological Factors in Children with Molar Incisor Hypomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuca, Maria Rita; Cappè, Maria; Carli, Elisabetta; Lardani, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical defects and etiological factors potentially involved in the onset of MIH in a pediatric sample. Methods 120 children, selected from the university dental clinic, were included: 60 children (25 boys and 35 girls; average age: 9.8 ± 1.8 years) with MIH formed the test group and 60 children (27 boys and 33 girls; average age: 10.1 ± 2 years) without MIH constituted the control group. Distribution and severity of MIH defects were evaluated, and a questionnaire was used to investigate the etiological variables; chi-square, univariate, and multivariate statistical tests were performed (significance level set at p MIH defects: 55 molars and 75 incisors showed mild defects, 91 molars and 20 incisors had moderate lesions, and 40 molars and 3 incisors showed severe lesions. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis showed a significant association (p MIH and ear, nose, and throat (ENT) disorders and the antibiotics used during pregnancy (0.019). Conclusions Moderate defects were more frequent in the molars, while mild lesions were more frequent in the incisors. Antibiotics used during pregnancy and ENT may be directly involved in the etiology of MIH in children. PMID:29861729

  8. Phase II drugs under clinical investigation for the treatment of chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Shilan; Didari, Tina; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Chronic constipation (CC) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorder that significantly impairs the quality of life in affected subjects. As almost half of the patients suffering from CC are not satisfied with currently available medicines, there is a need to develop new molecules with better effectiveness and tolerability. The authors include all experimental and clinical trials (up to Phase II) about new investigational drugs for the treatment of CC. The article identifies nine new agents: mitemcinal, TD-8954, YKP10811, itopride, RM-131, KWA-0711, elobixibat, velusetrag, and naronapride. All nine agents have shown prokinetic effects in different stages of the development. The mechanisms of new developing drugs include: the activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine type-4 (5-HT4), ghrelin and motilin receptors, antagonizing dopamine type-2 (D2) receptors, inhibition of ileal bile acid reabsorption and acetylcholine esterase, as well as water absorption from the GI tract. At this current point in time, new generations of 5-HT4 receptor agonists (velusetrag, noranopride and YKP10811) are hoped to progress, further in the future, due to better efficiency and safety. However, it is not possible to make a concise conclusion at this current time due to a lack of evidence. Further clinical trials with a longer duration and a larger sample size are warranted.

  9. Driving Organizational Change From the Bedside: The AACN Clinical Scene Investigator Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Susan R; Goodyear-Bruch, Caryl; Olney, Adrienne; Hanson, Dave; Altman, Marian S; Varn-Davis, Natasha S; Brinker, Debbie; Lavandero, Ramón; Cox, Karen S

    2017-08-01

    Staff nurses are pivotal in leading change related to quality improvement efforts, although many lack skills to steer change from the bedside. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) staff nurse leadership program, Clinical Scene Investigator (CSI) Academy, teaches and empowers staff nurses in leadership skills and change concepts to translate evidence into practice affecting patient outcomes. To describe the curriculum of the AACN CSI Academy that provides staff nurses with the leadership skills required to create unit-based change projects that positively impact patient/family outcomes. The curriculum of the Academy included leadership topics, communication, change concepts, quality improvement methods, project management, and data management and analysis. Each team of participants collected project data to show improvements in patient care. The program evaluation used many data sources to assess the program effectiveness, relating to the professional growth of the participant nurses. The participants assessed project patient outcomes, sustainability, and spread. The first cohort of CSI participants included 164 direct care nurses from 42 hospitals in 6 cities. They rated the Academy highly in the program evaluation, and they reported that the Academy contributed to their professional development. The individual hospital quality improvement projects resulted in positive patient and estimated fiscal outcomes that were generally sustained 1 year after the program. With the skills, tools, and support obtained from participation in the CSI Academy, staff nurses can make substantial contributions to their organizations in clinical and possibly fiscal outcomes. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  10. Linking ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed to track results of interventional human clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtech Huser

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In an effort to understand how results of human clinical trials are made public, we analyze a large set of clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, the world's largest clinical trial registry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We considered two trial result artifacts: (1 existence of a trial result journal article that is formally linked to a registered trial or (2 the deposition of a trial's basic summary results within the registry. RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 8907 completed, interventional, phase 2-or-higher clinical trials that were completed in 2006-2009. The majority of trials (72.2% had no structured trial-article link present. A total of 2367 trials (26.6% deposited basic summary results within the registry. Of those, 969 trials (10.9% were classified as trials with extended results and 1398 trials (15.7% were classified as trials with only required basic results. The majority of the trials (54.8% had no evidence of results, based on either linked result articles or basic summary results (silent trials, while a minimal number (9.2% report results through both registry deposition and publication. DISCUSSION: Our study analyzes the body of linked knowledge around clinical trials (which we refer to as the "trialome". Our results show that most trials do not report results and, for those that do, there is minimal overlap in the types of reporting. We identify several mechanisms by which the linkages between trials and their published results can be increased. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that even when combining publications and registry results, and despite availability of several information channels, trial sponsors do not sufficiently meet the mandate to inform the public either via a linked result publication or basic results submission.

  11. Translation of Human iPSCs: From Clinical Trial in a Dish to Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Nazish; Liu, Chun; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of changing the plasticity of terminally differentiated cells toward pluripotency has completely altered the outlook of biomedical research. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a new source of therapeutic cells free from the ethical issues or immune barriers of human embryonic stem cells. iPSCs also confer considerable advantages over conventional methods of studying human diseases. Since its advent, iPSC technology has expanded, with 3 major applications: disease modeling; regenerative therapy; and drug discovery. Here we discuss, in a comprehensive manner, the recent advances in iPSC technology in relation to basic, clinical, and population health. PMID:27151349

  12. Clinical significance of serum anti-human papillomavirus 16 and 18 antibodies in cervical neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chay, Doo Byung; Cho, Hanbyoul; Kim, Bo Wook; Kang, Eun Suk; Song, Eunseop; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2013-02-01

    To estimate the clinical significance of serum anti-human papillomavirus (HPV) antibodies and high-risk cervical HPV DNA in cervical neoplasia. The study population comprised patients who were histopathologically diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1 (n=64), CIN 2 and 3 (n=241), cervical cancer (n=170), and normal control participants (n=975). Cervical HPV DNA tests were performed through nucleic acid hybridization assay tests, and serum anti-HPV 16 and 18 antibodies were measured by competitive immunoassay. The associations of HPV DNA and anti-HPV antibodies were evaluated with demographic characteristics and compared according to the levels of disease severity. Anti-HPV antibodies were also investigated with clinicopathologic parameters, including survival data. Among various demographic characteristics, factors involving sexual behavior had a higher tendency of HPV DNA positivity and HPV seropositivity. Human papillomavirus DNA mean titer and positivity were both increased in patients with cervical neoplasia compared with those with normal control participants, but there was no statistical difference among types of cervical neoplasia. Serum anti-HPV 16 antibodies were also able to differentiate cervical neoplasia from a normal control participant and furthermore distinguished CIN 1 from CIN 2 and 3 (odd ratio 2.87 [1.43-5.78], P=.002). In cervical cancer, HPV 16 seropositivity was associated with prolonged disease-free survival according to the univariable analysis (hazard ratio=0.12 [0.01-0.94], P=.044). Serum anti-HPV 16 antibodies can distinguish cervical neoplasia from a normal control and has the advantage of identifying high-grade CIN. Moreover, in cervical cancer, HPV 16 seropositivity may be associated with a more favorable prognosis. II.

  13. New clinically relevant, orthotopic mouse models of human chondrosarcoma with spontaneous metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dass Crispin R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondrosarcoma responds poorly to adjuvant therapy and new, clinically relevant animal models are required to test targeted therapy. Methods Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and FS090, were evaluated for proliferation, colony formation, invasion, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Cell lines were also investigated for VEGF, MMP-2, MMP-9, and RECK expression. JJ012 and FS090 were injected separately into the mouse tibia intramedullary canal or tibial periosteum. Animal limbs were measured, and x-rayed for evidence of tumour take and progression. Tibias and lungs were harvested to determine the presence of tumour and lung metastases. Results JJ012 demonstrated significantly higher proliferative capacity, invasion, and colony formation in collagen I gel. JJ012 conditioned medium stimulated endothelial tube formation and osteoclastogenesis with a greater potency than FS090 conditioned medium, perhaps related to the effects of VEGF and MMP-9. In vivo, tumours formed in intratibial and periosteal groups injected with JJ012, however no mice injected with FS090 developed tumours. JJ012 periosteal tumours grew to 3 times the non-injected limb size by 7 weeks, whereas intratibial injected limbs required 10 weeks to achieve a similar tumour size. Sectioned tumour tissue demonstrated features of grade III chondrosarcoma. All JJ012 periosteal tumours (5/5 resulted in lung micro-metastases, while only 2/4 JJ012 intratibial tumours demonstrated metastases. Conclusions The established JJ012 models replicate the site, morphology, and many behavioural characteristics of human chondrosarcoma. Local tumour invasion of bone and spontaneous lung metastasis offer valuable assessment tools to test the potential of novel agents for future chondrosarcoma therapy.

  14. IMPACT OF NEW PRODUCTS WITH A FLOUR DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS "RAPAMID" ON CLINICAL STATE OF THE HUMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Kireevа

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Тhe principal problems, which the food industry of Ukraine is confronted with, is to provide the population with foodstuffs of high biological value. At the moment the technology of producing traditional foodstuffs is being improved and new generation of foodstuffs, which meet today’s requirements, is being made. These are foodstuffs with balanced composition, low calorie, sugar and fat content, high content of healthy ingredients for functional and therapeutic purposes. Taking into account that bread is one of the principal foodstuffs, the task of reducing caloric content of baked goods and enriching them with dietary fibers, vitamins and mineral substances is important and urgent. One of the main tasks of the food industry in Ukraine today is the search for new types of additives that contain a complex of functional ingredients and can give therapeutic and prophylactic properties for food products. The article presents the results of a clinical study of dietary additive "Rapamid" and flour products using this additive for the human body. The authors studied radioprotective properties of dietary additive "Rapamid" and flour products with it. Also it was investigated the influence of these additives and products with it on the general clinical condition of the children who receive high doses of radiation. The obtained results show that additional appointment to the normal diet and the basic treatment of dietary аdditive "Rapamid" and flour products with the use of this additive promotes children's immunity, disease prevention with stress and physical stress. Dietary additive "Rapamid" and flour products using this have antioxidant, anti-allergic and radioprotective properties, have positively influences on the cardio - vascular and hematopoietic systems, displays the body of toxic elements and radionuclides.

  15. Clinical system for non-invasive in situ monitoring of gases in the human paranasal sinuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewander, Märta; Guan, Zuguang; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune; Svensson, Tomas

    2009-06-22

    We present a portable system for non-invasive, simultaneous sensing of molecular oxygen (O(2)) and water vapor (H(2)O) in the human paranasal cavities. The system is based on high-resolution tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLAS) and digital wavelength modulation spectroscopy (dWMS). Since optical interference and non-ideal tuning of the diode lasers render signal processing complex, we focus on Fourier analysis of dWMS signals and procedures for removal of background signals. Clinical data are presented, and exhibit a significant improvement in signal-to-noise with respect to earlier work. The in situ detection limit, in terms of absorption fraction, is about 5x10(-5) for oxygen and 5x10(-4) for water vapor, but varies between patients due to differences in light attenuation. In addition, we discuss the use of water vapor as a reference in quantification of in situ oxygen concentration in detail. In particular, light propagation aspects are investigated by employing photon time-of-flight spectroscopy.

  16. Clinical and scientific impact of human papillomavirus on head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jeffrey M; Stavas, Mark J; Cmelak, Anthony J

    2014-10-10

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) arises from the skull base to the clavicles and is the fifth most common cancer in the world by incidence. Historically, in the developed world HNC was associated with tobacco use and alcohol consumption, and the combination of the two produced a synergistic increase in risk. However, beginning in 1983, investigators have found a significant and growing proportion of HNC patients with human papillomavirus-positive (HPV) tumors who neither drank nor used tobacco. Since that time, there has been increased interest in the molecular biology of HPV-positive HNC. Multiple studies now show that HPV has shifted the epidemiological landscape and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). These studies provide strong evidence for improved survival outcomes in patients with HPV-positive HNSCC compared to those with HPV-negative HNSCC. In many reports, HPV status is the strongest predictor of locoregional control, disease specific survival and overall survival. In response to these findings, there has been significant interest in the best management of HPV-positive disease. Discussions within major cooperative groups consider new trials designed to maintain the current strong survival outcomes while reducing the long-term treatment-related toxicities. This review will highlight the epidemiological, clinical and molecular discoveries surrounding HPV-related HNSCC over the recent decades and we conclude by suggesting how these findings may guide future treatment approaches.

  17. Investigational Clinical Trial of a Prototype Optoelectronic Computer-Aided Navigation Device for Dental Implant Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokstad, Asbjørn; Winnett, Brenton; Fava, Joseph; Powell, David; Somogyi-Ganss, Eszter

    New digital technologies enable real-time computer-aided (CA) three-dimensional (3D) guidance during dental implant surgery. The aim of this investigational clinical trial was to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of a prototype optoelectronic CA-navigation device in comparison with the conventional approach for planning and effecting dental implant surgery. Study participants with up to four missing teeth were recruited from the pool of patients referred to the University of Toronto Graduate Prosthodontics clinic. The first 10 participants were allocated to either a conventional or a prototype device study arm in a randomized trial. The next 10 participants received implants using the prototype device. All study participants were restored with fixed dental prostheses after 3 (mandible) or 6 (maxilla) months healing, and monitored over 12 months. The primary outcome was the incidence of any surgical, biologic, or prosthetic adverse events or device-related complications. Secondary outcomes were the incidence of positioning of implants not considered suitable for straightforward prosthetic restoration (yes/no); the perception of the ease of use of the prototype device by the two oral surgeons, recorded by use of a Likert-type questionnaire; and the clinical performance of the implant and superstructure after 1 year in function. Positioning of the implants was appraised on periapical radiographs and clinical photographs by four independent blinded examiners. Peri-implant bone loss was measured on periapical radiographs by a blinded examiner. No adverse events occurred related to placing any implants. Four device-related complications led to a switch from using the prototype device to the conventional method. All implants placed by use of the prototype device were in a position considered suitable for straightforward prosthetic restoration (n = 21). The qualitative evaluation by the surgeons was generally positive, although ergonomic challenges were identified

  18. Investigating Clinically and Scientifically Useful Cut Points on the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Michael H; Raymond, Nancy; Coleman, Eli; Swinburne Romine, Rebecca

    2017-05-01

    clinical screening tool and the other, more conservative measurement that is useful for etiologic and epidemiologic research. Miner MH, Raymond N, Coleman E, Swinburne Romine R. Investigating Clinically and Scientifically Useful Cut Points on the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory. J Sex Med 2017;14:715-720. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of Mergers in Terms of Human Resources and an Example of Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alparslan Şahin GÖRMÜŞ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Businesses may grow by acquisitions in order to protect their assets, to compete and to synergize in today’s global competitive environment. This kind of growth occurred among the businesses varies according to the different criteria. While businesses aim to growth achieve in order to increase their economic profitability, it is necessary to consider the human factor which is the businesses’ building block. As people working within the different businesses will continue to work within the same business culture after the business combination, the importance of human resource management is an undeniable truth in businesses for ensuring employees’ adaptation during of the merger process. The aim of this study, the impact of the problem occurred as a result of ignoring the human resources management is investigated. The study is executed in a business which merge by the way of a textile company operating Uşak province taking over another company in the same sector.

  20. Investigation and evaluation into the usability of human-computer interfaces using a typical CAD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickett, J D

    1987-01-01

    This research program covers three topics relating to the human-computer interface namely, voice recognition, tools and techniques for evaluation, and user and interface modeling. An investigation into the implementation of voice-recognition technologies examines how voice recognizers may be evaluated in commercial software. A prototype system was developed with the collaboration of FEMVIEW Ltd. (marketing a CAD package). A theoretical approach to evaluation leads to the hypothesis that human-computer interaction is affected by personality, influencing types of dialogue, preferred methods for providing helps, etc. A user model based on personality traits, or habitual-behavior patterns (HBP) is presented. Finally, a practical framework is provided for the evaluation of human-computer interfaces. It suggests that evaluation is an integral part of design and that the iterative use of evaluation techniques throughout the conceptualization, design, implementation and post-implementation stages will ensure systems that satisfy the needs of the users and fulfill the goal of usability.

  1. Investigations with FDG-PET Scanning in Prostate Cancer Show Limited Value for Clinical Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, Eeva [Univ. of Turku (Finland). Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy; Hogg, Annette; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney [The Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, East Melbourne, Vic (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging; Frydenberg, Mark [Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Vic (Australia)

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate FDG-PET (fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Twenty-two patients were studied during different disease phases of prostate cancer, for staging or restaging to clarify specific clinical questions. FDG-PET was performed encompassing the thorax, abdomen and pelvis using the Penn PET 300H scanner. Scanning was begun 60 min after {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose marker. Patients were catheterized and administered diuretics to minimize urinary activity. Information obtained with FDG-PET was concordant with findings from other investigations in 7/22 (32%) patients, discordant in 15/22 (68%) patients and equivalent in one patient (4%). PET indicated progressive disease in five patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <4 ng/L. The impact on management of the patients was high in 46% of cases, low in 41% and for 14% there was no impact on management. The accuracy of FDG-PET was 72% (95% CI 50-89) as confirmed by invasive diagnostics/follow-up. FDG-PET can provide useful information and improve the clinician's decision on further management procedures in selected patients with low PSA and bone or lymph node changes. A negative PET scan in prostate cancer should be interpreted with caution.

  2. Methodology optimization and diversification for the investigation of virulence potential in Haemophilus influenzae clinical strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giucă, Mihaela Cristina; Străuţ, Monica; Surdeanu, Maria; Nica, Maria; Ungureanu, Vasilica; Mihăescu, Grigore

    2011-01-01

    Ten Haemophilus influenzae strains were isolated from patients aged between 1.6 - 24 years, with various diagnoses (acute meningitis, acute upper respiratory infection, otitis media and acute sinusitis). Identification was based on phenotypic and molecular characteristics; antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by diffusion method according to CLSI standards 2011 for seven antibiotics. The results of molecular testing showed that all the studied strains produced an amplicon of 1000 bp with ompP2 primers indicating that all strains were H. influenzae. For six strains, the PCR amplicon obtained with bexA specific primers, proving that the strains were capsulated. The results of phenotypic testing showed that four strains were ampicillin nonsusceptible and (beta-lactamase-positive. The virulence potential of H. influenzae clinical strains was investigated by phenotypic methods, including the assessment of the soluble virulence factors on specific media containing the biochemical substratum for the investigated enzymatic factor, as well as the adherence and invasion capacity to HeLa cells monolayer using Cravioto modified method. The studied strains exhibited mainly a diffuse adherence pattern and different adherence indexes. Interestingly, two strains isolated from the same pacient (blood and CSF) showed a different degree of invasiveness, the strain isolated from blood being 20 times more invasive than the one isolated from CSF.

  3. Composition and function of macroencapsulated human embryonic stem cell-derived implants: comparison with clinical human islet cell grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motté, Evi; Szepessy, Edit; Suenens, Krista; Stangé, Geert; Bomans, Myriam; Jacobs-Tulleneers-Thevissen, Daniel; Ling, Zhidong; Kroon, Evert; Pipeleers, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    β-Cells generated from large-scale sources can overcome current shortages in clinical islet cell grafts provided that they adequately respond to metabolic variations. Pancreatic (non)endocrine cells can develop from human embryonic stem (huES) cells following in vitro derivation to pancreatic endoderm (PE) that is subsequently implanted in immune-incompetent mice for further differentiation. Encapsulation of PE increases the proportion of endocrine cells in subcutaneous implants, with enrichment in β-cells when they are placed in TheraCyte-macrodevices and predominantly α-cells when they are alginate-microencapsulated. At posttransplant (PT) weeks 20-30, macroencapsulated huES implants presented higher glucose-responsive plasma C-peptide levels and a lower proinsulin-over-C-peptide ratio than human islet cell implants under the kidney capsule. Their ex vivo analysis showed the presence of single-hormone-positive α- and β-cells that exhibited rapid secretory responses to increasing and decreasing glucose concentrations, similar to isolated human islet cells. However, their insulin secretory amplitude was lower, which was attributed in part to a lower cellular hormone content; it was associated with a lower glucose-induced insulin biosynthesis, but not with lower glucagon-induced stimulation, which together is compatible with an immature functional state of the huES-derived β-cells at PT weeks 20-30. These data support the therapeutic potential of macroencapsulated huES implants but indicate the need for further functional analysis. Their comparison with clinical-grade human islet cell grafts sets references for future development and clinical translation. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Stable tracer investigations in humans for assessing the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronese, I.; Cantone, M.C.; Giussani, A.; Maggioni, T.; Birattari, C.; Bondardi, M.; Groppi, F.; Garlaschelli, I.; Werner, E.; Roth, P.; Hoellriegl, V.; Louvat, P.; Felgenhauer, N.; Zilker, Th.

    2003-01-01

    The interest in the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium in humans is justified by the potential radiological risk represented by their radionuclides. Only a few data related to the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium in humans are available and, accordingly, the biokinetic models currently recommended by the ICRP for these elements are mainly based on data from animal experiments. The use of stable isotopes as tracers, coupled with a proper analytical technique (nuclear activation analysis with protons) for their determination in biological samples, represents an ethically acceptable methodology for biokinetic investigations, being free from any radiation risk for the volunteer subjects. In this work, the results obtained in eight biokinetic investigations for ruthenium, conducted on a total of three healthy volunteers, and six for zirconium, performed on a total of three subjects, are presented and compared to the predictions of the ICRP models. (author)

  5. Methods of investigation for cardiac autonomic dysfunction in human research studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardi, Luciano; Spallone, Vincenza; Stevens, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This consensus document provides evidence-based guidelines regarding the evaluation of diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) for human research studies as a result of the work of the CAN Subcommittee of the Toronto Diabetic Neuropathy Expert Group. The CAN subcommittee critically...... reviewed the limitations and strengths of the available diagnostic approaches for CAN and the need for developing new tests for autonomic function. It was concluded that the most sensitive and specific approaches currently available to evaluate CAN in clinical research are: 1) heart rate variability, 2......) baroreflex sensitivity, 3) muscle sympathetic nerve activity, 4) plasma catecholamines, and 5) heart sympathetic imaging. It was also recommended that efforts should be undertaken to develop new non-invasive and safe CAN tests to be used in clinical research, with a higher sensitivity and specificity...

