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Sample records for human chromosome x-linked

  1. Affected kindred analysis of human X chromosome exomes to identify novel X-linked intellectual disability genes.

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    Tejasvi S Niranjan

    Full Text Available X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders.

  2. Affected kindred analysis of human X chromosome exomes to identify novel X-linked intellectual disability genes.

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    Niranjan, Tejasvi S; Skinner, Cindy; May, Melanie; Turner, Tychele; Rose, Rebecca; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome) in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families) using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders.

  3. X chromosome inactivation and X-linked mental retardation

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    Willard, H.F. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1996-07-12

    The expression of X-linked genes in females heterozygous for X-linked defects can be modulated by epigenetic control mechanisms that constitute the X chromosome inactivation pathway. At least four different effects have been found to influence, in females, the phenotypic expression of genes responsible for X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). First, non-random X inactivation, due either to stochastic or genetic factors, can result in tissues in which one cell type (for example, that in which the X chromosome carrying a mutant XLMR gene is active) dominates, instead of the normal mosaic cell population expected as a result of random X inactivation. Second, skewed inactivation of the normal X in individuals carrying a deletion of part of the X chromosome has been documented in a number of mentally retarded females. Third, functional disomy of X-linked genes that are expressed inappropriately due to the absence of X inactivation has been found in mentally retarded females with structurally abnormal X chromosomes that do not contain the X inactivation center. And fourth, dose-dependent overexpression of X-linked genes that normally {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} X inactivation may account for the mental and developmental delay associated with increasing numbers of otherwise inactive X chromosomes in individuals with X chromosome aneuploidy. 53 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Many X-linked microRNAs escape meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

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    Song, Rui; Ro, Seungil; Michaels, Jason D; Park, Chanjae; McCarrey, John R; Yan, Wei

    2009-04-01

    Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during spermatogenesis is characterized by transcriptional silencing of genes on both the X and Y chromosomes in mid-to-late pachytene spermatocytes. MSCI is believed to result from meiotic silencing of unpaired DNA because the X and Y chromosomes remain largely unpaired throughout first meiotic prophase. However, unlike X-chromosome inactivation in female embryonic cells, where 25-30% of X-linked structural genes have been reported to escape inactivation, previous microarray- and RT-PCR-based studies of expression of >364 X-linked mRNA-encoding genes during spermatogenesis have failed to reveal any X-linked gene that escapes the silencing effects of MSCI in primary spermatocytes. Here we show that many X-linked miRNAs are transcribed and processed in pachytene spermatocytes. This unprecedented escape from MSCI by these X-linked miRNAs suggests that they may participate in a critical function at this stage of spermatogenesis, including the possibility that they contribute to the process of MSCI itself, or that they may be essential for post-transcriptional regulation of autosomal mRNAs during the late meiotic and early postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  5. Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

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    Sosa, Enrique; Flores, Luis; Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R

    2015-11-01

    Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Our results show definitively that Type I X-linked miRNA genes are subject to MSCI, as are all or most X-linked mRNA genes, whereas Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI by continuing ongoing, active transcription in primary spermatocytes. We corroborated these results by co-localization of RNA-FISH signals with both a corresponding DNA-FISH signal and an immunofluorescence signal for RNA polymerase II. We also found that X-linked miRNA genes that escape MSCI locate non-randomly to the periphery of the XY body, whereas genes that are subject to MSCI remain located within the XY body in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that the mechanism of escape of X-linked miRNA genes from MSCI involves their relocation to a position outside of the repressive chromatin domain associated with the XY body. The fact that Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI suggests an immediacy of function of the encoded miRNAs specifically required during the meiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  6. X-chromosome tiling path array detection of copy number variants in patients with chromosome X-linked mental retardation

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    Martínez F

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aproximately 5–10% of cases of mental retardation in males are due to copy number variations (CNV on the X chromosome. Novel technologies, such as array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH, may help to uncover cryptic rearrangements in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR patients. We have constructed an X-chromosome tiling path array using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs and validated it using samples with cytogenetically defined copy number changes. We have studied 54 patients with idiopathic mental retardation and 20 controls subjects. Results Known genomic aberrations were reliably detected on the array and eight novel submicroscopic imbalances, likely causative for the mental retardation (MR phenotype, were detected. Putatively pathogenic rearrangements included three deletions and five duplications (ranging between 82 kb to one Mb, all but two affecting genes previously known to be responsible for XLMR. Additionally, we describe different CNV regions with significant different frequencies in XLMR and control subjects (44% vs. 20%. Conclusion This tiling path array of the human X chromosome has proven successful for the detection and characterization of known rearrangements and novel CNVs in XLMR patients.

  7. A new chromosome x exon-specific microarray platform for screening of patients with X-linked disorders.

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    Bashiardes, Stavros; Kousoulidou, Ludmila; van Bokhoven, Hans; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies and advances in high-density oligonucleotide arrays have shown that microdeletions and microduplications occur at a high frequency in the human genome, causing various genetic conditions including mental retardation. Thus far little is known about the pathways leading to this disease, and implementation of microarrays is hampered by their increasing cost and complexity, underlining the need for new diagnostic tools. The aim of this study was to introduce a new targeted platform called "chromosome X exon-specific array" and to apply this new platform to screening of 20 families (including one blind positive control) with suspected X-linked mental retardation, to identify new causative X-linked mental retardation genes. The new microarray contains of 21,939 oligonucleotides covering 92.9% of all exons of all genes on chromosome X. Patient screening resulted in successful identification of the blind positive control included in the sample of 20 families, and one of the remaining 19 families was found to carry a 1.78-kilobase deletion involving all exons of pseudogene BRAF2. The BRAF2 deletion segregated in the family and was not found in 200 normal male samples, and no copy number variations are reported in this region. Further studies and focused investigation of X-linked disorders have the potential to reveal the molecular basis of human genetic pathological conditions that are caused by copy-number changes in chromosome X genes.

  8. The mouse rumpshaker mutation of the proteolipid protein in human X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia

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    Kobayashi, H.; Hoffman, E.P.; Matise, T.C. [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities. We have recently genetically analyzed the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family reported by Johnston and McKusick in 1962. We employed a fluorescent multiplex CA repeat strategy using a 22 locus, 10 cM framework map of the human X chromosome and localized the gene within a 36 cM region of Xq2l.3-q24 which includes the PLP locus. Saugier-Veber et al. recently reported a point mutation (His139Tyr) in exon 3B of the PLP gene in an X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family (SPG2). This family shows no optic atrophy, in contrast to the family we have studied. This data showed that SPG2 and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease were allelic disorders. We investigated the PLP gene as a candidate gene for the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family using SSCP and direct sequencing methods. We found a point mutation (T to C) in exon 4 of affected males which alters the amino-acid (Ile to Thr) at residue 186. This change was absent in the unaffected males of the family and in 40 unrelated control females (80 X chromosomes). Surprisingly, this mutation is identical to the mutation previously identified in the rumpshaker mouse model. The complete homology between both the mouse and human PLP sequence, and the mouse rumpshaker mutation and human spastic paraplegia mutation in our family, permit direct parallels to be drawn with regards to pathophysiology. Our data indicates that the well-documented and striking clinical differences between Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is due to the specific effect of different mutations of the human PLP gene on oligodendrocyte differentiation and development and on later myelin production and maintenance.

  9. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation.

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    Hélène Royo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI. MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions.

  10. Silencing of X-Linked MicroRNAs by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation.

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    Royo, Hélène; Seitz, Hervé; ElInati, Elias; Peters, Antoine H F M; Stadler, Michael B; Turner, James M A

    2015-10-01

    During the pachytene stage of meiosis in male mammals, the X and Y chromosomes are transcriptionally silenced by Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI). MSCI is conserved in therian mammals and is essential for normal male fertility. Transcriptomics approaches have demonstrated that in mice, most or all protein-coding genes on the X chromosome are subject to MSCI. However, it is unclear whether X-linked non-coding RNAs behave in a similar manner. The X chromosome is enriched in microRNA (miRNA) genes, with many exhibiting testis-biased expression. Importantly, high expression levels of X-linked miRNAs (X-miRNAs) have been reported in pachytene spermatocytes, indicating that these genes may escape MSCI, and perhaps play a role in the XY-silencing process. Here we use RNA FISH to examine X-miRNA expression in the male germ line. We find that, like protein-coding X-genes, X-miRNAs are expressed prior to prophase I and are thereafter silenced during pachynema. X-miRNA silencing does not occur in mouse models with defective MSCI. Furthermore, X-miRNAs are expressed at pachynema when present as autosomally integrated transgenes. Thus, we conclude that silencing of X-miRNAs during pachynema in wild type males is MSCI-dependent. Importantly, misexpression of X-miRNAs during pachynema causes spermatogenic defects. We propose that MSCI represents a chromosomal mechanism by which X-miRNAs, and other potential X-encoded repressors, can be silenced, thereby regulating genes with critical late spermatogenic functions.

  11. Comparative mapping of canine and human proximal Xq and genetic analysis of canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

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    Deschenes, S.M.; Puck, J.M.; Dutra, A.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Parallel genetic analysis of animal and human genetic diseases can facilitate the identification and characterization of the causative gene defects. For example, canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by clinical, pathological, and immunological manifestations similar to the most common form of human SCID. To derive a canine syntenic map including genes that in humans are located in proximal Xq, near human X-linked SCID, poly (TG) polymorphisms were identified at the canine phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and choroideremia (CHM) loci. These plus a polymorphic poly (CAG) sequence in exon 1 of the canine androgen receptor gene (AR) were used to genotype members of the colony informative for X-linked SCID. No recombinations among SCIDX1, AR, PGK, or CHM were observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized PGK and CHM to proximal Xq in the dog, in the same chromosomal location occupied by the human genes. Somatic cell hybrid analysis and methylation differences at AR demonstrated that female dogs carrying X-linked SCID have the same lymphocyte-limited skewed X-chromosome inactivation patterns as human carriers. These genetic and phenotypic findings provide evidence that mutations in the same gene, now identified as the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor, cause canine and human X-linked SCID. This approach is an efficient method for comparative gene mapping and disease identification. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. X-chromosomal inactivation directly influences the phenotypic manifestation of X-linked protoporphyria.

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    Brancaleoni, V; Balwani, M; Granata, F; Graziadei, G; Missineo, P; Fiorentino, V; Fustinoni, S; Cappellini, M D; Naik, H; Desnick, R J; Di Pierro, E

    2016-01-01

    X-linked protoporphyria (XLP), a rare erythropoietic porphyria, results from terminal exon gain-of-function mutations in the ALAS2 gene causing increased ALAS2 activity and markedly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. Patients present with severe cutaneous photosensitivity and may develop liver dysfunction. XLP was originally reported as X-linked dominant with 100% penetrance in males and females. We characterized 11 heterozygous females from six unrelated XLP families and show markedly varying phenotypic and biochemical heterogeneity, reflecting the degree of X-chromosomal inactivation of the mutant gene. ALAS2 sequencing identified the specific mutation and confirmed heterozygosity among the females. Clinical history, plasma and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were determined. Methylation assays of the androgen receptor and zinc-finger MYM type 3 short tandem repeat polymorphisms estimated each heterozygotes X-chromosomal inactivation pattern. Heterozygotes with equal or increased skewing, favoring expression of the wild-type allele had no clinical symptoms and only slightly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations and/or frequency of protoporphyrin-containing peripheral blood fluorocytes. When the wild-type allele was preferentially inactivated, heterozygous females manifested the disease phenotype and had both higher erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels and circulating fluorocytes. These findings confirm that the previous dominant classification of XLP is inappropriate and genetically misleading, as the disorder is more appropriately designated XLP.

  13. X-chromosomal inactivation directly influences the phenotypic manifestation of X-linked protoporphyria

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    Brancaleoni, V.; Balwani, M.; Granata, F.; Graziadei, G.; Missineo, P.; Fiorentino, V.; Fustinoni, S.; Cappellini, M.D.; Naik, H.; Desnick, R.J.; Di Pierro, E.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked protoporphyria (XLP), a rare erythropoietic porphyria, results from terminal exon gain-of-function mutations in the ALAS2 gene causing increased ALAS2 activity and markedly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. Patients present with severe cutaneous photosensitivity and may develop liver dysfunction. XLP was originally reported as X-linked dominant with 100% penetrance in males and females. We characterized 11 heterozygous females from six unrelated XLP families and show markedly varying phenotypic and biochemical heterogeneity, reflecting the degree of X-chromsomal inactivation of the mutant gene. ALAS2 sequencing identified the specific mutation and confirmed heterozygosity among the females. Clinical history, plasma and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were determined. Methylation assays of the androgen receptor and zinc-finger MYM type 3 short tandem repeat polymorphisms estimated each heterozygotes X-chromosomal inactivation pattern. Heterozygotes with equal or increased skewing, favoring expression of the wild-type allele had no clinical symptoms and only slightly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations and/or frequency of protoporphyrin-containing peripheral blood fluorocytes. When the wild-type allele was preferentially inactivated, heterozygous females manifested the disease phenotype and had both higher erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels and circulating fluorocytes. These findings confirm that the previous dominant classification of XLP is inappropriate and genetically misleading, as the disorder is more appropriately designated XLP. PMID:25615817

  14. X chromosome array-CGH for the identification of novel X-linked mental retardation genes.

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    Bauters, Marijke; Van Esch, Hilde; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Array-CGH technology for the detection of submicroscopic copy number changes in the genome has recently been developed for the identification of novel disease-associated genes. It has been estimated that submicroscopic genomic deletions or duplications will be present in 5-7% of patients with idiopathic mental retardation (MR). Since 30% more males than females are diagnosed with MR, we have developed a full coverage X chromosome array-CGH with a theoretical resolution of 82 kb, for the detection of copy number alterations in patients with suspected X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). First, we have validated the genomic location of X-derived clones through male versus female hybridisations. Next, we validated our array for efficient and reproducible detection of known alterations in XLMR patients. In all cases, we were able to detect the deletions and duplications in males as well as females. Due to the high resolution of our X-array, the boundaries of the genomic aberrations could clearly be identified making genotype-phenotype studies more reliable. Here, we describe the production and validation of a full coverage X-array-CGH, which will allow for fast and easy screening of submicroscopic copy number alterations in XLMR patients with the aim to identify novel MR genes or mechanisms involved in a deranged cognitive development.

  15. siRNAs from an X-linked satellite repeat promote X-chromosome recognition in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Menon, Debashish U; Coarfa, Cristian; Xiao, Weimin; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Meller, Victoria H

    2014-11-18

    Highly differentiated sex chromosomes create a lethal imbalance in gene expression in one sex. To accommodate hemizygosity of the X chromosome in male fruit flies, expression of X-linked genes increases twofold. This is achieved by the male- specific lethal (MSL) complex, which modifies chromatin to increase expression. Mutations that disrupt the X localization of this complex decrease the expression of X-linked genes and reduce male survival. The mechanism that restricts the MSL complex to X chromatin is not understood. We recently reported that the siRNA pathway contributes to localization of the MSL complex, raising questions about the source of the siRNAs involved. The X-linked 1.688 g/cm(3) satellite related repeats (1.688(X) repeats) are restricted to the X chromosome and produce small RNA, making them an attractive candidate. We tested RNA from these repeats for a role in dosage compensation and found that ectopic expression of single-stranded RNAs from 1.688(X) repeats enhanced the male lethality of mutants with defective X recognition. In contrast, expression of double-stranded hairpin RNA from a 1.688(X) repeat generated abundant siRNA and dramatically increased male survival. Consistent with improved survival, X localization of the MSL complex was largely restored in these males. The striking distribution of 1.688(X) repeats, which are nearly exclusive to the X chromosome, suggests that these are cis-acting elements contributing to identification of X chromatin.

  16. Screening of 20 patients with X-linked mental retardation using chromosome X-specific array-MAPH.

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    Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Parkel, Sven; Zilina, Olga; Palta, Priit; Puusepp, Helen; Remm, Maido; Turner, Gillian; Boyle, Jackie; van Bokhoven, Hans; de Brouwer, Arjan; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Gecz, Jozef; Kurg, Ants; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2007-01-01

    The rapid advancement of high-resolution DNA copy number assessment methods revealed the significant contribution of submicroscopic genetic imbalances to abnormal phenotypes, including mental retardation. In order to detect submicroscopic genetic imbalances, we have screened 20 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) using a chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform with median resolution of 238kb. Among the 20 families, 18 were experimental, as they were not previously screened with any microarray method, and two were blind controls with known aberrations, as they were previously screened by array-CGH. This study presents the first clinical application of chromosome X-specific array-MAPH methodology. The screening of 20 affected males from 20 unrelated XLMR families resulted in the detection of an unknown deletion, spanning a region of 7-23kb. Family studies and population screening demonstrated that the detected deletion is an unknown rare copy number variant. One of the control samples, carrying approximately 6-Mb duplication was correctly identified, moreover it was found to be interrupted by a previously unknown 19kb region of normal copy number. The second control 50kb deletion was not identified, as this particular region was not covered by array-MAPH probes. This study demonstrates that the chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform is a valuable tool for screening patients with XLMR, or other X-linked disorders, and emerges the need for introducing new high-resolution screening methods for the detection of genetic imbalances.

  17. Dosage compensation on the active X chromosome minimizes transcriptional noise of X-linked genes in mammals.

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    Yin, Shanye; Wang, Ping; Deng, Wenjun; Zheng, Hancheng; Hu, Landian; Hurst, Laurence D; Kong, Xiangyin

    2009-01-01

    Theory predicts that haploid-expressed genes should have noisier expression than comparable diploid-expressed ones with the same expression level. However, in mammals there are several classes of gene that are monoallelically expressed, including X-linked genes, imprinted genes and some other autosomal genes. Does it follow that the evolution of X chromosomes in eukaryotes comes at the cost of increased transcriptional noise in the heterogametic sex? Moreover, is escaping X-inactivation in mammalian females associated with an increase in transcriptional variation? To address these questions, we analyze gene expression variation between replicate samples of diverse mammalian cell lines in steady-state using microarray data. We observe that transcriptional variation of X-linked genes is no different to that of autosomal genes both before and after control for transcript abundance. By contrast, autosomal genes subject to allelic exclusion do have unusually high noise levels even allowing for their low transcript abundance. The prior theory we suggest was insufficient, at least as regards X-chromosomes, as it failed to appreciate the regulatory complexity of gene expression, not least the effects of genomic neighborhood. These results suggest that high noise is not a necessary consequence of haploid expression and emphasize the primacy of expression level as a determinant of noise. The latter has consequences for understanding the etiology of haplo-insufficiency and the evolution of gene expression levels. Given the coupling between expression level and noise on the X-chromosome, we suggest that part of the selective advantage of dosage compensation is noise abatement of X-linked genes.

  18. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer.

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    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson's two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of 'two-hit inactivation' in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches in cancer therapy.

  19. Nonrandom X chromosome inactivation in natural killer cells from obligate carriers of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

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    Wengler, G.S.; Parolini, O.; Conley, M.E. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (United States) St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)); Allen, R.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, H. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States))

    1993-01-15

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, markedly reduced numbers of T cells, absent mitogen responses, decreased numbers of NK cells, and normal or elevated numbers of B cells. The abnormalities in the NK cell and B cell lineages could be attributed to dependence of these cell lineages on T cells or T cell-derived factors, or to expression of the XSCID gene defect in these cell lineages. In past experiments, the authors have examined X chromosome inactivation patterns in T cells and cultured B cells from female obligate carriers of XSCID and have found that both cell lineages demonstrate nonrandom X chromosome inactivation. This indicates that the gene defect is intrinsic to both of these cell lineages. In the present experiments, a polymerase chain reaction technique was used to evaluate X chromosome inactivation patterns in highly purified populations of freshly isolated NK cells, B cells, CD4[sup +] cells, and CD8[sup +] cells from three obligate carriers of XSCID. All four lymphoid cell populations from these three women exhibited exclusive use of a single X as the active X. In contrast, both X chromosomes were used as the active X in neutrophils and monocytes. These findings indicate that the XSCID gene is expressed in the NK cell lineage as well as in T cells and B cells. This observation makes it highly unlikely that the XSCID gene is involved in Ag receptor gene rearrangements. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Accounting for eXentricities: analysis of the X chromosome in GWAS reveals X-linked genes implicated in autoimmune diseases.

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    Diana Chang

    Full Text Available Many complex human diseases are highly sexually dimorphic, suggesting a potential contribution of the X chromosome to disease risk. However, the X chromosome has been neglected or incorrectly analyzed in most genome-wide association studies (GWAS. We present tailored analytical methods and software that facilitate X-wide association studies (XWAS, which we further applied to reanalyze data from 16 GWAS of different autoimmune and related diseases (AID. We associated several X-linked genes with disease risk, among which (1 ARHGEF6 is associated with Crohn's disease and replicated in a study of ulcerative colitis, another inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Indeed, ARHGEF6 interacts with a gastric bacterium that has been implicated in IBD. (2 CENPI is associated with three different AID, which is compelling in light of known associations with AID of autosomal genes encoding centromere proteins, as well as established autosomal evidence of pleiotropy between autoimmune diseases. (3 We replicated a previous association of FOXP3, a transcription factor that regulates T-cell development and function, with vitiligo; and (4 we discovered that C1GALT1C1 exhibits sex-specific effect on disease risk in both IBDs. These and other X-linked genes that we associated with AID tend to be highly expressed in tissues related to immune response, participate in major immune pathways, and display differential gene expression between males and females. Combined, the results demonstrate the importance of the X chromosome in autoimmunity, reveal the potential of extensive XWAS, even based on existing data, and provide the tools and incentive to properly include the X chromosome in future studies.

  1. Accounting for eXentricities: analysis of the X chromosome in GWAS reveals X-linked genes implicated in autoimmune diseases.

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    Chang, Diana; Gao, Feng; Slavney, Andrea; Ma, Li; Waldman, Yedael Y; Sams, Aaron J; Billing-Ross, Paul; Madar, Aviv; Spritz, Richard; Keinan, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Many complex human diseases are highly sexually dimorphic, suggesting a potential contribution of the X chromosome to disease risk. However, the X chromosome has been neglected or incorrectly analyzed in most genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We present tailored analytical methods and software that facilitate X-wide association studies (XWAS), which we further applied to reanalyze data from 16 GWAS of different autoimmune and related diseases (AID). We associated several X-linked genes with disease risk, among which (1) ARHGEF6 is associated with Crohn's disease and replicated in a study of ulcerative colitis, another inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Indeed, ARHGEF6 interacts with a gastric bacterium that has been implicated in IBD. (2) CENPI is associated with three different AID, which is compelling in light of known associations with AID of autosomal genes encoding centromere proteins, as well as established autosomal evidence of pleiotropy between autoimmune diseases. (3) We replicated a previous association of FOXP3, a transcription factor that regulates T-cell development and function, with vitiligo; and (4) we discovered that C1GALT1C1 exhibits sex-specific effect on disease risk in both IBDs. These and other X-linked genes that we associated with AID tend to be highly expressed in tissues related to immune response, participate in major immune pathways, and display differential gene expression between males and females. Combined, the results demonstrate the importance of the X chromosome in autoimmunity, reveal the potential of extensive XWAS, even based on existing data, and provide the tools and incentive to properly include the X chromosome in future studies.

  2. Influence of sex and genetic variability on expression of X-linked genes in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagné, Raphaële; Zeller, Tanja; Rotival, Maxime; Szymczak, Silke; Truong, Vinh; Schillert, Arne; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Münzel, Thomas; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, François; Blankenberg, Stefan; Tiret, Laurence

    2011-11-01

    In humans, the fraction of X-linked genes with higher expression in females has been estimated to be 5% from microarray studies, a proportion lower than the 25% of genes thought to escape X inactivation. We analyzed 715 X-linked transcripts in circulating monocytes from 1,467 subjects and found an excess of female-biased transcripts on the X compared to autosomes (9.4% vs 5.5%, pgenes not previously known to escape inactivation, the most significant one was EFHC2 whose 20% of variability was explained by sex. We also investigated cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) by analyzing 15,703 X-linked SNPs. The frequency and magnitude of X-linked cis eQTLs were quite similar in males and females. Few genes exhibited a stronger genetic effect in females than in males (ARSD, DCX, POLA1 and ITM2A). These genes would deserve further investigation since they may contribute to sex pathophysiological differences.

  3. Dosage-sensitive X-linked locus influences the development of amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex, and fear recognition in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Catriona D; Lawrence, Kate; Thomas, N Simon; Price, Cathy J; Ashburner, John; Friston, Karl J; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Oreland, Lars; Skuse, David H

    2003-11-01

    The amygdala, which plays a critical role in emotional learning and social cognition, is structurally and functionally sexually dimorphic in humans. We used magnetic neuroimaging and molecular genetic analyses with healthy subjects and patients possessing X-chromosome anomalies to find dosage-sensitive genes that might influence amygdala development. If such X-linked genes lacked a homologue on the Y-chromosome they would be expressed in one copy in normal 46,XY males and two copies in normal 46,XX females. We showed by means of magnetic neuroimaging that 46,XY males possess significantly increased amygdala volumes relative to normal 46,XX females. However, females with Turner syndrome (45,X) have even larger amygdalae than 46,XY males. This finding implies that haploinsufficiency for one or more X-linked genes influences amygdala development irrespective of a direct or indirect (endocrinological) mechanism involving the Y-chromosome. 45,X females also have increased grey matter volume in the orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally, close to a region implicated in emotional learning. They are as poor as patients with bilateral amygdalectomies in the recognition of fear from facial expressions. We attempted to localize the gene(s) responsible for these deficits in X-monosomy by means of a deletion mapping strategy. We studied female patients possessing structural X-anomalies of the short arm. A genetic locus (no greater than 4.96 Mb in size) at Xp11.3 appears to play a key role in amygdala and orbitofrontal structural and (by implication) functional development. Females with partial X-chromosome deletions, in whom this critical locus is deleted, have normal intelligence. Their fear recognition is as poor as that of 45,X females and their amygdalae are correspondingly enlarged. This 4.96 Mb region contains, among others, the genes for monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and B (MAOB), which are involved in the oxidative deamination of several neurotransmitters, including dopamine and

  4. A new resource for characterizing X-linked genes in Drosophila melanogaster: systematic coverage and subdivision of the X chromosome with nested, Y-linked duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, R Kimberley; Deal, Megan E; Deal, Jennifer A; Garton, Russell D; Brown, C Adam; Ward, Megan E; Andrade, Rachel S; Spana, Eric P; Kaufman, Thomas C; Cook, Kevin R

    2010-12-01

    Interchromosomal duplications are especially important for the study of X-linked genes. Males inheriting a mutation in a vital X-linked gene cannot survive unless there is a wild-type copy of the gene duplicated elsewhere in the genome. Rescuing the lethality of an X-linked mutation with a duplication allows the mutation to be used experimentally in complementation tests and other genetic crosses and it maps the mutated gene to a defined chromosomal region. Duplications can also be used to screen for dosage-dependent enhancers and suppressors of mutant phenotypes as a way to identify genes involved in the same biological process. We describe an ongoing project in Drosophila melanogaster to generate comprehensive coverage and extensive breakpoint subdivision of the X chromosome with megabase-scale X segments borne on Y chromosomes. The in vivo method involves the creation of X inversions on attached-XY chromosomes by FLP-FRT site-specific recombination technology followed by irradiation to induce large internal X deletions. The resulting chromosomes consist of the X tip, a medial X segment placed near the tip by an inversion, and a full Y. A nested set of medial duplicated segments is derived from each inversion precursor. We have constructed a set of inversions on attached-XY chromosomes that enable us to isolate nested duplicated segments from all X regions. To date, our screens have provided a minimum of 78% X coverage with duplication breakpoints spaced a median of nine genes apart. These duplication chromosomes will be valuable resources for rescuing and mapping X-linked mutations and identifying dosage-dependent modifiers of mutant phenotypes.

  5. The genomic structure of human BTK, the defective gene in X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, J.; Parolini, O. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Conley, M.E. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN (United States); Belmont, J.W. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    It has recently been demonstrated that mutations in the gene for Bruton`s tyrosine kinase (BTK) are responsible for X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Southern blot analysis and sequencing of cDNA were used to document deletions, insertions, and single base pair substitutions. To facilitate analysis of BTK regulation and to permit the development of assays that could be used to screen genomic DNA for mutations in BTK, the authors determined the genomic organization of this gene. Subcloning of a cosmid and a yeast artificial chromosome showed that BTK is divided into 19 exons spanning 37 kilobases of genomic DNA. Analysis of the region 5{prime} to the first untranslated exon revealed no consensus TATAA or CAAT boxes; however, three retinoic acid binding sites were identified in this region. Comparison of the structure of BTK with that of other nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, including SRC, FES, and CSK, demonstrated a lack of conservation of exon borders. Information obtained in this study will contribute to understanding of the evolution of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. It will also be useful in diagnostic studies, including carrier detection, and in studies directed towards gene therapy or gene replacement. 29 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Comparative analysis of protocadherin-11 X-linked expression among postnatal rodents, non-human primates, and songbirds suggests its possible involvement in brain evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Matsunaga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protocadherin-11 is a cell adhesion molecule of the cadherin superfamily. Since, only in humans, its paralog is found on the Y chromosome, it is expected that protocadherin-11X/Y plays some role in human brain evolution or sex differences. Recently, a genetic mutation of protocadherin-11X/Y was reported to be associated with a language development disorder. Here, we compared the expression of protocadherin-11 X-linked in developing postnatal brains of mouse (rodent and common marmoset (non-human primate to explore its possible involvement in mammalian brain evolution. We also investigated its expression in the Bengalese finch (songbird to explore a possible function in animal vocalization and human language faculties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Protocadherin-11 X-linked was strongly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and brainstem. Comparative analysis between mice and marmosets revealed that in certain areas of marmoset brain, the expression was clearly enriched. In Bengalese finches, protocadherin-11 X-linked was expressed not only in nuclei of regions of the vocal production pathway and the tracheosyringeal hypoglossal nucleus, but also in areas homologous to the mammalian amygdala and hippocampus. In both marmosets and Bengalese finches, its expression in pallial vocal control areas was developmentally regulated, and no clear expression was seen in the dorsal striatum, indicating a similarity between songbirds and non-human primates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the enriched expression of protocadherin-11 X-linked is involved in primate brain evolution and that some similarity exists between songbirds and primates regarding the neural basis for vocalization.

  7. Hyperexpression of the X chromosome in both sexes results in extensive female bias of X-linked genes in the flour beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Eldon G; Kirkland, Donna; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2010-07-12

    A genome's ability to produce two separate sexually dimorphic phenotypes is an intriguing biological mystery. Microarray-based studies of a handful of model systems suggest that much of the mystery can be explained by sex-biased gene expression evolved in response to sexually antagonistic selection. We present the first whole-genome study of sex-biased expression in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Tribolium is a model for the largest eukaryotic order, Coleoptera, and we show that in whole-body adults, approximately 20% of the transcriptome is differentially regulated between the sexes. Among T. castaneum, Drosophila melanogaster, and Anopheles gambiae, we identify 416 1:1:1 orthologs with conserved sex-biased expression. Overrepresented functional categories among sex-biased genes are primarily those involved in gamete production and development. The genomic distribution of sex-biased genes in T. castaneum is distinctly nonrandom, with the strongest deficit of male-biased genes on the X chromosome (9 of 793) of any species studied to date. Tribolium also shows a significant enrichment of X-linked female-biased genes (408 of 793). Our analyses suggest that the extensive female bias of Tribolium X chromosome gene expression is due to hyperexpression of X-linked genes in both males and females. We propose that the overexpression of X chromosomes in females is an evolutionary side effect of the need to dosage compensate in males and that mechanisms to reduce female X chromosome gene expression to autosomal levels are sufficient but imperfect.

  8. X linked mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeb, Imen; Ben Jemaa, Lamia; Chaabouni, Habiba

    2009-05-01

    Mental retardation (MR) is a group of heterogeneous clinical conditions. There are more than 900 genetic disorders associated with MR and it affects around 3% of the general population. Many MR conditions described are syndromic, fragile X syndrome being the most common clinical entity among them. X linked mental retardation (XLMR) is subdivided in two categories: syndromic XLMR (MRXS) when MR is associated with clinical features and non-syndromic XLMR (MRX) when MR is isolated. The aim of this systematic review of the literature was to join together the results of several studies related to X linked mental retardation and to present various genes implicated in this disease. In this review, focus has been given on genes implicated in mental retardation, the clinical data and on phenotype-genotype correlations. An exhaustive electronic and library research of the recent literature was carried out on the Web sites "Science Direct" and "Interscience Wiley". The key words used were "mental retardation", "X chromosome", "gene", "syndromic mental retardation", "non-syndromic mental retardation". In this review a number of X linked genes, the clinical features associated with the gene abnormality, and the prevalence of the disease gene are discussed. We classified these genes by order of their first implication in MR. A table presented on the XLMR Update Web site who list the 82 known XLMR genes is available as XLMR Genes and corresponding proteins.

  9. Regulation of male fertility by X-linked genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ke; Yang, Fang; Wang, Peijing Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a worldwide reproductive health problem, affecting men and women about equally. Mouse genetic studies demonstrate that more than 200 genes specifically or predominantly regulate fertility. However, few genetic causes of infertility in humans have been identified. Here, we focus on the regulation of male fertility by X-linked, germ cell-specific genes. Previous genomic studies reveal that the mammalian X chromosome is enriched for genes expressed in early spermatogenesis. Recent genetic studies in mice show that X-linked, germ cell-specific genes, such as A-kinase anchor protein 4 (Akap4), nuclear RNA export factor 2 (Nxf2), TBP-associated factor 7l (Taf7l), and testis-expressed gene 11 (Tex11), indeed play important roles in the regulation of male fertility. Moreover, we find that the Taf7l Tex11 double-mutant males exhibit much more severe defects in meiosis than either single mutant, suggesting that these 2 X-linked genes regulate male meiosis synergistically. The X-linked, germ cell-specific genes are particularly attractive in the study of male infertility in humans. Because males are hemizygous for X-linked genes, loss-of-function mutations in the single-copy X-linked genes, unlike in autosomal genes, would not be masked by a normal allele. The genetic studies of X-linked, germ cell-specific genes in mice have laid a foundation for mutational analysis of their human orthologues in infertile men.

  10. Hunting for Novel X-Linked Breast Cancer Suppressor Genes in Mouse and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    B Fig. 5-2 CEPX RP11-344O14 (FOXP3) 353K22 344014 573N21 Fig. 5-3 C C a n c e r N o r m a l N CRepressor ZF LZ FKH E1 E2 E5E3 E4 E6 E7 E8 E9 E10...is an X-linked breast cancer suppressor gene and an important regulator of the HER-2/ErbB2 oncogene . 15. SUBJECT TERMS No subject terms provided 16...of this oncogene in breast cancer. One potential mechanism by which Foxp3 represses Her-2/ErbB2 is to inhibit the promoter activity. Analysis of the

  11. Gene therapy rescues photoreceptor blindness in dogs and paves the way for treating human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Lewin, Alfred S; Iwabe, Simone; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Chiodo, Vince A; Fajardo, Diego S; Román, Alejandro J; Deng, Wen-Tao; Swider, Malgorzata; Alemán, Tomas S; Boye, Sanford L; Genini, Sem; Swaroop, Anand; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2012-02-07

    Hereditary retinal blindness is caused by mutations in genes expressed in photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium. Gene therapy in mouse and dog models of a primary retinal pigment epithelium disease has already been translated to human clinical trials with encouraging results. Treatment for common primary photoreceptor blindness, however, has not yet moved from proof of concept to the clinic. We evaluated gene augmentation therapy in two blinding canine photoreceptor diseases that model the common X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene, which encodes a photoreceptor ciliary protein, and provide evidence that the therapy is effective. After subretinal injections of adeno-associated virus-2/5-vectored human RPGR with human IRBP or GRK1 promoters, in vivo imaging showed preserved photoreceptor nuclei and inner/outer segments that were limited to treated areas. Both rod and cone photoreceptor function were greater in treated (three of four) than in control eyes. Histopathology indicated normal photoreceptor structure and reversal of opsin mislocalization in treated areas expressing human RPGR protein in rods and cones. Postreceptoral remodeling was also corrected: there was reversal of bipolar cell dendrite retraction evident with bipolar cell markers and preservation of outer plexiform layer thickness. Efficacy of gene therapy in these large animal models of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa provides a path for translation to human treatment.

  12. Familial-skewed X-chromosome inactivation as a predisposing factor for late-onset X-linked sideroblastic anemia in carrier females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, M; May, A; Bergamaschi, G; Cerani, P; Rosti, V; Bishop, D F

    2000-12-15

    X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is caused by mutations in the erythroid-specific 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS2) gene. An elderly woman who presented with an acquired sideroblastic anemia is studied. Molecular analysis revealed that she was heterozygous for a missense mutation in the ALAS2 gene, but she expressed only the mutated gene in reticulocytes. Her 2 daughters and a granddaughter were heterozygous for this mutation, had normal hemoglobin levels, and expressed the normal ALAS2 gene in reticulocytes. A grandson with a previous diagnosis of thalassemia intermedia was found to be hemizygous for the ALAS2 mutation. Treatment with pyridoxine completely corrected the anemia both in the proband and her grandson. All women who were analyzed in this family showed skewed X-chromosome inactivation in leukocytes, which indicated a hereditary condition associated with unbalanced lyonization. Because the preferentially active X chromosome carried the mutant ALAS2 allele, acquired skewing in the elderly likely worsened the genetic condition and abolished the normal ALAS2 allele expression in the proband. (Blood. 2000;96:4363-4365)

  13. IL-2R{gamma} gene microdeletion demonstrates that canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency is a homologue of the human disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henthorn, P.S.; Fimiani, V.M.; Patterson, D.F. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by profound defects in cellular and humoral immunity and, in humans, is associated with mutations in the gene for the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R{gamma}). We have examined this gene in a colony of dogs established from a single X-linked SCID carrier female. Affected dogs have a 4-bp deletion in the first exon of the IL-2R{gamma} gene, which precludes the production of a functional protein, demonstrating that the canine disease is a true homologue of human X-linked SCID. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  14. A new chromosome x exon-specific microarray platform for screening of patients with X-linked disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bashiardes, S.; Kousoulidou, L.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Ropers, H.H.; Chelly, J.; Moraine, C.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Esch, H. van; Froyen, G.; Patsalis, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies and advances in high-density oligonucleotide arrays have shown that microdeletions and microduplications occur at a high frequency in the human genome, causing various genetic conditions including mental retardation. Thus far little is known about the pathways leading to this disease,

  15. FARVATX: Family-Based Rare Variant Association Test for X-Linked Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods.

  16. Two mutational hotspots in the interleukin-2 receptor {gamma} chain gene causing human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Buckley, R.H. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Human severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immunity, is most commonly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene for interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor {gamma} chain (IL2RG). For mutational analysis of IL2RG in males with SCID, SSCP screening was followed by DNA sequencing. Of 40 IL2RG mutations found in unrelated SCID patients, 6 were point mutations at the CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 690-691, encoding amino acid R226. This residue lies in the extracellular domain of the protein in a region not previously recognized to be significantly conserved in the cytokine receptor gene family, 11 amino acids upstream from the highly conserved WSXWS motif. Three additional instances of mutation at another CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 879 produced a premature termination signal in the intracellular domain of IL2RG, resulting in loss of the SH2-homologous intracellular domain known to be essential for signaling from the IL-2 receptor complex. Mutations at these two hotspots constitute >20% of the X-linked SCID mutations found by our group and a similar proportion of all reported IL2RG mutations. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. High-resolution genomic microarrays for X-linked mental retardation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtenberg, D.; Veltman, J.A.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Developments in genomic microarray technology have revolutionized the study of human genomic copy number variation. This has significantly affected many areas in human genetics, including the field of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Chromosome X-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes

  18. High-resolution genomic microarrays for X-linked mental retardation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtenberg, D.; Veltman, J.A.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Developments in genomic microarray technology have revolutionized the study of human genomic copy number variation. This has significantly affected many areas in human genetics, including the field of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Chromosome X-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes microarr

  19. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  20. Localization of a new type of X-linked liver glycogenosis to the chromosomal region Xp22 containing the liver {alpha}-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (PHKA2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickx, J.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.J. [Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe here a new type of X-linked liver glycogen storage disease. The main symptoms include liver enlargement and growth retardation. The clinical and biochemical abnormalities of this glycogenosis are similar to those of classical X-linked liver glycogenosis due to phosphorylase kinase deficiency (XLG). However, in constrast to patients with XLG, the patients described here have no reduced phosphorylase kinase activity in erythrocytes and leukocytes, and no enzyme deficiency could be found. Linkage analysis of four families with this X-linked type of liver glycogenosis assigned the disease gene to Xp22. Lod scores obtained with the markers DXS987, DXS207, and DXS999 were 3.97, 2.71, and 2.40, respectively, all at 0% recombination. Multipoint linkage analysis localized the disease gene between DXS143 and DXS989 with a maximum lod score of 4.70 at {theta}=0, relative to DXS987. As both the classical XLG gene and the liver {alpha}-subunit of PHK (PHKA2) are also located in Xp22, this variant type of XLG may be allelic to classical XLG, and both diseases may be caused by mutations in PHKA2. Therefore, they propose to classify XLG as XLG type I (the classical type of XLG) and XLG type II (the variant type of XLG). 28 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Inheritance of most X-linked traits is not dominant or recessive, just X-linked

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobyns, WB; Filauro, A; Tomson, BN; Chan, AS; Ho, AW; Ting, NT; Oosterwijk, JC; Ober, C

    2004-01-01

    The existence of X-linked disorders in humans has been recognized for many centuries, based on lessons in religious texts and observations of specific human families (e.g., color blindness or Daltonism). Our modern concepts of Mendelian (including X-linked) inheritance originated just after the turn

  2. Inheritance of most X-linked traits is not dominant or recessive, just X-linked

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobyns, WB; Filauro, A; Tomson, BN; Chan, AS; Ho, AW; Ting, NT; Oosterwijk, JC; Ober, C

    2004-01-01

    The existence of X-linked disorders in humans has been recognized for many centuries, based on lessons in religious texts and observations of specific human families (e.g., color blindness or Daltonism). Our modern concepts of Mendelian (including X-linked) inheritance originated just after the turn

  3. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mark T; Grafham, Darren V; Coffey, Alison J; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L; Howe, Kevin L; Ashurst, Jennifer L; Fulton, Robert S; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C; Hurles, Matthew E; Andrews, T Daniel; Scott, Carol E; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P; Hunt, Sarah E; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I S; Babbage, Anne K; Bagguley, Claire L; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E; Barlow, Karen F; Barrett, Ian P; Bates, Karen N; Beare, David M; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M; Brown, Andrew J; Brown, Mary J; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G; Conquer, Jen S; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; Deshazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J; Huckle, Elizabeth J; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J; Hunt, Adrienne R; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J; Joseph, Shirin S; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E; Lovell, Jamieson D; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O'Dell, Christopher N; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V; Pearson, Danita M; Pelan, Sarah E; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G; Sehra, Harminder K; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D; Smith, Michelle L; Sotheran, Elizabeth C; Steingruber, Helen E; Steward, Charles A; Storey, Roy; Swann, R Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C; d'Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L; Whiteley, Mathew N; Wilkinson, Jane E; Willey, David L; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L; Wray, Paul W; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J; Hillier, Ladeana W; Willard, Huntington F; Wilson, Richard K; Waterston, Robert H; Rice, Catherine M; Vaudin, Mark; Coulson, Alan; Nelson, David L; Weinstock, George; Sulston, John E; Durbin, Richard; Hubbard, Tim; Gibbs, Richard A; Beck, Stephan; Rogers, Jane; Bentley, David R

    2005-03-17

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.

  4. MAOA and GYG2 are submitted to X chromosome inactivation in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabellini, Raquel; Vasques, Luciana R; de Mello, Joana Carvalho Moreira; Hernandes, Lys Molina; Pereira, Lygia V

    2009-08-16

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a comprehensively studied phenomenon that helped to highlight the heritable nature of epigenetic modifications. Although it consists of the transcriptional inactivation of a whole X chromosome in females, some genes escape this process and present bi-allelic expression. Using human fibroblasts with skewed inactivation, we determined allele-specific expression of two X-linked genes previously described to escape XCI in rodent/human somatic cell hybrids, MAOA and GYG2, and the pattern of DNA methylation of their 5' end. Results from these complementary methodologies let us to conclude that both genes are subjected to X inactivation in normal human fibroblasts, indicating that hybrid cells are not an adequate system for studying epigenotypes. We emphasize the need of an analysis of XCI in normal human cell lines, helping us to determine more precisely which X-linked genes contribute to differences among genders and to the phenotypes associated with sex chromosomes aneuploidies.

  5. Nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation: where are the missing mutations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ropers, H.H.; Hoeltzenbein, M.; Kalscheuer, V.M.M.; Yntema, H.G.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Fryns, J.P.; Chelly, J.; Partington, M.; Gecz, J.; Moraine, C.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of linkage intervals from 125 unrelated families with nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation (NS-XLMR) has revealed that the respective gene defects are conspicuously clustered in defined regions of the human X-chromosome, with approximately 30% of all mutations being located on the proxi

  6. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Human chromosomes: Structure, behavior, and effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therman, E.; Susman, M.

    1993-12-31

    The book `Human Chromosomes: Structure, Behavior, and Effects` covers the most important topics regarding human chromosomes and current research in cytogenetics. Attention is given both to structure and function of autosomes and sex chromosomes, as well as definitions and causes of chromosomal aberrations. This often involves discussion about various aspects of the cell cycle (both mitosis and meiosis). Methods and techniques involved in researching and mapping human chromosomes are also discussed.

  8. Role of ATRX in chromatin structure and function: implications for chromosome instability and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente, Rabindranath; Baumann, Claudia; Viveiros, Maria M

    2011-08-01

    Functional differentiation of chromatin structure is essential for the control of gene expression, nuclear architecture, and chromosome stability. Compelling evidence indicates that alterations in chromatin remodeling proteins play an important role in the pathogenesis of human disease. Among these, α-thalassemia mental retardation X-linked protein (ATRX) has recently emerged as a critical factor involved in heterochromatin formation at mammalian centromeres and telomeres as well as facultative heterochromatin on the murine inactive X chromosome. Mutations in human ATRX result in an X-linked neurodevelopmental condition with various degrees of gonadal dysgenesis (ATRX syndrome). Patients with ATRX syndrome may exhibit skewed X chromosome inactivation (XCI) patterns, and ATRX-deficient mice exhibit abnormal imprinted XCI in the trophoblast cell line. Non-random or skewed XCI can potentially affect both the onset and severity of X-linked disease. Notably, failure to establish epigenetic modifications associated with the inactive X chromosome (Xi) results in several conditions that exhibit genomic and chromosome instability such as fragile X syndrome as well as cancer development. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of ATRX function and its interacting partners in different tissues will no doubt contribute to our understanding of the pathogenesis of ATRX syndrome as well as the epigenetic origins of aneuploidy. In turn, this knowledge will be essential for the identification of novel drug targets and diagnostic tools for cancer progression as well as the therapeutic management of global epigenetic changes commonly associated with malignant neoplastic transformation.

  9. Human X-linked Intellectual Disability Factor CUL4B Is Required for Post-meiotic Sperm Development and Male Fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chih-Hsiang; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Rung; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Ying-Hung; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-02-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that an E3-ubiquitin ligase associated with human X-linked intellectual disability, CUL4B, plays a crucial role in post-meiotic sperm development. Initially, Cul4b(Δ)/Y male mice were found to be sterile and exhibited a progressive loss in germ cells, thereby leading to oligoasthenospermia. Adult Cul4b mutant epididymides also contained very low numbers of mature spermatozoa, and these spermatazoa exhibited pronounced morphological abnormalities. In post-meiotic spermatids, CUL4B was dynamically expressed and mitosis of spermatogonia and meiosis of spermatocytes both appeared unaffected. However, the spermatids exhibited significantly higher levels of apoptosis during spermiogenesis, particularly during the acrosome phase through the cap phase. Comparative proteomic analyses identified a large-scale shift between wild-type and Cul4b mutant testes during early post-meiotic sperm development. Ultrastructural pathology studies further detected aberrant acrosomes in spermatids and nuclear morphology. The protein levels of both canonical and non-canonical histones were also affected in an early spermatid stage in the absence of Cul4b. Thus, X-linked CUL4B appears to play a critical role in acrosomal formation, nuclear condensation, and in regulating histone dynamics during haploid male germ cell differentiation in relation to male fertility in mice. Thus, it is possible that CUL4B-selective substrates are required for post-meiotic sperm morphogenesis.

  10. Dosage regulation of the active X chromosome in human triploid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxian Deng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, dosage compensation is achieved by doubling expression of X-linked genes in both sexes, together with X inactivation in females. Up-regulation of the active X chromosome may be controlled by DNA sequence-based and/or epigenetic mechanisms that double the X output potentially in response to autosomal factor(s. To determine whether X expression is adjusted depending on ploidy, we used expression arrays to compare X-linked and autosomal gene expression in human triploid cells. While the average X:autosome expression ratio was about 1 in normal diploid cells, this ratio was lower (0.81-0.84 in triploid cells with one active X and higher (1.32-1.4 in triploid cells with two active X's. Thus, overall X-linked gene expression in triploid cells does not strictly respond to an autosomal factor, nor is it adjusted to achieve a perfect balance. The unbalanced X:autosome expression ratios that we observed could contribute to the abnormal phenotypes associated with triploidy. Absolute autosomal expression levels per gene copy were similar in triploid versus diploid cells, indicating no apparent global effect on autosomal expression. In triploid cells with two active X's our data support a basic doubling of X-linked gene expression. However, in triploid cells with a single active X, X-linked gene expression is adjusted upward presumably by an epigenetic mechanism that senses the ratio between the number of active X chromosomes and autosomal sets. Such a mechanism may act on a subset of genes whose expression dosage in relation to autosomal expression may be critical. Indeed, we found that there was a range of individual X-linked gene expression in relation to ploidy and that a small subset ( approximately 7% of genes had expression levels apparently proportional to the number of autosomal sets.

  11. A 6. 5-Mb yeast artificial chromosome contig incorporating 33 DNA markers on the human X chromosome at Xq22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetrie, D.; Kendall, E.; Coffey, A.; Hassock, S.; Collins, J.; Todd, C.; Bobrow, M.; Bentley, D.R. (Paediatric Research Unit, London (United Kingdom)); Lehrach, H. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)); Harris, A. (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    The Xq22 region of the human X chromosome contains genes for a number of inherited disorders. Sixty-nine yeast artificial chromosome clones have been isolated and assembled into a 6.5-Mb contig that contains 33 DNA markers localized to this region. This contig extends distally from DXS366 to beyond DXS87 and includes the genes involved in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (btk), Fabry disease (GLA), and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PLP). The order of markers in this contig is consistent with the known genetic and physical mapping information of Xq22. This cloned material provides a source from which to isolate other genes located in this part of the X chromosome. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. X-Linked agammaglobulinemia in a child with Klinefelter's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochino, Alexis-Virgil; Janda, Ales; Ravcukova, Barbora; Plaiasu, Vasilica; Ochiana, Diana; Gherghina, Ioan; Freiberger, Tomas

    2014-02-01

    Bruton's agammaglobulinemia is a rare X-linked humoral immunodeficiency manifesting with recurrent bacterial infections early in life. Klinefelter's syndrome caused by an additional X chromosome is the most common sex chromosome disorder. A previously unreported association of these two conditions is described here.

  13. Allele-specific analysis of cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprograming reveals distinct and predictive susceptibilities of human X-linked genes to reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, Irene; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Chan, Yi-Wah; Kohler, Anne-Celine; Lenhard, Boris; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G

    2017-01-25

    Inactivation of one X chromosome is established early in female mammalian development and can be reversed in vivo and in vitro when pluripotency factors are re-expressed. The extent of reactivation along the inactive X chromosome (Xi) and the determinants of locus susceptibility are, however, poorly understood. Here we use cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprograming to study human Xi reactivation and allele-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify reactivated loci. We show that a subset of human Xi genes is rapidly reactivated upon re-expression of the pluripotency network. These genes lie within the most evolutionary recent segments of the human X chromosome that are depleted of LINE1 and enriched for SINE elements, predicted to impair XIST spreading. Interestingly, this cadre of genes displays stochastic Xi expression in human fibroblasts ahead of reprograming. This stochastic variability is evident between clones, by RNA-sequencing, and at the single-cell level, by RNA-FISH, and is not attributable to differences in repressive histone H3K9me3 or H3K27me3 levels. Treatment with the DNA demethylating agent 5-deoxy-azacytidine does not increase Xi expression ahead of reprograming, but instead reveals a second cadre of genes that only become susceptible to reactivation upon induction of pluripotency. Collectively, these data not only underscore the multiple pathways that contribute to maintaining silencing along the human Xi chromosome but also suggest that transcriptional stochasticity among human cells could be useful for predicting and engineering epigenetic strategies to achieve locus-specific or domain-specific human Xi gene reactivation.

  14. XLPRA: A canine retinal degeneration inherited as an X-linked trait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acland, G.M.; Blanton, S.H.; Hershfield, B.; Aguirre, G.D.

    1994-08-01

    Breeding studies are reported of a previously undescribed hereditary retinal degeneration identified in the Siberian Husky breed of dog. This disorder clinically resembles the previously reported autosomal recessive canine hereditary retinal degenerations collectively termed progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). However, the pedigree of the propositus, a male Siberian Husky, exhibited an X-linked pattern of transmission. This dog was outcrossed to three phenotypically normal female laboratory Beagles and two of their F1 daughters were bred to a phenotypically normal male Beagle, producing affected males in the F2 generation. Subsequent inbreedings produced further affected males and affected females as well. X-linked transmission was established by exclusion of alternative modes of inheritance and, consequently, the disease has been termed X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA). This is the first reported X-linked retinal degeneration in an animal. Because of the many similarities of PRA in dogs to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in humans, this new disease may not only represent the first animal model of X-linked RP (XLRP) but may well be a true homolog of one of the XLRP loci (RP2, RP3, RP6). It is the first retinal degeneration in dogs that can be assigned to an identified canine chromosome, and the first for which linkage mapping offers a realistic approach to proceed by positional cloning towards identifying the responsible gene. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1, a gene involved in X-linked intellectual disability, undergoes RNA editing and alternative splicing during human brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Barresi

    Full Text Available Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1 encodes for a Rho-GTPase-activating protein, important for dendritic morphogenesis and synaptic function. Mutations in this gene have been identified in patients with X-linked intellectual disability associated with cerebellar hypoplasia. ADAR enzymes are responsible for A-to-I RNA editing, an essential post-transcriptional RNA modification contributing to transcriptome and proteome diversification. Specifically, ADAR2 activity is essential for brain development and function. Herein, we show that the OPHN1 transcript undergoes post-transcriptional modifications such as A-to-I RNA editing and alternative splicing in human brain and other tissues. We found that OPHN1 editing is detectable already at the 18th week of gestation in human brain with a boost of editing at weeks 20 to 33, concomitantly with OPHN1 expression increase and the appearance of a novel OPHN1 splicing isoform. Our results demonstrate that multiple post-transcriptional events occur on OPHN1, a gene playing an important role in brain function and development.

  16. Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), a gene involved in X-linked intellectual disability, undergoes RNA editing and alternative splicing during human brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, Sabina; Tomaselli, Sara; Athanasiadis, Alekos; Galeano, Federica; Locatelli, Franco; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra; Gallo, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1) encodes for a Rho-GTPase-activating protein, important for dendritic morphogenesis and synaptic function. Mutations in this gene have been identified in patients with X-linked intellectual disability associated with cerebellar hypoplasia. ADAR enzymes are responsible for A-to-I RNA editing, an essential post-transcriptional RNA modification contributing to transcriptome and proteome diversification. Specifically, ADAR2 activity is essential for brain development and function. Herein, we show that the OPHN1 transcript undergoes post-transcriptional modifications such as A-to-I RNA editing and alternative splicing in human brain and other tissues. We found that OPHN1 editing is detectable already at the 18th week of gestation in human brain with a boost of editing at weeks 20 to 33, concomitantly with OPHN1 expression increase and the appearance of a novel OPHN1 splicing isoform. Our results demonstrate that multiple post-transcriptional events occur on OPHN1, a gene playing an important role in brain function and development.

