WorldWideScience

Sample records for human chromosome 5q31

  1. A gene for pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy maps to chromosome 5q31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier-Daire, V; Dagoneau, N; Nabbout, R; Burglen, L; Penet, C; Soufflet, C; Desguerre, I; Munnich, A; Dulac, O

    2000-10-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by generalized seizures in the first hours of life and responding only to pyridoxine hydrochloride. The pathogenesis of PDE is unknown, but an alteration in the binding of pyridoxal 5-phosphate to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) has been postulated in patients with PDE. Results are reported for genetic linkage analyses in four families with consanguineous parents and in one family with nonconsanguineous parents. The GAD1 (2q31) and GAD2 genes (10p23) were tested and excluded. A genomewide search was subsequently performed, using microsatellite markers at an average distance of 10 cM, and the search revealed linkage of the disease-causing gene to markers on chromosome 5q31.2-q31.3 (maximum LOD score [Z(max)] 8.43 at recombination fraction [theta] 0 and Zmax=7.58 at straight theta=0 at loci D5S2017 and D5S1972, respectively). A recombination event, between loci D5S638 and D5S463, in one family defined the distal boundary, and a second recombination event between loci D5S2011 and D5S2017 in another family defined the proximal boundary of the genetic interval encompassing the PDE gene (5.1 cM). Ongoing studies may lead to the identification of the disease-causing gene.

  2. Syntenic homology of human unique DNA sequences within chromossome regions 5q31, 10q22, 13q32-33 and 19q13.1 in the great apes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallente-Samonte Rhea U.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Homologies between chromosome banding patterns and DNA sequences in the great apes and humans suggest an apparent common origin for these two lineages. The availability of DNA probes for specific regions of human chromosomes (5q31, 10q22, 13q32-33 and 19q13.1 led us to cross-hybridize these to chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes, PTR, gorilla (Gorilla gorilla, GGO and orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus, PPY chromosomes in a search for equivalent regions in the great apes. Positive hybridization signals to the chromosome 5q31-specific DNA probe were observed at HSA 5q31, PTR 4q31, GGO 4q31 and PPY 4q31, while fluorescent signals using the chromosome 10q22-specific DNA probe were noted at HSA 10q22, PTR 8q22, GGO 8q22 and PPY 7q22. The chromosome arms showing hybridization signals to the Quint-EssentialTM 13-specific DNA probe were identified as HSA 13q32-33, PTR 14q32-33, GGO 14q32-33 and PPY 14q32-33, while those presenting hybridization signals to the chromosome 19q13.1-specific DNA probe were identified as HSA 19q13.1, PTR 20q13, GGO 20q13 and PPY 20q13. All four probes presumably hybridized to homologous chromosomal locations in the apes, which suggests a homology of certain unique DNA sequences among hominoid species.

  3. Systematic screening at diagnosis of -5/del(5)(q31), -7, or chromosome 8 aneuploidy by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization in 110 acute myelocytic leukemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients: concordances and discrepancies with conventional cytogenetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, V.; Castagne, C.; Muhlematter, D.; Parlier, V.; Gmur, J.; Hess, U.; Kovacsovics, T.; Meyer-Monard, S.; Tichelli, A.; Tobler, A.; Jacky, E.; Schanz, U.; Bargetzi, M.; Hagemeijer, A.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Melle, G. van; Jotterand-Bellomo, M.

    2004-01-01

    To assess the contribution of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH) toward the detection of recurring unbalanced chromosomal anomalies at diagnosis, a systematic screening of -5/del(5)(q31), -7, and chromosome 8 aneuploidy was performed on 110 patients with acute myelocytic leukemia

  4. A chromosome 5q31.1 locus associates with tuberculin skin test reactivity in HIV-positive individuals from tuberculosis hyper-endemic regions in east Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, Rafal S; Stein, Catherine M; Kodaman, Nuri; Maro, Isaac; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Igo, Robert P; Magohe, Albert; Malone, LaShaunda L; Chervenak, Keith; Hall, Noemi B; Matee, Mecky; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Joloba, Moses; Moore, Jason H; Scott, William K; Lahey, Timothy; Boom, W Henry; von Reyn, C Fordham; Williams, Scott M; Sirugo, Giorgio

    2017-06-01

    One in three people has been infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), and the risk for MTB infection in HIV-infected individuals is even higher. We hypothesized that HIV-positive individuals living in tuberculosis-endemic regions who do not get infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis are genetically resistant. Using an "experiment of nature" design that proved successful in our previous work, we performed a genome-wide association study of tuberculin skin test positivity using 469 HIV-positive patients from prospective study cohorts of tuberculosis from Tanzania and Uganda to identify genetic loci associated with MTB infection in the context of HIV-infection. Among these individuals, 244 tested were tuberculin skin test (TST) positive either at enrollment or during the >8 year follow up, while 225 were not. We identified a genome-wide significant association between a dominant model of rs877356 and binary TST status in the combined cohort (Odds ratio = 0.2671, p = 1.22x10-8). Association was replicated with similar significance when examining TST induration as a continuous trait. The variant lies in the 5q31.1 region, 57kb downstream from IL9. Two-locus analyses of association of variants near rs877356 showed a haplotype comprised of rs877356 and an IL9 missense variant, rs2069885, had the most significant association (p = 1.59x10-12). We also replicated previously linked loci on chromosomes 2, 5, and 11. IL9 is a cytokine produced by mast cells and TH2 cells during inflammatory responses, providing a possible link between airway inflammation and protection from MTB infection. Our results indicate that studying uninfected, HIV-positive participants with extensive exposure increases the power to detect associations in complex infectious disease.

  5. Long-range epigenetic silencing of chromosome 5q31 protocadherins is involved in early and late stages of colorectal tumorigenesis through modulation of oncogenic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallosso, A R; Øster, Bodil; Greenhough, A

    2012-01-01

    Loss of tumour suppressor gene function can occur as a result of epigenetic silencing of large chromosomal regions, referred to as long-range epigenetic silencing (LRES), and genome-wide analyses have revealed that LRES is present in many cancer types. Here we utilize Illumina Beadchip methylatio...

  6. Allelic methylation levels of the noncoding VTRNA2-1 located on chromosome 5q31.1 predict outcome in AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Qiu, Xiangning; Søgaard, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 5q are associated with poor outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) suggesting the presence of tumor suppressor(s) at the locus. However, definitive identification of putative tumor suppressor genes remains controversial. Here we show that a 106-nucleotide noncoding RNA...

  7. Familial insertion (3;5)(q25.3;q22.1q31.3) with deletion or duplication of chromosome region 5q22.1-5q31.3 in ten unbalanced carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, Y.H.; Engelen, J.J.M.; Govaerts, L.C.P.; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van; Loneus, W.H.; Lent-Albrechts, J.C. van; Blij-Philipsen, M. van der; Hamers, A.J.H.; Schrander-Stumpel, C.T.R.M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the clinical and cytogenetic data of a large family with an unbalanced insertion translocation (3;5)(q25.3;q22.1q31.3). Analysis of GTG-banded chromosomes demonstrated that unbalanced inheritance of a parental insertion translocation caused either a partial deletion or duplication 5q in

  8. Mutations in PURA Cause Profound Neonatal Hypotonia, Seizures, and Encephalopathy in 5q31.3 Microdeletion Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lalani, Seema R.; Zhang, Jing; Schaaf, Christian P.; Brown, Chester W.; Magoulas, Pilar; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; El-Gharbawy, Areeg; Wierenga, Klaas J.; Bartholomew, Dennis; Fong, Chin-To; Barbaro-Dieber, Tina; Kukolich, Mary K.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Austin, Elise; Keller, Kory

    2014-01-01

    5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by neonatal hypotonia, encephalopathy with or without epilepsy, and severe developmental delay, and the minimal critical deletion interval harbors three genes. We describe 11 individuals with clinical features of 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome and de novo mutations in PURA, encoding transcriptional activator protein Pur-α, within the critical region. These data implicate causative PURA mutations responsible for the severe neurological phenotypes o...