  6. Prevalence and clinical symptoms of human metapneumovirus infection in hospitalized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette); G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard); J.C. Fockens (John); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); W.E.Ph. Beyer (Walter); R. de Groot (Ronald); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDuring a 17-month period, we performed retrospective analyses of the prevalence of and clinical symptoms associated with human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infection, among patients in a university hospital in The Netherlands. All available nasal-aspirate, throat-swab, sputum, and

  7. Timing of HAART initiation and clinical outcomes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroconverters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonsson, Michele; Fusco, Jennifer S.; Cole, Stephen R.; Thomas, James C.; Porter, Kholoud; Kaufman, Jay S.; Davidian, Marie; White, Alice D.; Hartmann, Katherine E.; Eron, Joseph J.; del Amo, Julia; Meyer, Laurence; Bucher, Heiner C.; Chene, Geneviève; Pillay, Deenan; Prins, Maria; Rosinska, Magda; Sabin, Caroline; Touloumi, Giota; Lodi, Sara; Coughlin, Kate; Walker, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; de Luca, Andrea; Fisher, Martin; Muga, Roberto; Kaldor, John; Kelleher, Tony; Ramacciotti, Tim; Gelgor, Linda; Cooper, David; Smith, Don; Gill, John; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Nielsen, Claus; Pedersen, Court; Lutsar, Irja; Dabis, Francois; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Masquelier, Bernard; Costagliola, Dominique; Guiguet, Marguerite; Vanhems, Philippe; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Ghosn, Jade; Boufassa, Faroudy; Hamouda, Osamah; Geskus, Ronald; van der Helm, Jannie; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the clinical benefit of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation vs deferral in a given month in patients with CD4 cell counts less than 800/μL. In this observational cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroconverters from CASCADE (Concerted Action on

  8. Medical humanitarianism, human rights and political advocacy: the case of the Israeli Open Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Nora; Filc, Dani; Davidovitch, Nadav

    2012-03-01

    In the context of neo-liberal retrenchments humanitarian NGOs have become alternative healthcare providers that partially fill the vacuum left by the welfare state's withdrawal from the provision of services to migrants and other marginalized populations. In many cases they thus help to build legitimacy for the state's retreat from social responsibilities. Human rights organizations play an important role in advocating for migrants' rights, but in many cases they represent a legalistic and individualized conceptualization of the right to health that limits their claims for social justice. This paper analyzes the interactions and tensions between the discourses of medical humanitarianism, human rights and political advocacy using the example of an "Open Clinic" run by an Israeli human rights organization as a case-study: In 2007 dramatically increasing patient numbers provoked an intense internal debate concerning the proposal to temporarily close the "Open Clinic" in order to press the government to take action. Based on protocols from internal meetings and parliamentary hearings and in-depth interviews, we have analyzed divergent contextualizations of the Clinic's closure. These reflect conflicting notions regarding the Clinic's variegated spectrum of roles--humanitarian, political, legitimizing, symbolic, empowering and organizational--and underlying conceptualizations of migrants' "deservingness". Our case-study thus helps to illuminate NGOs' role in the realm of migrant healthcare and points out options for a possible fruitful relationship between the divergent paradigms of medical humanitarianism, human rights and political advocacy. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Investigation of Fe and Ca in non-stimulated human saliva using NAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, J. A. G.; Zamboni, C. B.; Kovacs, L.; Lewgoy, H. R.

    2015-07-01

    In this study we investigated non-stimulated human whole saliva of healthy subjects and patients with periodontal disease using Neutron Activation Analysis technique (NAA). The measurements were performed in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP. We found considerable metabolic changes mainly in Fe and Ca concentration in whole saliva of periodontal patients. These data are useful for identifying or preventing this oral disease in the Brazilian population.

  10. Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Ganges water, human clinical and milk samples at Varanasi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Dharmendra K; Singh, Rakesh K; Singh, Durg V; Dubey, Suresh K

    2013-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes isolated from Ganges water, human clinical and milk samples were characterized by antibiotic susceptibility, serotype identification, detection of virulence genes and ERIC- and REP-PCR fingerprint analyses. All isolates were uniformly resistant to ampicillin, except two isolates, and showed variable resistance to gentamicin, cotrimoxazole, ofloxacin, rifampicin and tetracycline. Of the 20 isolates found positive for pathogens, seven (four human and three water isolates) belong to serogroups 4b, 4d and 4e; six (one human and five water isolates) belong to serogroups 1/2c and 3c; four milk isolates belong to serogroups 1/2b and 3b; and three milk isolates belong to serogroups 1/2a and 3a. Two water isolates, all human isolates, except one (Pb1) lacking inlJ gene, and three milk isolates possess inlA, inlC, plcA, prfA, actA, hlyA and iap genes. The remaining water and milk isolates showed variable presence of inlJ, plcA, prfA, and iap genes. ERIC- and REP-PCR based analyses collectively indicated that isolates of human clinical samples belong to identical or similar clone and isolates of water and milk samples belong to different clones. Overall study demonstrates the prevalence of pathogenic L. monocytogenes species in the environmental and clinical samples. Most of the isolates were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigations of portable cadmium telluride (CdTe(Cl)) detectors for clinical studies with radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The combination of small, portable γ-radiation-sensitive Cadmium Telluride (CdTE(Cl)) crystal detectors and portable solid state data storage memories makes it feasible to extend the measuring period in a number of clinical investigations based on the use of various radioisotopes and external detection. Blood sampling can be avoided in some cases. Continuous ambulatory monitoring of relevant physiological parameters is practicable, e.g. kidney function (GFR), left ventricular ejection fraction, subcutaneous blood flow, muscle blood flow and insulin absorption in diabetic patients. In the present methodological study the applicability of the 133-Xe washout technique to subcutaneous (s.c.) adipose tissue blood flow (SBF) has been investigated and adapted to the use of CdTe(Cl) detectors attached to the skin surface for the measurement of local 133-Xe-disappearance rate constants (k). Physical characterization of CdTe(Cl) detectors as γ-sensitive devices has been performed, and adequate counting sensitivities were found without detector energy-resolution properties. The CdTe(Cl) detectors are therefore suitable for single indicator studies. The measuring geometry of CdTe(Cl) detectors was studied and compared with that of stationary Sodium Iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors in both phantom and in vivo investigations. The spatial properties of CdTe(Cl) detectors could to some extent be adjusted by pulse height discrimination and lead collimation. When long-term measurements were complicated by for instance physical activity of the patients, the small CdTe(Cl) detectors in general showed equal or better performance than the heavy and voluminous NaI(Tl) detectors. The free movement of the ambulatory patient and the avoidance of cable connections to stationary data-collecting systems gave improved possibilities for measurements of the relevant parameters. From this point of view, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors must be considered an important advance for radioactivity studies in

  12. In Vitro Investigation of Heat Transfer Phenomenon in Human Immature Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Talebi; Sahar Moghimi; Mina Shafagh; Hadi Kalani; Fatemeh Mazhari

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp). Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU). Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second ...

  13. Investigating emotional contagion in dogs (Canis familiaris) to emotional sounds of humans and conspecifics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Annika; Barber, Anjuli L A; Faragó, Tamás; Müller, Corsin A; Huber, Ludwig

    2017-07-01

    Emotional contagion, a basic component of empathy defined as emotional state-matching between individuals, has previously been shown in dogs even upon solely hearing negative emotional sounds of humans or conspecifics. The current investigation further sheds light on this phenomenon by directly contrasting emotional sounds of both species (humans and dogs) as well as opposed valences (positive and negative) to gain insights into intra- and interspecies empathy as well as differences between positively and negatively valenced sounds. Different types of sounds were played back to measure the influence of three dimensions on the dogs' behavioural response. We found that dogs behaved differently after hearing non-emotional sounds of their environment compared to emotional sounds of humans and conspecifics ("Emotionality" dimension), but the subjects responded similarly to human and conspecific sounds ("Species" dimension). However, dogs expressed more freezing behaviour after conspecific sounds, independent of the valence. Comparing positively with negatively valenced sounds of both species ("Valence" dimension), we found that, independent of the species from which the sound originated, dogs expressed more behavioural indicators for arousal and negatively valenced states after hearing negative emotional sounds. This response pattern indicates emotional state-matching or emotional contagion for negative sounds of humans and conspecifics. It furthermore indicates that dogs recognized the different valences of the emotional sounds, which is a promising finding for future studies on empathy for positive emotional states in dogs.

  14. Human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities in Kathmandu, Nepal: a qualitative investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Nepal has experienced sporadic reports of human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities. Our objective was to identify a range of human rights that are enshrined in international law and/or are commonly reported by sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu, to be nonprotected or violated. Methods In September 2009 three focus group discussions were conducted by trained interviewers among a convenience sample of sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu Nepal. The modified Delphi technique was utilized to elicit and rank participant-generated definitions of human rights and their subsequent violations. Data was analyzed independently and cross checked by another investigator. Results Participants (n = 29) reported experiencing a range of human rights violations at home, work, educational, health care settings and in public places. Lack of adequate legal protection, physical and mental abuse and torture were commonly reported. Access to adequate legal protection and improvements in the family and healthcare environment were ranked as the most important priority areas. Conclusions Sexual and gender minorities in Nepal experienced a range of human rights violations. Future efforts should enroll a larger and more systematic sample of participants to determine frequency, timing, and/or intensity of exposure to rights violations, and estimate the population-based impact of these rights violations on specific health outcomes PMID:22591775

  15. Human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities in Kathmandu, Nepal: a qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonal; Pant, Sunil Babu; Dhakal, Suben; Pokhrel, Subash; Mullany, Luke C

    2012-05-16

    Nepal has experienced sporadic reports of human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities. Our objective was to identify a range of human rights that are enshrined in international law and/or are commonly reported by sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu, to be nonprotected or violated. In September 2009 three focus group discussions were conducted by trained interviewers among a convenience sample of sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu Nepal. The modified Delphi technique was utilized to elicit and rank participant-generated definitions of human rights and their subsequent violations. Data was analyzed independently and cross checked by another investigator. Participants (n = 29) reported experiencing a range of human rights violations at home, work, educational, health care settings and in public places. Lack of adequate legal protection, physical and mental abuse and torture were commonly reported. Access to adequate legal protection and improvements in the family and healthcare environment were ranked as the most important priority areas. Sexual and gender minorities in Nepal experienced a range of human rights violations. Future efforts should enroll a larger and more systematic sample of participants to determine frequency, timing, and/or intensity of exposure to rights violations, and estimate the population-based impact of these rights violations on specific health outcomes.

  16. Data sharing platforms for de-identified data from human clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Shmueli-Blumberg, Dikla

    2018-04-01

    Data sharing of de-identified individual participant data is being adopted by an increasing number of sponsors of human clinical trials. In addition to standardizing data syntax for shared trial data, semantic integration of various data elements is the focus of several initiatives that define research common data elements. This perspective article, in the first part, compares several data sharing platforms for de-identified clinical research data in terms of their size, policies and supported features. In the second part, we use a case study approach to describe in greater detail one data sharing platform (Data Share from National Institute of Drug Abuse). We present data on the past use of the platform, data formats offered, data de-identification approaches and its use of research common data elements. We conclude with a summary of current and expected future trends that facilitate secondary research use of data from completed human clinical trials.

  17. A curated transcriptome dataset collection to investigate the functional programming of human hematopoietic cells in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahbuba; Boughorbel, Sabri; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Cugno, Chiara; Chaussabel, Damien; Marr, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Compendia of large-scale datasets made available in public repositories provide an opportunity to identify and fill gaps in biomedical knowledge. But first, these data need to be made readily accessible to research investigators for interpretation. Here we make available a collection of transcriptome datasets to investigate the functional programming of human hematopoietic cells in early life. Thirty two datasets were retrieved from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and loaded in a custom web application called the Gene Expression Browser (GXB), which was designed for interactive query and visualization of integrated large-scale data. Quality control checks were performed. Multiple sample groupings and gene rank lists were created allowing users to reveal age-related differences in transcriptome profiles, changes in the gene expression of neonatal hematopoietic cells to a variety of immune stimulators and modulators, as well as during cell differentiation. Available demographic, clinical, and cell phenotypic information can be overlaid with the gene expression data and used to sort samples. Web links to customized graphical views can be generated and subsequently inserted in manuscripts to report novel findings. GXB also enables browsing of a single gene across projects, thereby providing new perspectives on age- and developmental stage-specific expression of a given gene across the human hematopoietic system. This dataset collection is available at: http://developmentalimmunology.gxbsidra.org/dm3/geneBrowser/list.

  18. Coordination of International Risk-Reduction Investigations by the Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.; Bogomolov, Valery V.

    2015-01-01

    Effective use of the unique capabilities of the International Space Station (ISS) for risk reduction on future deep space missions involves preliminary work in analog environments to identify and evaluate the most promising techniques, interventions and treatments. This entails a consolidated multinational approach to biomedical research both on ISS and in ground analogs. The Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration (MHRPE) was chartered by the five ISS partners to recommend the best combination of partner investigations on ISS for risk reduction in the relatively short time available for ISS utilization. MHRPE will also make recommendations to funding agencies for appropriate preparatory analog work. In 2011, NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) and the Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) of the Russian Academy of Science, acting for MHRPE, developed a joint US-Russian biomedical program for the 2015 one-year ISS mission (1YM) of American and Russian crewmembers. This was to evaluate the possibilities for multilateral research on ISS. An overlapping list of 16 HRP, 9 IBMP, 3 Japanese, 3 European and 1 Canadian investigations were selected to address risk-reduction goals in 7 categories: Functional Performance, Behavioral Health, Visual Impairment, Metabolism, Physical Capacity, Microbial and Human Factors. MHRPE intends to build on this bilateral foundation to recommend more fully-integrated multilateral investigations on future ISS missions commencing after the 1YM. MHRPE has also endorsed an on-going program of coordinated research on 6-month, one-year and 6-week missions ISS expeditions that is now under consideration by ISS managers. Preparatory work for these missions will require coordinated and collaborative campaigns especially in the psychological and psychosocial areas using analog isolation facilities in Houston, Köln and Moscow, and possibly elsewhere. The multilateral Human Analogs research working group (HANA) is the focal point of those

  19. Typical investigational medicinal products follow relatively uniform regulations in 10 European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Kubiak, Christine; Whitfield, Kate

    2012-01-01

    In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe.......In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe....

  20. A tool to facilitate clinical biomarker studies - a tissue dictionary based on the Human Protein Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampf Caroline

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complexity of tissue and the alterations that distinguish normal from cancer remain a challenge for translating results from tumor biological studies into clinical medicine. This has generated an unmet need to exploit the findings from studies based on cell lines and model organisms to develop, validate and clinically apply novel diagnostic, prognostic and treatment predictive markers. As one step to meet this challenge, the Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to produce antibodies towards human protein targets corresponding to all human protein coding genes and to map protein expression in normal human tissues, cancer and cells. Here, we present a dictionary based on microscopy images created as an amendment to the Human Protein Atlas. The aim of the dictionary is to facilitate the interpretation and use of the image-based data available in the Human Protein Atlas, but also to serve as a tool for training and understanding tissue histology, pathology and cell biology. The dictionary contains three main parts, normal tissues, cancer tissues and cells, and is based on high-resolution images at different magnifications of full tissue sections stained with H & E. The cell atlas is centered on immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy images, using different color channels to highlight the organelle structure of a cell. Here, we explain how this dictionary can be used as a tool to aid clinicians and scientists in understanding the use of tissue histology and cancer pathology in diagnostics and biomarker studies.

  1. Investigation of the mechanism of action of alemtuzumab in a human CD52 transgenic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanping; Turner, Michael J; Shields, Jacqueline; Gale, Matthew S; Hutto, Elizabeth; Roberts, Bruce L; Siders, William M; Kaplan, Johanne M

    2009-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD52, an antigen found on the surface of normal and malignant lymphocytes. It is approved for the treatment of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and is undergoing Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. The exact mechanism by which alemtuzumab mediates its biological effects in vivo is not clearly defined and mechanism of action studies have been hampered by the lack of cross-reactivity between human and mouse CD52. To address this issue, a transgenic mouse expressing human CD52 (hCD52) was created. Transgenic mice did not display any phenotypic abnormalities and were able to mount normal immune responses. The tissue distribution of hCD52 and the level of expression by various immune cell populations were comparable to those seen in humans. Treatment with alemtuzumab replicated the transient increase in serum cytokines and depletion of peripheral blood lymphocytes observed in humans. Lymphocyte depletion was not as profound in lymphoid organs, providing a possible explanation for the relatively low incidence of infection in alemtuzumab-treated patients. Interestingly, both lymphocyte depletion and cytokine induction by alemtuzumab were largely independent of complement and appeared to be mediated by neutrophils and natural killer cells because removal of these populations with antibodies to Gr-1 or asialo-GM-1, respectively, strongly inhibited the activity of alemtuzumab whereas removal of complement by treatment with cobra venom factor had no impact. The hCD52 transgenic mouse appears to be a useful model and has provided evidence for the previously uncharacterized involvement of neutrophils in the activity of alemtuzumab. PMID:19740383

  2. Elucidation of salvage laryngectomy pathologic and clinical variables to guide further treatment intensification investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharpf, Joseph; Ward, Matthew; Adelstein, David; Koyfman, Shlomo; Li, Mingsi

    2018-04-01

    There are limited treatment options beyond surgical salvage for patients who fail nonoperative treatment for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we examine the failure patterns after surgical salvage and the potential pathologic and clinical prognostic variables that might guide further postoperative intensification investigation. Retrospective analysis at a tertiary academic referral center. From an institutional review board-approved institutional head and neck cancer registry, a consecutive series of 147 patients who underwent salvage laryngectomy for squamous cell cancer recurrence or persistence after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy between May 1995 and May 2016 were identified. Variables potentially associated with oncologic outcome after surgical salvage were then collected and retrospectively evaluated. The projected 2-year locoregional failure rate was 21.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.6%-29.0%]), and the overall survival 65% (95% CI, 57.5%-74.3%) for the entire cohort after salvage laryngectomy. On multivariable analysis, sarcomatoid/spindle cell pathology (hazard ratio [HR], 3.147; 95% CI, 1.181-8.386; P = 0.022), lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) (positive vs. negative; HR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.21-4.42; P = 0.011), and advanced initial American Joint Committee on Cancer 7th Edition grouped stage (stages III-IVB vs. stages I-II; HR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.04-2.6; P = 0.035) were found to be independently associated with inferior disease-free survival. No other clinical or pathologic variables predicted failure. Salvage laryngectomy after nonoperative treatment failure results in successful locoregional control rates and survival in the majority of patients failing initial therapy. This should temper enthusiasm for routine treatment intensification with postoperative re-irradiation and/or other systemic treatments for the vast majority of patients. Sarcomatoid pathology, LVSI, and an advanced initial stage are associated with inferior

  3. Investigating the congruence of crowdsourced information with official government data: the case of pediatric clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minki; Jung, Yuchul; Jung, Dain; Hur, Cinyoung

    2014-02-03

    Health 2.0 is a benefit to society by helping patients acquire knowledge about health care by harnessing collective intelligence. However, any misleading information can directly affect patients' choices of hospitals and drugs, and potentially exacerbate their health condition. This study investigates the congruence between crowdsourced information and official government data in the health care domain and identifies the determinants of low congruence where it exists. In-line with infodemiology, we suggest measures to help the patients in the regions vulnerable to inaccurate health information. We text-mined multiple online health communities in South Korea to construct the data for crowdsourced information on public health services (173,748 messages). Kendall tau and Spearman rank order correlation coefficients were used to compute the differences in 2 ranking systems of health care quality: actual government evaluations of 779 hospitals and mining results of geospecific online health communities. Then we estimated the effect of sociodemographic characteristics on the level of congruence by using an ordinary least squares regression. The regression results indicated that the standard deviation of married women's education (P=.046), population density (P=.01), number of doctors per pediatric clinic (P=.048), and birthrate (P=.002) have a significant effect on the congruence of crowdsourced data (adjusted R²=.33). Specifically, (1) the higher the birthrate in a given region, (2) the larger the variance in educational attainment, (3) the higher the population density, and (4) the greater the number of doctors per clinic, the more likely that crowdsourced information from online communities is congruent with official government data. To investigate the cause of the spread of misleading health information in the online world, we adopted a unique approach by associating mining results on hospitals from geospecific online health communities with the sociodemographic

  4. Investigation of biomaterials by human epithelial gingiva cells: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neunzehn Jörg

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In modern medicine and dentistry the use of biomaterials is a fast developing field of increasing interest. Especially in dentistry the interaction between biomaterials like implant materials and the soft tissue in the oral cavity is in the focus of daily research. In this context the high importance of testing materials and their surfaces concerning their biocompatibility towards corresponding cells is very likely. For this purpose this study investigates cells derived from human gingival biopsies on different materials and surfaces. Methods Cells in this study were cultivated out of human biopsies by a grow out explant technique and were sub cultivated on titanium, zirconium dioxide and collagen membrane specimens. To characterise the cells on the material surfaces used in this study immunohistochemical and histological staining techniques as well as different methods of microscopy (light microscopy and SEM were applied. Results With the aid of the explant technique and the chosen cell cultivation method it was possible to investigate the human gingiva derived cells on different materials. The data of the present study show that the human gingival cells attach and proliferate on all three tested materials by exhibiting characteristic gingival keratinocyte protein expression even after long periods of culture e.g. up to 70 days. Conclusions It could be shown that the three tested materials titanium, zirconium dioxide and collagen membrane (and their special surfaces are good candidates for the application as materials in the dental gingival environment or, in the case of the collagen membrane as scaffold/cell-carrier for human gingival cells in tissue engineering.

  5. Investigations of the human visual system using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollias, Spyros S.

    2004-01-01

    The application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in studies of the visual system provided significant advancement in our understanding of the organization and functional properties of visual areas in the human cortex. Recent technological and methodological improvements allowed studies to correlate neuronal activity with visual perception and demonstrated the ability of fMRI to observe distributed neural systems and to explore modulation of neural activity during higher cognitive processes. Preliminary applications in patients with visual impairments suggest that this method provides a powerful tool for the assessment and management of brain pathologies. Recent research focuses on obtaining new information about the spatial localization, organization, functional specialization and participation in higher cognitive functions of visual cortical areas in the living human brain and in further establishment of the method as a useful clinical tool of diagnostic and prognostic significance for various pathologic processes affecting the integrity of the visual system. It is anticipated that the combined neuroimaging approach in patients with lesions and healthy controls will provide new insight on the topography and functional specialization of cortical visual areas and will further establish the clinical value of the method for improving diagnostic accuracy and treatment planning

  6. Herniation pits in human mummies: a CT investigation in the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Sicily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Panzer

    Full Text Available Herniation pits (HPs of the femoral neck were first described in a radiological publication in 1982 as round to oval radiolucencies in the proximal superior quadrant of the femoral neck on anteroposterior radiographs of adults. In following early clinical publications, HPs were generally recognized as an incidental finding. In contrast, in current clinical literature they are mentioned in the context of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI of the hip joint, which is known to cause osteoarthritis (OA. The significance of HPs in chronic skeletal disorders such as OA is still unclear, but they are discussed as a possible radiological indicator for FAI in a large part of clinical studies.In this paleoradiological study we examined a sample of mummies from the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Sicily, by a mobile computed tomography (CT scanner. Evaluation of the CT examinations revealed HPs in six out of 16 (37.5% adult male mummies.The first aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of HPs shown in our mummy collection to the findings described in clinical literature. Thereby CT evaluation revealed that their osseous imaging characteristics are in accordance, consisting of round to oval subcortical lesions at the anterior femoral neck, clearly demarcated by a sclerotic margin.The second aim was to introduce HPs to the paleoradiological and paleopathological methodology as an entity that underwent a renaissance from an incidental finding to a possible radiological indicator of FAI in the clinical situation. As FAI plays an important role in the development of OA of the hip, which is a very common finding in human skeletal remains, HPs should always be considered in paleoradiological evaluation of hip joint diseases.