  17. Cloning and characterization of CLCN5, the human kidney chloride channel gene implicated in Dent disease (an X-linked hereditary nephrolithiasis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, S.E.; Van Bakel, I.; Craig, I.W. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-10-10

    Dent disease, an X-linked familial renal tubular disorder, is a form of Fanconi syndrome associated with proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, and eventual renal failure. We have previously used positional cloning to identify the 3{prime} part of a novel kidney-specific gene (initially termed hClC-K2, but now referred to as CLCN5), which is deleted in patients from one pedigree segregating Dent disease. Mutations that disrupt this gene have been identified in other patients with this disorder. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of the complete open reading frame of the human CLCN5 gene, which is predicted to encode a protein of 746 amino acids, with significant homology to all known members of the ClC family of voltage-gated chloride channels. CLCN5 belongs to a distinct branch of this family, which also includes the recently identified genes CLCN3 and CLCN4. We have shown that the coding region of CLCN5 is organized into 12 exons, spanning 25-30 kb of genomic DNA, and have determined the sequence of each exon-intron boundary. The elucidation of the coding sequence and exon-intron organization of CLCN5 will both expedite the evaluation of structure/function relationships of these ion channels and facilitate the screening of other patients with renal tubular dysfunction for mutations at this locus. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Chromosome Variations And Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudek, D.

    1974-01-01

    Article focused on the science of cytogenetics, which studied the transmission of the units of heredity called chromosomes, and considered the advantage of proper diagnosis of genetic diseases, treated on the chromosomal level. (Author/RK)

  19. Research on automatic human chromosome image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Delie; Tian, Jinwen; Liu, Jian

    2007-11-01

    Human chromosome karyotyping is one of the essential tasks in cytogenetics, especially in genetic syndrome diagnoses. In this thesis, an automatic procedure is introduced for human chromosome image analysis. According to different status of touching and overlapping chromosomes, several segmentation methods are proposed to achieve the best results. Medial axis is extracted by the middle point algorithm. Chromosome band is enhanced by the algorithm based on multiscale B-spline wavelets, extracted by average gray profile, gradient profile and shape profile, and calculated by the WDD (Weighted Density Distribution) descriptors. The multilayer classifier is used in classification. Experiment results demonstrate that the algorithms perform well.

  20. Differential splicing of human androgen receptor pre-mRNA in X-linked reifenstein syndrome, because of a deletion involving a putative branch site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Verleun-Mooijman, M.C.T.; Blaeij, T.J.P. de; Brinkmann, A.O.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1994-04-01

    The analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, mRNA, and protein in a subject with X-linked Reifenstein syndrome (partial androgen insensitivity) is reported. The presence of two mature AR transcripts in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient is established, and, by reverse transcriptase-PCR and RNase transcription analysis, the wild-type transcript and a transcript in which exon 3 sequences are absent without disruption of the translational reading frame are identified. Sequencing and hybridization analysis show a deletion of >6 kb in intron 2 of the human AR gene, starting 18 bp upstream of exon 3. The deletion includes the putative branch-point sequence (BPS) but not the acceptor splice site on the intron 2/exon 3 boundary. The deletion of the putative intron 2 BPS results in 90% inhibition of wild-type splicing. The mutant transcript encodes an AR protein lacking the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain. Western/immunoblotting analysis is used to show that the mutant AR protein is expressed in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient. The residual 10% wild-type transcript can be the result of the use of a cryptic BPS located 63 bp upstream of the intron 2/exon 3 boundary of the mutant AR gene. The mutated AR protein has no transcription-activating potential and does not influence the transactivating properties of the wild-type AR, as tested in cotransfection studies. It is concluded that the partial androgen-insensitivity syndrome of this patient is the consequence of the limited amount of wild-type AR protein expressed in androgen target cells, resulting from the deletion of the intron 2 putative BPS. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A Plain English Map of the Human Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Presents a chromosome map for 19 known chromosomes in human genetics. Describes the characteristics attributed to the genetic codes for each of the chromosomes and discusses the teaching applications of the chromosome map. (MDH)

  2. Extremely low nucleotide diversity in the X-linked region of papaya caused by a strong selective sweep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBuren, Robert; Wai, Ching Man; Zhang, Jisen; Han, Jennifer; Arro, Jie; Lin, Zhicong; Liao, Zhenyang; Yu, Qingyi; Wang, Ming-Li; Zee, Francis; Moore, Richard C; Charlesworth, Deborah; Ming, Ray

    2016-11-28

    The papaya Y-linked region showed clear population structure, resulting in the detection of the ancestral male population that domesticated hermaphrodite papayas were selected from. The same populations were used to study nucleotide diversity and population structure in the X-linked region. Diversity is very low for all genes in the X-linked region in the wild dioecious population, with nucleotide diversity π syn = 0.00017, tenfold lower than the autosomal region (π syn = 0.0017) and 12-fold lower than the Y-linked region (π syn = 0.0021). Analysis of the X-linked sequences shows an undivided population, suggesting a geographically wide diversity-reducing event, whereas two subpopulations were observed in the autosomes separating gynodioecy and dioecy and three subpopulations in the Y-linked region separating three male populations. The extremely low diversity in the papaya X-linked region was probably caused by a recent, strong selective sweep before domestication, involving either the spread of a recessive mutation in an X-linked gene that is beneficial to males or a partially dominant mutation that benefitted females or both sexes. Nucleotide diversity in the domesticated X samples is about half that in the wild Xs, probably due to the bottleneck when hermaphrodites were selected during domestication. The extreme low nucleotide diversity in the papaya X-linked region is much greater than observed in humans, great apes, and the neo-X chromosome of Drosophila miranda, which show the expected pattern of Y-linked genes X-linked genes genes; papaya shows an unprecedented pattern of X-linked genes genes genes.

  3. Paradigm Lost: The Human Chromosome Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Lawrence; Blystone, Robert V.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses whether the discovery in 1956 that humans have a chromosome number of 46, as opposed to 47 or 48 as previously thought, fits into a paradigm shift of the Kuhnian type. Concludes that Kuhn probably would not have considered the chromosome number shift to be large enough to be a focus for one of his paradigms. (AIM)

  4. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, Jean Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Giatras, Iannis

    2003-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease characterized by much less severe disease...... defects developed in 75%, 28%, and 15%, respectively. The probability of developing end-stage renal disease or deafness before the age of 40 yr was 12% and 10%, respectively, in girls and women versus 90 and 80%, respectively, in boys and men. The risk of progression to end-stage renal disease appears...... to increase after the age of 60 yr in women. Because of the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and the large intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity, early prognosis of the disease in X-linked Alport syndrome carriers remains moot. Risk factors for developing renal failure have been identified...

  5. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, Jean Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Giatras, Iannis

    2003-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease characterized by much less severe disease...... in girls and women. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" (ECASCA) group was established to delineate the Alport syndrome phenotype in each gender and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X...... to increase after the age of 60 yr in women. Because of the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and the large intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity, early prognosis of the disease in X-linked Alport syndrome carriers remains moot. Risk factors for developing renal failure have been identified...

  6. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, J P; Knebelmann, B; Giatras, I

    2000-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by the association of progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and, frequently, ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease....... Considerable allelic heterogeneity has been observed. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" has been established to delineate accurately the AS phenotype and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X...... of age was approximately 60% in patients with missense mutations, contrary to 90% for the other types of mutations. The natural history of X-linked AS and correlations with COL4A5 mutations have been established in a large cohort of male patients. These data could be used for further evaluation...

  7. Meiotic chromosome abnormalities in human spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Renée H

    2006-08-01

    The last few years have witnessed an explosion in the information about chromosome abnormalities in human sperm and the meiotic events that predispose to these abnormalities. We have determined that all chromosomes are susceptible to nondisjunction, but chromosomes 21 and 22 and, especially, the sex chromosomes have an increased frequency of aneuploidy. Studies are just beginning on the effects of potential mutagens on the chromosomal constitution of human sperm. The effects of pesticides and cancer therapeutic agents have been reviewed. In the last decade, there has been a great impetus to study chromosome abnormalities in sperm from infertile men because the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) made it possible for these men to father pregnancies. A large number of studies have demonstrated that infertile men have an increased frequency of chromosomally abnormal sperm and children, even when they have a normal somatic karyotype. Meiotic studies on the pachytene stage of spermatogenesis have demonstrated that infertile men have impaired chromosome synapsis, a significantly decreased frequency of recombination, and an increased frequency of chromosomes completely lacking a recombination site. Such errors make these cells susceptible to meiotic arrest and the production of aneuploid gametes.

  8. Multipoint linkage analysis in X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Kruse, T A; Thomsen, A

    1991-01-01

    In order to localize the gene for the X-linked form of Alport syndrome (ATS) more precisely, we performed restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with nine different X-chromosomal DNA markers in 107 members of twelve Danish families segregating for classic ATS or progressive hereditary ...

  9. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  10. A Revised Map of the Human Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Presents an updated map of the human chromosomes, building on a "plain English map" that was previously published. A brief summary of genes research is included in the gene explanations accompanying the map. (PR)

  11. Stable X Chromosome Reactivation in Female Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahsin Stefan Barakat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In placental mammals, balanced expression of X-linked genes is accomplished by X chromosome inactivation (XCI in female cells. In humans, random XCI is initiated early during embryonic development. To investigate whether reprogramming of female human fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs leads to reactivation of the inactive X chromosome (Xi, we have generated iPSC lines from fibroblasts heterozygous for large X-chromosomal deletions. These fibroblasts show completely skewed XCI of the mutated X chromosome, enabling monitoring of X chromosome reactivation (XCR and XCI using allele-specific single-cell expression analysis. This approach revealed that XCR is robust under standard culture conditions, but does not prevent reinitiation of XCI, resulting in a mixed population of cells with either two active X chromosomes (Xas or one Xa and one Xi. This mixed population of XaXa and XaXi cells is stabilized in naive human stem cell medium, allowing expansion of clones with two Xas.

  12. X-linked genes and mental functioning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skuse, David H

    2005-01-01

    ... (as indicated by the large number of X-linked mental retardation syndromes). In addition, there is evidence for relatively specific effects of X-linked genes on social-cognition and emotional regulation...

  13. Engineered human dicentric chromosomes show centromere plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Anne W; Gustashaw, Karen M; Willard, Huntington F

    2005-01-01

    The centromere is essential for the faithful distribution of a cell's genetic material to subsequent generations. Despite intense scrutiny, the precise genetic and epigenetic basis for centromere function is still unknown. Here, we have used engineered dicentric human chromosomes to investigate mammalian centromere structure and function. We describe three classes of dicentric chromosomes isolated in different cell lines: functionally monocentric chromosomes, in which one of the two genetically identical centromeres is consistently inactivated; functionally dicentric chromosomes, in which both centromeres are consistently active; and dicentric chromosomes heterogeneous with respect to centromere activity. A study of serial single cell clones from heterogeneous cell lines revealed that while centromere activity is usually clonal, the centromere state (i.e. functionally monocentric or dicentric) in some lines can switch within a growing population of cells. Because pulsed field gel analysis indicated that the DNA at the centromeres of these chromosomes did not change detectably, this switching of the centromere state is most likely due to epigenetic changes. Inactivation of one of the two active centromeres in a functionally dicentric chromosome was observed in a percentage of cells after treatment with Trichostatin A, an inhibitor of histone deacetylation. This study provides evidence that the activity of human centromeres, while largely stable, can be subject to dynamic change, most likely due to epigenetic modification.

  14. Seizures and X-linked intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Roger E; Holden, Kenton R.; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability occurs as an isolated X-linked trait and as a component of recognizable X-linked syndromes in the company of somatic, metabolic, neuromuscular, or behavioral abnormalities. Seizures accompany intellectual disability in almost half of these X-linked disorders. The spectrum of seizures found in the X-linked intellectual disability syndromes is broad, varying in time of onset, type of seizure, and response to anticonvulsant therapy. The majority of the genes associated wi...

  15. Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

    2001-09-01

    Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

  16. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, J P; Knebelmann, B; Giatras, I

    2000-01-01

    . Considerable allelic heterogeneity has been observed. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" has been established to delineate accurately the AS phenotype and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X......-linked transmission, were collected. Characteristics of the 401 male patients belonging to the 195 families with COL4A5 mutation are presented. All male patients were hematuric, and the rate of progression to end-stage renal failure and deafness was mutation-dependent. Large deletions, non-sense mutations, or small...... mutations changing the reading frame conferred to affected male patients a 90% probability of developing end-stage renal failure before 30 yr of age, whereas the same risk was of 50 and 70%, respectively, in patients with missense or splice site mutation. The risk of developing hearing loss before 30 yr...

  17. X-linked congenital retinoschisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, U; Brümmer, S; Foerster, M H; Wessing, A

    1990-01-01

    The natural history and electrophysiological findings of 52 patients with X-linked congenital retinoschisis with a follow-up of up to 26 years are described. The mean visual acuity was reduced to 0.24 +/- 0.2 and remained unchanged in most patients during this time. If visual loss occurred, it usually happened in the first decennium. The complications were retinal detachments in 11% and vitreous hemorrhages in 4% of the eyes. In general, the vitreous hemorrhages resolved spontaneously. Retinal detachments were treated successfully with conventional buckling procedures. Redetachments occurred in about 40%. Prophylactic laser coagulation was of no use because it was complicated by detachment in 43% of our series. The electro-oculogram was usually normal. In addition to the known electrorentinographic findings of normal a-wave and reduced b-wave amplitudes, we found prolonged b-wave latencies and implicit times, as well as a reduced 30 Hz flicker response.

  18. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Project aims for the past year have been to refine the cytogenetic based physical map of human chromosome 16. This has been achieved by extending the panel of mouse/human hybrids of chromosome 16 to over sixty hybrids and mapping approximately 250 DNA makers. The high resolution of this physical map, with an average distance between breakpoints of less than 1.6 Mb, and the availability of at least one STS in the majority of these intervals, will be the basis for constructing extensive contigs of cloned DNA.

  19. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility.

  20. X-linked mental retardation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ropers, H.H.; Hamel, B.C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic factors have an important role in the aetiology of mental retardation. However, their contribution is often underestimated because in developed countries, severely affected patients are mainly sporadic cases and familial cases are rare. X-chromosomal mental retardation is the exception to

  1. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Marieke; Vosters, Sanne; Merkx, Gerard; D'Hauwers, Kathleen; Wansink, Derick G; Ramos, Liliana; de Boer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  2. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke de Vries

    Full Text Available In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI, which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  3. The origin of human chromosome 2 analyzed by comparative chromosome mapping with a DNA microlibrary

    OpenAIRE

    Wienberg, Johannes; Jauch, Anna; Lüdecke, H J; Senger, G.; Horsthemke, B; Claussen, U.; Cremer, Thomas; Arnold, N; Lengauer, Christoph

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescencein situ hybridization (FISH) of microlibraries established from distinct chromosome subregions can test the evolutionary conservation of chromosome bands as well as chromosomal rearrangements that occurred during primate evolution and will help to clarify phylogenetic relationships. We used a DNA library established by microdissection and microcloning from the entire long arm of human chromosome 2 for fluorescencein situ hybridization and comparative mapping of the chromosomes of ...

  4. Chromosome protein framework from proteome analysis of isolated human metaphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Kiichi; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    We have presented a structural model of the chromosome based on its constituent proteins. Development of a method of mass isolation for intact human metaphase chromosomes and proteome analysis by mass spectrometry of the isolated chromosomal proteins enabled us to develop a four-layer structural model of human metaphase chromosomes. The model consists of four layers, each with different chromosomal protein sets, i.e., chromosome coating proteins (CCPs), chromosome peripheral proteins (CPPs), chromosome structural proteins (CSPs), and chromosome fibrous proteins (CFPs). More than 200 identified proteins have been classified and assigned to the four layers with each layer occupying a distinct region of the chromosome. CCPs are localized at the most outer regions of the chromosomes and they attach to the regions tentatively and occasionally. CCPs include mostly mitochondrial and cytoplasmic proteins, e.g., 70 kDa heat shock protein 9B and Hsp60. CPPs are also localized at the peripheral regions of the chromosomes, but as the essential part of the chromosomes. CPPs include nucleolin, lamin A/C, fibrillarin, etc. CSPs are the primary chromosomal structure proteins, and include topoisomerase IIalpha, condensin subunits, histones, etc. CFPs have a fibrous nature, e.g., beta-actin, vimentin, myosin II, tublin, etc. A data set of these proteins, which we developed, contains essential chromosome proteins with classified information based on this four-layer model and presents useful leads for further studies on chromosomal structure and function.

  5. Strategies for sequencing human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1996-06-01

    This project funded for four years (02.92 to 01.96) was a renewal of a project funded for 2.5 years (07.89 to 01.92). This report covers the period 07.89 to 07.94. The original project was entitled {open_quotes}Correlation of physical and genetic maps of Human Chromosome 16{close_quotes}. The aim over this period was to construct a cytogenetic-based physical map of chromosome 16, to enable integration of its physical and genetic maps. This was achieved by collaboration and isolation of new markers until each bin on the physical map contained a polymorphic marker on the linkage map. A further aim was to integrate all mapping data for this chromosome and to achieve contig closure over band q24.

  6. The complete sequence of human chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, State; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie, Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan, Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, Chris; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstenin, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimbal, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar, Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan M.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-04-15

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-encoding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families and the first complete versions of each of the large chromosome 5 specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and play a likely mechanistic role, since deletions of these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  7. Human Sperm Chromosome Analysis—Study on Human Sperm Chromosome Mutagenesis Induced by Carbon Disulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEJUN-YI; FUXIAO-MIN

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect CS2 of on human sperm chromosomal aberration.The human sperm/hamster egg fusion techniquse was used to analyze 203 human sperm chromosome complement form 9 healthy volunteers.The incidence of numerical aberration was 1.0%,and that of structural chromosome aberration was 5.9% and total abnormalities was 6.9%.Structural aberrations consisted of breaks,deletions, centric rings,fragments,and chromatid exchange.The results from high concentration group(10μmol·L-1 CS2)showed that the incidence of chromosomal aberration rate was significantly higher than that of the control group.The results indicate that high concentration of CS2 might directly cause mutatenesis f the germ cell.

  8. A first-generation X-inactivation profile of the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, L; Cottle, A A; Goglin, K C; Willard, H F

    1999-12-01

    In females, most genes on the X chromosome are generally assumed to be transcriptionally silenced on the inactive X as a result of X inactivation. However, particularly in humans, an increasing number of genes are known to "escape" X inactivation and are expressed from both the active (Xa) and inactive (Xi) X chromosomes; such genes reflect different molecular and epigenetic responses to X inactivation and are candidates for phenotypes associated with X aneuploidy. To identify genes that escape X inactivation and to generate a first-generation X-inactivation profile of the X, we have evaluated the expression of 224 X-linked genes and expressed sequence tags by reverse-transcription-PCR analysis of a panel of multiple independent mouse/human somatic cell hybrids containing a normal human Xi but no Xa. The resulting survey yields an initial X-inactivation profile that is estimated to represent approximately 10% of all X-linked transcripts. Of the 224 transcripts tested here, 34 (three of which are pseudoautosomal) were expressed in as many as nine Xi hybrids and thus appear to escape inactivation. The genes that escape inactivation are distributed nonrandomly along the X; 31 of 34 such transcripts map to Xp, implying that the two arms of the X are epigenetically and/or evolutionarily distinct and suggesting that genetic imbalance of Xp may be more severe clinically than imbalance of Xq. A complete X-inactivation profile will provide information relevant to clinical genetics and genetic counseling and should yield insight into the genomic and epigenetic organization of the X chromosome.

  9. [DNA image-fluorimetry of individual human chromosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, N A; Sakuta, G A; Rozanov, Iu M; Shteĭn, G I; Kudriavtsev, B N

    2013-01-01

    Mucrofluorimetric method for the determination of DNA content in individual human chromosomes has been developed. The method is based on a preliminary identification of chromosomes with Hoechst 33258, followed by staining of the chromosomes with Feulgen reaction using Schiffs reagent type ethidium bromide-SO2, then measuring the fluorescence intensity of the chromosomes using an image analyzer. The method allows to determine the DNA content of individual chromosomes with accuracy up to 4.5 fg. DNA content of individual human chromosomes, their p-and q-arms as well as homologous chromosomes were measured using the developed method. It has been shown that the DNA content in the chromosomes of normal human karyotype is unstable. Fluctuations in the DNA content in some chromosomes can vary 35-40 fg.

  10. PLS3 mutations in X-linked osteoporosis with fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, F.S. Van; Zillikens, M.C.; Micha, D.; Riessland, M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Milbradt, J.; Franken, A.A.; Harsevoort, A.J.; Lichtenbelt, K.D.; Pruijs, H.E.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M.E.; Zwertbroek, R.; Moutaouakil, Y.; Egthuijsen, J.; Hammerschmidt, M.; Bijman, R.; Semeins, C.M.; Bakker, A.D.; Everts, V.; Klein-Nulend, J.; Campos-Obando, N.; Hofman, A.; Meerman, G.J. te; Verkerk, A.J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Maugeri, A.; Sistermans, E.A.; Waisfisz, Q.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Wirth, B.; Simon, M.E.; Pals, G.

    2013-01-01

    Plastin 3 (PLS3), a protein involved in the formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) bundles, appears to be important in human bone health, on the basis of pathogenic variants in PLS3 in five families with X-linked osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures that we report here. The bone-regulatory prop

  11. The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzny, Donna M; Scherer, Steven E; Kaul, Rajinder

    2006-01-01

    After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chr...

  12. Mapping the x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skare, J.C.; Milunsky, A.; Byron, K.S.; Sullivan, J.L.

    1987-04-01

    The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is triggered by Epstein-Barr virus infection and results in fatal mononucleosis, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferative disorders. This study shows that the mutation responsible for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is genetically linked to a restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with the DXS42 probe (from Xq24-q27). The most likely recombination frequency between the loci is 4%, and the associated logarithm of the odds is 5.26. Haplotype analysis using flanking restriction fragment length polymorphism markers indicates that the locus for X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome is distal to probe DXS42 but proximal to probe DXS99 (from Xq26-q27). It is now possible to predict which members of a family with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome are carrier females and to diagnose the syndrome prenatally.

  13. Mapping genes on human chromosome 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, T.; Phipps, P.; Serino, K. [Collaborative Research, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While a substantial number of genes have been physically localized to human chromosome 20, few have been genetically mapped. In the process of developing a genetic linkage map of chromosome 20, we have mapped microsatellite polymorphisms associated with six genes. Three of these had highly informative polymorphisms (greater than 0.70) that were originally identified by other investigators. These include avian sarcoma oncogene homolog (SRC), ribophorin II (RPN2), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1). Polymorphisms associated with two genes were determined following a screen of their DNA sequences in GenBank. These include dinucleotide polymorphisms in introl II of cystatin c (CST3) and in the promoter region of neuroendocrine convertase 2 (NEC2) with heterozygosities of 0.52 and 0.54, respectively. A sixth gene, prodynorphin (PDYN) was mapped following the identification of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (heterozygosity of 0.35) in a cosmid subclone from a YAC homologous to the original phage clone. CA-positive cosmid subclones from a YAC for an additional gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha (GNAS10), have been identified and sequencing is in progress. Similar efforts were utilized to identify a microsatellite polymorphism from a half-YAC cloned by W. Brown and localized by FISH to 20pter. This polymorphism is highly informative, with a heterozygosity of 0.83, and serves to delimit the genetic map of the short arm of this chromosome.

  14. X-chromosome inactivation in Rett Syndrome human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron YL Cheung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects girls due primarily to heterozygous mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2. Random X-chromosome inactivation (XCI results in cellular mosaicism in which some cells express wild-type MECP2 while other cells express mutant MECP2. The generation of patient-specific human induced Pluripotent Stem cells (hiPSCs facilitates the production of RTT-hiPSC-derived neurons in vitro to investigate disease mechanisms and identify novel drug treatments. The generation of RTT-hiPSCs has been reported by many laboratories, however, the XCI status of RTT-hiPSCs has been inconsistent. Some report RTT-hiPSCs retain the inactive X-chromosome (post-XCI of the founder somatic cell allowing isogenic RTT-hiPSCs that express only the wild-type or mutant MECP2 allele to be isolated from the same patient. Post-XCI RTT-hiPSCs-derived neurons retain this allele-specific expression pattern of wild-type or mutant MECP2. Conversely, others report RTT-hiPSCs in which the inactive X-chromosome of the founder somatic cell reactivates (pre-XCI upon reprogramming into RTT-hiPSCs. Pre-XCI RTT-hiPSC-derived neurons exhibit random XCI resulting in cellular mosaicism with respect to wild-type and mutant MECP2 expression. Here we review and attempt to interpret the inconsistencies in XCI status of RTT-hiPSCs generated to date by comparison to other pluripotent systems in vitro and in vivo and the methods used to analyze XCI. Finally, we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of post- and pre-XCI hiPSCs in the context of RTT, and other X-linked and autosomal disorders for translational medicine.

  15. X-linked cataract and Nance-Horan syndrome are allelic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Coccia, Margherita; Brooks, Simon P.; Webb, Tom R.; Christodoulou, Katja; Wozniak, Izabella O.; Murday, Victoria; Balicki, Martha; Yee, Harris A.; Wangensteen, Teresia; Riise, Ruth; Saggar, Anand K; Park, Soo-Mi; Kanuga, Naheed; Francis, Peter J; Maher, Eamonn R

    2009-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked developmental disorder characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism and, in some cases, mental retardation. Protein truncation mutations in a novel gene (NHS) have been identified in patients with this syndrome. We previously mapped X-linked congenital cataract (CXN) in one family to an interval on chromosome Xp22.13 which encompasses the NHS locus; however, no mutations were identified in the NHS gene. In this study, we ...

  16. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Mark T.; Grafham, Darren V.; Coffey, Alison J; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R.; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P.; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L.; Howe, Kevin L; Jennifer L Ashurst; Fulton, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a...

  17. Dosage Compensation of X-Linked Muller Element F Genes but Not X-Linked Transgenes in the Australian Sheep Blowfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Rebecca J; Belikoff, Esther J; Scott, Maxwell J

    2015-01-01

    In most animals that have X and Y sex chromosomes, chromosome-wide mechanisms are used to balance X-linked gene expression in males and females. In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, the dosage compensation mechanism also generally extends to X-linked transgenes. Over 70 transgenic lines of the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina have been made as part of an effort to develop male-only strains for a genetic control program of this major pest of sheep. All lines carry a constitutively expressed fluorescent protein marker gene. In all 12 X-linked lines, female larvae show brighter fluorescence than male larvae, suggesting the marker gene is not dosage compensated. This has been confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for selected lines. To determine if endogenous X-linked genes are dosage compensated, we isolated 8 genes that are orthologs of genes that are on the fourth chromosome in D. melanogaster. Recent evidence suggests that the D. melanogaster fourth chromosome, or Muller element F, is the ancestral X chromosome in Diptera that has reverted to an autosome in Drosophila species. We show by quantitative PCR of male and female DNA that 6 of the 8 linkage group F genes reside on the X chromosome in L. cuprina. The other two Muller element F genes were found to be autosomal in L. cuprina, whereas two Muller element B genes were found on the same region of the X chromosome as the L. cuprina orthologs of the D. melanogaster Ephrin and gawky genes. We find that the L. cuprina X chromosome genes are equally expressed in males and females (i.e., fully dosage compensated). Thus, unlike in Drosophila, it appears that the Lucilia dosage compensation system is specific for genes endogenous to the X chromosome and cannot be co-opted by recently arrived transgenes.

  18. X-linked ichthyosis along with epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shambulingappa Pallagatti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ichthyoses are a heterogenous group of hereditary keratinization disorders that share in common the accumulation & shedding of large amounts of hyperkeratotic epidermis.Early reports of ichthyosis in the Indian and Chinese literature date back to several hundred years. X-linked recessive ichthyosis (XLI is a common disorder of keratinization and affects males who inherit an X-chromosome having a steroid sulphatase genetic mutation.In the present communication we report a case of XLI and dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in the same patient. To the best of our knowledge it has been reported only once before.

  19. Flow karyotyping and sorting of human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.W.; Lucas, J.; Peters, D.; Pinkel, D.; Trask, B.; van den Engh, G.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1986-07-16

    Flow cytometry and sorting are becoming increasingly useful as tools for chromosome classfication and for the detection of numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Chromosomes of a single type can be purified with these tools to facilitate gene mapping or production of chromosome specific recombinant DNA libraries. For analysis of chromosomes with flow cytometry, the chromosomes are extracted from mitotic cells, stained with one or more fluorescent dyes and classified one-by-one according to their dye content(s). Thus, the flow approach is fundamentally different than conventional karyotyping where chromosomes are classified within the context of a metaphase spread. Flow sorting allows purification of chromosomes that can be distinguished flow cytometrically. The authors describe the basic principles of flow cytometric chromosome classification i.e. flow karyotyping, and chromosome sorting and describe several applications. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Homologies between human and marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) chromosomes revealed by comparative chromosome painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherlock, J.K.; Griffin, D.K.; Delhanty, J.D.A.; Parrington, J.M. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-15

    Regions of DNA homology between human and marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) chromosomes have been demonstrated using fluorescence in situ hybridization. All 24 chromosome paints and two centromere repeat sequences from Homo sapiens (HSA) have been annealed to previously G-banded metaphase spreads of Callithrix jacchus. All human paint probes, except Y, successfully hybridized to marmoset chromosomes. Fifteen of them hybridized to one region only, seven to two regions, and paint 1 to three regions. Homologies proposed from previous banding comparisons have been confirmed for HSA 2, 4-6, 10-12, 18, 19, 21, and X and partially confirmed for HSA 1 and 3, but were not in agreement for HSA 14 and 17. Human centromere repeat sequences for X and 18 did not hybridize to marmoset chromosomes. Because, at present, there is the confusing situation of several different numbering systems for marmoset chromosomes, we propose a new simpler nomenclature based on descending order of chromosome size. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Isolation and characterization of DNA probes for human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, P C

    1990-01-01

    A coordinated effort to map and sequence the human genome has recently become a national priority. Chromosome 21, the smallest human chromosome accounting for less than 2% of the human genome, is an attractive model system for developing and evaluating genome mapping technology. Several strategies are currently being explored including the development of chromosome 21 libraries from somatic cell hybrids as reported here, the cloning of chromosome 21 in yeast artificial chromosomes (McCormick et al., 1989b), and the construction of chromosome 21 libraries using chromosome flow-sorting techniques (Fuscoe et al., 1989). This report describes the approaches used to identify DNA probes that are useful for mapping chromosome 21. Probes were successfully isolated from both phage and cosmid libraries made from two somatic cell hybrids that contain human chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome. The 15 cosmid clones from the WA17 library, reduced to cloned DNA sequences of an average size of 3 kb, total 525 kb of DNA which is approximately 1% of chromosome 21. From these clones, a set of polymorphic DNA markers that span the length of the long arm of chromosome 21 has been generated. All of the probes thus far analyzed from the WA17 libraries have been mapped to chromosome 21 both by physical and genetic mapping methods. It is therefore likely that the WA17 hybrid cell line contains human chromosome 21 as the only human component, in agreement with cytogenetic observation. The 153E7b cosmid libraries will provide an alternative source of cloned chromosome 21 DNA. Library screening techniques can be employed to obtain cloned DNA sequences from the same genetic loci of the two different chromosome 21s. Comparative analysis will allow direct estimation of DNA sequence variation for different regions of chromosome 21. Mapped DNA probes make possible the molecular analysis of chromosome 21 at a level of resolution not achievable by classical cytogenetic techniques (Graw et al

  2. Human Structural Variation: Mechanisms of Chromosome Rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckselblatt, Brooke; Rudd, M Katharine

    2015-10-01

    Chromosome structural variation (SV) is a normal part of variation in the human genome, but some classes of SV can cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Analysis of the DNA sequence at SV breakpoints can reveal mutational mechanisms and risk factors for chromosome rearrangement. Large-scale SV breakpoint studies have become possible recently owing to advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) including whole-genome sequencing (WGS). These findings have shed light on complex forms of SV such as triplications, inverted duplications, insertional translocations, and chromothripsis. Sequence-level breakpoint data resolve SV structure and determine how genes are disrupted, fused, and/or misregulated by breakpoints. Recent improvements in breakpoint sequencing have also revealed non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between paralogous long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) or human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) repeats as a cause of deletions, duplications, and translocations. This review covers the genomic organization of simple and complex constitutional SVs, as well as the molecular mechanisms of their formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Large-scale reconstruction of 3D structures of human chromosomes from chromosomal contact data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Tuan; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomes are not positioned randomly within a nucleus, but instead, they adopt preferred spatial conformations to facilitate necessary long-range gene-gene interactions and regulations. Thus, obtaining the 3D shape of chromosomes of a genome is critical for understanding how the genome folds, functions and how its genes interact and are regulated. Here, we describe a method to reconstruct preferred 3D structures of individual chromosomes of the human genome from chromosomal contact data generated by the Hi-C chromosome conformation capturing technique. A novel parameterized objective function was designed for modeling chromosome structures, which was optimized by a gradient descent method to generate chromosomal structural models that could satisfy as many intra-chromosomal contacts as possible. We applied the objective function and the corresponding optimization method to two Hi-C chromosomal data sets of both a healthy and a cancerous human B-cell to construct 3D models of individual chromosomes at resolutions of 1 MB and 200 KB, respectively. The parameters used with the method were calibrated according to an independent fluorescence in situ hybridization experimental data. The structural models generated by our method could satisfy a high percentage of contacts (pairs of loci in interaction) and non-contacts (pairs of loci not in interaction) and were compatible with the known two-compartment organization of human chromatin structures. Furthermore, structural models generated at different resolutions and from randomly permuted data sets were consistent.

  4. STS Gene in a Pedigree with X-linked Ichthyosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU An; XIAO Shengxiang; TAN Shengshun; LEI Xiaobing; ZHANG Jiangan; JIAO Ting; LIU Yan

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the gene mutation in a pedigree with X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) and to explore the relationship between the mutation and its clinical manifestations, genomic DNA of affected members, the normal member of the pedigree and 50 unrelated normal members was extracted with a whole blood genomic DNA extraction kit and the DNA was used as a template for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated amplification of exon 1 and exon 10 of the STS gene. hHb6 (human hair basic keratin) gene was used as the internal control. Our results showed that the STS gene was deleted in affected members in the pedigree with X-linked ichthyosis. The normal member of the pedigree and 50 unrelated normal members had no such deletion. The proband and his mother had products in the internal control after PCR amplification. The blank control had no product. It is concluded that deletion of the STS gene existed in this pedigree with X-linked ichthyosis, and it is responsible for the unique skin lesions of X-linked ichthyosis.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart disease. Dilated cardiomyopathy ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that prevents developing red ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is a disorder that mainly affects males. ...

  8. Sex-specific silencing of X-linked genes by Xist RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Srimonta; Maclary, Emily; Hinten, Michael; Kalantry, Sundeep

    2016-01-19

    X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is thought to catalyze silencing of X-linked genes in cis during X-chromosome inactivation, which equalizes X-linked gene dosage between male and female mammals. To test the impact of Xist RNA on X-linked gene silencing, we ectopically induced endogenous Xist by ablating the antisense repressor Tsix in mice. We find that ectopic Xist RNA induction and subsequent X-linked gene silencing is sex specific in embryos and in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). A higher frequency of X(ΔTsix)Y male cells displayed ectopic Xist RNA coating compared with X(ΔTsix)X female cells. This increase reflected the inability of X(ΔTsix)Y cells to efficiently silence X-linked genes compared with X(ΔTsix)X cells, despite equivalent Xist RNA induction and coating. Silencing of genes on both Xs resulted in significantly reduced proliferation and increased cell death in X(ΔTsix)X female cells relative to X(ΔTsix)Y male cells. Thus, whereas Xist RNA can inactivate the X chromosome in females it may not do so in males. We further found comparable silencing in differentiating X(ΔTsix)Y and 39,X(ΔTsix) (X(ΔTsix)O) ESCs, excluding the Y chromosome and instead implicating the X-chromosome dose as the source of the sex-specific differences. Because X(ΔTsix)X female embryonic epiblast cells and EpiSCs harbor an inactivated X chromosome prior to ectopic inactivation of the active X(ΔTsix) X chromosome, we propose that the increased expression of one or more X-inactivation escapees activates Xist and, separately, helps trigger X-linked gene silencing.

  9. A highly conserved pericentromeric domain in human and gorilla chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, M; Gosálvez, J; Gosálvez, A; Nieddu, M; López-Fernández, C; Mezzanotte, R

    2009-01-01

    Significant similarity between human and gorilla genomes has been found in all chromosome arms, but not in centromeres, using whole-comparative genomic hybridization (W-CGH). In human chromosomes, centromeric regions, generally containing highly repetitive DNAs, are characterized by the presence of specific human DNA sequences and an absence of homology with gorilla DNA sequences. The only exception is the pericentromeric area of human chromosome 9, which, in addition to a large block of human DNA, also contains a region of homology with gorilla DNA sequences; the localization of these sequences coincides with that of human satellite III. Since highly repetitive DNAs are known for their high mutation frequency, we hypothesized that the chromosome 9 pericentromeric DNA conserved in human chromosomes and deriving from the gorilla genome may thus play some important functional role.

  10. A high density of human communication-associated genes in chromosome 7q31-q36: differential expression in human and non-human primate cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E; Jensen, L R; Farcas, R; Kondova, I; Bontrop, R E; Navarro, B; Fuchs, E; Kuss, A W; Haaf, T

    2012-01-01

    The human brain is distinguished by its remarkable size, high energy consumption, and cognitive abilities compared to all other mammals and non-human primates. However, little is known about what has accelerated brain evolution in the human lineage. One possible explanation is that the appearance of advanced communication skills and language has been a driving force of human brain development. The phenotypic adaptations in brain structure and function which occurred on the way to modern humans may be associated with specific molecular signatures in today's human genome and/or transcriptome. Genes that have been linked to language, reading, and/or autism spectrum disorders are prime candidates when searching for genes for human-specific communication abilities. The database and genome-wide expression analyses we present here revealed a clustering of such communication-associated genes (COAG) on human chromosomes X and 7, in particular chromosome 7q31-q36. Compared to the rest of the genome, we found a high number of COAG to be differentially expressed in the cortices of humans and non-human primates (chimpanzee, baboon, and/or marmoset). The role of X-linked genes for the development of human-specific cognitive abilities is well known. We now propose that chromosome 7q31-q36 also represents a hot spot for the evolution of human-specific communication abilities. Selective pressure on the T cell receptor beta locus on chromosome 7q34, which plays a pivotal role in the immune system, could have led to rapid dissemination of positive gene variants in hitchhiking COAG.

  11. Human oocytes. Error-prone chromosome-mediated spindle assembly favors chromosome segregation defects in human oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubcová, Zuzana; Blayney, Martyn; Elder, Kay; Schuh, Melina

    2015-06-05

    Aneuploidy in human eggs is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down syndrome. Most aneuploidy results from chromosome segregation errors during the meiotic divisions of an oocyte, the egg's progenitor cell. The basis for particularly error-prone chromosome segregation in human oocytes is not known. We analyzed meiosis in more than 100 live human oocytes and identified an error-prone chromosome-mediated spindle assembly mechanism as a major contributor to chromosome segregation defects. Human oocytes assembled a meiotic spindle independently of either centrosomes or other microtubule organizing centers. Instead, spindle assembly was mediated by chromosomes and the small guanosine triphosphatase Ran in a process requiring ~16 hours. This unusually long spindle assembly period was marked by intrinsic spindle instability and abnormal kinetochore-microtubule attachments, which favor chromosome segregation errors and provide a possible explanation for high rates of aneuploidy in human eggs.

  12. Scanning conductance microscopy investigations on fixed human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Jensen, Linda Boye;

    2008-01-01

    Scanning conductance microscopy investigations were carried out in air on human chromosomes fixed on pre-fabricated SiO2 surfaces with a backgate. The point of the investigation was to estimate the dielectric constant of fixed human chromosomes in order to use it for microfluidic device...... optimization. The phase shift caused by the electrostatic forces, together with geometrical measurements of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and the chromosomes were used to estimate a value,for the dielectric constant of different human chromosomes....

  13. Drosophila X-Linked Genes Have Lower Translation Rates than Autosomal Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-02-01

    In Drosophila, X-linked and autosomal genes achieve comparable expression at the mRNA level. Whether comparable X-autosome gene expression is realized at the translational and, ultimately, the protein levels is, however, unknown. Previous studies suggest the possibility of higher translation rates for X-linked genes owing to stronger usage of preferred codons. In this study, we use public ribosome profiling data from Drosophila melanogaster to infer translation rates on the X chromosome versus the autosomes. We find that X-linked genes have consistently lower ribosome densities than autosomal genes in S2 cells, early embryos, eggs, and mature oocytes. Surprisingly, the lower ribosome densities of X-linked genes are not consistent with faster translation elongation but instead imply slower translation initiation. In particular, X-linked genes have sequence features known to slow translation initiation such as stronger mRNA structure near start codons and longer 5'-UTRs. Comparison to outgroup species suggests that stronger mRNA structure is an evolved feature of Drosophila X chromosomes. Finally, we find that the magnitude of the X-autosome difference in ribosome densities is smaller for genes encoding members of protein complexes, suggesting that stoichiometry constrains the evolution of translation rates. In sum, our analyses suggest that Drosophila X-linked genes have evolved lower translation rates than autosomal genes despite stronger usage of preferred codons.

  14. Growth in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariceta, Gema; Langman, Craig B

    2007-04-01

    Growth failure appears frequently in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) due to hypophosphatemia, disease severity, body disproportion, and primary bone abnormality. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) increases phosphate tubular reabsorption and phosphate level in blood and, thus, constitutes an attractive but controversial therapy in short children with XLHR, those efficacy was demonstrated in small uncontrolled series. Our aim was to report our experience regarding growth in XLHR. Twenty-seven children with XLHR--20 girls, seven boys--diagnosed at a median (md) of 1.46 years of age, (range 0.39-8.5 years), were studied at 10.12 years of age (1.58-18.56), md (range). All received oral treatment with phosphate and calcitriol. At the first visit, grouped Z-height was -1; (-4.58; 0.54) md (range). After 5 years' follow-up (0.92-15.6), Z-height was -0.91 (- 4.56; 0.17), not different from that at baseline (P = 0.465). In 16 children entirely controlled in our program upon presentation, a "catch up" phenomenon after the rickets had healed (P = 0.823) or throughout the long-term was not observed (P = 0.995). Eight patients had a Z-height 2 years at diagnosis, male gender and non-adherence to treatment. Four children, all boys, received rhGH, and in two cases with sufficient follow up stature normalized. No rhGH side effects were observed, and phosphate and calcitriol doses remained stable. Linear growth failure appeared in a third of XLHR children. Efforts need to be made to reduce the age of diagnosis and to improve adherence to treatment. Treatment with rhGH should be considered early, after the rickets has been controlled, in those patients with impaired growth or delayed diagnosis.

  15. Contiguous gene syndromes due to deletions in the distal short arm of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballabio, A.; Andria, G. (Univ. of Reggio Calabria, Catanzaro (Italy)); Bardoni, B.; Fraccaro, M.; Maraschio, P.; Zuffardi, O.; Guioli, S.; Camerino, G. (Univ. of Pavia (Italy)); Carrozzo, R. (Univ. of Naples (Italy)); Bick, D.; Campbell, L. (Univ. of Texas, San Antonio (USA)); Hamel, B. (Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Ferguson-Smith, M.A. (Univ. of Cambridge (England)); Gimelli, G. (G. Gaslini Institute, Genoa (Italy))

    1989-12-01

    Mendelian inherited disorders to deletions of adjacent genes on a chromosome have been described as contiguous gene syndromes. Short stature, chondrodysplasia punctata, mental retardation, steroid sulfatase deficiency, and Kallmann syndrome have been found as isolated entities or associated in various combination in 27 patients with interstitial and terminal deletions involving the distal short are of the X chromosome. The use of cDNA and genomic probes from the Xp22-pter region allowed us to identify 12 different deletion intervals and to confirm, and further refine, the chromosomal assignment of X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata and Kallmann syndrome genes. A putative pseudoautosomal gene affecting height and an X-linked nonspecific mental retardation gene have been tentatively assigned to specific intervals. The deletion panel described is a useful tool for mapping new sequences and orienting chromosome walks in the region.

  16. Chromosomal patterns in human malignant astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, J A; Bello, M J; de Campos, J M; Kusak, M E; Ramos, C; Benitez, J

    1987-12-01

    Cytogenetic analysis by direct and/or in vitro preparations was performed on 34 malignant astrocytomas. Thirty tumors showed near-diploid chromosome numbers, whereas, tritetraploid chromosome complements were present in four tumors. The most frequent chromosomal changes implied numerical deviations by a gain of chromosomes #7, #19, and #20, and by losses of #10, #22, and Y. Structural rearrangements were present in stem- or side lines of 24 tumors. Although no common chromosomal rearrangement seems to exist among those tumors, chromosomes #1, #6, #7, and #9 were predominantly involved. Polysomy and structural rearrangements of chromosome #7 could be related to the overexpression of epidermal growth factor gene, previously observed in some malignant gliomas.

  17. Human-chromosome alterations induced by argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simi, S.; Colella, C. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy). Lab. di Mutagenesi e Differenziamento); Agati, G.; Fusi, F. (Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Farmacologia); Corsi, M.F.; Pratesi, R. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Florence (Italy). Lab. di Elettronica Quantistica); Tocco, G.A. (Naples Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Istologia ed Embrilogia)

    1984-07-01

    The possible occurrence of genetic damage arising from exposure of human cells to visible laser light has been evaluated in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes. Aneuploidy and chromosome aberrations have been observed after exposure to an argon laser. These findings appear of special interest in view of the possible role of these chromosome alterations in carcinogenesis.

  18. Robustness of the inference of human population structure: A comparison of X-chromosomal and autosomal microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sohini

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, data on 20 X-chromosomal microsatellite polymorphisms from the HGDP-CEPH cell line panel are used to infer human population structure. Inferences from these data are compared to those obtained from autosomal microsatellites. Some of the major features of the structure seen with 377 autosomal markers are generally visible with the X-linked markers, although the latter provide less resolution. Differences between the X-chromosomal and autosomal results can be explained without requiring major differences in demographic parameters between males and females. The dependence of the partitioning on the number of individuals sampled from each region and on the number of markers used is discussed.

  19. An X-linked homologue of the autosomal inprinted gene ZNF127 escapes X inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longstreet, M.; Nicholls, R.D.; Willard, H.F. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The ZNF127 gene has been shown to be subject to parental imprinting in both humans and the mouse and maps to within the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome critical region on chromosome 15. We have cloned two X-linked related loci, one of which, ZNFXp is a transcribed gene while the other, ZNFXq, is an untranscribed pseudogene. ZNFXp is 83.6% identical to ZNFXq and 65.4% identical to ZNF127 over 1.4 kb of open reading frame they share in common, Like ZNF127, the predicted protein sequence of ZNFXp contains a C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc finger domain and C{sub 3}H zinc finger-like motifs. Whereas ZNF127 has three C{sub 3}H motifs, ZNFXp has four. A strong CpG island is located within 1 kb 5{prime} of the predicted amino terminus of ZNFXp. Expression of ZNFXp has been detected from mouse/human somatic cell hybrids containing either an active (n=2) or an inactive (n=4) chromosome, and thus escapes X inactivation. Probes made from the 3{prime} UTR of ZNFXp detect a number of related loci in both human and murine DNA, none of which is the ZNF127 locus on chromosome 15. None of the detectable murine bands shows dosage differences between males and females as would be expected for X-linked loci. This raises the possibility that ZNFXp inserted into the human X chromosome after its divergence from a common ancestor with the murine X. We have mapped ZNFXp to Xp11.4 by Southern blotting and PCR of hybrid DNAs and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). ZNFXq maps within the X Inactivation Center (XIC) region on Xq13.2, approximately 300 kb distal to the XIST gene. We find it intriguing, and perhaps significant, that two members of this gene family are subject to epigenetic regulation -- one autosomal imprinting, and the other escape from X inactivation. These results could imply an evolutionary and mechanistic relationship between these two processes.

  20. Construction and characterization of genomic libraries from specific human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumlauf, R; Jeanpierre, M; Young, B D

    1982-05-01

    Highly purified fractions of human chromosomes 21 and 22 were isolated from a suspension of metaphase chromosomes stained with ethidium bromide by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS II). Two recombinant DNA libraries, representing chromosomes 21 and 22, were constructed by complete digestion of DNA from these fractions with EcoRI and insertion into the vector lambda gtWES lambda B. Twenty clones selected at random from the chromosome 22 library hybridized to EcoRI-digested human DNA, and five of these clones hybridized to single bands identical in size to the phage inserts. These five single-copy sequences and a clone coding for an 8S RNA isolated by screening the chromosome 22 library for expressed sequences were characterized in detail. Hybridization of all six clones to a panel of sorted chromosomes and hybrid cell lines confirmed the assignment of the sequences to chromosome 22. The sequences were localized to regions of chromosome 22 by hybridization to translocated chromosomes sorted from a cell line having a balanced translocation t(17;22)(p13;q11) and to hybrid cell lines containing the various portions of another translocation t(X;22)(q13;q112). Five clones reside on the long arm of chromosome 22 between q112 and pter, while one clone and an 18S rRNA gene isolated from the chromosome 22 library reside pter and g112. The construction of chromosome-specific libraries by this method has the advantage of being direct and applicable to nearly all human chromosomes and will be important in molecular analysis of human genetic diseases.

  1. Selection and fine mapping of chromosome-specific cDNAs: application to human chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, M; Sala, C; Rivella, S; Toniolo, D

    1996-12-01

    We have developed a methodology for identification and fine mapping of chromosome-specific transcripts. Combining digestion of DNA with different restriction enzymes, ligation to "bubble" linkers, and PCR amplification from Alu and "bubble" primers, we have synthesized human chromosome 1-specific sequences from DNA of a somatic cell hybrid, A9Neol. After hybridization to human fetal brain cDNA, we could efficiently capture chromosome 1-specific cDNAs. The cDNAs were sequenced and used as probes in hybridizations to high-density filters containing the arrayed CEPH Mega-YAC library and to the arrayed cDNA library from infant brain made by B. Soares, which has been extensively sequenced. By this approach we have been able to select chromosome 1-specific cDNAs, to map them to chromosome 1 YAC contigs, and to identify and map corresponding longer cDNAs and ESTs.

  2. Altered chromosome 6 in immortal human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard-Smith, K; Patsalis, P; Pardinas, J R; Jha, K K; Henderson, A S; Ozer, H L

    1992-05-01

    Human diploid fibroblasts have a limited life span in vitro, and spontaneous immortalization is an extremely rare event. We have used transformation of human diploid fibroblasts by an origin-defective simian virus 40 genome to develop series of genetically matched immortal cell lines to analyze immortalization. Comparison of a preimmortal transformant (SVtsA/HF-A) with its uncloned and cloned immortalized derivatives (AR5 and HAL) has failed to reveal any major alteration involving the simian virus 40 genome. Karyotypic analysis, however, demonstrated that all of the immortal cell lines in this series have alterations of chromosome 6 involving loss of the portion distal to 6q21. The karyotypic analysis was corroborated by DNA analyses. Southern analysis demonstrated that only one copy of three proto-oncogene loci (ros1, c-myb, and mas1) on 6q was retained in immortal cells. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of the microsatellite polymorphism at 6q22 (D6S87) showed loss of heterozygosity. In addition, elevated expression of c-myb (6q22-23) was observed. We hypothesize that the region at and/or distal to 6q21 plays a role in immortalization, consistent with the presence of a growth suppressor gene.

  3. Altered chromosome 6 in immortal human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard-Smith, K.; Pardinas, J.R.; Jha, K.K.; Ozer, H.L. (New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States)); Patsalis, P.; Henderson, A.S. (City Univ. of New York, NY (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Human diploid fibroblasts have a limited life span in vitro, and spontaneous immortalization is an extremely rare event. We have used transformation of human diploid fibroblasts by an origin-defective simian virus 40 genome to develop series of genetically matched immortal cell lines to analyze immortalization. Comparison of a preimmortal transformant (SVtsA/HF-A) with its uncloned and cloned immortalized derivatives (AR5 and HAL) has failed to reveal any major alteration involving the simian virus 40 genome. Karyotypic analysis, however, demonstrated that all of the immortal cell lines in this series have alterations of chromosome 6 involving loss of the portion distal to 6q21. The karyotypic analysis was corroborated by DNA analyses. Southern analysis demonstrated that only one copy of three proto-oncogene loci (ros1, c-myb, and mas1) on 6q was retained in immortal cells. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of the microsatellite polymorphism at 6q22 (D6S87) showed loss of heterozygosity. In addition, elevated expression of c-myb (6q22-23) was observed. We hypothesize that the region at and/or distal to 6q21 plays a role in immortalization, consistent with the presence of a growth suppressor gene. 66 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Effects of hepatitis B virus infection on human sperm chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Huang; Tian-Hua Huang; Huan-Ying Qiu; Xiao-Wu Fang; Tian-Gang Zhuang; Hong-Xi Liu; Yong-Hua Wang; Li-Zhi Deng; Jie-Wen Qiu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the level of sperm chromosome aberrations in male patients with hepatitis B, and to directly detect whether there are HBV DNA integrations in sperm chromosomes of hepatitis B patients.METHODS: Sperm chromosomes of 14 tested subjects (5healthy controls, 9 patients with HBV infection, including 1with acute hepatitis B, 2 with chronic active hepatitis B, 4with chronic persistent hepatitis B, 2 chronic HBsAg carriers with no clinical symptoms) were prepared using interspecific in vitro fertilization between zona-free golden hamster ova and human spermatozoa, and the frequencies of aberration spermatozoa were compared between subjects of HBV infection and controls. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to sperm chromosome spreads was carried out with biotin-labeled full length HBV DNA probe to detect the specific HBV DNA sequences in the sperm chromosomes.RESULTS: The total frequency of sperm chromosome aberrations in HBV infection group (14.8%, 33/223) was significantly higher than that in the control group (4.3%,5/116). Moreover, the sperm chromosomes in HBV infection patients commonly presented stickiness, clumping, failure to staining, etc, which would affect the analysis of sperm chromosomes. Specific fluorescent signal spots for HBV DNA were seen in sperm chromosomes of one patient with chronic persistent hepatitis. In 9 (9/42) sperm chromosome complements containing fluorescent signal spots, one presented 5 obvious FISH spots, others presented 2 to 4signals. There was significant difference of fluorescence intensity among the signal spots. The distribution of signal sites among chromosomes was random.CONCLUSION: HBV infection can bring about mutagenic effects on sperm chromosomes. Integrations of viral DNA into sperm chromosomes which are multisites and nonspecific, can further increase the instability of sperm chromosomes. This study suggested that HBV infection can create extensively hereditary effects by alteration genetic constituent and

  5. Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC in humans; are there B chromosomes hidden among them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie Caroline

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC and B-chromosomes represent a heterogeneous collection of chromosomes added to the typical karyotype, and which are both small in size. They may consist of heterochromatic and/or euchromatic material. Also a predominance of maternal transmission was reported for both groups. Even though sSMC and B-chromosomes show some similarity it is still an open question if B-chromosomes are present among the heterogeneous group of sSMC. According to current theories, sSMC would need drive, drift or beneficial effects to increase in frequency in order to become B chromosome. However, up to now no B-chromosomes were described in human. Results Here we provide first evidence and discuss, that among sSMC B-chromosomes might be hidden. We present two potential candidates which may already be, or may in future evolve into B chromosomes in human: (i sSMC cases where the marker is stainable only by DNA derived from itself; and (ii acrocentric-derived inverted duplication sSMC without associated clinical phenotype. Here we report on the second sSMC stainable exclusively by its own DNA and show that for acrocentric derived sSMC 3.9× more are familial cases than reported for other sSMC. Conclusion The majority of sSMC are not to be considered as B-chromosomes. Nonetheless, a minority of sSMC show similarities to B-chromosomes. Further studies are necessary to come to final conclusions for that problem.