  9. Long-term follow-up of a patient with 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome and the smallest de novo 5q31.2q31.3 deletion involving PURA

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaglia, Maria Clara; Zanotta, Nicoletta; Giorda, Roberto; D?Angelo, Grazia; Zucca, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Background Purine-rich element binding protein A (PURA, MIM 600473), is considered the crucial phenocritical gene for an emerging 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome. To date, at least seven affected individuals with overlapping 5q31.2q31.3 deletions, varying in size from 2.6 to 5?Mb, have been reported sharing neurologic features such as severe developmental delay, neonatal hypotonia, early feeding difficulties, respiratory distress and EEG abnormalities. The recent finding that de novo PURA point...

  10. Variants in SKP1, PROB1, and IL17B genes at keratoconus 5q31.1-q35.3 susceptibility locus identified by whole-exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolak, Justyna A; Gambin, Tomasz; Pitarque, Jose A; Molinari, Andrea; Jhangiani, Shalini; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Lupski, James R; Gajecka, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconus (KTCN) is a protrusion and thinning of the cornea, resulting in impairment of visual function. The extreme genetic heterogeneity makes it difficult to discover factors unambiguously influencing the KTCN phenotype. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing to reduce the number of candidate genes at the 5q31.1-q35.3 locus and to prioritize other potentially relevant variants in an Ecuadorian family with KTCN. We applied WES in two affected KTCN individuals from the Ecuadorian family that showed a suggestive linkage between the KTCN phenotype and the 5q31.1-q35.3 locus. Putative variants identified by WES were further evaluated in this family using Sanger sequencing. Exome capture discovered a total of 173 rare (minor allele frequency G in SKP1, c.671G>A in PROB1, and c.527G>A in IL17B in the 5q31.1-q35.3 linkage region, and c.850G>A in HKDC1 in the 10q22 locus completely segregated with the phenotype in the studied KTCN family. We demonstrate that a combination of various techniques significantly narrowed the studied genomic region and reduced the list of the putative exonic variants. Moreover, since this locus overlapped two other chromosomal regions previously recognized in distinct KTCN studies, our findings suggest that this 5q31.1-q35.3 locus might be linked with KTCN.

  11. Monosomy 9p24{r_arrow}pter and trisomy 5q31{r_arrow}qter: Case report and review of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmenti, L.A.; Steinberger, J.; Mammel, M.C. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-22

    Partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 (p24{r_arrow}pter) and partial duplication of the long arm of chromosome 5 (q32{r_arrow}qter) were observed in an abnormal boy who died at age 8 weeks of a complex cyanotic cardiac defect. He also had minor anomalies, sagittal craniosynostosis, triphalangeal thumbs, hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum. Two other infants with similar cytogenetic abnormalities were described previously. These patients had severe congenital heart defect, genitourinary anomalies, broad nasal bridge, low hairline, apparently low-set ears, short neck, and triphalangeal thumbs, in common with our patient. We suggest that combined monosomy 9q23,24{r_arrow}pter and trisomy 5q31,32{r_arrow}qter may constitute a clinically recognizable syndrome. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Sublocalization of seven human simple sequence repeat polymorphic markers: D5S349, D5S351, and D5S355 to 5q11. 2-q13. 1, D5S350 to 5p13. 1-p14, D5S35s to 5q31. 2-q33. 1, D5S353 to 5q33. 2-qter, and D5S354 to 5q13. 2-q15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warrington, J.A.; Wasmuth, J.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Seven highly informative human simple sequence repeat polymorphisms that map to human chromosome 5 have been sublocalized using a panel of somatic cell hybrids that retain naturally occurring deletions (4, 7). Simple sequence repeats are useful in the construction of high-resolution maps of the human genome because they are highly polymorphic and easily typed by the polymerase chain reaction (2, 9, 10, 11). The presence or absence of each of the seven simple sequence repeats, D5S349, D5S350, D5S351, D5S352, D5S353, D5S354, and D5S355, in a panel of somatic cell hybrids was determined using the polymerase chain reaction. The sequence of the PCR primer sets was previously reported by Hudson et al. Each PCR was carried out in a total volume of 25 PI using 0.2 pg DNA in 67 mM Tris-HCI (pH 8.3),6.7 mM MgCl[sub 2], 16.6 mM ammonium sulfate, 10 mM [beta]-mercaptoethanol, 1.25 mM each dNTP, 25 pmol each primer, and I unit of Thermos aquaticus DNA polymerase. The initial denaturation was at 94[degrees]R C for 1.5 min and the annealing temperatures ranged from 57 to 67[degrees]R C. Figure 1 depicts the chromosome 5 natural deletion mapping panel and the location of the markers. D5S350 was present in all hybrid cell lines except HHW1124 and HHW764 (SRO p13.1-p14). D5S349, D5S351, and D5S355 were absent in HHW1064 and HHW1124 and present in all other cell lines (SROq11.2-q13.1).D5S354 was absent in HHW1124 and present in all other cell lines (SRO q13.2-q15). D5S352 was present in all cell lines (SRO q31.2-q33.1), and D5S353 was present in all cell lines except HHW1138 (SRO q33.2-qter). 11 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Fortuitous FISH diagnosis of an interstitial microdeletion (5)(q31.1q31.2) in a girl suspected to present a cri-du-chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, A L; Callier, P; Leheup, B; Marle, N; Jalloul, M; Coffinet, L; Feillet, F; Valduga, M; Jonveaux, P; Mugneret, F

    2007-06-15

    Constitutional interstitial deletions of 5q are relatively rare and most are poorly characterized cytogenetically. Consequently a definite karyotype-phenotype correlation is difficult to establish. We report on a new case of a girl presenting with an abnormal cry, upslanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, anteverted nostrils, microretrognathia, growth retardation, and an adenoid cyst at the base of the tongue. The first suspected diagnosis was cri-du-chat syndrome because of the mewing cry. Standard cytogenetic analyses were interpreted as normal, but FISH studies using the probe of cri-du-chat syndrome with the control probe EGR1 (5q31.2)/D5S23 (Abbott) revealed a 5q31.2 microdeletion which was then confirmed by CGH-array (Abbott). FISH studies using PACs and BACs clones (Rocchi, Italia) enabled us to characterize the breakpoints of the deleted region. Cytogenetic analysis with FISH studies revealed a normal karyotype with normal 5q31 region in both parents. This case is compared with the other cases reported in the literature.

  14. The human Y chromosome: a masculine chromosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, Michiel J.; Repping, Sjoerd

    2006-01-01

    Once considered to be a genetic wasteland of no scientific interest beyond sex determination, the human Y chromosome has made a significant comeback in the past few decades and is currently implicated in multiple diseases, including spermatogenic failure - absent or very low levels of sperm

  15. Physical and genetic map of 5q31: use of fluorescence in situ hybridization data to identify errors in the CEPH database. Centre d'Etude de Polymorphisme Humain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, C A; Le Beau, M M; Neuman, W L; Keinanen, M; Yamaoka, L H; Speer, M C; Espinosa, R; Nakamura, Y; Williamson, R; Mullan, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome 5, band q31, contains the genes responsible for a number of interesting genetic and malignant diseases, as well as many cloned genes. To prepare a high-resolution map of this region, eight anonymous DNA markers were mapped by combining genetic data derived from linkage analysis, with physical data obtained using two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Probe order was determined by FISH on metaphase cells, supplemented with interphase analysis, while genetic distance and likely order were determined by multipoint linkage analysis using genotype data from Centre d'Etude de Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) pedigrees. Discrepancies between the genetic and physical maps suggested that there was a high rate of genotyping errors in the CEPH data for these markers, and prompted a statistical analysis to identify these errors. By assuming a known physical order (as determined by FISH) it was possible to identify markers which had the greatest degree of error. The average typing error was estimated at 1.8%, but several markers had much higher error rates; a 14% error rate was predicted for one locus, which was subsequently confirmed by retyping. The analysis led to the preparation of a revised map spanning 24.5 cM of 5q31. This study illustrates the power of FISH to determine physical order over a wide genomic distance, and demonstrates how order can be used as an adjunct to linkage analysis, particularly in the identification of genotyping errors.