  7. On-site management of investigational products and drug delivery systems in conformity with Good Clinical Practices (GCPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méthot, Julie; Brisson, Diane; Gaudet, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Investigators and research teams participating in clinical trials have to deal with complex investigational products, study designs, and research environments. The emergence of new drug delivery systems and investigational products combining more than one drug and the development of biodrugs such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, siRNA, and gene therapy to treat orphan or common diseases constitute a new challenge for investigators and clinical sites. We describe the requirements and challenges of drug management in conformity with Good Clinical Practices (GCPs) for investigators and sites participating in clinical trials. Review At all sites participating in clinical trials, standard operating procedures (SOPs) covering the critical path of drug and drug delivery systems management are required. All steps should be auditable, including reception, validation, storage, access, preparation, distribution, techniques of administration, use, return, and destruction of research products. Biodrugs require traceability and specific SOPs on the management of potential immune reactions. Investigational products must be stored under standard auditable conditions. The traceability of storage conditions (including temperature) requires these conditions to be monitored on a continuous basis. A dedicated space with restricted access limited to authorized qualified personnel facilitates the monitoring. The development of standardized, auditable settings and the application of dedicated, site-specific SOPs for the management of investigational products and drug delivery systems contribute to guarantee the compliance to GCP requirements.

  8. Non-inflammatory destructive periodontal disease: a clinical, microbiological, immunological and genetic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Repeke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis comprises a group of multifactorial diseases in which periodontopathogens accumulate in dental plaque and trigger host chronic inflammatory and immune responses against periodontal structures, which are determinant to the disease outcome. Although unusual cases of non-inflammatory destructive periodontal disease (NIDPD are described, their pathogenesis remains unknown. A unique NIDPD case was investigated by clinical, microbiological, immunological and genetic tools. The patient, a non-smoking dental surgeon with excessive oral hygiene practice, presented a generalized bone resorption and tooth mobility, but not gingival inflammation or occlusion problems. No hematological, immunological or endocrine alterations were found. No periodontopathogens (A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, F. nucleatum and T. denticola or viruses (HCMV, EBV-1 and HSV-1 were detected, along with levels of IL-1β and TNF-a in GCF compatible with healthy tissues. Conversely ALP, ACP and RANKL GCF levels were similar to diseased periodontal sites. Genetic investigation demonstrated that the patient carried some SNPs, as well HLA-DR4 (*0404 and HLA-B27 alleles, considered risk factors for bone loss. Then, a less vigorous and diminished frequency of toothbrushing was recommended to the patient, resulting in the arrest of alveolar bone loss, associated with the return of ALP, ACP and RANKL in GCF to normality levels. In conclusion, the unusual case presented here is compatible with the previous description of NIDPD, and the results that a possible combination of excessive force and frequency of mechanical stimulation with a potentially bone loss prone genotype could result in the alveolar bone loss seen in NIDPD.

  9. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems...... to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co...... of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut....

  10. Human genetics after the bomb: Archives, clinics, proving grounds and board rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindee, Susan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper I track the history of post-1945 human genetics and genomics emphasizing the importance of ideas about risk to the scientific study and medical management of human heredity. Drawing on my own scholarship as it is refracted through important new work by other scholars both junior and senior, I explore how radiation risk and then later disease risk mattered to the development of genetics and genomics, particularly in the United States. In this context I excavate one of the central ironies of post-war human genetics: while studies of DNA as the origin and cause of diseases have been lavishly supported by public institutions and private investment around the world, the day-to-day labor of intensive clinical innovation has played a far more important role in the actual human experience of genetic disease and genetic risk for affected families. This has implications for the archival record, where clinical interactions are less readily accessible to historians. This paper then suggests that modern genomics grew out of radiation risk; that it was and remains a risk assessment science; that it is temporally embedded as a form of both prediction and historical reconstruction; and that it has become a big business focused more on risk and prediction (which can be readily marketed) than on effective clinical intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High purity of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells obtained from neural stem cells: suitable for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caiying; Luan, Zuo; Yang, Yinxiang; Wang, Zhaoyan; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yabin; Du, Qingan

    2015-01-30

    Recent studies have suggested that the transplantation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) may be a promising potential therapeutic strategy for a broad range of diseases affecting myelin, such as multiple sclerosis, periventricular leukomalacia, and spinal cord injury. Clinical interest arose from the potential of human stem cells to be directed to OPCs for the clinical application of treating these diseases since large quantities of high quality OPCs are needed. However, to date, there have been precious few studies about OPC induction from human neural stem cells (NSCs). Here we successfully directed human fetal NSCs into highly pure OPCs using a cocktail of basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and neurotrophic factor-3. These cells had typical morphology of OPCs, and 80-90% of them expressed specific OPC markers such as A2B5, O4, Sox10 and PDGF-αR. When exposed to differentiation medium, 90% of the cells differentiated into oligodendrocytes. The OPCs could be amplified in our culture medium and passaged at least 10 times. Compared to a recent published method, this protocol had much higher stability and repeatability, and OPCs could be obtained from NSCs from passage 5 to 38. It also obtained more highly pure OPCs (80-90%) via simpler and more convenient manipulation. This study provided an easy and efficient method to obtain large quantities of high-quality human OPCs to meet clinical demand. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhou, Jianda; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia‑associated transcription factor (MITF), sex‑determining region Y‑box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease‑causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease‑causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research.

  14. Ischaemic memory imaging using metabolic radiopharmaceuticals: overview of clinical settings and ongoing investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Naya, Masanao [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Sapporo (Japan); Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    ''Ischaemic memory'' is defined as a prolonged functional and/or biochemical alteration remaining after a particular episode of severe myocardial ischaemia. The biochemical alteration has been reported as metabolic stunning. Metabolic imaging has been used to detect the footprint left by previous ischaemic episodes evident due to delayed recovery of myocardial metabolism (persistent dominant glucose utilization with suppression of fatty acid oxidation). β-Methyl-p-[{sup 123}I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer widely used for metabolic imaging in clinical settings in Japan. In patients with suspected coronary artery disease but no previous myocardial infarction, BMIPP has shown acceptable diagnostic accuracy. In particular, BMIPP plays an important role in the identification of prior ischaemic insult in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute chest pain syndrome. Recent data also show the usefulness of {sup 123}I-BMIPP SPECT for predicting cardiovascular events in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Similarly, SPECT or PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG injected during peak exercise or after exercise under fasting conditions shows an increase in FDG uptake in postischaemic areas. This article will overview the roles of ischaemic memory imaging both under established indications and in ongoing investigations. (orig.)

  15. Variability of intraductal papillomas of the mammary gland: Clinical, roentgenologic and morphologic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummel, W.

    1974-01-01

    The radiodiagnostical method of choice is the galactographic technique. However, a specific X-ray image of the papilloma does not exist. The galactographic technique has to be adapted to the surgical and histologic one. Only by combining these three techniques good results can be achieved. It is not possible to draw conclusions from the colour of the pathologic discharge about the type and character of the pathologic process. Contrary to the findings documented in the literature, we were able to diagnose with our technique not only small tumours, but also tumours situated in the periphery of the lactiferous duct. Because of our investigations it is no longer possible to maintain and keep the strict division of the proliferative changes occurring at the lactiferous duct walls. In this study, the most significant morphologic results are described in detail. In all patients with pathologic discharge of the mammary gland, the so-called papillo-carcinoma was found only in one case. As clinical consequence it has therefore to be demanded that in all women with the symptom of pathologic mamillary discharge first of all the origin of this discharge has to be localised by means of galactography. Only the individual morphologic picture of a proliferative change of the lactiferous duct provides some prognostic value. The prerequisites for such an individual assessment are differentiated roentgenologic, surgical and histological techniques. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Clinical investigation of 131I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Haiqing; Wu Bian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical curative effects of 131 I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate for Graves disease. Methods: Patients with Graves disease took lithium carbonate (250 mg, once per day) orally for 5 weeks. Then they were treated with 131 I (doses=3.15 MBq(80 uCi)/g, based on 60%-70% of the thyroid size). We kept track from 6 to 24 months (averaging 14 months) and classified the results into three: cured, improved or no effect. Results: After a single cycle of 131 I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate, 106 patients with Graves disease were cured, 28 were improved and 8 saw no effects, respectively 74.6%, 19.7% and 5.6% among the 142 patients. We then treated 23 of them with another 131 I therapy (without lithium carbonate). 10 of such were cured (43.5%), 8 were improved (34.8%) and the other 5 saw no effects. Among all patients, hypothyroidism was observed from 25(17.6%), 6 months after the first 131 I therapy. Conclusions: Notable curative results were observed from 131 I therapy combined with low-dose lithium carbonate for Graves disease. Moreover, the dosage of 131 I was therefore decreased, which also lowered the toxicity response. (authors)

  17. Investigation of Exon 1 in FXN Gene in Patients with Clinical Symptomatic of Friedreich Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseroleslami M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA is an autosomal recessive disorder that is typically associated with dysarthria, muscle weakness, spasticity in the lower limbs, scoliosis, bladder dysfunction, absent lower limb reflexes, and loss of position and vibration sense. Approximately two-thirds of these patients suffer from cardiomyopathy and more than 30% have diabetes mellitus. Individuals with FRDA have identifiable mutations in the FXN gene. The most common type of mutation which is observed on both alleles in more than 98% of patients is an expansion of a GAA triplet-repeat in intron of FXN gene. Approximately 2% of individuals with FRDA are compound heterozygotes, who have a GAA expansion in the disease-causing range in one FXN allele and an inactivating FXN mutation in another allele. Aim of the present study was to investigate exon 1 in FRDA gene in patients with clinical symptoms of Friedreich’s Ataxia that have not GAA triplet-repeat expansion in intron 1 of FXN gene.Methods: In this study, exon 1 in 5 patients suspected of FRDA analyzed using PCR and sequencing. Results: An A to G transition at nucleotide number 815284, in exon 1 was observed in all patients. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that disease-causing homozygous mutations could be because of consanguinity marriage in Iran. Therefore, sequencing of all exons of the gene is necessary.

  18. Clinical distinctions between selective mutism and social phobia: an investigation of childhood psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeganeh, Robin; Beidel, Deborah C; Turner, Samuel M; Pina, Armando A; Silverman, Wendy K

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that children with selective mutism are more socially anxious than children with social anxiety disorder but who are not selectively mute. Twenty-three children with comorbid selective mutism and social phobia and 23 age-matched controls with social phobia alone and their parents participated in a comprehensive assessment of social anxiety and related aspects of psychopathology. The results do not uniformly support previous suggestions that children with selective mutism refuse speech because they are "frozen with fear." Although clinician and observer ratings for children with selective mutism revealed higher ratings of social distress than for children with social phobia alone, self-report data do not support this conclusion. Furthermore, although there were no group differences on measures of trait anxiety, general fears, or scores on the Child Behavior Checklist broadband Internalizing or Externalizing scales, children with selective mutism scored higher than children with social phobia alone on the Child Behavior Checklist Delinquency subscale, suggesting the presence of a broader clinical syndrome. It remains unclear whether children with selective mutism have extreme levels of social anxiety. Potential areas that might shed further light on this interesting disorder are discussed.

  19. Ischaemic memory imaging using metabolic radiopharmaceuticals: overview of clinical settings and ongoing investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Naya, Masanao; Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara

    2014-01-01

    ''Ischaemic memory'' is defined as a prolonged functional and/or biochemical alteration remaining after a particular episode of severe myocardial ischaemia. The biochemical alteration has been reported as metabolic stunning. Metabolic imaging has been used to detect the footprint left by previous ischaemic episodes evident due to delayed recovery of myocardial metabolism (persistent dominant glucose utilization with suppression of fatty acid oxidation). β-Methyl-p-[ 123 I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer widely used for metabolic imaging in clinical settings in Japan. In patients with suspected coronary artery disease but no previous myocardial infarction, BMIPP has shown acceptable diagnostic accuracy. In particular, BMIPP plays an important role in the identification of prior ischaemic insult in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute chest pain syndrome. Recent data also show the usefulness of 123 I-BMIPP SPECT for predicting cardiovascular events in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Similarly, SPECT or PET imaging with 18 F-FDG injected during peak exercise or after exercise under fasting conditions shows an increase in FDG uptake in postischaemic areas. This article will overview the roles of ischaemic memory imaging both under established indications and in ongoing investigations. (orig.)

  20. The investigation of genetic and clinical features in Chinese patients with juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z-J; Lin, H-X; Liu, G-L; Tao, Q-Q; Ni, W; Xiao, B-G; Wu, Z-Y

    2017-09-01

    Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (JALS) occurs at an age of onset below 25 years with a heterogeneous disease onset location, variable progression and survival time. To investigate whether an ALS gene profile could resolve any aspects of clinical symptom heterogeneity, we have used targeted sequencing technology in a cohort of 12 JALS patients of Chinese descent. We detected 5 likely pathogenic mutations, 2 in familial probands and 3 in sporadic patients. One was a known TARDBP mutation (p.G348V) and 4 were FUS frameshift mutations including a known p.Gln519Ilefs*9 mutation and 3 novel mutations, p.Gly515Valfs*14, p.Gly486Profs*30, and p.Arg498Alafs*32. Of the 4 FUS mutations, 2 were able to be confirmed as de novo mutations. The TARDBP mutation carrier showed a classic ALS phenotype. All patients with FUS mutations experienced limb weakness at an early age and developed bulbar symptoms during the disease course. FUS mutations have previously been associated with increased JALS disease progression, however, we found a large range 12 to 84 months in disease survival (mean 58.2 months). Our results justify future screening for variants in FUS as it remains the most frequent genetic determinant of early onset, JALS (found in 30% of our patients). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ischaemic memory imaging using metabolic radiopharmaceuticals: overview of clinical settings and ongoing investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Naya, Masanao; Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara

    2014-02-01

    "Ischaemic memory" is defined as a prolonged functional and/or biochemical alteration remaining after a particular episode of severe myocardial ischaemia. The biochemical alteration has been reported as metabolic stunning. Metabolic imaging has been used to detect the footprint left by previous ischaemic episodes evident due to delayed recovery of myocardial metabolism (persistent dominant glucose utilization with suppression of fatty acid oxidation). β-Methyl-p-[(123)I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer widely used for metabolic imaging in clinical settings in Japan. In patients with suspected coronary artery disease but no previous myocardial infarction, BMIPP has shown acceptable diagnostic accuracy. In particular, BMIPP plays an important role in the identification of prior ischaemic insult in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute chest pain syndrome. Recent data also show the usefulness of (123)I-BMIPP SPECT for predicting cardiovascular events in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Similarly, SPECT or PET imaging with (18)F-FDG injected during peak exercise or after exercise under fasting conditions shows an increase in FDG uptake in postischaemic areas. This article will overview the roles of ischaemic memory imaging both under established indications and in ongoing investigations.

  2. New approaches to chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: from neuropharmacology to clinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Edward B; Slusher, Barbara S; Rojas, Camilo; Navari, Rudolph M

    2006-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are considered to be among the most distressing consequences of cytotoxic chemotherapies. Currently, there are several novel 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), including ondansetron, granisetron, and dolasetron. These agents provide significant improvement in the management of acute emesis but are ineffective at preventing delayed emesis. In 2003, a new 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, palonosetron HCL (Aloxi), was introduced to the U.S. market. Palonosetron was found to be effective in preventing delayed CINV. Indeed, palonosetron was the first and only 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist approved by the FDA for the prevention of both acute and delayed CINV. More recently, studies on the role of substance P in the emetic process led to the development of aprepitant (Emend) for the prevention of delayed emesis in combination with 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists. Despite these major advances, CINV remains uncontrolled in some patients. Current efforts are focused on treating refractory emesis and include both the clinical evaluation of compounds marketed for other indications and the preclinical evaluation of novel molecules targeting other transmitters in the emetic pathway. Ongoing work in pharmacogenomics has postulated several candidate genes that could be involved in emetic sensitivity and responsiveness to antiemetic therapy. Investigations into the pharmacogenomics of CINV may someday be able to aid in the identification of high risk patients and patients unlikely to respond to conventional therapies.

  3. Investigating Treatment Outcomes Across OCD Symptom Dimensions in a Clinical Sample of OCD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Tannah; Wetterneck, Chad T; Bartsch, Robert A; Leonard, Rachel C; Riemann, Bradley C

    2015-01-01

    Despite the heterogeneous nature of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), many self-report assessments do not adequately capture the clinical picture presenting within each symptom dimension, particularly unacceptable thoughts (UTs). In addition, obsessions and ordering/arranging compulsions are often underrepresented in samples of treatment outcome studies for OCD. Such methodological discrepancies may obscure research findings comparing treatment outcomes across OCD symptom dimensions. This study aimed to improve upon previous research by investigating treatment outcomes across OCD symptom dimensions using the Dimensional Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, which offers a more comprehensive assessment of UTs. The study included a primarily residential sample of 134 OCD patients. Results indicated that there were no significant differences in treatment outcomes across symptom dimensions. However, the severity of UTs remained significantly greater than other symptom dimensions at both admission and discharge. Thus, it is possible that UTs may exhibit uniquely impairing features, compared with other symptom dimensions. It is also possible that these findings may reflect the characteristics of the residential OCD samples. These speculations as well as implications for OCD treatment and future research are discussed.

  4. Recognition of food-allergic patients and their allergens by RAST technique and clinical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wraith, D.G.; Merrett, J.; Roth, A.; Yman, L.; Merrett, T.G.

    1979-01-01

    Sera from 119 patients with possible food allergies were tested against a panel of thirteen food allergens by the RAST method. The results were compared with in vivo tests. 79% of foods causing symptoms gave a positive RAST to the specific food. Symptoms were grouped according to their time of appearance after taking the food 'immediate' up to 1 hr and 'non-immediate' more than 1 hr afterwards. Almost all those with 'immediate' symptoms were already aware of the foods causing them and there was a 100% correlation of the RAST results with these. Only a few of those with 'non-immediate' symptoms were previously aware that these foods were responsible, and 64% of these gave a positive RAST. The majority of patients with a positive RAST result had total IgE in excess of 300 u/ml, had specific IgE antibodies against one or more common inhalant allergens, were under the age of 30 years and had a combination of asthma and eczema. The RAST method was found to be a useful and safe guide upon which to base a clinical investigation of food allergy, especially for patients whose symptoms appeared more than 1 hr after the food and in whom the relationship between their symptoms and food was not apparent. The RAST technique was surprisingly successful in identifying the foods which caused these 'non-immediate' symptoms. (author)

  5. [Clinical impact of opening a human milk bank in a neonatal unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Román, S; Bustos-Lozano, G; López-Maestro, M; Rodríguez-López, J; Orbea-Gallardo, C; Samaniego-Fernández, M; Pallás-Alonso, C R

    2014-09-01

    The benefits of donor human milk compared with artificial formulas have been well demonstrated; nevertheless the impact in the clinical practice of opening a human milk bank within a neonatal unit has not yet been studied. The main aim of this study was to analyze the impact on the clinical practice of opening a human milk bank in a neonatal unit to provide donor human milk for preterm infants ≤ 32 weeks of gestational age. A before and after study was designed, with the intervention being the opening a human milk bank. Preterm infants ≤ 32 weeks of gestational age born in the Hospital 12 Octubre from July to December 2005 and January to June 2008 (firsts 6 months after opening the human milk bank) were included. After opening the human milk bank, enteral feedings were started 31h before (Partificial formula, the exposure to formula in the first 15 days of life was reduced from 50% to 16.6%, and it's consumption during the first 28 days of life was significantly reduced. There was a higher consumption of own mother's milk during the hospital stay, and a higher rate of exclusive breastfeeding at hospital discharge (54% vs 40%). The availability of donor human milk has led to quicker progression with enteral feedings and earlier withdrawal of parenteral nutrition. It has reduced the exposure to artificial formulas, and has also increased the intake of own mother's milk during the hospital stay and the rate of exclusive breastfeeding at hospital discharge. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Improvement in the performance of external quality assessment in Korean HIV clinical laboratories using unrecalcified human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Sook; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Chan-Wha; Kim, Hyon-Suk; Kim, Sung Soon

    2012-01-01

    The external quality assessment schemes (EQAS) organizer provides a suitable program to monitor and improve the quality of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing laboratories with EQAS panels prepared under various conditions. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of human plasma samples on the EQAS results of HIV obtained from hospital-based clinical laboratories. From 2007 to 2009, HIV EQAS panels consisted of four to six samples that consisted of undiluted positive and negative samples and were provided to laboratories twice per year. Up until the first half EQAS in 2008, EQAS panel materials were obtained by converting acid citrate dextrose treated plasma to serum via chemical treatment with CaCl2. Beginning with the second EQAS in 2008, all materials were prepared without the defibrination process. Approximately 300 HIV clinical laboratories participated in this program. The overall performance of clinical laboratories was shown to be improved when using unrecalcified plasma panels compared with recalcified panels. Significant differences were observed in EIA analyses of plasma for both positive (plaboratories.

  7. Generation of clinical-grade human induced pluripotent stem cells in Xeno-free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Hao, Jie; Bai, Donghui; Gu, Qi; Han, Weifang; Wang, Lei; Tan, Yuanqing; Li, Xia; Xue, Ke; Han, Pencheng; Liu, Zhengxin; Jia, Yundan; Wu, Jun; Liu, Lei; Wang, Liu; Li, Wei; Liu, Zhonghua; Zhou, Qi

    2015-11-12

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are considered as one of the most promising seed cell sources in regenerative medicine. Now hiPSC-based clinical trials are underway. To ensure clinical safety, cells used in clinical trials or therapies should be generated under GMP conditions, and with Xeno-free culture media to avoid possible side effects like immune rejection that induced by the Xeno reagents. However, up to now there are no reports for hiPSC lines developed completely under GMP conditions using Xeno-free reagents. Clinical-grade human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells used as feeder cells and parental cells of the clinical-grade hiPSCs were isolated from human foreskin tissues and cultured in Xeno-free media. Clinical-grade hiPSCs were derived by integration-free Sendai virus-based reprogramming kit in Xeno-free pluriton™ reprogramming medium or X medium. Neural cells and cardiomyocytes differentiation were conducted following a series of spatial and temporal specific signals induction according to the corresponding lineage development signals. Biological safety evaluation of the clinical-grade HFF cells and hiPSCs were conducted following the guidance of the "Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China, Edition 2010, Volume III". We have successfully derived several integration-free clinical-grade hiPSC lines under GMP-controlled conditions and with Xeno-free reagents culture media in line with the current guidance of international and national evaluation criteria. As for the source of hiPSCs and feeder cells, biological safety evaluation of the HFF cells have been strictly reviewed by the National Institutes for Food and Drug Control (NIFDC). The hiPSC lines are pluripotent and have passed the safety evaluation. Moreover, one of the randomly selected hiPSC lines was capable of differentiating into functional neural cells and cardiomyocytes in Xeno-free culture media. The clinical-grade hiPSC lines therefore could be valuable sources for

  8. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian.