  6. Evidence for compensatory upregulation of expressed X-linked genes in mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xinxian; Hiatt, Joseph B; Nguyen, Di Kim; Ercan, Sevinc; Sturgill, David; Hillier, LaDeana W; Schlesinger, Felix; Davis, Carrie A; Reinke, Valerie J; Gingeras, Thomas R; Shendure, Jay; Waterston, Robert H; Oliver, Brian; Lieb, Jason D; Disteche, Christine M

    2011-10-23

    Many animal species use a chromosome-based mechanism of sex determination, which has led to the coordinate evolution of dosage-compensation systems. Dosage compensation not only corrects the imbalance in the number of X chromosomes between the sexes but also is hypothesized to correct dosage imbalance within cells that is due to monoallelic X-linked expression and biallelic autosomal expression, by upregulating X-linked genes twofold (termed 'Ohno's hypothesis'). Although this hypothesis is well supported by expression analyses of individual X-linked genes and by microarray-based transcriptome analyses, it was challenged by a recent study using RNA sequencing and proteomics. We obtained new, independent RNA-seq data, measured RNA polymerase distribution and reanalyzed published expression data in mammals, C. elegans and Drosophila. Our analyses, which take into account the skewed gene content of the X chromosome, support the hypothesis of upregulation of expressed X-linked genes to balance expression of the genome.

  7. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  8. Nonrandom involvement of chromosomal segments in human hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The consistent occurrence of nonrandom chromosome changes in human malignancies suggests that they are not trivial epiphenomena. Whereas we do not understand their significance at present, one possible role which they may fulfill is to provide the chromosomally aberrant cells with a proliferative advantage as the result of alteration of the number and/or location of genes related to nucleic acid biosynthesis. It would be expected that the proliferative advantage provided by various chromosome aberrations differs in patients with different genetic constitutions.

  9. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Vosters, S.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Hauwers, K.W.M. d'; Wansink, D.G.; Ramos, L.; Boer, P. de

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylate

  10. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Vosters, S.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Hauwers, K.W.M. d'; Wansink, D.G.; Ramos, L.; Boer, P. de

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly

  11. Chromosomal redistribution of male-biased genes in mammalian evolution with two bursts of gene gain on the X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong E; Vibranovski, Maria D; Landback, Patrick; Marais, Gabriel A B; Long, Manyuan

    2010-10-05

    Mammalian X chromosomes evolved under various mechanisms including sexual antagonism, the faster-X process, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). These forces may contribute to nonrandom chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes. In order to understand the evolution of gene content on the X chromosome and autosome under these forces, we dated human and mouse protein-coding genes and miRNA genes on the vertebrate phylogenetic tree. We found that the X chromosome recently acquired a burst of young male-biased genes, which is consistent with fixation of recessive male-beneficial alleles by sexual antagonism. For genes originating earlier, however, this pattern diminishes and finally reverses with an overrepresentation of the oldest male-biased genes on autosomes. MSCI contributes to this dynamic since it silences X-linked old genes but not X-linked young genes. This demasculinization process seems to be associated with feminization of the X chromosome with more X-linked old genes expressed in ovaries. Moreover, we detected another burst of gene originations after the split of eutherian mammals and opossum, and these genes were quickly incorporated into transcriptional networks of multiple tissues. Preexisting X-linked genes also show significantly higher protein-level evolution during this period compared to autosomal genes, suggesting positive selection accompanied the early evolution of mammalian X chromosomes. These two findings cast new light on the evolutionary history of the mammalian X chromosome in terms of gene gain, sequence, and expressional evolution.

  12. Chromosomal redistribution of male-biased genes in mammalian evolution with two bursts of gene gain on the X chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong E Zhang

    Full Text Available Mammalian X chromosomes evolved under various mechanisms including sexual antagonism, the faster-X process, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. These forces may contribute to nonrandom chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes. In order to understand the evolution of gene content on the X chromosome and autosome under these forces, we dated human and mouse protein-coding genes and miRNA genes on the vertebrate phylogenetic tree. We found that the X chromosome recently acquired a burst of young male-biased genes, which is consistent with fixation of recessive male-beneficial alleles by sexual antagonism. For genes originating earlier, however, this pattern diminishes and finally reverses with an overrepresentation of the oldest male-biased genes on autosomes. MSCI contributes to this dynamic since it silences X-linked old genes but not X-linked young genes. This demasculinization process seems to be associated with feminization of the X chromosome with more X-linked old genes expressed in ovaries. Moreover, we detected another burst of gene originations after the split of eutherian mammals and opossum, and these genes were quickly incorporated into transcriptional networks of multiple tissues. Preexisting X-linked genes also show significantly higher protein-level evolution during this period compared to autosomal genes, suggesting positive selection accompanied the early evolution of mammalian X chromosomes. These two findings cast new light on the evolutionary history of the mammalian X chromosome in terms of gene gain, sequence, and expressional evolution.

  13. Conserved synteny between pig chromosome 8 and human chromosome 4 but rearranged and distorted linkage maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellegren, H.; Edfors-Lilja, I.; Anderson, L. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)); Wintero, A.K. (Royal Veterinary and Agricultural Univ., Fredriksberg (Denmark))

    1993-09-01

    The porcine genes encoding interleukin 2, alcohol dehydrogenase (class I) gamma polypeptide, and osteopontin were mapped to chromosome 8 by linkage analysis. Together with previous assignments to this chromosome (the albumin, platelet-derived growth factor receptor A, and fibrinogen genes), an extensive syntenic homology with human chromosome 4 was discovered. Loci from about three-quarters of the q arm of human chromosome 4 are on pig chromosome 8. However, the linear order of the markers is not identical in the two species, and there are several examples of interspecific differences in the recombination fractions between adjacent markers. The conserved synteny between man and the pig gives strong support to a previous suggestion that a synteny group present in the ancestor of mammalian species has been retained on human chromosome 4q. Since loci from this synteny group are found on two cattle chromosomes, the bovine rearrangement must have occurred after the split of Suidae and Bovidae within Artiodactyla. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Hierarchical radial and polar organisation of chromosomes in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, N M; Lau, P; Hann, M; Ioannou, D; Hoffman, D; Barrionuevo, M; Maxson, W; Ory, S; Tempest, H G

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that chromosomes occupy distinct positions within the interphase nuclei, conferring a potential functional implication to the genome. In addition, alterations in the nuclear organisation patterns have been associated with disease phenotypes (e.g. cancer or laminopathies). The human sperm is the smallest cell in the body with specific DNA packaging and the mission of delivering the paternal genome to the oocyte during fertilisation. Studies of nuclear organisation in the sperm have postulated nonrandom chromosome position and have proposed a chromocentre model with the centromeres facing toward the interior and the telomeres toward the periphery of the nucleus. Most studies have assessed the nuclear address in the sperm longitudinally predominantly using centromeric or telomeric probes and to a lesser extent with whole chromosome paints. To date, studies investigating the radial organisation of human sperm have been limited. The purpose of this study was to utilise whole chromosome paints for six clinically important chromosomes (18, 19, 21, 22, X, and Y) to investigate nuclear address by assessing their radial and longitudinal nuclear organisation. A total of 10,800 sperm were analysed in nine normozoospermic individuals. The results have shown nonrandom chromosome position for all chromosomes using both methods of analysis. We present novel radial and polar analysis of chromosome territory localization within the human sperm nucleus. Specifically, a hierarchical organisation was observed radially with chromosomes organised from the interior to the periphery (chromosomes 22, 21, Y, X, 19, and 18 respectively) and polar organisation from the sperm head to tail (chromosomes X, 19, Y, 22, 21, and 18, respectively). We provide evidence of defined nuclear organisation in the human sperm and discuss the function of organisation and potential possible clinical ramifications of these results in regards to male infertility and early human development.

  15. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents.

  16. Chromosomal mapping of the human M6 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olinsky, S.; Loop, B.T.; DeKosky, A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    M6 is a neuronal membrane glycoprotein that may have an important role in neural development. This molecule was initially defined by a monoclonal antibody that affected the survival of cultured cerebellar neurons and the outgrowth of neurites. The nature of the antigen was discovered by expression cDNA cloning using this monoclonal antibody. Two distinct murine M6 cDNAs (designated M6a and M6b) whose deduced amino acid sequences were remarkably similar to that of the myelin proteolipid protein human cDNA and genomic clones encoding M6a and M6b and have characterized them by restriction mapping, Southern hybridization with cDNA probes, and sequence analysis. We have localized these genes within the human genome by FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). The human M6a gene is located at 4q34, and the M6b gene is located at Xp22.2 A number of human neurological disorders have been mapped to the Xp22 region, including Aicardi syndrome (MIM 304050), Rett syndrome (MIM 312750), X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (MIM 302801), and X-linked mental retardation syndromes (MRX1, MIM 309530). This raises the possibility that a defect in the M6b gene is responsible for one of these neurological disorders. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Non-specific X linked mental retardation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, B.; Turner, G; Mulley, J.; Gedeon, A; PARTINGTON, M.

    1991-01-01

    Non-specific X linked mental retardation (MRX) is mental retardation in persons of normal physical appearance who have no recognisable features apart from a characteristic pedigree. Review of published reports shows that there is clinical variability in the degree of mental retardation within families and genetic heterogeneity, based on gene localisation, between families. We propose a classification based on genetic localisation and a set of minimal clinical features that should be recorded ...

  18. Somatic mosaicism underlies X-linked acrogigantism syndrome in sporadic male subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Daly (Adrian); B. Yuan (Bo); Fina, F. (Frederic); J.-H. Caberg (Jean-Hubert); G. Trivellin (Giampaolo); L. Rostomyan (Liliya); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); L.A. Naves (Lucianna); D. Metzger (Daniel); T. Cuny (Thomas); Rabl, W. (Wolfgang); N.S. Shah (Nalini Samir); M-L. Jaffrain-Rea (Marie-Lise); Chiara Zatelli, M. (Maria); F.R. Faucz (Fabio R.); E. Castermans (Emilie); Nanni-Metellus, I. (Isabelle); Lodish, M. (Maya); A. Muhammad (Ammar); Palmeira, L. (Leonor); Potorac, I. (Iulia); G. Mantovani (Giovanna); S.J.C.M.M. Neggers (Bas); Klein, M. (Marc); A. Barlier (Anne); P. Liu (Pengfei); Ouafik, L. (L'houcine); V. Bours (Vincent); Lupski, J.R. (James R.); C.A. Stratakis (Constantine); A. Beckers (Albert)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSomatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG)syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric gigantism due to aggressive pituitary tumors that is caused by submicroscopic chromosom

  19. Arthritis and X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Pedro; Santos, Alexandra; Faria, Emília; Silva, Jorge; Malcata, Armando; Chieira, Celso

    2008-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are defined as genetically determined functional and/or quantitative abnormalities in one or more of the components of the immune system. Immunodeficiency and arthritis can be related, although the mechanisms are not always clear. Different causes for immunodeficiency can secondarily be found in patients with arthritis; on the other hand, arthritis can be a manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Arthritis occurs chiefly in humoral primary immunodeficiencies, namely in X-linked agammaglobulinemia and common variable immunodeficiency, and may be one of the warning signs for primary immunodeficiency. We report a case of arthritis as the presenting feature of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. In X-linked agammaglobulinemia, arthritis may be a consequence of infection, most notably by Mycoplasma, or of immune dysfunction itself. In children, and occasionally in young adults, a combination of arthritis and hypogammaglobulinemia should suggest primary immunodeficiency, although other causes of hypogammaglobulinemia must be excluded. Physicians evaluating patients with arthritis should be aware of this fact so that an early diagnosis can be pursued as it is of extreme importance in the optimal management and prognosis of these patients.

  20. Deficit of mitonuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2015-01-29

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, display underrepresentations of mitonuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions over the generality of the role of sexual conflict in shaping the distribution of mt-N genes. Here we tested whether mt-N genes moved off of the therian X chromosome following sex chromosome formation, consistent with the role of sexual conflict, or whether the paucity of mt-N genes on the therian X is a chance result of an underrepresentation on the ancestral regions that formed the X chromosome. We used a synteny-based approach to identify the ancestral regions in the platypus and chicken genomes that later formed the therian X chromosome. We then quantified the movement of mt-N genes on and off of the X chromosome and the distribution of mt-N genes on the human X and ancestral X regions. We failed to find an excess of mt-N gene movement off of the X. The bias of mt-N genes on ancestral therian X chromosomes was also not significantly different from the biases on the human X. Together our results suggest that, rather than conflict driving mt-N genes off of the mammalian X, random biases on chromosomes that formed the X chromosome could explain the paucity of mt-N genes in the therian lineage.

  1. Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Heineman, Maas Jan; van der Veen, Fulco; Repping, Sjoerd

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos has been described for almost two decades, its exact prevalence is still unknown. The prevalence of mosaicism is important in the context of preimplantation genetic screening in which the chromosomal status of an embryo is d

  2. Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Echten-Arends, J. van; Mastenbroek, S.; Sikkema-Raddatz, B.; Korevaar, J.C.; Heineman, M.J.; Veen, F. van der; Repping, S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos has been described for almost two decades, its exact prevalence is still unknown. The prevalence of mosaicism is important in the context of preimplantation genetic screening in which the chromosomal status of an embryo is d

  3. Strong Selective Sweeps on the X Chromosome in the Human-Chimpanzee Ancestor Explain Its Low Divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Y Dutheil

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The human and chimpanzee X chromosomes are less divergent than expected based on autosomal divergence. We study incomplete lineage sorting patterns between humans, chimpanzees and gorillas to show that this low divergence can be entirely explained by megabase-sized regions comprising one-third of the X chromosome, where polymorphism in the human-chimpanzee ancestral species was severely reduced. We show that background selection can explain at most 10% of this reduction of diversity in the ancestor. Instead, we show that several strong selective sweeps in the ancestral species can explain it. We also report evidence of population specific sweeps in extant humans that overlap the regions of low diversity in the ancestral species. These regions further correspond to chromosomal sections shown to be devoid of Neanderthal introgression into modern humans. This suggests that the same X-linked regions that undergo selective sweeps are among the first to form reproductive barriers between diverging species. We hypothesize that meiotic drive is the underlying mechanism causing these two observations.

  4. Absence of Y chromosome in human placental site trophoblastic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Pei; Wang, Hanlin L; Chu, Peiguo; Yang, Bin; Huang, Jiaoti; Baergen, Rebecca N; Sklar, Jeffrey; Yang, Ximing J; Soslow, Robert A

    2007-10-01

    Placental site trophoblastic tumor is a neoplasm of extravillous intermediate trophoblast at the implantation site, preceded in the majority of cases by a female gestational event. Our pilot investigation suggested that the development of this tumor might require a paternally derived X chromosome and the absence of a Y chromosome. Twenty cases of placental site trophoblastic tumor were included in this study. Genotyping at 15 polymorphic loci and one sex determination locus was performed by multiplex PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis. X chromosome polymorphisms were determined by PCR amplification of exon 1 of the human androgen receptor gene using primers flanking the polymorphic CAG repeats within this region. Genotyping at 15 polymorphic loci was informative and paternal alleles were present in all tumors, confirming the trophoblastic origin of the tumors. The presence of an X chromosome and the absence of a Y chromosome were observed in all tumors. Among 13 cases in which analysis of the X chromosome polymorphism was informative, all but one demonstrated at least two X alleles and seven cases showed one identifiable paternal X allele. These results confirm a unique pathogenetic mechanism in placental site trophoblastic tumor, involving an exclusion of the Y chromosome from the genome and, therefore, a tumor arising from the trophectoderm of a female conceptus. As epigenetic regulations of imprinting during X chromosome inactivation are of significant biological implications, placental site trophoblastic tumor may provide an important model for studying the sex chromosome biology and the proliferative advantage conferred by the paternal X chromosome.

  5. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    This project aimed to divide chromosome 16 into approximately 50 intervals of {approximately}2Mb in size by constructing a series of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids each containing a rearranged chromosome 16. Using these hybrids, DNA probes would be regionally mapped by Southern blot or PCR analysis. Preference would be given to mapping probes which demonstrated polymorphisms for which the CEPH panel of families had been typed. This would allow a correlation of the physical and linkage maps of this chromosome. The aims have been substantially achieved. 49 somatic cell hybrids have been constructed which have allowed definition of 46, and potentially 57, different physical intervals on the chromosome. 164 loci have been fully mapped into these intervals. A correlation of the physical and genetic maps of the chromosome is in an advanced stage of preparation. The somatic cell hybrids constructed have been widely distributed to groups working on chromosome 16 and other genome projects.

  6. The human enamel protein gene amelogenin is expressed from both the X and the Y chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salido, E.C. (Faculty of Medicine, La Laguna (Spain)); Yen, P.H.; Koprivnikar, K.; Shapiro, L.J. (University of California School of Medicine, Torrence (United States)); Yu, Lohchung (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Amelogenins, a family of extracellular matrix proteins of the dental enamel, are transiently but abundantly expressed by ameloblasts during tooth development. In this paper the authors report the characterization of the AMGX and AMGY genes on the short arms of the human X and Y chromosomes which encode the amelogenins. Their studies on the expression of the amelogenin genes in male developing tooth buds showed that both the AMGX and AMGY genes are transcriptionally active and encode potentially functional proteins. They have isolated genomic and cDNA clones form both the AMGX and AMGY loci and have studied the sequence organization of these two genes. Reverse transcriptase (RT)PCR amplification of the 5[prime] portion of the amelogenin transcripts revealed several alternatively spliced products. This information will be useful for studying the molecular basis of X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta, for understanding the evolution and regulation of gene expression on the mammalian sex chromosomes, and for investigating the role of amelogenin genes during tooth development.

  7. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of human chromosomes in microfluidic channels: extracting chromosome dielectric properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Dimaki, Maria; Buckley, Sonia;

    2011-01-01

    An investigation of the dielectric properties of polyamine buffer prepared human chromosomes is presented in this paper. Chromosomes prepared in this buffer are only a few micrometers in size and shaped roughly like spherical discs. Dielectrophoresis was therefore chosen as the method...... of manipulation combined with a custom designed microfluidic system containing the required electrodes for dielectrophoresis experiments. Our results show that although this system is presently not able to distinguish between the different chromosomes, it can provide average data for the dielectric properties...... of human chromosomes in polyamine buffer. These can then be used to optimize system designs for further characterization and even sorting. The experimental data from the dielectrophoretic manipulation were combined with theoretical calculations to extract a range of values for the permittivity...

  8. Two unique mutations in the interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2RG) cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency arising in opposite parental germ lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puck, J.M.; Pepper, A.E. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The gene encoding the gamma chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2 lies in human X13.1 and is mutated in males with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). 27 X-linked SCID mutations have been found in our laboratory. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of genomic DNA using primers flanking each of the 8 exons was followed by direct sequencing of abnormally migrating fragments from SCID patients and family members. A 9 bp in-frame duplication insertion was found in IL2RG exon 5 of a patient from a large X-linked SCID pedigree; the resulting duplication of 3 extracellular amino acids, including the first tryptophan of the {open_quotes}WSXWS{close_quotes} cytokine binding motif, is predicted to disrupt interaction of the cytokine receptor chain with its ligand. Genetic linkage studies demonstrated that the grandmaternal X chromosome associated with SCID was contributed to 3 daughters, 2 obligate carriers and 1 woman of unknown status. However, this grandmother`s genomic DNA did not contain the insertion mutation, nor did she have skewed X-chromosome inactivation in her lymphocytes. That both obligate carrier daughters, but not the third daughter, had the insertion proved the grandmother to be a germline mosaic. A second proband had X-linked SCID with a branch point mutation due to substitution of T for A 15 bp 5{prime} of the start of IL2RG exon 3. This mutation resulted in undetectable IL2RG mRNA by Northern blot. Linkage analysis and sequencing of IL2RG DNA in this family proved the mutation to have originated in the germline of the proband`s grandfather, an immunocompetent individual who contributed an X chromosome with normal IL2RG to one daughter and a mutated X to the another.

  9. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Seldin, M.F. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Correction of the X-linked immunodeficiency phenotype by transgenic expression of human Bruton Tyrosine kinase under the control of the class II major histocompatibility complex Ea locus control region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drabek, D.; Raguz, S.; Wit, de T.P.M.; Dingjan, G.M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Grosveld, F.; Hendriks, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is essential for the development of pre-B cells to mature B cell stages. Btk-deficient mice manifest an X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) defect characterized by a reduction of peripheral IgMlow IgDhigh B cells, a lack of peritoneal CD5 B cells, low serum levels of IgM and

  11. Correction of the X-linked immunodeficiency phenotype by transgenic expression of human Bruton tyrosine kinase under the control of the class II major histocompatibility complex Ea locus control region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); S. Raguz (Selina); A.P.M. de Wit (Ton); G.M. Dingjan (Gemma); H.F.J. Savelkoul (Huub); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractBruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is essential for the development of pre-B cells to mature B cell stages. Btk-deficient mice manifest an X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) defect characterized by a reduction of peripheral IgMlow IgDhigh B cells, a lack of peritoneal CD5+ B cells, low serum

  12. The third international workshop of human chromosome 5. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Third International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 was held in Laguna Beach, California, March 5-8, 1994. The pace at which new mapping information has been published in the last year make almost any report outdated before publication. Much of the information in this report and the most recent data from the Human chromosome 5 Genome Center at U.C. Irvine on the physical map of chromosome 5 are accessible via a WWW server. For most loci referred to in this report that can be detected by Polymerase Chain Reaction, the sequences of the oligonucleotide primers are available and some primer sequences are provided in this report.

  13. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major pitfalls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bernd Rosenbusch; Michael Schneider; Hans Wilhelm Michelmann

    2008-08-01

    Human oocytes that remained unfertilized in programmes of assisted reproduction have been analysed cytogenetically for more than 20 years to assess the incidence of aneuploidy in female gametes. However, the results obtained so far are not indisputable as a consequence of difficulties in evaluating oocyte chromosome preparations. Because of the lack of guidelines, we decided to summarize for the first time, the possible pitfalls in human oocyte chromosome analysis. Therefore, we screened the material from our previous studies and compiled representative, complicated cases with recommendations for their cytogenetic classification. We point out that maturity and size of the oocyte are important parameters and that fixation artefacts, as well as the particular structure of oocyte chromosomes, may predispose one to misinterpretations. Moreover, phenomena related to oocyte activation and fertilization are illustrated and explained. This compilation may help to avoid major problems in future studies and contribute to a more precise, and uniform assessment of human oocyte chromosomes.

  14. Fourth international workshop on human chromosome 5. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Fourth International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 was held in Manchester, UK on November 9--10, 1996 and was hosted by the University of Manchester. The major goals of the workshop were: (1) to collate the various genetic, cytogenetic and physical maps of human chromosome 5; (2) to integrate these maps and identify/correct discrepancies between them wherever possible; (3) to catalogue the sequence-ready contigs of the chromosome; (4) to co-ordinate the various sequencing efforts to avoid future duplication; (5) to establish the first (to the author`s knowledge) web site for the human chromosome 5 community which contains the above information in a readily accessible form.

  15. Meiotic drive impacts expression and evolution of x-linked genes in stalk-eyed flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Josephine A; Brand, Cara L; Paczolt, Kimberly A; Johns, Philip M; Baker, Richard H; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This Page Aughton DJ, Kelley RI, Metzenberg A, Pureza V, Pauli RM. X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata ( ... Punctata 2, X-Linked Herman GE, Kelley RI, Pureza V, Smith D, Kopacz K, Pitt J, Sutphen ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Printable PDF Open All Close All ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  18. [X-linked Kallmann's syndrome: intra and interfamilial heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Alfonso; Loidi, Lourdes; Colino, Esmeralda; del Carmen Miranda, María; Barrio, Raquel

    2007-05-26

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia characterize Kallmann's syndrome, whose X-linked form is due to mutations in the KAL1 gene. We studied a family with 6 affected members. We compare their clinical (chryptorchidism, micropenis, puberty, associated malformations), analytical (gonadotrophin releasing hormone test, and human chorionic gonadotropin test), genetic (cariotype), and radiological data of the described familiar cases with other reported sporadic cases. The described cases carried the R191X mutation. We found phenotypic heterogeneity between the patients. We report the first familiar cases of Kallmann's syndrome due to the R191X mutation. Probably other genes and/or epigenetic factors determine the phenotype.

  19. Alpha thalassaemia-mental retardation, X linked

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibbons Richard

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract X-linked alpha thalassaemia mental retardation (ATR-X syndrome in males is associated with profound developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, genital abnormalities and alpha thalassaemia. Female carriers are usually physically and intellectually normal. So far, 168 patients have been reported. Language is usually very limited. Seizures occur in about one third of the cases. While many patients are affectionate with their caregivers, some exhibit autistic-like behaviour. Patients present with facial hypotonia and a characteristic mouth. Genital abnormalities are observed in 80% of children and range from undescended testes to ambiguous genitalia. Alpha-thalassaemia is not always present. This syndrome is X-linked recessive and results from mutations in the ATRX gene. This gene encodes the widely expressed ATRX protein. ATRX mutations cause diverse changes in the pattern of DNA methylation at heterochromatic loci but it is not yet known whether this is responsible for the clinical phenotype. The diagnosis can be established by detection of alpha thalassaemia, identification of ATRX gene mutations, ATRX protein studies and X-inactivation studies. Genetic counselling can be offered to families. Management is multidisciplinary: young children must be carefully monitored for gastro-oesophageal reflux as it may cause death. A number of individuals with ATR-X are fit and well in their 30s and 40s.

  20. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Fernando L; Poznik, G David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-04-07

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes-including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447-806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups.

  1. X-linked inheritance in neuronal migration disorders (NMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andermann, E.; Dubeau, F.; Tampieri, D. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    With the advent of MRI imaging, an increasing number of NMD have been identified in patients with epilepsy. Although most cases have been sporadic, families with these disorders have now been reported in several types of NMD. Furthermore, subcortical bank heterotopia (SBH) or {open_quotes}double cortex syndrome{close_quotes} and periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) have a marked female predominance. Two females with SBH, mild mental retardation and seizures had sons with lissencephaly, severe retardation and seizures, and daughters with SBH. X-linked lissencephaly has been observed in several other families, and one girl with lissencephaly was found to have a de novo X-autosomal translocation with a breakpoint in chromosome Xq22. We have studied three families with two or more generations affected by PNH in females, a high frequency of spontaneous abortions and abnormal sex ratios in sibships. The clinical manifestations include seizures and normal intelligence. Three other families with PNH in females have been reported in the literature. Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria has been reported in monozygotic twins and in siblings, and we have studied a brother and sister with an affected maternal uncle. These findings suggest sex-linked dominant inheritance with male lethality or severe expression in males. The three disorders described above may represent different mutations of a single gene or mutations in two or more genes on the X-chromosome. At least one gene is probably located in chromosome band Xq22. Genetic linkage studies in families with NMD as well as a search for candidate genes such as adhesion molecules known to map on the X-chromosome should lead to the identification of the gene(s) responsible for these disorders.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions X-linked SCID X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is an inherited disorder of the immune ...

  3. Evolutionarily different alphoid repeat DNA on homologous chromosomes in human and chimpanzee.

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, A L; Laursen, H B; Jones, C; Bak, A L

    1992-01-01

    Centromeric alphoid DNA in primates represents a class of evolving repeat DNA. In humans, chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid DNA while chromosomes 14 and 22 share another subfamily. We show that similar pairwise homogenizations occur in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), where chromosomes 14 and 22, homologous to human chromosomes 13 and 21, share one partially homogenized alphoid DNA subfamily and chromosomes 15 and 23, homologous to human chromosomes 14 and 22, share anothe...

  4. The human chromosome. Electron microscopic observations on chromatin fiber organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, J G; Moore, D E

    1969-04-01

    Human lymphocytes were grown in short-term tissue culture and were arrested in metaphase with Colcemid. Their chromosomes were prepared by the Langmuir trough-critical point drying technique and were examined under the electron microscope. In addition, some chromosomes were digested with trypsin, Pronase, or DNase. The chromosomes consist entirely of tightly packed, 240 +/- 50-A chromatin fibers. Trypsin and Pronase treatments induce relaxation of fiber packing and reveal certain underlying fiber arrangements. Furthermore, trypsin treatment demonstrates that the chromatin fiber has a 25-50 A trypsin-resistant core surrounded by a trypsin-sensitive sheath. DNase digestion suggests that this core contains DNA.

  5. Abnormal X : autosome ratio, but normal X chromosome inactivation in human triploid cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norwood Thomas H

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X chromosome inactivation (XCI is that aspect of mammalian dosage compensation that brings about equivalence of X-linked gene expression between females and males by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes (Xi in normal female cells, leaving them with a single active X (Xa as in male cells. In cells with more than two X's, but a diploid autosomal complement, all X's but one, Xa, are inactivated. This phenomenon is commonly thought to suggest 1 that normal development requires a ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set, and 2 that an early event in XCI is the marking of one X to be active, with remaining X's becoming inactivated by default. Results Triploids provide a test of these ideas because the ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set cannot be achieved, yet this abnormal ratio should not necessarily affect the one-Xa choice mechanism for XCI. Previous studies of XCI patterns in murine triploids support the single-Xa model, but human triploids mostly have two-Xa cells, whether they are XXX or XXY. The XCI patterns we observe in fibroblast cultures from different XXX human triploids suggest that the two-Xa pattern of XCI is selected for, and may have resulted from rare segregation errors or Xi reactivation. Conclusion The initial X inactivation pattern in human triploids, therefore, is likely to resemble the pattern that predominates in murine triploids, i.e., a single Xa, with the remaining X's inactive. Furthermore, our studies of XIST RNA accumulation and promoter methylation suggest that the basic features of XCI are normal in triploids despite the abnormal X:autosome ratio.

  6. Recent insights into the regulation of X-chromosome inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia K

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Karmele Valencia, Anton Wutz Department of Biology, Institute of Molecular Health Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: X-chromosome inactivation (XCI is the mechanism by which mammals compensate gene dosage differences between males and females. XCI is required for female development and has implications for human disease. As a result, a single X chromosome is transcriptionally active in both male and female cells. Functional hemizygosity of the X chromosomes greatly predisposes to phenotypic consequences of mutations. In females, X chromosomes are randomly chosen to become inactivated leading to a mosaic pattern of cells expressing genes from either chromosome. This facilitates the masking of phenotypic consequences of heterozygous X-linked mutations. Skewing of XCI in favor of one chromosome can result in increased severity of disease symptoms, if the X chromosome with a gene mutation remains preferentially active. In addition, phenotypic masking of X-linked mutations is not always observed. Rett syndrome represents a paradigm of this statement. Dosage compensation can also mask some aspects of sex chromosome aneuploidies. X-chromosome aneuploidies include Klinefelter, Turner, and X-trisomy syndromes. In all these cases, a single active X chromosome is present. However, in those cases with two or more X chromosomes, some genes from the inactivated X chromosome escape from XCI becoming active. Therefore, dose imbalances of escape genes cause pathologies. Defects in the structure and silencing of the inactive X chromosome are further observed in human pluripotent stem cells and in certain tumors. Taken together, these findings suggest that aspects of XCI are relevant for a large number of human diseases. Here we review basic and clinical research on XCI with the aim of illustrating connections and highlighting opportunities for future investigation. Keywords: XCI, X-linked diseases, sex chromosome

  7. Neutropenia Associated with X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghamohammadi Asghar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available X-linked Agammaglobulinemia (XLA is a hereditary immunodeficiency, characterized by an early onset of recurrent bacterial infections, hypogammaglobulinemia and markedly reduced B lymphocytes number. In order to determine the association of neutropenia among Iranian patients with XLA, hospital records of 30 patients with confirmed XLA in Children Medical Center Hospital, were reviewed. Eight out of 30 XLA patients (26.7% developed neutropenia during the course of the disease. In two patients, episodes of neutropenia were identified before or at the time of diagnosis of XLA. Other six patients whom were not visited regularly and did not receive periodical immunoglobulin replacement therapy experienced neutropenia after diagnosis of XLA. Neutropenia in XLA is mainly associated with infection and is resolved with intravenous immunoglobulin replacement and antibiotics therapy.

  8. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  9. X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia associated with hypospadias in an Egyptian baby: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metwalley Kotb

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia is a rare developmental disorder of the human adrenal cortex and is caused by deletion or mutation of the dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenita critical region of the X chromosome, gene 1 (DAX-1 gene. Most affected children present with failure to thrive, salt wasting and hypoglycemic convulsions in the first months of life. Hypospadias affects approximately one in 250 live male births. Mutations in the mastermind-like domain-containing 1 (MAMLD1 gene have been implicated as one of the causes of hypospadias in children. To the best of our knowledge, an association between congenital adrenal hypoplasia due to a DAX-1 mutation and hypospadias due to mutation of the MAMLD1 gene has not previously been reported in the literature. Case presentation A 35-day-old male Egyptian baby was referred to our institution for the evaluation of a two-week history of recurrent vomiting associated with electrolyte imbalance. On examination, our patient was found to have hypotension and dehydration. A genital examination showed distal penile hypospadias with chordee and normal testes. He had hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis. Endocrinological investigations revealed low levels of cortisol, 17-hydroxyprogesterone and aldosterone, with a high level of adrenocorticotrophic hormone. A provisional diagnosis of congenital adrenal hypoplasia associated with hypospadias was made. A molecular genetics study confirmed the diagnosis of X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia due to DAX-1 mutations and hypospadias due to MAMLD1 mutation. He was started on hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone treatment. After three weeks of treatment, his symptoms improved and his blood sugar, sodium, potassium and cortisol levels normalized. Conclusions We report the case of an Egyptian baby with an association of congenital adrenal hypoplasia due to DAX-1 mutation and hypospadias due

  10. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  11. Visual acuity and X-linked color blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägle, Herbert; de Luca, Emanuela; Serey, Ludwig; Bach, Michael; Sharpe, Lindsay T

    2006-04-01

    Optimal sampling for visual acuity requires a fine array of cones with identical sensitivity. Thus, dichromats, whose inner fovea is made up of cones having the same spectral sensitivity, may have better than normal visual acuity. We investigated this by comparing the visual acuities of trichromats and X-linked dichromats, while taking into account the different molecular genetics underlying the disorder. Our subjects were age- and refraction-matched groups of normals (n=8) and X-linked dichromats (n=13). The dichromats (four protanopes and nine deuteranopes) were genotyped and classified according to whether they carried a single (n=6) or multiple (n=7) visual pigment genes on their X-chromosome. Visual acuity was measured in both eyes with the Freiburger Visual Acuity Test. Normal trichromats and ungenotyped dichromats do not significantly differ in visual acuity, nor do ungenotyped protanopes and deuteranopes. However, multi-gene dichromats, who possess more than one photopigment gene in the array, all of which encode for the same long- or middle-wavelength sensitive photopigment, have significantly higher visual acuity than either normal trichromats or dichromats who have only a single-gene. Multi-gene dichromats may benefit from a reduction in chromatic aberration and chromatic noise in the high acuity channel, normally a consequence of combining signals from different cone photoreceptor types and of cone-specific patterns of retinal image defocus and blur. Single-gene dichromats may not share in the advantage because of other molecular differences that influence the development of the retinal mosaic and/or its visual pathways.

  12. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Fernando L.; Poznik, G. David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes—including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447–806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7–2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups. PMID:27058445

  13. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskeatnaf Mulugeta Achame

    Full Text Available Chimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY, representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural selection acting on the MSY as a unit. Positive selection might involve the performance of the MSY in spermatogenesis. Chimpanzees have a highly polygamous mating behavior, so that sperm competition is thought to provide a strong selective force acting on the Y chromosome in the chimpanzee lineage. In consequence of evolution of the heterologous sex chromosomes in mammals, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI results in a transcriptionally silenced XY body in male meiotic prophase, and subsequently also in postmeiotic repression of the sex chromosomes in haploid spermatids. This has evolved to a situation where MSCI has become a prerequisite for spermatogenesis. Here, by analysis of microarray testicular expression data representing a small number of male chimpanzees and men, we obtained information indicating that meiotic and postmeiotic X chromosome silencing might be more effective in chimpanzee than in human spermatogenesis. From this, we suggest that the remarkable reorganization of the chimpanzee Y chromosome, compared to the human Y chromosome, might have an impact on its meiotic interactions with the X chromosome and thereby on X chromosome silencing in spermatogenesis. Further studies will be required to address comparative functional aspects of MSCI in chimpanzee, human, and other placental mammals.

  14. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta Achame, Eskeatnaf; Baarends, Willy M; Gribnau, Joost; Grootegoed, J Anton

    2010-12-14

    Chimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural selection acting on the MSY as a unit. Positive selection might involve the performance of the MSY in spermatogenesis. Chimpanzees have a highly polygamous mating behavior, so that sperm competition is thought to provide a strong selective force acting on the Y chromosome in the chimpanzee lineage. In consequence of evolution of the heterologous sex chromosomes in mammals, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) results in a transcriptionally silenced XY body in male meiotic prophase, and subsequently also in postmeiotic repression of the sex chromosomes in haploid spermatids. This has evolved to a situation where MSCI has become a prerequisite for spermatogenesis. Here, by analysis of microarray testicular expression data representing a small number of male chimpanzees and men, we obtained information indicating that meiotic and postmeiotic X chromosome silencing might be more effective in chimpanzee than in human spermatogenesis. From this, we suggest that the remarkable reorganization of the chimpanzee Y chromosome, compared to the human Y chromosome, might have an impact on its meiotic interactions with the X chromosome and thereby on X chromosome silencing in spermatogenesis. Further studies will be required to address comparative functional aspects of MSCI in chimpanzee, human, and other placental mammals.

  15. Human embryonic stem cells as models for aneuploid chromosomal syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancotti, Juan-Carlos; Narwani, Kavita; Buehler, Nicole; Mandefro, Berhan; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Yanuka, Ofra; Clark, Amander; Hill, David; Benvenisty, Nissim; Lavon, Neta

    2010-09-01

    Syndromes caused by chromosomal aneuploidies are widely recognized genetic disorders in humans and often lead to spontaneous miscarriage. Preimplantation genetic screening is used to detect chromosomal aneuploidies in early embryos. Our aim was to derive aneuploid human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines that may serve as models for human syndromes caused by aneuploidies. We have established 25 hESC lines from blastocysts diagnosed as aneuploid on day 3 of their in vitro development. The hESC lines exhibited morphology and expressed markers typical of hESCs. They demonstrated long-term proliferation capacity and pluripotent differentiation. Karyotype analysis revealed that two-third of the cell lines carry a normal euploid karyotype, while one-third remained aneuploid throughout the derivation, resulting in eight hESC lines carrying either trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), 16, 17, 21 (Down syndrome), X (Triple X syndrome), or monosomy X (Turner syndrome). On the basis of the level of single nucleotide polymorphism heterozygosity in the aneuploid chromosomes, we determined whether the aneuploidy originated from meiotic or mitotic chromosomal nondisjunction. Gene expression profiles of the trisomic cell lines suggested that all three chromosomes are actively transcribed. Our analysis allowed us to determine which tissues are most affected by the presence of a third copy of either chromosome 13, 16, 17 or 21 and highlighted the effects of trisomies on embryonic development. The results presented here suggest that aneuploid embryos can serve as an alternative source for either normal euploid or aneuploid hESC lines, which represent an invaluable tool to study developmental aspects of chromosomal abnormalities in humans.

  16. Targeted sequencing of the human X chromosome exome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Kajari; Shetty, Amol Carl; Patel, Viren; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2011-10-01

    We used a RainDance Technologies (RDT) expanded content library to enrich the human X chromosome exome (2.5 Mb) from 26 male samples followed by Illumina sequencing. Our multiplex primer library covered 98.05% of the human X chromosome exome in a single tube with 11,845 different PCR amplicons. Illumina sequencing of 24 male samples showed coverage for 97% of the targeted sequences. Sequence from 2 HapMap samples confirmed missing data rates of 2-3% at sites successfully typed by the HapMap project, with an accuracy of at least ~99.5% as compared to reported HapMap genotypes. Our demonstration that a RDT expanded content library can efficiently enrich and enable the routine sequencing of the human X chromosome exome suggests a wide variety of potential research and clinical applications for this platform.

  17. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1992-08-01

    Project aims for the past year have been to refine the cytogenetic based physical map of human chromosome 16. This has been achieved by extending the panel of mouse/human hybrids of chromosome 16 to over sixty hybrids and mapping approximately 250 DNA makers. The high resolution of this physical map, with an average distance between breakpoints of less than 1.6 Mb, and the availability of at least one STS in the majority of these intervals, will be the basis for constructing extensive contigs of cloned DNA.

  18. X-linked ichthyosis without STS deficiency: Clinical, genetical, and molecular studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robledo, R.; Melis, P.; Schillinger, E.; Siniscalco, M. [Istituto di Genetica Molecolare del, Trieste (Italy)] [and others

    1995-11-06

    We report on a Sardinian pedigree with congenital ichthyosis associated with normal levels of steroid sulfatase and a normal molecular pattern, as detectable with a cDNA probe for the steroid sulfatase (STS) gene. Though the pattern of transmission of the disease is consistent with X-linked recessive inheritance, this form of ichthyosis was found to segregate independently of genetic polymorphisms detected by probes of the region Xp22.3, where the STS locus has been mapped. The search for close genetic linkages with other polymorphic markers scattered along the entire X chromosome has so far been fruitless. For the time being, the main conclusion derived from these data is that STS deficiency is not a sine qua non for X-linked ichthyosis which may also result from a mutational event at an X-chromosomal site genetically unlinked to the STS locus. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Engineering targeted chromosomal amplifications in human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Simeon; Yi, Kyung H; Park, Jeenah; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Price, Amanda J; Lauring, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Chromosomal amplifications are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers. However, experimental systems to study the processes that lead to specific, recurrent amplification events in human cancers are lacking. Moreover, some common amplifications, such as that at 8p11-12 in breast cancer, harbor multiple driver oncogenes, which are poorly modeled by conventional overexpression approaches. We sought to develop an experimental system to model recurrent chromosomal amplification events in human cell lines. Our strategy is to use homologous-recombination-mediated gene targeting to deliver a dominantly selectable, amplifiable marker to a specified chromosomal location. We used adeno-associated virus vectors to target human MCF-7 breast cancer cells at the ZNF703 locus, in the recurrent 8p11-12 amplicon, using the E. coli inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) enzyme as a marker. We applied selective pressure using IMPDH inhibitors. Surviving clones were found to have increased copy number of ZNF703 (average 2.5-fold increase) by droplet digital PCR and FISH. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization confirmed that amplifications had occurred on the short arm of chromosome 8, without changes on 8q or other chromosomes. Patterns of amplification were variable and similar to those seen in primary human breast cancers, including "sawtooth" patterns, distal copy number loss, and large continuous regions of copy number gain. This system will allow study of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are permissive for chromosomal amplification and provide a model to analyze oncogene cooperativity in amplifications harboring multiple candidate driver genes.

  20. Assignment of the protein kinase C [delta] polypeptide gene (PRKCD) to human chromosome 3 and mouse chromosome 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppi, K.; Siwarski, D.; Goodnight, J.; Mischak, H. (Molecular Genetics Section Lab. of Genetics, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The protein kinase C (pkc) enzymes are a family of serine-threonine protein kinases, each encoded by a distinct and separate gene. The chromosomal locations of human PRKCA, PRKCB, and PRKCG have previously been established. The authors now report that PRKCD, a novel member of the pkc gene family, maps to human chromosome 3. The chromosomal location of Pkcd has also been determined in the mouse by analysis of recombination frequency in an interspecific panel of back-cross mice. They find that the locus encoding pkcd resides proximal to nucleoside phosphorylase (Np-2) and Tcra on mouse chromosome 14 in a region syntenic with human 3p. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Assignment of the protein kinase C delta polypeptide gene (PRKCD) to human chromosome 3 and mouse chromosome 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppi, K; Siwarski, D; Goodnight, J; Mischak, H

    1994-01-01

    The protein kinase C (pkc) enzymes are a family of serine-threonine protein kinases, each encoded by a distinct and separate gene. The chromosomal locations of human PRKCA, PRKCB, and PRKCG have previously been established. We now report that PRKCD, a novel member of the pkc gene family, maps to human chromosome 3. The chromosomal location of Pkcd has also been determined in the mouse by analysis of recombination frequency in an interspecific panel of backcross mice. We find that the locus encoding pkcd resides proximal to nucleoside phosphorylase (Np-2) and Tcra on mouse chromosome 14 in a region syntenic with human 3p.

  2. Molecular and genetic basis of X-linked immunodeficiency disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puck, J.M. (National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Within a short time interval the specific gene defects causing three X-linked human immunodeficiencies, agammaglobulinemia (XLA), hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM), and severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), have been identified. These represent the first human disease phenotypes associated with each of three gene families already recognized to be important in lymphocyte development and signaling: XLA is caused by mutations of a B cell-specific intracellular tyrosine kinase; HIGM, by mutations in the TNF-related CD40 ligand, through which T cells deliver helper signals by direct contact with B cell CD40; and XSCID, by mutations in the [gamma] chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2. Each patient mutation analyzed to date has been unique, representing both a challenge for genetic diagnosis and management and an important resource for dissecting molecular domains and understanding the physiologic function of the gene products.

  3. Refined genetic mapping of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fain, P.R.; Barker, D.F.; Chance, P.F. (Univ. of Utah, School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Genetic linkage studies were conducted in four multigenerational families with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX), using 12 highly polymorphic short-tandem-repeat markers for the pericentromeric region of the X Chromosome. Pairwise linkage analysis with individual markers confirmed tight linkage of CMTX to the pericentromeric region in each family. Multipoint analyses strongly support the order DXS337-CMTX-DXS441-(DXS56, PGK1). 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. ASAR15, A cis-acting locus that controls chromosome-wide replication timing and stability of human chromosome 15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Donley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along each mammalian chromosome at different times during each S phase, following a temporal replication program. We have used a Cre/loxP-based strategy to identify cis-acting elements that control this replication-timing program on individual human chromosomes. In this report, we show that rearrangements at a complex locus at chromosome 15q24.3 result in delayed replication and structural instability of human chromosome 15. Characterization of this locus identified long, RNA transcripts that are retained in the nucleus and form a "cloud" on one homolog of chromosome 15. We also found that this locus displays asynchronous replication that is coordinated with other random monoallelic genes on chromosome 15. We have named this locus ASynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 15, or ASAR15. Previously, we found that disruption of the ASAR6 lincRNA gene results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic condensation and structural instability of human chromosome 6. Previous studies in the mouse found that deletion of the Xist gene, from the X chromosome in adult somatic cells, results in a delayed replication and instability phenotype that is indistinguishable from the phenotype caused by disruption of either ASAR6 or ASAR15. In addition, delayed replication and chromosome instability were detected following structural rearrangement of many different human or mouse chromosomes. These observations suggest that all mammalian chromosomes contain similar cis-acting loci. Thus, under this scenario, all mammalian chromosomes contain four distinct types of essential cis-acting elements: origins, telomeres, centromeres and "inactivation/stability centers", all functioning to promote proper replication, segregation and structural stability of each chromosome.

  5. High-resolution microarray analysis unravels complex Xq28 aberrations in patients and carriers affected by X-linked blue cone monochromacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsenko, S A; Bakos, H A; Vitullo, K; Kedrov, M; Kishore, A; Jennings, B J; Surti, U; Wood-Trageser, M A; Cercone, S; Yatsenko, A N; Rajkovic, A; Iannaccone, A

    2016-01-01

    The human X chromosome contains ∼ 1600 genes, about 15% of which have been associated with a specific genetic condition, mainly affecting males. Blue cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked condition caused by a loss-of-function of both the OPN1LW and OPN1MW opsin genes. The cone opsin gene cluster is composed of 2-9 paralogs with 99.8% sequence homology and is susceptible to deletions, duplications, and mutations. Current diagnostic tests employ polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technologies; however, alterations remain undetermined in 10% of patients. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is limited or unavailable. High-resolution X chromosome-targeted CGH microarray was applied to test for rearrangements in males with BCM and female carriers from three unrelated families. Pathogenic alterations were revealed in all probands, characterized by sequencing of the breakpoint junctions and quantitative real-time PCR. In two families, we identified a novel founder mutation that consisted of a complex 3-kb deletion that embraced the cis-regulatory locus control region and insertion of an additional aberrant OPN1MW gene. The application of high-resolution X-chromosome microarray in clinical diagnosis brings significant advantages in detection of small aberrations that are beyond the resolution of clinically available aCGH analysis and which can improve molecular diagnosis of the known conditions and unravel previously unrecognized X-linked diseases.

  6. [Panel of X-linked single-nucleotide polymorphic markers for DNA identification (XSNPid) based on multiplex genotyping by multilocus PCR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, V A; Vagaitseva, K V; Kharkov, V N; Cherednichenko, A A; Bocharova, A V

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic markers linked with the X chromosome (X-linked) are used in the field of population and medical genetics, as well as for DNA identification of individuals in forensic science and forensic medicine. We proposed an XSNPid panel that consists of 66 unlinked single nucleotide X chromosome markers and developed a protocol for their multiplex genotyping using multilocus PCR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The XSNPid panel is genotyped within two multiplexes (36 and 30 markers). The developed protocol provides an efficient genotype reading; the fraction of determined genotypes is 98.29%. The high level of gene diversity (0.461) for the X-linked SNPs included in the panel is characteristic of the Russian population. A total of 63 out of 66 markers that provide a high efficiency of genotyping and independent inheritance are suitable for DNA identification purposes. The XSNPid panel is characterized by a very high discriminating ability when studying the Russian population. The probability of genotype coincidence in two unrelated individuals is 9 × 10^(-27) for women and 2 × 10^(-18) for men. Also, the XSNPid panel has a greater multiplex capacity in addition to a higher discriminating ability compared to the other closest analogues of the X chromosome SNP sets, which makes it more cost effective and less time consuming. The XSNPid panel is a convenient tool, not only for individual DNA identification, but also for population genetic studies.

  7. The DNA Sequence And Comparative Analysis Of Human Chromosome5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, Steve; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie,Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black,Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan,Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner,Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou,Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar,Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers,Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang,Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, SusanM.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-08-01

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes and contains numerous intrachromosomal duplications, yet it has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting that they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-coding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families. We also completely sequenced versions of the large chromosome-5-specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and probably have a mechanistic role in human physiological variation, as deletions in these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy.

  8. The X chromosome and immune associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Ilaria; Lleo, Ana; Gershwin, M Eric; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2012-05-01

    The X chromosome is known to contain the largest number of immune-related genes of the whole human genome. For this reason, X chromosome has recently become subject of great interest and attention and numerous studies have been aimed at understanding the role of genes on the X chromosome in triggering and maintaining the autoimmune aggression. Autoimmune diseases are indeed a growing heath burden affecting cumulatively up to 10% of the general population. It is intriguing that most X-linked primary immune deficiencies carry significant autoimmune manifestations, thus illustrating the critical role played by products of single gene located on the X chromosome in the onset, function and homeostasis of the immune system. Again, the plethora of autoimmune stigmata observed in patients with Turner syndrome, a disease due to the lack of one X chromosome or the presence of major X chromosome deletions, indicate that X-linked genes play a unique and major role in autoimmunity. There have been several reports on a role of X chromosome gene dosage through inactivation or duplication in women with autoimmune diseases, for example through a higher rate of circulating cells with a single X chromosome (i.e. with X monosomy). Finally, a challenge for researchers in the coming years will be to dissect the role for the large number of X-linked microRNAs from the perspective of autoimmune disease development. Taken together, X chromosome might well constitute the common trait of the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, other than to explain the female preponderance of these conditions. This review will focus on the available evidence on X chromosome changes and discuss their potential implications and limitations.

  9. Positioning of human chromosomes in murine cell hybrids according to synteny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaburn, Karen J; Newbold, Robert F; Bridger, Joanna M

    2008-12-01

    Chromosomes occupy non-random spatial positions in interphase nuclei. It remains unclear what orchestrates this high level of organisation. To determine how the nuclear environment influences the spatial positioning of chromosomes, we utilised a panel of stable mouse hybrid cell lines carrying a single, intact human chromosome. Eleven of 22 human chromosomes revealed an alternative location in hybrid nuclei compared to that of human fibroblasts, with the majority becoming more internally localised. Human chromosomes in mouse nuclei position according to neither their gene density nor size, but rather the position of human chromosomes in hybrid nuclei appears to mimic that of syntenic mouse chromosomes. These results suggest that chromosomes adopt the behaviour of their host species chromosomes and that the nuclear environment is an important determinant of the interphase positioning of chromosomes.

  10. [Developing a physical map of human chromosome 22]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, M.I.

    1991-12-31

    We have developed bacterial F-factor based systems for cloning large fragments of human DNA in E. coli. In addition to large size, these systems are capable of maintaining human DNA with a high degree of stability. The cosmid size clones are called Fosmids and the clones containing larger inserts (100--200 kb) are called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The ultimate test of the effectiveness of cloning and mapping technology is the degree to which it can be efficiently applied to solve complex mapping problems. We, therefore, plan to use the large fragment cloning procedure as well as a variety of other approaches to generate a complete map of overlapping clones corresponding to human chromosome 22. We have thus far prepared two human chromosome 22 specific Fosmid libraries and we are in the process of constructing a chromosome 22 specific BAC library composed of fragments larger than 100 kb. We will further optimize the technology so that libraries of fragments larger than 200 kb can be readily prepared.

  11. (Developing a physical map of human chromosome 22)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, M.I.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed bacterial F-factor based systems for cloning large fragments of human DNA in E. coli. In addition to large size, these systems are capable of maintaining human DNA with a high degree of stability. The cosmid size clones are called Fosmids and the clones containing larger inserts (100--200 kb) are called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The ultimate test of the effectiveness of cloning and mapping technology is the degree to which it can be efficiently applied to solve complex mapping problems. We, therefore, plan to use the large fragment cloning procedure as well as a variety of other approaches to generate a complete map of overlapping clones corresponding to human chromosome 22. We have thus far prepared two human chromosome 22 specific Fosmid libraries and we are in the process of constructing a chromosome 22 specific BAC library composed of fragments larger than 100 kb. We will further optimize the technology so that libraries of fragments larger than 200 kb can be readily prepared.

  12. Repeat Sequences and Base Correlations in Human Y Chromosome Palindromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neng-zhi Jin; Zi-xian Liu; Yan-jiao Qi; Wen-yuan Qiu

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of information theory and statistical methods, we use mutual information, n-tuple entropy and conditional entropy, combined with biological characteristics, to analyze the long range correlation and short range correlation in human Y chromosome palindromes. The magnitude distribution of the long range correlation which can be reflected by the mutual information is P5>P5a>P5b (P5a and P5b are the sequences that replace solely Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats with random uncorrelated sequences in human Y chromosome palindrome 5, respectively); and the magnitude distribution of the short range correlation which can be reflected by the n-tuple entropy and the conditional entropy is P5>P5a>P5b>random uncorrelated sequence. In other words, when the Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats replace with random uncorrelated sequence, the long range and short range correlation decrease gradually. However, the random uncorrelated sequence has no correlation. This research indicates that more repeat sequences result in stronger correlation between bases in human Y chromosome. The analyses may be helpful to understand the special structures of human Y chromosome palindromes profoundly.