  16. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Epitope shared by functional variant of organic cation/carnitine transporter, OCTN1, Campylobacter jejuni and Mycobacterium paratuberculosis may underlie susceptibility to Crohn's disease at 5q31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Ackerley, Cameron; Onizuka, Russell; Tilups, Aina; Lamhonwah, Daniel; Chung, Cilla; Tao, Ke Sheng; Tellier, Raymond; Tein, Ingrid

    2005-12-02

    Campylobacter jejuni and Mycobacterium paratuberculosis have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. The presence of bacterial metabolites in the colonic lumen causing a specific breakdown of fatty acid oxidation in colonic epithelial cells has been suggested as an initiating event in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). l-Carnitine is a small highly polar zwitterion that plays an essential role in fatty acid oxidation and ATP generation in intestinal bioenergetic metabolism. The organic cation/carnitine transporters, OCTN1 and OCTN2, function primarily in the transport of l-carnitine and elimination of cationic drugs in the intestine. High-resolution linkage disequilibrium mapping has identified a region of about 250kb in size at 5q31 (IBD5) encompassing the OCTN1 and -2 genes, to confer susceptibility to Crohn's disease. Recently, two variants in the OCTN1 and OCTN2 genes have been shown to form a haplotype which is associated with susceptibility to Crohn's. We show that OCTN1 and OCTN2 are strongly expressed in target areas for IBD such as ileum and colon. Further, we have now identified a nine amino acid epitope shared by this functional variant of OCTN1 (Leu503Phe) (which decreases the efficiency of carnitine transport), and by C. jejuni (9 aa) and M. paratuberculosis (6 aa). The prevalence of this variant of OCTN1 (Phe503:Leu503) is 3-fold lower in unaffected individuals of Jewish origin (1:3.44) compared to unaffected individuals of non-Jewish origin (1:1). We hypothesize that a specific antibody raised to this epitope during C. jejuni or M. paratuberculosis enterocolitis would cross-react with the intestinal epithelial cell functional variant of OCTN1, an already less efficient carnitine transporter, leading to an impairment of mitochondrial beta-oxidation which may then serve as an initiating event in IBD. This impairment of l-carnitine transport by OCTN1 may respond to high-dose l-carnitine therapy.

  18. Know Your Chromosomes Hybrid Cells and Human Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 6. Know Your Chromosomes Hybrid Cells and Human Chromosomes. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 6 June 1996 pp 41-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Chromosome microarrays in human reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajcan-Separovic, Evica

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome microarray (CMA) testing allows automatic and easy identification of large chromosomal abnormalities detectable by conventional cytogenetics as well as the detection of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances. A PubMed search was performed in order to review the current use of CMA testing in the field of human reproduction. Articles discussing the use of CMA in the preimplantation setting, ongoing pregnancies, miscarriages and patients with reproductive disorders were considered. A high rate of concordance between conventional methods of detecting chromosomal abnormalities [e.g. fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), karyotyping] and CMA was reported in the prenatal setting with CMA providing more comprehensive and detailed results as it investigates the whole genome at higher resolution. In preimplantation genetic screening, CMA is replacing FISH and the selection of embryos based on CMA has already resulted in live births. For ongoing pregnancies and miscarriages, CMA eliminates tissue culture failures and artifacts and allows a quick turnaround time. The detection of submicroscopic imbalances [or copy number variants (CNVs)] is beneficial when the imbalance has a clear clinical consequence but is challenging for previously undescribed imbalances, particularly for ongoing pregnancies. Recurrent CNVs have been documented in patients with reproductive disorders; however, the application of CMA in this field is still limited. CMA enhances reproductive medicine as it facilitates better understanding of the genetic aspects of human development and reproduction and more informed patient management. Further clinical validation of CMA in the prenatal setting, creation of practice guidelines and catalogs of newly discovered submicroscopic imbalances with clinical outcomes are areas that will require attention in the future.

  20. A Plain English Map of the Human Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Presents a chromosome map for 19 known chromosomes in human genetics. Describes the characteristics attributed to the genetic codes for each of the chromosomes and discusses the teaching applications of the chromosome map. (MDH)

  1. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  2. Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

    2001-09-01

    Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

  3. Nonrandom chromosomal changes in human malignant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1977-01-01

    The role of chromosomal changes in human malignant cells has been the subject of much debate. The observation of nonrandom chromosomal changes has become well recognized in chronic myelogenous leukemia, and more recently in acute myelogenous leukemia. In the present report, data are presented on the sites of duplication of chromosome No. 1 in hematologic disorders. Trisomy for region lq25 to lq32 was observed in every one of 34 patients whose cells showed duplication of some part of chromosome No. 1. Adjacent regions lq21 to lq25, and lq32 to lqter, also were trisomic in the majority of patients. Two patients had deletions, one of lq32 to qter, and the other, of lp32 to pter. The sites of chromosomal breaks leading to trisomy differ from those involved in balanced reciprocal translocations. Some of these sites are sometimes, but not always, vulnerable in constitutional chromosomal abnormalities. The nature of the proliferative advantage conferred on myeloid cells by these chromosomal changes is unknown.

  4. Structure of the human chromosome interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sarnataro

    Full Text Available New Hi-C technologies have revealed that chromosomes have a complex network of spatial contacts in the cell nucleus of higher organisms, whose organisation is only partially understood. Here, we investigate the structure of such a network in human GM12878 cells, to derive a large scale picture of nuclear architecture. We find that the intensity of intra-chromosomal interactions is power-law distributed. Inter-chromosomal interactions are two orders of magnitude weaker and exponentially distributed, yet they are not randomly arranged along the genomic sequence. Intra-chromosomal contacts broadly occur between epigenomically homologous regions, whereas inter-chromosomal contacts are especially associated with regions rich in highly expressed genes. Overall, genomic contacts in the nucleus appear to be structured as a network of networks where a set of strongly individual chromosomal units, as envisaged in the 'chromosomal territory' scenario derived from microscopy, interact with each other via on average weaker, yet far from random and functionally important interactions.

  5. Human oocyte chromosome analyses need a standardized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies of DNA polymorphisms in human trisomic abor- tions and liveborn have revealed a chromosome-specific vari- ation in the importance of meiosis I versus meiosis II er- rors. As a general rule, maternal meiosis I errors predom- inate among almost all trisomies (Hassold and Hunt 2001). It is evident that a direct ...

  6. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke de Vries

    Full Text Available In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI, which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  7. The complete sequence of human chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, State; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie, Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan, Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, Chris; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstenin, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimbal, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar, Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan M.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-04-15

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-encoding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families and the first complete versions of each of the large chromosome 5 specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and play a likely mechanistic role, since deletions of these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  8. Mapping genes to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Sarah [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    For this project, 22 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were fine mapped to regions of human chromosome 19. An EST is a short DNA sequence that occurs once in the genome and corresponds to a single expressed gene. {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probes were made by polymerase chain reaction for each EST and hybridized to filters containing a chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. The location of the ESTs on the chromosome was determined by the location of the ordered cosmid to which the EST hybridized. Of the 22 ESTs that were sublocalized, 6 correspond to known genes, and 16 correspond to anonymous genes. These localized ESTs may serve as potential candidates for disease genes, as well as markers for future physical mapping.

  9. Use of a CEPH meiotic breakpoint panel to refine the locus of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1A (LGMD1A) to a 2-Mb interval on 5q31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoloni, L; Horrigan, S K; Viles, K D; Gilchrist, J M; Stajich, J M; Vance, J M; Yamaoka, L H; Pericak-Vance, M A; Westbrook, C A; Speer, M C

    1998-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1A (LGMD1A) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by progressive weakness of the hip and shoulder girdle. The gene for LGMD1A had been localized to a 7-cM interval at 5q31 in a single large family (Family 39). To refine the localization of LGMD1A further and to aid in its identification, a high-resolution physical map of the locus was used to identify and provisionally localize 25 polymorphic markers. A subset of these markers was then ordered genetically, using a CEPH meiotic breakpoint panel, resulting in an integrated physical-genetic map of the locus. Relevant markers were genotyped on the members of Family 39 who contained informative recombination events, resulting in a further narrowing of LGMD1A to an interval bounded by D5S479 and D5S594, estimated to be 2 Mb in size. Integration of the genetic and physical map permits the identification of several transcription units from within the narrowed LGMD1A interval, including one that is muscle specific, representing candidate genes for this familial dystrophy. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  10. Angular resolved light scattering microscopy on human chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dennis; Stark, Julian; Kienle, Alwin

    2017-07-01

    Angular resolved scattering light measurements on chromosomes are compared to Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) simulations using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based geometrical models. This could present a novel, marker-free method for human chromosome karyotyping.