  9. Qualitative investigation of fresh human scalp hair with full-field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo June; Pi, Long-Quan; Min, Gihyeon; Lee, Won-Soo; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated depth-resolved cellular structures of unmodified fresh human scalp hairs with ultrahigh-resolution full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). The Linnik-type white light interference microscope has been home-implemented to observe the micro-internal layers of human hairs in their natural environment. In hair shafts, FF-OCT has qualitatively revealed the cellular hair compartments of cuticle and cortex layers involved in keratin filaments and melanin granules. No significant difference between black and white hair shafts was observed except for absence of only the melanin granules in the white hair, reflecting that the density of the melanin granules directly affects the hair color. Anatomical description of plucked hair bulbs was also obtained with the FF-OCT in three-dimensions. We expect this approach will be useful for evaluating cellular alteration of natural hairs on cosmetic assessment or diagnosis of hair diseases.

  10. Investigation of titanium dioxide/ tungstic acid -based photocatalyst for human excrement wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Wang, Can; Xiao, Kemeng; Gao, Yufeng; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Heng

    2018-05-01

    An activated carbon (AC) coated with tungstic acid (WO3)/titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocomposites photocatalytic material (ACWT) combined with Three-phase Fluidized Bed (TFB) was investigated for human excrement wastewater treatment. Under the ultraviolet (UV) and fluorescent lamp illumination, the ACWT had shown a good performance on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total nitrogen (TN) removal but inefficient on ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) removal. Optimized by Taguchi method, COD and TN removal efficiency was up to 88.39% and 55.07%, respectively. Among all the parameters, the dosage of ACWT had the largest contribution on the process. Bacterial community changes after treatment demonstrated that this photocatalytic system had a great sterilization effect on wastewater. These results confirmed that ACWT could be applied for the human excrement wastewater treatment.

  11. Experimental investigation of radiation effect on human thermal comfort by Taguchi method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanoglu, Nurullah; Yigit, Abdulvahap

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Radiation heat flux from lighting lamps on human thermal comfort is studied. • The effect of posture position on thermal comfort is investigated. • The effect of clothing color on thermal comfort is examined. • Radiation heat flux from halogen reflector lamp increase skin temperature more. • Posture position effect on thermal comfort is less than the other parameters. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of radiation heat flux of lighting lamps on human thermal comfort was investigated by using Taguchi method. In addition, at indoor conditions, clothing color and posture position under the radiation effect on thermal comfort were also investigated. For this purpose, experiments were performed in an air conditioned laboratory room in summer and autumn seasons. The amount of temperature rise on the back was considered as performance parameter. An L8 orthogonal array was selected as an experimental plan for the third parameters mentioned above for summer and autumn seasons. The results were analyzed for the optimum conditions using signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and ANOVA method. The optimum results were found to be clear halogen lamp as lighting lamp, white as t-shirt color, standing as posture position, in summer season. The optimum levels of the lighting lamp, t-shirt color and posture position were found to be clear halogen lamp, white, sitting in autumn season, respectively.

  12. Molecular typing and epidemiological investigation of clinical populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using an oligonucleotide-microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballarini Annalisa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which has the potential to become extremely harmful in the nosocomial environment, especially for cystic fibrosis (CF patients, who are easily affected by chronic lung infections. For epidemiological purposes, discriminating P.aeruginosa isolates is a critical step, to define distribution of clones among hospital departments, to predict occurring microevolution events and to correlate clones to their source. A collection of 182 P. aeruginosa clinical strains isolated within Italian hospitals from patients with chronic infections, i.e. cystic fibrosis (CF patients, and with acute infections were genotyped. Molecular typing was performed with the ArrayTube (AT multimarker microarray (Alere Technologies GmbH, Jena, Germany, a cost-effective, time-saving and standardized method, which addresses genes from both the core and accessory P.aeruginosa genome. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST were employed as reference genotyping techniques to estimate the ArrayTube resolution power. Results 41 AT-genotypes were identified within our collection, among which 14 were novel and 27 had been previously described in publicly available AT-databases. Almost 30% of the genotypes belonged to a main cluster of clones. 4B9A, EC2A, 3C2A were mostly associated to CF-patients whereas F469, 2C1A, 6C22 to non CF. An investigation on co-infections events revealed that almost 40% of CF patients were colonized by more than one genotype, whereas less than 4% were observed in non CF patients. The presence of the exoU gene correlated with non-CF patients within the intensive care unit (ICU whereas the pKLC102-like island appeared to be prevalent in the CF centre. The congruence between the ArrayTube typing and PFGE or MLST was 0.077 and 0.559 (Adjusted Rand coefficient, respectively. AT typing of this Italian collection could be easily integrated with the global P

  13. A clinical investigation of force delivery systems for orthodontic space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, C; Jones, S P

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the force retention, and rates of space closure achieved by elastomeric chain and nickel titanium coil springs. Randomized clinical trial. Eastman Dental Hospital, London and Queen Mary's University Hospital, Roehampton, 1998-2000. Twenty-two orthodontic patients, wearing the pre-adjusted edgewise appliance undergoing space closure in opposing quadrants, using sliding mechanics on 0.019 x 0.025-inch posted stainless steel archwires. Medium-spaced elastomeric chain [Durachain, OrthoCare (UK) Ltd., Bradford, UK] and 9-mm nickel titanium coil springs [OrthoCare (UK) Ltd.] were placed in opposing quadrants for 15 patients. Elastomeric chain only was used in a further seven patients. The initial forces on placement and residual forces at the subsequent visit were measured with a dial push-pull gauge [Orthocare (UK) Ltd]. Study models of eight patients were taken before and after space closure, from which measurements were made to establish mean space closure. The forces were measured in grammes and space closure in millimetres. Fifty-nine per cent (31/53) of the elastomeric sample maintained at least 50 per cent of the initial force over a time period of 1-15 weeks. No sample lost all its force, and the mean loss was 47 per cent (range: 0-76 per cent). Nickel titanium coil springs lost force rapidly over 6 weeks, following that force levels plateaued. Forty-six per cent (12/26) maintained at least 50 per cent of their initial force over a time period of 1-22 weeks, and mean force loss was 48 per cent (range: 12-68 per cent). The rate of mean weekly space closure for elastomeric chain was 0.21 mm and for nickel titanium coil springs 0.26 mm. There was no relationship between the initial force applied and rate of space closure. None of the sample failed during the study period giving a 100 per cent response rate. In clinical use, the force retention of elastomeric chain was better than previously concluded. High initial forces resulted in high force decay

  14. Investigating the role of feedback and motivation in clinical reaction time assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckner, James T; Chandran, Srikrishna; Richardson, James K

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the influence of performance feedback and motivation during 2 tests of simple visuomotor reaction time (RT). Cross-sectional, observational study. Outpatient academic physiatry clinic. Thirty-one healthy adults (mean [SD], 54 ± 15 years). Participants completed a clinical test of RT (RT(clin)) and a computerized test of RT with and without performance feedback (RT(compFB) and RT(compNoFB), respectively) in randomly assigned order. They then ranked their degree of motivation during each test. RT(clin) measured the time required to catch a suspended vertical shaft by hand closure after release of the shaft by the examiner. RT(compFB) and RT(compNoFB) both measured the time required to press a computer key in response to a visual cue displayed on a computer monitor. Performance feedback (visual display of the previous trial and summary results) was provided for RT(compFB), but not for RT(compNoFB). Means and standard deviations of RT(clin), RT(compFB), and RT(compNoFB) and participants' self-reported motivation on a 5-point Likert scale for each test. There were significant differences in both the means and standard deviations of RT(clin), RT(compFB), and RT(compNoFB) (F(2,60) = 81.66, P motivation between RT(clin) and RT(compFB), both of which were reported to be more motivating than RT(compNoFB). The stronger correlation between RT(clin) and RT(compFB) as well as the higher reported motivation during RT(clin) and RT(compFB) testing suggest that performance feedback is a positive motivating factor that is inherent to RT(clin) testing. RT(clin) is a simple, inexpensive technique for measuring RT and appears to be an intrinsically motivating task. This motivation may promote faster, more consistent RT performance compared with currently available computerized programs, which do not typically provide performance feedback. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of the effects of human body stability on joint angles’ prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasha Zanoosi, A. A., E-mail: aliakbar.pasha@yahoo.com, E-mail: aliakbar.pasha@qiau.ac.ir [Islamic Azad University, Faculty of Industrial & Mechanical Engineering, Qazvin Branch (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, D.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.; Feri, M. [Bu Ali-Sina University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beheshtiha, A. Sh. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Mechanics and Computational Mechanics (Germany); Fallahnejad, K. [Flinders University, Discipline of Mechanical Engineering, School of Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Loosing stability control in elderly or paralyzed has motivated researchers to study how a stability control system works and how to determine its state at every time instant. Studying the stability of a human body is not only an important problem from a scientific viewpoint, but also finally leads to new designs of prostheses and orthoses and rehabilitation methods. Computer modeling enables researchers to study and describe the reactions and propose a suitable and optimized motion pattern to strengthen the neuromuscular system and helps a human body maintain its stability. A perturbation as a tilting is exposed to an underfoot plate of a musculoskeletal model of the body to study the stability. The studied model of a human body included four links and three degrees of freedom with eight muscles in the sagittal plane. Lagrangian dynamics was used for deriving equations of motion and muscles were modeled using Hill’s model. Using experimental data of joint trajectories for a human body under tilting perturbation, forward dynamics has been applied to predict joint trajectories and muscle activation. This study investigated the effects of stability on predicting body joints’ motion. A new stability function for a human body, based on the zero moment point, has been employed in a forward dynamics procedure using a direct collocation method. A multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm has been proposed to employ stability as a robotic objective function along with muscle stresses as a biological objective function. The obtained results for joints’ motion were compared to experimental data. The results show that, for this type of perturbations, muscle stresses are in conflict with body stability. This means that more body stability requires more stresses in muscles and reverse. Results also show the effects of the stability objective function in better prediction of joint trajectories.

  16. Investigation of the effects of human body stability on joint angles’ prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasha Zanoosi, A. A.; Naderi, D.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.; Feri, M.; Beheshtiha, A. Sh.; Fallahnejad, K.

    2015-01-01

    Loosing stability control in elderly or paralyzed has motivated researchers to study how a stability control system works and how to determine its state at every time instant. Studying the stability of a human body is not only an important problem from a scientific viewpoint, but also finally leads to new designs of prostheses and orthoses and rehabilitation methods. Computer modeling enables researchers to study and describe the reactions and propose a suitable and optimized motion pattern to strengthen the neuromuscular system and helps a human body maintain its stability. A perturbation as a tilting is exposed to an underfoot plate of a musculoskeletal model of the body to study the stability. The studied model of a human body included four links and three degrees of freedom with eight muscles in the sagittal plane. Lagrangian dynamics was used for deriving equations of motion and muscles were modeled using Hill’s model. Using experimental data of joint trajectories for a human body under tilting perturbation, forward dynamics has been applied to predict joint trajectories and muscle activation. This study investigated the effects of stability on predicting body joints’ motion. A new stability function for a human body, based on the zero moment point, has been employed in a forward dynamics procedure using a direct collocation method. A multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm has been proposed to employ stability as a robotic objective function along with muscle stresses as a biological objective function. The obtained results for joints’ motion were compared to experimental data. The results show that, for this type of perturbations, muscle stresses are in conflict with body stability. This means that more body stability requires more stresses in muscles and reverse. Results also show the effects of the stability objective function in better prediction of joint trajectories

  17. "There are too many, but never enough": qualitative case study investigating routine coding of clinical information in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin; Morrison, Zoe; Kalra, Dipak; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    We sought to understand how clinical information relating to the management of depression is routinely coded in different clinical settings and the perspectives of and implications for different stakeholders with a view to understanding how these may be aligned. Qualitative investigation exploring the views of a purposefully selected range of healthcare professionals, managers, and clinical coders spanning primary and secondary care. Our dataset comprised 28 semi-structured interviews, a focus group, documents relating to clinical coding standards and participant observation of clinical coding activities. We identified a range of approaches to coding clinical information including templates and order entry systems. The challenges inherent in clearly establishing a diagnosis, identifying appropriate clinical codes and possible implications of diagnoses for patients were particularly prominent in primary care. Although a range of managerial and research benefits were identified, there were no direct benefits from coded clinical data for patients or professionals. Secondary care staff emphasized the role of clinical coders in ensuring data quality, which was at odds with the policy drive to increase real-time clinical coding. There was overall no evidence of clear-cut direct patient care benefits to inform immediate care decisions, even in primary care where data on patients with depression were more extensively coded. A number of important secondary uses were recognized by healthcare staff, but the coding of clinical data to serve these ends was often poorly aligned with clinical practice and patient-centered considerations. The current international drive to encourage clinical coding by healthcare professionals during the clinical encounter may need to be critically examined.

  18. “There Are Too Many, but Never Enough": Qualitative Case Study Investigating Routine Coding of Clinical Information in Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin; Morrison, Zoe; Sheikh, Aziz; Kalra, Dipak

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to understand how clinical information relating to the management of depression is routinely coded in different clinical settings and the perspectives of and implications for different stakeholders with a view to understanding how these may be aligned. Materials and Methods Qualitative investigation exploring the views of a purposefully selected range of healthcare professionals, managers, and clinical coders spanning primary and secondary care. Results Our dataset comprised 28 semi-structured interviews, a focus group, documents relating to clinical coding standards and participant observation of clinical coding activities. We identified a range of approaches to coding clinical information including templates and order entry systems. The challenges inherent in clearly establishing a diagnosis, identifying appropriate clinical codes and possible implications of diagnoses for patients were particularly prominent in primary care. Although a range of managerial and research benefits were identified, there were no direct benefits from coded clinical data for patients or professionals. Secondary care staff emphasized the role of clinical coders in ensuring data quality, which was at odds with the policy drive to increase real-time clinical coding. Conclusions There was overall no evidence of clear-cut direct patient care benefits to inform immediate care decisions, even in primary care where data on patients with depression were more extensively coded. A number of important secondary uses were recognized by healthcare staff, but the coding of clinical data to serve these ends was often poorly aligned with clinical practice and patient-centered considerations. The current international drive to encourage clinical coding by healthcare professionals during the clinical encounter may need to be critically examined. PMID:22937106

  19. ISFG: Recommendations regarding the use of non-human (animal) DNA in forensic genetic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linacre, A.; Gusmão, L.; Hecht, W.

    2010-01-01

    : the trade and possession of a species, or products derived from a species, which is contrary to legislation; as evidence where the crime is against a person or property; instances of animal cruelty; or where the animal is the offender. The first instance is addressed by determining the species present...... that is integral to a forensic science investigation and are not relevant to the breeding of animals for commercial purposes. This DNA commission was formed out of discussions at the International Society for Forensic Genetics 23rd Congress in Buenos Aires to outline recommendations on the use of non-human DNA...

  20. Establishment and clinical application of immunoradiometric assay for human growth hormone in serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Jinfeng; Wu Congyuan; Niu Zhanpo; Zhang Kui; Song Ailing; Deng Jieying; Shi Mifan

    1992-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for human growth hormone (hGH) in serum is developed based on two high specific monoclonal antibodies against hGh. It can specifically detect the levels of serum bioactive hGh and had no cross-reaction with human prolactin (hPRL) and hGh oligmeric forms. The sensitivity was 0.2 ng/ml and the recovery for different concentrations of hGh was 92.0% ∼ 103.2%. The coefficients of variation for intra and inter-assay were<9.1% and <14.2%, respectively. Integral analysis of the results of RIA and IRMA with the patients' clinical manifestations revealed that hGh IRMA is better than hGh RIA in reflecting the clinical states of different acromegalic patients

  1. Model for investigating the benefits of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2011-01-01

    with the effectiveness of clinical supervision, as measured by the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS). Furthermore, MCSS scores were associated with benefits, such as increased job satisfaction, vitality, rational coping and less stress, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization. Multivariate analyses......The objective of this study was to test a model for analysing the possible benefits of clinical supervision. The model suggested a pathway from participation to effectiveness to benefits of clinical supervision, and included possible influences of individual and workplace factors. The study sample...

  2. A Formal Investigation of the Organization of Guidance Behavior: Implications for Humans and Autonomous Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhaodan

    symmetries and interaction patterns, is then elaborated on with the example of Dubins' vehicle's guidance behavior. The dissertation then describes the details of the agile human guidance experiments using miniature helicopters, the technique that is developed for the analysis of the experimental data and the analysis results. The results confirm that human guidance behavior indeed exhibits invariance as defined by interaction patterns. Subsequently, the behavior in each interaction pattern is investigated using piecewise affine model identification. Combined, the results provide a natural and formal decomposition of the behavior that can be unified under a hierarchical hidden Markov model. By employing the languages of dynamical system and control and by adopting algorithms from system identification and machine learning, the framework presented in this dissertation provides a fertile ground where these different disciplines can meet. It also promises multiple potential directions where future research can be headed.

  3. Clinical prediction in defined populations: a simulation study investigating when and how to aggregate existing models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen P. Martin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical prediction models (CPMs are increasingly deployed to support healthcare decisions but they are derived inconsistently, in part due to limited data. An emerging alternative is to aggregate existing CPMs developed for similar settings and outcomes. This simulation study aimed to investigate the impact of between-population-heterogeneity and sample size on aggregating existing CPMs in a defined population, compared with developing a model de novo. Methods Simulations were designed to mimic a scenario in which multiple CPMs for a binary outcome had been derived in distinct, heterogeneous populations, with potentially different predictors available in each. We then generated a new ‘local’ population and compared the performance of CPMs developed for this population by aggregation, using stacked regression, principal component analysis or partial least squares, with redevelopment from scratch using backwards selection and penalised regression. Results While redevelopment approaches resulted in models that were miscalibrated for local datasets of less than 500 observations, model aggregation methods were well calibrated across all simulation scenarios. When the size of local data was less than 1000 observations and between-population-heterogeneity was small, aggregating existing CPMs gave better discrimination and had the lowest mean square error in the predicted risks compared with deriving a new model. Conversely, given greater than 1000 observations and significant between-population-heterogeneity, then redevelopment outperformed the aggregation approaches. In all other scenarios, both aggregation and de novo derivation resulted in similar predictive performance. Conclusion This study demonstrates a pragmatic approach to contextualising CPMs to defined populations. When aiming to develop models in defined populations, modellers should consider existing CPMs, with aggregation approaches being a suitable modelling

  4. Intradiscal electrothermal treatment for discogenic back pain: experimental investigation and preliminary clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Wen; Teng Gaojun; He Shicheng; Guo Jinhe; Deng Gang; Zhu Guangyu; Li Guozhao; Ding Huijuan; Shen Zhiping

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness and the safety of IDET for chronic discogenic low back pain. Methods: Standard intradiscal electrothermal treatment were performed in two adjacent disc levels (L3-4, L4-5) of two domestic pigs. MRI were available at pretreatment, posttreatment of 1,2 weeks, and then the two animals were killed respectively at 1,2 weeks after the procedure. The specimens were then undergone thin sectioned and subjected to humatoxylin and eosin staining for histological investigation. 23 patients (totally 29 discs, including L2-3 to L5-S1) with chronic symptoms underwent IDET for clinical study. VAS (Visual Analog Scale) pain scores were collected before the treatment, 1 week and 3 months after the procedure. One way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Results: 4 discs of standard IDET models have been set up in two pigs showing normal MRI T2W1 signal of nucleus pulposus immediately after the procedure, but the high signal extent of the central part of the nucleo pulposus shrinked with conspicuous peripheral low signal changes during the following 1-2 W. Degeneration and shrinkage of nucleo-pulposus with lecolized fibrous ring thickening were found pathologically but without damage to nurve roots and epidural sac. 29 discs in 23 patients were performed successfully, without complication. The follow-up evaluation of 1 week and 3 months after the treatment showing significant differences with those before the treatment on was scores 65.3% and 78.9% respectively (P<0.0001). Conclusions: IDET is safe and effective for chronic discogenic low back pain. (authors)

  5. Clinical investigation of proximate exposed group. 1. A study for prevalence rate of diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikako; Hasegawa, Kazuyo; Kato, Masafumi; Kumasawa, Toshihiko

    1984-11-01

    In order to investigate effects of the A-bombing on prevalence of diabetes mellitus, follow-up studies were made on 5907 A-bomb survivors who received glucose tolerance test (GTT) during 20 years between 1963 and 1983. The A-bomb survivors were divided into the group A (1899 men and 1165 women exposed within 1.9 km from the hypocenter) and the group B (1725 men and 1118 women exposed 3.0 km or farther from it). Among non-obese survivors, 21.9% and 21.8% were being treated for diabetes mellitus or were evaluated as having diabetic type on GTT in the group A and the group B, respectively; while this was seen in 52.1% of obese survivors in the group A and 49.9% in the group B. There was no difference between the groups. In non-obese survivors, the annual development rate from the normal type to the diabetic type was 0.89% in the group A and 0.65% in the group B; the annual development rate from the borderline type to the diabetic type was 5.73% in the group A and 5.49% in the group B, showing no differences between the groups. The annual development rate from the normal or borderline type to the diabetic type was two times or higher in obese survivors than in non-obese survivors irrespective of exposure status. Regarding the number of diabetic survivors who became non-diabetic type in spite of having no treatment, and prevalence of diabetic complications, no difference was seen between the groups. These results suggest that the A-bombing has scarcely influenced the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and clinical course.

  6. [Non-commercial clinical trials--who will be the legal sponsor? Sponsorship of investigator-initiated clinical trials according to the German Drug Law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger-Döring, G; Boos, J

    2006-07-01

    Non-commercial clinical trials may be of great benefit to the patients concerned. The 12th amendment to the German Drug Law (AMG) changed legal liability of the initiators of investigator-initiated clinical trials with extensive consequences for traditional project leaders. The central point under discussion is the sponsor's responsibility according to the AMG. Presently leading management divisions of university hospitals and universities are developing proceedings to assume sponsor responsibility by institutions (institutional sponsorship), which should enable investigator-initiated clinical trials to be conducted according to legal requirements in the future. Detailed problems and special questions can only be resolved in a single-minded fashion, and if necessary political processes should be catalyzed.