  13. X-linked liver glycogenosis: From patient to gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, P.J.; Hendrickx, J. [Univ. of Antwert (Belgium)

    1994-09-01

    X-linked liver glycogenosis (XLG) is the most frequent glycogen storage disorder. Studying a collection of more than 50 XLG families, we have subdivided XLG into XLG I which shows a clear deficiency of phosphorylase kinase (PHK), and XLG II in which no enzyme deficiency has yet been found. However, the clinical pictures of XLG I and XLG II with hepatormegaly and growth retardation are indistinguishable. We have localized the XLG I and the XLG II gene by linkage analysis in multiple large families to the same chromosomal region in Xp22. Multipoint linkage analysis gave lod scores of above 15 in XLG I and above 4.5 in XLG II with Xp22 markers, whereas analysis of key recombinants located both disease genes between DXS143 and DXS989. Therefore, XLG I and XLG II might be due to allelic mutations in the same gene. To clone the disease gene, we searched for PHK subunit genes and isolated genomic and cDNA clones from a liver alpha subunit gene (PHKA2). As PHKA2 could be mapped by FISH and radiation hybrids to Xp22, it is a candidate gene for XLG. To prove that PHKA2 harbours the mutations responsible for XLG I and XLG II, we studied different XLG I and XLG II patients with Southern blot analysis and genomic SSCP scanning. Several mutations (nonsense mutations, splice site mutations) were identified indicating that PHKA2 is the XLG gene.

  14. Characterization of human PGD blastocysts with unbalanced chromosomal translocations and human embryonic stem cell line derivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, N; Féraud, O; Bas, C; Amit, M; Frydman, R; Bennaceur-Griscelli, A; Tachdjian, G

    2009-01-01

    Novel embryonic stem cell lines derived from embryos carrying structural chromosomal abnormalities obtained after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) are of interest to study in terms of the influence of abnormalities on further development. A total of 22 unbalanced blastocysts obtained after PGD were analysed for structural chromosomal defects. Morphological description and chromosomal status of these blastocysts was established and they were used to derive human embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines. An outgrowth of cells was observed for six blastocysts (6/22; 27%). For two blastocysts, the exact morphology was unknown since they were at early stage, and for four blastocysts, the inner cell mass was clearly visible. Fifteen blastocysts carried an unbalanced chromosomal defect linked to a reciprocal translocation, resulting in a positive outgrowth of cells for five blastocysts. One human ESC line was obtained from a blastocyst carrying a partial chromosome-21 monosomy and a partial chromosome-1 trisomy. Six blastocysts carried an unbalanced chromosomal defect linked to a Robertsonian translocation, and one showed a positive outgrowth of cells. One blastocyst carried an unbalanced chromosomal defect linked to an insertion and no outgrowth was observed. The efficiency of deriving human ESC lines with constitutional chromosomal disorders was low and probably depends on the initial morphological aspect of the blastocysts and/or the type of the chromosomal disorders.

  15. X-linked acrogigantism syndrome: clinical profile and therapeutic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; W de Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R; Daly, Adrian F; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-06-01

    X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological, and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and microduplication of chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in two families was dominant, with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2-3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight standard deviation scores (SDS) of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF1 and usually prolactin, due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection, but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high levels of expression of somatostatin receptor subtype-2 in tumor tissue. Postoperative use of adjuvant pegvisomant resulted in control of IGF1 in all five cases where it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management.

  16. Construction of a genetic map of human chromosome 17 by use of chromosome-mediated gene transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weiming; Gorman, P.A.; Rider, S.H.; Hedge, P.J.; Moore, G.; Prichard, C.; Sheer, D.; Solomon, E. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (England))

    1988-11-01

    The authors used somatic-cell hybrids, containing as their only human genetic contribution part or all of chromosome 17, as donors for chromosome-mediated gene transfer. A total of 54 independent transfectant clones were isolated and analyzed by use of probes or isoenzymes for >20 loci located on chromosome 17. By combining the data from this chromosome-mediated gene transfer transfectant panel, conventional somatic-cell hybrids containing well-defined breaks on chromosome 17, and in situ hybridization they propose the following order for these loci; pter-(TP53-RNP2-D17S1)-(MYH2-MYH1)-D17Z1-CRYB1-(ERBA1-GCSF-NGL)-acute promyelocytic leukemia breakpoint-RNU2-HOX2-(NGFR-COLIAI-MPO)-GAA-UMPH-GHC-TK1-GALK-qter. Using chromosome-mediated gene transfer, they have also regionally localized the random probes D17S6 to D17S19 on chromosome 17.

  17. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  18. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  19. Report on the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, D.J. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Armour, J. [Univ. of Leicester (England). Dept. of Genetics; Bale, A.E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Genetics] [and others

    1993-12-31

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 9 was held in Chatham, Massachusetts on April 18--20, 1993. Fifty-three abstracts were received and the data presented on posters. The purpose of the meeting was to bring together all interested investigators working on the map of chromosome 9, many of whom had disease-specific interests. After a brief presentation of interests and highlighted results, the meeting broke up into the following subgroups for production of consensus maps: 9p; 9cen-q32; 9q32 ter. A global mapping group also met. Reports of each of these working groups is presented in the summary.

  20. Dermatomyositis-like syndrome in x-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro David Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs encompass more than 250 different pathological conditions. X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA has been occasionally associated with cutaneous and muscular manifestations resembling dermatomyositis, often termed dermatomyositis-like syndrome (DLS. This syndrome has been associated with cutaneous, muscular and central nervous system manifestations, accompanying a persistent infection by an Echovirus. According to sixteen previously reported cases, this syndrome has a poor prognosis. We report the case of a 27-years old male, with XLA and DLS, successfully treated with 6 cycles of human immunoglobulin and methotrexate. Clinical symptoms improved dramatically with a complete resolution of the musculoskeletal manifestations. Despite this clinical response, prognosis should remain reserved. The evolution of this syndrome remains unpredictable and therapeutic options are limited. To the best of our knowledge, there are only a few reports of similar cases which have survived so many months after the diagnosis.

  1. Chromosomal Aberrations in Humans Induced by Urban Air Pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Norppa, Hannu; Gamborg, Michael O.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the influence of individual susceptibility factors on the genotoxic effects of urban air pollution in 106 nonsmoking bus drivers and 101 postal workers in the Copenhagen metropolitan area. We used the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes...... that long-term exposure to urban air pollution (with traffic as the main contributor) induces chromosome damage in human somatic cells. Low DNA repair capacity and GSTM1 and NAT2 variants associated with reduced detoxification ability increase susceptibility to such damage. The effect of the GSTM1 genotype......, which was observed only in the bus drivers, appears to be associated with air pollution, whereas the NAT2 genotype effect, which affected all subjects, may influence the individual response to some other common exposure or the baseline level of chromosomal aberrations....

  2. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells.

  3. Micro RNAs and DNA methylation are regulatory players in human cells with altered X chromosome to autosome balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpathak, Shriram N.; Deobagkar, Deepti D.

    2017-01-01

    The gene balance hypothesis predicts that an imbalance in the dosage sensitive genes affects the cascade of gene networks that may influence the fitness of individuals. The phenotypes associated with chromosomal aneuploidies demonstrate the importance of gene dosage balance. We have employed untransformed human fibroblast cells with different number of X chromosomes to assess the expression of miRNAs and autosomal genes in addition to the DNA methylation status. High throughput NGS analysis using illumina Next seq500 has detected several autosomal as well as X linked miRNAs as differentially expressed in X monosomy and trisomy cells. Two of these miRNAs (hsa-miR-125a-5p and 335-5p) are likely to be involved in regulation of the autosomal gene expression. Additionally, our data demonstrates altered expression and DNA methylation signatures of autosomal genes in X monosomy and trisomy cells. In addition to miRNAs, expression of DNMT1 which is an important epigenetic player involved in many processes including cancer, is seen to be altered. Overall, present study provides a proof for regulatory roles of micro RNAs and DNA methylation in human X aneuploidy cells opening up possible new ways for designing therapeutic strategies. PMID:28233878

  4. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimwood, Jane; Gordon, Laurie A; Olsen, Anne; Terry, Astrid; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lamerdin, Jane; Hellsten, Uffe; Goodstein, David; Couronne, Olivier; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Ashworth, Linda; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caenepeel, Sean; Carrano, Anthony; Caoile, Chenier; Chan, Yee Man; Christensen, Mari; Cleland, Catherine A; Copeland, Alex; Dalin, Eileen; Dehal, Paramvir; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Garcia, Carmen; Georgescu, Anca M; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Ho, Isaac; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Larionov, Vladimer; Leem, Sun-Hee; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Malfatti, Stephanie; Martinez, Diego; McCready, Paula; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nelson, Kathryn; Nolan, Matt; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Popkie, Anthony P; Predki, Paul; Quan, Glenda; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanine; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; She, Xinwei; Smith, Doug; Slezak, Tom; Solovyev, Victor; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wagner, Mark; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Xie, Gary; Yang, Joan; Dubchak, Inna; Furey, Terrence S; DeJong, Pieter; Dickson, Mark; Gordon, David; Eichler, Evan E; Pennacchio, Len A; Richardson, Paul; Stubbs, Lisa; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Myers, Richard M; Rubin, Edward M; Lucas, Susan M

    2004-04-01

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high G + C content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolaemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one-quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  5. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimwood, J; Gordon, L A; Olsen, A; Terry, A; Schmutz, J; Lamerdin, J; Hellsten, U; Goodstein, D; Couronne, O; Tran-Gyamfi, M

    2004-04-06

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high GC content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in Mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  6. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimwood, Jane; Gordon, Laurie A.; Olsen, Anne; Terry, Astrid; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lamerdin, Jane; Hellsten, Uffe; Goodstein, David; Couronne, Olivier; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Ashworth, Linda; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caenepeel, Sean; Carrano, Anthony; Caoile, Chenier; Chan, Yee Man; Christensen, Mari; Cleland, Catherine A.; Copeland, Alex; Dalin, Eileen; Dehal, Paramvir; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Garcia, Carmen; Georgescu, Anca M.; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eldelyn; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Ho, Issac; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Larionov, Vladimer; Leem, Sun-Hee; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Malfatti, Stephanie; Martinez, Diego; McCready, Paula; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nelson, Kathryn; Nolan, Matt; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Popkie, Anthony P.; Predki, Paul; Quan, Glenda; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanine; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; She, Xinwei; Smith, Doug; Slezak, Tom; Solovyev, Victor; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wagner, Mark; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Xie, Gary; Yang, Joan; Dubchak, Inna; Furey, Terrence S.; DeJong, Pieter; Dickson, Mark; Gordon, David; Eichler, Evan E.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Richardson, Paul; Stubbs, Lisa; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan M.

    2003-09-15

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high G1C content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9 percent of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolaemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one-quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25 percent of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, a nd segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  7. A Novel PHEX Mutation in Japanese Patients with X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Kawahara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH is a dominant inherited disorder characterized by renal phosphate wasting, aberrant vitamin D metabolism, and abnormal bone mineralization. Inactivating mutations in the gene encoding phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (PHEX have been found to be associated with XLH. Here, we report a 16-year-old female patient affected by hypophosphatemic rickets. We evaluated her serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 levels and conducted sequence analysis of the disease-associated genes of FGF23-related hypophosphatemic rickets: PHEX, FGF23, dentin matrix protein 1, and ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1. She was diagnosed with XLH based on her clinical features and family history. Additionally, we observed elevated FGF23 levels and a novel PHEX exon 9 mutation (c.947G>T; p.Gly316Val inherited from her father. Although bioinformatics showed that the mutation was neutral, Gly316 is perfectly conserved among humans, mice, and rats, and there were no mutations in other FGF23-related rickets genes, suggesting that in silico analysis is limited in determining mutation pathogenicity. In summary, we present a female patient and her father with XLH harboring a novel PHEX mutation that appears to be causative of disease. Measurement of FGF23 for hypophosphatemic patients is therefore useful for the diagnosis of FGF23-dependent hypophosphatemia.

  8. Splice-correction strategies for treatment of X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestas, Burcu; Turunen, Janne J; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Wang, Qing; Månsson, Robert; El Andaloussi, Samir; Berglöf, Anna; Smith, C I Edvard

    2015-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the gene coding for Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Deficiency of BTK leads to a developmental block in B cell differentiation; hence, the patients essentially lack antibody-producing plasma cells and are susceptible to various infections. A substantial portion of the mutations in BTK results in splicing defects, consequently preventing the formation of protein-coding mRNA. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are therapeutic compounds that have the ability to modulate pre-mRNA splicing and alter gene expression. The potential of ASOs has been exploited for a few severe diseases, both in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Recently, advances have also been made in using ASOs as a personalized therapy for XLA. Splice-correction of BTK has been shown to be feasible for different mutations in vitro, and a recent proof-of-concept study demonstrated the feasibility of correcting splicing and restoring BTK both ex vivo and in vivo in a humanized bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-transgenic mouse model. This review summarizes the advances in splice correction, as a personalized medicine for XLA, and outlines the promises and challenges of using this technology as a curative long-term treatment option.

  9. Chromosomal aberrations related to metastasis of human solid tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lun-Xiu Qin

    2002-01-01

    The central role of sequential accumulation of genetic alterations during the development of cancer has been firmly established since the pioneering cytogenetic studies successfully defined recurrent chromosome changes in spedfic types of tumor. In the course of carcinogenesis, cells experience several genetic alterations that are associated with the transition from a preneoplastic lesion to an invasive tumor and finally to the metastatic state. Tumor progression is characterized by stepwise accumulation of genetic alterations.So does the dominant metastatic clone. Modern molecular genetic analyses have clarified that genomic changes accumulate during the development and progression of cancers. In comparison with the corresponding primary tumor,additional events of chromosomal aberrations (including gains or allelic losses) are frequently found in metastases, and the incidence of combined chromosomal alterations in the primary tumor, plus the occurrence of additional aberrations inthe distant metastases, correlated significantly with decreased postmetastatic survival. The deletions at 3p, 4p, 6q, 8p, 10q,11p, 11q, 12p, 13q, 16q, 17p, 18q, 21q, and 22q, as well as the over-representations at 1q, 8q, 9q, 14q and 15q, have been found to associate preferentially with the metastatic phenotype of human cancers. Among of them, the deletions on chromosomes 8p, 17p, 11p and 13p seem to be more significant, and more detail fine regions of them, including 8p11, 8p21-12, 8p22, 8p23, 17p13.3, 11p15.5, and 13q12-13 have been suggested harboring metastasis-suppressor genes.During the past decade, several human chromosomes have been functionally tested through the use of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT), and metastasis-suppressor activities have been reported on chromosomes 1, 6, 7, 8, 10,11, 12, 16, and 17. However, it is not actually known at what stage of the metastatic cascade these alterations have occurred.There is still controversial with the association

  10. The mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenaventura, J.M. [Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The principle goal of our laboratory is the discovery of new genes on human chromosome 19. One of the strategies to achieve this goal is through the use of cDNA clones known as {open_quotes}expressed sequence tags{close_quotes} (ESTs). ESTs, short segments of sequence from a cDNA clone that correspond to the mRNA, occur as unique regions in the genome and, therefore, can be used as markers for specific positions. In collaboration with researchers from Genethon in France, fifteen cDNA clones from a normalized human infant brain cDNA library were tested and determined to map to chromosome 19. A verification procedure is then followed to confirm assignment to chromosome 19. First, primers for each cDNA clone are developed and then amplified by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA. Next, a {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probe is made by polymerase chain reaction for each clone and then hybridized against filters containing an LLNL chromosome 19-specific cosmid library to find putative locations on the chromosome. The location is then verified by running a polymerase chain reactions from the positive cosmids. With the Browser database at LLNL, additional information about the positive cosmids can be found. Through use of the BLAST database at the National Library of Medicine, homologous sequences to the clones can be found. Among the fifteen cDNA clones received from Genethon, all have been amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Three have turned out as repetitive elements in the genome. Ten have been mapped to specific locations on chromosome 19. Putative locations have been found for the remaining two clones and thus verification testing will proceed.

  11. Human interphase chromosomes: a review of available molecular cytogenetic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human karyotype is usually studied by classical cytogenetic (banding techniques. To perform it, one has to obtain metaphase chromosomes of mitotic cells. This leads to the impossibility of analyzing all the cell types, to moderate cell scoring, and to the extrapolation of cytogenetic data retrieved from a couple of tens of mitotic cells to the whole organism, suggesting that all the remaining cells possess these genomes. However, this is far from being the case inasmuch as chromosome abnormalities can occur in any cell along ontogeny. Since somatic cells of eukaryotes are more likely to be in interphase, the solution of the problem concerning studying postmitotic cells and larger cell populations is interphase cytogenetics, which has become more or less applicable for specific biomedical tasks due to achievements in molecular cytogenetics (i.e. developments of fluorescence in situ hybridization -- FISH, and multicolor banding -- MCB. Numerous interphase molecular cytogenetic approaches are restricted to studying specific genomic loci (regions being, however, useful for identification of chromosome abnormalities (aneuploidy, polyploidy, deletions, inversions, duplications, translocations. Moreover, these techniques are the unique possibility to establish biological role and patterns of nuclear genome organization at suprachromosomal level in a given cell. Here, it is to note that this issue is incompletely worked out due to technical limitations. Nonetheless, a number of state-of-the-art molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e multicolor interphase FISH or interpahase chromosome-specific MCB allow visualization of interphase chromosomes in their integrity at molecular resolutions. Thus, regardless numerous difficulties encountered during studying human interphase chromosomes, molecular cytogenetics does provide for high-resolution single-cell analysis of genome organization, structure and behavior at all stages of cell cycle.

  12. Genome-wide misexpression of X-linked versus autosomal genes associated with hybrid male sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuemei; Shapiro, Joshua A; Ting, Chau-Ti; Li, Yan; Li, Chunyan; Xu, Jin; Huang, Huanwei; Cheng, Ya-Jen; Greenberg, Anthony J; Li, Shou-Hsien; Wu, Mao-Lien; Shen, Yang; Wu, Chung-I

    2010-08-01

    Postmating reproductive isolation is often manifested as hybrid male sterility, for which X-linked genes are overrepresented (the so-called large X effect). In contrast, X-linked genes are significantly under-represented among testis-expressing genes. This seeming contradiction may be germane to the X:autosome imbalance hypothesis on hybrid sterility, in which the X-linked effect is mediated mainly through the misexpression of autosomal genes. In this study, we compared gene expression in fertile and sterile males in the hybrids between two Drosophila species. These hybrid males differ only in a small region of the X chromosome containing the Ods-site homeobox (OdsH) (also known as Odysseus) locus of hybrid sterility. Of genes expressed in the testis, autosomal genes were, indeed, more likely to be misexpressed than X-linked genes under the sterilizing action of OdsH. Since this mechanism of X:autosome interaction is only associated with spermatogenesis, a connection between X:autosome imbalance and the high rate of hybrid male sterility seems plausible.

  13. Synteny mapping of five human chromosome 7 genes on bovine chromosomes 4 and 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, E; Womack, J E; Grosz, M D

    1999-01-01

    Five genes on human chromosome 7 (HSA 7) were assigned to bovine chromosome 21 (BTA 21) and 4 (BTA 4) using a bovine-rodent somatic hybrid cell panel. These five genes were alpha-I subunit of adenylate cyclase-inhibiting G-protein (GNAI1), alpha/beta preprotachykinin (TAC1), reelin (RELN), c-AMP dependant protein kinase type II beta regulatory chain (PRKAR2B) and apolipoprotein A1 regulatory protein 1 (TFCOUP2). Four genes mapped to BTA 4 (GNAI1, TAC1, RELN, PRKAR2B) while one gene mapped to BTA 21 (TFCOUP2). This study confirms the synteny conservation between HSA 7 and BTA 4, finely maps the breakpoints of conserved synteny on HSA 7 and defines a new synteny conservation between HSA 7 and BTA 21.

  14. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speckmann, C.; Lehmberg, K.; Albert, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) deficiency caused by mutations in BIRC4 was initially described in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP) who had no mutations in SH2D1A. In the initial reports, EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) was the predominant...

  15. Increased expression of X-linked genes in mammals is associated with a higher stability of transcripts and an increased ribosome density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucillion, Marie-Line; Larsson, Jan

    2015-03-18

    Mammalian sex chromosomes evolved from the degeneration of one homolog of a pair of ancestral autosomes, the proto-Y. This resulted in a gene dose imbalance that is believed to be restored (partially or fully) through upregulation of gene expression from the single active X-chromosome in both sexes by a dosage compensatory mechanism. We analyzed multiple genome-wide RNA stability data sets and found significantly longer average half-lives for X-chromosome transcripts than for autosomal transcripts in various human cell lines, both male and female, and in mice. Analysis of ribosome profiling data shows that ribosome density is higher on X-chromosome transcripts than on autosomal transcripts in both humans and mice, suggesting that the higher stability is causally linked to a higher translation rate. Our results and observations are in accordance with a dosage compensatory upregulation of expressed X-linked genes. We therefore propose that differential mRNA stability and translation rates of the autosomes and sex chromosomes contribute to an evolutionarily conserved dosage compensation mechanism in mammals.

  16. DIA1R is an X-linked gene related to Deleted In Autism-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhari Aziz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDS are frequently occurring disorders diagnosed by deficits in three core functional areas: social skills, communication, and behaviours and/or interests. Mental retardation frequently accompanies the most severe forms of ASDs, while overall ASDs are more commonly diagnosed in males. Most ASDs have a genetic origin and one gene recently implicated in the etiology of autism is the Deleted-In-Autism-1 (DIA1 gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a bioinformatics-based approach, we have identified a human gene closely related to DIA1, we term DIA1R (DIA1-Related. While DIA1 is autosomal (chromosome 3, position 3q24, DIA1R localizes to the X chromosome at position Xp11.3 and is known to escape X-inactivation. The gene products are of similar size, with DIA1 encoding 430, and DIA1R 433, residues. At the amino acid level, DIA1 and DIA1R are 62% similar overall (28% identical, and both encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. Both genes are ubiquitously expressed, including in fetal and adult brain tissue. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Examination of published literature revealed point mutations in DIA1R are associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR and DIA1R deletion is associated with syndromes with ASD-like traits and/or XLMR. Together, these results support a model where the DIA1 and DIA1R gene products regulate molecular traffic through the cellular secretory pathway or affect the function of secreted factors, and functional deficits cause disorders with ASD-like symptoms and/or mental retardation.

  17. Construction and characterization of human chromosome 2-specific cosmid, fosmid, and PAC clone libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingrich, J.C.; Boehrer, D.M.; Garnes, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the construction and characterization of three human chromosome 2-specific clone libraries. A chromosome 2-specific PAC library was also constructed from a hybrid cell line. The chromosome 2 coverage of each of the three libraries was further determined by PCR screening clone pools with 82 chromosome 2-specific STSs. 47 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. G-CSF receptor (CSF3R) mutations in X-linked neutropenia evolving to acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows for the first time that patients with X-linked neutropenia, caused by mutations in the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome gene, developed myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia with acquisition of mutations in the CSF3R gene and loss of chromosome 7. See related perspective article on page 1333.

  19. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Achame; W.M. Baarends (Willy); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractChimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural

  20. Extensive X-linked adaptive evolution in central chimpanzees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Christina; Qian, Yu; Bataillon, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    as 30% of all amino acid replacements being adaptive. Adaptive evolution is barely detectable on the autosomes except for a few striking cases of recent selective sweeps associated with immunity gene clusters. We also find much stronger purifying selection than observed in humans, and in contrast...... on the dominance of beneficial (adaptive) and deleterious mutations. Here we capture and sequence the complete exomes of 12 chimpanzees and present the largest set of protein-coding polymorphism to date. We report extensive adaptive evolution specifically targeting the X chromosome of chimpanzees with as much...... to humans, we find that purifying selection is stronger on the X chromosome than on the autosomes in chimpanzees. We therefore conclude that most adaptive mutations are recessive. We also document dramatically reduced synonymous diversity in the chimpanzee X chromosome relative to autosomes and stronger...

  1. Two CpG mutational hot spots in the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2RG) may cause 15% of all human severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M. [National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethseda, MD (United States); Liu, X. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immune function, is caused by various autosomal gene defects, including adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, as well as mutations in the X-linked IL2RG gene encoding the gamma chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2. Mutational analysis of IL2RG was performed using genomic DNA from males with SCID referred from genetics and immunology centers. Single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) were sought by PCR amplification of each of the 8 IL2RG exons using labelled flanking primers. Sequence of exons with aberrant SSCP detected a majority of unique deleterious IL2RG mutations in 30 unrelated SCID patients. However, multiple mutations were seen at CpG dinucleotides, known to be C{yields}T transversion sites. cDNA 690-691 in exon 5 was mutated in 4 patients, 1 patient with each of the C{sub 690}{yields}T causing an Arg{yields}Cys substitution, and 1 with G{sub 691}{yields}A causing Arg{yields}His. Two other patients had SCID caused by a single mutation in IL2RG exon 7. This C{sub 879}{yields}T, also in a CpG, changed an Arg to STOP, resulting in loss of the SH2-related intracellular domain. In addition to our patients, 1 patient with each of the C{sub 690} and the C{sub 879} mutations have been reported by others, giving an overall incidence of 20% from our lab and 21% from all reported IL2RG SCID mutations. While ADA defects account for approximately 15% of SCID, a striking male SCID predominance suggest up to 70% of the cases are X-linked, due to IL2RG mutation. Thus, screening for mutations at the 2 CpG hot spots we have found in IL2RG can identify the genotype of as many SCID cases as are found by ADA testing.

  2. A complex genetic basis to X-linked hybrid male sterility between two species of house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Jeffrey M; Dean, Matthew D; Nachman, Michael W

    2008-08-01

    The X chromosome plays a central role in the evolution of reproductive isolation, but few studies have examined the genetic basis of X-linked incompatibilities during the early stages of speciation. We report the results of a large experiment focused on the reciprocal introgression of the X chromosome between two species of house mice, Mus musculus and M. domesticus. Introgression of the M. musculus X chromosome into a wild-derived M. domesticus genetic background produced male-limited sterility, qualitatively consistent with previous experiments using classic inbred strains to represent M. domesticus. The genetic basis of sterility involved a minimum of four X-linked factors. The phenotypic effects of major sterility QTL were largely additive and resulted in complete sterility when combined. No sterility factors were uncovered on the M. domesticus X chromosome. Overall, these results revealed a complex and asymmetric genetic basis to X-linked hybrid male sterility during the early stages of speciation in mice. Combined with data from previous studies, we identify one relatively narrow interval on the M. musculus X chromosome involved in hybrid male sterility. Only a handful of spermatogenic genes are within this region, including one of the most rapidly evolving genes on the mouse X chromosome.

  3. Long-range restriction map of the terminal part of the short arm of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, C.; Levilliers, J.; Weissenbach, J. (Institut Pasteur, Paris (France))

    1990-05-01

    The terminal part of the short arm of the human X chromosome has been mapped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The map, representing the distal two-thirds of Xp22.3 spans a total of 10,000 kilobases (kb) from Xpter to the DXS143 locus. A comparison with linkage data indicates that 1 centimorgan (cM) in this region corresponds to about 600 kb. CpG islands were essentially concentrated in the 1,500 kb immediately proximal to the pseudoautosomal boundary. Several loci, including the gene encoding steroid sulfatase (STS) and the loci for the X-linked recessive form of chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX) and for Kallmann syndrome (KAL) have been placed relative to the Xp telomere. CDPX is located between 2,650 and 5,550 kb from Xpter, and STS is located between 7,250 and 7,830 kb from Xpter. KAL maps to an interval of 350 kb between 8,600 and 8,950 kb from the telomere. The X-chromosomal breakpoints of a high proportion of XX males resulting from X-Y interchange cluster to a 920-kb region proximal and close to the pseudoautosomal boundary.

  4. DNA methylation profiling of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22

    OpenAIRE

    Eckhardt, Florian; Lewin, Joern; Cortese, Rene; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Attwood, John; Burger, Matthias; Burton, John; Cox, Tony V.; Davies, Rob; Down, Thomas A; Haefliger, Carolina; Horton, Roger; Howe, Kevin; Jackson, David K.; Kunde, Jan

    2006-01-01

    DNA methylation constitutes the most stable type of epigenetic modifications modulating the transcriptional plasticity of mammalian genomes. Using bisulfite DNA sequencing, we report high-resolution methylation reference profiles of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22, providing a resource of about 1.9 million CpG methylation values derived from 12 different tissues. Analysis of 6 annotation categories, revealed evolutionary conserved regions to be the predominant sites for differential DNA methyl...

  5. Chromosome conformation elucidates regulatory relationships in developing human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Hyejung; de la Torre-Ubieta, Luis; Stein, Jason L; Parikshak, Neelroop N; Huang, Jerry; Opland, Carli K; Gandal, Michael J; Sutton, Gavin J; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Lu, Daning; Lee, Changhoon; Eskin, Eleazar; Voineagu, Irina; Ernst, Jason; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2016-10-27

    Three-dimensional physical interactions within chromosomes dynamically regulate gene expression in a tissue-specific manner. However, the 3D organization of chromosomes during human brain development and its role in regulating gene networks dysregulated in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia, are unknown. Here we generate high-resolution 3D maps of chromatin contacts during human corticogenesis, permitting large-scale annotation of previously uncharacterized regulatory relationships relevant to the evolution of human cognition and disease. Our analyses identify hundreds of genes that physically interact with enhancers gained on the human lineage, many of which are under purifying selection and associated with human cognitive function. We integrate chromatin contacts with non-coding variants identified in schizophrenia genome-wide association studies (GWAS), highlighting multiple candidate schizophrenia risk genes and pathways, including transcription factors involved in neurogenesis, and cholinergic signalling molecules, several of which are supported by independent expression quantitative trait loci and gene expression analyses. Genome editing in human neural progenitors suggests that one of these distal schizophrenia GWAS loci regulates FOXG1 expression, supporting its potential role as a schizophrenia risk gene. This work provides a framework for understanding the effect of non-coding regulatory elements on human brain development and the evolution of cognition, and highlights novel mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disorders.

  6. Chromosomal inversions between human and chimpanzee lineages caused by retrotransposons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungnam Lee

    Full Text Available The long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1 and Alu elements are the most abundant mobile elements comprising 21% and 11% of the human genome, respectively. Since the divergence of human and chimpanzee lineages, these elements have vigorously created chromosomal rearrangements causing genomic difference between humans and chimpanzees by either increasing or decreasing the size of genome. Here, we report an exotic mechanism, retrotransposon recombination-mediated inversion (RRMI, that usually does not alter the amount of genomic material present. Through the comparison of the human and chimpanzee draft genome sequences, we identified 252 inversions whose respective inversion junctions can clearly be characterized. Our results suggest that L1 and Alu elements cause chromosomal inversions by either forming a secondary structure or providing a fragile site for double-strand breaks. The detailed analysis of the inversion breakpoints showed that L1 and Alu elements are responsible for at least 44% of the 252 inversion loci between human and chimpanzee lineages, including 49 RRMI loci. Among them, three RRMI loci inverted exonic regions in known genes, which implicates this mechanism in generating the genomic and phenotypic differences between human and chimpanzee lineages. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of mobile element bases inversion breakpoints between human and chimpanzee lineages, and highlights their role in primate genome evolution.

  7. New insights into human nondisjunction of chromosome 21 in oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Renee Oliver

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Nondisjunction of chromosome 21 is the leading cause of Down syndrome. Two risk factors for maternal nondisjunction of chromosome 21 are increased maternal age and altered recombination. In order to provide further insight on mechanisms underlying nondisjunction, we examined the association between these two well established risk factors for chromosome 21 nondisjunction. In our approach, short tandem repeat markers along chromosome 21 were genotyped in DNA collected from individuals with free trisomy 21 and their parents. This information was used to determine the origin of the nondisjunction error and the maternal recombination profile. We analyzed 615 maternal meiosis I and 253 maternal meiosis II cases stratified by maternal age. The examination of meiosis II errors, the first of its type, suggests that the presence of a single exchange within the pericentromeric region of 21q interacts with maternal age-related risk factors. This observation could be explained in two general ways: 1 a pericentromeric exchange initiates or exacerbates the susceptibility to maternal age risk factors or 2 a pericentromeric exchange protects the bivalent against age-related risk factors allowing proper segregation of homologues at meiosis I, but not segregation of sisters at meiosis II. In contrast, analysis of maternal meiosis I errors indicates that a single telomeric exchange imposes the same risk for nondisjunction, irrespective of the age of the oocyte. Our results emphasize the fact that human nondisjunction is a multifactorial trait that must be dissected into its component parts to identify specific associated risk factors.

  8. The gene for human glutaredoxin (GLRX) is localized to human chromosome 5q14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, C.A.; Holmgren, A. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Bajalica, S.; Lagercrantz, J. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-03-05

    Glutaredoxin is a small protein (12 kDa) catalyzing glutathione-dependent disulfide oxidoreduction reactions in a coupled system with NADPH, GSH, and glutathione reductase. A cDNA encoding the human glutaredoxin gene (HGMW-approved symbol GLRX) has recently been isolated and cloned from a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human genomic library in Charon 4A led to the identification of three genomic clones. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes with one genomic clone as a probe, the human glutaredoxin gene was localized to chromosomal region 5q14. This localization at chromosome 5 was in agreement with the somatic cell hybrid analysis, using DNA from a human-hamster and a human-mouse hybrid panel and using a human glutaredoxin cDNA as a probe. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  9. The X-Linked Hypothesis of Brain Disorders: Can Gender Ratios Tell Us Anything About Cellular Etiology of Neurodegenerative and Psychiatric Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Bodini, Benedetta; Politis, Marios; Pariante, Carmine M; Ciccarelli, Olga; Yeo, Ronald A

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we propose an X-linked hypothesis of brain disorders that postulates a neuronal origin of those neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders with a greater male prevalence. The hypothesis is based on the accumulated genetics and genomic evidence linking X chromosome genes and transcripts to neuronal cells. The behavioral genetics literature has long pointed to the link between postsynaptic protein complexes coded on chromosome X and mental retardation. More recently, novel genomic evidence has emerged of X-linked mRNA overexpression of neuronal source in the human brain. We review the evidence for this hypothesis and its consistency with the distribution across genders of brain disorders of known aetiology. We then provide examples of the utilization of this hypothesis in the investigation of the pathophysiology of complex brain disorders in both the stratification of disease cohorts and the development of realistic preclinical models. We conclude by providing a general framework for testing its validity, which will be exploited in future studies, and provide future directions for research.

  10. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  11. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  12. Human estrogen sulfotransferase gene (STE): Cloning, structure, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Her, Chengtao; Aksoy, I.A.; Weinshilboum, M. [Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Sulfation is an important pathway in the metabolism of estrogens. We recently cloned a human liver estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) cDNA. We have now determined the structure and chromosomal localization of the EST gene, STE, as a step toward molecular genetic studies of the regulation of EST in humans. STE spans approximately 20 kb and consists of 8 exons, ranging in length from 95 to 181 bp. The locations of most exon-intron splice junctions within STE are identical to those found in a human phenol ST (PST) gene, STM, and in a rat PST gene. In addition, the locations of five STE introns are also conserved in the human dehydroepiandrosterone (DBEA) ST gene, STD. The 5{prime} flanking region of STE contains one CCAAT and two TATA sequences. The location of one of the TATA box elements is in excellent agreement with the site of transcription initiation as determined by 5{prime}-rapid amplification of cDNA ends. STE was mapped to human chromosome 4q13.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cloning and structural characterization of STE will now make it possible to study potential molecular genetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of EST in human tissues. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A worldwide phylogeography for the human X chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone S Santos-Lopes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We reasoned that by identifying genetic markers on human X chromosome regions where recombination is rare or absent, we should be able to construct X chromosome genealogies analogous to those based on Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms, with the advantage of providing information about both male and female components of the population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified a 47 Kb interval containing an Alu insertion polymorphism (DXS225 and four microsatellites in complete linkage disequilibrium in a low recombination rate region of the long arm of the human X chromosome. This haplotype block was studied in 667 males from the HGDP-CEPH Human Genome Diversity Panel. The haplotypic diversity was highest in Africa (0.992+/-0.0025 and lowest in the Americas (0.839+/-0.0378, where no insertion alleles of DXS225 were observed. Africa shared few haplotypes with other geographical areas, while those exhibited significant sharing among themselves. Median joining networks revealed that the African haplotypes were numerous, occupied the periphery of the graph and had low frequency, whereas those from the other continents were few, central and had high frequency. Altogether, our data support a single origin of modern man in Africa and migration to occupy the other continents by serial founder effects. Coalescent analysis permitted estimation of the time of the most recent common ancestor as 182,000 years (56,700-479,000 and the estimated time of the DXS225 Alu insertion of 94,400 years (24,300-310,000. These dates are fully compatible with the current widely accepted scenario of the origin of modern mankind in Africa within the last 195,000 years and migration out-of-Africa circa 55,000-65,000 years ago. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A haplotypic block combining an Alu insertion polymorphism and four microsatellite markers on the human X chromosome is a useful marker to evaluate genetic diversity of human populations and

  14. Chromosome surveys of human populations: between epidemiology and anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chadarevian, Soraya

    2014-09-01

    It is commonly held that after 1945 human genetics turned medical and focussed on the individual rather than on the study of human populations that had become discredited. However, a closer look at the research practices at the time quickly reveals that human population studies, using old and new tools, prospered in this period. The essay focuses on the rise of chromosome analysis as a new tool for the study of human populations. It reviews a broad array of population studies ranging from newborn screening programmes to studies of isolated or 'primitive' people. Throughout, it highlights the continuing role of concerns and opportunities raised by the propagation of atomic energy for civilian and military uses, the collection of large data bases and computers, and the role of international organisations like the World Health Organisation and the International Biological Programme in shaping research agendas and carving out a space for human heredity in the postwar era.

  15. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Chromosomes of human sperm: variability among normal individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandriff, B.; Gordon, L.; Ashworth, L.; Watchmaker, G.; Moore, D. II; Wyrobek, A.J.; Carrano, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    The chromosomal constitution of 2468 human sperm cells has been investigated by fusion of human sperm with hamster eggs. The overall frequency of cells with structural aberrations was 7.7%, ranging from 1.9% to 15.8%, and varying significantly among individuals. The highest frequency occurred in sperm from the oldest donor (49 years), who also had had a vasectomy reversal three years prior to sampling. The overall aneuploidy frequency was 1.7%, ranging from 0.6% to 3.1%. In nine out of ten donors from whom blood samples were available the frequency of sperm cells with structural aberrations was higher than that for lymphocytes. Two previously reported donors were resampled after an interval of 14 and 16 months respectively, and were each found to have similar frequencies of sperm chromosome abnormalities at both sampling times. A father-son pair included in the study had several chromosome breakpoints in common, although no more frequency than unrelated individuals. 32 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  17. Non-meiotic chromosome instability in human immature oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daina, Gemma; Ramos, Laia; Rius, Mariona; Obradors, Albert; Del Rey, Javier; Giralt, Magda; Campillo, Mercedes; Velilla, Esther; Pujol, Aïda; Martinez-Pasarell, Olga; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-02-01

    Aneuploidy has been a major issue in human gametes and is closely related to fertility problems, as it is known to be present in cleavage stage embryos and gestational losses. Pre-meiotic chromosome abnormalities in women have been previously described. The aim of this study is to assess the whole-chromosome complement in immature oocytes to find those abnormalities caused by mitotic instability. For this purpose, a total of 157 oocytes at the germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, and discarded from IVF cycles, were analysed by CGH. Fifty-six women, between 18 and 45 years old (mean 32.5 years), including 32 IVF patients (25-45 years of age) and 24 IVF oocyte donors (18-33 years of age), were included in the study. A total of 25/157 (15.9%) of the oocytes analysed, obtained from three IVF clinics, contained chromosome abnormalities, including both aneuploidy (24/157) and structural aberrations (9/157). Independently of the maternal age, the incidence of abnormal oocytes which originated before meiosis is 15.9%, and these imbalances were found in 33.9% of the females studied. This work sheds light on the relevance of mitotic instability responsible for the generation of the abnormalities present in human oocytes.

  18. Variations of X chromosome inactivation occur in early passages of female human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Dvash

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is a dosage compensation mechanism essential for embryonic development and cell physiology. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs derived from inner cell mass (ICM of blastocyst stage embryos have been used as a model system to understand XCI initiation and maintenance. Previous studies of undifferentiated female hESCs at intermediate passages have shown three possible states of XCI; 1 cells in a pre-XCI state, 2 cells that already exhibit XCI, or 3 cells that never undergo XCI even upon differentiation. In this study, XCI status was assayed in ten female hESC lines between passage 5 and 15 to determine whether XCI variations occur in early passages of hESCs. Our results show that three different states of XCI already exist in the early passages of hESC. In addition, we observe one cell line with skewed XCI and preferential expression of X-linked genes from the paternal allele, while another cell line exhibits random XCI. Skewed XCI in undifferentiated hESCs may be due to clonal selection in culture instead of non-random XCI in ICM cells. We also found that XIST promoter methylation is correlated with silencing of XIST transcripts in early passages of hESCs, even in the pre-XCI state. In conclusion, XCI variations already take place in early passages of hESCs, which may be a consequence of in vitro culture selection during the derivation process. Nevertheless, we cannot rule out the possibility that XCI variations in hESCs may reflect heterogeneous XCI states in ICM cells that stochastically give rise to hESCs.

  19. X-chromosome inactivation in monkey embryos and pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masahito; Ma, Hong; Sparman, Michelle L; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Ramsey, Cathy M; Woodward, Joy S; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith R; Wolff, Erin E; Jia, Yibing; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M

    2012-11-15

    Inactivation of one X chromosome in female mammals (XX) compensates for the reduced dosage of X-linked gene expression in males (XY). However, the inner cell mass (ICM) of mouse preimplantation blastocysts and their in vitro counterparts, pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs), initially maintain two active X chromosomes (XaXa). Random X chromosome inactivation (XCI) takes place in the ICM lineage after implantation or upon differentiation of ESCs, resulting in mosaic tissues composed of two cell types carrying either maternal or paternal active X chromosomes. While the status of XCI in human embryos and ICMs remains unknown, majority of human female ESCs show non-random XCI. We demonstrate here that rhesus monkey ESCs also display monoallelic expression and methylation of X-linked genes in agreement with non-random XCI. However, XIST and other X-linked genes were expressed from both chromosomes in isolated female monkey ICMs indicating that ex vivo pluripotent cells retain XaXa. Intriguingly, the trophectoderm (TE) in preimplantation monkey blastocysts also expressed X-linked genes from both alleles suggesting that, unlike the mouse, primate TE lineage does not support imprinted paternal XCI. Our results provide insights into the species-specific nature of XCI in the primate system and reveal fundamental epigenetic differences between in vitro and ex vivo primate pluripotent cells.

  20. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations.

  1. Preleptotene chromosome condensation stage in human foetal and neonatal testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, J M; Devictor, M; Stahl, A

    1977-04-01

    A preleptotene stage of chromosome condensation analogous to that already described in various plants and in the oocytes of several animal species has been observed in the human foetal testis. Contrary to what has been previously described, this stage in the testis is not followed by decondensation leading to leptotene filaments. This observation underlines the problem of the precise significance of this stage and its relation to initiation of meiosis. It is suggested that meiosis may be initiated during this condensation phase and that the male germ cell, despite its XY chromosome constitution, tends to evolve towards meiosis. This proposal pleads in favour of both the role of somatic cells in the inhibition of meiosis in the male foetus and the role of environmental factors rather than genetic constitution of the germ cell in meiotic induction.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked intellectual disability, Siderius type

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Cleft Palate Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Facts About Intellectual Disability (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: Siderius X-linked mental retardation syndrome Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (UK): Cleft Lip and Palate Information Kennedy Krieger ...

  3. Detection and validation of copy number variation in X-linked mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauters, M; Weuts, A; Vandewalle, J; Nevelsteen, J; Marynen, P; Van Esch, H; Froyen, G

    2008-01-01

    Studies to identify the genetic defects associated with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) in males have revealed tens of genes important for normal brain development and cognitive functioning in men. Despite extensive efforts in breakpoint cloning of chromosomal rearrangements and mutation screening of candidate genes on the X chromosome, still many XLMR families and sporadic cases remain unsolved. It is now clear that submicroscopic copy number changes on the X chromosome can explain about 5% of these idiopathic cases. Interestingly, beside gene deletions, an increase in gene dosage due to genomic duplications seems to contribute to causality more often than expected. Since larger duplications on the X chromosome are tolerated compared to deletions, they often harbour more than one gene hampering the identification of the causal gene. In contrast to copy number variations (CNVs) on autosomes, most disease-associated CNVs on the X chromosome in males are inherited from their mothers who normally do not present with any clinical symptoms due to non-random X inactivation. Here, we review the different methods applied to study copy number alterations on the X chromosome in patients with cognitive impairment, discuss those CNVs that are associated with disease and elaborate on the genes and mechanisms involved. At the end, we will resume in vivo assays to study the relation of CNVs on the X chromosome and mental disability.

  4. A systematic, large-scale resequencing screen of X-chromosome coding exons in mental retardation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarpey, P.S.; Smith, R.; Pleasance, E.; Whibley, A.; Edkins, S.; Hardy, C.; O'Meara, S.; Latimer, C.; Dicks, E.; Menzies, A.; Stephens, P.; Blow, M.; Greenman, C.; Xue, Y.; Tyler-Smith, C.; Thompson, D.; Gray, K.; Andrews, J.; Barthorpe, S.; Buck, G.; Cole, J.; Dunmore, R.; Jones, D.; Maddison, M.; Mironenko, T.; Turner, R.; Turrell, K.; Varian, J.; West, S.; Widaa, S.; Wray, P.; Teague, J.; Butler, A.; Jenkinson, A.; Jia, M.; Richardson, D.; Shepherd, R.; Wooster, R.; Tejada, M.I.; Martinez, F.; Carvill, G.; Goliath, R.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Bokhoven, H. van; Esch, H. van; Chelly, J.; Raynaud, M.; Ropers, H.H.; Abidi, F.E.; Srivastava, A.K.; Cox, J.; Luo, Y.; Mallya, U.; Moon, J.; Parnau, J.; Mohammed, S.; Tolmie, J.L.; Shoubridge, C.; Corbett, M.; Gardner, A.; Haan, E.; Rujirabanjerd, S.; Shaw, M.A.; Vandeleur, L.; Fullston, T.; Easton, D.F.; Boyle, J.; Partington, M.; Hackett, A.; Field, M.; Skinner, C.; Stevenson, R.E.; Bobrow, M.; Turner, G.; Schwartz, C.E.; Gecz, J.; Raymond, F.L.; Futreal, P.A.; Stratton, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale systematic resequencing has been proposed as the key future strategy for the discovery of rare, disease-causing sequence variants across the spectrum of human complex disease. We have sequenced the coding exons of the X chromosome in 208 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR),

  5. Sequence and expression analysis of gaps in human chromosome 20

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Seemann, Stefan; Mang, Yuan;

    2012-01-01

    The finished human genome-assemblies comprise several hundred un-sequenced euchromatic gaps, which may be rich in long polypurine/polypyrimidine stretches. Human chromosome 20 (chr 20) currently has three unfinished gaps remaining on its q-arm. All three gaps are within gene-dense regions and....../or overlap disease-associated loci, including the DLGAP4 locus. In this study, we sequenced ~99% of all three unfinished gaps on human chr 20, determined their complete genomic sizes and assessed epigenetic profiles using a combination of Sanger sequencing, mate pair paired-end high-throughput sequencing...... and chromatin, methylation and expression analyses. We found histone 3 trimethylated at Lysine 27 to be distributed across all three gaps in immortalized B-lymphocytes. In one gap, five novel CpG islands were predominantly hypermethylated in genomic DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes and human cerebellum...

  6. X-linked intellectual disability related genes disrupted by balanced X-autosome translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Meloni, Vera Ayres; Di Battista, Adriana; de Mello, Claudia Berlim; Bragagnolo, Silvia; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas; Carvalheira, Gianna Maria; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Detailed molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving X-chromosome has been a key strategy in identifying X-linked intellectual disability-causing genes. We fine-mapped the breakpoints in four women with balanced X-autosome translocations and variable phenotypes, in order to investigate the corresponding genetic contribution to intellectual disability. We addressed the impact of the gene interruptions in transcription and discussed the consequences of their functional impairment in neurodevelopment. Three patients presented with cognitive impairment, reinforcing the association between the disrupted genes (TSPAN7-MRX58, KIAA2022-MRX98, and IL1RAPL1-MRX21/34) and intellectual disability. While gene expression analysis showed absence of TSPAN7 and KIAA2022 expression in the patients, the unexpected expression of IL1RAPL1 suggested a fusion transcript ZNF611-IL1RAPL1 under the control of the ZNF611 promoter, gene disrupted at the autosomal breakpoint. The X-chromosomal breakpoint definition in the fourth patient, a woman with normal intellectual abilities, revealed disruption of the ZDHHC15 gene (MRX91). The expression assays did not detect ZDHHC15 gene expression in the patient, thus questioning its involvement in intellectual disability. Revealing the disruption of an X-linked intellectual disability-related gene in patients with balanced X-autosome translocation is a useful tool for a better characterization of critical genes in neurodevelopment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Human Chromosome 21: Mapping of the chromosomes and cloning of cDNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonarakis, S.E.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the research funded by DOE grant DE-FG02-89ER60857 from 6/15/89 to 8/31/91 was to contribute to the physical mapping of human chromosome 21 (HC21) by cloning large fragments of DNA into Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs) and identify YACs that map on HC21. A total of 54 sequence tagged sites (STS) have been developed and mapped in our laboratory to HC21 and can be used as initial reference points for YAC identification and construction of overlapping clones. A small YAC library was constructed which is HC21 specific. DNA from somatic cell hybrid WAV17 or from flow-sorted HC21 was partially digested with EcoRI, ligated into vectors PJS97, PJS98, and YACs have been obtained with average size insert of more than 300 kb. This library has been deposited in D. Patterson's lab for the Joint YAC screening effort. Additional YAC libraries from ICI Pharmaceuticals or from Los Alamos National Laboratories have been screened with several STS and positive YACs have been identified. Work in progress includes screening of YAC libraries in order to construct overlapping clones, characterization of the cloning ends of YACs, characterization of additional STS and cloning of HC21 specific cDNAs. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Mapping of guanylin to murine chromosome 4 and human chromosome 1p34-p35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciaky, D.; Cohen, M.B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Jenkins, N.A. [Mammalian Genetics Lab., Frederick, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-20

    Guanylin is a 15-amino-acid peptide similar in structure and in function to ST{sub a}, the heat stable enterotoxin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (4). Both guanylin and ST{sub a} bind guanylyl cyclase-C (GC-C), resulting in increased levels of intracellular cGMP and induction of Cl- secretion (4) via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFM) (2). Guanylin is a highly regulated intestinal gene that is differentially expressed along the duodenal-to-colonic and villus-to-crypt axes. Guanylin mRNA abundance is maximal in the distal small intestine and proximal colon, where the mRNA is detected mainly in differentiated villus epithelial cells and superficial colonic epithelial cells, respectively. The murine guanylin gene (Guca2) has been isolated and sequenced; the gene is 1.7 kb and consists of 3 exons. We report here the mapping of Guca2 to mouse chromosome 4 by linkage analysis and to human chromosome region 1p34-p35 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). 20 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Functional gene groups are concentrated within chromosomes, among chromosomes and in the nuclear space of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenin, Annelyse; Ein-Dor, Liat; Ozery-Flato, Michal; Shamir, Ron

    2014-09-01

    Genomes undergo changes in organization as a result of gene duplications, chromosomal rearrangements and local mutations, among other mechanisms. In contrast to prokaryotes, in which genes of a common function are often organized in operons and reside contiguously along the genome, most eukaryotes show much weaker clustering of genes by function, except for few concrete functional groups. We set out to check systematically if there is a relation between gene function and gene organization in the human genome. We test this question for three types of functional groups: pairs of interacting proteins, complexes and pathways. We find a significant concentration of functional groups both in terms of their distance within the same chromosome and in terms of their dispersal over several chromosomes. Moreover, using Hi-C contact map of the tendency of chromosomal segments to appear close in the 3D space of the nucleus, we show that members of the same functional group that reside on distinct chromosomes tend to co-localize in space. The result holds for all three types of functional groups that we tested. Hence, the human genome shows substantial concentration of functional groups within chromosomes and across chromosomes in space.

  10. Chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes exposed to energetic protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and are therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/µm. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy range the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction products such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are energy dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  11. Induction of chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes by fission neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcia Augusta da; Coelho, Paulo Rogerio Pinto; Bartolini, Paolo; Okazaki, Kayo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: kokazaki@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by sparsely ionizing radiation (low-LET) are well known and cytogenetic analyses of irradiated human lymphocytes have been widely applied to biological dosimetry. However, much less is known about chromosome aberrations induced by densely ionizing radiation (high LET), such as that of alpha particles or neutrons. Such particles induce DNA strand breaks, as well as chromosome breakage and rearrangements of high complexity. This damage is more localized and less efficiently repaired than after X- or {gamma}-ray irradiation. This preferential production of complex aberrations by densely ionizing radiation is related to the unique energy deposition patterns, which produces highly localized multiple DNA damage at the chromosomal level. A better knowledge of the interactions between different types of radiation and cellular DNA is of importance, not only from the radiobiological viewpoint but also for dosimetric and therapeutic purposes. The objective of the present study was to analyse the cytogenetic effects of fission neutrons on peripheral blood lymphocytes in order to evaluate structural and numerical aberrations and number of cells in the different mitotic cycles. So, blood samples from five healthy donors, 22-25 years old, of both sexes, were irradiated in the Research Reactor IEA-R1 of our Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP) with thermal and fast neutrons at doses of 0.2; 0.3; 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. The {gamma} contribution to the total absorbed dose was about 30%. These doses were monitored by thermoluminescent dosemeters: LiF-600 (for neutrons) and LiF-700 (for {gamma}-rays). The data concerning structural aberrations were evaluated with regard to three parameters: percentage of cells with aberrations, number of aberrations/cell and number of dicentric/cell. The cytogenetic results showed an increase in the three parameters after irradiation with neutrons, as a function of radiation dose. Apparently, there was no influence of neutrons on the

  12. Transillumination spatially modulated illumination microscopy for human chromosome imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitris, Costas; Heracleous, Peter; Patsalis, Philippos

    2005-03-01

    Human chromosome analysis is an essential task in cytogenetics, especially in prenatal screening, genetic syndrome diagnosis, cancer pathology research and mutagen dosimetry. Chromosomal analysis begins with the creation of a karyotype, which is a layout of chromosome images organized by decreasing size in pairs. Both manual and automatic classification of chromosomes are limited by the resolution of the microscope and imaging system used. One way to improve the results of classification and even detect subtleties now remaining undetected, is to enhance the resolution of the images. It is possible to achieve lateral resolution beyond the classical limit, by using spatially modulated illumination (SMI) in a wide-field, non-confocal microscope. In this case, the sample is illuminated with spatially modulated light, which makes normally inaccessible high-resolution information visible in the observed image by shifting higher frequencies within the OTF limits of the microscope. Although, SMI microscopes have been reported in the past, this manuscript reports the development of a transillumination microscope for opaque, non-fluorescent samples. The illumination path consisted of a light source illuminating a ruled grating which was subsequently imaged on the sample. The grating was mounted on a rotating and translating stage so that the magnification and rotation of the pattern could be adjusted. The imaging lens was a 1.25 NA oil immersion objective. Test samples showed resolution improvement, as judged from a comparison of the experimentally obtained FWHM. Further studies using smaller fringe distance or laser interference pattern illumination will be evaluated to further optimize the SMI results.

  13. Chromosome Aberration in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to a space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/micrometer. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction produces such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are LET dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  14. Transient myelodysplastic syndrome in X-linked agammaglobulinemia with a novel Btk mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Gaurav; Currimbhoy, Zinet

    2008-12-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a rare disorder in which recurrent infections occur due to low serum globulins and circulating B lymphocytes caused by a mutation in the Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) gene. While myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) associated with low B lymphocyte counts has been described, clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in confirmed cases of XLA have never been reported. We describe a case of XLA with a novel Btk mutation who also had a persistent clonal population in the bone marrow with abnormal cytogenetics in multiple chromosomes that resolved 1(1/2) years after treatment with IVIG, mimicking a picture of transient MDS.