  11. The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzny, Donna M; Scherer, Steven E; Kaul, Rajinder

    2006-01-01

    After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chr...

  12. Large-scale reconstruction of 3D structures of human chromosomes from chromosomal contact data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Tuan; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomes are not positioned randomly within a nucleus, but instead, they adopt preferred spatial conformations to facilitate necessary long-range gene-gene interactions and regulations. Thus, obtaining the 3D shape of chromosomes of a genome is critical for understanding how the genome folds, functions and how its genes interact and are regulated. Here, we describe a method to reconstruct preferred 3D structures of individual chromosomes of the human genome from chromosomal contact data generated by the Hi-C chromosome conformation capturing technique. A novel parameterized objective function was designed for modeling chromosome structures, which was optimized by a gradient descent method to generate chromosomal structural models that could satisfy as many intra-chromosomal contacts as possible. We applied the objective function and the corresponding optimization method to two Hi-C chromosomal data sets of both a healthy and a cancerous human B-cell to construct 3D models of individual chromosomes at resolutions of 1 MB and 200 KB, respectively. The parameters used with the method were calibrated according to an independent fluorescence in situ hybridization experimental data. The structural models generated by our method could satisfy a high percentage of contacts (pairs of loci in interaction) and non-contacts (pairs of loci not in interaction) and were compatible with the known two-compartment organization of human chromatin structures. Furthermore, structural models generated at different resolutions and from randomly permuted data sets were consistent.

  13. The hierarchically organized splitting of chromosomal bands for all human chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liehr Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome banding is widely used in cytogenetics. However, the biological nature of hierarchically organized splitting of chromosomal bands of human chromosomes is an enigma and has not been, as yet, studied. Results Here we present for the first time the hierarchically organized splitting of chromosomal bands in their sub-bands for all human chromosomes. To do this, array-proved multicolor banding (aMCB probe-sets for all human chromosomes were applied to normal metaphase spreads of three different G-band levels. We confirmed for all chromosomes to be a general principle that only Giemsa-dark bands split into dark and light sub-bands, as we demonstrated previously by chromosome stretching. Thus, the biological band splitting is in > 50% of the sub-bands different than implemented by the ISCN nomenclature suggesting also a splitting of G-light bands. Locus-specific probes exemplary confirmed the results of MCB. Conclusion Overall, the present study enables a better understanding of chromosome architecture. The observed difference of biological and ISCN band-splitting may be an explanation why mapping data from human genome project do not always fit the cytogenetic mapping.

  14. Flow cytometry measurements of human chromosome kinetochore labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Malloy, P.; Sumner, A.T.

    1989-03-01

    A method for the preparation and measurement of immunofluorescent human chromosome centromeres in suspension is described using CREST antibodies, which bind to the centromeric region of chromosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated antihuman antibodies provide the fluorescent label. Labeled chromosomes are examined on microscope slides and by flow cytometry. In both cases a dye which binds to DNA is added to provide identification of the chromosome groups. Sera from different CREST patients vary in their ability to bind to chromosome arms in addition to the centromeric region. Flow cytometry and microfluorimetry measurements have shown that with a given CREST serum the differences in kinetochore fluorescence between chromosomes are only minor. Flow cytometry experiments to relate the number of dicentric chromosomes, induced by in vitro radiation of peripheral blood cells to the slightly increased number of chromosomes with above-average kinetochore fluorescence did not produce decisive radiation dosimetry results.

  15. Scanning conductance microscopy investigations on fixed human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Jensen, Linda Boye

    2008-01-01

    Scanning conductance microscopy investigations were carried out in air on human chromosomes fixed on pre-fabricated SiO2 surfaces with a backgate. The point of the investigation was to estimate the dielectric constant of fixed human chromosomes in order to use it for microfluidic device...... optimization. The phase shift caused by the electrostatic forces, together with geometrical measurements of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and the chromosomes were used to estimate a value,for the dielectric constant of different human chromosomes....

  16. Genomic imprinting and human chromosome 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIELA M. REPETTO

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is a reversible phenomenon that affects the expression of genes depending on their parental origin. The best characterized human disorders resulting from an alteration of the imprinting process are Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes. They are due to the lack of active maternal or paternal genes, respectively, from chromosome region 15q11q13. Most cases arise via interstitial deletions. We review evidence that other common cytogenetic alterations of this region, interstitial and supernumerary duplications, could be the reciprocal products of the deletions and are also affected by the imprinting phenomenon, given the predominance of maternally-derived duplications in patients ascertained due to developmental delays or autistic features.

  17. Variation in conserved non-coding sequences on chromosome 5q and susceptibility to asthma and atopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubchak Inna

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionarily conserved sequences likely have biological function. Methods To determine whether variation in conserved sequences in non-coding DNA contributes to risk for human disease, we studied six conserved non-coding elements in the Th2 cytokine cluster on human chromosome 5q31 in a large Hutterite pedigree and in samples of outbred European American and African American asthma cases and controls. Results Among six conserved non-coding elements (>100 bp, >70% identity; human-mouse comparison, we identified one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in each of two conserved elements and six SNPs in the flanking regions of three conserved elements. We genotyped our samples for four of these SNPs and an additional three SNPs each in the IL13 and IL4 genes. While there was only modest evidence for association with single SNPs in the Hutterite and European American samples (P IL4 gene (P IL13 gene was strongly associated with total IgE (P = 0.00022 and allergic sensitization to mold allergens (P = 0.00076 in the Hutterites, and more modestly associated with sensitization to molds in the European Americans and African Americans (P Conclusion These results indicate that there is overall little variation in the conserved non-coding elements on 5q31, but variation in IL4 and IL13, including possibly one SNP in a conserved element, influence asthma and atopic phenotypes in diverse populations.

  18. Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC in humans; are there B chromosomes hidden among them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie Caroline

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC and B-chromosomes represent a heterogeneous collection of chromosomes added to the typical karyotype, and which are both small in size. They may consist of heterochromatic and/or euchromatic material. Also a predominance of maternal transmission was reported for both groups. Even though sSMC and B-chromosomes show some similarity it is still an open question if B-chromosomes are present among the heterogeneous group of sSMC. According to current theories, sSMC would need drive, drift or beneficial effects to increase in frequency in order to become B chromosome. However, up to now no B-chromosomes were described in human. Results Here we provide first evidence and discuss, that among sSMC B-chromosomes might be hidden. We present two potential candidates which may already be, or may in future evolve into B chromosomes in human: (i sSMC cases where the marker is stainable only by DNA derived from itself; and (ii acrocentric-derived inverted duplication sSMC without associated clinical phenotype. Here we report on the second sSMC stainable exclusively by its own DNA and show that for acrocentric derived sSMC 3.9× more are familial cases than reported for other sSMC. Conclusion The majority of sSMC are not to be considered as B-chromosomes. Nonetheless, a minority of sSMC show similarities to B-chromosomes. Further studies are necessary to come to final conclusions for that problem.