  7. Investigating the effects of Pentoxifylline on human breast cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush N. Goel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in a global scenario. In the present study, biochemical changes exerted upon Pentoxifylline (PTX treatment had been appraised in human breast cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy. There are no clinically approved methods to monitor such therapeutic responses available. The spectral profiling is suggestive of changes in DNA, protein and lipid contents showing a linear relationship with drug dosage. Further, multivariate analysis using principal-component based linear-discriminant-analysis (PC-LDA was employed for classifying the control and the PTX treated groups. These findings support the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy as an alternate/adjunct label-free, objective method for monitoring drug-induced modifications against breast cancer cells.

  8. Investigation of an isolated case of human Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever in Central Uganda, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Balinandi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF is the most geographically widespread tick-borne viral infection. Outbreaks of CCHF in sub-Saharan Africa are largely undetected and thus under-reported. On November 9, 2015, the National Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Laboratory at the Uganda Virus Research Institute received an alert for a suspect VHF case in a 33-year-old male who presented with VHF compatible signs and symptoms at Mengo Hospital in Kampala. Methods: A blood sample from the suspect patient was tested by RT-PCR for CCHF and found positive. Serological testing on sequential blood specimens collected from this patient showed increasing anti-CCHFV IgM antibody titers, confirming recent infection. Repeat sampling of the confirmed case post recovery showed high titers for anti-CCHFV-specific IgG. An epidemiological outbreak investigation was initiated following the initial RT-PCR positive detection to identify any additional suspect cases. Results: Only a single acute case of CCHF was detected from this outbreak. No additional acute CCHF cases were identified following field investigations. Environmental investigations collected 53 tick samples, with only 1, a Boophilus decoloratus, having detectable CCHFV RNA by RT-PCR. Full-length genomic sequencing on a viral isolate from the index human case showed the virus to be related to the DRC (Africa 2 lineage. Conclusions: This is the fourth confirmed CCHF outbreak in Uganda within 2 years after more than 50 years of no reported human CCHF cases in this country. Our investigations reaffirm the endemicity of CCHFV in Uganda, and show that exposure to ticks poses a significant risk for human infection. These findings also reflect the importance of having an established national VHF surveillance system and diagnostic capacity in a developing country like Uganda, in order to identify the first cases of VHF outbreaks and rapidly respond to reduce secondary cases. Additional efforts should focus on

  9. Cell-mediated immune response: a clinical review of the therapeutic potential of human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sonja Izquierdo; Fuglsang, Katrine; Blaakaer, Jan

    2014-12-01

    This clinical review aims to assess the efficacy of human papillomavirus 16/18 (HPV16/18) vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response in women with existing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer induced by HPV16 or HPV18. A focused and thorough literature search conducted in five different databases found 996 publications. Six relevant articles were chosen for further review. In total, 154 patients (>18 years of age) were enrolled in prospective study trials with 3-15 months of follow up. The vaccine applications were administered two to four times. The vaccines contained different combinations of HPV16 and HPV18 and early proteins, E6 and E7. The primary outcome was the cell-mediated immune response. Correlation to clinical outcome (histopathology) and human leukocyte antigen genes were secondary endpoints. All vaccines triggered a detectable cell-mediated immune response, some of which were statistically significant. Correlations between immunological response and clinical outcome (histopathology) were not significant, so neoplasms may not be susceptible to vaccine-generated cytotoxic T cells (CD8(+)). Prophylactic HPV vaccines have been introduced to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer in young women. Women already infected with HPV could benefit from a therapeutic HPV vaccination. Hence, it is important to continue the development of therapeutic HPV vaccines to lower the rate of HPV-associated malignancies and crucial to evaluate vaccine efficacy clinically. This clinical review represents an attempt to elucidate the theories supporting the development of an HPV vaccine with a therapeutic effect on human papillomavirus-induced malignancies of the cervix. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. Radiochemical studies, pre-clinical investigation and preliminary clinical evaluation of "1"7"0Tm-EDTMP prepared using in-house freeze-dried EDTMP kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Tapas; Shinto, Ajit; Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai K.; Sarma, Haladhar D.; Mohammed, Sahiralam Khan; Mitra, Arpit; Lad, Sangita; Rajan, M.G.R.; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to formulate "1"7"0Tm-EDTMP using an in-house freeze-dried EDTMP kit and evaluate its potential as a bone pain palliation agent. Patient dose of "1"7"0Tm-EDTMP was prepared with high radiochemical purity using the lyophilized kit at room temperature within 15 min. Pre-clinical evaluation in normal Wistar rats revealed selective skeletal accumulation with extended retention. Preliminary clinical investigation in 8 patients with disseminated skeletal metastases exhibited selective uptake in the bone and retention therein for a long duration. - Highlights: • Formulation of patient dose of "1"7"0Tm-EDTMP using freeze-dried EDTMP kit. • Radiochemical studies and pre-clinical evaluation of the agent in animal model. • Clinical evaluation in eight cancer patients with disseminated skeletal metastases.

  11. The role of Clinical Trial Units in investigator- and industry-initiated research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Niederhäusern, Belinda; Fabbro, Thomas; Pauli-Magnus, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Six multidisciplinary competence centres (Clinical Trial Units, CTUs) in Basel, Berne, Geneva, Lausanne, St. Gallen and Zurich provide professional support to clinical researchers in the planning, implementation, conduct and evaluation of clinical studies. Through their coordinated network, these units promote high-quality, nationally harmonised and internationally standardised clinical research conduct in Switzerland. We will describe why this network has been established, how it has been successful in stilling the growing need for clinical research support, which training and education opportunities it offers, and how it created national awareness for the still-existing hurdles towards clinical research excellence in Switzerland. Taking the CTU Basel as an example, we show that a considerable number (25%) of the studies submitted for regulatory approval in 2013 were supported by the CTU, decreasing the number of findings in ethics reviews by about one-third. We conclude that these achievements, together with a Swiss national funding model for clinical research, and improved national coordination, will be critical factors to successfully position Swiss clinical research at the international forefront.

  12. Clinical impact of diagnostic SPET investigations with a dopamine re-uptake ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Werdelin, Lene M; Friberg, Lars

    2002-01-01

    The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is based on clinical features with pathological verification. However, autopsy has been found to confirm a specialist diagnosis in only about 75% of cases. Especially early in the course of the disease, the clinical diagnosis can be difficult. Imaging of presy...

  13. "Omic" investigations of protozoa and worms for a deeper understanding of the human gut "parasitome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Valeria; Mancinelli, Livia; Bracaglia, Giorgia; Del Chierico, Federica; Vernocchi, Pamela; Di Girolamo, Francesco; Garrone, Stefano; Tchidjou Kuekou, Hyppolite; D'Argenio, Patrizia; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Urbani, Andrea; Putignani, Lorenza

    2017-11-01

    The human gut has been continuously exposed to a broad spectrum of intestinal organisms, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites (protozoa and worms), over millions of years of coevolution, and plays a central role in human health. The modern lifestyles of Western countries, such as the adoption of highly hygienic habits, the extensive use of antimicrobial drugs, and increasing globalisation, have dramatically altered the composition of the gut milieu, especially in terms of its eukaryotic "citizens." In the past few decades, numerous studies have highlighted the composition and role of human intestinal bacteria in physiological and pathological conditions, while few investigations exist on gut parasites and particularly on their coexistence and interaction with the intestinal microbiota. Studies of the gut "parasitome" through "omic" technologies, such as (meta)genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, are herein reviewed to better understand their role in the relationships between intestinal parasites, host, and resident prokaryotes, whether pathogens or commensals. Systems biology-based profiles of the gut "parasitome" under physiological and severe disease conditions can indeed contribute to the control of infectious diseases and offer a new perspective of omics-assisted tropical medicine.

  14. Human-Assisted Machine Information Exploitation: a crowdsourced investigation of information-based problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Sue E.; Vanni, Michelle; Caylor, Justine; Hoye, Jeff

    2017-05-01

    The Human-Assisted Machine Information Exploitation (HAMIE) investigation utilizes large-scale online data collection for developing models of information-based problem solving (IBPS) behavior in a simulated time-critical operational environment. These types of environments are characteristic of intelligence workflow processes conducted during human-geo-political unrest situations when the ability to make the best decision at the right time ensures strategic overmatch. The project takes a systems approach to Human Information Interaction (HII) by harnessing the expertise of crowds to model the interaction of the information consumer and the information required to solve a problem at different levels of system restrictiveness and decisional guidance. The design variables derived from Decision Support Systems (DSS) research represent the experimental conditions in this online single-player against-the-clock game where the player, acting in the role of an intelligence analyst, is tasked with a Commander's Critical Information Requirement (CCIR) in an information overload scenario. The player performs a sequence of three information processing tasks (annotation, relation identification, and link diagram formation) with the assistance of `HAMIE the robot' who offers varying levels of information understanding dependent on question complexity. We provide preliminary results from a pilot study conducted with Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) participants on the Volunteer Science scientific research platform.

  15. Do Online Voting Patterns Reflect Evolved Features of Human Cognition? An Exploratory Empirical Investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Priestley

    Full Text Available Online votes or ratings can assist internet users in evaluating the credibility and appeal of the information which they encounter. For example, aggregator websites such as Reddit allow users to up-vote submitted content to make it more prominent, and down-vote content to make it less prominent. Here we argue that decisions over what to up- or down-vote may be guided by evolved features of human cognition. We predict that internet users should be more likely to up-vote content that others have also up-voted (social influence, content that has been submitted by particularly liked or respected users (model-based bias, content that constitutes evolutionarily salient or relevant information (content bias, and content that follows group norms and, in particular, prosocial norms. 489 respondents from the online social voting community Reddit rated the extent to which they felt different traits influenced their voting. Statistical analyses confirmed that norm-following and prosociality, as well as various content biases such as emotional content and originality, were rated as important motivators of voting. Social influence had a smaller effect than expected, while attitudes towards the submitter had little effect. This exploratory empirical investigation suggests that online voting communities can provide an important test-bed for evolutionary theories of human social information use, and that evolved features of human cognition may guide online behaviour just as it guides behaviour in the offline world.

  16. Investigation of prostaglandin levels in human milk after high performance liquid chromatography purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu-Wang, C.Y.; Neu, J.

    1986-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate five prostaglandins (PGs), i.e. PGE 2 , PGF/sub 2α/, 13-14-dihydro-15-keto-PGF/sub 2α/ (DHKF/sub 2α/), thromboxane B 2 (TXB 2 ) and 6-keto-PGF/sub 1α/), measured by (RIA) after C 18 Sep-Pak extraction and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two trials were performed. In each trial, 3-5 mature human milk samples were pooled, acidified and extracted for PGs. The separation of PGs by HPLC was achieved by using an isocratic solvent system of acetonitrile/water (pH 3.0) (32/68, V/V). The PG levels from the two trials were determined and averaged after monitoring the recoveries. The results indicate that PGE 2 and DHKF/sub 2α/ are the two major PGs found in extracted human milk. However, after HPLC purification, no predominant PG is found and the levels of all the five PGs are much lower compared to the extracted sample. Since the immunoreactive material was also detected in HPLC fractions not within the PG peak, low levels of PG found in human milk after HPLC is likely due to the purification step removing the bulk of nonspecific immunoreactive substances present in the sample

  17. Investigation of avian influenza infections in wild birds, poultry and humans in Eastern Dongting Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinghong; Gao, Lidong; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Tao; Liu, Yunzhi; Dong, Libo; Liu, Fuqiang; Yang, Hao; Cai, Yahui; Yu, Mingdong; Yao, Yi; Xu, Cuilin; Xiao, Xiangming; Shu, Yuelong

    2014-01-01

    We investigated avian influenza infections in wild birds, poultry, and humans at Eastern Dongting Lake, China. We analyzed 6,621 environmental samples, including fresh fecal and water samples, from wild birds and domestic ducks that were collected from the Eastern Dongting Lake area from November 2011 to April 2012. We also conducted two cross-sectional serological studies in November 2011 and April 2012, with 1,050 serum samples collected from people exposed to wild birds and/or domestic ducks. Environmental samples were tested for the presence of avian influenza virus (AIV) using quantitative PCR assays and virus isolation techniques. Hemagglutination inhibition assays were used to detect antibodies against AIV H5N1, and microneutralization assays were used to confirm these results. Among the environmental samples from wild birds and domestic ducks, AIV prevalence was 5.19 and 5.32%, respectively. We isolated 39 and 5 AIVs from the fecal samples of wild birds and domestic ducks, respectively. Our analysis indicated 12 subtypes of AIV were present, suggesting that wild birds in the Eastern Dongting Lake area carried a diverse array of AIVs with low pathogenicity. We were unable to detect any antibodies against AIV H5N1 in humans, suggesting that human infection with H5N1 was rare in this region.

  18. Do Online Voting Patterns Reflect Evolved Features of Human Cognition? An Exploratory Empirical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Maria; Mesoudi, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Online votes or ratings can assist internet users in evaluating the credibility and appeal of the information which they encounter. For example, aggregator websites such as Reddit allow users to up-vote submitted content to make it more prominent, and down-vote content to make it less prominent. Here we argue that decisions over what to up- or down-vote may be guided by evolved features of human cognition. We predict that internet users should be more likely to up-vote content that others have also up-voted (social influence), content that has been submitted by particularly liked or respected users (model-based bias), content that constitutes evolutionarily salient or relevant information (content bias), and content that follows group norms and, in particular, prosocial norms. 489 respondents from the online social voting community Reddit rated the extent to which they felt different traits influenced their voting. Statistical analyses confirmed that norm-following and prosociality, as well as various content biases such as emotional content and originality, were rated as important motivators of voting. Social influence had a smaller effect than expected, while attitudes towards the submitter had little effect. This exploratory empirical investigation suggests that online voting communities can provide an important test-bed for evolutionary theories of human social information use, and that evolved features of human cognition may guide online behaviour just as it guides behaviour in the offline world.

  19. Investigation on bisphenol A levels in human milk and dairy supply chain: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercogliano, Raffaelina; Santonicola, Serena

    2018-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), widely used as additive in food packaging, is an environmental and food contaminant that shows a weak estrogenic activity in general population and toxicity in the infant population. A temporary tolerable daily intake (t-TDI) of 4 μg/kg bw/day and a migration limit of 0.6 mg/kg in food from plastic materials, intended to come in contact with food, were fixed. Dietary milk is important in the human diet. The review investigated the contamination levels in human milk and along the dairy supply chain. Despite the reported levels are generally below the fixed limits, breast milk is considered a continuous low-level exposure to endocrine-active compounds for infants. In addition, BPA residues are detected in milk and dairy products posing a risk to human health. BPA enters into milk chain via multiple pathways at various points during milk production (e.g., PVC tubing used during the milking process, transfer from bulk milk to storage tanks, during milk processing). To prevent or mitigate this hazard, a specific TDI for infants is recommended and evaluation of risk factors at each phase of the dairy supply chain, in the quality systems, is recommended. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Depletion of Human DNA in Spiked Clinical Specimens for Improvement of Sensitivity of Pathogen Detection by Next-Generation Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Mohammad R.; Rawat, Arun; Tang, Patrick; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Thomas, Eva; Tan, Rusung; Tilley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has shown promise for the detection of human pathogens from clinical samples. However, one of the major obstacles to the use of NGS in diagnostic microbiology is the low ratio of pathogen DNA to human DNA in most clinical specimens. In this study, we aimed to develop a specimen-processing protocol to remove human DNA and enrich specimens for bacterial and viral DNA for shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nasopharyngeal aspi...

  1. A review of human factors principles for the design and implementation of medication safety alerts in clinical information systems

    OpenAIRE

    Phansalkar, Shobha; Edworthy, Judy; Hellier, Elizabeth; Seger, Diane L; Schedlbauer, Angela; Avery, Anthony J; Bates, David W

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to describe the implementation of human factors principles for the design of alerts in clinical information systems. First, we conduct a review of alarm systems to identify human factors principles that are employed in the design and implementation of alerts. Second, we review the medical informatics literature to provide examples of the implementation of human factors principles in current clinical information systems using alerts to provide medication decisio...

  2. An Investigation on the Effect of Extremely Low Frequency Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Human Electrocardiograms (ECGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qiang; Mahmoud, Seedahmed S; Yan, Jiayong; Li, Hui

    2016-11-23

    For this investigation, we studied the effects of extremely low frequency pulse electromagnetic fields (ELF-PEMF) on the human cardiac signal. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) of 22 healthy volunteers before and after a short duration of ELF-PEMF exposure were recorded. The experiment was conducted under single-blind conditions. The root mean square (RMS) value of the recorded data was considered as comparison criteria. We also measured and analysed four important ECG time intervals before and after ELF-PEMF exposure. Results revealed that the RMS value of the ECG recordings from 18 participants (81.8% of the total participants) increased with a mean value of 3.72%. The increase in ECG voltage levels was then verified by a second experimental protocol with a control exposure. In addition to this, we used hyperbolic T-distributions (HTD) in the analysis of ECG signals to verify the change in the RR interval. It was found that there were small shifts in the frequency-domain signal before and after EMF exposure. This shift has an influence on all frequency components of the ECG signals, as all spectrums were shifted. It is shown from this investigation that a short time exposure to ELF-PEMF can affect the properties of ECG signals. Further study is needed to consolidate this finding and discover more on the biological effects of ELF-PEMF on human physiological processes.

  3. Radio-pharmaceuticals for human use: the legal framework and the clinical indications authorised in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes-Blanco, A.; Esteban Gomez, J

    2003-01-01

    The inclusion of radio-pharmaceuticals in the health legislation represented a significant change because of the obligation, for the first time, to undergo a registration process to enable them to be marketed. It also served to regulate clinical investigation using these drugs, and the prior evaluation they must undergo in other to obtain official health clearance. (Author) 27 refs

  4. Ultra-trace measurement of Dechloranes to investigate food as a route of human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Homme, Benjamin; Calaprice, Chiara; Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Zambonin, Carlo; Leardi, Riccardo; Focant, Jean-François

    2015-11-01

    Dechloranes, including Dechlorane Plus (syn- and anti-isomers), Dechlorane 602, Dechlorane 603, Dechlorane 604, Chlordene Plus, and Mirex are used as flame-retardants and were recently found in human serum of the European population. In order to investigate if food consumption would possibly be a significant route of exposure, we developed a method for the measurement of Dechloranes in food and feed. We showed that it was possible to extend the scope of the regular polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), dioxin like (DL-), and non-dioxin like (NDL-) regulated PCBs clean-up and fractionation procedure to Dechloranes and that no compound degradation occurred during the strong acidic treatments used for lipid digestion. Dechloranes were measured by gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QQQMS/MS). We optimized injection parameters by face centered experimental design (FCD). The electron ionization fragmentation was investigated to set appropriate multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions. Instrumental and method limits of quantitation (iLOQs and mLOQs) were determined following EU guidelines for dioxin analyses in food. A total of 88 samples were analyzed to assess the prevalence of this route of exposure to humans. Average levels of the sum of Dechloranes ranged from 10 to 31pg/g fat, with the exception of fish, feed additives, and corn that were reported in pg/g wet weight at average levels of 9, 12, and 2pg/g ww. Based on Belgian food habits, a dietary intake was estimated to be 136pg/day. The relatively low reported levels indicate that other routes of human exposure should be considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigations of efficacy of intramammary applied antimicrobials and glucocorticosteroides in the treatment of subclinical and clinical mastitis in cows

    OpenAIRE

    Vakanjac, Slobodanka; Pavlović, Vojislav; Magaš, Vladimir; Pavlović, Miloš; Đurić, Miloje; Maletić, Milan; Nedić, Svetlana; Sočo, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the mammary gland, mastitis in cows, presents one of the most acute problems in intensive dairy production, inflicting huge economic losses. In the course of one year, 80 samples were taken at investigated farms from udder quarters of cows with clinical mastitis and 160 samples from udder quarters of cows with subclinical mastitis. The efficacy of three preparations, A, B, and C, was examined in the treatment of clinical and subclinical mast...

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic evaluation of 18 Nocardia isolates from human clinical samples in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Herrera, K; Sandoval, H; Couble, A; Mouniee, D; Ramírez-Durán, N; Uzcategui de Morillo, M; Serrano, J A; Bergeron, E; Boiron, P; Rodríguez-Nava, V

    2012-03-01

    Mexico has the largest number of clinical cases of actinomycetoma in North and South America. Species originally identified by less specific methods have been recently reclassified as other known species or as new species. To assess, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic methods, the species distribution of 18 human clinical isolates originally identified as N. brasiliensis, some of them isolated between 1947 and 1959 in Mexico City. Clinical isolates came from the Hospital General, "Dr. Manuel Gea Gonzalez", and Instituto Nacional de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológica (INDRE) in Mexico, D.F. The strains used in this study included 15 clinical strains isolated between 1947 and 1959 that were originally identified as N. brasiliensis and three more strains obtained in 2007 identified as Nocardia spp. The isolates were identified genotypically by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene, and their phenotypic profiles were obtained with the API Coryne(®) system. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns were tested according to the protocol of the Comité de l'antibiogramme de la Société française de microbiologie[4]. According to 16S rRNA gene, sequencing were identified among 18 human clinical isolates as Nocardia farcinica (n=11) and Nocardia brasiliensis (n=7). A high number of the strains were susceptible to the majority of the antibiotics tested. The phenotypic profiles of the strains were quite uniform for N. farcinica and some variability was observed for N. brasiliensis strains. N. farcinica was the most prevalent species identified. Modern methodologies should be applied in clinical laboratories to accurately identify etiological agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Initial investigation of the effects of an experimentally learned schema on spatial associative memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buuren, Mariët; Kroes, Marijn C W; Wagner, Isabella C; Genzel, Lisa; Morris, Richard G M; Fernández, Guillén

    2014-12-10

    Networks of interconnected neocortical representations of prior knowledge, "schemas," facilitate memory for congruent information. This facilitation is thought to be mediated by augmented encoding and accelerated consolidation. However, it is less clear how schema affects retrieval. Rodent and human studies to date suggest that schema-related memories are differently retrieved. However, these studies differ substantially as most human studies implement pre-experimental world-knowledge as schemas and tested item or nonspatial associative memory, whereas animal studies have used intraexperimental schemas based on item-location associations within a complex spatial layout that, in humans, could engage more strategic retrieval processes. Here, we developed a paradigm conceptually linked to rodent studies to examine the effects of an experimentally learned spatial associative schema on learning and retrieval of new object-location associations and to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying schema-related retrieval. Extending previous findings, we show that retrieval of schema-defining associations is related to activity along anterior and posterior midline structures and angular gyrus. The existence of such spatial associative schema resulted in more accurate learning and retrieval of new, related associations, and increased time allocated to retrieve these associations. This retrieval was associated with right dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral parietal activity, as well as interactions between the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial and lateral parietal regions, and between the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior midline regions, supporting the hypothesis that retrieval of new, schema-related object-location associations in humans also involves augmented monitoring and systematic search processes. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416662-09$15.00/0.