  15. Progress towards construction of a total restriction fragment map of a human chromosome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Vissing; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. Solomon; G. Moore; N. Lench; N. Shennan; R. Williamson

    1987-01-01

    textabstractWe present an approach to the construction of an overlapping restriction fragment map of a single human chromosome. A genomic cosmid library genome was constructed from a mouse-human hybrid cell line containing chromosome 17 as its only human genetic component. Cosmids containing human i

  16. High-speed AFM of human chromosomes in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, L. M.; Dunton, P. G.; Ulcinas, A.; Engledew, D. J.; Hoshi, O.; Ushiki, T.; Miles, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    Further developments of the previously reported high-speed contact-mode AFM are described. The technique is applied to the imaging of human chromosomes at video rate both in air and in water. These are the largest structures to have been imaged with high-speed AFM and the first imaging in liquid to be reported. A possible mechanism that allows such high-speed contact-mode imaging without significant damage to the sample is discussed in the context of the velocity dependence of the measured lateral force on the AFM tip.

  17. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease by indirect linkage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgulová, Irena; Putzová, Martina; Soldatova, Inna; Stejskal, David

    2017-08-07

    To present methodical approach of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) as an option for an unaffected pregnancy in reproductive-age couples who have a genetic risk of the X-linked dominant peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease. We performed PGD of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease using haplotyping/indirect linkage analysis, when during analysis we reach to exclude embryos that carry a high-risk haplotype linked to the causal mutation p.Leu9Phe in the GJB1 gene. Within the PGD cycle, we examined 4 blastomeres biopsied from cleavage-stage embryos and recommended 3 embryos for transfer. Two embryos were implanted into the uterus; however, it resulted in a singleton pregnancy with a male descendant. Three years later, the couple returned again with spontaneous gravidity. A chorionic biopsy examination of this gravidity ascertained the female sex and a pericentric inversion of chromosome 5 in 70% of the cultivated foetal cells. Using indirect linkage analysis, PGD may help to identify genetic X-linked defects within embryos during screening, thereby circumventing the potential problems with abortion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. X-linked cataract and Nance-Horan syndrome are allelic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, Margherita; Brooks, Simon P.; Webb, Tom R.; Christodoulou, Katja; Wozniak, Izabella O.; Murday, Victoria; Balicki, Martha; Yee, Harris A.; Wangensteen, Teresia; Riise, Ruth; Saggar, Anand K.; Park, Soo-Mi; Kanuga, Naheed; Francis, Peter J.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle M.; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2009-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked developmental disorder characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism and, in some cases, mental retardation. Protein truncation mutations in a novel gene (NHS) have been identified in patients with this syndrome. We previously mapped X-linked congenital cataract (CXN) in one family to an interval on chromosome Xp22.13 which encompasses the NHS locus; however, no mutations were identified in the NHS gene. In this study, we show that NHS and X-linked cataract are allelic diseases. Two CXN families, which were negative for mutations in the NHS gene, were further analysed using array comparative genomic hybridization. CXN was found to be caused by novel copy number variations: a complex duplication–triplication re-arrangement and an intragenic deletion, predicted to result in altered transcriptional regulation of the NHS gene. Furthermore, we also describe the clinical and molecular analysis of seven families diagnosed with NHS, identifying four novel protein truncation mutations and a novel large deletion encompassing the majority of the NHS gene, all leading to no functional protein. We therefore show that different mechanisms, aberrant transcription of the NHS gene or no functional NHS protein, lead to different diseases. Our data highlight the importance of copy number variation and non-recurrent re-arrangements leading to different severity of disease and describe the potential mechanisms involved. PMID:19414485

  20. Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) in humans; are there B chromosomes hidden among them

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie Caroline; Kosyakova Nadezda; Mrasek Kristin; Liehr Thomas; Vermeesch Joris; Trifonov Vladimir; Rubtsov Nikolai

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) and B-chromosomes represent a heterogeneous collection of chromosomes added to the typical karyotype, and which are both small in size. They may consist of heterochromatic and/or euchromatic material. Also a predominance of maternal transmission was reported for both groups. Even though sSMC and B-chromosomes show some similarity it is still an open question if B-chromosomes are present among the heterogeneous group of sSMC. Ac...

  1. Extracellular matrix mineralization in periodontal tissues: Noncollagenous matrix proteins, enzymes, and relationship to hypophosphatasia and X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Marc D; Hoac, Betty; Addison, William N; Barros, Nilana M T; Millán, José L; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    As broadly demonstrated for the formation of a functional skeleton, proper mineralization of periodontal alveolar bone and teeth - where calcium phosphate crystals are deposited and grow within an extracellular matrix - is essential for dental function. Mineralization defects in tooth dentin and cementum of the periodontium invariably lead to a weak (soft or brittle) dentition in which teeth become loose and prone to infection and are lost prematurely. Mineralization of the extremities of periodontal ligament fibers (Sharpey's fibers) where they insert into tooth cementum and alveolar bone is also essential for the function of the tooth-suspensory apparatus in occlusion and mastication. Molecular determinants of mineralization in these tissues include mineral ion concentrations (phosphate and calcium), pyrophosphate, small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins and matrix vesicles. Amongst the enzymes important in regulating these mineralization determinants, two are discussed at length here, with clinical examples given, namely tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase and phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome. Inactivating mutations in these enzymes in humans and in mouse models lead to the soft bones and teeth characteristic of hypophosphatasia and X-linked hypophosphatemia, respectively, where the levels of local and systemic circulating mineralization determinants are perturbed. In X-linked hypophosphatemia, in addition to renal phosphate wasting causing low circulating phosphate levels, phosphorylated mineralization-regulating small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins, such as matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein and osteopontin, and the phosphorylated peptides proteolytically released from them, such as the acidic serine- and aspartate-rich-motif peptide, may accumulate locally to impair mineralization in this disease.

  2. Molecular cytogenetics of human germ cell tumours : i(12p) and related chromosomal anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts van Kessel, A; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Sinke, R J; Looijenga, L; Oosterhuis, J W; de Jong, B

    1993-01-01

    Human testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) comprise a heterogeneous group of solid neoplasms. These tumours are characterized by a highly specific chromosomal anomaly, i.e. an isochromosome of the short arm of chromosome 12. At present, this i(12p) chromosome has been observed in about 80% of TGCTs.

  3. Isolation and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 20-specific alpha-satellite DNA clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, A; Archidiacono, N; Carbone, R; Bolino, A; Shridhar, V; Miller, O J; Miller, D A; Ward, D C; Rocchi, M

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a human genomic DNA clone (PZ20, locus D20Z2) that identifies, under high-stringency hybridization conditions, an alphoid DNA subset specific for chromosome 20. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Sequence analysis confirmed our previously reported data on the great similarity between the chromosome 20 and chromosome 2 alphoid subsets. Comparative mapping of pZ20 on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes, also performed under high-stringency conditions, indicates that the alphoid subset has ancestral sequences on chimpanzee chromosome 11 and gorilla chromosome 19. However, no hybridization was observed to chromosomes 21 in the great apes, the homolog of human chromosome 20.

  4. H4K20me1 contributes to downregulation of X-linked genes for C. elegans dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielle, Anne; Lang, Jackie; Dong, Yan; Ercan, Sevinc; Kotwaliwale, Chitra; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Appert, Alex; Chen, Q Brent; Dose, Andrea; Egelhofer, Thea; Kimura, Hiroshi; Stempor, Przemyslaw; Dernburg, Abby; Lieb, Jason D; Strome, Susan; Ahringer, Julie

    2012-09-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans dosage compensation complex (DCC) equalizes X-chromosome gene dosage between XO males and XX hermaphrodites by two-fold repression of X-linked gene expression in hermaphrodites. The DCC localizes to the X chromosomes in hermaphrodites but not in males, and some subunits form a complex homologous to condensin. The mechanism by which the DCC downregulates gene expression remains unclear. Here we show that the DCC controls the methylation state of lysine 20 of histone H4, leading to higher H4K20me1 and lower H4K20me3 levels on the X chromosomes of XX hermaphrodites relative to autosomes. We identify the PR-SET7 ortholog SET-1 and the Suv4-20 ortholog SET-4 as the major histone methyltransferases for monomethylation and di/trimethylation of H4K20, respectively, and provide evidence that X-chromosome enrichment of H4K20me1 involves inhibition of SET-4 activity on the X. RNAi knockdown of set-1 results in synthetic lethality with dosage compensation mutants and upregulation of X-linked gene expression, supporting a model whereby H4K20me1 functions with the condensin-like C. elegans DCC to repress transcription of X-linked genes. H4K20me1 is important for mitotic chromosome condensation in mammals, suggesting that increased H4K20me1 on the X may restrict access of the transcription machinery to X-linked genes via chromatin compaction.

  5. 125 INCOMPLETE COMPENSATORY UP-REGULATION OF X-LINKED GENES IN BOVINE GERMLINE, EARLY EMBRYOS, AND SOMATIC TISSUES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, J; Jue, N K; Jiang, Z; O'Neill, R; Wolf, E; Blomberg, L A; Dong, H; Zheng, X; Chen, J; Tian, X

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of a proper gene dosage is essential in cellular networks. To resolve the dosage imbalance between eutherian females (XX) and male (XY), X chromosome inactivation (XCI) occurs in females, while X-chromosome dosage compensation up-regulates the active X to balance its expression with that of autosome pairs [Ohno's hypothesis; Ohno 1967 Sex Chromosomes and Sex-linked Genes (Springer-Verlag), p. 99]. These phenomena have been well studied in humans and mice, despite many controversies over the existence of such up-regulation. Using RNA sequencing data, we determined X chromosome dosage compensation in the bovine by analysing the global expression profiles of germ cells, embryos, and somatic tissues. Eight bovine RNA-seq data sets were obtained in from the Gene Expression Omnibus, covering bovine immature/mature oocytes (GSE59186 and GSE52415), pre-implantation conceptuses (GSE59186, GSE52415, and GSE56513), extra-embryonic tissues (PRJNA229443), and male/female somatic tissues (GSE74076, GSE63509, PRJEB6377, and GSE65125). The RNAseq data were trimmed and non-uniquely (paralogs included) mapped to the bovine reference genome assembly UMD3.1.1 using Hisat2 (version 2.0.5) aligner. The mRNA level of each gene, estimated by transformed transcripts per kilobase million was quantified by IsoEM (version 1.1.5). These RNA-seq data sets represented 4 chromosome scenarios in cells: XXXX:AAAA (diploid immature oocyte with DNA duplication), XX:AA (haploid mature oocyte with DNA duplication), XX:AA and X:AA (gradual changed X status in bovine pre-implantation conceptuses), and X:AA (extra-embryonic tissues and somatic cells in female with one active X or XY male) were analysed for dosage compensation. A total of 959 X-linked genes and 20,316 autosome genes were used to calculate the relative X to autosomal gene (A) expression (RXE): log2 (X expression) - log2 (A expression). The following dosage determinations were made: RXE values ≥ 0: complete dosage

  6. Chromosomal mapping of 18S-28S rRNA genes and 10 cDNA clones of human chromosome 1 in the musk shrew (Suncus murinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroiwa, A; Matsubara, K; Nagase, T; Nomura, N; Seong, J K; Ishikawa, A; Anunciado, R V; Tanaka, K; Yamagata, T; Masangkay, J S; Dang, V B; Namikawa, T; Matsuda, Y

    2001-01-01

    The direct R-banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method was used to map 18S-28S ribosomal RNA genes and 10 human cDNA clones on the chromosomes of the musk shrew (Suncus murinus). The chromosomal locations of 18S-28S ribosomal RNA genes were examined in the five laboratory lines and wild animals captured in the Philippines and Vietnam, and the genes were found on chromosomes 5, 6, 9, and 13 with geographic variation. The comparative mapping of 10 cDNA clones of human chromosome 1 demonstrated that human chromosome 1 consisted of at least three segments homologous to Suncus chromosomes (chromosomes 7, 10, and 14). This approach with the direct R-banding FISH method is useful for constructing comparative maps between human and insectivore species and for explicating the process of chromosomal rearrangements during the evolution of mammals.

  7. Copy number gain of VCX, X-linked multi-copy gene, leads to cell proliferation and apoptosis during spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Juan; Qin, Yufeng; Wang, Rong; Huang, Zhenyao; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ran; Song, Ling; Ling, Xiufeng; Hu, Zhibin; Miao, Dengshun; Shen, Hongbing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Lu, Chuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Male factor infertility affects one-sixth of couples worldwide, and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms. In recent years there has been increasing evidence to implicate the participation of X chromosome in the process of spermatogenesis. To uncover the roles of X-linked multi-copy genes in spermatogenesis, we performed systematic analysis of X-linked gene copy number variations (CNVs) and Y chromosome haplogrouping in 447 idiopathic NOA patients and 485 healthy controls. Interestingly, the frequency of individuals with abnormal level copy of Variable charge, X-linked (VCX) was significantly different between cases and controls after multiple test correction (p = 5.10 × 10−5). To discriminate the effect of gain/loss copies in these genes, we analyzed the frequency of X-linked multi-copy genes in subjects among subdivided groups. Our results demonstrated that individuals with increased copy numbers of Nuclear RNA export factor 2 (NXF2) (p = 9.21 × 10−8) and VCX (p = 1.97 × 10−4) conferred the risk of NOA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that increasing copy number of VCX could upregulate the gene expression and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our study establishes a robust association between the VCX CNVs and NOA risk. PMID:27705943

  8. Copy number gain of VCX, X-linked multi-copy gene, leads to cell proliferation and apoptosis during spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Juan; Qin, Yufeng; Wang, Rong; Huang, Zhenyao; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ran; Song, Ling; Ling, Xiufeng; Hu, Zhibin; Miao, Dengshun; Shen, Hongbing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Lu, Chuncheng

    2016-11-29

    Male factor infertility affects one-sixth of couples worldwide, and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms. In recent years there has been increasing evidence to implicate the participation of X chromosome in the process of spermatogenesis. To uncover the roles of X-linked multi-copy genes in spermatogenesis, we performed systematic analysis of X-linked gene copy number variations (CNVs) and Y chromosome haplogrouping in 447 idiopathic NOA patients and 485 healthy controls. Interestingly, the frequency of individuals with abnormal level copy of Variable charge, X-linked (VCX) was significantly different between cases and controls after multiple test correction (p = 5.10 × 10-5). To discriminate the effect of gain/loss copies in these genes, we analyzed the frequency of X-linked multi-copy genes in subjects among subdivided groups. Our results demonstrated that individuals with increased copy numbers of Nuclear RNA export factor 2 (NXF2) (p = 9.21 × 10-8) and VCX (p = 1.97 × 10-4) conferred the risk of NOA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that increasing copy number of VCX could upregulate the gene expression and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our study establishes a robust association between the VCX CNVs and NOA risk.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome Printable PDF Open ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome is an inherited ...

  10. A linkage map of mouse chromosome 8: further definition of homologous linkage relationships between mouse chromosome 8 and human chromosomes 8, 16, and 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, T A; Rochelle, J M; Saunders, A M; Seldin, M F

    1991-05-01

    Using an interspecific cross, a mouse chromosome 8 linkage map spanning 72 cM has been defined by the segregation of restriction fragment length variants. Linkage and genetic distance were established for 10 loci by analysis of 114 meiotic events and indicated the following gene order: (centromere)-Insr-3.5 cM-Plat-26.3 cM-Crryps/Mel/Jund-3.5 cM-Junb/Ucp-10.5 cM-Mt-1-27.2 cM-Acta2-0.9 cM-Aprt. These data provide further definition of mouse chromosome 8 linkage relationships and the relationship between segments of this chromosome and human chromosomes 8, 16, and 19.

  11. Staining and embedding of human chromosomes for 3-d serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Mohammed; Chen, Bo; Hashimoto, Teruo; Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Thompson, George; Robinson, Ian

    2014-12-01

    The high-order structure of human chromosomes is an important biological question that is still under investigation. Studies have been done on imaging human mitotic chromosomes using mostly 2-D microscopy methods. To image micron-sized human chromosomes in 3-D, we developed a procedure for preparing samples for serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM). Polyamine chromosomes are first separated using a simple filtration method and then stained with heavy metal. We show that the DNA-specific platinum blue provides higher contrast than osmium tetroxide. A two-step procedure for embedding chromosomes in resin is then used to concentrate the chromosome samples. After stacking the SBFSEM images, a familiar X-shaped chromosome was observed in 3-D.

  12. Autism and X-linked hypophosphatemia: A possible association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Vermeersch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We herein report the joint occurrence of an autistic disorder (AD and X-linked hypophosphatemia. X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH, an X-linked dominant disorder, is the most common of the inherited renal phosphate wasting disorders. Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder that occurs mainly due to genetic causes. In approximately 6-15% of cases, the autistic phenotype is a part of a broader genetic condition called syndromic autism. Therefore, reports of cases with the joint occurrence of a known genetic syndrome and a diagnosis of ASD by a child psychiatrist are relevant. A joint occurrence does not, however, mean that there is always a causal link between the genetic syndrome and the autistic behavioural phenotype. In this case, there are a number of arguments countering a causal link.

  13. Independent intrachromosomal recombination events underlie the pericentric inversions of chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes homologous to human chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goidts, Violaine; Szamalek, Justyna M; de Jong, Pieter J; Cooper, David N; Chuzhanova, Nadia; Hameister, Horst; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2005-09-01

    Analyses of chromosomal rearrangements that have occurred during the evolution of the hominoids can reveal much about the mutational mechanisms underlying primate chromosome evolution. We characterized the breakpoints of the pericentric inversion of chimpanzee chromosome 18 (PTR XVI), which is homologous to human chromosome 16 (HSA 16). A conserved 23-kb inverted repeat composed of satellites, LINE and Alu elements was identified near the breakpoints and could have mediated the inversion by bringing the chromosomal arms into close proximity with each other, thereby facilitating intrachromosomal recombination. The exact positions of the breakpoints may then have been determined by local DNA sequence homologies between the inversion breakpoints, including a 22-base pair direct repeat. The similarly located pericentric inversion of gorilla (GGO) chromosome XVI, was studied by FISH and PCR analysis. The p- and q-arm breakpoints of the inversions in PTR XVI and GGO XVI were found to occur at slightly different locations, consistent with their independent origin. Further, FISH studies of the homologous chromosomal regions in macaque and orangutan revealed that the region represented by HSA BAC RP11-696P19, which spans the inversion breakpoint on HSA 16q11-12, was derived from the ancestral primate chromosome homologous to HSA 1. After the divergence of orangutan from the other great apes approximately 12 million years ago (Mya), a duplication of the corresponding region occurred followed by its interchromosomal transposition to the ancestral chromosome 16q. Thus, the most parsimonious interpretation is that the gorilla and chimpanzee homologs exhibit similar but nonidentical derived pericentric inversions, whereas HSA 16 represents the ancestral form among hominoids.

  14. Assessment of aneuploidy in human oocytes and preimplantation embryos by chromosome painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougier, N.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.; Plachot, M. [Hospital Necker, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The poor quality of chromosome preparations often observed after fixation of oocytes and embryos did not usually allow accurate identification of chromosomes involved in non-disjunctions. We, therefore, used chromosome painting to determine the incidence of abnormalities for chromosomes 1 and 7. A total of 50 oocytes inseminated for IVF and showing no signs of fertilization as well as 37 diploid embryos donated for research were fixed according to the Dyban`s technique. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was carried out using whole chromosome painting DNA probes specific for human chromosome 1 and 7. The incidence of aneuploidy was 28%, 10% and 60% for metaphase II, polar body and sperm chromosomes, respectively. The high incidence of aneuploidy observed in sperm prematurely condensed sperm chromosomes is due to the fact that usually far less than 23 sperm chromatids are observed, maybe as a consequence of incomplete chromosome condensation. Thirty seven embryos were analyzed with the same probes. 48% of early embryos were either monosomic 1 or 7 or mosaics comprising blastomeres with 1, 2 or 3 signals. Thus, 8 among the 11 abnormal embryos had hypodiploid cells (25 to 37 chromosomes) indicating either an artefactual loss of chromosomes or a complex anomaly of nuclear division (maltinucleated blastomeres, abnormal migration of chromosomes at anaphase). We therefore calculated a {open_quotes}corrected{close_quotes} incidence of aneuploidy for chromosomes 1 or 7 in early embryos: 18%. 86% of the blastocysts showed mosaicism 2n/3 or 4n as a consequence of the formation of the syncitiotrophoblast. To conclude, chromosome painting is an efficient method to accurately identify chromosomes involved in aneuploidy. This technique should allow us to evaluate the incidence of non-disjunction for all chromosome pairs. Our results confirm the high incidence of chromosome abnormalities occurring as a consequence of meiotic or mitotic non-disjunctions in human oocytes and embryos.

  15. A new nonsyndromic X-linked sensorineural hearing impairment linked to Xp21.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Pikus, A.T.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.; Skarka, H.; Wilcox, E.R. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-10-01

    X-linked deafness is a rare cause of hereditary hearing impairment. We have identified a family with X-linked dominant sensorineural hearing impairment, characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in carrier females, that is linked to the Xp21.2, which contains the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus. The auditory impairment in affected males was congenital, bilateral, profound, sensorineural, affecting all frequencies, and without evidence of radiographic abnormality of the temporal bone. Adult carrier females manifested bilateral, mild-to-moderate high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment of delayed onset during adulthood. Eighteen commercially available polymorphic markers from the X chromosome, generating a 10-15-cM map, were initially used for identification of a candidate region. DXS997, located within the DMD gene, generated a two-point LOD score of 2.91 at {theta} = 0, with every carrier mother heterozygous at this locus. Recombination events at DXS992 (located within the DMD locus, 3{prime} to exon 50 of the dystrophin gene) and at DXS1068 (5{prime} to the brain promoter of the dystrophin gene) were observed. No recombination events were noted with the following markers within the DMD locus: 5{prime}DYS II, intron 44, DXS997, and intron 50. There was no clinical evidence of Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy in any family member. It is likely that this family represents a new locus on the X chromosome, which when mutated results in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and is distinct from the heterogeneous group of X-linked hearing losses that have been previously described. 57 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Connexin mutations in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergoffen, J. (Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical School, Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Scherer, S.S.; Wang, S.; Scott, M.; Bone, L.J.; Chen, K.; Lensch, M.W.; Fischbeck, K.H. (Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical School, PA (United States)); Paul, D.L. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Change, P.F. (Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical School and Neurology Division, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1993-12-24

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) is a form of hereditary neuropathy with demyelination. Recently, this disorder was mapped to chromosome Xq13.1. The gene for the gap junction protein connexin32 is located in the same chromosomal segment, which led to its consideration as a candidate gene for CMTX. With the use of Northern (RNA) blot and immunohistochemistry techniques, it was found that connexin32 is normally expressed in myelinated peripheral nerve. Direct sequencing of the connexin32 gene showed seven different mutations in affected persons from eight CMTX families. These findings, a demonstration of inherited defects in a gap junction protein, suggest that connexin32 plays an important role in peripheral nerve.

  17. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalmers, R.M.; Davis, M.B.; Sweeney, M.G.; Wood, N.W.; Harding, A.E. [Inst. of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affected females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. [DIAGNOSTIC VARIATIONS OF X-LINKED MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY WITH CONTRACTURES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R; Gugutsidze, D; Khizanishvili, N

    2015-01-01

    Case report with review describes X-linked muscular dystrophy with contractures in 28 years old man and his cousin. The disease revealed itself in an early stage (age 5-10), the process was progressing with apparent tendons retraction and contraction, limited movement in the areas of the neck and back of spine, atrophy of shoulder and pelvic yard and back muscles. Intellect was intact. Cardyomyopathy was exhibited. CK was normal. EMG showed classic myopathic features. Muscle biopsy showed different caliber groups of muscle fibers, growth of endo-perimesial connective tissue. Clinical manifestations together with electrophysiological and histological data suggest consistency with Rotthauwe-Mortier-Bayer X-linked muscular dystrophy.

  19. Clinical patterns of X linked agammaglobulinemia in Malaysian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, L M; Ismail, Z; Zainudin, B M; Low, S M; Azizi, B H; Noah, R M; Nasaruddin, B A

    1995-06-01

    X linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is rarely reported from developing countries especially from South East Asia. It appears that X linked agammaglobulinemia is less common in certain ethnic groups. It is very uncommon in black people in USA and South Africa. In multiracial Malaysia we have documented five XLA in Malays and Indians but not in the Chinese that constitute about 31% of the population. First degree relatives afflicted with XLA or other primary immunodeficiencies occurred more often in our study. All showed lung involvement although the etiologic organisms involved were atypical, being Gram negative.

  20. Linkage localization of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergoffen, J. (Children' s Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States) Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)); Trofatter, J.; Haines, J.L. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (United States)); Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)); Chance, P.F. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)); Fischbeck, K.H. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is a heterogeneous group of slowly progressive, degenerative disorders of peripheral nerve. X-linked CMT (CMTX) (McKusick 302800), a subdivision of type I, or demyelinating, CMT is an X-linked dominant condition with variable penetrance. Previous linkage analysis using RFLPs demonstrated linkage to markers on the proximal long and short arms of the X chromosome, with the more likely localization on the proximal long arm of the X chromosome. Available variable simple-sequence repeats (VSSRs) broaden the possibilities for linkage analysis. This paper presents new linkage data and recombination analysis derived from work with four VSSR markers - AR, PGKP1, DXS453, and DXYS1X - in addition to analysis using RFLP markers described elsewhere. These studies localize the CMTX gene to the proximal Xq segment between PGKP1 (Xq11.2-12) and DXS72 (Xq21.1), with a combined maximum multipoint lod score of 15.3 at DXS453 ([theta] = 0). 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. A sex-ratio meiotic drive system in Drosophila simulans. II: an X-linked distorter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Tao

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes creates a genetic condition favoring the invasion of sex-ratio meiotic drive elements, resulting in the biased transmission of one sex chromosome over the other, in violation of Mendel's first law. The molecular mechanisms of sex-ratio meiotic drive may therefore help us to understand the evolutionary forces shaping the meiotic behavior of the sex chromosomes. Here we characterize a sex-ratio distorter on the X chromosome (Dox in Drosophila simulans by genetic and molecular means. Intriguingly, Dox has very limited coding capacity. It evolved from another X-linked gene, which also evolved de nova. Through retrotransposition, Dox also gave rise to an autosomal suppressor, not much yang (Nmy. An RNA interference mechanism seems to be involved in the suppression of the Dox distorter by the Nmy suppressor. Double mutant males of the genotype dox; nmy are normal for both sex-ratio and spermatogenesis. We postulate that recurrent bouts of sex-ratio meiotic drive and its subsequent suppression might underlie several common features observed in the heterogametic sex, including meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and achiasmy.

  2. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  3. A comparative of G-banded chromosome of Assam Macaque (Macaca assamensis and relationship to human (Homo sapiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunjongrat, R.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This research was the first to report a comparative analysis of G-banded chromosome of Assam macaque, Macaca assamensis (Primate, Cercopithecidae and relationship to human, Homo sapiens (Primate, Hominidae. Blood samples were taken from two males and two females held captive in Nakhonratchasima Zoo and Songkla Zoo. After the standard whole blood lymphocyte culture at 37ºC for 72 hr in presence of colchicine, metaphase spreads were performed on microscopic slides and air-dried. G-banding technique was applied to stain the chromosomes. The results showed that the number of diploid chromosomes of Assam macaque was 2n = 42. The type of autosomes are 18 metacentric and 22 submetacentric chromosomes. In addition, a pair of short arm chromosome 13 showed clearly observable satellite chromosome. X-chromosome was the submetacentric and Y chromosome was the smallest telocentric chromosome. We found that chromosome 5, 12, 13, 19 and X had the same G-banding patterns as those of human chromosomes. The short arm of chromosome 13 is similar to the chromosome 22 of human as indicated by G-banding techniques. In addition, the long arm of chromosome 13 is similar to the chromosome 15 of human. These results indicate that the chromosome 13 of the Assam macaque was split into 2 chromosomes. Chromosome 1, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 17 and 20 are similar to those of human chromosomes. This study suggest that the chromosome 1 is a pericentric inversion of human chromosome 1. Chromosomes 2, 4, 15, 16, 18 and Y are different from those of human chromosomes. These results show the evolutionary relationship between the Assam macaque and human.

  4. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage anal...

  5. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aiuto, L; Antonacci, R; Marzella, R; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M

    1993-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed.

  6. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  7. The Human Proteome Organization Chromosome 6 Consortium: integrating chromosome-centric and biology/disease driven strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, C H; Kast, J; Foster, L J; Siu, K W M; Overall, C M; Binkowski, T A; Hildebrand, W H; Scherer, A; Mansoor, M; Keown, P A

    2014-04-04

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) is designed to generate a comprehensive map of the protein-based molecular architecture of the human body, to provide a resource to help elucidate biological and molecular function, and to advance diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Within this framework, the chromosome-based HPP (C-HPP) has allocated responsibility for mapping individual chromosomes by country or region, while the biology/disease HPP (B/D-HPP) coordinates these teams in cross-functional disease-based groups. Chromosome 6 (Ch6) provides an excellent model for integration of these two tasks. This metacentric chromosome has a complement of 1002-1034 genes that code for known, novel or putative proteins. Ch6 is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, many with high population prevalence, devastating clinical impact and profound societal consequences. The unique combination of genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, phenomic and health services data being drawn together within the Ch6 program has enormous potential to advance personalized medicine by promoting robust biomarkers, subunit vaccines and new drug targets. The strong liaison between the clinical and laboratory teams, and the structured framework for technology transfer and health policy decisions within Canada will increase the speed and efficacy of this transition, and the value of this translational research. Canada has been selected to play a leading role in the international Human Proteome Project, the global counterpart of the Human Genome Project designed to understand the structure and function of the human proteome in health and disease. Canada will lead an international team focusing on chromosome 6, which is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, including immune and inflammatory disorders affecting the brain, skeletal system, heart and blood vessels, lungs, kidney, liver, gastrointestinal tract and endocrine system. Many of these chronic and persistent

  8. Cell-autonomous correction of ring chromosomes in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershteyn, Marina; Hayashi, Yohei; Desachy, Guillaume; Hsiao, Edward C.; Sami, Salma; Tsang, Kathryn M.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Ring chromosomes are structural aberrations commonly associated with birth defects, mental disabilities and growth retardation. Rings form after fusion of the long and short arms of a chromosome, and are sometimes associated with large terminal deletions. Owing to the severity of these large aberrations that can affect multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have been proposed. During cell division, ring chromosomes can exhibit unstable behaviour leading to continuous production of aneuploid progeny with low viability and high cellular death rate. The overall consequences of this chromosomal instability have been largely unexplored in experimental model systems. Here we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient fibroblasts containing ring chromosomes with large deletions and found that reprogrammed cells lost the abnormal chromosome and duplicated the wild-type homologue through the compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD) mechanism. The karyotypically normal iPSCs with isodisomy for the corrected chromosome outgrew co-existing aneuploid populations, enabling rapid and efficient isolation of patient-derived iPSCs devoid of the original chromosomal aberration. Our results suggest a fundamentally different function for cellular reprogramming as a means of `chromosome therapy' to reverse combined loss-of-function across many genes in cells with large-scale aberrations involving ring structures. In addition, our work provides an experimentally tractable human cellular system for studying mechanisms of chromosomal number control, which is of critical relevance to human development and disease.

  9. The localization of a gene causing X-linked cleft palate and ankyloglossia (CPX) in an Icelandic kindred is between DXS326 and DXYS1X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanier, P; Forbes, S A; Arnason, A; Bjornsson, A; Sveinbjornsdottir, E; Williamson, R; Moore, G

    1993-09-01

    The locus responsible for X-linked, nonsyndromic cleft palate and/or ankyloglossia (CPX) has previously been mapped to the proximal long arm of the human X chromosome between Xq21.31 and q21.33 in an Icelandic kindred. We have extended these studies by analyzing an additional 14 informative markers in the family as well as including several newly investigated family members. Recombination analysis indicates that the CPX locus is more proximal than previously thought, within the interval Xq21.1-q21.31. Two recombinants place DXYS1X as the distal flanking marker, while one recombinant defines DXS326 as the proximal flanking marker, an interval of less than 5 cM. Each of the flanking markers recombines with the CPX locus, giving 2-point lod scores of Zmax = 4.16 at theta = 0.08 (DXS326) and Zmax = 5.80 at theta = 0.06 (DXYS1X).

  10. Human nucleolus organizers on nonhomologous chromosomes can share the same ribosomal gene variants.

    OpenAIRE

    Krystal, M; D'Eustachio, P; Ruddle, F H; Arnheim, N

    1981-01-01

    The distributions of three human ribosomal gene polymorphisms among individual chromosomes containing nucleolus organizers were analyzed by using mouse--human hybrid cells. Different nucleolus organizers can contain the same variant, suggesting the occurrence of genetic exchanges among ribosomal gene clusters on nonhomologous chromosomes. Such exchanges appear to occur less frequently in mice. This difference is discussed in terms of the nucleolar organization and chromosomal location of ribo...

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm: comparisons among four healthy men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandriff, B.; Gordon, L.; Ashworth, L.; Watchmaker, G.; Carrano, A.; Wyrobek, A.

    1984-01-01

    The human-sperm/hamster-egg system has been used to compare the frequencies of structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations in 909 sperm karyotypes from four normal healthy men. The frequency of structural aberrations was 1.3, 4.8, 9.0, and 10.4% respectively in the four donors. Certain specific breakpoints were seen twice or even three times in three of the donors. The incidence of aneuploidy was 1.3, 1.4, 1.4, and 1.9%. In three donors the frequencies of structural aberrations were significantly higher in sperm than in lymphocytes from the same man. X-to-Y ratios did not differ significantly from the expected 50:50. 37 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  12. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all publishe...

  13. Multiple colorectal neoplasms in X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Tytgat, Kristien M. A. J.; Viorsink, Folkert H. M.; Sinke, Richard J.; Ten Berge, Ineke J. N.; Giardiello, Francis M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Keller, Josbert J.

    2008-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by germline mutation of the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. It is characterized by disturbed B-cell development, decreased immunoglobulin levels, and increased patient susceptibility to infection. An increased risk of

  14. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked creatine deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4159.2010.06935.x. Epub 2010 Aug 25. Review. Citation on PubMed Clark AJ, Rosenberg EH, Almeida LS, Wood TC, Jakobs C, Stevenson RE, Schwartz CE, Salomons GS. X-linked creatine transporter (SLC6A8) mutations in about 1% of males with mental retardation of unknown etiology. Hum Genet. 2006 Jul;119( ...

  15. Multiple colorectal neoplasms in X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Tytgat, Kristien M. A. J.; Viorsink, Folkert H. M.; Sinke, Richard J.; Ten Berge, Ineke J. N.; Giardiello, Francis M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Keller, Josbert J.

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder caused by germline mutation of the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. It is characterized by disturbed B-cell development, decreased immunoglobulin levels, and increased patient susceptibility to infection. An increased risk of

  16. Chromosomal localization of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene to human chromosome 4q13. 1-q21. 1 and mouse chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, U.B.; Dushkin, H.; Beier, D.R.; Chin, W.W. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Altherr, M.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GRHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor on the cell surface of pituitary gonadotropes, where it serves to transduce signals from the extracellular ligand, the hypothalamic factor gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and to modulate the synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. The authors have localized the GRHR gene to the q13.1-q21.1 region of the human chromosome 4 using mapping panels of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids containing different human chromosomes or different regions of human chromosome 4. Furthermore, using linkage analysis of single-strand conformational polymorphisms, the murine GRHR gene was localized to mouse chromosome 5, linked to the endogenous retroviral marker Pmv-11. This is consistent with the evolutionary conservation of homology between these two regions, as has been previously suggested from comparative mapping of several other loci. The localization of the GRHR gene may be useful in the study of disorders of reproduction. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Similar Levels of X-linked and Autosomal Nucleotide Variation in African and non-African populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Jeffrey D

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Levels of molecular diversity in Drosophila have repeatedly been shown to be higher in ancestral, African populations than in derived, non-African populations. This pattern holds for both coding and noncoding regions for a variety of molecular markers including single nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites. Comparisons of X-linked and autosomal diversity have yielded results largely dependent on population of origin. Results In an attempt to further elucidate patterns of sequence diversity in Drosophila melanogaster, we studied nucleotide variation at putatively nonfunctional X-linked and autosomal loci in sub-Saharan African and North American strains of D. melanogaster. We combine our experimental results with data from previous studies of molecular polymorphism in this species. We confirm that levels of diversity are consistently higher in African versus North American strains. The relative reduction of diversity for X-linked and autosomal loci in the derived, North American strains depends heavily on the studied loci. While the compiled dataset, comprised primarily of regions within or in close proximity to genes, shows a much more severe reduction of diversity on the X chromosome compared to autosomes in derived strains, the dataset consisting of intergenic loci located far from genes shows very similar reductions of diversities for X-linked and autosomal loci in derived strains. In addition, levels of diversity at X-linked and autosomal loci in the presumably ancestral African population are more similar than expected under an assumption of neutrality and equal numbers of breeding males and females. Conclusion We show that simple demographic scenarios under assumptions of neutral theory cannot explain all of the observed patterns of molecular diversity. We suggest that the simplest model is a population bottleneck that retains an ancestral female-biased sex ratio, coupled with higher rates of positive selection at

  18. Systems-level chromosomal parameters represent a suprachromosomal basis for the non-random chromosomal arrangement in human interphase nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatakia, Sarosh N.; Mehta, Ishita S.; Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2016-01-01

    Forty-six chromosome territories (CTs) are positioned uniquely in human interphase nuclei, wherein each of their positions can range from the centre of the nucleus to its periphery. A non-empirical basis for their non-random arrangement remains unreported. Here, we derive a suprachromosomal basis of that overall arrangement (which we refer to as a CT constellation), and report a hierarchical nature of the same. Using matrix algebra, we unify intrinsic chromosomal parameters (e.g., chromosomal length, gene density, the number of genes per chromosome), to derive an extrinsic effective gene density matrix, the hierarchy of which is dominated largely by extrinsic mathematical coupling of HSA19, followed by HSA17 (human chromosome 19 and 17, both preferentially interior CTs) with all CTs. We corroborate predicted constellations and effective gene density hierarchy with published reports from fluorescent in situ hybridization based microscopy and Hi-C techniques, and delineate analogous hierarchy in disparate vertebrates. Our theory accurately predicts CTs localised to the nuclear interior, which interestingly share conserved synteny with HSA19 and/or HSA17. Finally, the effective gene density hierarchy dictates how permutations among CT position represents the plasticity within its constellations, based on which we suggest that a differential mix of coding with noncoding genome modulates the same. PMID:27845379

  19. CHARACTERIZATION AND CHROMOSOMAL ASSIGNMENT OF YEAST ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES CONTAINING HUMAN 3P13-P21-SPECIFIC SEQUENCE-TAGGED SITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MICHAELIS, SC; BARDENHEUER, W; LUX, A; SCHRAMM, A; GOCKEL, A; SIEBERT, R; WILLERS, C; SCHMIDTKE, K; TODT, B; VANDERHOUT, AH; BUYS, CHCM; HEPPELLPARTON, AC; RABBITTS, PH; UNGAR, S; SMITH, D; LEPASLIER, D; COHEN, D; OPALKA, B; SCHUTTE, J

    1995-01-01

    Human chromosomal region 3p12-p23 is proposed to harbor at least three tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and other neoplasias. In order to identify one of these genes we defined sequence tagged sites (STSs) specific for 3p13-p24.2 by analyzing a

  20. Construction of a consistent YAC contig for human chromosome region 3p14.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardenheuer, W; Michaelis, S; Lux, A; Vieten, L; Brocker, F; Julicher, K; Willers, C; Siebert, R; Smith, DI; vanderHout, AH; Buys, C; Schutte, J; Opalka, B

    1996-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions and translocations of human chromosome region 3p14 are observed in various human malignancies and suggest the existence of a tumor suppressor gene locus within this region. Tumors most frequently affected by these aberrations are small-cell lung cancer and renal-cell carcinoma.

  1. A role for Aurora C in the chromosomal passenger complex during human preimplantation embryo development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Margarida Avo; van de Werken, Christine; de Vries, Marieke; Jahr, Holger; Vromans, Martijn J. M.; Laven, Joop S. E.; Fauser, Bart C.; Kops, Geert J.; Lens, Susanne M.; Baart, Esther B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human embryos generated by IVF demonstrate a high incidence of chromosomal segregation errors during the cleavage divisions. To analyse underlying molecular mechanisms, we investigated the behaviour of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) in human oocytes and embryos. This important m

  2. Construction of human artificial chromosome vectors by recombineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzamanis, George; Cheung, Wing; Abdulrazzak, Hassan; Perez-Luz, Sara; Howe, Steven; Cooke, Howard; Huxley, Clare

    2005-05-23

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) can be formed de novo by transfection of large fragments of cloned alphoid DNA into human HT1080 cells in tissue culture. In order to generate HACs carrying a gene of interest, one can either co-transfect the alphoid DNA and the gene of interest, or one can clone both into a single vector prior to transfection. Here we describe linking approximately 70 kb of alphoid DNA onto a 156-kb BAC carrying the human HPRT gene using Red homologous recombination in the EL350 Escherichia coli host [Lee et al., Genomics 73 (2001) 56-65]. A selectable marker and EGFP marker were then added by loxP/Cre recombination using the arabinose inducible cre gene in the EL350 bacteria. The final construct generates minichromosomes in HT1080 cells and the HPRT gene is expressed. The retrofitting vector can be used to add the approximately 70 kb of alphoid DNA to any BAC carrying a gene of interest to generate a HAC vector. The method can also be used to link any unrelated BAC or PAC insert onto another BAC clone. The EL350 bacteria are an excellent host for building up complex vectors by a combination of homologous and loxP/Cre recombination.

  3. Comparative distribution of the alpha 1(IV), alpha 5(IV), and alpha 6(IV) collagen chains in normal human adult and fetal tissues and in kidneys from X-linked Alport syndrome patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Peissel, B; Geng, L.; Kalluri, R.; Kashtan, C; Rennke, H G; Gallo, G R; Yoshioka, K.; Sun, M J; Hudson, B.G.; Neilson, E. G.

    1995-01-01

    We have shown previously that the 5' ends of the genes for the alpha 5(IV) and alpha 6(IV) collagen chains lie head-to-head on Xq22 and are deleted in patients with Alport syndrome (AS)-associated diffuse leiomyomatosis. In this study, we raised a rabbit anti-human alpha 6(IV)chain antibody, demonstrated its specificity by the analysis of recombinant NC1 domains af all six type IV chains, and studied the distribution of the alpha 6(IV) chain in relation to the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 5(IV) chai...

  4. Novel X-linked genes revealed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in the green anole, Anolis carolinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, Michail; Altmanová, Marie; Pokorná, Martina Johnson; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-08-28

    The green anole, Anolis carolinensis (ACA), is the model reptile for a vast array of biological disciplines. It was the first nonavian reptile to have its genome fully sequenced. During the genome project, the XX/XY system of sex chromosomes homologous to chicken chromosome 15 (GGA15) was revealed, and 106 X-linked genes were identified. We selected 38 genes located on eight scaffolds in ACA and having orthologs located on GGA15, then tested their linkage to ACA X chromosome by using comparative quantitative fluorescent real-time polymerase chain reaction applied to male and female genomic DNA. All tested genes appeared to be X-specific and not present on the Y chromosome. Assuming that all genes located on these scaffolds should be localized to the ACA X chromosome, we more than doubled the number of known X-linked genes in ACA, from 106 to 250. While demonstrating that the gene content of chromosome X in ACA and GGA15 is largely conserved, we nevertheless showed that numerous interchromosomal rearrangements had occurred since the splitting of the chicken and anole evolutionary lineages. The presence of many ACA X-specific genes localized to distinct contigs indicates that the ACA Y chromosome should be highly degenerated, having lost a large amount of its original gene content during evolution. The identification of novel genes linked to the X chromosome and absent on the Y chromosome in the model lizard species contributes to ongoing research as to the evolution of sex determination in reptiles and provides important information for future comparative and functional genomics.

  5. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M; Song, Ihn Young; Jauch, Anna; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Hayden, Karen E; Bridger, Joanna M; Sullivan, Beth A

    2010-08-12

    Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics) that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  6. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Stimpson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  7. Human ring chromosomes and small supernumerary marker chromosomes-do they have telomeres?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Roberta Santos; Klein, Elisabeth; Venner, Claudia; Hamid, Ahmed B; Bhatt, Samarth; Melaragno, Maria Isabel; Volleth, Marianne; Polityko, Anna; Kulpanovich, Anna; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Ring chromosomes and small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are enigmatic types of derivative chromosomes, in which the telomeres are thought to play a crucial role in their formation and stabilization. Considering that there are only a few studies that evaluate the presence of telomeric sequences in ring chromosomes and on sSMC, here, we analyzed 14 ring chromosomes and 29 sSMC for the presence of telomeric sequences through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The results showed that ring chromosomes can actually fall into two groups: the ones with or without telomeres. Additionally, telomeric signals were detectable at both ends of centric and neocentric sSMC with inverted duplication shape, as well as in complex sSMC. Apart from that, generally both ring- and centric minute-shaped sSMC did not present telomeric sequences neither detectable by FISH nor by a second protein-directed immunohistochemical approach. However, the fact that telomeres are absent does not automatically mean that the sSMC has a ring shape, as often deduced in the previous literature. Overall, the results obtained by FISH studies directed against telomeres need to be checked carefully by other approaches.

  8. X-linked ocular albinism and sensorineural deafness: Linkage to Xp22. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winship, I.M.; Babaya, M.; Ramesar, R.S. (Univ. of Cape Town Medical School (South Africa))

    1993-11-01

    X-linked ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness (OASD) is an autonomous disorder that poses significant clinical problems, causing affected individuals to be blind and deaf by early middle age. Classical X-linked ocular albinism (without deafness; OA1) has recently been linked to markers in the Xp22.2-Xp22.3 region of the human genome. In the present report, a large South African family with OASD was investigated at the molecular level and tight linkage was found to the DXS452 locus at Xp22.3 using 25 informative meioses, with a maximum lod score of 7.1 at a recombination fraction of 0.00. These findings suggest that OA1 and OASD are allelic variants or that they may be due to contiguous gene defects. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Topology, structures, and energy landscapes of human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter G

    2015-05-12

    Chromosome conformation capture experiments provide a rich set of data concerning the spatial organization of the genome. We use these data along with a maximum entropy approach to derive a least-biased effective energy landscape for the chromosome. Simulations of the ensemble of chromosome conformations based on the resulting information theoretic landscape not only accurately reproduce experimental contact probabilities, but also provide a picture of chromosome dynamics and topology. The topology of the simulated chromosomes is probed by computing the distribution of their knot invariants. The simulated chromosome structures are largely free of knots. Topologically associating domains are shown to be crucial for establishing these knotless structures. The simulated chromosome conformations exhibit a tendency to form fibril-like structures like those observed via light microscopy. The topologically associating domains of the interphase chromosome exhibit multistability with varying liquid crystalline ordering that may allow discrete unfolding events and the landscape is locally funneled toward "ideal" chromosome structures that represent hierarchical fibrils of fibrils.

  10. Genetic heterogeneity of syndromic X-linked recessive microphthalmia-anophthalmia: is Lenz microphthalmia a single disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, David; Hadley, Donald W; Tifft, Cynthia J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2002-07-15

    Nonsyndromic congenital microphthalmia or anophthalmia is a heterogeneous malformation with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked modes of inheritance. Lenz microphthalmia syndrome comprises microphthalmia with mental retardation, malformed ears, skeletal anomalies, and is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern. Prior studies have shown linkage of both isolated (or nonsyndromic) anophthalmos (ANOP1, [MIM 301590]) and Lenz syndrome [MIM 309800] to Xq27-q28. Nonsyndromic colobomatous microphthalmia [MIM 300345] has been linked to Xp11.4-Xq11.1. We describe a five-generation African-American family with microphthalmia or anophthalmia, mental retardation, and urogenital anomalies, in an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern, consistent with Lenz syndrome. Initial linkage analysis with microsatellite markers excluded the region in Xq27-q28 previously reported as a candidate region for ANOP1 [MIM 301590]. An X-chromosome scan revealed linkage to a 10-cM region between markers DXS228 and DXS992 in Xp11.4-p21.2. Multipoint analysis gave a maximum LOD score of 2.46 at marker DXS993. These data show that X-linked recessive syndromic microphthalmia exhibits genetic heterogeneity. In addition, it suggests that Lenz microphthalmia syndrome, previously thought to be a single disorder, may represent an amalgam of two distinct disorders.

  11. A simple filtration technique for obtaining purified human chromosomes in suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Mohammed; Parmar, Neha; Bhella, Gurdeep K; Robinson, Ian K

    2014-05-01

    Here we present a simple method for cleaning polyamine human mitotic chromosomes in solution. This was achieved by filtering intact (unburst) nuclei along with both large and small cytoplasmic debris through a series of different pore sized filters. Pure human chromosomes were recovered using a simple reverse filtration step. Fluorescence microscopy was used to validate the chromosome suspension after each filtration step. This reverse filtration technique is an improvement in both procedure time and chromosome recovery compared to currently used post-purification methods. Chromosomes purified by our method could be used for many applications, such as structural studies using microfluidics and high resolution imaging or generation of chromosome paints and sequencing after flow cytometry.

  12. Phenotype and genotype analysis of a Chinese family with prelingual X-linked hereditary hearing impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Bing; CHENG Jing; YANG Shu-zhi; CAO Ju-yang; SHEN Wei-dong; JI Fei; KANG Dong-yang; ZHANG Xin; DAI Pu; YUAN Hui-jun

    2009-01-01

    Background X-linked hearing impairment is clinically and genetically a heterogeneous disease.Although many disorders manifest with hearing loss,a limited number of sex-linked loci and only one gene (POU3F4) have been shown to be implicated in X-linked non-syndromic hearing impairment.In the present study,we have performed a clinical and genetic analysis of a Chinese family with X-linked non-syndromic hearing loss,with emphasis on audiological findings and genomic mapping.Methods The clinical features of Family JX01 were evaluated by physical and audiometric examination in eighteen family members.Mutation screening of POU3F4 was identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing.Molecular evaluation consisted of X-chromosome wide genotyping by microsatellite makers (STR),followed by analyzing using MLINK computer program.Results Five affected males demonstrated bilateral,symmetrical sensorineural and profound hearing loss.The hearing impairment started prelingual.The female carriers did not have any complain of hearing loss,however,two of them were tested with milder loss with high frequency.No causative mutations in POU3F4 gene were detected by DNA sequencing.Linkage analysis indicated that the responsible gene was linked to locus DXS1227 (maximum lod score=2.04 at θ=0).Conclusions The affected males in Family JX01 have profound prelingual sensorineural hearing impairment,In addition,two female carriers showed mild to moderate hearing losses.However,none of females complained of any hearing loss.Analysis of hereditary deafness in this family mapped most compatibly to the Xq27.2.

  13. Stable morphology, but dynamic internal reorganisation, of interphase human chromosomes in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Müller

    Full Text Available Despite the distinctive structure of mitotic chromosomes, it has not been possible to visualise individual chromosomes in living interphase cells, where chromosomes spend over 90% of their time. Studies of interphase chromosome structure and dynamics use fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (FISH on fixed cells, which potentially damages structure and loses dynamic information. We have developed a new methodology, involving photoactivation of labelled histone H3 at mitosis, to visualise individual and specific human chromosomes in living interphase cells. Our data revealed bulk chromosome volume and morphology are established rapidly after mitosis, changing only incrementally after the first hour of G1. This contrasted with the behaviour of specific loci on labelled chromosomes, which showed more progressive reorganisation, and revealed that "looping out" of chromatin from chromosome territories is a dynamic state. We measured considerable heterogeneity in chromosome decondensation, even between sister chromatids, which may reflect local structural impediments to decondensation and could potentially amplify transcriptional noise. Chromosome structure showed tremendous resistance to inhibitors of transcription, histone deacetylation and chromatin remodelling. Together, these data indicate steric constraints determine structure, rather than innate chromosome architecture or function-driven anchoring, with interphase chromatin organisation governed primarily by opposition between needs for decondensation and the space available for this to happen.

  14. Engineering of Systematic Elimination of a Targeted Chromosome in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic trisomy leads to abortion or congenital genetic disorders in humans. The most common autosomal chromosome abnormalities are trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21. Although alteration of gene dosage is thought to contribute to disorders caused by extra copies of chromosomes, genes associated with specific disease phenotypes remain unclear. To generate a normal cell from a trisomic cell as a means of etiological analysis or candidate therapy for trisomy syndromes, we developed a system to eliminate a targeted chromosome from human cells. Chromosome 21 was targeted by integration of a DNA cassette in HeLa cells that harbored three copies of chromosome 21. The DNA cassette included two inverted loxP sites and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk gene. This system causes missegregation of chromosome 21 after expression of Cre recombinase and subsequently enables the selection of cells lacking the chromosome by culturing in a medium that includes ganciclovir (GCV. Cells harboring only two copies of chromosome 21 were efficiently induced by transfection of a Cre expression vector, indicating that this approach is useful for eliminating a targeted chromosome.

  15. Dialkyl Phosphate Urinary Metabolites and Chromosomal Abnormalities in Human Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Zaida I.; Young, Heather A.; Meeker, John D.; Martenies, Sheena E.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Gray, George; Perry, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The past decade has seen numerous human health studies seeking to characterize the impacts of environmental exposures, such as organophosphate (OP) insecticides, on male reproduction. Despite an extensive literature on OP toxicology, many hormone-mediated effects on the testes are not well understood. Objectives This study investigated environmental exposures to OPs and their association with the frequency of sperm chromosomal abnormalities (i.e., disomy) among adult men. Methods Men (n=159) from a study assessing the impact of environmental exposures on male reproductive health were included in this investigation. Multi-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes X, Y, and 18 was used to determine XX18, YY18, XY18 and total disomy in sperm nuclei. Urine was analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for concentrations of dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites of OPs [dimethylphosphate (DMP); dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP); dimethyldithiophosphate (DMDTP); diethylphosphate (DEP); diethylthiophosphate (DETP); and diethyldithiophosphate (DEDTP)]. Poisson regression was used to model the association between OP exposures and disomy measures. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated for each disomy type by exposure quartiles for most metabolites, controlling for age, race, BMI, smoking, specific gravity, total sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. Results A significant positive trend was seen for increasing IRRs by exposure quartiles of DMTP, DMDTP, DEP and DETP in XX18, YY18, XY18 and total disomy. A significant inverse association was observed between DMP and total disomy. Findings for total sum of DAP metabolites concealed individual associations as those results differed from the patterns observed for each individual metabolite. Dose-response relationships appeared nonmonotonic, with most of the increase in disomy rates occurring between the second and third exposure quartiles and without additional

  16. Evolving practice: X-linked agammaglobulinemia and lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, S; Kotecha, S; Douglass, J A; Paul, E; Hore-Lacy, F; Hore-Lacey, F; Stirling, R; Snell, G I; Westall, G P

    2015-04-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a rare primary humoral immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by agammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections and bronchiectasis. Despite the association with end-stage bronchiectasis, the literature on XLA and lung transplantation is extremely limited. We report a series of 6 XLA patients with bronchiectasis who underwent lung transplantation. Short-term outcomes were excellent however long-term outcomes were disappointing with a high incidence of pulmonary sepsis and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD).