  19. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Roland; Eckenberg, Ralph; Petit, Jean-Louis; Fonknechten, Núria; Da Silva, Corinne; Cattolico, Laurence; Levy, Michaël; Barbe, Valérie; de Berardinis, Véronique; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Pelletier, Eric; Vico, Virginie; Anthouard, Véronique; Rowen, Lee; Madan, Anup; Qin, Shizhen; Sun, Hui; Du, Hui; Pepin, Kymberlie; Artiguenave, François; Robert, Catherine; Cruaud, Corinne; Brüls, Thomas; Jaillon, Olivier; Friedlander, Lucie; Samson, Gaelle; Brottier, Philippe; Cure, Susan; Ségurens, Béatrice; Anière, Franck; Samain, Sylvie; Crespeau, Hervé; Abbasi, Nissa; Aiach, Nathalie; Boscus, Didier; Dickhoff, Rachel; Dors, Monica; Dubois, Ivan; Friedman, Cynthia; Gouyvenoux, Michel; James, Rose; Madan, Anuradha; Mairey-Estrada, Barbara; Mangenot, Sophie; Martins, Nathalie; Ménard, Manuela; Oztas, Sophie; Ratcliffe, Amber; Shaffer, Tristan; Trask, Barbara; Vacherie, Benoit; Bellemere, Chadia; Belser, Caroline; Besnard-Gonnet, Marielle; Bartol-Mavel, Delphine; Boutard, Magali; Briez-Silla, Stéphanie; Combette, Stephane; Dufossé-Laurent, Virginie; Ferron, Carolyne; Lechaplais, Christophe; Louesse, Claudine; Muselet, Delphine; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Pateau, Emilie; Petit, Emmanuelle; Sirvain-Trukniewicz, Peggy; Trybou, Arnaud; Vega-Czarny, Nathalie; Bataille, Elodie; Bluet, Elodie; Bordelais, Isabelle; Dubois, Maria; Dumont, Corinne; Guérin, Thomas; Haffray, Sébastien; Hammadi, Rachid; Muanga, Jacqueline; Pellouin, Virginie; Robert, Dominique; Wunderle, Edith; Gauguet, Gilbert; Roy, Alice; Sainte-Marthe, Laurent; Verdier, Jean; Verdier-Discala, Claude; Hillier, LaDeana; Fulton, Lucinda; McPherson, John; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Wilson, Richard; Scarpelli, Claude; Gyapay, Gábor; Wincker, Patrick; Saurin, William; Quétier, Francis; Waterston, Robert; Hood, Leroy; Weissenbach, Jean

    2003-02-06

    Chromosome 14 is one of five acrocentric chromosomes in the human genome. These chromosomes are characterized by a heterochromatic short arm that contains essentially ribosomal RNA genes, and a euchromatic long arm in which most, if not all, of the protein-coding genes are located. The finished sequence of human chromosome 14 comprises 87,410,661 base pairs, representing 100% of its euchromatic portion, in a single continuous segment covering the entire long arm with no gaps. Two loci of crucial importance for the immune system, as well as more than 60 disease genes, have been localized so far on chromosome 14. We identified 1,050 genes and gene fragments, and 393 pseudogenes. On the basis of comparisons with other vertebrate genomes, we estimate that more than 96% of the chromosome 14 genes have been annotated. From an analysis of the CpG island occurrences, we estimate that 70% of these annotated genes are complete at their 5' end.

  20. [Frequency of chromosome variants in human populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshov, N P; Kulieva, L M

    1979-01-01

    Chromosome variants were analyzed in the course of the population chromosome investigation of 6000 newborns and clinical cytogenetic studies of 403 married couples with recurrent spontaneous abortions, stillbirths or offsprings having congenital malformations or Down's syndrome. The following variants were determined: 1) Igh+, 9gh+, 16gh+ - the enlargement of the secondary constrictions of the size, more than 1/4 of the long arm of the chromosome; 2) Dp+ or Gp+ - the enlargement of the short arms of acrocentrics, their size being more than the short arm of the chromosome 18; 3) Ds+ or Gs - large satellites of the acrocentrics which are equal or more than the thickness of the chromatids of the long arms; 4) Es+ - satellites on the short arms of the chromosomes 17 or 18; 5) Dss of Gss - double satellites; 6) Yq+ - the enlargement of the long arm of Y chromosome, the size of which being more than G chromosome; 7) Yq- - deletion of the long arm of Y chromosome, the size of the long arm being less than chromosomes 21--22. The total frequency of variants in newborns was 12.8/1000 births. The incidence of different types of variants per 1000 births was as follows: Igh+ - 0.33; 9gh+ - 0.17; 16gh+ - 0.50; Ds+ - 2.33; Dp+ - 1.50; Dp- - 0.17; Gs+ - 0.83; Gp+ - 2.17; Yq+ - 6.91/1000 males; Yg- - 0.99/1000 males; double variants - 0.33; other variants - 0.33. 4.0% of married couples with recurrent spontaneous abortions had major chromosome aberrations, 14.6% - extreme variants of chromosomes. Among 113 couples with the history of congenital malformations in their offsprings major chromosome abnormalities were found in 4.4%, chromosome variants - 13.3%. The frequency of chromosome variants among 139 patients with Down's syndrome was 7.2%. In one case Robertsonian translocation t(DqGa) was determined. The most frequent types of variant chromosomes were Ds+, Dp+, Es+, Yq+.

  1. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  2. Nonrandom involvement of chromosomal segments in human hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The consistent occurrence of nonrandom chromosome changes in human malignancies suggests that they are not trivial epiphenomena. Whereas we do not understand their significance at present, one possible role which they may fulfill is to provide the chromosomally aberrant cells with a proliferative advantage as the result of alteration of the number and/or location of genes related to nucleic acid biosynthesis. It would be expected that the proliferative advantage provided by various chromosome aberrations differs in patients with different genetic constitutions.

  3. Human ferritin gene is assigned to chromosome 19.

    OpenAIRE

    Caskey, J H; Jones, C; Miller, Y E; Seligman, P A

    1983-01-01

    Ferritin is the intracellular iron storage protein. Tissue ferritin stores are markedly increased in hemochromatosis, a disease of iron overload that has been linked to chromosome 6. In order to provide further information concerning the genetics of ferritin synthesis and to determine if the structural gene for ferritin was on chromosome 6, studies were performed to identify the human chromosome that contains the ferritin gene. Ferritin immunoassays were performed on extracts of Chinese hamst...

  4. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 13

    OpenAIRE

    Dunham, A.; Matthews, L. H.; Burton, J.; Ashurst, J. L.; Howe, K. L.; Ashcroft, K. J.; Beare, D. M.; Burford, D. C.; Hunt, S. E.; Griffiths-Jones, S.; Jones, M. C.; Keenan, S. J.; Oliver, K.; Scott, C. E.; Ainscough, R.

    2004-01-01

    Chromosome 13 is the largest acrocentric human chromosome. It carries genes involved in cancer including the breast cancer type 2 (BRCA2) and retinoblastoma (RB1) genes, is frequently rearranged in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and contains the DAOA locus associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We describe completion and analysis of 95.5 megabases (Mb) of sequence from chromosome 13, which contains 633 genes and 296 pseudogenes. We estimate that more than 95.4% of the prot...

  5. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M. de; Vosters, S.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Hauwers, K.W.M. d'; Wansink, D.G.; Ramos, L.; Boer, P. de

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly

  6. Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Heineman, Maas Jan; van der Veen, Fulco; Repping, Sjoerd

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos has been described for almost two decades, its exact prevalence is still unknown. The prevalence of mosaicism is important in the context of preimplantation genetic screening in which the chromosomal status of an embryo is

  7. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of human chromosomes in microfluidic channels: extracting chromosome dielectric properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Dimaki, Maria; Buckley, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    An investigation of the dielectric properties of polyamine buffer prepared human chromosomes is presented in this paper. Chromosomes prepared in this buffer are only a few micrometers in size and shaped roughly like spherical discs. Dielectrophoresis was therefore chosen as the method...... of manipulation combined with a custom designed microfluidic system containing the required electrodes for dielectrophoresis experiments. Our results show that although this system is presently not able to distinguish between the different chromosomes, it can provide average data for the dielectric properties...... of human chromosomes in polyamine buffer. These can then be used to optimize system designs for further characterization and even sorting. The experimental data from the dielectrophoretic manipulation were combined with theoretical calculations to extract a range of values for the permittivity...

  8. The study of human Y chromosome variation through ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivisild, Toomas

    2017-05-01

    High throughput sequencing methods have completely transformed the study of human Y chromosome variation by offering a genome-scale view on genetic variation retrieved from ancient human remains in context of a growing number of high coverage whole Y chromosome sequence data from living populations from across the world. The ancient Y chromosome sequences are providing us the first exciting glimpses into the past variation of male-specific compartment of the genome and the opportunity to evaluate models based on previously made inferences from patterns of genetic variation in living populations. Analyses of the ancient Y chromosome sequences are challenging not only because of issues generally related to ancient DNA work, such as DNA damage-induced mutations and low content of endogenous DNA in most human remains, but also because of specific properties of the Y chromosome, such as its highly repetitive nature and high homology with the X chromosome. Shotgun sequencing of uniquely mapping regions of the Y chromosomes to sufficiently high coverage is still challenging and costly in poorly preserved samples. To increase the coverage of specific target SNPs capture-based methods have been developed and used in recent years to generate Y chromosome sequence data from hundreds of prehistoric skeletal remains. Besides the prospects of testing directly as how much genetic change in a given time period has accompanied changes in material culture the sequencing of ancient Y chromosomes allows us also to better understand the rate at which mutations accumulate and get fixed over time. This review considers genome-scale evidence on ancient Y chromosome diversity that has recently started to accumulate in geographic areas favourable to DNA preservation. More specifically the review focuses on examples of regional continuity and change of the Y chromosome haplogroups in North Eurasia and in the New World.