  8. A clinical investigation of motivation to change standards and cognitions about failure in perfectionism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Sarah J; Piek, Jan P; Dyck, Murray J; Rees, Clare S; Hagger, Martin S

    2013-10-01

    Clinical perfectionism is a transdiagnostic process that has been found to maintain eating disorders, anxiety disorders and depression. Cognitive behavioural models explaining the maintenance of clinical perfectionism emphasize the contribution of dichotomous thinking and resetting standards higher following both success and failure in meeting their goals. There has been a paucity of research examining the predictions of the models and motivation to change perfectionism. Motivation to change is important as individuals with clinical perfectionism often report many perceived benefits of their perfectionism; they are, therefore, likely to be ambivalent regarding changing perfectionism. The aim was to compare qualitative responses regarding questions about motivation to change standards and cognitions regarding failure to meet a personal standard in two contrasting groups with high and low negative perfectionism. Negative perfectionism refers to concern over not meeting personal standards. A clinical group with a range of axis 1 diagnoses who were elevated on negative perfectionism were compared to a group of athletes who were low on negative perfectionism. Results indicated that the clinical group perceived many negative consequences of their perfectionism. They also, however, reported numerous benefits and the majority stated that they would prefer not to change their perfectionism. The clinical group also reported dichotomous thinking and preferring to either keep standards the same or reset standards higher following failure, whilst the athlete group reported they would keep standards the same or set them lower. The findings support predictions of the cognitive behavioural model of clinical perfectionism.

  9. Clinical Investigation of Adrenal Incidentalomas in Japanese Patients of the Fukuoka Region with Updated Diagnostic Criteria for Sub-clinical Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Ichiro; Sugimoto, Kaoru; Miyajima, Tetsumasa; Ide, Tomoko; Minezaki, Midori; Takeshita, Kaori; Takahara, Saori; Nakagawa, Midori; Fujimura, Yuki; Kudo, Tadachika; Miyajima, Shigero; Taira, Hiroshi; Ohe, Kenji; Ishii, Tatsu; Yanase, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Kunihisa

    2018-04-27

    Objectives We retrospectively investigated the clinical and endocrinological characteristics of adrenal incidentalomas. Methods We studied 61 patients who had been diagnosed with adrenal incidentalomas and had undergone detailed clinical and endocrinological evaluations while hospitalized. We used common criteria to diagnose the functional tumors, but for sub-clinical Cushing's syndrome, we used an updated set of diagnosis criteria: serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dL after a positive response to a 1-mg dexamethasone suppression test if the patient has a low morning ACTH level (Cushing's syndrome and sub-clinical Cushing's syndrome), and 25 (41.0%) had non-functional tumors. Compared with the non-functional tumor group, the primary aldosteronism group and the cortisol-secreting adenoma group were significantly younger and had significantly lower rates of hypokalemia, whereas the pheochromocytoma group had significantly larger tumors and a significantly lower body mass index. Conclusion Our study found a larger percentage of functional tumors among adrenal incidentalomas than past reports, partly because we used a lower serum cortisol level after a dexamethasone suppression test to diagnose sub-clinical Cushing's syndrome and because all of the patients were hospitalized and could therefore receive more detailed examinations. Young patients with hypokalemia or lean patients with large adrenal tumors warrant particularly careful investigation.

  10. Investigating the effect of the reality gap on the human psychophysiological state in the context of human-swarm interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëtan Podevijn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The reality gap is the discrepancy between simulation and reality—the same behavioural algorithm results in different robot swarm behaviours in simulation and in reality (with real robots. In this paper, we study the effect of the reality gap on the psychophysiological reactions of humans interacting with a robot swarm. We compare the psychophysiological reactions of 28 participants interacting with a simulated robot swarm and with a real (non-simulated robot swarm. Our results show that a real robot swarm provokes stronger reactions in our participants than a simulated robot swarm. We also investigate how to mitigate the effect of the reality gap (i.e., how to diminish the difference in the psychophysiological reactions between reality and simulation by comparing psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed on a computer screen and psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed in virtual reality. Our results show that our participants tend to have stronger psychophysiological reactions in simulation displayed in virtual reality (suggesting a potential way of diminishing the effect of the reality gap.

  11. [Investigation of in vitro metronidazole resistance in the clinical isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertabaklar, Hatice; Yaman Karadam, Senem; Malatyalı, Erdoğan; Ertuğ, Sema

    2016-10-01

    -sensitive isolates were 27.17 µg/ml in aerobic and 7.75 µg/ml in anaerobic conditions. The rate of metronidazole resistance detected in this study was higher than most of reports from different countries. Despite being limited to the isolates from Aydin province (located at Agean region of Turkey), the present study has a value as it presented the existence of metronidazole-resistant isolates in Turkey for the first time. More research from other parts of Turkey is needed to better understand the metronidazole resistance at a national scale and to investigate novel strategies for the treatment. Moreover, further studies need to be carried out in order to clarify the relationship between clinical treatment response and in vitro metronidazole resistance in trichomoniasis.

  12. Judgement bias in goats (Capra hircus: investigating the effects of human grooming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Baciadonna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal emotional states can be investigated by evaluating their impact on cognitive processes. In this study, we used a judgement bias paradigm to determine if short-term positive human-animal interaction (grooming induced a positive affective state in goats. We tested two groups of goats and trained them to discriminate between a rewarded and a non-rewarded location over nine training days. During training, the experimental group (n = 9 was gently groomed by brushing their heads and backs for five min over 11 days (nine training days, plus two testing days, total time 55 min. During training, the control group (n = 10 did not experience any direct interaction with the experimenter, but was kept unconstrained next to him for the same period of time. After successful completion of the training, the responses (latency time of the two groups to reach ambiguous locations situated between the two reference locations (i.e., rewarded/non-rewarded were compared over two days of testing. There was not a positive bias effect after the animals had been groomed. In a second experiment, 10 goats were tested to investigate whether grooming induced changes in physiological activation (i.e., heart rate and heart rate variability. Heart rate increased when goats were groomed compared to the baseline condition, when the same goats did not receive any contact with the experimenter. Also, subjects did not move away from the experimenter, suggesting that the grooming was positively accepted. The very good care and the regular positive contacts that goats received from humans at the study site could potentially account for the results obtained. Good husbandry outcomes are influenced by animals’ perception of the events and this is based on current circumstances, past experiences and individual variables. Taking into account animals’ individual characteristics and identifying effective strategies to induce positive emotions could increase the understanding and

  13. Clinical characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome: investigating differences in White and South Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Hamidreza; Davies, Melanie J; Bodicoat, Danielle H; Levy, Miles J; Gray, Laura J; Howlett, Trevor A; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2015-10-01

    To understand the phenotypic presentation of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) of different ethnicities and at different ages. Cross-sectional, retrospective data analysis (1988 - 2009). Specialist clinic in a University Hospital, Leicestershire, UK. Women with PCOS, n = 1310 (mean age 26·2 years), 70·9% White and 29·1% South Asian (SA) attending a speciality clinic in Leicester UK. Clinical and demographic characteristics of women with PCOS including age at first clinic appointment, signs and symptoms, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure (BP). Compared to White women, the SA were younger (24·3 vs 27·1 years, P women with PCOS appear to be significantly different depending on ethnicity, obesity and age. This has implications for management strategies in these groups. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Meteoric 10Be as a tool to investigate human induced soil fluxes: a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; De Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Minella, Jean; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The use of meteoric 10Be as a tool to understand long term landscape behavior is becoming increasingly popular. Due its high residence time, meteoric 10Be allows in principle to investigate in situ erosion rates over time scales exceeding the period studied with classical approaches such as 137Cs. The use of meteoric 10Be strongly contributes to the traditional interpretation of sedimentary archives which cannot be unequivocally coupled to sediment production and could provide biased information over longer time scales (Sadler, 1981). So far, meteoric 10Be has successfully been used in geochemical fingerprinting of sediments, to date soil profiles, to assess soil residence times and to quantify downslope soil fluxes using accumulated 10Be inventories along a hill slope. However, less attention is given to the potential use of the tracer to directly asses human induced changes in soil fluxes through deforestation, cultivation and reforestation. A good understanding of the processes governing the distribution of meteoric 10Be both within the soil profile and at landscape scale is essential before meteoric 10Be can be successfully applied to assess human impact. We developed a spatially explicit 2D-model (Be2D) in order to gain insight in meteoric 10Be movement along a hillslope that is subject to human disturbance. Be2D integrates both horizontal soil fluxes and vertical meteoric 10Be movement throughout the soil prolife. Horizontal soil fluxes are predicted using (i) well studied geomorphical laws for natural erosion and soil formation as well as (ii) human accelerated water and tillage erosion. Vertical movement of meteoric 10Be throughout the soil profile is implemented by inserting depth dependent retardation calculated using experimentally determined partition coefficients (Kd). The model was applied to different environments such as (i) the Belgian loess belt, characterized by aeolian deposits enriched in inherited meteoric 10Be, (ii) highly degraded and stony

  15. Clinical investigation on Theileria equi and Babesia caballi infections in Italian donkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laus, Fulvio; Spaterna, Andrea; Faillace, Vanessa; Veronesi, Fabrizia; Ravagnan, Silvia; Beribé, Francesca; Cerquetella, Matteo; Meligrana, Marina; Tesei, Beniamino

    2015-04-28

    Interest in the welfare and diseases of donkeys is constantly increasing in several countries. Despite this, clinical research into donkeys needs to be in continual development since they show different reactions compared to horses in many conditions, including infectious diseases, and need specific clinical and therapeutic approaches. No reports are currently available on clinical and clinical pathology data regarding donkeys with natural piroplasms infection. Venous blood samples were taken from one hundred and thirty eight donkeys and underwent indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) to detect IgG antibodies against Theileria equi and Babesia caballi and real-time polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. Clinical examinations, haematological analyses and serum bilirubin evaluation were also performed and compared with positive or negative status. A seroprevalence of 40.6% and 47.8% was found for T. equi and B. caballi, respectively; double positivity was detected in 19.6% of the animals. PCR results showed that 17.4% of the animals tested positive for T.equi and 3.6% for B. caballi with no double positivity. Twelve donkeys (8.7%) had clinical signs consistent with chronic forms of the disease and no acute forms were detected. Fifty-eight donkeys had haematological and serum bilirubin alterations and 56 (96.6%) of them were IFAT and/or PCR positive. Changes in erythrocyte number, packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, platelets number and total bilirubin were significantly associated with positive and symptomatic animals. Nonspecific clinical presentation seems to be very common in donkeys and several clinical pathology alterations persist after natural infection. Therefore, apparently healthy donkeys can have masked but severe clinical pathology alterations. Acute forms are very seldom observed in donkeys. Clinical monitoring of chronically infected donkeys is recommended since such animals

  16. A review on the clinical spectrum and natural history of human influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punpanich, Warunee; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this review is to provide updated information on the clinical spectrum and natural history of human influenza, including risk factors for severe disease, and to identify the knowledge gap in this area. We searched the MEDLINE database of the recent literature for the period January 2009 to August 17, 2011 with regard to the abovementioned aspects of human influenza, focusing on A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza. The clinical spectrum and outcomes of cases of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza have been mild and rather indistinguishable from those of seasonal influenza. Sporadic cases covering a wide range of neurological complications have been reported. Underlying predisposing conditions considered to be high-risk for A(H1N1)pdm09 infections are generally similar to those of seasonal influenza, but with two additional risk groups: pregnant women and the morbidly obese. Co-infections with bacteria and D222/N variants or 225G substitution of the viral genome have also been reported to be significant factors associated with the severity of disease. The current knowledge gap includes: (1) a lack of clarification regarding the relatively greater severity of the Mexican A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza outbreak in the early phase of the pandemic; (2) insufficient data on the clinical impact, risk factors, and outcomes of human infections caused by resistant strains of influenza; and (3) insufficient data from less developed countries that would enable them to prioritize strategies for influenza prevention and control. Clinical features and risk factors of A(H1N1)pdm09 are comparable to those of seasonal influenza. Emerging risk factors for severe disease with A(H1N1)pdm09 include morbid obesity, pregnancy, bacterial co-infections, and D222/N variants or 225G substitution of the viral genome. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Definition of major bleeding in clinical investigations of antihemostatic medicinal products in surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, S; Angerås, U; Bergqvist, D

    2010-01-01

    in several non-surgical trials. A preliminary proposal for a parallel definition for surgical studies was presented at the 54(th) Annual Meeting of the SSC in Vienna, July 2008. Based on those discussions and further consultations with European and North American surgeons with experience from clinical trials...... of this definition from the regulatory authorities to enhance its incorporation into future clinical trial protocols....

  18. Emerging biomarkers in anaplastic oligodendroglioma: implications for clinical investigation and patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebjam, Solmaz; McNamara, Mairéad G; Mason, Warren P

    2013-07-01

    Oligodendrogliomas are heterogeneous tumors with a variable response to treatment. This clinical variability underlines the urgent need for markers that can reliably aid diagnosis and guide clinical decision-making. Long-term follow-up data from the EORTC 26951 and RTOG 9402 clinical trials in newly diagnosed anaplastic oligodendroglioma have established chromosome 1p19q codeletion as a predictive marker of response to procarbazine, lomustine and vincristine chemotherapy in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. In addition, MGMT promoter hypermethylation has been strongly associated with glioma CpG island hypermethylation phenotype (G-CIMP+) status, this has been suggested as an epiphenomenon of genome-wide methylation, conferring a more favorable prognosis. Molecular profiling of these tumors has identified several other markers with potential clinical significance: mutations of IDH, CIC, FUBP1 and CDKN2A require further validation before they can be implemented as clinical decision-making tools. Additionally, recent data on the clinical significance of intrinsic glioma subtyping appears promising. Indeed, existing evidence suggests that comprehensive analyses such as intrinsic glioma subtyping or G-CIMP status are superior to single molecular markers. Clearly, with evolving treatment strategies and in the era of individualized therapy, broader omics-based molecular evaluations are required to improve outcome prediction and to identify patients who will benefit from specific treatment strategies.

  19. Clinical Correlates of Diarrhea and Gut Parasites among Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seropositive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis Bisong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cluster differentiation 4 (CD4 count estimation, which is not readily available in most resource poor settings in Nigeria, is an important indexdetermining commencement of antiretroviral therapy (ART. It is imperative for physicians who come in contact with these patients in such settings to recognize other parameters to evaluate these patients. The clinical correlates of diarrhea and gut parasites among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-seropositive patients attending our special treatment clinic were studied. Three hundred and forty consenting HIV-positive adult subjects were enrolled. Their stool and blood specimens were collected for a period of three months. Stool samples were analyzed for the presence of diarrhea and gut parasites. The patients were clinically evaluated by physical examination for the presence of pallor, dehydration, oral thrush, wasting lymphadenopathy, dermatitis, skin hyperpigmentation, and finger clubbing. Participants with diarrhea represented 14.1% of the population, while 21.5% harbored one or more parasites. In the subjects with diarrhea, 14.6% harbored gut parasites. The presence of diarrhea was associated with a low CD4 count. Clinically, oral thrush, wasting, and rashes were more reliable predictors of low CD4 count levels; whereas, the presence of pallor, dehydration, wasting, and rashes correlated with the presence of diarrhea. HIV patients presenting with pallor, dehydration, wasting, and rashes should be evaluated for the presence of diarrhea. The clinical variables associated with low CD4 count in this study may guide commencing antiretroviral therapy in resource poor settings.

  20. Investigation of spatial correlation in MR images of human cerebral white matter using geostatistical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keil, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the structure of human cerebral white matter is gaining interest in the neurological as well as in the neuroscientific community. It has been demonstrated in many studies that white matter is a very dynamic structure, rather than a static construct which does not change for a lifetime. That means, structural changes within white matter can be observed even on short timescales, e.g. in the course of normal ageing, neurodegenerative diseases or even during learning processes. To investigate these changes, one method of choice is the texture analysis of images obtained from white matter. In this regard, MRI plays a distinguished role as it provides a completely non-invasive way of acquiring in vivo images of human white matter. This thesis adapted a statistical texture analysis method, known as variography, to quantify the spatial correlation of human cerebral white matter based on MR images. This method, originally introduced in geoscience, relies on the idea of spatial correlation in geological phenomena: in naturally grown structures near things are correlated stronger to each other than distant things. This work reveals that the geological principle of spatial correlation can be applied to MR images of human cerebral white matter and proves that variography is an adequate method to quantify alterations therein. Since the process of MRI data acquisition is completely different to the measuring process used to quantify geological phenomena, the variographic analysis had to be adapted carefully to MR methods in order to provide a correctly working methodology. Therefore, theoretical considerations were evaluated with numerical samples in a first, and validated with real measurements in a second step. It was shown that MR variography facilitates to reduce the information stored in the texture of a white matter image to a few highly significant parameters, thereby quantifying heterogeneity and spatial correlation distance with an accuracy better than 5

  1. Investigation of spatial correlation in MR images of human cerebral white matter using geostatistical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keil, Fabian

    2014-03-20

    Investigating the structure of human cerebral white matter is gaining interest in the neurological as well as in the neuroscientific community. It has been demonstrated in many studies that white matter is a very dynamic structure, rather than a static construct which does not change for a lifetime. That means, structural changes within white matter can be observed even on short timescales, e.g. in the course of normal ageing, neurodegenerative diseases or even during learning processes. To investigate these changes, one method of choice is the texture analysis of images obtained from white matter. In this regard, MRI plays a distinguished role as it provides a completely non-invasive way of acquiring in vivo images of human white matter. This thesis adapted a statistical texture analysis method, known as variography, to quantify the spatial correlation of human cerebral white matter based on MR images. This method, originally introduced in geoscience, relies on the idea of spatial correlation in geological phenomena: in naturally grown structures near things are correlated stronger to each other than distant things. This work reveals that the geological principle of spatial correlation can be applied to MR images of human cerebral white matter and proves that variography is an adequate method to quantify alterations therein. Since the process of MRI data acquisition is completely different to the measuring process used to quantify geological phenomena, the variographic analysis had to be adapted carefully to MR methods in order to provide a correctly working methodology. Therefore, theoretical considerations were evaluated with numerical samples in a first, and validated with real measurements in a second step. It was shown that MR variography facilitates to reduce the information stored in the texture of a white matter image to a few highly significant parameters, thereby quantifying heterogeneity and spatial correlation distance with an accuracy better than 5

  2. A review of human factors principles for the design and implementation of medication safety alerts in clinical information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phansalkar, Shobha; Edworthy, Judy; Hellier, Elizabeth; Seger, Diane L; Schedlbauer, Angela; Avery, Anthony J; Bates, David W

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to describe the implementation of human factors principles for the design of alerts in clinical information systems. First, we conduct a review of alarm systems to identify human factors principles that are employed in the design and implementation of alerts. Second, we review the medical informatics literature to provide examples of the implementation of human factors principles in current clinical information systems using alerts to provide medication decision support. Last, we suggest actionable recommendations for delivering effective clinical decision support using alerts. A review of studies from the medical informatics literature suggests that many basic human factors principles are not followed, possibly contributing to the lack of acceptance of alerts in clinical information systems. We evaluate the limitations of current alerting philosophies and provide recommendations for improving acceptance of alerts by incorporating human factors principles in their design.

  3. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical reasoning in neurology: use of the repertory grid technique to investigate the reasoning of an experienced occupational therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Kathy; Grice, James W

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the use of a structured interview methodology, the repertory grid technique, for investigating the clinical reasoning of an experienced occupational therapist in the domain of upper limb hypertonia as a result of brain injury. Repertory grid interviews were completed before and after exposure to a protocol designed to guide clinical reasoning and decision-making in relation to upper limb neurological rehabilitation. Data were subjected to both qualitative and quantitative analyses. Qualitative analysis focussed on clinical reasoning content. Common themes across the pre- and post-exposure interviews were the use of theoretical frameworks and practice models, the significance of clinical expertise, and discrimination of 'broad' and 'specific' aspects, as well as differentiation between 'therapist and client-related' aspects of the clinical situation. Quantitative analysis indicated that for both pre- and post-exposure repertory grids, clinical reasoning was structured in terms of two main concepts. In the pre-exposure grid, these were related to the therapist's role, and to the 'scope' of practice tasks (either broad or specific). In the post-exposure grid the two main concepts were upper limb performance, and client-centred aspects of the therapy process. The repertory grid technique is proposed as an effective tool for exploring occupational therapy clinical reasoning, based on its capacity for accessing personal frames of reference, and elucidating both the meaning and the structure supporting clinical reasoning.

  5. Experimenting Clinical Pathways in General Practice: a Focus Group Investigation with Italian General Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannini, Lucia; Cattaneo, Cesarina; Peduzzi, Paolo; Lopiccoli, Silvia; Auxilia, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB), Italy, to develop general practitioners’ (GPs) care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs’ involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients’ and professionals’ satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs) held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results Four major themes emerged: i) clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii) they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs’ role; iii) nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv) the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs’ adherence and commitment. Acknowledgments the Authors thank Dr. AP. Cantù and Dr D. Cereda who participated in the two focus groups as observers. PMID:25181354

  6. Clinical endpoint adjudication in a contemporary all-comers coronary stent investigation: methodology and external validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranckx, Pascal; McFadden, Eugene; Cutlip, Donald E; Mehran, Roxana; Swart, Michael; Kint, P P; Zijlstra, Felix; Silber, Sigmund; Windecker, Stephan; Serruys, Patrick W C J

    2013-01-01

    Globalisation in coronary stent research calls for harmonization of clinical endpoint definitions and event adjudication. Little has been published about the various processes used for event adjudication or their impact on outcome reporting. We performed a validation of the clinical event committee (CEC) adjudication process on 100 suspected events in the RESOLUTE All-comers trial (Resolute-AC). Two experienced Clinical Research Organisations (CRO) that had already extensive internal validation processes in place, participated in the study. After initial adjudication by the primary-CEC, events were cross-adjudicated by an external-CEC using the same definitions. Major discrepancies affecting the primary end point of target-lesion failure (TLF), a composite of cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction (TV-MI), or clinically-indicated target-lesion revascularization (CI-TLR), were analysed by an independent oversight committee who provided recommendations for harmonization. Discordant adjudications were reconsidered by the primary CEC. Subsequently, the RAC database was interrogated for cases that based on these recommendations merited re-adjudication and these cases were also re-adjudicated by the primary CEC. Final discrepancies in adjudication of individual components of TLF occurred in 7 out of 100 events in 5 patients. Discrepancies for the (hierarchical) primary endpoint occurred in 5 events (2 cardiac deaths and 3 TV-MI). After application of harmonization recommendations to the overall RAC population (n=2292), the primary CEC adjudicated 3 additional clinical-TLRs and considered 1 TV-MI as no event. A harmonization process provided a high level of concordance for event adjudication and improved accuracy for final event reporting. These findings suggest it is feasible to pool clinical event outcome data across clinical trials even when different CECs are responsible for event adjudication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimenting clinical pathways in general practice: a focus group investigation with Italian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Zannini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clinical governance is considered crucial in primary care. Since 2005, clinical pathways have been experimentally implemented at the Local Health Authority of Monza Brianza (ASLMB, Italy, to develop general practitioners’ (GPs care of patients affected by some chronic diseases. The experimentation was aimed at introducing clinical governance in primary care, increasing GPs’ involvement in the care of their patients, and improving both patients’ and professionals’ satisfaction. In the period 2005-2006, 12% of the 763 employed GPs in the ASLMB were involved in the experiment, while this percentage increased to 15-20% in 2007-2008. Design and Methods. Twenty-four GPs were purposively sampled, randomly divided into two groups and asked to participate in focus groups (FGs held in 2008, aimed at evaluating their perception of the experiment. The FGs were audio-recorded, dialogues were typed out and undergone to a thematic analysis, according to the Interpretative Phenomenological Approach. Results. Four major themes emerged: i clinical pathways can result in GPs working in a more efficient and effective fashion; ii they can assure higher levels of both patient and professional satisfaction, since they sustain a caring approach and strengthen the GPs’ role; iii nevertheless, clinical pathways increase the bureaucratic workload and problems can arise in relationships among GPs and the LHA; iv the implementation of clinical pathways can be improved, especially by reducing bureaucracy and by assuring their continuity. Conclusions. Managerial aspects should be considered with care in order to experimentally introduce clinical pathways in general practice, and continuity of the experimentation should be guaranteed to improve GPs’ adherence and commitment.