  17. X-linked stapes gusher: CT findings in one patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Castillo, Mauricio; Buchman, Craig A

    2003-01-01

    A 31-year-old male patient presented with progressive mixed hearing loss since birth. A stapedectomy was attempted and was unsuccessful because of perilymph gushing. CT of the temporal bones showed bulbous dilatation of the fundi of the internal auditory canals and absence of the bone plates separating them from the base of the cochleas. This unusual abnormality was found after the attempted stapedectomy and explains the clinical findings. The findings in male patients are fairly typical X-linked congenital deafness.

  18. PRENATAL-DIAGNOSIS IN A FAMILY WITH X-LINKED CHRONIC GRANULOMATOUS-DISEASE WITH THE USE OF THE POLYMERASE CHAIN-REACTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, M; BOLSCHER, BGJM; SIJMONS, RH; SCHEFFER, H; WEENING, RS; ROOS, D

    1992-01-01

    In the X-linked form of chronic granulomatous disease (X91-degrees CGD), the genetic defect is linked to the CYBB locus on the X chromosome. We studied a family with a genetic defect in this gene, consisting of a G-->A substitution at the fifth base of the 5' donor splice site of intron 3. This muta

  19. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G;

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage......), resulting in deletion of varying amounts of 21q22.1 to 21qter. The data from one individual who had a Down syndrome phenotype were consistent with asymmetric breakage and reunion of 21q sequences from an intermediate isochromosome or Robertsonian translocation chromosome as reported by Wong et al. Another...... patient, who also exhibited Down syndrome, showed evidence of a third mechanism of ring formation. The likely initial event was breakage and reunion of the short and long arms, resulting in a small r(21), followed by a sister-chromatid exchange resulting in a double-sized and symmetrically dicentric r(21...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is part of a large molecule called the trafficking protein particle (TRAPP) complex, which plays a role ... X chromosome , which is one of the two sex chromosomes. In males (who have only one X ...

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of X-linked recessive Lenz microphthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Kaname, Tadashi; Muramatsu, Yukako; Yanagi, Kumiko; Kumagai, Kyoko; Mizuno, Seiji; Naritomi, Kenji; Saitoh, Shinji; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2013-11-01

    Lenz microphthalmia syndrome comprises microphthalmia-anophthalmia with mental retardation, malformed ears and skeletal anomalies, and is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern. In 2004, it was reported that the missense mutation (BCL-6 co-repressor gene [BCOR] c.254C>T, p.P85L) in a single family with Lenz microphthalmia syndrome co-segregated with the disease phenotype. We report a case of prenatal diagnosis for X-linked recessive Lenz microphthalmia syndrome with the mutation. A 32-year-old gravida 5, para 2 Japanese woman was referred to Nagoya City University Hospital at 15 weeks of gestation. After genetic counseling and informed consent, amniocentesis was performed for fetal karyotyping, which was 46,XY. Using the extracted DNA from cultured amniotic cells, fetal search for BCOR c.254C>T mutation was undertaken. The couple requested medical termination of pregnancy, and the postabortion examination confirmed the diagnosis. This is the third report of a BCOR mutation, associated with X-linked syndromic microphthalmia, and most importantly, it is always the same mutation. The prenatal genetic diagnosis of the Lenz microphthalmia syndrome allowed time for parental counseling and delivery planning.

  2. DNA Catenation Maintains Structure of Human Metaphase Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. V. Bauer, David; Marie, Rodolphe; Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted

    2012-01-01

    Mitotic chromosome structure is pivotal to cell division but difficult to observe in fine detail using conventional methods. DNA catenation has been implicated in both sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome condensation, but has never been observed directly. We have used a lab-on-a-chip...

  3. X chromosome inactivation is initiated in human preimplantation embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Ilse M; Laven, Joop S E; Stevens, Mary; Jonkers, Iris; Galjaard, Robert-Jan; Gribnau, Joost; van Doorninck, J Hikke

    2009-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is the mammalian mechanism that compensates for the difference in gene dosage between XX females and XY males. Genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms induce transcriptional silencing of one X chromosome in female cells. In mouse embryos, XCI is initiated at the

  4. Deficit of mito-nuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, R; Zimmer, F.; Mank, J E

    2015-01-01

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhaditis elegans, display under-representations of mito-nuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions ov...

  5. Molecular genetic analysis of X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia and isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D.M.; Kurman, C.C.; Staudt, L.M. [Univ. of Brescia (Italy)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    In 1980 the clinical syndrome of X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia and isolated growth hormone deficiency (XLA/GHD) was described. XLA/GHD patients have reduced serum levels of Ig and normal cell-mediated immunity, and thus resemble patients with Bruton`s X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). However, XLA/GHD patients also have isolated GHD. Mutations and deletions in the Bruton`s tyrosine kinase gene (BTK) are responsible for Bruton`s XLA. We investigated BTK gene expression in an XLA/GHD patient from the family originally described by Northern analysis, cDNA sequencing, and Western analysis of protein production using mAb to BTK. BTK mRNA was normal in size and abundance, and the mRNA sequence was normal over the coding region, except for a single silent mutation. BTK protein was present in normal amounts in PBMC of this patient. Thus, at the molecular level, XLA/GHD is a different disease entity from Bruton`s XLA. These results suggest that undescribed genes critical for B cell development and growth hormone production exist on the X chromosome. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Variation in the X-linked EFHC2 gene is associated with social cognitive abilities in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Startin, Carla M; Fiorentini, Chiara; de Haan, Michelle; Skuse, David H

    2015-01-01

    Females outperform males on many social cognitive tasks. X-linked genes may contribute to this sex difference. Males possess one X chromosome, while females possess two X chromosomes. Functional variations in X-linked genes are therefore likely to impact more on males than females. Previous studies of X-monosomic women with Turner syndrome suggest a genetic association with facial fear recognition abilities at Xp11.3, specifically at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs7055196) within the EFHC2 gene. Based on a strong hypothesis, we investigated an association between variation at SNP rs7055196 and facial fear recognition and theory of mind abilities in males. As predicted, males possessing the G allele had significantly poorer facial fear detection accuracy and theory of mind abilities than males possessing the A allele (with SNP variant accounting for up to 4.6% of variance). Variation in the X-linked EFHC2 gene at SNP rs7055196 is therefore associated with social cognitive abilities in males.

  7. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Bassi, M.T. [Univ. of Siena (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Autosomal and X-Linked Additive Genetic Variation for Lifespan and Aging: Comparisons Within and Between the Sexes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Griffin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Theory makes several predictions concerning differences in genetic variation between the X chromosome and the autosomes due to male X hemizygosity. The X chromosome should: (i typically show relatively less standing genetic variation than the autosomes, (ii exhibit more variation in males compared to females because of dosage compensation, and (iii potentially be enriched with sex-specific genetic variation. Here, we address each of these predictions for lifespan and aging in Drosophila melanogaster. To achieve unbiased estimates of X and autosomal additive genetic variance, we use 80 chromosome substitution lines; 40 for the X chromosome and 40 combining the two major autosomes, which we assay for sex-specific and cross-sex genetic (covariation. We find significant X and autosomal additive genetic variance for both traits in both sexes (with reservation for X-linked variation of aging in females, but no conclusive evidence for depletion of X-linked variation (measured through females. Males display more X-linked variation for lifespan than females, but it is unclear if this is due to dosage compensation since also autosomal variation is larger in males. Finally, our results suggest that the X chromosome is enriched for sex-specific genetic variation in lifespan but results were less conclusive for aging overall. Collectively, these results suggest that the X chromosome has reduced capacity to respond to sexually concordant selection on lifespan from standing genetic variation, while its ability to respond to sexually antagonistic selection may be augmented.

  9. Autosomal and X-Linked Additive Genetic Variation for Lifespan and Aging: Comparisons Within and Between the Sexes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Robert M; Schielzeth, Holger; Friberg, Urban

    2016-12-07

    Theory makes several predictions concerning differences in genetic variation between the X chromosome and the autosomes due to male X hemizygosity. The X chromosome should: (i) typically show relatively less standing genetic variation than the autosomes, (ii) exhibit more variation in males compared to females because of dosage compensation, and (iii) potentially be enriched with sex-specific genetic variation. Here, we address each of these predictions for lifespan and aging in Drosophila melanogaster To achieve unbiased estimates of X and autosomal additive genetic variance, we use 80 chromosome substitution lines; 40 for the X chromosome and 40 combining the two major autosomes, which we assay for sex-specific and cross-sex genetic (co)variation. We find significant X and autosomal additive genetic variance for both traits in both sexes (with reservation for X-linked variation of aging in females), but no conclusive evidence for depletion of X-linked variation (measured through females). Males display more X-linked variation for lifespan than females, but it is unclear if this is due to dosage compensation since also autosomal variation is larger in males. Finally, our results suggest that the X chromosome is enriched for sex-specific genetic variation in lifespan but results were less conclusive for aging overall. Collectively, these results suggest that the X chromosome has reduced capacity to respond to sexually concordant selection on lifespan from standing genetic variation, while its ability to respond to sexually antagonistic selection may be augmented.

  10. European gene mapping project (EUROGEM) : Breakpoint panels for human chromosomes based on the CEPH reference families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attwood, J; Bryant, SP; Bains, R; Povey, R; Povey, S; Rebello, M; Kapsetaki, M; Moschonas, NK; Grzeschik, KH; Otto, M; Dixon, M; Sudworth, HE; Kooy, RF; Wright, A; Teague, P; Terrenato, L; Vergnaud, G; Monfouilloux, S; Weissenbach, J; Alibert, O; Dib, C; Faure, S; Bakker, E; Pearson, NM; Vossen, RHAM; Gal, A; MuellerMyhsok, B; Cann, HM; Spurr, NK

    1996-01-01

    Meiotic breakpoint panels for human chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 17; 18, 20 and X were constructed from genotypes from the CEPH reference families. Each recombinant chromosome included has a breakpoint well-supported with reference to defined quantitative criteria. The panels

  11. Replication Banding Patterns in Human Chromosomes Detected Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine Incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2011-10-26

    A novel technique using the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into replicating DNA is described for the analysis of replicating banding patterns of human metaphase chromosomes. Human lymphocytes were synchronized with excess thymidine and treated with EdU during the late S phase of the cell cycle. The incorporated EdU was then detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor® 488 azides, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acetylene group of EdU. Chromosomes with incorporated EdU showed a banding pattern similar to G-banding of normal human chromosomes. Imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions showed that the structure of the chromosomes was well preserved even after EdU treatment. Comparison between fluorescence microscopy and AFM images of the same chromosome 1 indicated the presence of ridges and grooves in the chromatid arm, features that have been previously reported in relation to G-banding. These results suggest an intimate relationship between EdU-induced replication bands and G- or R-bands in human chromosomes. This technique is thus useful for analyzing the structure of chromosomes in relation to their banding patterns following DNA replication in the S phase.

  12. Report of the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.A.; Neuman, W.L. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States); McPherson, J.; Wasmuth, J. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Chemistry; Camper, S. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Medical School; Plaetke, R. [Eceles Inst. of Human Genetics, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Human Genetics; Williamson, R. [St. Mary`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics

    1993-12-31

    This report describes the accomplishments of the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 as was held May 11--13,1992 at the University of Chicago. Included in the report are abstract of individual presentations and a consensus map of the chromosome.

  13. Chromosome Structural Alteration an Unusual Abnormality Characterizing Human Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Movafagh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Ring chromosomes are rare cytogenetic abnormalities that occur in less than 10% of hematopoietic malignancies. They are rare in blood disorder. The present review has focused on the ring chromosome associated with oncology malignancies. Materials and Methods: By reviewing the web-based search for all English scientific peer review articles published, was initiated using Medline/PubMed, Mitelman database (http://cgap.nci.nih.gov/Chromosomes/Mitelman, and other pertinent references on websites about ring chromosomes in Oncology. The software program as End Note was used to handle the proper references for instruction to author. Karyotype descriptions were cited according to ISCN.Conclusion: Ring chromosomes are rare chromosomal aberrations, almost many times are of de novo origin, presenting a different phenotype regarding the loss of genetic material. The karyotype represents the main analysis for detection of ring chromosomes, but other molecular technics are necessary for complete characterization. The information of this review article adds to the spectrum of both morphology and genetic rearrangements in the field of oncology malignancies.

  14. A high-resolution interval map of the q21 region of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, C.; Monaco, A.P. [ICRF Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others; Arnould, C. [Laboratoire de Genetique Humaine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [and others

    1995-06-10

    In a previous study, we have developed a panel of chromosomal rearrangements for the physical mapping of the q13-q21 region of the human X chromosome. Here, we report the physical localization of 36 additional polymorphic markers by polymerase chain reaction analysis. The high density of chromosomal breakpoints in Xq21 allows us to map 58 DNA loci in 22 intervals. As a result, this segment of the X chromosome is saturated with approximately three sequence tagged sites per megabase of DNA, which will facilitate the construction of a YAC contig of this region. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional profile of human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Sergey I; Deutsch, Samuel; Genolet, Raphael; Borel, Christelle; Parand, Leila; Ucla, Catherine; Schütz, Frederic; Duriaux Sail, Genevieve; Dupré, Yann; Jaquier-Gubler, Pascale; Araud, Tanguy; Conne, Beatrice; Descombes, Patrick; Vassalli, Jean-Dominique; Curran, Joseph; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated extensive transcriptional activity across the human genome, a substantial fraction of which is not associated with any functional annotation. However, very little is known regarding the post-transcriptional processes that operate within the different classes of RNA molecules. To characterize the post-transcriptional properties of expressed sequences from human chromosome 21 (HSA21), we separated RNA molecules from three cell lines (GM06990, HeLa S3, and SK-N-AS) according to their ribosome content by sucrose gradient fractionation. Polyribosomal-associated RNA and total RNA were subsequently hybridized to genomic tiling arrays. We found that approximately 50% of the transcriptional signals were located outside of annotated exons and were considered as TARs (transcriptionally active regions). Although TARs were observed among polysome-associated RNAs, RT-PCR and RACE experiments revealed that approximately 40% were likely to represent nonspecific cross-hybridization artifacts. Bioinformatics discrimination of TARs according to conservation and sequence complexity allowed us to identify a set of high-confidence TARs. This set of TARs was significantly depleted in the polysomes, suggesting that it was not likely to be involved in translation. Analysis of polysome representation of RefSeq exons showed that at least 15% of RefSeq transcripts undergo significant post-transcriptional regulation in at least two of the three cell lines tested. Among the regulated transcripts, enrichment analysis revealed an over-representation of genes involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including APP and the BACE1 protease that cleaves APP to produce the pathogenic beta 42 peptide. We demonstrate that the combination of RNA fractionation and tiling arrays is a powerful method to assess the transcriptional and post-transcriptional properties of genomic regions.

  16. The X-files of inflammation: cellular mosaicism of X-linked polymorphic genes and the female advantage in the host response to injury and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolarics, Zoltán

    2007-06-01

    Females as compared with males display better general health status, longevity, and improved clinical course after injury and infection. It is generally believed that the female advantage is associated with the effects of sex hormones. This review argues that the sex benefit of females during the host response is associated with polymorphism of X-linked genes and cellular mosaicism for X-linked parental alleles. Cells from females carry both parental X chromosomes (maternal, Xm; or paternal, Xp), whereas males carry only one (Xm). Because of dosage compensation and random X inactivation, half of the cells from females express either Xm or Xp. Therefore, females are cellular mosaics for their X-linked polymorphic genes. This cellular mosaicism in females represents a more adaptive and balanced cellular machinery that is advantageous during the innate immune response. Several genes encoding key metabolic and regulatory proteins reside on the X chromosome, including members of the apoptotic cascade, hormone homeostasis, glucose metabolic enzymes, superoxide-producing machinery, and the toll-like receptor/nuclear factor kappaB/c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. Polymorphic forms of these X-linked proteins are likely to manifest in phenotypic differences in the mosaic cell populations in females and may contribute to sex-related differences in the host response to injury and infection. The unique inheritance pattern of X-linked polymorphisms and their potential confounding effects in clinical trials are also discussed; furthermore, we present potential biomarkers for studying mosaic cell populations of innate immunity.

  17. [Progress on X-linked mental retardation related gene JARID1C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xu; Gao, Xiao-Cai; Zhang, Fu-Chang

    2010-03-01

    JARID1C is one of the genes related to X-linked mental retardation. Its express product influences transcription and expression of the related genes in brain nervous system, and may be associated with human cognitive ability. Study on the functions of JARID1C not only helps to understand its molecular role in mental retardation and human cognitive ability, but also provides references for clinical diagnosis and prevention of mental retardation. This article reviews the progresses on JARID1C in location, isolation, physiological functions, and cognitive functions of its encoding product. The future re-search work of JARID1C is also discussed.

  18. Association of CHRDL1 mutations and variants with X-linked megalocornea, Neuhauser syndrome and central corneal thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice E Davidson

    Full Text Available We describe novel CHRDL1 mutations in ten families with X-linked megalocornea (MGC1. Our mutation-positive cohort enabled us to establish ultrasonography as a reliable clinical diagnostic tool to distinguish between MGC1 and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG. Megalocornea is also a feature of Neuhäuser or megalocornea-mental retardation (MMR syndrome, a rare condition of unknown etiology. In a male patient diagnosed with MMR, we performed targeted and whole exome sequencing (WES and identified a novel missense mutation in CHRDL1 that accounts for his MGC1 phenotype but not his non-ocular features. This finding suggests that MMR syndrome, in some cases, may be di- or multigenic. MGC1 patients have reduced central corneal thickness (CCT; however no X-linked loci have been associated with CCT, possibly because the majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS overlook the X-chromosome. We therefore explored whether variants on the X-chromosome are associated with CCT. We found rs149956316, in intron 6 of CHRDL1, to be the most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP (p = 6.81×10(-6 on the X-chromosome. However, this association was not replicated in a smaller subset of whole genome sequenced samples. This study highlights the importance of including X-chromosome SNP data in GWAS to identify potential loci associated with quantitative traits or disease risk.

  19. Application of carrier testing to genetic counseling for X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Nachtman, R.G.; Belmont, J.W.; Rosenblatt, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    Bruton X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a phenotypically recessive genetic disorder of B lymphocyte development. Female carriers of XLA, although asymptomatic, have a characteristic B cell lineage-specific skewing of the pattern of X inactivation. Skewing apparently results from defective growth and maturation of B cell precursors bearing a mutant active X chromosome. In this study, carrier status was tested in 58 women from 22 families referred with a history of agammaglobulinemia. Primary carrier analysis to examine patterns of X inactivation in CD19[sup +] peripheral blood cells (B lymphocytes) was conducted using quantitative PCR at the androgen-receptor locus. Obligate carriers of XLA demonstrated >95% skewing of X inactivation in peripheral blood CD19[sup +] cells but not in CD19[sup [minus

  20. Regulatory divergence of X-linked genes and hybrid male sterility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Ayako; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Postzygotic reproductive isolation is the reduction of fertility or viability in hybrids between genetically diverged populations. One example of reproductive isolation, hybrid male sterility, may be caused by genetic incompatibility between diverged genetic factors in two distinct populations. Genetic factors involved in hybrid male sterility are disproportionately located on the X chromosome. Recent studies showing the evolutionary divergence in gene regulatory networks or epigenetic effects suggest that the genetic incompatibilities occur at much broader levels than had previously been thought (e.g., incompatibility of protein-protein interactions). The latest studies suggest that evolutionary divergence of transcriptional regulation causes genetic incompatibilities in hybrid animals, and that such incompatibilities preferentially involve X-linked genes. In this review, we focus on recent progress in understanding hybrid sterility in mice, including our studies, and we discuss the evolutionary significance of regulatory divergence for speciation.

  1. Karyotyping human and mouse cells using probes from single-sorted chromosomes and open source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, Tamara A; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Bradford, William D; Seidel, Christopher W; Slaughter, Brian D; Sivagnanam, Shamilene; Wu, Yuping; Li, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Multispectral karyotyping analyzes all chromosomes in a single cell by labeling them with chromosome-specific probes conjugated to unique combinations of fluorophores. Currently available multispectral karyotyping systems require the purchase of specialized equipment and reagents. However, conventional laser scanning confocal microscopes that are capable of separating multiple overlapping emission spectra through spectral imaging and linear unmixing can be utilized for classifying chromosomes painted with multicolor probes. Here, we generated multicolor chromosome paints from single-sorted human and mouse chromosomes and developed the Karyotype Identification via Spectral Separation (KISS) analysis package, a set of freely available open source ImageJ tools for spectral unmixing and karyotyping. Chromosome spreads painted with our multispectral probe sets can be imaged on widely available spectral laser scanning confocal microscopes and analyzed using our ImageJ tools. Together, our probes and software enable academic labs with access to a laser-scanning spectral microscope to perform multicolor karyotyping in a cost-effective manner.

  2. Techniques for imaging human metaphase chromosomes in liquid conditions by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiki, Tatsuo; Shigeno, Masatsugu; Hoshi, Osamu

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain three-dimensional images of wet chromosomes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions. Human metaphase chromosomes—obtained either by chromosome spreads or by an isolation technique—were observed in a dynamic mode by AFM in a buffer solution. Under suitable operating conditions with a soft triangular cantilever (with the spring constant of 0.08-0.4 N m-1), clear images of fixed chromosomes in the chromosome spread were obtained by AFM. For imaging isolated chromosomes with the height of more than 400 nm, a cantilever with a high aspect ratio probing tip was required. The combination of a Q-control system and the sampling intelligent scan (SIS) system in dynamic force mode AFM was useful for obtaining high-quality images of the isolated chromosomes, in which globular or cord-like structures about 50 nm thick were clearly observed on the surface of each chromatid.

  3. The Relationship Between Spontaneous Telomere Loss and Chromosome Instability in a Human Tumor Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Fouladi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome instability plays an important role in cancer by promoting the alterations in the genome required for tumor cell progression. The loss of telomeres that protect the ends of chromosomes and prevent chromosome fusion has been proposed as one mechanism for chromosome instability in cancer cells, however, there is little direct evidence to support this hypothesis. To investigate the relationship between spontaneous telomere loss and chromosome instability in human cancer cells, clones of the EJ-30 tumor cell line were isolated in which a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk gene was integrated immediately adjacent to a telomere. Selection for HSV-tkdeficient cells with ganciclovir demonstrated a high rate of loss of the end these "marked" chromosomes (10-4 events/cell per generation. DNA sequence and cytogenetic analysis suggests that the loss of function of the HSV-tk gene most often involves telomere loss, sister chromatid fusion, and prolonged periods of chromosome instability. In some HSV-tk-deficient cells, telomeric repeat sequences were added on to the end of the truncated HSV-tk gene at a new location, whereas in others, no telomere was detected on the end of the marked chromosome. These results suggest that spontaneous telomere loss is a mechanism for chromosome instability in human cancer cells.

  4. Females with a disorder phenotypically identical to X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conley, M.E. (Univ. of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis (United States)); Sweinberg, S.K. (Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1992-03-01

    Clinical and laboratory findings in two girls with a disorder phenotypically indistinguishable from typical X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) are described. To examine the possibility that subtle defects in the X chromosome might explain the findings, detailed genetic studies were performed on one of these patients. Cytogenetic studies showed a normal 46XX karyotype. Southern blot analysis of her DNA showed that she had inherited a maternal and a paternal allele at sites flanking the locus for typical XLA at Xq22, making a microdeletion or uniparental disomy unlikely. To determine whether both of her X chromosomes could function as the active X, somatic-cell hybrids that selectively retained the active X were produced from her activated T cells. A normal random pattern of X inactivation was seen. Of 21 T-cell hybrids, 3 retained both X chromosomes, 7 had one X as the active X, and 11 had the other X as the active X. The authors have interpreted these studies as indicating that there is an autosomal recessive disorder that is phenotypically identical to XLA.

  5. Scanning electron microscope studies of human metaphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemilt, L A; Estandarte, A K C; Yusuf, M; Robinson, I K

    2014-03-06

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to evaluate potential chromosome preparations and staining methods for application in high-resolution three-dimensional X-ray imaging. Our starting point is optical fluorescence microscopy, the standard method for chromosomes, which only gives structural detail at the 200 nm scale. In principle, with suitable sample preparation protocols, including contrast enhancing staining, the surface structure of the chromosomes can be viewed at the 1 nm level by SEM. Here, we evaluate a heavy metal nucleic-acid-specific stain, which gives strong contrast in the backscattered electron signal. This study uses SEM to examine chromosomes prepared in different ways to establish a sample preparation protocol for X-rays. Secondary electron and backscattered electron signals are compared to evaluate the effectiveness of platinum-based stains used to enhance the contrast.

  6. How-to-Do-It. Human Chromosome Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Doug

    1990-01-01

    Described is a laboratory activity in which high school students may perform a karyotype analysis of their own chromosomes. Materials and procedures are detailed. A source of materials for this exercise is provided. (CW)

  7. The effects of severe mixed environmental pollution on human chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Katsantoni, A; Nakou, S; Antoniadou-Koumatou, I; Côté, G B

    1986-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies were conducted on healthy young mothers, shortly after child birth, in two residential areas each with an approximate population of 20,000, situated about 25 km from Athens, Greece. One of the areas, Elefsis, is subject to severe mixed industrial pollution, and the other, Koropi, is relatively free of pollution. Chromosomal aberrations were investigated in 16 women from each area in 72 hour lymphocyte cultures treated with gentian violet to enhance any chromosomal instabil...

  8. Human-specific duplication and mosaic transcripts: the recent paralogous structure of chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jeffrey A; Yavor, Amy M; Viggiano, Luigi; Misceo, Doriana; Horvath, Juliann E; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Schwartz, Stuart; Rocchi, Mariano; Eichler, Evan E

    2002-01-01

    In recent decades, comparative chromosomal banding, chromosome painting, and gene-order studies have shown strong conservation of gross chromosome structure and gene order in mammals. However, findings from the human genome sequence suggest an unprecedented degree of recent (homologous duplications (> or = 1 kb and > or = 90%) on chromosome 22. Overall, 10.8% (3.7/33.8 Mb) of chromosome 22 is duplicated, with an average sequence identity of 95.4%. To organize the duplications into tractable units, intron-exon structure and well-defined duplication boundaries were used to define 78 duplicated modules (minimally shared evolutionary segments) with 157 copies on chromosome 22. Analysis of these modules provides evidence for the creation or modification of 11 novel transcripts. Comparative FISH analyses of human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaque reveal qualitative and quantitative differences in the distribution of these duplications--consistent with their recent origin. Several duplications appear to be human specific, including a approximately 400-kb duplication (99.4%-99.8% sequence identity) that transposed from chromosome 14 to the most proximal pericentromeric region of chromosome 22. Experimental and in silico data further support a pericentromeric gradient of duplications where the most recent duplications transpose adjacent to the centromere. Taken together, these data suggest that segmental duplications have been an ongoing process of primate genome evolution, contributing to recent gene innovation and the dynamic transformation of genome architecture within and among closely related species.

  9. An unusual presentation of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Summary X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a rare genetic condition caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that result in accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in various tissues. This leads to demyelination in the CNS and impaired steroidogenesis in the adrenal cortex and testes. A 57-year-old gentleman was referred for the assessment of bilateral gynaecomastia of 6 months duration. He had skin hyperpigmentation since 4 years of age and spastic paraparesis for the past 15...

  10. JOINT DISEASE IN CHILDREN WITH X-LINKED AGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Kareva

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA are prone to recurrent bacterial infections due to low levels of immunoglobulins. Clinical symptoms include recurrent bacterial otitis media, bronchitis, pneumonia, meningitis, skin infection and arthritis.In the majority of cases arthritis can be shown to be caused by infection, but also aseptic arthritis and autoimmune diseases may be present. Monoarthritis and oligoarthritis is usual pattern, although polyarthritis may occur. This paper presents diagnostic and therapeutic problems in our patients with agammaglobulinemia and arthritis.

  11. CT and MRI findings in X-linked progressive deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Hakan; Savaş, Recep; Oğüt, Fatih; Kirazli, Tayfun; Alper, Hüdaver

    2008-09-01

    Congenital X-linked mixed deafness is a rare anomaly that has typical features and can be diagnosed on the basis of progressive mixed hearing loss and the typical imaging findings. Recognition of these findings may alter the course of treatment and perilymph gushing can be avoided. A 10-year-old male patient presented with a history of progressive hearing loss. Computed tomography of the temporal bones showed bulbous dilatation of the fundi of the internal auditory canals (IAC) and the absence of the bony plates separating the basal turn of the cochleas and IAC. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated obliteration of the labyrinthine spaces at the right side.

  12. A high-resolution comparative map between pig chromosome 17 and human chromosomes 4, 8, and 20: Identification of synteny breakpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahbib-Mansais, Yvette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Mompart, Florence;

    2005-01-01

    We report on the construction of a high-resolution comparative map of porcine chromosome 17 (SSC17) focusing on evolutionary breakpoints with human chromosomes. The comparative map shows high homology with human chromosome 20 but suggests more limited homologies with other human chromosomes. SSC17...... is of particular interest in studies of chromosomal organization due to the presence of QTLs that affect meat quality and carcass composition. A total of 158 pig ESTs available in databases or developed by the Sino-Danish Pig Genome Sequencing Consortium were mapped using the INRA-University of Minnesota porcine...... radiation hydrid panel. The high-resolution map was further anchored by fluorescence in situ hybridization. This study confirmed the extensive conservation between SSC17 and HSA20 and enabled the gene order to be determined. The homology of the SSC17 pericentromeric region was extended to other human...

  13. Overexpression of X-linked genes in T cells from women with lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewagama, Anura; Gorelik, Gabriela; Patel, Dipak; Liyanarachchi, Punsisi; McCune, W Joseph; Somers, Emily; Gonzalez-Rivera, Tania; Strickland, Faith; Richardson, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Women develop lupus more frequently than men and the reason remains incompletely understood. Evidence that men with Klinefelter's Syndrome (XXY) develop lupus at approximately the same rate as women suggests that a second X chromosome contributes. However, since the second X is normally inactivated, how it predisposes to lupus is unclear. DNA methylation contributes to the silencing of one X chromosome in women, and CD4+ T cell DNA demethylation contributes to the development of lupus-like autoimmunity. This suggests that demethylation of genes on the inactive X may predispose women to lupus, and this hypothesis is supported by a report that CD40LG, an immune gene encoded on the X chromosome, demethylates and is overexpressed in T cells from women but not men with lupus. Overexpression of other immune genes on the inactive X may also predispose women to this disease. We therefore compared mRNA and miRNA expression profiles in experimentally demethylated T cells from women and men as well as in T cells from women and men with lupus. T cells from healthy men and women were treated with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine, then X-linked mRNAs were surveyed with oligonucleotide arrays, and X-linked miRNA's surveyed with PCR arrays. CD40LG, CXCR3, OGT, miR-98, let-7f-2*, miR 188-3p, miR-421 and miR-503 were among the genes overexpressed in women relative to men. MiRNA target prediction analyses identified CBL, which downregulates T cell receptor signaling and is decreased in lupus T cells, as a gene targeted by miR-188-3p and miR-98. Transfection with miR-98 and miR-188-3p suppressed CBL expression. The same mRNA and miRNA transcripts were also demethylated and overexpressed in CD4+ T cells from women relative to men with active lupus. Together these results further support a role for X chromosome demethylation in the female predisposition to lupus.

  14. Chromosomal localization of murine and human oligodendrocyte-specific protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronstein, J.M.; Wu, S.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Oligodendrocyte-specific protein (OSP) is a recently described protein present only in myelin of the central nervous system. Several inherited disorders of myelin are caused by mutations in myelin genes but the etiology of many remain unknown. We mapped the location of the mouse OSP gene to the proximal region of chromosome 3 using two sets of multilocus crosses and to human chromosome 3 using somatic cell hybrids. Fine mapping with fluorescence in situ hybridization placed the OSP gene at human chromosome 3q26.2-q26.3. To date, there are no known inherited neurological disorders that localize to these regions. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Human spermatogenic failure purges deleterious mutation load from the autosomes and both sex chromosomes, including the gene DMRT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Lopes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gonadal failure, along with early pregnancy loss and perinatal death, may be an important filter that limits the propagation of harmful mutations in the human population. We hypothesized that men with spermatogenic impairment, a disease with unknown genetic architecture and a common cause of male infertility, are enriched for rare deleterious mutations compared to men with normal spermatogenesis. After assaying genomewide SNPs and CNVs in 323 Caucasian men with idiopathic spermatogenic impairment and more than 1,100 controls, we estimate that each rare autosomal deletion detected in our study multiplicatively changes a man's risk of disease by 10% (OR 1.10 [1.04-1.16], p<2 × 10(-3, rare X-linked CNVs by 29%, (OR 1.29 [1.11-1.50], p<1 × 10(-3, and rare Y-linked duplications by 88% (OR 1.88 [1.13-3.13], p<0.03. By contrasting the properties of our case-specific CNVs with those of CNV callsets from cases of autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and intellectual disability, we propose that the CNV burden in spermatogenic impairment is distinct from the burden of large, dominant mutations described for neurodevelopmental disorders. We identified two patients with deletions of DMRT1, a gene on chromosome 9p24.3 orthologous to the putative sex determination locus of the avian ZW chromosome system. In an independent sample of Han Chinese men, we identified 3 more DMRT1 deletions in 979 cases of idiopathic azoospermia and none in 1,734 controls, and found none in an additional 4,519 controls from public databases. The combined results indicate that DMRT1 loss-of-function mutations are a risk factor and potential genetic cause of human spermatogenic failure (frequency of 0.38% in 1306 cases and 0% in 7,754 controls, p = 6.2 × 10(-5. Our study identifies other recurrent CNVs as potential causes of idiopathic azoospermia and generates hypotheses for directing future studies on the genetic basis of male infertility and IVF outcomes.

  16. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning 2.5 Mbp in Xq25, the critical region for the X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanyi, A.; Li, B.F.; Li, S. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is characterized by a marked vulnerability in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Infection of XLP patients with EBV invariably results in fatal mononucleosis, agammaglobulinemia or B-cell lymphoma. The XLP gene lies within a 10 cM region in Xq25 between DXS42 and DXS10. Initial chromosome studies revealed an interstitial, cytogenetically visible deletion in Xq25 in one XLP family (43-004). We estimated the size of the Xq25 deletion by dual laser flow karyotyping to involve 2% of the X chromosome, or approximately 3 Mbp of DNA sequences. To further delineate the deletion we performed a series of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analyses which showed that DXS6 and DXS100, two Xq25-specific markers, are missing from 45-004 DNA. Five yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from a chromosome X specific YAC library containing sequences deleted in patient`s 43-004 DNA were isolated. These five YACs did not overlap, and their end fragments were used to screen the CEPH MegaYAC library. Seven YACs were isolated from the CEPH MegaYAC library. They could be arranged into a contig which spans between DXS6 and DXS100. The contig contains a minimum of 2.5 Mbp of human DNA. A total of 12 YAC end clone, lambda subclones and STS probes have been used to order clones within the contig. These reagents were also used in Southern blot and patients showed interstitial deletions in Xq25. The size of these deletions range between 0.5 and 2.5 Mbp. The shortest deletion probably represents the critical region for the XLP gene.

  17. Human germ cell formation in xenotransplants of induced pluripotent stem cells carrying X chromosome aneuploidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Antonia A; Chiang, H Rosaria; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E; Reijo Pera, Renee A

    2014-09-22

    Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial loss of the second sex chromosome and is characterized by spontaneous fetal loss in >90% of conceptions. Survivors possess an array of somatic and germline clinical characteristics. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an opportunity for insight into genetic requirements of the X chromosome linked to Turner syndrome. We derived iPSCs from Turner syndrome and control individuals and examined germ cell development as a function of X chromosome composition. We demonstrate that two X chromosomes are not necessary for reprogramming or maintenance of pluripotency and that there are minimal differences in gene expression, at the single cell level, linked to X chromosome aneuploidies. Formation of germ cells, as assessed in vivo through a murine xenotransplantation model, indicated that undifferentiated iPSCs, independent of X chromosome composition, are capable of forming germ-cell-like cells (GCLCs) in vivo. In combination with clinical data regarding infertility in women with X chromosome aneuploidies, results suggest that two intact X chromosomes are not required for human germ cell formation, qualitatively or quantitatively, but rather are likely to be required for maintenance of human germ cells to adulthood.

  18. The use of DAPI fluorescence lifetime imaging for investigating chromatin condensation in human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Botchway, Stanley; Lynch, Christophe; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian

    2016-08-16

    Chromatin undergoes dramatic condensation and decondensation as cells transition between the different phases of the cell cycle. The organization of chromatin in chromosomes is still one of the key challenges in structural biology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), a technique which utilizes a fluorophore's fluorescence lifetime to probe changes in its environment, was used to investigate variations in chromatin compaction in fixed human chromosomes. Fixed human metaphase and interphase chromosomes were labeled with the DNA minor groove binder, DAPI, followed by measurement and imaging of the fluorescence lifetime using multiphoton excitation. DAPI lifetime variations in metaphase chromosome spreads allowed mapping of the differentially compacted regions of chromatin along the length of the chromosomes. The heteromorphic regions of chromosomes 1, 9, 15, 16, and Y, which consist of highly condensed constitutive heterochromatin, showed statistically significant shorter DAPI lifetime values than the rest of the chromosomes. Differences in the DAPI lifetimes for the heteromorphic regions suggest differences in the structures of these regions. DAPI lifetime variations across interphase nuclei showed variation in chromatin compaction in interphase and the formation of chromosome territories. The successful probing of differences in chromatin compaction suggests that FLIM has enormous potential for application in structural and diagnostic studies.

  19. Studies on the integration of hepatitis B virusDNA sequence in human sperm chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-MinHUANG; Tian-HuaHUANG

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To study the integration of hepatitis Bvirus(HBV)DNAinto sperm chromosomes in hepatitsBpatients and the features of its integration.Methods:Sperm chromosomes of 14subjects(5healthy controls and9HBpatients,including1acute hepatitis B,2chronic active hepatitisB,4chronic persistent hepatitsB,2HBsAg chronic carriers with no clinical symptoms)were prepared using imterspecific in vitro fertilization between zona-free hamster oocytes and human spermatozoa.Fluosescence in situ hybridization(FISH)to sperm chromosome spreads was carried out with biotin-labeled full length HBVDNAprobe to detect the specificHBVDNA sequences in the sperm chromosomes.Results:Specific fluorescent signal spots for HBVDNAwere seen iv sperm chromosomes of one patient with chronic persistent hepatitisB.In9(9/42)sperm chromosome complements containing fluorescent signal spots,one presented5obvious FISHspots and the others2to4signals.The fluorescence intensity showed significant difference among the signal spots.The distribution of signal sites among chromosomes seems to be random.Con clusion:HBV could integrate into human sperm chromosomes.Results suggest that the possibility of vertical transmission of HBVvia the germ line tothe next generation is present.

  20. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes: altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werken, C; Avo Santos, M; Laven, J S E; Eleveld, C; Fauser, B C J M; Lens, S M A; Baart, E B

    2015-10-01

    Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal phosphorylation dynamics of histone H2A at T120 (H2ApT120) by Bub1 kinase and subsequent recruitment of Shugoshin, but phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 3 (H3pT3) by Haspin failed to show the expected centromeric enrichment on metaphase chromosomes in the zygote. Human cleavage stage embryos show high levels of chromosomal instability. What causes this high error rate is unknown, as mechanisms used to ensure proper chromosome segregation in mammalian embryos are poorly described. In this study, we investigated the pathways regulating CPC targeting to the inner centromere in human embryos. We characterized the distribution of the CPC in relation to activity of its two main centromeric targeting pathways: the Bub1-H2ApT120-Sgo-CPC and Haspin-H3pT3-CPC pathways. The study was conducted between May 2012 and March 2014 on human surplus embryos resulting from in vitro fertilization treatment and donated for research. In zygotes, nuclear envelope breakdown was monitored by time-lapse imaging to allow timed incubations with specific inhibitors to arrest at prometaphase and metaphase, and to interfere with Haspin and Aurora B/C kinase activity. Functionality of the targeting pathways was assessed through characterization of histone phosphorylation dynamics by immunofluorescent analysis, combined with gene expression by RT-qPCR and immunofluorescent localization of key pathway proteins. Immunofluorescent analysis of the CPC subunit Inner Centromere Protein revealed the pool of stably bound CPC proteins was not strictly confined to the inner centromere of prometaphase chromosomes in human zygotes, as observed in later stages of preimplantation development and somatic cells. Investigation of the

  1. Arrested rearrangement of TCR V[beta] genes in thymocytes from children with x-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleasman, J.W.; Harville, T.O.; White, G.B.; Barrett, D.J. (Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainsville, FL (United States)); George, J.F. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)); Goodenow, M.M. (Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainsville, FL (United States) Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) is an immunodeficiency disorder in which T cell development is arrested in the thymic cortex. B lymphocytes in children with X-linked SCID seem to differentiate normally. X-linked SCID is associated with a mutation in the gene that encodes the IL-2R [gamma]-chain. Because TCR-[beta] gene recombination is a pivotal initial event in T lymphocyte onteogeny within the thymus, the authors hypothesized that a failure to express normal IL-2R[gamma] could lead to impaired TCR-[beta] gene recombination in early thymic development. PCR was used to determine the status of TCR-[beta] gene-segment rearrangements in thymic DNA that had been obtained from children with X-linked SCID. The initial step in TCR-[beta] gene rearrangement, that of D[beta] to J[beta] recombination, was readily detected in all thymus samples from children with X-linked SCID; in contrast, V[beta] to DJ[beta] gene rearrangements were undetectable in the same samples. Both D[beta] to J[beta] and V[beta] to DJ[beta] TCR genes were rearranged in the thymic tissues obtained from immunologically normal children. The authors conclude that TCR[beta]-chain gene rearrangement is arrested in children with X-linked SCID. The results suggest a causative relationship between the failure of TCR [beta]-chain gene arrangements to proceed beyond DJ[beta] rearrangements and the production of a nonfunctional IL-2R [gamma]-chain. 45 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Characterization of mutations in 22 females with X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (Happle syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Gail E; Kelley, Richard I; Pureza, V; Smith, D; Kopacz, Kevin; Pitt, James; Sutphen, Rebecca; Sheffield, Leslie J; Metzenberg, Aida B

    2002-01-01

    Human X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2) or Happle syndrome is associated with mutations in the human emopamil binding protein (EBP), a delta8-delta7-sterol isomerase involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. The purpose of the current study was to determine the spectrum of EBP mutations in females with CDPX2 and the utility of biochemical screening for the disorder by analysis of plasma sterols. Genomic sequencing of the coding exons of the human delta8-delta7-sterol isomerase gene was performed on DNA from 26 females with suspected X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata. Clinical data and sterol analyses were obtained for 24 and 23 of the patients, respectively. Mutations in the human EBP delta8-delta7-sterol isomerase gene were found in 22 (85%) of 26 females studied, including 20 (91%) of 22 patients who demonstrated an abnormal sterol profile. Thirteen of the mutations have not been reported previously. All of the females in whom mutations were found demonstrated typical skin manifestations of CDPX2, and all but one had a skeletal dysplasia. Plasma sterol analysis was a highly specific and sensitive indicator of the presence of an EBP mutation in females with suspected CDPX2, including a clinically unaffected mother of a sporadic case. No clear genotype/phenotype correlations were ascertained, probably because phenotypic expression is influenced substantially by the pattern of X-inactivation in an affected female.

  3. Genetic Diversity on the Human X Chromosome Does Not Support a Strict Pseudoautosomal Boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Daniel J; Brotman, Sarah M; Wilson Sayres, Melissa A

    2016-05-01

    Unlike the autosomes, recombination between the X chromosome and the Y chromosome is often thought to be constrained to two small pseudoautosomal regions (PARs) at the tips of each sex chromosome. PAR1 spans the first 2.7 Mb of the proximal arm of the human sex chromosomes, whereas the much smaller PAR2 encompasses the distal 320 kb of the long arm of each sex chromosome. In addition to PAR1 and PAR2, there is a human-specific X-transposed region that was duplicated from the X to the Y chromosome. The X-transposed region is often not excluded from X-specific analyses, unlike the PARs, because it is not thought to routinely recombine. Genetic diversity is expected to be higher in recombining regions than in nonrecombining regions because recombination reduces the effect of linked selection. In this study, we investigated patterns of genetic diversity in noncoding regions across the entire X chromosome of a global sample of 26 unrelated genetic females. We found that genetic diversity in PAR1 is significantly greater than in the nonrecombining regions (nonPARs). However, rather than an abrupt drop in diversity at the pseudoautosomal boundary, there is a gradual reduction in diversity from the recombining through the nonrecombining regions, suggesting that recombination between the human sex chromosomes spans across the currently defined pseudoautosomal boundary. A consequence of recombination spanning this boundary potentially includes increasing the rate of sex-linked disorders (e.g., de la Chapelle) and sex chromosome aneuploidies. In contrast, diversity in PAR2 is not significantly elevated compared to the nonPARs, suggesting that recombination is not obligatory in PAR2. Finally, diversity in the X-transposed region is higher than in the surrounding nonPARs, providing evidence that recombination may occur with some frequency between the X and Y chromosomes in the X-transposed region.

  4. BGN Mutations in X-Linked Spondyloepimetaphyseal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Yoon; Bae, Jun-Seok; Kim, Nayoung K D; Forzano, Francesca; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Baldo, Chiara; Faravelli, Francesca; Cho, Tae-Joon; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Kyoung Yeul; Ikegawa, Shiro; Shim, Jong Sup; Ko, Ah-Ra; Miyake, Noriko; Nishimura, Gen; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Spranger, Jürgen; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Park, Woong-Yang; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2016-06-02

    Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasias (SEMDs) comprise a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive disorders. An apparent X-linked recessive (XLR) form of SEMD in a single Italian family was previously reported. We have been able to restudy this family together with a second family from Korea by segregating a severe SEMD in an X-linked pattern. Exome sequencing showed missense mutations in BGN c.439A>G (p.Lys147Glu) in the Korean family and c.776G>T (p.Gly259Val) in the Italian family; the c.439A>G (p.Lys147Glu) mutation was also identified in a further simplex SEMD case from India. Biglycan is an extracellular matrix proteoglycan that can bind transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and thus regulate its free concentration. In 3-dimensional simulation, both altered residues localized to the concave arc of leucine-rich repeat domains of biglycan that interact with TGF-β. The observation of recurrent BGN mutations in XLR SEMD individuals from different ethnic backgrounds allows us to define "XLR SEMD, BGN type" as a nosologic entity.

  5. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Irradiated with Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of the present experiment was to provide data on the dose-dependent production of chromosome aberrations such as dicentrics, centric rings, and excess acentrics. Radiation is one of the more dangerous clastogens in the environment. Ionizing radiation causes chromosome breakages and various cytogenetic aberrations in exposed cells. In an investigation into radiation emergencies, it is important to estimate the dose to exposed persons for several reasons. Physical dosimeters (e. g., film badges) may misrepresent the actual radiation dose and may not be available in a radiological accident or terrorism incident. Biological dosimetry is suitable for estimating the radiation dose during such accidents. The dicentric chromosome assay is very sensitive and a reliable bio-indicator in cases of accidental overexposure.

  6. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This project is now progressing strongly. Thirteen somatic cell hybrids containing rearranged {number sign}16 chromosomes have been constructed, bringing the total number of hybrids constructed by the group to 27 which divides chromosome 16 into 29 regions. 170 probes have been mapped into these regions. Although this is the second progress report for this contract it essentially contains all the work carried out since the first progress report covered a period of less than three months during which little had been done other than setting up. The project has been progressing very well and has led to numerous collaborations with other groups involved in mapping this chromosome or studying genes on it. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Chromosomal localization of the human gene encoding c-myc promoter-binding protein (MPB1) to chromosome 1p35-pter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R.A.; Dowler, L.L. [Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States); Adkison, L.R. [Mercer Univ. School of Medicine, Macon, GA (United States); Ray, R.B. [St. Louis Univ. Health Sciences Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-02-01

    We report the mapping of the human gene MPB1 (c-myc promoter binding protein), a recently identified gene regulatory protein. MPB1 binds to the c-myc P2 promoter and exerts a negative regulatory role on c-myc transcription. Since exogenous expression from transfection of the MPB1 gene suppresses the tumorigenic property of breast cancer cells, there was interest in determining the chromosomal location of this gene. The human MPB1 gene was assigned to human chromosome 1p35-pter using Southern blot analyses of genomic DNAs from rodent-human somatic hybrid cell lines. A specific human genomic fragment was observed only in the somatic cell lines containing human chromosome 1 or the p35-pter region of the chromosome. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites near the polymorphic CAG repeat in the human androgen-receptor gene correlates with X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Moseley, A.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Belmont, J.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The human androgen-receptor gene (HUMARA; GenBank) contains a highly polymorphic trinucleotide repeat in the first exon. The authors have found that the methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites less than 100 pb away from this polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) correlates with X inactivation. The close proximity of the restriction-enzyme sites to the STR allows the development of a PCR assay that distinguishes between the maternal and paternal alleles and identifies their methylation status. The accuracy of this assay was tested on (a) DNA from hamster/human hybrid cell lines containing either an active or inactive human X chromosome; (b) DNA from normal males and females; and (c) DNA from females showing nonrandom patterns of X inactivation. Data obtained using this assay correlated substantially with those obtained using the PGK, HPRT, and M27[beta] probes, which detect X inactivation patterns by Southern blot analysis. In order to demonstrate one application of this assay, the authors examined X inactivation patterns in the B lymphocytes of potential and obligate carriers of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. PJA1, encoding a RING-H2 finger ubiquitin ligase, is a novel human X chromosome gene abundantly expressed in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Chen, Yiwang; Tagle, Danilo A; Cai, Tao

    2002-06-01

    RING-finger proteins contain cysteine-rich, zinc-binding domains and are involved in the formation of macromolecular scaffolds important for transcriptional repression and ubiquitination. In this study, we have identified a RING-H2 finger gene, PJA1 (for praja-1), from a human brain cDNA library and mapped it to human chromosome Xq12 between markers DXS983 and DXS1216, a region implicated in X-linked mental retardation (MRX). Northern blot analysis indicated a 2.7-kb transcript that was abundantly expressed in the brain, including regions of the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, medulla, occipital pole, frontal lobe, temporal lobe, and putamen. Amino acid sequence analysis of the 71-kDa protein PJA1 showed 52.3% identity to human PJA2 (for praja-2, also known as NEURODAP1/KIAA0438) and also a significant identity to its homologs in rat, mouse, and zebrafish. In vitro binding and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that both PJA1 and PJA2 are able to bind the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH5B. Moreover, the ubiquitination assay indicated that PJA1 and PJA2 have an E2-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Thus our findings demonstrate that PJA1 can be involved in protein ubiquitination in the brain and is a suitable candidate gene for MRX.

  10. Role of the X-linked gene GPR174 in autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, C; Mitchell, A L; Gan, E; Wilson, I; Pearce, S H S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune endocrinopathies demonstrate a profound gender bias, but the reasons for this remain obscure. The 1000 genes on the X chromosome are likely to be implicated in this inherent susceptibility; various theories, including skewed X chromosome inactivation and fetal microchimerism, have been proposed. GPR174 is an Xq21 putative purinergic receptor that is widely expressed in lymphoid tissues. A single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs3827440, encoding Ser162Pro, has recently been associated with Graves' disease in Chinese and Polish populations, suggesting a role of this X chromosome gene in autoimmune disease. We investigated the role of rs3827440 in a UK cohort of patients with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD). Samples from 286 AAD cases and 288 healthy controls were genotyped using TaqMan single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays (C_25954273_10) on the Applied Biosystems 7900HT Fast real-time PCR system. Using a dominant (present/absent) model, the serine-encoding T allele of rs3827440 was present in 189 of 286 AAD patients (66%) compared with 132 of 288 unaffected controls (46%) [P = .010, odds ratio 1.80 (5%-95% confidence interval 1.22-2.67)]. An allele dosage model found a significant excess of the T allele in AAD patients compared with controls [P = .03, odds ratio 1.34 (5%-95% confidence interval 1.07-1.67)]. We have demonstrated a significant association of this X chromosome-encoded immunoreceptor with AAD for the first time. This X-linked gene could have a more generalized role in autoimmunity pathogenesis: G protein-coupled receptors are promising drugable targets, and further work to elucidate the functional role of GPR174 is now warranted.

  11. Visualization of Elasticity Distribution of Single Human Chromosomes by Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Keisuke; Hoshi, Osamu; Fukushi, Daisuke; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2005-07-01

    We succeeded in visualizing the spatial distribution of the local elasticity of mitotic human chromosomes in a liquid environment using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). Force-versus-indentation curves (force curves) were collected over an entire single chromosome. To estimate the local elasticity of thin chromosomes from the force curves, we examined the validity of a previously proposed model that takes into account the effect of the finite thickness of samples on the estimation of the local elasticity. The force curves obtained are well represented by the model within a small indentation range. The elasticity obtained is independent of the indentation within an indentation range of 100 nm. Such fitting procedures for the force curves collected are carried out over the entire chromosome, and the elasticity distribution of a single chromosome is visualized.

  12. Tri-directional anaphases as a novel chromosome segregation defect in human oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverfield, Jenna; Dean, Nicola L; Nöel, Diana; Rémillard-Labrosse, Gaudeline; Paradis, Veronique; Kadoch, Isaac-Jacques; FitzHarris, Greg

    2017-06-01

    What are the chromosome segregation errors in human oocyte meiosis-I that may underlie oocyte aneuploidy? Multiple modes of chromosome segregation error were observed, including tri-directional anaphases, which we attribute to loss of bipolar spindle structure at anaphase-I. Oocyte aneuploidy is common and associated with infertility, but mechanistic information on the chromosome segregation errors underlying these defects is scarce. Lagging chromosomes were recently reported as a possible mechanism by which segregation errors occur. Long-term confocal imaging of chromosome dynamics in 50 human oocytes collected between January 2015 and May 2016. Germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes were collected from women undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles and also CD1 mice. Oocytes were microinjected with complementary RNAs to label chromosomes, and in a subset of oocytes, the meiotic spindle. Oocytes were imaged live through meiosis-I using confocal microscopy. 3D image reconstruction was used to classify chromosome segregation phenotypes at anaphase-I. Segregation phenotypes were related to spindle dynamics and cell cycle timings. Most (87%) mouse oocytes segregated chromosomes with no obvious defects. We found that 20% of human oocytes segregated chromosomes bi-directionally with no lagging chromosomes. The rest were categorised as bi-directional anaphase with lagging chromosomes (20%), bi-directional anaphase with chromatin mass separation (34%) or tri-directional anaphase (26%). Segregation errors correlated with chromosome misalignment prior to anaphase. Spindles were tripolar when tri-directional anaphases occurred. Anaphase phenotypes did not correlate with meiosis-I duration (P = 0.73). Not applicable. Oocytes were recovered at GV stage after gonadotrophin-stimulation, and the usual oocyte quality caveats apply. Whilst the possibility that imaging may affect oocyte physiology cannot be formally excluded, detailed controls and justifications are presented

  13. Prediction of human cell radiosensitivity: Comparison of clonogenic assay with chromosome aberrations scored using premature chromosome condensation with fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasai, K.; Evans, J.W.; Kovacs, M.S. [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether chromosome aberrations scored by premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can predict the radiosensitivity of human cell lines, thereby providing a possible means of assessing the in situ radiosensitivity of normal tissues and the radiocurability of individual human cancers. We used four cells lines of different radiosensitivity: normal human fibroblasts (AG1522), ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts (AT2052), a human fibrosarcoma cell line (HT1080), and a human melanoma cell line (melanoma 903). These were irradiated in plateau phase with a range of doses and assessed both for clonogenic cell survival and for aberrations in a single chromosome (number 4) immediately after, and 24 h after irradiation. The initial number of breaks in chromosome 4 was proportional to irradiation dose and was identical for all the different human cell lines, irrespective of radiosensitivity. On the other hand, the number of chromosome 4 breaks remaining 24 h after irradiation reflected the radiosensitivity of the cells such that the relationship between residual chromosome aberrations and cell survival was the same for the different cell lines. These results suggest that the scoring of chromosome aberrations in interphase using FISH with PCC holds considerable promise for predicting the radiosensitivity of normal and tumor tissues in situ. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Regulation of X-linked gene expression during early mouse development by Rlim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Shin, JongDae; Shea, Jeremy M; Yu, Jun; Bošković, Ana; Byron, Meg; Zhu, Xiaochun; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Torres, Eduardo M; Zhu, Lihua J; Rando, Oliver J; Bach, Ingolf

    2016-09-19

    Mammalian X-linked gene expression is highly regulated as female cells contain two and male one X chromosome (X). To adjust the X gene dosage between genders, female mouse preimplantation embryos undergo an imprinted form of X chromosome inactivation (iXCI) that requires both Rlim (also known as Rnf12) and the long non-coding RNA Xist. Moreover, it is thought that gene expression from the single active X is upregulated to correct for bi-allelic autosomal (A) gene expression. We have combined mouse genetics with RNA-seq on single mouse embryos to investigate functions of Rlim on the temporal regulation of iXCI and Xist. Our results reveal crucial roles of Rlim for the maintenance of high Xist RNA levels, Xist clouds and X-silencing in female embryos at blastocyst stages, while initial Xist expression appears Rlim-independent. We find further that X/A upregulation is initiated in early male and female preimplantation embryos.