  9. Twelve new polymorphic microsatellites on human chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, J.C.; Ram, K.T.; Puck, J.M. (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (United States))

    1993-01-01

    A strategy directed at constructing polymorphic STSs from human chromosome 22 has yielded 15 poly(TG) microsatellite markers. A short insert plasmid library containing flow-sorted chromosome 22 DNA was screened with a labeled poly(AC) probe. A combination of sequencing techniques was used to identify the poly(TG) targets, primers were designed to flank these targets, and PCR screening was carried out on a panel of genomic and hybrid DNAs to determine heterozygosity and regional localization on chromosome 22. Twelve of the STSs are polymorphic. Markers with high heterozygosity have been localized to three subregions of 22q, with seven in the Giemsa-dark 22ql2 band. The new chromosome 22 loci will be useful for mapping disease loci, for linkage analysis, and for PCR-based contig construction in the ongoing effort to map human chromosome 22. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The Human Y-Chromosome - Introduction into Genetics and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, M

    2003-07-01

    Human Y-chromosomal DNA analysis is becoming well established in forensic sciences. That is because human Y-chromosomal DNA polymorphisms are the only genetic markers that are able to specifically characterize and identify male culprit DNA in material from sexual assault or forcible rape cases where offenders are almost always males. Appropriate Y-chromosomal DNA markers evaluated for forensic applications with standardized nomenclature, typing and statistic methodology, and haplotype frequency databases are currently available to the forensic DNA community. As with any other kind of DNA evidence, the Y-chromosomal DNA analysis in forensic science requires not only a high standard of quality assurance but also appropriate scientific background knowledge to ensure correct interpretation of DNA profiles. The following overview article will provide an introduction to the molecular genetics of the human Y-chromosome and will discuss the advantages that Y-chromosomal DNA polymorphisms can offer to forensic applications, as well as the limitations to the types of information provided by the human Y-chromosome. Copyright © 2003 Central Police University.

  11. The third international workshop of human chromosome 5. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Third International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 was held in Laguna Beach, California, March 5-8, 1994. The pace at which new mapping information has been published in the last year make almost any report outdated before publication. Much of the information in this report and the most recent data from the Human chromosome 5 Genome Center at U.C. Irvine on the physical map of chromosome 5 are accessible via a WWW server. For most loci referred to in this report that can be detected by Polymerase Chain Reaction, the sequences of the oligonucleotide primers are available and some primer sequences are provided in this report.

  12. A maximum likelihood algorithm for reconstructing 3D structures of human chromosomes from chromosomal contact data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwadare, Oluwatosin; Zhang, Yuxiang; Cheng, Jianlin

    2018-02-23

    The development of chromosomal conformation capture techniques, particularly, the Hi-C technique, has made the analysis and study of the spatial conformation of a genome an important topic in bioinformatics and computational biology. Aided by high-throughput next generation sequencing techniques, the Hi-C technique can generate genome-wide, large-scale intra- and inter-chromosomal interaction data capable of describing in details the spatial interactions within a genome. These data can be used to reconstruct 3D structures of chromosomes that can be used to study DNA replication, gene regulation, genome interaction, genome folding, and genome function. Here, we introduce a maximum likelihood algorithm called 3DMax to construct the 3D structure of a chromosome from Hi-C data. 3DMax employs a maximum likelihood approach to infer the 3D structures of a chromosome, while automatically re-estimating the conversion factor (α) for converting Interaction Frequency (IF) to distance. Our results show that the models generated by 3DMax from a simulated Hi-C dataset match the true models better than most of the existing methods. 3DMax is more robust to structural variability and noise. Compared on a real Hi-C dataset, 3DMax constructs chromosomal models that fit the data better than most methods, and it is faster than all other methods. The models reconstructed by 3DMax were consistent with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments and existing knowledge about the organization of human chromosomes, such as chromosome compartmentalization. 3DMax is an effective approach to reconstructing 3D chromosomal models. The results, and the models generated for the simulated and real Hi-C datasets are available here: http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/bdm_download/3DMax/ . The source code is available here: https://github.com/BDM-Lab/3DMax . A short video demonstrating how to use 3DMax can be found here: https://youtu.be/ehQUFWoHwfo .

  13. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Fernando L; Poznik, G David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-04-07

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes-including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447-806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chromosome 5q deletion and epigenetic suppression of the gene encoding alpha-catenin (CTNNA1) in myeloid cell transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting Xi; Becker, Michael W; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Wu, Wen-Shu; Deng, Min; Mikhalkevich, Natallia; Hsu, Karl; Bloomfield, Clara D; Stone, Richard M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Galinsky, Ilene A; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Clarke, Michael F; Look, A Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial loss of all or part of the long arm of chromosome 5, or del(5q), is a frequent clonal chromosomal abnormality in human myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, a preleukemic disorder) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases by deleting one or more tumor-suppressor genes. Although a major commonly deleted region (CDR) has been delineated on chromosome band 5q31.1 (refs. 3-7), attempts to identify tumor suppressors within this band have been unsuccessful. We focused our analysis of gene expression on RNA from primitive leukemia-initiating cells, which harbor 5q deletions, and analyzed 12 genes within the CDR that are expressed by normal hematopoietic stem cells. Here we show that the gene encoding alpha-catenin (CTNNA1) is expressed at a much lower level in leukemia-initiating stem cells from individuals with AML or MDS with a 5q deletion than in individuals with MDS or AML lacking a 5q deletion or in normal hematopoietic stem cells. Analysis of HL-60 cells, a myeloid leukemia line with deletion of the 5q31 region, showed that the CTNNA1 promoter of the retained allele is suppressed by both methylation and histone deacetylation. Restoration of CTNNA1 expression in HL-60 cells resulted in reduced proliferation and apoptotic cell death. Thus, loss of expression of the alpha-catenin tumor suppressor in hematopoietic stem cells may provide a growth advantage that contributes to human MDS or AML with del(5q).

  15. Persistence of Breakage in Specific Chromosome Bands 6 Years after Acute Exposure to Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Francés

    251 breakpoints in exposed individuals were identified, showing a non-uniform distribution in the human ideogram. Ten chromosome bands were found to be especially prone to breakage through both statistical methods. By comparing these bands with those observed in certain exposed individuals who had already participated the previous study, it was found in both studies that four bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31 and 17p11.2 are particularly sensitive to breakage. Additionally, the dysfunction in DNA repair mechanisms was not significantly higher in oil-exposed individuals than in non-exposed individuals.The sample size and the possibility of some kind of selection bias should be considered. Genotoxic results cannot be extrapolated to the high number of individuals who participated occasionally in clean-up tasks.Our findings show the existence of at least four target bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31 and 17p11.2 with a greater propensity to break over time after an acute exposure to oil. The breaks in these bands, which are commonly involved in hematological cancer, may explain the increase of cancer risk reported in chronically benzene-exposed individuals. In addition, a more efficiency of the DNA repair mechanisms has been detected six years after in fishermen who were highly exposed to the oil spill. To date, only this study, performed by our group on the previous and present genotoxic effects, has analyzed the chromosomal regions affected by breakage after an acute oil exposure.

  16. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 9

    OpenAIRE

    Humphray, S. J.; Oliver, K.; Hunt, A. R.; Plumb, R. W.; Loveland, J. E.; Howe, K. L.; Andrews, T. D.; Searle, S.; Hunt, S. E.; Scott, C. E.; Jones, M. C.; Ainscough, R.; Almeida, J. P.; Ambrose, K. D.; Ashwell, R. I. S.