  8. Clinical Trial Electronic Portals for Expedited Safety Reporting: Recommendations from the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative Investigational New Drug Safety Advancement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Raymond P; Finnigan, Shanda; Patel, Krupa; Whitney, Shanell; Forrest, Annemarie

    2016-12-15

    Use of electronic clinical trial portals has increased in recent years to assist with sponsor-investigator communication, safety reporting, and clinical trial management. Electronic portals can help reduce time and costs associated with processing paperwork and add security measures; however, there is a lack of information on clinical trial investigative staff's perceived challenges and benefits of using portals. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) sought to (1) identify challenges to investigator receipt and management of investigational new drug (IND) safety reports at oncologic investigative sites and coordinating centers and (2) facilitate adoption of best practices for communicating and managing IND safety reports using electronic portals. CTTI, a public-private partnership to improve the conduct of clinical trials, distributed surveys and conducted interviews in an opinion-gathering effort to record investigator and research staff views on electronic portals in the context of the new safety reporting requirements described in the US Food and Drug Administration's final rule (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21 Section 312). The project focused on receipt, management, and review of safety reports as opposed to the reporting of adverse events. The top challenge investigators and staff identified in using individual sponsor portals was remembering several complex individual passwords to access each site. Also, certain tasks are time-consuming (eg, downloading reports) due to slow sites or difficulties associated with particular operating systems or software. To improve user experiences, respondents suggested that portals function independently of browsers and operating systems, have intuitive interfaces with easy navigation, and incorporate additional features that would allow users to filter, search, and batch safety reports. Results indicate that an ideal system for sharing expedited IND safety information is through a central portal used by

  9. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Basic Research to Potential Clinical Applications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa de Souza Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs are derived from a direct reprogramming of human somatic cells to a pluripotent stage through ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. These cells have two important properties, which are the self-renewal capacity and the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. So, the discovery of hiPSCs opens new opportunities in biomedical sciences, since these cells may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of diseases in the production of new diseases models, in drug development/drug toxicity tests, gene therapies, and cell replacement therapies. However, the hiPSCs technology has limitations including the potential for the development of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities leading to tumorigenicity. Nowadays, basic research in the hiPSCs field has made progress in the application of new strategies with the aim to enable an efficient production of high-quality of hiPSCs for safety and efficacy, necessary to the future application for clinical practice. In this review, we show the recent advances in hiPSCs’ basic research and some potential clinical applications focusing on cancer. We also present the importance of the use of statistical methods to evaluate the possible validation for the hiPSCs for future therapeutic use toward personalized cell therapies.

  10. Measurement and Clinical Significance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Marrocco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is the result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS formation and enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants. Biomarkers of oxidative stress are relevant in the evaluation of the disease status and of the health-enhancing effects of antioxidants. We aim to discuss the major methodological bias of methods used for the evaluation of oxidative stress in humans. There is a lack of consensus concerning the validation, standardization, and reproducibility of methods for the measurement of the following: (1 ROS in leukocytes and platelets by flow cytometry, (2 markers based on ROS-induced modifications of lipids, DNA, and proteins, (3 enzymatic players of redox status, and (4 total antioxidant capacity of human body fluids. It has been suggested that the bias of each method could be overcome by using indexes of oxidative stress that include more than one marker. However, the choice of the markers considered in the global index should be dictated by the aim of the study and its design, as well as by the clinical relevance in the selected subjects. In conclusion, the clinical significance of biomarkers of oxidative stress in humans must come from a critical analysis of the markers that should give an overall index of redox status in particular conditions.

  11. Biomedical and Clinical Promises of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopporn Jongkamonwiwat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders are characterized by the chronic and progressive loss of neuronal structures and functions. There is a variability of the onsets and causes of clinical manifestations. Cell therapy has brought a new concept to overcome brain diseases, but the advancement of this therapy is limited by the demands of specialized neurons. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been promised as a renewable resource for generating human neurons for both laboratory and clinical purposes. By the modulations of appropriate signalling pathways, desired neuron subtypes can be obtained, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide genetically matched neurons for treating patients. These hPSC-derived neurons can also be used for disease modeling and drug screening. Since the most urgent problem today in transplantation is the lack of suitable donor organs and tissues, the derivation of neural progenitor cells from hPSCs has opened a new avenue for regenerative medicine. In this review, we summarize the recent reports that show how to generate neural derivatives from hPSCs, and discuss the current evidence of using these cells in animal studies. We also highlight the possibilities and concerns of translating these hPSC-derived neurons for biomedical and clinical uses in order to fight against neurological disorders.

  12. Quantitative imaging of the human upper airway: instrument design and clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, M. S.; Armstrong, J. J.; Paduch, A.; Sampson, D. D.; Walsh, J. H.; Hillman, D. R.; Eastwood, P. R.

    2006-08-01

    Imaging of the human upper airway is widely used in medicine, in both clinical practice and research. Common imaging modalities include video endoscopy, X-ray CT, and MRI. However, no current modality is both quantitative and safe to use for extended periods of time. Such a capability would be particularly valuable for sleep research, which is inherently reliant on long observation sessions. We have developed an instrument capable of quantitative imaging of the human upper airway, based on endoscopic optical coherence tomography. There are no dose limits for optical techniques, and the minimally invasive imaging probe is safe for use in overnight studies. We report on the design of the instrument and its use in preliminary clinical studies, and we present results from a range of initial experiments. The experiments show that the instrument is capable of imaging during sleep, and that it can record dynamic changes in airway size and shape. This information is useful for research into sleep disorders, and potentially for clinical diagnosis and therapies.

  13. [What are Considerations for Clinical Investigation of New Drugs and Treatment Techniques for Major Depressive Disorders?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder treatments remain unsatisfactory, and the development of novel antidepressants is continuing. Therefore, not only the establishment of therapeutic strategies to accumulate evidence on existing therapies, but also the development of novel therapies is required in order to improve the medical standards. In principle, parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are necessary to assess new compounds for the treatment of major depressive disorders from a scientific perspective. To provide unambiguous evidence of antidepressant activity, well-controlled studies with adequate designs must show efficacy with a statistically significant effect on a clinically meaningful endpoint. For this purpose, it is important to examine all aspects of factors that adversely affect the efficacy and safety assessment in the planning stage of clinical trials and reduce these factors. There are several specific characteristics of clinical trials for neuropsychiatric disorders. Some typical features are as follows: 1) a high and variable response, 2) impact on the effect of the baseline severity of disorders, 3) high dropout rates, 4) biases related to subjective measures of clinical symptoms. In this paper, considerations for the planning and performing of clinical trials for major depressive disorders will be discussed based on these features.

  14. Clinical impact of diagnostic SPET investigations with a dopamine re-uptake ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loekkegaard, Annemette; Werdelin, Lene M.; Friberg, Lars

    2002-01-01

    The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is based on clinical features with pathological verification. However, autopsy has been found to confirm a specialist diagnosis in only about 75% of cases. Especially early in the course of the disease, the clinical diagnosis can be difficult. Imaging of presynaptic dopamine transporters (DAT receptors) has provided a possible diagnostic probe in the evaluation of Parkinson's disease. The cocaine analogue [ 123 I]-2-β-carboxymethoxy-3-β(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([ 123 I]-β-CIT) is one of several radioligands that have been developed for single-photon emission tomography (SPET). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of [ 123 I]-β-CIT SPET on the diagnosis and clinical management of patients with a primary, tentative diagnosis of parkinsonism. We undertook a retrospective evaluation of the clinical records of 90 consecutive patients referred to [ 123 I]-β-CIT SPET from the neurological department, Bispebjerg Hospital. In 58 subjects the scans revealed altered tracer uptake consistent with Parkinson's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy. A significant change in the management or treatment because of the scan was found in 25 patients (28%). The sensitivity of the examination was 97% and the specificity 83%. In conclusion, a significant clinical impact of DAT receptor SPET imaging was found. DAT receptor imaging is a useful diagnostic probe in patients with a possible diagnosis of parkinsonism. (orig.)

  15. Model for investigating the benefits of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to test a model for analysing the possible benefits of clinical supervision. The model suggested a pathway from participation to effectiveness to benefits of clinical supervision, and included possible influences of individual and workplace factors. The study sample was 136 nursing staff members in permanent employment on nine general psychiatric wards and at four community mental health centres at a Danish psychiatric university hospital. Data were collected by means of a set of questionnaires. Participation in clinical supervision was associated with the effectiveness of clinical supervision, as measured by the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS). Furthermore, MCSS scores were associated with benefits, such as increased job satisfaction, vitality, rational coping and less stress, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization. Multivariate analyses indicated that certain individual and workplace factors were related to subscales of the MCSS, as well as some of the benefits. The study supported the suggested model, but methodological limitations apply. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  16. [Is the structure of surgical clinics in Germany changing? A current investigation into the structure of surgical clinics in the Federal Republic of Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lob, G; Lob, T; Bauer, H; Niethard, F; Polonius, J; Siebert, H

    2009-04-01

    Medical developments have led to extensive specialization in the field of surgery. This has already been reflected for many years in altered structure and organization forms of surgical clinics. Indispensable quality standards, statutory general conditions, increasing competition in service providers and health insurance with transparency of the service procedure all intensify this trend. The aim of this investigation was, therefore, to determine how far this differentiation of service supply in the field of surgery is also reflected in the area and in surgical departments and clinics of basic and routine supply. To achieve this, all available published information on the structure and organization of surgical clinics in the Federal Republic of Germany was classified according to current departmentalization into "undivided" or general/visceral surgery facilities compared to orthopedic/trauma surgery departments.

  17. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  18. The "Human Colour" Crayon: Investigating the Attitudes and Perceptions of Learners regarding Race and Skin Colour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeske Alexander

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Some coloured and black learners in South Africa use a light orange or pink crayon to represent themselves in art. Many learners name this colour “human colour” or “skin colour”. This is troublesome, because it could reflect exclusionary ways of representing race in images and language. This case study, conducted with two schools in the Western Cape, investigated Grade 3 learners’ attitudes and perceptions regarding race and skin colour through art processes and discussion. The aim was to promote critical engagement with race in Foundation Phase educational contexts. Suggestions include changing the language used to describe skin colour, just recognition and representation of races in educational resources and the promotion of critical citizenship education. This research indicates the need to create practical curriculum guidelines to discuss race issues in the South African classroom.

  19. Investigation of the redox-dependent modulation of structure and dynamics in human cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Mizue; Saio, Tomohide; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Takeshi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2016-01-22

    Redox-dependent changes in the structure and dynamics of human cytochrome c (Cyt c) were investigated by solution NMR. We found significant structural changes in several regions, including residues 23-28 (loop 3), which were further corroborated by chemical shift differences between the reduced and oxidized states of Cyt c. These differences are essential for discriminating redox states in Cyt c by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) during electron transfer reactions. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments identified that the region around His33 undergoes conformational exchanges on the μs-ms timescale, indicating significant redox-dependent structural changes. Because His33 is not part of the interaction site for CcO, our data suggest that the dynamic properties of the region, which is far from the interaction site for CcO, contribute to conformational changes during electron transfer to CcO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigations on the mechanism of chlorpromazine phototoxicity: effects on lysosomes of cultured human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasei, K.; Ichihashi, M.; Mojamdar, M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and UVA on lysosomes of cultured normal human fibroblasts has been investigated. Acid phosphatase (ACPase) activity in 12000 g pellet of cells treated with CPZ (10 μg/ml) and UVA (6 x 10 4 J/m 2 ) was found to be decreased as compared with non-treated, CPZ or UVA treated control cells. This decrease, however, was not accompanied by a concomitant increase in ACPase activity in the 12000 g supernatant. The addition of Triton X-100 to cells pre-treated with CPZ + UVA resulted in only a moderate increase in ACPase activity of the 12000 g supernatant. ACPase activity of the cells incubated in media containing pre-irradiated CPZ was also found to be decreased. These results indicate that CPZ + UVA directly inactivate lysosomal enzymes, possibly without affecting the membrane. (author)

  1. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE PROTONATION STATES OF HUMAN LACTOFERRIN IRON-BINDING PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Anghel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the protonation states of ionizable groups of human lactoferrin in various conformations were investigated theoretically, at physiological pH (7.365. These calculations show that the transition of the protein from a conformation to another one is accompanied by changes in the protonation state of specific amino acid residues. Analysis of the pKa calculatons underlined the importance of participation of two arginines and one lysine in the opening / closing of the protein. In addition, it was found that the mechanism of iron release depends on the protonation state of TYR-192. Protonated state of this residue in the closed form of lactoferrin will trigger the opening of protein and release of iron ions.

  2. Investigation of carbachol and PACAP38 in a human model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther

    2011-01-01

    and VIP in migraine and head pain. In study I-III we investigated acetylcholine, via the analogue carbachol, and PACAP38 in a human model of migraine. In study IV we studied if PACAP38 and VIP might induce central sensitization, neurogenic inflammation and mast cell degranulation in a cutaneous model...... in migraine patients as well as sustained dilatation of cephalic vessels. In study IV VIP and PACAP38 evoked skin pain, central sensitization, neurogenic inflammation and mast cell degranulation, but VIP showed to be more potent than PACAP38 in inducing neurogenic inflammation and mast cell degranulation...... that neurogenic inflammation and mast cell degranulation are unlikely to cause PACAP38 induced migraine. The present thesis contributes to our knowledge on migraine pathophysiology and suggests PAC1 receptor antagonism as a new target for migraine treatment....

  3. Investigation on human serum albumin and Gum Tragacanth interactions using experimental and computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Sajad; Taran, Mojtaba; Shahlaei, Mohsen

    2018-02-01

    The study on the interaction of human serum albumin and Gum Tragacanth, a biodegradable bio-polymer, has been undertaken. For this purpose, several experimental and computational methods were used. Investigation of thermodynamic parameters and mode of interactions were carried out using Fluorescence spectroscopy in 300 and 310K. Also, a Fourier transformed infrared spectra and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy was performed. To give detailed insight of possible interactions, docking and molecular dynamic simulations were also applied. Results show that the interaction is based on hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Structural analysis implies on no adverse change in protein conformation during binding of GT. Furthermore, computational methods confirm some evidence on secondary structure enhancement of protein as a presence of combining with Gum Tragacanth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human intervention study to investigate the intestinal accessibility and bioavailability of anthocyanins from bilberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Dolores; Jung, Kathrin; Winter, Manuel; Rogoll, Dorothee; Melcher, Ralph; Richling, Elke

    2017-09-15

    We investigated the importance of the large intestine on the bioavailability of anthocyanins from bilberries in humans with/without a colon. Low bioavailability of anthocyanins in plasma and urine was observed in the frame of this study. Anthocyanins reached the circulation mainly as glucuronides. Analysis of ileal effluents (at end of small intestine) demonstrated that 30% of ingested anthocyanins were stable during 8h passage through the upper intestine. Only 20% degradants were formed and mostly intact anthocyanins were absorbed from the small intestine. Higher amounts of degradants than anthocyanins reached the circulation after bilberry extract consumption in both groups of subjects. Comparison of the bioavailability of anthocyanins in healthy subjects versus ileostomists revealed substantially higher amounts of anthocyanins and degradants in the plasma/urine of subjects with an intact gut. The results suggested that the colon is a significant site for absorption of bioactive components such as anthocyanins and their degradation products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gaucher disease: Physical, kinetic and immunologic investigations of human and canine acid β-glucosidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbro, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Kinetic and immunologic techniques were developed to investigate the nature of the acid β-glucosidase (β-Glc) defects which results in human and canine Gaucher disease (GD). Two new affinity columns, using the potent inhibitors of β-Glc (N-alkyl-deoxynojirimycins) as affinity ligands, were synthesized and methods were developed to obtain homogeneous β-Glc from normal human placenta. Polyclonal and monoclonal (representing 14 different epitopes from 18 clones) antibodies were produced to the pure normal β-Glc. Monospecific polyclonal IgG and tritiated-bromo-conduritol B epoxide ([ 3 H]Br-CBE), a specific covalent active site directed inhibitor of β-Glc, were used to quantitate the functional catalytic sites in normal and Type 1 Ashkenazi Jewish GD (AJGD) enzyme preparations: The k cat values for several new substrates with the mutant enzymes from spleen were about 1.5-fold less than the respective normal enzyme, indicating a nearly normal catalytic capacity of the mutant enzymes. Immunoblotting studies with polyclonal or several monoclonal antibodies indicated three molecular forms of β-Glc (M r = 67,000, 62,000 to 65,000 and 58,000) in fibroblast extracts from normals and Type 1 AJGD patients. In comparison, only one form of cross-reacting immunologic material (CRIM) was detected in fibroblast extracts from Types 2 and 3 or several non-Jewish Type 1 GD patients

  6. Polarized Ends of Human Macula Densa Cells: Ultrastructural Investigation and Morphofunctional Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangiotti, Angela Maria; Lorenzi, Teresa; Zingaretti, Maria Cristina; Fabri, Mara; Morroni, Manrico

    2018-05-01

    The morphology of the kidney macula densa (MD) has extensively been investigated in animals, whereas human studies are scanty. We studied the fine structure of human MD cells focusing on their apical and basal ends and correlating structure and function. The MD region was examined by transmission electron microscopy in six renal biopsies from patients with kidney disease. Ultrastructural analysis of MD cells was performed on serial sections. MD cells show two polarized ends. The apical portion is characterized by a single, immotile cilium associated with microvilli; apically, cells are joined by adhering junctions. In the basal portion, the cytoplasm contains small, dense granules and numerous, irregular cytoplasmic projections extending to the adjacent extraglomerular mesangium. The projections often contain small, dense granules. A reticulated basement membrane around MD cells separates them from the extraglomerular mesangium. Although the fact that tissue specimens came from patients with kidney disease mandates extreme caution, ultrastructural examination confirmed that MD cells have sensory features due to the presence of the primary cilium, that they are connected by apical adhering junctions forming a barrier that separates the tubular flow from the interstitium, and that they present numerous basal interdigitations surrounded by a reticulated basement membrane. Conceivably, the latter two features are related to the functional activity of the MD. The small, dense granules in the basal cytoplasm and in cytoplasmic projections are likely related to the paracrine function of MD cells. Anat Rec, 301:922-931, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Validation of a robotic balance system for investigations in the control of human standing balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Billy L; Huryn, Thomas P; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Croft, Elizabeth A; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that human body sway during standing approximates the mechanics of an inverted pendulum pivoted at the ankle joints. In this study, a robotic balance system incorporating a Stewart platform base was developed to provide a new technique to investigate the neural mechanisms involved in standing balance. The robotic system, programmed with the mechanics of an inverted pendulum, controlled the motion of the body in response to a change in applied ankle torque. The ability of the robotic system to replicate the load properties of standing was validated by comparing the load stiffness generated when subjects balanced their own body to the robot's mechanical load programmed with a low (concentrated-mass model) or high (distributed-mass model) inertia. The results show that static load stiffness was not significantly (p > 0.05) different for standing and the robotic system. Dynamic load stiffness for the robotic system increased with the frequency of sway, as predicted by the mechanics of an inverted pendulum, with the higher inertia being accurately matched to the load properties of the human body. This robotic balance system accurately replicated the physical model of standing and represents a useful tool to simulate the dynamics of a standing person. © 2011 IEEE

  8. Investigation of the redox-dependent modulation of structure and dynamics in human cytochrome c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Mizue [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Saio, Tomohide [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kumeta, Hiroyuki [Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Uchida, Takeshi [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Inagaki, Fuyuhiko [Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Ishimori, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    Redox-dependent changes in the structure and dynamics of human cytochrome c (Cyt c) were investigated by solution NMR. We found significant structural changes in several regions, including residues 23–28 (loop 3), which were further corroborated by chemical shift differences between the reduced and oxidized states of Cyt c. These differences are essential for discriminating redox states in Cyt c by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) during electron transfer reactions. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments identified that the region around His33 undergoes conformational exchanges on the μs-ms timescale, indicating significant redox-dependent structural changes. Because His33 is not part of the interaction site for CcO, our data suggest that the dynamic properties of the region, which is far from the interaction site for CcO, contribute to conformational changes during electron transfer to CcO. - Highlights: • Solution structure and dynamics analysis for human Cyt c by NMR. • Structural changes responsible for the discrimination of the redox state in Cyt c. • Conformational exchange in the region outside of the interaction site for CcO. • Less flexibility and rigid structure of the interaction site on Cyt c for CcO.

  9. Guidewire retention following central venous catheterisation: a human factors and safe design investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horberry, Tim; Teng, Yi-Chun; Ward, James; Patil, Vishal; Clarkson, P John

    2014-01-01

    Central Venous Catheterisation (CVC) has occasionally been associated with cases of retained guidewires in patients after surgery. In theory, this is a completely avoidable complication; however, as with any human procedure, operator error leading to guidewires being occasionally retained cannot be fully eliminated. The work described here investigated the issue in an attempt to better understand it both from an operator and a systems perspective, and to ultimately recommend appropriate safe design solutions that reduce guidewire retention errors. Nine distinct methods were used: observations of the procedure, a literature review, interviewing CVC end-users, task analysis construction, CVC procedural audits, two human reliability assessments, usability heuristics and a comprehensive solution survey with CVC end-users. The three solutions that operators rated most highly, in terms of both practicality and effectiveness, were: making trainees better aware of the potential guidewire complications and strongly emphasising guidewire removal in CVC training, actively checking that the guidewire is present in the waste tray for disposal, and standardising purchase of central line sets so that differences that may affect chances of guidewire loss is minimised. Further work to eliminate/engineer out the possibility of guidewires being retained is proposed.