  15. Four unrelated patients with Lubs X-linked mental retardation syndrome and different Xq28 duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Oliver; Gebauer, Konstanze; Lechno, Stanislav; van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Bonin, Michael; Seidel, Jörg; Thamm-Mücke, Barbara; Horn, Denise; Klopocki, Eva; Hertzberg, Christoph; Zechner, Ulrich; Haaf, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    The Lubs X-linked mental retardation syndrome (MRXSL) is caused by small interstitial duplications at distal Xq28 including the MECP2 gene. Here we report on four novel male patients with MRXSL and different Xq28 duplications delineated by microarray-based chromosome analysis. All mothers were healthy carriers of the duplications. Consistent with an earlier report [Bauters et al. (2008); Genome Res 18: 847-858], the distal breakpoints of all four Xq28 duplications were located in regions containing low-copy repeats (LCRs; J, K, and L groups), which may facilitate chromosome breakage and reunion events. The proximal breakpoint regions did not contain known LCRs. Interestingly, we identified apparent recurrent breakage sites in the proximal and distal breakpoint regions. Two of the four patients displayed more complex rearrangements. Patient 2 was endowed with a quadruplicated segment and a small triplication within the duplication, whereas patient 3 displayed two triplicated segments within the duplication, supporting that the Fork Stalling and Template Switching (FoSTeS) model may explain a subset of the structural rearrangements in Xq28. Clinically, muscular hypertonia and contractures of large joints may present a major problem in children with MRXSL. Because injection of botulinum toxin (BT-A; Botox) proved to be extremely helpful for patient 1, we recommend consideration of Botox treatment in other patients with MRXSL and severe joint contractures.

  16. Thermolabile phenol sulfotransferase gene (STM): Localization to human chromosome 16p11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, I.A.; Her, C.; Weinshilboum, M. [Mayo Medical School, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Thermolabile (TL) phenol sulfotransferase (PST) catalyzes the sulfate conjugation of phenolic monoamine neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. We recently cloned a cDNA for human liver TL PST and expressed it in COS-1 cells. We now report the chromosomal localization of the human TL PST gene (STM) as well as its partial sequence. DNA from NIGMS Human/Rodent Somatic Cell Hybrid Mapping Panels 1 and 2 was screened by use of the PCR, and the STM gene was mapped to chromosome 16. Regional localization to 16p11.2 was performed by PCR analysis of a high-resolution mouse/human somatic cell hybrid panel that contained defined portions of human chromosome 16. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Chromosome distribution in human sperm – a 3D multicolor banding-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrasek Kristin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear architecture studies in human sperm are sparse. By now performed ones were practically all done on flattened nuclei. Thus, studies close at the in vivo state of sperm, i.e. on three-dimensionally conserved interphase cells, are lacking by now. Only the position of 14 chromosomes in human sperm was studied. Results Here for the first time a combination of multicolor banding (MCB and three-dimensional analysis of interphase cells was used to characterize the position and orientation of all human chromosomes in sperm cells of a healthy donor. The interphase nuclei of human sperm are organized in a non-random way, driven by the gene density and chromosome size. Conclusion Here we present the first comprehensive results on the nuclear architecture of normal human sperm. Future studies in this tissue type, e.g. also in male patients with unexplained fertility problems, may characterize yet unknown mechanisms of infertility.

  18. Hierarchical multifractal representation of symbolic sequences and application to human chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provata, A.; Katsaloulis, P.

    2010-02-01

    The two-dimensional density correlation matrix is constructed for symbolic sequences using contiguous segments of arbitrary size. The multifractal spectrum obtained from this matrix motif is shown to characterize the correlations in the symbolic sequences. This method is applied to entire human chromosomes, shuffled human chromosomes, reconstructed human genomic sequences and to artificial random sequences. It is shown that all human chromosomes have common characteristics in their multifractal spectrum and deviate substantially from random and uncorrelated sequences of the same size. Small deviations are observed between the longer and the shorter chromosomes, especially for the higher (in absolute values) statistical moments. The correlations are crucial for the form of the multifractal spectrum; surrogate shuffled chromosomes present randomlike spectrum, distinctly different from the actual chromosomes. Analytical approaches based on hierarchical superposition of tensor products show that retaining pair correlations in the sequences leads to a closer representation of the genomic multifractal spectra, especially in the region of negative exponents, due to the underrepresentation of various functional units (such as the cytosine-guanine CG combination and its complementary GC complex). Retaining higher-order correlations in the construction of the tensor products is a way to approach closer the structure of the multifractal spectra of the actual genomic sequences. This hierarchical approach is generic and is applicable to other correlated symbolic sequences.

  19. Three-dimensional genome architecture influences partner selection for chromosomal translocations in human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Engreitz

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations are frequent features of cancer genomes that contribute to disease progression. These rearrangements result from formation and illegitimate repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, a process that requires spatial colocalization of chromosomal breakpoints. The "contact first" hypothesis suggests that translocation partners colocalize in the nuclei of normal cells, prior to rearrangement. It is unclear, however, the extent to which spatial interactions based on three-dimensional genome architecture contribute to chromosomal rearrangements in human disease. Here we intersect Hi-C maps of three-dimensional chromosome conformation with collections of 1,533 chromosomal translocations from cancer and germline genomes. We show that many translocation-prone pairs of regions genome-wide, including the cancer translocation partners BCR-ABL and MYC-IGH, display elevated Hi-C contact frequencies in normal human cells. Considering tissue specificity, we find that translocation breakpoints reported in human hematologic malignancies have higher Hi-C contact frequencies in lymphoid cells than those reported in sarcomas and epithelial tumors. However, translocations from multiple tissue types show significant correlation with Hi-C contact frequencies, suggesting that both tissue-specific and universal features of chromatin structure contribute to chromosomal alterations. Our results demonstrate that three-dimensional genome architecture shapes the landscape of rearrangements directly observed in human disease and establish Hi-C as a key method for dissecting these effects.

  20. Nanodissection of human chromosomes with near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, K; Riemann, I; Fritzsche, W

    2001-06-01

    Near-infrared laser pulses of a compact 80-MHz femtosecond laser source at 800 nm, a mean power of 15-100 mW, 170-fs pulse width, and millisecond beam dwell times at the target have been used for multiphoton-mediated nanoprocessing of human chromosomes. By focusing of the laser beam with high-numerical-aperture objectives of a scanning microscope to diffraction-limited spots and with light intensities of terawatts per cubic centimeter, precise submicrometer holes and cuts in human chromosomes have been processed by single-point exposure and line scans. A minimum FWHM cut size of ~100 nm during a partial dissection of chromosome 1, which is below the diffraction-limited spot size, and a minimum material removal of ~0.003mum (3) were determined by a scanning-force microscope. The plasma-induced ablated material corresponds to ~1/400 of the chromosome 1 volume and to ~65x10(3) base pairs of chromosomal DNA. A complete dissection could be performed with FWHM cut sizes below 200 nm. High-repetition-frequency femtosecond lasers at low mean power in combination with high-numerical-aperture focusing optics appear therefore as appropriate noncontact tools for nanoprocessing of bulk and (or) surfaces of transparent materials such as chromosomes. In particular, the noninvasive inactivation of certain genomic regions on single chromosomes within living cells becomes possible.

  1. Apoptosis preferentially eliminates irradiated g0 human lymphocytes bearing dicentric chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, P; Meschini, R; Lewinska, D; Palitti, F

    2008-02-01

    G(0) human peripheral blood lymphocytes were X-irradiated to determine whether there is a direct relationship between radiation-induced dicentric chromosomes and the triggering of apoptosis. Immediately after X-ray exposure, control and irradiated lymphocytes were analyzed for viability, apoptosis and chromosome damage using the premature chromosome condensation technique. A batch of lymphocytes was kept in liquid holding for 48 h and then loaded on Ficoll-Paque medium to separate apoptotic (high-density) and normal (normal-density) cells. Then the same end points were analyzed in high-density and normal-density fractions of control and irradiated lymphocytes. After 48 h of liquid holding, the majority of apoptotic cells contained dicentric chromosomes. These results demonstrate that in human lymphocytes, the type of chromosome damage influences the induction of programmed cell death and provide direct evidence that cells bearing dicentrics are eliminated by apoptosis. G0 lymphocytes are the most common tissue used in biodosimetry studies, and the amount of chromosomal damage detected depends on the time between exposure and sampling. Since the radiation-induced apoptotic cells show the presence of dicentrics, radiation-induced damage can be underestimated. These results may have relevance in evaluations of the efficacy of radiotherapy based on the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations.

  2. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Nakamura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and sometimes present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The precise relationship between mutations in the DMD gene and cardiomyopathy remain unclear. However, some hypothetical mechanisms are being considered to be associated with the presence of some several dystrophin isoforms, certain reported mutations, and an unknown dystrophin-related pathophysiological mechanism. Recent therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the severe dystrophinopathy phenotype, appears promising, but the presence of XLDCM highlights the importance of focusing on cardiomyopathy while elucidating the pathomechanism and developing treatment.

  3. X linked agammaglobulinemia: a single centre experience from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Rashid H; Parekh, Deep; Ahmad, Noor; Madkaikar, Manisha; Ahmed, Javed

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a series of seven cases of X-linked Agammaglobulinemia, diagnosed and receiving treatment at a tertiary care centre in Mumbai. The ages of the patients ranged from 15 mo to 15 y. After diagnosis at a mean age of 3 ½ y, all were advised intravenous immunoglobulin (IvIg) infusion therapy in doses of 400-600 mg/kg every 3-4 wk. They were followed up for an average duration of 9 y, throughout which the complications and overall response to immunoglobulin therapy have been observed. The clinical profiles of each of these cases were retrospectively analysed with respect to age at diagnosis, frequency and severity of infections before and after initiation of treatment, co-morbidities and response to therapy. The results demonstrate the importance of early diagnosis and its correlation with decreased complications.

  4. Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis and X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia: An Uncommon Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Lavrador

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by agammaglobulinemia requiring replacement treatment with immunoglobulin. The association of XLA and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN is unexpected and, to our knowledge, only one case was previously published. Case Report. The authors report the case of a 10-year-old boy with family history and prenatal diagnosis of XLA, treated from birth with intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy. He presented with pneumonia, macroscopic hematuria, nephrotic proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and hypercholesterolemia with normal renal function and serum complement levels. Renal histology showed immune complex mediated MPGN. He was started on high dose prednisolone and ramipril and switched to weekly subcutaneous immunoglobulin. After a 4-month treatment, hematuria and proteinuria significantly improved and prednisolone was gradually tapered without relapse. Conclusion. The pathogenic process underlying MPGN development in this patient is unknown but residual humoral immunity might play an important role. Thus, this case highlights the risk of autoimmune disorders among patients with XLA.

  5. X-linked deafness with stapes gusher in females

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadaki, E. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71110 Stavrakia, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Prassopoulos, P. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71110 Stavrakia, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Bizakis, J. [Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71110 Stavrakia, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Karampekios, S. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71110 Stavrakia, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Papadakis, H. [Department of Otolaryngology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71110 Stavrakia, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Gourtsoyiannis, N. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71110 Stavrakia, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    1998-11-01

    A 22-year-old woman presented with severe mixed hearing loss and a flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the middle ear during stapes surgery (stapes gusher). HRCT of the temporal bones showed characteristic abnormalities of the inner ear (bulbous dilatation of the lateral portion of the internal acoustic meatus with incomplete separation from the cochlea, and widening of the first part of the facial nerve canal) described in X-linked progressive mixed deafness with stapes gusher. The evaluation of the patient's family revealed a sister with the same clinical history and identical HRCT findings, and 11 normal male relatives. This is the first report with typical findings of this entity that affects only female members of a family, suggesting another type of inheritance.

  6. X-linked creatine transporter deficiency: clinical aspects and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Mancini, Grazia M; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-09-01

    Creatine transporter deficiency was discovered in 2001 as an X-linked cause of intellectual disability characterized by cerebral creatine deficiency. This review describes the current knowledge regarding creatine metabolism, the creatine transporter and the clinical aspects of creatine transporter deficiency. The condition mainly affects the brain while other creatine requiring organs, such as the muscles, are relatively spared. Recent studies have provided strong evidence that creatine synthesis also occurs in the brain, leading to the intriguing question of why cerebral creatine is deficient in creatine transporter deficiency. The possible mechanisms explaining the cerebral creatine deficiency are discussed. The creatine transporter knockout mouse provides a good model to study the disease. Over the past years several treatment options have been explored but no treatment has been proven effective. Understanding the pathogenesis of creatine transporter deficiency is of paramount importance in the development of an effective treatment.

  7. Chiari malformation, syringomyelia and bulbar palsy in X linked hypophosphataemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Laura; Wordsworth, Paul

    2015-11-11

    X linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) is a rare condition with numerous musculoskeletal complications. It may mimic other more familiar conditions, such as vitamin D deficiency, ankylosing spondylitis or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. We describe two cases with Chiari type 1 malformations and syringomyelia, neither of which is well recognised in XLH. The first presented late with the additional complications of spinal cord compression, pseudofracture, renal stones and gross femoroacetabular impingement requiring hip replacement. The second also had bulbar palsy; the first case to be described in this condition, to the best of our knowledge. We wish to raise awareness of the important neurological complications of syringomyelia, Chiari malformation, spinal cord compression and bulbar palsy when treating these patients. We also wish to draw attention to the utility of family history and genetic testing when making the diagnosis of this rare but potentially treatable condition.

  8. Use of chromosome translocations for measuring prior environment exposures in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in cytogenetic methodology are beginning to have a major impact upon our ability to provide assessments of environmental exposure in humans. The advent of fluorescent-based techniques for `painting` whole chromosomes has made the analysis of chromosome translocations rapid, specific, sensitive and routine. Chromosome painting has been used to address a wide variety of scientific questions, resulting in an increased understanding of the biological consequences of adverse environmental exposure. This paper describes the use of chromosome translocations as a biological marker of exposure and effect in humans. The relevance of translocations is discussed, as are the advantages and disadvantages of painting compared to classical cytogenetic methods for translocation evaluation. The factors to consider in the use of translocations as a retrospective indicator of exposure are then described. Several theoretical parameters that are important to the use of translocations are provided, and the paper concludes with a vision for the future of cytogenetic methodology.

  9. The gene for calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAMLG) is located on human Chromosome 5q23 and a syntenic region of mouse chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bram, R.J.; Valentine, V.; Shapiro, D.N. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-15

    The CAMLG gene encodes a novel cyclophilin B-binding protein called calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand, which appears to be involved in the regulation of calcium signaling in T lymphocytes and other cells. The murine homolog, Caml, was localized by interspecific backcross analysis in the middle of chromosome 13. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, this gene was localized to human chromosome 5 in a region (q23) known to be syntenic to mouse chromosome 13. These results provide further evidence supporting the extensive homology between human chromosome 5q and mouse chromosome 13. In addition, the results will provide a basis for further evaluation of cytogenetic anomalies that may contribute to inherited defects in calcium signaling or immune system function. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Localization of the tight junction protein gene TJP1 to human chromosome 15q13, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region, and to mouse chromosome 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandas, T.K. [Darthmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    The gene encoding the tight junction (zonula occludens) protein, TJP1, was mapped to human chromosome 15q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a cDNA probe. The Jackson Laboratory backcross DNA panel derived from the cross (C57BL/6JEi X SPRET/Ei) F1 females X SPRET/Ei males was used to map the mouse Tjp1 to chromosome 7 near position 30 on the Chromosome Committee Map, a region with conserved homology to human chromosome 15q13. FISH studies on metaphases from patients with the Prader-Willi (PWS) or the Angelman syndrome (AS) showed that TJP1 maps close but distal to the PWS/AS chromosome region. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  11. [Assessing the inactivation pattern in chromosome X among symptomatic carriers and women with haemophilia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundo-Ayala, Jessica Noemi; Jaloma-Cruz, Ana Rebeca

    2008-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation is a stochastic event that occurs early in female embryo development to achieve dosage compensation with males. Certain genetic mechanisms affect the normal process causing a skewed X inactivation pattern which has clinical relevance in female carriers of X-linked recessive disorders, like haemophilia. The most commonly used assay to evaluate the X inactivation pattern is the PCR amplification of the human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA). The use of this technique in bleeding carriers and women with haemophilia allows identifying if their hemorrhagic symptoms are due to an unfavourable lyonization. Furthermore, these studies are important for understanding the X chromosome inactivation process in humans.

  12. "Micro-deletions" of the human Y chromosome and their relationship with male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Haines, Christopher J; Han, Yibing

    2008-04-01

    The Y chromosome evolves from an autochromosome and accumulates male-related genes including sex-determining region of Y-chromosome (SRY) and several spermatogenesis-related genes. The human Y chromosome (60 Mb long) is largely composed of repetitive sequences that give it a heterochromatic appearance, and it consists of pseudoautosomal, euchromatic, and heterochromatic regions. Located on the two extremities of the Y chromosome, pseudoautosomal regions 1 and 2 (PAR1 and PAR2, 2.6 Mb and 320 bp long, respectively) are homologs with the termini of the X chromosome. The euchromatic region and some of the repeat-rich heterochromatic parts of the Y chromosome are called "male-specific Y" (MSY), which occupy more than 95% of the whole Y chromosome. After evolution, the Y chromosome becomes the smallest in size with the least number of genes but with the most number of copies of genes that are mostly spermatogenesis-related. The Y chromosome is characterized by highly repetitive sequences (including direct repeats, inverted repeats, and palindromes) and high polymorphism. Several gene rearrangements on the Y chromosome occur during evolution owing to its specific gene structure. The consequences of such rearrangements are not only loss but also gain of specific genes. One hundred and fifty three haplotypes have been discovered in the human Y chromosome. The structure of the Y chromosome in the GenBank belongs to haplotype R1. There are 220 genes (104 coding genes, 111 pseudogenes, and 5 other uncategorized genes) according to the most recent count. The 104 coding genes encode a total of about 48 proteins/protein families (including putative proteins/protein families). Among them, 16 gene products have been discovered in the azoospermia factor region (AZF) and are related to spermatogenesis. It has been discovered that one subset of gene rearrangements on the Y chromosome, "micro-deletions", is a major cause of male infertility in some populations. However, controversies

  13. "Micro-deletions" of the human Y chromosome and their relationship with male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Li; Christopher J Haines; Yibing Han

    2008-01-01

    The Y chromosome evolves from an autochromosome and accumulates male-related genes including sex-determining region of Y-chromosome (SRY) and several spermatogenesis-related genes.The human Y chromosome (60 Mb long) is largely composed of repeti-tive sequences that give it a heterochromatic appearance,and it consists of pseudoautosomal,euchromatic,and heterochromatic regions.Located on the two extremities of the Y chromosome,pseudoautosomal regions 1 and 2 (PAR1 and PAR2,2.6 Mb and 320 bp long,re-spectively) are homologs with the termini of the X chromosome.The euchromatic region and some of the repeat-rich heterochromatic parts of the Y chromosome are called "male-specific Y" (MSY),which occupy more than 95% of the whole Y chromosome.After evolu-tion,the Y chromosome becomes the smallest in size with the least number of genes but with the most number of copies of genes that are mostly spermatogenesis-related.The Y chromosome is characterized by highly repetitive sequences (including direct repeats,inverted repeats,and palindromes) and high polymorphism.Several gene rearrangements on the Y chromosome occur during evolution owing to its specific gene structure.The consequences of such rearrangements are not only loss but also gain of specific genes.One hundred and fifty three haplotypes have been discovered in the human Y chromosome.The structure of the Y chromosome in the GenBank belongs to haplotype R1.There are 220 genes (104 coding genes,111 pseudogenes,and 5 other uncategorized genes) according to the most recent count.The 104 coding genes encode a total of about 48 proteins/protein families (including putative proteins/protein families).Among them,16 gene products have been discovered in the azoospermia factor region (AZF) and are related to spermatogenesis.It has been dis-covered that one subset of gene rearrangements on the Y chromosome,"micro-deletions",is a major cause of male infertility in some populations.However,controversies exist about different Y

  14. Comparative mapping of a gorilla-derived alpha satellite DNA clone on great ape and human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, A; Miller, D A; Shridhar, V; Rocchi, M; Miller, O J; Ward, D C

    1991-11-01

    We have isolated an alpha satellite DNA clone, pG3.9, from gorilla DNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on banded chromosomes under high stringency conditions revealed that pG3.9 identifies homologous sequences at the centromeric region of ten gorilla chromosomes, and, with few exceptions, also recognizes the homologous chromosomes in human. A pG3.9-like alphoid DNA is present on a larger number of orangutan chromosomes, but, in contrast, is present on only two chromosomes in the chimpanzee. These results show that the chromosomal subsets of related alpha satellite DNA sequences may undergo different patterns of evolution.

  15. DNA methylation signature in peripheral blood reveals distinct characteristics of human X chromosome numerical aberrations

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal sex chromosome numbers in humans are observed in Turner (45,X) and Klinefelter (47,XXY) syndromes. Both syndromes are associated with several clinical phenotypes, whose molecular mechanisms are obscure, and show a range of inter-individual penetrance. In order to understand the effect of abnormal numbers of X chromosome on the methylome and its correlation to the variable clinical phenotype, we performed a genome-wide methylation analysis using MeDIP and Illumina’s Infiniu...

  16. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowcock, A.M.; Barnes, R.I. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gerken, S.C.; Leppert, M. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shiang, R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Jabs, E.W.; Warren, A.C.; Antonarakis, S. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Retief, A.E. [Univ. of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg (South Africa); Vergnaud, G. [Centre d`Etudes du Bouchet, Vert le Petit (France)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 13 is presented. This map contains 59 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 94 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 9 laboratories. A total of 25 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the centromeric region of chromosome 13 to the terminal band of the long arm. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 158, 203, and 178cM respectively. The largest interval is 24 cM and is between D13Z1 (alphaRI) and ATP1AL1. The mean genetic distance between the 25 uniquely placed loci is 7 cM. 76 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. [239Pu and chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okladnikova, N D; Osovets, S V; Kudriavtseva, T I

    2009-01-01

    The genome status in somatic cells was assessed using the chromosomal aberration (CA) test in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 194 plutonium workers exposed to occupational radiation mainly from low-transportable compounds of airborne 230Pu. Pu body burden at the time of cytogenetic study varied from values close to the method sensitivity to values multiply exceeding the permissible level. Standard (routine) methods of peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivation were applied. Chromatid- and chromosomal-type structural changes were estimated. Aberrations were estimated per 100 examined metaphase cells. The quantitative relationship between the CA frequency and Pu body burden and the absorbed dose to the lung was found. Mathematical processing of results was carried out based on the phenomenological model. The results were shown as theoretical and experimental curves. The threshold of the CA yield was 0.43 +/- 0.03 kBq (Pu body burden) and 6.12 +/- 1.20 cGy (absorbed dose to the lung).

  18. Human male infertility, the Y chromosome, and dinosaur extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman J. Silber

    2011-06-01

    Our studies of the Y chromosome and male infertility suggest that the default mechanism for determining the sex of offspring is the temperature of egg incubation, and that genetic sex determination (based on sex chromosomes like X and Y has evolved many times over and over again in different ways, in different genera, as a more foolproof method than temperature variation of assuring a balanced sex ratio in offspring. The absence of such a genetic sex determining mechanism in dinosaurs may have led to a skewed sex ratio when global temperature dramatically changed 65,000,000 years ago, resulting in a preponderance of males, and consequentially a rapid decline in population.

  19. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Progress report, July 1992--August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1993-09-01

    Progress in identification of chromosomal transformations associated with leukemogenesis is described. In particular progress in DNA cloning of chromosomal break points in human cancer patients is described.

  20. Genomic structure and paralogous regions of the inversion breakpoint occurring between human chromosome 3p12.3 and orangutan chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Y; Grossmann, B; Tsend-Ayush, E; Grützner, F; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Yang, F; Haaf, T

    2005-01-01

    Intrachromosomal duplications play a significant role in human genome pathology and evolution. To better understand the molecular basis of evolutionary chromosome rearrangements, we performed molecular cytogenetic and sequence analyses of the breakpoint region that distinguishes human chromosome 3p12.3 and orangutan chromosome 2. FISH with region-specific BAC clones demonstrated that the breakpoint-flanking sequences are duplicated intrachromosomally on orangutan 2 and human 3q21 as well as at many pericentromeric and subtelomeric sites throughout the genomes. Breakage and rearrangement of the human 3p12.3-homologous region in the orangutan lineage were associated with a partial loss of duplicated sequences in the breakpoint region. Consistent with our FISH mapping results, computational analysis of the human chromosome 3 genomic sequence revealed three 3p12.3-paralogous sequence blocks on human chromosome 3q21 and smaller blocks on the short arm end 3p26-->p25. This is consistent with the view that sequences from an ancestral site at 3q21 were duplicated at 3p12.3 in a common ancestor of orangutan and humans. Our results show that evolutionary chromosome rearrangements are associated with microduplications and microdeletions, contributing to the DNA differences between closely related species. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Complexities of X chromosome inactivation status in female human induced pluripotent stem cells-a brief review and scientific update for autism research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandulakis, Mary G; Meganathan, Kesavan; Kroll, Kristen L; Bonni, Azad; Constantino, John N

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allow researchers to make customized patient-derived cell lines by reprogramming noninvasively retrieved somatic cells. These cell lines have the potential to faithfully represent an individual's genetic background; therefore, in the absence of available human brain tissue from a living patient, these models have a significant advantage relative to other models of neurodevelopmental disease. When using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to model X-linked developmental disorders or inherited conditions that undergo sex-specific modulation of penetrance (e.g., autism spectrum disorders), there are significant complexities in the course and status of X chromosome inactivation (XCI) that are crucial to consider in establishing the validity of cellular models. There are major gaps and inconsistencies in the existing literature regarding XCI status during the derivation and maintenance of hiPSCs and their differentiation into neurons. Here, we briefly describe the importance of the problem, review the findings and inconsistencies of the existing literature, delineate options for specifying XCI status in clonal populations, and develop recommendations for future studies.

  2. Paternal uniparental isodisomy for human chromosome 20 and absence of external ears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, N.B.; Rand, E.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M. [Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy can cause disease if the involved chromosomal region contains imprinted genes. Uniparental disomy for portions of human chromosomes 6, 7, 9, 11, 14 and 15 have been associated with abnormal phenotypes. We studied a patient with multiple abnormalities including an absent left ear with a small right ear remnant, microcephaly, congenital heart disease and Hirschprung`s disease. Cytogenetics revealed a 45,XY,-20,-20,+ter rea(20;20)(p13;p13) in 10/10 cells from bone marrow and 20/20 cells from peripheral blood. Analysis of a skin culture revealed a second cell line with trisomy 20 resulting from an apparently normal chromosome 20 in addition to the terminally rearranged chromosome, in 8/100 cells studied. The unusual phenotype of our patient was not consistent with previously reported cases of deletions of 20p or mosaic trisomy 20. We hypothesized that the patient`s phenotype could either result from deletion of both copies of a gene near the p arm terminus of chromosome 20 or from uniparental disomy of chromosome 20. There were no alterations or rearrangements of PTP-alpha (which maps to distal 20p) by Southern or Northern blot analysis. A chromosome 20 sub-telomeric probe was found to be present on the rearranged 20 by FISH suggesting that subtelomeric sequences have not been lost as a consequece of this rearrangement. To determine the parental origin of the 2 chromosome 20`s in the terminal rearrangement, we studied the genotypes of the proband and his parents in lymphoblastoid cell lines at 8 polymorphic loci. Genotypes at D20S115, D20S186, and D20S119 indicated that there was paternal isodisomy. Other loci were uninformative. This is the first example of uniparental disomy for chromosome 20. Further studies are warranted to correlate phenotype with uniparental inheritance of this chromosome.

  3. Derivation of consensus inactivation status for X-linked genes from genome-wide studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaton, Bradley P; Cotton, Allison M; Brown, Carolyn J

    2015-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation is the epigenetic silencing of the majority of the genes on one of the X chromosomes in XX therian mammals. In humans, approximately 15 % of genes consistently escape from this inactivation and another 15 % of genes vary between individuals or tissues in whether they are subject to, or escape from, inactivation. Multiple studies have provided inactivation status calls for a large subset of the genes on the X chromosome; however, these studies vary in which genes they were able to make calls for and in some cases which call they give a specific gene. This analysis aggregated three published studies that have examined X chromosome inactivation status of genes across the X chromosome, generating consensus calls and identifying discordancies. The impact of expression level and chromosomal location on X chromosome inactivation status was also assessed. Overall, we assigned a consensus XCI status 639 genes, including 78 % of protein-coding genes expressed outside of the testes, with a lower frequency for non-coding RNA and testis-specific genes. Study-specific discordancies suggest that there may be instability of XCI during cell culture and also highlight study-specific variations in call type. We observe an enrichment of discordant genes at boundaries between genes subject to and escaping from inactivation. This study has compiled a comprehensive list of X-chromosome inactivation statuses for genes and also discovered some biases which will help guide future studies examining X-chromosome inactivation.

  4. [The dependence of the level of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes on the duration of their cultivation under ultraviolet irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushkovskiĭ, S R; Bezrukov, V F; Bariliak, I R

    1998-01-01

    The effect of duration of cultivation of lymphocytes of human UV-irradiated peripheral blood on the chromosomal aberration rate was studied. Under prolonged cultivation the more irradiated blood samples revealed higher level of chromosomal aberrations. The existence of UV-induced delayed chromosomal instability is supposed that may be found under prolonged cultivation. The mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed.

  5. A Study for the Feature Selection to Identify GIEMSA-Stained Human Chromosomes Based on Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    neural network (ANN) has been adopted for the human chromosome classification. It is important to select optimum features for training neural network...Many studies for computer-based chromosome analysis have shown that it is possible to classify chromosomes into 24 subgroups. In addition, artificial

  6. Dose-Response Curve of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma-Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lusiyanti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome aberration is a biomarker to predict the level of cell damage caused by exposure to ionizing radiation on human body. Dicentric chromosome is a specific chromosome aberration caused by ionizing radiation and is used as a gold standard biodosimetry of individuals over exposed to ionizing radiation. In radiation accident the dicentric assays has been applied as biological dosimetry to estimate radiation absorbed dose and also to confirm the radiation dose received to radiation workers.The purpose of this study was to generate a dose response curve of chromosome aberration (dicentric in human lymphocyte induced by gamma radiation. Peripheral blood samples from three non smoking healthy volunteers aged between 25-48 years old with informed consent were irradiated with dose between 0.1-4.0 Gy and a control using gamma teletherapy source. The culture procedure was conducted following the IAEA standard procedures with slight modifications. Analysis of dose-response curves used was LQ model Y = a + αD + βD2. The result showed that α and β values of the curve obtained were 0.018 ± 0.006 and 0.013 ± 0.002, respectively. Dose response calibration curve for dicentric chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by gamma-radiation fitted to linear quadratic model. In order to apply the dose response curve of chromosome aberration disentric for biodosimetry, this standar curve still need to be validated.

  7. The microcell mediated transfer of human chromosome 8 into highly metastatic rat liver cancer cell line C5F

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Liu; Sheng-Long Ye; Jiong Yang; Zhao-You Tang; Yin-Kun Liu; Lun-Xiu Qin; Shuang-Jian Qiu; Rui-Xia Sun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Our previous research on the surgical samples of primary liver cancer with CGH showed that the loss of human chromosome 8p had correlation with the metastatic phenotype of liver cancer. In order to seek the functional evidence that there could be a metastatsis suppressor gene (s) for liver cancer on human chromosome 8, we tried to transfer normal human chromosome 8 into rat liver cancer cell line C5F, which had high metastatic potential to lung.METHODS: Human chromosome 8 randomly marked with neo gene was introduced into C5F cell line by MMCT and positive microcell hybrids were screened by double selections of G418 and HAT. Single cell isolation cloning was applied to clone microcell hybrids. Finally, STS-PCR and WCP-FISH were used to confirm the introduction.RESULTS: Microcell hybrids resistant to HAT and G418 were obtained and 15 clones were obtained by single-cell isolation cloning. STS-PCR and WCP-FISH proved that human chromosome 8 had been successfully introduced into rat liver cancer cell line C5F. STS-PCR detected a random loss in the chromosome introduced and WCP-FISH found a consistent recombination of the introduced human chromosome with the rat chromosome.CONCLUSION: The successful introduction of human chromosome 8 into highly metastatic rat liver cancer cell line builds the basis for seeking functional evidence of a metastasis suppressor gene for liver cancer harboring on human chromosome 8 and its subsequent cloning.

  8. The sequence and analysis of duplication-rich human chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Chan, Yee Man; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C; Bruno, William J; Buckingham, Judith M; Callen, David F; Campbell, Connie S; Campbell, Mary L; Campbell, Evelyn W; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F; Chasteen, Leslie A; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M; Cohn, Judith D; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A; Grady, Deborah L; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip B; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Manohar, Chitra F; Mark, Graham A; McMurray, Kimberly L; Meincke, Linda J; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K; Mundt, Mark O; Munk, A Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O; Robinson, Donna L; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P Scott; Williams, Albert L; Wills, Patricia L; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dejong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman A; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Eichler, Evan E; Gilna, Paul; Lucas, Susan M; Myers, Richard M; Rubin, Edward M; Pennacchio, Len A

    2004-12-23

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,670 aligned transcripts, 19 transfer RNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and three RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukaemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. Whereas the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene-poor pericentromere of the p arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events that are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  9. The orphan nuclear receptor ROR{alpha} (RORA) maps to a conserved region of homology on human chromosome 15q21-q22 and mouse chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giguere, V. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada); Beatty, B.; Squire, J. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    ROR{alpha} is a novel member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid receptor superfamily with unique DNA-binding properties. We have mapped the RORA gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 15q21-q22. To map the mouse Rora gene, a partial mouse cDNA clone was isolated from brain. Using interspecific backcross analysis, we have mapped the Rora gene to mouse chromosome 9. This places the human RORA gene in the proximity of the PML gene, which is involved in a reciprocal chromosomal translocation t(15:17) with the RARA gene in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Direct analysis of radiation-induced chromosome fragments and rings in unstimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes by means of the premature chromosome condensation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelias, G E; Maillie, H D

    1985-03-01

    Development of the procedure to stimulate peripheral blood lymphocytes has greatly facilitated the understanding of chromosome aberration formation and repair mechanisms in human cells. Yet, because radiation induces far more initial chromosome breaks than are observed as aberrations in metaphase, it has not been possible to examine the kinetics of primary chromosome breakage and rejoining with this procedure. An improved method to induce premature chromosome condensation in unstimulated lymphocytes has been used to study primary chromosome breakage, rejoining, and ring formation at various times after irradiation with up to 800 rad of X-rays. The dose-response relations for chromosome fragments analyzed immediately or 1, 2, or 24 h after exposure were found to be linear. Rapid rejoining of chromosome fragments, which takes place in the first 3 h after X-ray exposure, was not correlated with a simultaneous increase in the formation of rings. The yield of rings per cell scored 24 h after irradiation, however, increased significantly and fit a linear quadratic equation. Both chromosome fragment rejoining and ring formation were completed about 6 h after irradiation. The frequency distributions of rings among cells followed a Poisson distribution, whereas chromosome fragments were overdispersed.

  11. An improved method for producing radiation hybrids applied to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    At the initiation of the grant we had just produced radiation hybrids from a monochromosomal microcell hybrid containing human chromosome 19 as its only human component. Radiation hybrids were produced using doses of radiation ranging from 1000--8000 rads. Lethally irradiated cells were then fused to hamster recipients (CHTG49) and selected for growth in histidinol. Approximately 240 clones were isolated and 75 clones were expanded for the isolation of DNA. This report describes in situ hybridization studies and the introduction of markers into human chromosome 19.

  12. Zebrafish model for the genetic basis of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathy, Rakesh Kotapati; McCulloch, Daphne L; Akhtar, Saeed; Al-mubrad, Turki M; Shu, Xinhua

    2013-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) affects 1/4000 individuals in most populations, and X-linked RP (XLRP) is one of the most severe forms of human retinal degeneration. Mutations in both the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene and retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2) gene account for almost all cases of XLRP. The functional roles of both RPGR and RP2 in the pathogenesis of XLRP are unclear. Due to the surprisingly high degree of functional conservation between human genes and their zebrafish orthologues, the zebrafish has become an important model for human retinal disorders. In this brief review, we summarize the functional characterization of XLRP-causing genes, RPGR and RP2, in zebrafish, and highlight recent studies that provide insight into the cellular functions of both genes. This will not only shed light on disease mechanisms in XLRP but will also provide a solid platform to test RP-causing mutants before proposing XLRP gene therapy trials.

  13. Functional human artificial chromosomes are generated and stably maintained in human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandegar, Mohammad A.; Moralli, Daniela; Khoja, Suhail; Cowley, Sally; Chan, David Y.L.; Yusuf, Mohammed; Mukherjee, Sayandip; Blundell, Michael P.; Volpi, Emanuela V.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; James, William; Monaco, Zoia L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel and efficient non-integrating gene expression system in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) utilizing human artificial chromosomes (HAC), which behave as autonomous endogenous host chromosomes and segregate correctly during cell division. HAC are important vectors for investigating the organization and structure of the kinetochore, and gene complementation. HAC have so far been obtained in immortalized or tumour-derived cell lines, but never in stem cells, thus limiting their potential therapeutic application. In this work, we modified the herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon system for efficient transfer of HAC DNA into two hESc. The deriving stable clones generated green fluorescent protein gene-expressing HAC at high frequency, which were stably maintained without selection for 3 months. Importantly, no integration of the HAC DNA was observed in the hESc lines, compared with the fibrosarcoma-derived control cells, where the exogenous DNA frequently integrated in the host genome. The hESc retained pluripotency, differentiation and teratoma formation capabilities. This is the first report of successfully generating gene expressing de novo HAC in hESc, and is a significant step towards the genetic manipulation of stem cells and potential therapeutic applications. PMID:21593218

  14. Large-scale cloning of human chromosome 2-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) using an interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS)-PCR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Stanton, V P; Fujiwara, T M; Wang, J X; Rezonzew, R; Crumley, M J; Morgan, K; Gros, P; Housman, D; Schurr, E

    1995-03-20

    We report here an efficient approach to the establishment of extended YAC contigs on human chromosome 2 by using an interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS)-PCR-based screening strategy for YAC DNA pools. Genomic DNA was extracted from 1152 YAC pools comprised of 55,296 YACs mostly derived from the CEPH Mark I library. Alu-element-mediated PCR was performed for each pool, and amplification products were spotted on hybridization membranes (IRS filters). IRS probes for the screening of the IRS filters were obtained by Alu-element-mediated PCR. Of 708 distinct probes obtained from chromosome 2-specific somatic cell hybrids, 85% were successfully used for library screening. Similarly, 80% of 80 YAC walking probes were successfully used for library screening. Each probe detected an average of 6.6 YACs, which is in good agreement with the 7- to 7.5-fold genome coverage provided by the library. In a preliminary analysis, we have identified 188 YAC groups that are the basis for building contigs for chromosome 2. The coverage of the telomeric half of chromosome 2q was considered to be good since 31 of 34 microsatellites and 22 of 23 expressed sequence tags that were chosen from chromosome region 2q13-q37 were contained in a chromosome 2 YAC sublibrary generated by our experiments. We have identified a minimum of 1610 distinct chromosome 2-specific YACs, which will be a valuable asset for the physical mapping of the second largest human chromosome.

  15. X-linked lethal infantile spinal muscular atrophy: From clinical description to molecular mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumbach, L.; Schiavi, A. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The proximal spinal muscular atrophies (PSMA), one of the most common forms of lower motor neuron disease in children, are characterized by progressive muscle weakness due to loss of anterior horn cells. All three autosomal recessive forms have been mapped to chromosome 5q11.2-11.3, implying an allelic association between these disorders. Recent evidence from our laboratories, as well as others, suggests that a distinct form of lethal neonatal spinal muscular atrophy, associated with early onset contractures, is determined by a gene on the X chromosome. We report our efforts in mapping this disease locus. Our original studies have focused on two unrelated multigenerational families with similar clinical presentations of severe hypotonia, muscle weakness, and a disease course similar to Werdnig Hoffman except for the additional finding of congenital or early onset contractures. Muscle biopsy and/or autopsy were indicative of anterior horn cell loss in affected males. Disease occurrence in each of the families was consistent with an X-linked recessive mode of inheritance. Subsequently, two additional families have been identified, as well as several sporadic male cases. Linkage analysis has been completed in one of these families using highly polymorphic repeats dispersed 10 cM on the X chromosome. Interpretation of results was achieved using an automated data acquisition program. Analysis of over 300 haplotypes generated using PCR-based DNA markers have identified two 16 cM regions on Xp with complete concordance to the disease phenotype. Our currents efforts are focused on the region surrounding the Kallman gene, in attempts to better define a candidate region, as well as analyze possible candidate genes within this region.

  16. Evidence for X-linked introgression between molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae from Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, K S; Townson, H

    2012-06-01

    The M and S molecular forms of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) are morphologically identical incipient species in which reproductive isolation is incomplete, enabling low-level gene flow between forms. In an attempt to find differences between the M and S forms, sequence variation was studied at loci along the X chromosome in adult female An. gambiae from Angola. A high proportion of M form specimens from Angola (79% of the 456 X chromosomes sampled) were found to contain a 16-bp insertion in intron 4 of the X-linked GPRCCK1 locus, relative to the AgamP3 release of the An. gambiae PEST genome sequence. The insertion was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in Angolan M form populations. The same insertion was found in all S form specimens examined, regardless of where in Africa they were sampled, but was absent from a sample of M form specimens collected in Ghana, Bioko and Mali. In M form specimens from Angola, there was an association between alleles at the GPRCCK1 locus and those at a microsatellite locus, AGXH678, close to the centromere of the X chromosome, with significant linkage disequilibrium between loci separated by 0.472 Mbp (P < 0.033). We show that the insertion results from introgression from the S form into the M form, rather than from the retention of an ancestral character. Gene flow from the S to M form could allow genes of adaptive value to be transferred, including those conferring insecticide resistance and others influencing ecology and behaviour, and thus malaria transmission and control. We discuss factors that may have led to this introgression event.

  17. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Interphase Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte Carl

  18. Three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories in the human interphase cell nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1999-01-01

    markdownabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte Carl

  19. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models, which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte Car

  20. The TP53 dependence of radiation-induced chromosome instability in human lymphoblastoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Jordan, Robert; Evans, Helen H.; Lenarczyk, Marek; Liber, Howard

    2003-01-01

    The dose and TP53 dependence for the induction of chromosome instability were examined in cells of three human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WIL2 cells: TK6, a TP53-normal cell line, NH32, a TP53-knockout created from TK6, and WTK1, a WIL2-derived cell line that spontaneously developed a TP53 mutation. Cells of each cell line were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, and then surviving clones were isolated and expanded in culture for approximately 35 generations before the frequency and characteristics of the instability were analyzed. The presence of dicentric chromosomes, formed by end-to-end fusions, served as a marker of chromosomal instability. Unexposed TK6 cells had low levels of chromosomal instability (0.002 +/- 0.001 dicentrics/cell). Exposure of TK6 cells to doses as low as 5 cGy gamma rays increased chromosome instability levels nearly 10-fold to 0.019 +/- 0.008 dicentrics/cell. There was no further increase in instability levels beyond 5 cGy. In contrast to TK6 cells, unexposed cultures of WTK1 and NH32 cells had much higher levels of chromosome instability of 0.034 +/- 0.007 and 0.041 +/- 0.009, respectively, but showed little if any effect of radiation on levels of chromosome instability. The results suggest that radiation exposure alters the normal TP53-dependent cell cycle checkpoint controls that recognize alterations in telomere structure and activate apoptosis.

  1. [Molecular cytogenetic methods for studying interphase chromosomes in human brain cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurov, I Iu; Vorsanova, S G; Solov'ev, I V; Iurov, Iu B

    2010-09-01

    One of the main genetic factors determining the functional activity of the genome in somatic cells, including brain nerve cells, is the spatial organization of chromosomes in the interphase nucleus. For a long time, no studies of human brain cells were carried out until high-resolution methods of molecular cytogenetics were developed to analyze interphase chromosomes in nondividing somatic cells. The purpose of the present work was to assess the potential of high-resolution methods of interphase molecular cytogenetics for studying chromosomes and the nuclear organization in postmitotic brain cells. A high efficiency was shown by such methods as multiprobe and quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Multiprobe FISH and QFISH), ImmunoMFISH (analysis of the chromosome organization in different types of brain cells), and interphase chromosome-specific multicolor banding (ICS-MCB). These approaches allowed studying the nuclear organization depending on the gene composition and types of repetitive DNA of specific chromosome regions in certain types of brain cells (in neurons and glial cells, in particular). The present work demonstrates a high potential of interphase molecular cytogenetics for studying the structural and functional organizations of the cell nucleus in highly differentiated nerve cells. Analysis of interphase chromosomes of brain cells in the normal and pathological states can be considered as a promising line of research in modern molecular cytogenetics and cell neurobiology, i. e., molecular neurocytogenetics.

  2. Structure, organization, and sequence of alpha satellite DNA from human chromosome 17: evidence for evolution by unequal crossing-over and an ancestral pentamer repeat shared with the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1986-09-01

    The centromeric regions of all human chromosomes are characterized by distinct subsets of a diverse tandemly repeated DNA family, alpha satellite. On human chromosome 17, the predominant form of alpha satellite is a 2.7-kilobase-pair higher-order repeat unit consisting of 16 alphoid monomers. We present the complete nucleotide sequence of the 16-monomer repeat, which is present in 500 to 1,000 copies per chromosome 17, as well as that of a less abundant 15-monomer repeat, also from chromosome 17. These repeat units were approximately 98% identical in sequence, differing by the exclusion of precisely 1 monomer from the 15-monomer repeat. Homologous unequal crossing-over is suggested as a probable mechanism by which the different repeat lengths on chromosome 17 were generated, and the putative site of such a recombination event is identified. The monomer organization of the chromosome 17 higher-order repeat unit is based, in part, on tandemly repeated pentamers. A similar pentameric suborganization has been previously demonstrated for alpha satellite of the human X chromosome. Despite the organizational similarities, substantial sequence divergence distinguishes these subsets. Hybridization experiments indicate that the chromosome 17 and X subsets are more similar to each other than to the subsets found on several other human chromosomes. We suggest that the chromosome 17 and X alpha satellite subsets may be related components of a larger alphoid subfamily which have evolved from a common ancestral repeat into the contemporary chromosome-specific subsets.

  3. The human and mouse receptors of hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAMM, genes (HMMR) map to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter and mouse chromosome 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Roller, M.L.; Camper, S.A. [Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The gene for the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAAM (designated hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, HMMR (human) and Hmmr (mouse), for mapping purposes), was localized to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter by somatic cell and radiation hybrid analyses. Investigation of two interspecific back-crosses localized the mouse RHAMM (Hmmr) locus 18 cM from the centromere of mouse chromosome 11 within a region of synteny homology with human chromosome 5q23-q35 genes. The map position of the human RHAMM gene places it in a region comparatively rich in disease-associated genes, including those for low-frequency hearing loss, dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, and myeloid disorders associated with the 5q-syndrome. The RHAMM gene location and its ability to transform cells when overexpressed implicate RHAMM as a possible candidate gene in the pathogenesis of the recently described t(5;14)(q33-q34;q11) acute lymphoblastic leukemias. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  4. X-linked genes and risk of orofacial clefts: evidence from two population-based studies in Scandinavia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astanand Jugessur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Orofacial clefts are common birth defects of complex etiology, with an excess of males among babies with cleft lip and palate, and an excess of females among those with cleft palate only. Although genes on the X chromosome have been implicated in clefting, there has been no association analysis of X-linked markers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We added new functionalities in the HAPLIN statistical software to enable association analysis of X-linked markers and an exploration of various causal scenarios relevant to orofacial clefts. Genotypes for 48 SNPs in 18 candidate genes on the X chromosome were analyzed in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (562 Norwegian and 235 Danish case-parent triads. For haplotype analysis, we used a sliding-window approach and assessed isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (iCL/P separately from isolated cleft palate only (iCPO. We tested three statistical models in HAPLIN, allowing for: i the same relative risk in males and females, ii sex-specific relative risks, and iii X-inactivation in females. We found weak but consistent associations with the oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1 gene (formerly known as CXORF5 in the Danish iCL/P samples across all models, but not in the Norwegian iCL/P samples. In sex-specific analyses, the association with OFD1 was in male cases only. No analyses showed associations with iCPO in either the Norwegian or the Danish sample. CONCLUSIONS: The association of OFD1 with iCL/P is plausible given the biological relevance of this gene. However, the lack of replication in the Norwegian samples highlights the need to verify these preliminary findings in other large datasets. More generally, the novel analytic methods presented here are widely applicable to investigations of the role of X-linked genes in complex traits.

  5. X-linked genes and risk of orofacial clefts: evidence from two population-based studies in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Skare, Øivind; Lie, Rolv T; Wilcox, Allen J; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene; Nguyen, Truc Trung; Murray, Jeffrey C; Gjessing, Håkon K

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are common birth defects of complex etiology, with an excess of males among babies with cleft lip and palate, and an excess of females among those with cleft palate only. Although genes on the X chromosome have been implicated in clefting, there has been no association analysis of X-linked markers. We added new functionalities in the HAPLIN statistical software to enable association analysis of X-linked markers and an exploration of various causal scenarios relevant to orofacial clefts. Genotypes for 48 SNPs in 18 candidate genes on the X chromosome were analyzed in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (562 Norwegian and 235 Danish case-parent triads). For haplotype analysis, we used a sliding-window approach and assessed isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (iCL/P) separately from isolated cleft palate only (iCPO). We tested three statistical models in HAPLIN, allowing for: i) the same relative risk in males and females, ii) sex-specific relative risks, and iii) X-inactivation in females. We found weak but consistent associations with the oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) gene (formerly known as CXORF5) in the Danish iCL/P samples across all models, but not in the Norwegian iCL/P samples. In sex-specific analyses, the association with OFD1 was in male cases only. No analyses showed associations with iCPO in either the Norwegian or the Danish sample. The association of OFD1 with iCL/P is plausible given the biological relevance of this gene. However, the lack of replication in the Norwegian samples highlights the need to verify these preliminary findings in other large datasets. More generally, the novel analytic methods presented here are widely applicable to investigations of the role of X-linked genes in complex traits.

  6. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human thrombospondin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, F W; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B; Dixit, V M

    1990-04-01

    Thrombospondin (THBS1) is a large modular glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix and contains a variety of distinct domains, including three repeating subunits (types I, II, and III) that share homology to an assortment of other proteins. Determination of THBS1 gene structure has revealed that the type I repeat modules are encoded by symmetrical exons and that the heparin-binding domain is encoded by a single exon. To further elucidate the higher level organization of THBS1, the gene was localized to the q11-qter region of chromosome 15.

  7. [The human genome--chromosome 10 and the collagen genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdicka, R

    1995-05-17

    In relation to locuses of the 10th chromosome at present the following are in the focus of interest: tumours of endocrine glands, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MTC) and multiple endocrine neoplasias (MEN). It seems that the unifying basis is the oncogene RET, responsible for the development of Hirschsprung's disease HSCR. The authors mentions also metabolically important locuses for choline acetyltransferase (CHAT), uriporphyrinogen synthase (UROS) and methyl guanine methyltransferase (MGMT). A special paragraph is devoted to a list of collagenous genes COL1-COL18 and diseases associated with them.

  8. Molecular genetic approach to human meningioma: loss of genes on chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seizinger, B.R.; De La Monte, S.; Atkins, L.; Gusella, J.F.; Martuza, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    A molecular genetic approach employing polymorphic DNA markers has been used to investigate the role of chromosomal aberrations in meningioma, one of the most common tumors of the human nervous system. Comparison of the alleles detected by DNA markers in tumor DNA versus DNA from normal tissue revealed chromosomal alterations present in primary surgical specimens. In agreement with cytogenetic studies of cultured meningiomas, the most frequent alteration detected was loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22. Forty of 51 patients were constitutionally heterozygous for at least one chromosome 22 DNA marker. Seventeen of the 40 constitutionally heterozygotic patients (43%) displayed hemizygosity for the corresponding marker in their meningioma tumor tissues. Loss of heterozygosity was also detected at a significantly lower frequency for markers on several other autosomes. In view of the striking association between acoustic neuroma and meningioma in bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis and the discovery that acoustic neuromas display specific loss of genes on chromosome 22, the authors propose that a common mechanism involving chromosome 22 is operative in the development of both tumor types. Fine-structure mapping to reveal partial deletions in meningiomas may provide the means to clone and characterize a gene (or genes) of importance for tumorigenesis in this and possibly other clinically associated tumors of the human nervous system.

  9. Early and Late Damages in Chromosome 3 of Human Lymphocytes After Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Kahdim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor formation in humans or animals is a multi-step process. An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. GI is defined as elevated or persistent genetic damages occurring many generations after the cells are exposed. While early studies have demonstrated radiation-induced GI in several cell types as detected in endpoints such as mutation, apoptosis and damages in chromosomes, the dependence of GI on the quality of radiation remains uncertain. To investigate GI in human lymphocytes induced by both low- and high-LET radiation, we initially exposed white blood cells collected from healthy subjects to gamma rays in vitro, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis post irradiation and at several intervals during the culture period. Among a number of biological endpoints planned for the project, the multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) allows identification of inversions that were expected to be stable. We present here early and late chromosome aberrations detected with mBAND in chromosome 3 after gamma exposure. Comparison of chromosome damages in between human lymphocytes and human epithelial cells is also discussed

  10. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Wu Li; Lin Bai; Lyu-Xia Dai; Xu He; Xian-Ping Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer has become the leading cause of death in many regions.Carcinogenesis is caused by the stepwise accumulation of genetic and chromosomal changes.The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosome and gene alterations in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.Methods: We used Giemsa banding and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization focusing on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM to analyze its chromosome alterations.In addition, the gains and losses in the specific chromosome regions were identified by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the amplifications of cancer-related genes were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Results: We identified a large number of chromosomal numerical alterations on all chromosomes except chromosome X and 19.Chromosome 10 is the most frequently involved in translocations with six different interchromosomal translocations.CGH revealed the gains on chromosome regions of 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, and the losses on 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p 13.31-13.33 and 17p 13.1-13.3.And PCR showed the amplification of genes: Membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME), sucrase-isomaltase (SI), butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE), and kininogen (KNG).Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis.We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p 13.31-13.33, and 17p 13.1-13.3.Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG) may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.