    2004-01-01

    Chromosome 9 is highly structurally polymorphic. It contains the largest autosomal block of heterochromatin, which is heteromorphic in 6–8% of humans, whereas pericentric inversions occur in more than 1% of the population. The finished euchromatic sequence of chromosome 9 comprises 109,044,351 base pairs and represents >99.6% of the region. Analysis of the sequence reveals many intra- and interchromosomal duplications, including segmental duplications adjacent to both the centromere and the l...

  17. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  18. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  19. Human embryonic stem cells as models for aneuploid chromosomal syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancotti, Juan-Carlos; Narwani, Kavita; Buehler, Nicole; Mandefro, Berhan; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Yanuka, Ofra; Clark, Amander; Hill, David; Benvenisty, Nissim; Lavon, Neta

    2010-09-01

    Syndromes caused by chromosomal aneuploidies are widely recognized genetic disorders in humans and often lead to spontaneous miscarriage. Preimplantation genetic screening is used to detect chromosomal aneuploidies in early embryos. Our aim was to derive aneuploid human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines that may serve as models for human syndromes caused by aneuploidies. We have established 25 hESC lines from blastocysts diagnosed as aneuploid on day 3 of their in vitro development. The hESC lines exhibited morphology and expressed markers typical of hESCs. They demonstrated long-term proliferation capacity and pluripotent differentiation. Karyotype analysis revealed that two-third of the cell lines carry a normal euploid karyotype, while one-third remained aneuploid throughout the derivation, resulting in eight hESC lines carrying either trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), 16, 17, 21 (Down syndrome), X (Triple X syndrome), or monosomy X (Turner syndrome). On the basis of the level of single nucleotide polymorphism heterozygosity in the aneuploid chromosomes, we determined whether the aneuploidy originated from meiotic or mitotic chromosomal nondisjunction. Gene expression profiles of the trisomic cell lines suggested that all three chromosomes are actively transcribed. Our analysis allowed us to determine which tissues are most affected by the presence of a third copy of either chromosome 13, 16, 17 or 21 and highlighted the effects of trisomies on embryonic development. The results presented here suggest that aneuploid embryos can serve as an alternative source for either normal euploid or aneuploid hESC lines, which represent an invaluable tool to study developmental aspects of chromosomal abnormalities in humans.

  20. A high-resolution comparative map between pig chromosome 17 and human chromosomes 4, 8, and 20: Identification of synteny breakpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahbib-Mansais, Yvette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Mompart, Florence

    2005-01-01

    We report on the construction of a high-resolution comparative map of porcine chromosome 17 (SSC17) focusing on evolutionary breakpoints with human chromosomes. The comparative map shows high homology with human chromosome 20 but suggests more limited homologies with other human chromosomes. SSC1...

  1. A high-resolution radiation hybrid map of chicken chromosome 5 and comparison with human chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Denis

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The resolution of radiation hybrid (RH maps is intermediate between that of the genetic and BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome contig maps. Moreover, once framework RH maps of a genome have been constructed, a quick location of markers by simple PCR on the RH panel is possible. The chicken ChickRH6 panel recently produced was used here to construct a high resolution RH map of chicken GGA5. To confirm the validity of the map and to provide valuable comparative mapping information, both markers from the genetic map and a high number of ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tags were used. Finally, this RH map was used for testing the accuracy of the chicken genome assembly for chromosome 5. Results A total of 169 markers (21 microsatellites and 148 ESTs were typed on the ChickRH6 RH panel, of which 134 were assigned to GGA5. The final map is composed of 73 framework markers extending over a 1315.6 cR distance. The remaining 61 markers were placed alongside the framework markers within confidence intervals. Conclusion The high resolution framework map obtained in this study has markers covering the entire chicken chromosome 5 and reveals the existence of a high number of rearrangements when compared to the human genome. Only two discrepancies were observed in relation to the sequence assembly recently reported for this chromosome.

  2. Mutational landscape of the human Y chromosome-linked genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutational landscape of the human Y chromosome-linked genes and loci in patients with hypogonadism. Deepali Pathak, Sandeep Kumar Yadav, Leena Rawal and Sher Ali. J. Genet. 94, 677–687. Table 1. Details showing age, sex, karyotype, clinical features and diagnosis results of the patients with H. Hormone profile.

  3. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Human oocytes that remained unfertilized in programmes of assisted reproduction have been analysed cytogenetically for more than 20 years to assess the incidence of aneuploidy in female gametes. However, the results obtained so far are not indisputable as a consequence of difficulties in evaluating oocyte chromosome ...

  4. Genome association study of human chromosome 13 and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Issue 1. Genome association study of human chromosome 13 and susceptibility to coronary artery disease in a Chinese population. Peng Jie Chen Xing Li Tingting Xie Yi Zhang Jianning Jiang Tingting Liu Tianjiao Chen Gang Guo Yuan. Research Note Volume 92 Issue 1 ...

  5. Construction of a genetic map of human chromosome 17 by use of chromosome-mediated gene transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weiming; Gorman, P.A.; Rider, S.H.; Hedge, P.J.; Moore, G.; Prichard, C.; Sheer, D.; Solomon, E. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (England))

    1988-11-01

    The authors used somatic-cell hybrids, containing as their only human genetic contribution part or all of chromosome 17, as donors for chromosome-mediated gene transfer. A total of 54 independent transfectant clones were isolated and analyzed by use of probes or isoenzymes for >20 loci located on chromosome 17. By combining the data from this chromosome-mediated gene transfer transfectant panel, conventional somatic-cell hybrids containing well-defined breaks on chromosome 17, and in situ hybridization they propose the following order for these loci; pter-(TP53-RNP2-D17S1)-(MYH2-MYH1)-D17Z1-CRYB1-(ERBA1-GCSF-NGL)-acute promyelocytic leukemia breakpoint-RNU2-HOX2-(NGFR-COLIAI-MPO)-GAA-UMPH-GHC-TK1-GALK-qter. Using chromosome-mediated gene transfer, they have also regionally localized the random probes D17S6 to D17S19 on chromosome 17.

  6. Using human artificial chromosomes to study centromere assembly and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Oscar; Kouprina, Natalay; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C

    2017-10-01

    Centromeres are the site of assembly of the kinetochore, which directs chromosome segregation during cell division. Active centromeres are characterized by the presence of nucleosomes containing CENP-A and a specific chromatin environment that resembles that of active genes. Recent work using human artificial chromosomes (HAC) sheds light on the fine balance of different histone post-translational modifications and transcription that exists at centromeres for kinetochore assembly and maintenance. Here, we review the use of HAC technology to understand centromere assembly and function. We put particular emphasis on studies using the alphoidtetO HAC, whose centromere can be specifically modified for epigenetic engineering studies.

  7. Report on the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, D.J. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Armour, J. [Univ. of Leicester (England). Dept. of Genetics; Bale, A.E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Genetics] [and others

    1993-12-31

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 9 was held in Chatham, Massachusetts on April 18--20, 1993. Fifty-three abstracts were received and the data presented on posters. The purpose of the meeting was to bring together all interested investigators working on the map of chromosome 9, many of whom had disease-specific interests. After a brief presentation of interests and highlighted results, the meeting broke up into the following subgroups for production of consensus maps: 9p; 9cen-q32; 9q32 ter. A global mapping group also met. Reports of each of these working groups is presented in the summary.

  8. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  9. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  10. Chromosomal Aberrations in Humans Induced by Urban Air Pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Norppa, Hannu; Gamborg, Michael O.

    1999-01-01

    that long-term exposure to urban air pollution (with traffic as the main contributor) induces chromosome damage in human somatic cells. Low DNA repair capacity and GSTM1 and NAT2 variants associated with reduced detoxification ability increase susceptibility to such damage. The effect of the GSTM1 genotype......We have studied the influence of individual susceptibility factors on the genotoxic effects of urban air pollution in 106 nonsmoking bus drivers and 101 postal workers in the Copenhagen metropolitan area. We used the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes......, which was observed only in the bus drivers, appears to be associated with air pollution, whereas the NAT2 genotype effect, which affected all subjects, may influence the individual response to some other common exposure or the baseline level of chromosomal aberrations....