  10. Investigation on main source of dioxin analogues in human breast milk (second report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, H.; Nakao, T.; Aozasa, O.; Ohta, S. [Setsunan Univ., Hirakata (Japan); Iwamatsu, T. [Teijin Eco Science, Co. Ltd., Matsuyama (Japan); Fujimine, Y. [Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Tokushima (Japan); Fukui, S. [Fukui Lactation Consultation, Amagasaki (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    In many countries, the breast milk sample has been used as a suitable indicator in order to examine human exposure level to Dioxins. In general, the breast milk level is considered to be reflecting to their accumulation level in the body. In addition, it is considered that ca. 60% of the accumulation amount of Dioxins is excreted to the baby through breast milk by nursing for a year. However, are these things true? In 1989, Frust et al. reported a time course of concentrations of Dioxins (abbreviated as Dioxins) in breast milk of one German during a period of 1 - 60 weeks after delivery. In the case of PCDFs, the level of 10 - 13 weeks after delivery was remarkably higher than that of 5 weeks. In addition, the PCBs level on the 10 to 13 weeks was also higher in comparison with on the 1 week. Thus, their pollution levels did not always decrease with a passing of time after childbirth. This suggests that all Dioxins in breast milk might be not derived from their storage in the body. Therefore, in 2001, we investigated the time alteration on the pollution level of Dioxins in breast milk from nine mothers and on their infants' daily intake of Dioxins by nursing. Consequently, it was revealed that the average daily intake of PCDD/DFs (PCDDs + PCDFs) was roughly constant during a period of 5 to 180 days after delivery. If all PCDD/DFs in breast milk are derived from only their body storage, the pollution level in milk must decrease in a linear course during a period of 5 to 180 days after delivery. However, thus linear decrease of pollution level was not observed in all tested mothers. These results indicated that PCDD/DFs in milk might be also delivered from other sources except for their storage in the body. Therefore, in this study, we tried to investigate the source of Dioxins in human breast milk.

  11. An Individualized, Perception-Based Protocol to Investigate Human Physiological Responses to Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolbaugh, Crystal L.; Bush, Emily C.; Galenti, Elizabeth S.; Welch, E. Brian; Towse, Theodore F.

    2018-01-01

    Cold exposure, a known stimulant of the thermogenic effects of brown adipose tissue (BAT), is the most widely used method to study BAT physiology in adult humans. Recently, individualized cooling has been recommended to standardize the physiological cold stress applied across participants, but critical experimental details remain unclear. The purpose of this work was to develop a detailed methodology for an individualized, perception-based protocol to investigate human physiological responses to cooling. Participants were wrapped in two water-circulating blankets and fitted with skin temperature probes to estimate BAT activity and peripheral vasoconstriction. We created a thermoesthesia graphical user interface (tGUI) to continuously record the subject's perception of cooling and shivering status during the cooling protocol. The protocol began with a 15 min thermoneutral phase followed by a series of 10 min cooling phases and concluded when sustained shivering (>1 min duration) occurred. Researchers used perception of cooling feedback (tGUI ratings) to manually adjust and personalize the water temperature at each cooling phase. Blanket water temperatures were recorded continuously during the protocol. Twelve volunteers (ages: 26.2 ± 1.4 years; 25% female) completed a feasibility study to evaluate the proposed protocol. Water temperature, perception of cooling, and shivering varied considerably across participants in response to cooling. Mean clavicle skin temperature, a surrogate measure of BAT activity, decreased (−0.99°C, 95% CI: −1.7 to −0.25°C, P = 0.16) after the cooling protocol, but an increase in supraclavicular skin temperature was observed in 4 participants. A strong positive correlation was also found between thermoesthesia and peripheral vasoconstriction (ρ = 0.84, P < 0.001). The proposed individualized, perception-based protocol therefore has potential to investigate the physiological responses to cold stress applied across populations with

  12. Investigations into the binding affinities of different human 5-HT4 receptor splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Helen R; Tochon-Danguy, Nathalie; Chinkwo, Kenneth A; Li, Jian G; Grabbe, Carmen; Shapiro, Marina; Pouton, Colin W; Coupar, Ian M

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the drug-receptor-binding sites of 5 selected human 5-HT(4) receptor splice variants [h5-HT4(a), h5-HT4(b), h5-HT4(c), h5-HT4(d) and h5-HT4(g)] display preferential affinities towards agonists. The agonists selected on the basis of chemical diversity and clinical relevance were: 5-HT4 benzamides, renzapride, zacopride and prucalopride; the benzimidazolones, DAU 6236 and BIMU 1; the aromatic ketone, RS67333, and the indole carbazimidamide tegaserod. The rank order of affinities ranging across the splice variants was: tegaserod (pKi: 7.38-7.91) > or = Y-36912 (pKi: 7.03-7.85) = BIMU 1 (pKi: 6.92-7.78) > or = DAU 6236 (pKi: 6.79-7.99) > or = 5-HT (pKi: 5.82-7.29) > or = 5-MeOT (pKi: 5.64-6.83) > or = renzapride (pKi: 4.85-5.56). We obtained affinity values for the 5-HT4(b), (d) and (g) variants for RS67333 (pKi: 7:48-8.29), prucalopride (pKi: 6.86-7.37) and zacopride (pKi: 5.88-7.0). These results indicate that the ligands interact with the same conserved site in each splice variant. Some splice variants have a higher affinity for certain agonists and the direction of selectivity followed a common trend of lowest affinity at the (d) variant. However, this trend was not evident in functional experiments. Our findings suggest that it may be possible to design splice variant selective ligands, which may be of relevance for experimental drugs but may be difficult to develop clinically. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: a radiological and clinical investigation of five cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demharter, J.; Bohndorf, K.; Michl, W.; Vogt, H.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To make a detailed evaluation of the clinical and radiological course of five children with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Emphasis was laid on the correlation between clinical data and radiological findings. Design and patients. Clinical data, histology (n=11), bone scintigraphy (n=17), and the plain radiographs (n=198) of these patients were reviewed. The mean time of observation was 6.6 years (range 1-14.5 years). Thirty-two lesions seen at the time of primary diagnosis (n=22) or during the course of the disease (n=10) were evaluated. Twenty-seven foci were located in bone; in five cases the sacroiliac joints were involved. Results. Bone scintigrams showed nearly all foci (31/32) and were especially helpful in clinically asymptomatic lesions (14/32) or foci which were radiographically difficult to detect or not seen at all (8/32). Only 14 of 32 foci were locally symptomatic clinically. In all cases with a short interval (≤3 weeks) between the onset of local symptoms and evaluation by plain radiographs (n=5) osteolysis was shown without a sclerotic margin. All bone lesions with a longer duration of local symptoms (n=7) revealed a variable radiographic pattern: osteolysis with sclerotic rim in three, a mixed lytic-sclerotic lesion in three and pure sclerosis in one. In two cases low back pain could be ascribed to sacroiliitis. Conclusion. Only careful correlation between clinical, scintigraphy and radiographic features permits an accurate assessment of disease activity in CRMO. The bone lesions detected radiographically soon after the onset of symptoms resemble those of acute osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  14. Funding opportunities for clinical investigators in the early stages of career development in cardiovascular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J; Becker, Richard C

    2013-11-01

    Contemporary cardiovascular research offers junior investigators the opportunity to explore the gamut of biomedical questions. Despite the recent reduction in the availability of funding mechanisms that have historically served as the primary pathways for investigators in the early stages of career development, there remain numerous traditional and non-traditional funding opportunities. This article highlights these opportunities in order to assist early career investigators in the development of a personalized research trajectory, which optimizes the potential for career success.

  15. Funding opportunities for clinical investigators in the early stages of career development in cardiovascular research

    OpenAIRE

    Mentz, Robert J.; Becker, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary cardiovascular research offers junior investigators the opportunity to explore the gamut of biomedical questions. Despite the recent reduction in the availability of funding mechanisms that have historically served as the primary pathways for investigators in the early stages of career development, there remain numerous traditional and non-traditional funding opportunities. This article highlights these opportunities in order to assist early career investigators in the developmen...

  16. Madigan Army Medical Center Department of Clinical Investigation Annual Progress Report Fiscal Year 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-30

    ferrets with diseased adrenal glands are usually unremarkable, occasionally a complete blood count may reveal regenerative or nonregenerative anemia and...renal failure and hypertension in non-pregnant individuals, and in pregnant women with preeclampsia . To date there exist no studies demonstrating the...Investigator: CDR Sylvia Y . N. Young, MC, USN Department: Preventive Medicine Facility: MAMC Associate Investigator(s): LTC Jeffrey D. Gunzenhauser, MC

  17. Investigating factors determining the use of the clinical care module by nurses through the UTAUT model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zhou, M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available conditions, and treatment plans. A clinical decision based on information that has been efficiently managed and processed lends itself to quality care outcomes.’ The Ministry of Health and Child Care (MoHCC) and the hospital health authorities have managed... : The Eighth International Conference on eHealth, Telemedicine, and Social Medicine (with DIGITAL HEALTHY LIVING 2016 / MATH 2016) Electronic Health (E-Health) projects rolled out do not offer the clinical services module to aid clinicians during decision...

  18. An investigation of clinical studies suggests those with multiple objectives should have at least 90% power for each endpoint.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borm, G.F.; Houben, R.; Welsing, P.M.J.; Zielhuis, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Many clinical studies have more than one objective, either formally or informally, but this is not usually taken into account in the determination of the sample size. We investigated the overall power of a study, that is, the probability that all the objectives will be

  19. Preclinical and clinical investigation of a CCR5 antagonist, AZD5672, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving methotrexate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerlag, Daniëlle M.; Hollis, Sally; Layton, Mark; Vencovský, Jiří; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Braddock, Martin; Tak, Paul P.; Oparanov, Boycho; Stoilov, Rumen; Yaneva, Tanya; Batalov, Anastas; Arteaga, Edgardo Tobias; Escalante, William Otero; Velez, Patricia; Restrepo, Jose Molina; Augustinova, Sevda; Blahova, Anna; Dvorak, Zdenek; Novosad, Libor; Rosa, Jan; Stehlikova, Helena; Vitek, Petr; Balazs, Tibor; Seregely, Katalin; Szombati, Istvan; Tarjan, Katalin; Csengei, Gabor; Galeazzi, Mauro; Saleniece, Sarmite; Saulite-Kandevica, Daina; Coleiro, Bernard; Badurski, Janusz; Brzosko, Marek; Chudzik, Dariusz; Gruszecka-Marczynska, Katarzyna; Hensel, Joanna; Pokrzywnicka-Gajek, Ines; Korpanty-Danda, Joanna; Sochocka-Bykowska, Malgorzata; Tlustochowicz, Witold; Stopinska-Polaszewska, Maria; Gluszko, Piotr; Nedelcovici, Corina; Radulescu, Florin; Gavrila, Mirea; Tanasescu, Coman; Korshunov, Nikolay; Matsievskaia, Galina; Damjanov, Nemanja; Dimic, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    To investigate both the preclinical effects of blocking the chemokine receptor CCR5 and the clinical effects of this approach on the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with active disease. Preclinical evaluations of AZD5672, a small-molecule antagonist of CCR5, were

  20. Clinical association between teeth malocclusions, wrong posture and ocular convergence disorders: an epidemiological investigation on primary school children

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    Silvestrini-Biavati Armando

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the various systems in the body are inter-connected to form a single structural unit, a pathological condition in one area can also affect other areas. There are many known correlations between the visual and motor system. The importance of visual function, particularly the paracentral peripheral field of view, in motor coordination, ambulation and the maintenance of balance has been amply demonstrated. In line with current medical principles, which are moving towards a more holistic view of the human body, this study aims to investigate, in an interdisciplinary manner, the incidence of dental malocclusions together with posture and eye convergence disorders. Methods Six hundred and five children attending at the 3rd, 4th and 5th years of seven Genoa primary schools were examined. Each child underwent the following examinations: (i dental/occlusal; (ii orthoptic; and (iii postural. Occlusal data concerned the presence of cross-bite, midline deviation with a mandibular shift, bad habits and deep or open bite. Postural assessment involved frontal and lateral inspection, investigation during trunk flexion and ambulation, and note of any asymmetry in the lower limbs. The recorded orthoptic data included those pertaining to ocular dominance, a cover test, convergence and the Brock string test. Results A prevalence of cases with an unphysiological gait was found in patients with overjet (14.70% or overbite (14.87%, while the percentage of patients with normal occlusion that showed an unphysiological gait was 13.08%. Also, about 93.8%–94.2% of children showed normal legs without dysmetry, with no difference in respect to the type of occlusion. Subjects with an open bite or deep bite showed a slightly different distribution of right or left dominant eyes. Conclusion About 13% of children showed a pathological gait and, among them, vertical anomalies of occlusion (deep bite or open bite were prevalent with respect to the other

  1. Clinical Aspects of Trace Elements: Zinc in Human Nutrition – Zinc Deficiency and Toxicity

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    Michelle M Pluhator

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Available evidence suggests that trace elements, such as zinc, once thought to have no nutritional relevance, are possibly deficient in large sections of the human population. Conditioned deficiencies have been reported to result from malabsorption syndromes, acrodermatitis enteropathica, alcoholism, gastrointestinal disease, thermal injury, chronic diseases (eg, diabetes, sickle cell anemia, and in total parenteral nutrition therapy. Awareness that patients with these problems are at risk has led health professionals to focus increasingly on the importance of zinc therapy in the prevention and treatment of deficiency. More recently zinc toxicity and its role in human nutrition and well-being have come under investigation. Reports have focused on the role of zinc toxicity in causes of copper deficiency, changes in the immune system and alterations in blood lipids. As the numerous challenges presented by the study of zinc in human nutrition are met, more appropriate recommendations for dietary and therapeutic zinc intake are being made.

  2. Investigation of Virtual Digital Human and Robotic Device Technology Merger Complimented by Haptics and Autostereoscopic Displays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As expected, the STTR Phase I investigation confirmed that the Digital Virtual Human (DVH) and Robonaut technologies can be merged, and that haptic and...

  3. The clinical significance of thymidylate synthase expression in human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hisayuki; Yui, Takehiro; Okada, Tatsuyoshi; Urano, Makoto; Sakurai, Kazuo; Naito, Kensei; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    The focus of human papilloma virus (HPV), particulary HPV 16 is on the role of carcinogenic and prognostic factors on oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (OSCC). However, it remains unclear why patients with HPV-positive tumors have better outcomes than those with HPV-negative tumors. Thymidylate synthase (TS) is one of the initial key enzymes in the 5-fluouracil (5-FU) metabolic pathway. Clinical studies showed that intratumoural TS level was related to the response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with several types of cancer such as gastroenterological and head and neck cancers. We investigated the prevalence of HPV infection and TS expression in the patients with OSCC and evaluated the prognostic implications according to the HPV status and TS expression. We evaluated for high-risk HPV types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 51, 52, 58) using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay on archival biopsies from 54 patients with OSCC. Immunohistochemical assessments for TS were also performed. HPV was positive in 22 (40.7%) of 54 samples. Of these positive cases, 21 (95%) carried HPV 16 and only 1 (5%) HPV58 sequences. TS was overexpressed in 25 (46.3%) of 54 samples. Of these, 19 (76.0%) had an HPV-negative status and 21 (84.0%) were heavy smokers. TS overexpression was associated with the patients with HPV-negative tumors (P=0.02) and heavy smokers (p=0.012). Univariate analysis revealed that HPV positive status (77.3% vs. 29.0%; p=0.006) significantly improved overall survival. Conversely, no remarkable prognostic difference was observed on immunohistochemical analysis of TS expression. A multivariate analysis using Cox's proportional hazard model showed that early T stage (T1-2), early N stage (N0-1), and positive HPV status were significantly independent predictors for superior overall survival. Our studies suggested that positive HPV status was most strongly associated with a favorable prognosis in the patients with OSCC. TS expression has an unusual aspect

  4. Investigating Salmonella Eko from Various Sources in Nigeria by Whole Genome Sequencing to Identify the Source of Human Infections.

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    Pimlapas Leekitcharoenphon

    Full Text Available Twenty-six Salmonella enterica serovar Eko isolated from various sources in Nigeria were investigated by whole genome sequencing to identify the source of human infections. Diversity among the isolates was observed and camel and cattle were identified as the primary reservoirs and the most likely source of the human infections.

  5. An investigation on clinical, radiological and biochemical methods for assessing periodontitis activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, P.T.M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to recognize in which stage rapidly progressing destruction of periodontal ligament fibers occurs, a number of diagnostic methods are studied in this thesis. It turns out that the actual much utilized clinical methods can not be improved while radiological and biochemical diagnositic methods are much more promising. 106 refs.; 20 figs.; 36 tabs

  6. An investigation into the bacterial contamination of goniolenses in use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundon, Rachael; Scurrell, Emma; Mould, John; Hayton-Lee, Emma; Heinrich, Christine

    2017-12-18

    Objectives To report the incidence and evaluate the clinical significance of goniolens bacterial contamination in clinical use in dogs with three different usage protocols and one with an added cleaning protocol. Animals Studied and Methods Three groups of twenty dogs undergoing gonioscopy at a private practice in the UK had the goniolenses swabbed for bacteriology culture and identification prior to placement on the cornea. Three protocols of lens use, with 2 different types of goniolens, were studied. One protocol was then repeated with 21 dogs with a lens cleaning protocol prior to storage. Results Low levels of bacterial contamination were found in all 3 initial groups (10-15%). No correlation was found between usage protocol used and rate of contamination and no correlation was found between length of storage between use and contamination. All bacteria cultured were considered naturally occurring commensals for the canine eye and environment. The group with a cleaning protocol had a 4.7% contamination rate. This was not statistically different from the non-cleaning groups. Conclusions The rate of bacterial contamination of goniolenses in clinical practice is low and the bacterial contaminants consist of commensal bacteria, unlikely to be of detriment to the eye. Minimal contamination of the goniolenses was found and this did not appear to be of clinical significance. The introduction of a simple cleaning protocol did not produce a statistically significant reduction in bacterial contamination. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. SES, Ethnic, and Gender Differences in Young Children's Informal Addition and Subtraction: A Clinical Interview Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Herbert P.; Pappas, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to examine possible socioeconomic status (SES) differences in 4- and 5-year-old children's informal mathematical knowledge. One hundred and two children, 32 from lower, 39 from middle, and 31 from upper SES families participated in the study. Each participant was given a clinical interview involving several addition…

  8. Definition and drivers of acute traumatic coagulopathy: clinical and experimental investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frith, D.; Goslings, J. C.; Gaarder, C.; Maegele, M.; Cohen, M. J.; Allard, S.; Johansson, P. I.; Stanworth, S.; Thiemermann, C.; Brohi, K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) is an impairment of hemostasis that occurs early after injury and is associated with a 4-fold higher mortality, increased transfusion requirements and organ failure. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to develop a clinically relevant

  9. Risk Based Monitoring (RBM: A global study focusing on perception and merits among clinical investigational sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajna P. Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: This unique study performed across ten emerging and developed countries strongly supported the need for systematic global training, education, and implementation of RBM regulatory guidance, with an aim for better safety of subjects and improved quality of clinical trial data. Furthermore, studies with larger sample sizes are recommended to provide an evidence-based approach.

  10. Molecular epigenetics in the management of ovarian cancer: Are we investigating a rational clinical promise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha eNguyen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is essentially a phenotypical change in gene expression without any alteration of the DNA sequence; the emergence of epigenetics in cancer research and mainstream oncology is fueling new hope. However, it is not yet known whether this knowledge will translate to improved clinical management of ovarian cancer. In this malignancy, women are still undergoing chemotherapy similar to what was approved in 1978, which to this day represents one of the biggest breakthroughs for treating ovarian cancer. While liquid tumors are benefitting from epigenetically-related therapies, solid tumors like ovarian cancer are not (yet?. Herein we will review the science of molecular epigenetics, especially DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNA, but also include transcription factors since they, too, are important in ovarian cancer. Preclinical and clinical research on the role of epigenetic modifications is summarized as well. Sadly, ovarian cancer remains an idiopathic disease, for the most part, and there are many areas of patient management which could benefit from improved technology. This review will also highlight the evidence suggesting that epigenetics may have preclinical utility in pharmacology and clinical applications for prognosis and diagnosis. Lastly, drugs currently in clinical trials (i.e. histone deacetylase inhibitors are discussed along with the promise for epigenetics in the exploitation of chemoresistance. Whether epigenetics will ultimately be the answer to better management in ovarian cancer is currently unknown; what we have now is hope.

  11. Investigation of the causes of clinical symptom aggravation in process of intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase

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    LI Chen-hua

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the causes of aggravation of microcirculation disorders in the process of intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase and the clinical outcomes. Methods The clinical data of the aggravated signs and symptoms of 13 cases treated by alteplase were reported, and the onset characteristics and clinical outcomes were analysed to summarize emergency experiences. Results There were 13 patients with stenosis of intracranial large arteries occurred perforating branch infarctions caused by the blocking of carried arteries (8 cases in internal carotid system, 5 cases in vertebral-basilar system. In the process of thrombolytic therapy, main aggravated presentations including cortical ischemic symptom, quadriplegia, exacerbated disturbance of consciousness were seen. Imaging examinations showed multiple new petechial ischemic foci in cortex and watershed region or increasing of infarct foci in cerebellum and brain stem. The prognosis was favorable after expectant treatment. NIHSS score was 8.69 ± 3.42 at 24 h after treatment, and mRS score was 0.94 ±0.37 at 3 month-follow-up. Neurologic deficit and quality of life were evidently improved. Conclusion In the course of intravenous thrombolytic therapy with alteplase. Aggravated clinical signs and symptoms may be related to various factors. Emboli disintegration inducing microcirculation disorder is inferred to be the main cause. For patients presenting aggravated signs and symptoms in thrombolysis process, favorable outcomes may occur as long as intensive care and timely treatment are performed.

  12. Characterization of a 2016 Clinical Isolate of Zika Virus in Non-human Primates

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    Xiao-Feng Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal models are critical to understand disease and to develop countermeasures for the ongoing epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV. Here we report a non-human primate model using a 2016 contemporary clinical isolate of ZIKV. Upon subcutaneous inoculation, rhesus macaques developed fever and viremia, with robust excretion of ZIKV RNA in urine, saliva, and lacrimal fluid. Necropsy of two infected animals revealed that systematic infections involving central nervous system and visceral organs were established at the acute phrase. ZIKV initially targeted the intestinal tracts, spleen, and parotid glands, and retained in spleen and lymph nodes till 10 days post infection. ZIKV-specific immune responses were readily induced in all inoculated animals. The non-human primate model described here provides a valuable platform to study ZIKV pathogenesis and to evaluate vaccine and therapeutics.

  13. "HUMAN AURICULAR MYIASIS CAUSED BY LUCILIA SERICATA: CLINICAL AND PARASITOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS"

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    R. Yaghoobi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is the invasion of body tissues of humans and animals by the larvae of the Diptera or two-winged flies. There are only sporadic reports in the literature concerning human ear myiasis. A 62-year-old bedridden woman in an intensive care unit was examined because of her intense swollen and erythematous right ear. Physical examination revealed 80 live larvae (maggots in the posterior part of right outer ear and external auditory