  11. Mapping of a liver phosphorylase kinase [alpha]-subunit gene on the mouse x chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Yan; Derry, J.M.J.; Barnard, P.J. (MRC Molecular Neurobiology Unit, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Hendrickx, J.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.R. (Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium))

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PHK) is a regulatory enzyme of the glycogenolytic pathway composed of a complex of four subunits. We recently mapped the muscle [alpha]-subunit gene (Phka) to the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with the proximal long arm of the human X chromosome and containing the human homologue of this gene, PHKA. We now report the mapping of the liver [alpha]-subunit gene to the telomeric end of the mouse X chromosome. This mapping position would suggest a location for the human liver [alpha]-subunit gene on the proximal short arm of the X chromosome, a region recently implicated in X-linked liver glycogenosis (XLG). 20 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Developing de novo human artificial chromosomes in embryonic stem cells using HSV-1 amplicon technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralli, Daniela; Monaco, Zoia L

    2015-02-01

    De novo artificial chromosomes expressing genes have been generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) and are maintained following differentiation into other cell types. Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are small, functional, extrachromosomal elements, which behave as normal chromosomes in human cells. De novo HAC are generated following delivery of alpha satellite DNA into target cells. HAC are characterized by high levels of mitotic stability and are used as models to study centromere formation and chromosome organisation. They are successful and effective as gene expression vectors since they remain autonomous and can accommodate larger genes and regulatory regions for long-term expression studies in cells unlike other viral gene delivery vectors currently used. Transferring the essential DNA sequences for HAC formation intact across the cell membrane has been challenging for a number of years. A highly efficient delivery system based on HSV-1 amplicons has been used to target DNA directly to the ES cell nucleus and HAC stably generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) at high frequency. HAC were detected using an improved protocol for hESc chromosome harvesting, which consistently produced high-quality metaphase spreads that could routinely detect HAC in hESc. In tumour cells, the input DNA often integrated in the host chromosomes, but in the host ES genome, it remained intact. The hESc containing the HAC formed embryoid bodies, generated teratoma in mice, and differentiated into neuronal cells where the HAC were maintained. The HAC structure and chromatin composition was similar to the endogenous hESc chromosomes. This review will discuss the technological advances in HAC vector delivery using HSV-1 amplicons and the improvements in the identification of de novo HAC in hESc.

  13. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro (Akita Univ. School of Medicine, Akita (Japan)); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Large-scale oscillation of structure-related DNA sequence features in human chromosome 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentian; Miramontes, Pedro

    2006-08-01

    Human chromosome 21 is the only chromosome in the human genome that exhibits oscillation of the (G+C) content of a cycle length of hundreds kilobases (kb) ( 500kb near the right telomere). We aim at establishing the existence of a similar periodicity in structure-related sequence features in order to relate this (G+C)% oscillation to other biological phenomena. The following quantities are shown to oscillate with the same 500kb periodicity in human chromosome 21: binding energy calculated by two sets of dinucleotide-based thermodynamic parameters, AA/TT and AAA/TTT bi- and tri-nucleotide density, 5'-TA-3' dinucleotide density, and signal for 10- or 11-base periodicity of AA/TT or AAA/TTT. These intrinsic quantities are related to structural features of the double helix of DNA molecules, such as base-pair binding, untwisting or unwinding, stiffness, and a putative tendency for nucleosome formation.

  15. Distribution of Chromosome Breakpoints in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed to Low- and High-LET Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is not only its ability to identify simultaneously both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges, but also the ability to measure the breakpoint location along the length of the chromosome in a precision that is unmatched with other traditional banding techniques. Breakpoints on specific regions of a chromosome have been known to associate with specific cancers. The breakpoint distribution in cells after low- and high-LET radiation exposures will also provide the data for biophysical modeling of the chromatin structure, as well as the data for the modeling the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. In a series of experiments, we studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations using the mBAND technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 different colored bands. Human epithelial cells (CH1 84B5F5/M10) were exposed in vitro to Cs- 137 rays at both low and high dose rates, secondary neutrons with a broad energy spectrum at a low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions at a high dose rate. The data of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations involving the painted chromosome have been reported previously. Here we present data of the location of the chromosome breaks along the length of chromosome 3 in the cells after exposures to each of the four radiation scenarios. In comparison to the expected breakpoint distribution based on the length of the bands, the observed distribution appeared to be non-random for both the low- and high-LET radiations. In particular, hot spots towards both ends of the chromosome were found after low-LET irradiations of either low or high dose rates. For both high-LET radiation types (Fe ions and neutrons), the breakpoint distributions were similar, and were much smoother than that for low-LET radiation. The dependence of the breakpoint distribution on the radiation quality requires further investigations.

  16. Tubulointerstitial nephritis complicating IVIG therapy for X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Keisuke; Nishi, Hitomi; Miyazawa, Tomoki; Wada, Norihisa; Izu, Akane; Enya, Takuji; Okada, Mitsuru; Takemura, Tsukasa

    2014-07-08

    Patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) develop immune-complex induced diseases such as nephropathy only rarely, presumably because their immunoglobulin (Ig) G concentration is low. We encountered a patient with XLA who developed tubulointerstitial nephritis during treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). A 20-year-old man was diagnosed with XLA 3 months after birth and subsequently received periodic γ-globulin replacement therapy. Renal dysfunction developed at 19 years of age in association with high urinary β2-microglobulin (MG) concentrations. A renal biopsy specimen showed dense CD3-positive lymphocytic infiltration in the tubulointerstitium and tubular atrophy, while no IgG4-bearing cell infiltration was found. Fibrosclerosis and crescent formation were evident in some glomeruli. Fluorescent antibody staining demonstrated deposition of IgG and complement component C3 in tubular basement membranes. After pulse steroid therapy was initiated, urinary β2-MG and serum creatinine concentrations improved. Neither drug reactions nor collagen disease were likely causes of tubular interstitial disorder in this patient. Although BK virus was ruled out, IgG in the γ-globulin preparation might have reacted with a pathogen present in the patient to form low-molecular-weight immune complexes that were deposited in the tubular basement membrane.

  17. Clinical Manifest X-Linked Recessive Adrenoleukodystrophy in a Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyda Hlin Skuladottir Jack

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD is a rare X-linked inherited leukodystrophy with a reduced capacity for degradation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs. The intracellular accumulation of VLCFA leads to demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS and cell destruction in the adrenal glands. ALD primarily affects males; however, females may develop milder symptoms that may be difficult to recognize. The present report describes a 35-year-old female who experienced a feeling of heaviness in the upper and lower limbs, pain in both knees, and difficulty climbing stairs, running, and jumping. Clinical examination revealed decreased sensitivity in the feet, particularly to touch. Deep tendon reflexes in the lower limbs were brisk, and Babinski's sign was present bilaterally. Multiple sclerosis (MS was excluded, and all clinical and biochemical tests were normal. After two years of progressing symptoms, the patient was reevaluated and plasma levels of VLCFA were found to be elevated. Seven years prior to this finding, the patient had been found to be heterozygous for the missense mutation c.1679C> T, p.Pro560Leu on the ABCD1 gene (ATP-Binding Cassette subfamily D1. In conclusion, the patient's symptoms could be attributed to ALD. The present case underlines the importance of reevaluating family history in women presenting with vague neurological symptoms.

  18. Molecular and cellular pathogenesis of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kim E; Ma, Cindy S; Cannons, Jennifer L; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Tangye, Stuart G

    2005-02-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an inherited immune defect caused by mutations in the Src homology 2 domain-containing gene 1A, which encodes the adapter protein, signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP). SAP is expressed in T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and NKT cells, where it binds to the cytoplasmic domain of the surface receptor SLAM (CD150) and the related receptors, 2B4 (CD244), CD84, Ly9 (CD229), NK-T-B-antigen, and CD2-like receptor-activating cytotoxic T cells. SAP also binds to the Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn and recruits it to SLAM, which leads to the generation of downstream phosphotyrosine signals. While the roles of the SLAM family receptors are only beginning to be understood, experiments suggest that these molecules regulate important aspects of lymphocyte function, such as proliferation, cytokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and antibody production. Thus, in XLP patients who lack functional SAP, the SLAM family receptors may not signal properly. This property likely contributes to the phenotypes of XLP, including fulminant infectious mononucleosis, lymphoma, and hypogammaglobulinemia. Further studies of SAP and the SLAM family receptors will provide insights into XLP and elucidate the signaling events regulating lymphocyte ontogeny and function.

  19. Shulman disease (eosinophilic fasciitis) in X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pituch-Noworolska, A; Mach-Tomalska, H; Szaflarska, A; Adamek, D

    2016-06-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) diagnosed in the first year of life is an immunodeficiency with a life-long indication for substitution of immunoglobulins, due to lack of B lymphocytes in the periphery. The decrease of bacterial infection frequency and severity is an effect of immunoglobulin replacement. However, in the majority of patients bronchiectasis and chronic sinusitis with an overgrown mucous membrane develop despite regular substitution. Autoimmune diseases as co-existing diseases in XLA are noted in a few patients presenting symptoms associated with arthritis, scleroderma and myositis. Our patient was diagnosed with XLA in the first year of life, followed by regular substitution of immunoglobulins. The symptoms of pain, edema of muscles of the right shank with skin edema and discoloration after mild injury were noted in a 13-year-old boy. Shulman disease was diagnosed after 6 months of symptoms, based on histopathology of muscle and skin biopsy. Before the diagnosis, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) were used with a transient effect. After the diagnosis, therapy included steroids, immunoglobulins in a high dose and immunosuppression, with improvement of clinical symptoms. During methotrexate (MTX) therapy the patient developed two episodes of pneumonia, so mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) was used, with a similar effect. Now, with this therapy, the symptoms are mild and stable without progression.

  20. [X-linked agammaglobulinemia in adults. Clinical evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgetti, Orlando B; Paolini, María V; Oleastro, Matías M; Fernández Romero, Diego S

    2016-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is characterized by absent or severely reduced B cells, low or undetectable immunoglobulin levels and clinically by extracellular bacterial infections which mainly compromise the respiratory tract as well as recurrent diarrheas. The mainstay of treatment is gammaglobulin replacement therapy, which allows most patients to reach adulthood with high quality of life. We analyzed the clinical features of 14 patients over 18 years of age with XLA diagnosis that received treatment in our unit from the year 2003, the date the first patient was derived, until 2015. The average age at which patients were referred was 20.4 years old; age at the last consult was 25.5. The average follow-up time was 59.8 months. Previously to being diagnosed all patients had suffered infections, most frequently respiratory. After diagnosis all were started on intravenous gammaglobulin replacement treatment and in spite of infections being reduced in severity and frequency, there were cases of severe disease with long term sequelae. At the beginning of our follow-up 35.7% presented impaired respiratory function with only one case being severe. In no cases during this period did the respiratory function worsen, nor were there severe clinical complications. Three patients were switched to subcutaneous immunoglobulin treatment with good tolerance. The number of XLA cases is increasing, as most reach the second decade of life without serious complications and remain free of severe infectious disease and further impairment of their respiratory functions with the treatment.

  1. T lymphocytes and NK cells in X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Zwonarz, Katarzyna; Błaut-Szlósarczyk, Anita; Szaflarska, Anna; Kowalczyk, Danuta; Siedlar, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Seven boys with diagnosis of X-linked agammaglobulinemia on regular substitution of immunoglobulins were included into study. The patients showed episodes of infections but the clinical course was mild with good response to antibiotics. All patients developed, with time, the chronic sinusitis with proliferation of mucous membrane, two patients showed bronchiectases. The number of T lymphocytes, ratio of CD4:CD8 subpopulations, response to stimulation and NK number were assayed with flow cytometry and cell culture. Results showed CD4:CD8 ratio within normal value in majority of patients, reverse ratio in 2 boys, increased number of activated T cells (CD3/HLA-DR) in one of them. The number of NK cells was different from lack of these cells to high number. Response of T cells to stimulation (mitogens and CD3) were normal in majority of assays. There were no associations between clinical course and observed changes in T or NK cell populations. Further studies on number and function of NK cells are needed.

  2. Discordant phenotype in siblings with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykowsky, M.J.; Veksler, K.S.; Sullivan, K.E. [Children`s Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a congenital humoral immunodeficiency caused by a defect in a B-cell-specific signaling molecule, Btk. There has been little concordance of phenotype with genotype in this disorder, and defects in Btk cause immunodeficiencies that range from mild impairment to complete inability to produce antibodies. The factors modifying the phenotype of XLA are not understood. The current study is the first description of two male siblings with identical T{sup 134}{yields}C mutations in the translation initiation ATG of Btk who have different clinical phenotypes as well as different laboratory phenotypes. The proband lacks immunoglobulins and B cells and has recurrent infections, while the elder, affected brother has normal levels of IgG and IgM and very few infections. Both have undetectable levels of Btk kinase activity in circulating mononuclear cells. Complete sequencing of Btk gene transcripts in both brothers revealed no additional mutations to account for the discordant phenotypes. This description provides unequivocal evidence that the phenotype of XLA is influenced by factors additional to the Btk gene. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. A pathway from chromosome transfer to engineering resulting in human and mouse artificial chromosomes for a variety of applications to bio-medical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshimura, Mitsuo; Uno, Narumi; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Katoh, Motonobu; Inoue, Toshiaki

    2015-02-01

    Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) is a technique to transfer a chromosome from defined donor cells into recipient cells and to manipulate chromosomes as gene delivery vectors and open a new avenue in somatic cell genetics. However, it is difficult to uncover the function of a single specific gene via the transfer of an entire chromosome or fragment, because each chromosome or fragment contains a set of numerous genes. Thus, alternative tools are human artificial chromosome (HAC) and mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) vectors, which can carry a gene or genes of interest. HACs/MACs have been generated mainly by either a "top-down approach" (engineered creation) or a "bottom-up approach" (de novo creation). HACs/MACs with one or more acceptor sites exhibit several characteristics required by an ideal gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance and the capacity to carry large genomic loci plus their regulatory elements, thus allowing the physiological regulation of the introduced gene in a manner similar to that of native chromosomes. The MMCT technique is also applied for manipulating HACs and MACs in donor cells and delivering them to recipient cells. This review describes the lessons learned and prospects identified from studies on the construction of HACs and MACs, and their ability to drive exogenous gene expression in cultured cells and transgenic animals via MMCT. New avenues for a variety of applications to bio-medical challenges are also proposed.

  4. Specific chromosomal imbalances in human papillomavirus-transfected cells during progression toward immortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solinas-Toldo, Sabina; Dürst, Matthias; Lichter, Peter

    1997-01-01

    High risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) known to be closely associated with cervical cancer, such as HPV16 and HPV18, have the potential to immortalize human epithelial cells in culture. Four lines of HPV-transfected keratinocytes were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization at different time points after transfection. A number of chromosomal imbalances was found to be highly characteristic for the cultures progressing toward immortality. Whereas several of these were new and previously not found as recurrent aberrations in cervical tumors, some were identical to chromosomal changes observed during cervical carcinogenesis. The data put new emphasis on the studied cell system as a relevant model for HPV-induced pathogenesis. PMID:9108068

  5. Genetic and epigenetic changes of genes on chromosome 3 in human urogenital tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordiyuk V. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous disorders of genes and alterations of their expression are observed on a short arm of human chromosome 3, particularly in 3p14, 3p21, 3p24 compact regions in epithelial tumors. These aberrations affect the key biological processes specific for cancerogenesis. Such genes or their products could be used for diagnostics and prognosis of cancer. Genetical and epigenetical changes of a number of genes on chromosome 3 in human urogenital cancer, their role in cellular processes and signal pathways and perspectives as molecular markers of cancer diseases are analyzed in the review

  6. Replication Banding Patterns in Human Chromosomes Detected Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine Incorporation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    A novel technique using the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into replicating DNA is described for the analysis of replicating banding patterns of human metaphase chromosomes. Human lymphocytes were synchronized with excess thymidine and treated with EdU during the late S phase of the cell cycle. The incorporated EdU was then detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor® 488 azides, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acety...

  7. X-linked genes and risk of orofacial clefts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Skare, Øivind; Lie, Rolv T

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are common birth defects of complex etiology, with an excess of males among babies with cleft lip and palate, and an excess of females among those with cleft palate only. Although genes on the X chromosome have been implicated in clefting, there has been no association analysis...

  8. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  9. Mammalian X chromosome inactivation evolved as a dosage-compensation mechanism for dosage-sensitive genes on the X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessia, Eugénie; Makino, Takashi; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; McLysaght, Aoife; Marais, Gabriel A B

    2012-04-03

    How and why female somatic X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) evolved in mammals remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that XCI is a dosage-compensation mechanism that evolved to equalize expression levels of X-linked genes in females (2X) and males (1X), with a prior twofold increase in expression of X-linked genes in both sexes ("Ohno's hypothesis"). Whereas the parity of X chromosome expression between the sexes has been clearly demonstrated, tests for the doubling of expression levels globally along the X chromosome have returned contradictory results. However, changes in gene dosage during sex-chromosome evolution are not expected to impact on all genes equally, and should have greater consequences for dosage-sensitive genes. We show that, for genes encoding components of large protein complexes (≥ 7 members)--a class of genes that is expected to be dosage-sensitive--expression of X-linked genes is similar to that of autosomal genes within the complex. These data support Ohno's hypothesis that XCI acts as a dosage-compensation mechanism, and allow us to refine Ohno's model of XCI evolution. We also explore the contribution of dosage-sensitive genes to X aneuploidy phenotypes in humans, such as Turner (X0) and Klinefelter (XXY) syndromes. X aneuploidy in humans is common and is known to have mild effects because most of the supernumerary X genes are inactivated and not affected by aneuploidy. Only genes escaping XCI experience dosage changes in X-aneuploidy patients. We combined data on dosage sensitivity and XCI to compute a list of candidate genes for X-aneuploidy syndromes.

  10. Modified C-band technique for the analysis of chromosome abnormalities in irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Akifumi; Akiyama, Miho; Yamada, Yuji [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A., E-mail: myoshida@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    A modified C-band technique was developed in order to analyze more accurately dicentric, tricentric, and ring chromosomes in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes. Instead of the original method relying on treatment with barium hydroxide Ba(OH){sub 2}, C-bands were obtained using a modified form of heat treatment in formamide followed with DAPI staining. This method was tentatively applied to the analysis of dicentric chromosomes in irradiated human lymphocytes to examine its availability. The frequency of dicentric chromosome was almost the same with conventional Giemsa staining and the modified C-band technique. In the analysis using Giemsa staining, it is relatively difficult to identify the centromere on the elongated chromosomes, over-condensed chromosomes, fragment, and acentric ring. However, the modified C-band method used in this study makes it easier to identify the centromere on such chromosomes than with the use of Giemsa staining alone. Thus, the modified C-band method may give more information about the location of the centromere. Therefore, this method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation due to the analysis of the dicentric chromosome in human lymphocytes exposed to the radiation. Furthermore, this method is simpler and faster than the original C-band protocol and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method with the centromeric DNA probe. - Highlights: > The dicentric (dic) assay is the most effective for the radiation biodosimetry. > It is important to recognize the centromere of the dic. > We improved a C-band technique based on heat denaturation. > This technique enables the accurate detection of a centromere. > This method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation.

  11. Identification of chromosomal errors in human preimplantation embryos with oligonucleotide DNA microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liang

    Full Text Available A previous study comparing the performance of different platforms for DNA microarray found that the oligonucleotide (oligo microarray platform containing 385K isothermal probes had the best performance when evaluating dosage sensitivity, precision, specificity, sensitivity and copy number variations border definition. Although oligo microarray platform has been used in some research fields and clinics, it has not been used for aneuploidy screening in human embryos. The present study was designed to use this new microarray platform for preimplantation genetic screening in the human. A total of 383 blastocysts from 72 infertility patients with either advanced maternal age or with previous miscarriage were analyzed after biopsy and microarray. Euploid blastocysts were transferred to patients and clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were measured. Chromosomes in some aneuploid blastocysts were further analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH to evaluate accuracy of the results. We found that most (58.1% of the blastocysts had chromosomal abnormalities that included single or multiple gains and/or losses of chromosome(s, partial chromosome deletions and/or duplications in both euploid and aneuploid embryos. Transfer of normal euploid blastocysts in 34 cycles resulted in 58.8% clinical pregnancy and 54.4% implantation rates. Examination of abnormal blastocysts by FISH showed that all embryos had matching results comparing microarray and FISH analysis. The present study indicates that oligo microarray conducted with a higher resolution and a greater number of probes is able to detect not only aneuploidy, but also minor chromosomal abnormalities, such as partial chromosome deletion and/or duplication in human embryos. Preimplantation genetic screening of the aneuploidy by DNA microarray is an advanced technology used to select embryos for transfer and improved embryo implantation can be obtained after transfer of the screened normal

  12. A novel tandem repeat sequence located on human chromosome 4p: isolation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, M; Fukushige, S; Lefevre, C; Hadano, S; Ikeda, J E

    1997-06-01

    In an effort to analyze the genomic region of the distal half of human chromosome 4p, to where Huntington disease and other diseases have been mapped, we have isolated the cosmid clone (CRS447) that was likely to contain a region with specific repeat sequences. Clone CRS447 was subjected to detailed analysis, including chromosome mapping, restriction mapping, and DNA sequencing. Chromosome mapping by both a human-CHO hybrid cell panel and FISH revealed that CRS447 was predominantly located in the 4p15.1-15.3 region. CRS447 was shown to consist of tandem repeats of 4.7-kb units present on chromosome 4p. A single EcoRI unit was subcloned (pRS447), and the complete sequence was determined as 4752 nucleotides. When pRS447 was used as a probe, the number of copies of this repeat per haploid genome was estimated to be 50-70. Sequence analysis revealed that it contained two internal CA repeats and one putative ORF. Database search established that this sequence was unreported. However, two homologous STS markers were found in the database. We concluded that CRS447/pRS447 is a novel tandem repeat sequence that is mainly specific to human chromosome 4p.

  13. Damage of chromosoms under irradiation of human blood lymphocytes and development of bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetun, O V

    2016-12-01

    the research the distribution of radiation induced damages among chromosomes and their bands in irra diated in vitro human blood lymphocytes and in unirradiated bystander cells.Material and methods of research: cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by semi micromethod D.A. Hungerford, modeling of radiation induced bystander effect in mixed cultures consisting of irradiated in vitro and non irradiated blood lymphocytes from persons of different gender, GTG staining of metaphase chromosomes and their cytogenetic analysis. Break points in chromosomes under the formation of aberrations were identified in exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes in doses 0.25 Gy (95 breaks in 1248 cells) and 1.0 Gy (227 breaks in 726 cells) and in non irradiated bystander cells under their joint cultivation with irradiated in vitro human lymphocytes (51 breaks in 1137 cells at irradiation of adjacent populations of lymphocytes in dose 0.25 Gy and 75 breaks in 1321 cells at irradiation of adjacent population of lymphocytes in a dose 1.0 Gy). The distribution of injuries among the chromo somes and their bands was investigated. in radiation exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in bystander cells the fre quency of damaged bands and number of breaks which localized in them exceeded the control value (p bystander effect, chromosomes were damaged according to their relative length. Location of bands with increasing number of breaks coincided with the «hot spots» of chromosome damage following irradiation and fragile sites. More sensitive to damage were G negative euchromatin chromosome bands, in which were localized 82 88 % breaks. Damageability of telomeric regions in the irradiated cells had no significant difference from the control, while in bystander cells was lower than control value (p < 0.05). O. V. Shemetun.

  14. Roles of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein in the apoptosis of human monocytic cells induced by t-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus%X连锁凋亡抑制蛋白通路在金黄色葡萄球菌α-毒素诱导人外周血单核细胞凋亡过程中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻博; 佡剑非; 张萌; 阚亮; 王佳贺

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究金黄色葡萄球菌的主要毒力因子α-毒素感染人外周血单核细胞后细胞的凋亡率及X连锁凋亡抑制蛋白(XIAP)、凋亡抑制蛋白1/2 (cIAP1/2)、Survivin、Bcl-2、Bax和半胱氨酸的天冬氨酸蛋白酶(caspase-3)等的表达.方法 以Annexin V异硫氰酸荧光素(FITC)/碘化丙啶(PI)双染流式细胞仪检测人外周血单核细胞的凋亡率,Western blot法检测XIAP、cIAP1/2、Survivin、Bc1-2、Bax和caspase-3等的表达,采用荧光比色法测定细胞内caspase-3蛋白酶活性.结果 α-毒素能够以时间依赖的方式诱导人外周血单核细胞凋亡,α-毒素感染30、60和90 min凋亡率与感染0 min比较,其差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.001).随着作用时间的延长,XIAP、cIAP1/2、Survivin和Bcl-2表达逐渐下降,而Bax和caspase-3表达逐渐增加.结论 α-毒素可诱导人外周血单核细胞凋亡,XIAP信号通路在金黄色葡萄球菌的致病过程中起重要作用.%Objective To investigate the roles of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP),cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteinl/2 (cIAP1/2),Survivin,Bcl-2,Bax,and cysteine aspartic acid specific protease-3 (caspase-3) in the apoptosis of human monocytic cells induced by α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus.Methods Apoptosis rates of human monocytic cells were detected by Annexin V fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay.Western blot was performed to detect the expressions of XIAP,cIAP1/2,Survivin,Bcl-2,Bax,and caspase-3.Results The results showed that α-toxin induced apoptosis in human monocytic cells in a time-dependent manner.The apoptosis rates in the groups of 30,60 and 90 min increased significantly than those in the group of 0 min(P < 0.05 or P < 0.001).With the time extension,there was downregulation of XIAP,cIAP1/2,Survivin and Bcl-2,and upregulation of Bax and caspase-3.Conclusion α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus can induce the apoptosis of human monocytic cells.It is

  15. Evolution of homologous sequences on the human X and Y chromosomes, outside of the meiotic pairing segment.

    OpenAIRE

    Bickmore, W A; Cooke, H J

    1987-01-01

    A sequence isolated from the long arm of the human Y chromosome detects a highly homologous locus on the X. This homology extends over at least 50 kb of DNA and is postulated to be the result of a transposition event between the X and Y chromosomes during recent human evolution, since homologous sequences are shown to be present on the X chromosome alone in the chimpanzee and gorilla.

  16. Colocalization of coregulated genes: a steered molecular dynamics study of human chromosome 19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Di Stefano

    Full Text Available The connection between chromatin nuclear organization and gene activity is vividly illustrated by the observation that transcriptional coregulation of certain genes appears to be directly influenced by their spatial proximity. This fact poses the more general question of whether it is at all feasible that the numerous genes that are coregulated on a given chromosome, especially those at large genomic distances, might become proximate inside the nucleus. This problem is studied here using steered molecular dynamics simulations in order to enforce the colocalization of thousands of knowledge-based gene sequences on a model for the gene-rich human chromosome 19. Remarkably, it is found that most (≈ 88% gene pairs can be brought simultaneously into contact. This is made possible by the low degree of intra-chromosome entanglement and the large number of cliques in the gene coregulatory network. A clique is a set of genes coregulated all together as a group. The constrained conformations for the model chromosome 19 are further shown to be organized in spatial macrodomains that are similar to those inferred from recent HiC measurements. The findings indicate that gene coregulation and colocalization are largely compatible and that this relationship can be exploited to draft the overall spatial organization of the chromosome in vivo. The more general validity and implications of these findings could be investigated by applying to other eukaryotic chromosomes the general and transferable computational strategy introduced here.

  17. Maternal uniparental disomy for human chromosome 14, due to loss of a chromosome 14 from somatic cells with t(13;14) trisomy 14.

    OpenAIRE

    Antonarakis, S E; Blouin, J L; Maher, J; Avramopoulos, D; Thomas, G.; Talbot, C C

    1993-01-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for particular chromosomes is increasingly recognized as a cause of abnormal phenotypes in humans. We recently studied a 9-year-old female with a de novo Robertsonian translocation t(13;14), short stature, mild developmental delay, scoliosis, hyperextensible joints, hydrocephalus that resolved spontaneously during the first year of life, and hypercholesterolemia. To determine the parental origin of chromosomes 13 and 14 in the proband, we have studied the genotypes of...

  18. Early and Late Chromosome Damages in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  19. Genomic structure and evolution of the ancestral chromosome fusion site in 2q13-2q14.1 and paralogous regions on other human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-11-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13-2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%-99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ~100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans.

  20. Unique signatures of natural background radiation on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Premi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most frequently observed major consequences of ionizing radiation are chromosomal lesions and cancers, although the entire genome may be affected. Owing to its haploid status and absence of recombination, the human Y chromosome is an ideal candidate to be assessed for possible genetic alterations induced by ionizing radiation. We studied the human Y chromosome in 390 males from the South Indian state of Kerala, where the level of natural background radiation (NBR is ten-fold higher than the worldwide average, and that from 790 unexposed males as control. RESULTS: We observed random microdeletions in the Azoospermia factor (AZF a, b and c regions in >90%, and tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism (CNP of 11 different Y-linked genes in about 80% of males exposed to NBR. The autosomal homologues of Y-linked CDY genes largely remained unaffected. Multiple polymorphic copies of the Y-linked genes showing single Y-specific signals suggested their tandem duplication. Some exposed males showed unilocus duplication of DAZ genes resulting in six copies. Notably, in the AZFa region, approximately 25% of exposed males showed deletion of the DBY gene, whereas flanking genes USP9Y and UTY remained unaffected. All these alterations were detected in blood samples but not in the germline (sperm samples. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to high levels of NBR correlated with several interstitial polymorphisms of the human Y chromosome. CNPs and enhanced transcription of the SRY gene after duplication are envisaged to compensate for the loss of Y chromosome in some cells. The aforesaid changes, confined to peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggest a possible innate mechanism protecting the germline DNA from the NBR. Genome analysis of a larger population focusing on greater numbers of genes may provide new insights into the mechanisms and risks of the resultant genetic damages. The present work demonstrates unique signatures of NBR on human Y chromosomes

  1. Maternal uniparental disomy for human chromosome 14, due to loss of a chromosome 14 from somatic cells with t(13;14) trisomy 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, S E; Blouin, J L; Maher, J; Avramopoulos, D; Thomas, G; Talbot, C C

    1993-06-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for particular chromosomes is increasingly recognized as a cause of abnormal phenotypes in humans. We recently studied a 9-year-old female with a de novo Robertsonian translocation t(13;14), short stature, mild developmental delay, scoliosis, hyperextensible joints, hydrocephalus that resolved spontaneously during the first year of life, and hypercholesterolemia. To determine the parental origin of chromosomes 13 and 14 in the proband, we have studied the genotypes of DNA polymorphic markers due to (GT)n repeats in the patient and her parents' blood DNA. The genotypes of markers D14S43, D14S45, D14S49, and D14S54 indicated maternal UPD for chromosome 14. There was isodisomy for proximal markers and heterodisomy for distal markers, suggesting a recombination event on maternal chromosomes 14. In addition, DNA analysis first revealed--and subsequent cytogenetic analysis confirmed--that there was mosaic trisomy 14 in 5% of blood lymphocytes. There was normal (biparental) inheritance for chromosome 13, and there was no evidence of false paternity in genotypes of 11 highly polymorphic markers on human chromosome 21. Two cases of maternal UPD for chromosome 14 have previously been reported, one with a familial rob t(13;14) and the other with a t(14;14). There are several similarities among these patients, and a "maternal UPD chromosome 14 syndrome" is emerging; however, the contribution of the mosaic trisomy 14 to the phenotype cannot be evaluated. The study of de novo Robertsonian translocations of the type reported here should reveal both the extent of UPD in these events and the contribution of particular chromosomes involved in certain phenotypes.

  2. Maternal uniparental disomy for human chromosome 14, due to loss of a chromosome 14 from somatic cells with t(13; 14) trisomy 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonarakis, S.E.; Blouin, J.L.; Maher, J.; Avramopoulos, D.; Thomas, G.; Talbot, C.C. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) for particular chromosomes is increasingly recognized as a cause of abnormal phenotypes in humans. The authors recently studied a 9-year-old female with a de novo Robertsonian translocation t(13;14), short stature, mild developmental delay, scoliosis, hyperextensible joints, hydrocephalus that resolved spontaneously during the first year of life, and hyperchloesterolemia. To determine the parental origin of chromosomes 13 and 14 in the proband, they have studied the genotypes of DNA polymorphic markers due to (GT)n repeats in the patient and her parents' blood DNA. The genotypes of markers D14S43, D14S45, D14S49, and D14S54 indicated maternal UPD for chromosome 14. There was isodisomy for proximal markers and heterodisomy for distal markers, suggesting a recombination event on maternal chromosomes 14. In addition, DNA analysis first revealed -- and subsequent cytogenetic analysis confirmed -- that there was mosaic trisomy 14 in 5% of blood lymphocytes. There was normal (biparental) inheritance for chromosome 13, and there was no evidence of false paternity in genotypes of 11 highly polymorphic markers on human chromosome 21. Two cases of maternal UPD for chromosome 14 have previously been reported, one with a familial rob t(13;14) and the other with a t(14;14). There are several similarities among these patients, and a [open quotes]maternal UPD chromosome 14 syndrome[close quotes] is emerging; however, the contribution of the mosaic trisomy 14 to the phenotype cannot be evaluated. The study of de novo Robertsonian translocations of the type reported here should reveal both the extent of UPD in these events and the contribution of particular chromosomes involved in certain phenotypes. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. [X-linked agammaglobulinemia: experience in a Portuguese hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, A; Guedes, M; Vasconcelos, J; Neves, E; Fernandes, S; Marques, L

    2015-03-01

    X-Linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is characterized by an arrest of B cell differentiation, leading to recurrent bacterial infections. Lifelong immunoglobulin replacement therapy (IRT) is indicated to prevent infections and their complications. A retrospective study of patients with XLA followed in a level three hospital was performed; data was collected retrospectively by review of clinical files. XLA was diagnosed in 9 children. One (11%) had a positive family history with a prenatal diagnosis. Infection was the clinical presentation in all the others (89%), at an average age of 13 months; diagnosis was established at a mean age of 3.4 years. Acute otitis media (7/9) and pneumonia (5/9) were the most frequently observed. Seven (78%) presented serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels below 200mg/dL and all of them had CD19(+) B cells below 2%. Neutropenia was present at diagnosis in three patients (33%). Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) mutations were identified in all cases. Intravenous IRT was initiated, switched later to subcutaneous administration, in all. The mean time of follow-up was 10.7 years with cumulative time of 97 years. Eight children (89%) achieved IgG serum levels above 800 mg/dL. One presented lower values due to renal loss. No deaths occurred. After diagnosis the most frequent infections were acute otitis media (6/9). In spite of stable adequate IgG levels on IRT, two patients developed bronchiectasis. XLA overall prognosis is good, as long as patients have an early and adequate treatment. However, bronchiectasis can occur even on adequate immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. X-linked macrocytic dyserythropoietic anemia in females with an ALAS2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Tchaikovskii, Vassili; Ludwig, Leif S; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Lindsley, R Coleman; Bejar, Rafael; Shi, Jiahai; Lovitch, Scott B; Bishop, David F; Steensma, David P

    2015-04-01

    Macrocytic anemia with abnormal erythropoiesis is a common feature of megaloblastic anemias, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Here, we characterized a family with multiple female individuals who have macrocytic anemia. The proband was noted to have dyserythropoiesis and iron overload. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation that did not provide insight into the cause of the disease, whole-exome sequencing of multiple family members revealed the presence of a mutation in the X chromosomal gene ALAS2, which encodes 5'-aminolevulinate synthase 2, in the affected females. We determined that this mutation (Y365C) impairs binding of the essential cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate to ALAS2, resulting in destabilization of the enzyme and consequent loss of function. X inactivation was not highly skewed in wbc from the affected individuals. In contrast, and consistent with the severity of the ALAS2 mutation, there was a complete skewing toward expression of the WT allele in mRNA from reticulocytes that could be recapitulated in primary erythroid cultures. Together, the results of the X inactivation and mRNA studies illustrate how this X-linked dominant mutation in ALAS2 can perturb normal erythropoiesis through cell-nonautonomous effects. Moreover, our findings highlight the value of whole-exome sequencing in diagnostically challenging cases for the identification of disease etiology and extension of the known phenotypic spectrum of disease.

  5. X inactivation in females with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2012-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common inherited neuropathy, caused by mutations in gap junction beta-1 (GJB1). Males have a uniformly moderately severe phenotype while females have a variable phenotype, suggested to be due to X inactivation. We aimed to assess X inactivation pattern in females with CMT1X and correlate this with phenotype using the CMT examination score to determine whether the X inactivation pattern accounted for the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X. We determined X inactivation pattern in 67 females with CMT1X and 24 controls using the androgen receptor assay. We were able to determine which X chromosome carried the GJB1 mutation in 30 females. There was no difference in X inactivation pattern between patients and controls. In addition, there was no correlation between X inactivation pattern in blood and phenotype. A possible explanation for these findings is that the X inactivation pattern in Schwann cells rather than in blood may explain the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X.

  6. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortoluzzi Stefania

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers.

  7. Human Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Model X Chromosome Dampening and X Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakyan, Anna; Kim, Rachel; Chronis, Constantinos; Sabri, Shan; Bonora, Giancarlo; Theunissen, Thorold W; Kuoy, Edward; Langerman, Justin; Clark, Amander T; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Plath, Kathrin

    2017-01-05

    Naive human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be derived from primed hESCs or directly from blastocysts, but their X chromosome state has remained unresolved. Here, we show that the inactive X chromosome (Xi) of primed hESCs was reactivated in naive culture conditions. Like cells of the blastocyst, the resulting naive cells contained two active X chromosomes with XIST expression and chromosome-wide transcriptional dampening and initiated XIST-mediated X inactivation upon differentiation. Both establishment of and exit from the naive state (differentiation) happened via an XIST-negative XaXa intermediate. Together, these findings identify a cell culture system for functionally exploring the two X chromosome dosage compensation processes in early human development: X dampening and X inactivation. However, remaining differences between naive hESCs and embryonic cells related to mono-allelic XIST expression and non-random X inactivation highlight the need for further culture improvement. As the naive state resets Xi abnormalities seen in primed hESCs, it may provide cells better suited for downstream applications.

  8. Somatic mosaicism underlies X-linked acrogigantism syndrome in sporadic male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Adrian F; Yuan, Bo; Fina, Frederic; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; de Herder, Wouter W; Naves, Luciana A; Metzger, Daniel; Cuny, Thomas; Rabl, Wolfgang; Shah, Nalini; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Faucz, Fabio R; Castermans, Emilie; Nanni-Metellus, Isabelle; Lodish, Maya; Muhammad, Ammar; Palmeira, Leonor; Potorac, Iulia; Mantovani, Giovanna; Neggers, Sebastian J; Klein, Marc; Barlier, Anne; Liu, Pengfei; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Bours, Vincent; Lupski, James R; Stratakis, Constantine A; Beckers, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric gigantism due to aggressive pituitary tumors that is caused by submicroscopic chromosome Xq26.3 duplications that include GPR101 We studied XLAG syndrome patients (n= 18) to determine if somatic mosaicism contributed to the genomic pathophysiology. Eighteen subjects with XLAG syndrome caused by Xq26.3 duplications were identified using high-definition array comparative genomic hybridization (HD-aCGH). We noted that males with XLAG had a decreased log2ratio (LR) compared with expected values, suggesting potential mosaicism, whereas females showed no such decrease. Compared with familial male XLAG cases, sporadic males had more marked evidence for mosaicism, with levels of Xq26.3 duplication between 16.1 and 53.8%. These characteristics were replicated using a novel, personalized breakpoint junction-specific quantification droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) technique. Using a separate ddPCR technique, we studied the feasibility of identifying XLAG syndrome cases in a distinct patient population of 64 unrelated subjects with acromegaly/gigantism, and identified one female gigantism patient who had had increased copy number variation (CNV) threshold for GPR101 that was subsequently diagnosed as having XLAG syndrome on HD-aCGH. Employing a combination of HD-aCGH and novel ddPCR approaches, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that XLAG syndrome can be caused by variable degrees of somatic mosaicism for duplications at chromosome Xq26.3. Somatic mosaicism was shown to occur in sporadic males but not in females with XLAG syndrome, although the clinical characteristics of the disease were similarly severe in both sexes.

  9. X-linked Acrogigantism (X-LAG) Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Therapeutic Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J.; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H.; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; De Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R.; Daly, Adrian F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and a microduplication in chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in 2 families was dominant with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2–3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight SDS score of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF-1 and prolactin, usually due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high somatostatin receptor subtype-2 expression in tumor tissue. Postoperative adjuvant pegvisomant achieved control of IGF-1 all 5 cases in which it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management. PMID:25712922

  10. Somatic Mosaicism Underlies X-linked Acrogigantism (XLAG) Syndrome in Sporadic Male Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Adrian F.; Yuan, Bo; Fina, Frederic; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; de Herder, Wouter W.; Naves, Luciana A.; Metzger, Daniel; Cuny, Thomas; Rabl, Wolfgang; Shah, Nalini; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Faucz, Fabio R; Castermans, Emilie; Nanni-Metellus, Isabelle; Lodish, Maya; Muhammad, Ammar; Palmeira, Leonor; Potorac, Iulia; Mantovani, Giovanna; Neggers, Sebastian J.; Klein, Marc; Barlier, Anne; Liu, Pengfei; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Bours, Vincent; Lupski, James R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Beckers., Albert

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric gigantism due to aggressive pituitary tumors that is caused by submicroscopic chromosome Xq26.3 duplications that include GPR101. We studied XLAG syndrome patients (N=18) to determine if somatic mosaicism contributed to the genomic pathophysiology. Eighteen subjects with XLAG syndrome were identified with Xq26.3 duplications using high definition array comparative genome hybridization (HD-aCGH). We noted males with XLAG had a decreased log2 ratio compared with expected values, suggesting potential mosaicism, while females showed no such decrease. As compared with familial male XLAG cases, sporadic males had more marked evidence for mosaicism, with levels of Xq26.3 duplication between 16.1-53.8%. These characteristics were replicated using a novel, personalized breakpoint-junction specific quantification droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique. Using a separate ddPCR technique we studied the feasibility of identifying XLAG syndrome cases in a distinct patient population of 64 unrelated subjects with acromegaly/gigantism and identified one female gigantism patient that had increased copy number variation (CNV) threshold for GPR101 that was subsequently diagnosed as having XLAG syndrome on HD-aCGH. Employing a combination of HD-aCGH and novel ddPCR approaches, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that XLAG syndrome can be caused by variable degrees of somatic mosaicism for duplications at chromosome Xq26.3. Somatic mosaicism was shown to occur in sporadic males but not in females with XLAG syndrome, although the clinical characteristics of the disease were similarly severe in both sexes. PMID:26935837

  11. Childhood acromegaly due to X-linked acrogigantism: long term follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Rebecca J.; Bell, Jennifer; Chung, Wendy K.; David, Raphael; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Acromegaly in infancy is extremely rare. We describe a 32 year old woman who presented at 6 months of age with isolated macrocephaly, followed by accelerated linear growth. At 21 months of age, her head circumference was 55 cm (+5.5 SD), height was 97.6 cm (+4.4 SD) and weight was 20.6 kg (+6.2 SD). She had markedly elevated levels of growth hormone (GH) (135 ng/ml), IGF-1 (1540 ng/ml) and prolactin (370 ng/ml). A pituitary macroadenoma was surgically resected. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for GH. Post-operatively, she developed ACTH and TSH deficiency and diabetes insipidus. Methods Long term clinical follow-up and genetic testing with chromosomal microarray analysis. Results Despite GH deficiency, she grew well until 7 ½ years old, with subsequent decline in growth velocity, and received GH therapy for 5 years. Puberty was initiated with estrogen therapy. As an adult, she has no stigmata of acromegaly, with a height of 164.5 cm and non-acromegalic features. IGF-1 has remained in the low normal range. Prolactin has been mildly elevated. Serial MRIs have shown no evidence of tumor recurrence. She receives replacement therapy with hydrocortisone, levothyroxine and DDAVP. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed that she has X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) due to a de novo duplication of Xq26.3 (516 kb). She recently became pregnant following ovarian stimulation and chorionic villus sampling revealed that she is carrying a male with the same duplication. Conclusion This report provides detailed long term clinical follow-up of a patient with X-LAG syndrome. PMID:27631333

  12. Chromosomal mosaicism : underlying mechanisms and consequences for early human embryo development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Avó Ribeiro dos Santos, M.

    2013-01-01

    In humans, reproduction is considered a relatively inefficient process, when compared with other mammalian species and the chance of achieving a spontaneous pregnancy after timed intercourse is at the most 20-30%. Chromosome segregation errors are a well-known inherent feature of cell division in hu

  13. Localization of the kappa opioid receptor gene to human chromosome band 8q11. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Kazuki; Takeda, Jun; Bell, G.I.; Espinosa, R.; Le Beau, M.M. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Using the cloned mouse kappa opioid receptor cDNA clone as a probe, screened a human genomic library and isolated a clone containing part of the human kappa opioid receptor gene (OPRK1), designated [lambda]hSR4-1. To determine the chromosomal localization of OPRK1, [lambda]hSR4-1 DNA was labeled with biotin by nick-translation in the presence of bio-11-dUTP and hybridized to human metaphase cells prepared from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes as described previously. Hybridization of the OPRK1-specific probe [lambda]hSR4-1 DNA to normal human metaphase chromosomes resulted in specific labeling only of chromosome 8. Specific labeling of 8q11 was observed on all 4 (6 cells), 3 (9 cells), 2 (9 cells), or 1 (1 cell) chromatid of the chromosome 8 homologs in 25 cells examined. Of 72 signals observed, 70 were located at 8q11. 1 signal was located at 7q11 and at 12p11. In most cells, the signal on 8q was located at 8q11.2. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Chromosomal mosaicism : underlying mechanisms and consequences for early human embryo development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Avó Ribeiro dos Santos, M.

    2013-01-01

    In humans, reproduction is considered a relatively inefficient process, when compared with other mammalian species and the chance of achieving a spontaneous pregnancy after timed intercourse is at the most 20-30%. Chromosome segregation errors are a well-known inherent feature of cell division in hu

  15. The evolution of African great ape subtelomeric heterochromatin and the fusion of human chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Mario; Catacchio, Claudia R; Sajjadian, Saba; Vives, Laura; Sudmant, Peter H; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Graves, Tina A; Wilson, Richard K; Eichler, Evan E

    2012-06-01

    Chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes differ from human chromosomes by the presence of large blocks of subterminal heterochromatin thought to be composed primarily of arrays of tandem satellite sequence. We explore their sequence composition and organization and show a complex organization composed of specific sets of segmental duplications that have hyperexpanded in concert with the formation of subterminal satellites. These regions are highly copy number polymorphic between and within species, and copy number differences involving hundreds of copies can be accurately estimated by assaying read-depth of next-generation sequencing data sets. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses suggest that the structures have arisen largely independently in the two lineages with the exception of a few seed sequences present in the common ancestor of humans and African apes. We propose a model where an ancestral human-chimpanzee pericentric inversion and the ancestral chromosome 2 fusion both predisposed and protected the chimpanzee and human genomes, respectively, to the formation of subtelomeric heterochromatin. Our findings highlight the complex interplay between duplicated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements that rapidly alter the cytogenetic landscape in a short period of evolutionary time.

  16. A Quest for Missing Proteins : update 2015 on Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvatovich, Péter; Lundberg, Emma K; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi; He, Fuchu; Nice, Edouard C; Goode, Robert J A; Yu, Simon; Ranganathan, Shoba; Baker, Mark S; Domont, Gilberto B; Velasquez, Erika; Li, Dong; Liu, Siqi; Wang, Quanhui; He, Qing-Yu; Menon, Rajasree; Guan, Yuanfang; Corrales, Fernando Jose; Segura, Victor; Casal, José Ignacio; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Fuentes, Manuel; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Maria; Diez, Paula; Ibarrola, Nieves; Degano, Rosa M; Mohammed, Yassene; Borchers, Christoph H; Urbani, Andrea; Soggiu, Alessio; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Archakov, Alexander I; Ponomarenko, Elena; Lisitsa, Andrey V; Lichti, Cheryl F; Mostovenko, Ekaterina; Kroes, Roger A; Rezeli, Melinda; Vegvari, Akos; Fehniger, Thomas E; Bischoff, Rainer; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Deutsch, Eric W; Lane, Lydie; Nilsson, Carol L; Marko-Varga, György; Omenn, Gilbert S; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Cho, Jin-Young; Paik, Young-Ki; Hancock, William S

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent activities of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) consortium, which develops new technologies to identify yet-to-be annotated proteins (termed "missing proteins") in biological samples that lack sufficient experimental evidence at the protein level

  17. Students as "Humans Chromosomes" in Role-Playing Mitosis and Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Joseph P.; Yue, Joyce W.; Torres, Kieron M.

    2004-01-01

    Students often find it challenging to understand mitosis and meiosis and determine their processes. To develop an easier way to understand these terms, students are asked to role-play mitosis and meiosis and students themselves act as human chromosomes, which help students to learn differences between mitosis and meiosis.

  18. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF A RECURRING COMPLEX CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION IN 2 HUMAN EXTRAGONADAL GERM-CELL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SINKE, RJ; WEGHUIS, DO; SUIJKERBUIJK, RF; TANIGAMI, A; NAKAMURA, Y; LARSSON, C; WEBER, G; DEJONG, B; OOSTERHUIS, JW; MOLENAAR, WM; VANKESSEL, AG

    1994-01-01

    The molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation involving 6p21, 6p22, 6p23, and 11q13 in two independent bur similar extragonadal human germ cell rumors was initiated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) techniques

  19. Molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation in two human extragonadal germ cell tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinke, R J; Weghuis, D O; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Tanigami, A; Nakamura, Y; Larsson, C; Weber, G; Jong, B de; Oosterhuis, J W; Molenaar, W M

    1994-01-01

    The molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation involving 6p21, 6p22, 6q23, and 11q13 in two independent but similar extragonadal human germ cell tumors was initiated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) techniques

  20. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF A RECURRING COMPLEX CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION IN 2 HUMAN EXTRAGONADAL GERM-CELL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SINKE, RJ; WEGHUIS, DO; SUIJKERBUIJK, RF; TANIGAMI, A; NAKAMURA, Y; LARSSON, C; WEBER, G; DEJONG, B; OOSTERHUIS, JW; MOLENAAR, WM; VANKESSEL, AG

    1994-01-01

    The molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation involving 6p21, 6p22, 6p23, and 11q13 in two independent bur similar extragonadal human germ cell rumors was initiated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) techniques

  1. A Quest for Missing Proteins : update 2015 on Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvatovich, Péter; Lundberg, Emma K; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi; He, Fuchu; Nice, Edouard C; Goode, Robert J A; Yu, Simon; Ranganathan, Shoba; Baker, Mark S; Domont, Gilberto B; Velasquez, Erika; Li, Dong; Liu, Siqi; Wang, Quanhui; He, Qing-Yu; Menon, Rajasree; Guan, Yuanfang; Corrales, Fernando Jose; Segura, Victor; Casal, José Ignacio; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Fuentes, Manuel; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Maria; Diez, Paula; Ibarrola, Nieves; Degano, Rosa M; Mohammed, Yassene; Borchers, Christoph H; Urbani, Andrea; Soggiu, Alessio; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Archakov, Alexander I; Ponomarenko, Elena; Lisitsa, Andrey V; Lichti, Cheryl F; Mostovenko, Ekaterina; Kroes, Roger A; Rezeli, Melinda; Vegvari, Akos; Fehniger, Thomas E; Bischoff, Rainer; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Deutsch, Eric W; Lane, Lydie; Nilsson, Carol L; Marko-Varga, György; Omenn, Gilbert S; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Cho, Jin-Young; Paik, Young-Ki; Hancock, William S

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent activities of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) consortium, which develops new technologies to identify yet-to-be annotated proteins (termed "missing proteins") in biological samples that lack sufficient experimental evidence at the protein level

  2. Students as "Humans Chromosomes" in Role-Playing Mitosis and Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Joseph P.; Yue, Joyce W.; Torres, Kieron M.

    2004-01-01

    Students often find it challenging to understand mitosis and meiosis and determine their processes. To develop an easier way to understand these terms, students are asked to role-play mitosis and meiosis and students themselves act as human chromosomes, which help students to learn differences between mitosis and meiosis.

  3. An integrated physical map covering 25 cM of human chromosome 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; Hou, J.; Wagner, M.J.; Wells, D.E. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on an integrated physical map of human chromosome 8 using STS content analysis of somatic cell hybrids and YAC contigs. Such mapping efforts will help to localize genes linked to hereditary diseases. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. The immunogenetics of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Hennezel, Eva; Bin Dhuban, Khalid; Torgerson, Troy; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A; Piccirillo, Ciriaco

    2012-05-01

    Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare disorder in humans caused by germ-line mutations in the FOXP3 gene, a master transcriptional regulator for the development of CD4 regulatory T (Treg) cells. This T cell subset has global inhibitory functions that maintain immune homeostasis and mediate self-tolerance. Treg developmental deficiency or dysfunction is a hallmark of IPEX. It leads to severe, multi-organ, autoimmune phenomena including enteropathy, chronic dermatitis, endocrinopathy and other organ-specific diseases such as anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hepatitis and nephritis. In this review, the genetic, immunological and clinical characteristics of IPEX syndrome are described, and the impact of heritable mutations on the function of Treg cells highlighted.

  5. Evolution and survival on eutherian sex chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Wilson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the two eutherian sex chromosomes diverged from an ancestral autosomal pair, the X has remained relatively gene-rich, while the Y has lost most of its genes through the accumulation of deleterious mutations in nonrecombining regions. Presently, it is unclear what is distinctive about genes that remain on the Y chromosome, when the sex chromosomes acquired their unique evolutionary rates, and whether X-Y gene divergence paralleled that of paralogs located on autosomes. To tackle these questions, here we juxtaposed the evolution of X and Y homologous genes (gametologs in eutherian mammals with their autosomal orthologs in marsupial and monotreme mammals. We discovered that genes on the X and Y acquired distinct evolutionary rates immediately following the suppression of recombination between the two sex chromosomes. The Y-linked genes evolved at higher rates, while the X-linked genes maintained the lower evolutionary rates of the ancestral autosomal genes. These distinct rates have been maintained throughout the evolution of X and Y. Specifically, in humans, most X gametologs and, curiously, also most Y gametologs evolved under stronger purifying selection than similarly aged autosomal paralogs. Finally, after evaluating the current experimental data from the literature, we concluded that unique mRNA/protein expression patterns and functions acquired by Y (versus X gametologs likely contributed to their retention. Our results also suggest that either the boundary between sex chromosome strata 3 and 4 should be shifted or that stratum 3 should be divided into two strata.

  6. A First Generation Comparative Chromosome Map between Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Svetlana A; Perelman, Polina L; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Serdyukova, Natalia A; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ng, Bee L; Nie, Wenhui; Liehr, Thomas; Stanyon, Roscoe; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2015-01-01

    The domesticated guinea pig, Cavia porcellus (Hystricomorpha, Rodentia), is an important laboratory species and a model for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, genomic tools for this species are lacking; even its karyotype is poorly characterized. The guinea pig belongs to Hystricomorpha, a widespread and important group of rodents; so far the chromosomes of guinea pigs have not been compared with that of other hystricomorph species or with any other mammals. We generated full sets of chromosome-specific painting probes for the guinea pig by flow sorting and microdissection, and for the first time, mapped the chromosomal homologies between guinea pig and human by reciprocal chromosome painting. Our data demonstrate that the guinea pig karyotype has undergone extensive rearrangements: 78 synteny-conserved human autosomal segments were delimited in the guinea pig genome. The high rate of genome evolution in the guinea pig may explain why the HSA7/16 and HSA16/19 associations presumed ancestral for eutherians and the three syntenic associations (HSA1/10, 3/19, and 9/11) considered ancestral for rodents were not found in C. porcellus. The comparative chromosome map presented here is a starting point for further development of physical and genetic maps of the guinea pig as well as an aid for genome assembly assignment to specific chromosomes. Furthermore, the comparative mapping will allow a transfer of gene map data from other species. The probes developed here provide a genomic toolkit, which will make the guinea pig a key species to unravel the evolutionary bi