  11. Hexavalent Chromium Induces Chromosome Instability in Human Urothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie L.; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-01-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of Cr(VI) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer specifically and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer in general. PMID:26908176

  12. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Variation in conserved non-coding sequences on chromosome 5q andsusceptibility to asthma and atopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donfack, Joseph; Schneider, Daniel H.; Tan, Zheng; Kurz,Thorsten; Dubchak, Inna; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ober, Carole

    2005-09-10

    Background: Evolutionarily conserved sequences likely havebiological function. Methods: To determine whether variation in conservedsequences in non-coding DNA contributes to risk for human disease, westudied six conserved non-coding elements in the Th2 cytokine cluster onhuman chromosome 5q31 in a large Hutterite pedigree and in samples ofoutbred European American and African American asthma cases and controls.Results: Among six conserved non-coding elements (>100 bp,>70percent identity; human-mouse comparison), we identified one singlenucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in each of two conserved elements and sixSNPs in the flanking regions of three conserved elements. We genotypedour samples for four of these SNPs and an additional three SNPs each inthe IL13 and IL4 genes. While there was only modest evidence forassociation with single SNPs in the Hutterite and European Americansamples (P<0.05), there were highly significant associations inEuropean Americans between asthma and haplotypes comprised of SNPs in theIL4 gene (P<0.001), including a SNP in a conserved non-codingelement. Furthermore, variation in the IL13 gene was strongly associatedwith total IgE (P = 0.00022) and allergic sensitization to mold allergens(P = 0.00076) in the Hutterites, and more modestly associated withsensitization to molds in the European Americans and African Americans (P<0.01). Conclusion: These results indicate that there is overalllittle variation in the conserved non-coding elements on 5q31, butvariation in IL4 and IL13, including possibly one SNP in a conservedelement, influence asthma and atopic phenotypes in diversepopulations.

  14. Mapping of the taurine transporter gene to mouse chromosome 6 and to the short arm of human chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, A.; Uhl, G.R.; Gregor, P. [National Inst. of Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Transport proteins have essential functions in the uptake of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. We have mapped the gene encoding the taurine transporter, Taut, to the central region of mouse chromosome 6. Analysis of a cross segregating the neurological mutant mnd2 excluded Taut as a candidate gene for this closely linked mutation. To map the human taurine transporter gene, TAUT, a sequence-tagged site (STS) corresponding to the 3{prime} untranslated region of the human cDNA was developed. TAUT was assigned to human chromosome 3 by typing this STS on a panel of somatic cell hybrids. Further analysis of a hybrid panel containing defined deletions of chromosome 3 suggested that TAUT maps to 3p21-p25. These data extend a conserved linkage group on mouse chromosome 6 and human chromosome 3p. Deletion of TAUT might contribute to some phenotypic features of the 3p{sup -} syndrome. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a new cell, the centromere serves as an attachment site for the two halves of each replicated ... of each chromosome is inherited from the female parent and the other from the male parent. This ...

  16. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimwood, J; Gordon, L A; Olsen, A; Terry, A; Schmutz, J; Lamerdin, J; Hellsten, U; Goodstein, D; Couronne, O; Tran-Gyamfi, M

    2004-04-06

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high GC content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in Mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  17. Human interphase chromosomes: a review of available molecular cytogenetic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human karyotype is usually studied by classical cytogenetic (banding techniques. To perform it, one has to obtain metaphase chromosomes of mitotic cells. This leads to the impossibility of analyzing all the cell types, to moderate cell scoring, and to the extrapolation of cytogenetic data retrieved from a couple of tens of mitotic cells to the whole organism, suggesting that all the remaining cells possess these genomes. However, this is far from being the case inasmuch as chromosome abnormalities can occur in any cell along ontogeny. Since somatic cells of eukaryotes are more likely to be in interphase, the solution of the problem concerning studying postmitotic cells and larger cell populations is interphase cytogenetics, which has become more or less applicable for specific biomedical tasks due to achievements in molecular cytogenetics (i.e. developments of fluorescence in situ hybridization -- FISH, and multicolor banding -- MCB. Numerous interphase molecular cytogenetic approaches are restricted to studying specific genomic loci (regions being, however, useful for identification of chromosome abnormalities (aneuploidy, polyploidy, deletions, inversions, duplications, translocations. Moreover, these techniques are the unique possibility to establish biological role and patterns of nuclear genome organization at suprachromosomal level in a given cell. Here, it is to note that this issue is incompletely worked out due to technical limitations. Nonetheless, a number of state-of-the-art molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e multicolor interphase FISH or interpahase chromosome-specific MCB allow visualization of interphase chromosomes in their integrity at molecular resolutions. Thus, regardless numerous difficulties encountered during studying human interphase chromosomes, molecular cytogenetics does provide for high-resolution single-cell analysis of genome organization, structure and behavior at all stages of cell cycle.

  18. Statistical properties of nucleotides in human chromosomes 21 and 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Linxi [Department of Physics, Wenzhou Normal College, Wenzhou 325027 (China)]. E-mail: Lxzhang@hzcnc.com; Sun Tingting [Department of Physics, Wenzhou Normal College, Wenzhou 325027 (China); Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2005-02-01

    In this paper the statistical properties of nucleotides in human chromosomes 21 and 22 are investigated. The n-tuple Zipf analysis with n = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 is used in our investigation. It is found that the most common n-tuples are those which consist only of adenine (A) and thymine (T), and the rarest n-tuples are those in which GC or CG pattern appears twice. With the n-tuples become more and more frequent, the double GC or CG pattern becomes a single GC or CG pattern. The percentage of four nucleotides in the rarest ten and the most common ten n-tuples are also considered in human chromosomes 21 and 22, and different behaviors are found in the percentage of four nucleotides. Frequency of appearance of n-tuple f(r) as a function of rank r is also examined. We find the n-tuple Zipf plot shows a power-law behavior for r < 4{sup n-1} and a rapid decrease for r > 4{sup n-1}. In order to explore the interior statistical properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 in detail, we divide the chromosome sequence into some moving windows and we discuss the percentage of {xi}{eta} ({xi}, {eta} = A, C, G, T) pair in those moving windows. In some particular regions, there are some obvious changes in the percentage of {xi}{eta} pair, and there maybe exist functional differences. The normalized number of repeats N{sub 0}(l) can be described by a power law: N{sub 0}(l) {approx} l{sup -{mu}}. The distance distributions P{sub 0}(S) between two nucleotides in human chromosomes 21 and 22 are also discussed. A two-order polynomial fit exists in those distance distributions: log P{sub 0}(S) = a + bS + cS{sup 2}, and it is quite different from the random sequence.

  19. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Achame; W.M. Baarends (Willy); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractChimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural

  20. Immortalized hepatocytes using human artificial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masahiro; Ito, Ryoutaro; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Ikeno, Masashi; Kamiya, Megumi; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Horiguchi, Akihiko; Nagata, Hideo; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Naoya; Fox, Ira J; Okazaki, Tsuneko; Miyakama, Syuichi

    2008-01-01

    The shortage of organ donors has impeded the development of human hepatocyte transplantation. Immortalized hepatocytes could provide an unlimited supply of transplantable cells. To determine whether immortalized hepatocytes could provide global metabolic support in end-stage liver disease, rat hepatocyte clones were developed by transduction with the gene encoding the Simian virus 40 T antigen (SVT) using the human artificial minichromosome (HAC). The SVLT sequence was excised by FRT recombination. Following HAC infusion, the transduced hepatocytes express SVT, blasticidine resistance (BS), and the PGK promoter TK gene. Forty-six cell clones were obtained and at least partially characterized, as previously described, for albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), dipeptidylpeptidase 4 (Dpp4), gamma-glutamyltransferase 1 (Ggt), SVT, and beta-actin expression using RT-PCR. Clones were also assessed for albumin secretion into the culture medium using ELISA. All of the cell line secreted approximately 10 mg/dl of albumin, which is equivalent to the amount secreted by primary hepatocytes. In further experiments, this cell line will be used for transplantable cells or artificial organ using HAC. These results represent an important step toward the development of immortalized hepatocytes.

  1. Sequence and expression analysis of gaps in human chromosome 20

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Seemann, Stefan; Mang, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    /or overlap disease-associated loci, including the DLGAP4 locus. In this study, we sequenced ~99% of all three unfinished gaps on human chr 20, determined their complete genomic sizes and assessed epigenetic profiles using a combination of Sanger sequencing, mate pair paired-end high-throughput sequencing......The finished human genome-assemblies comprise several hundred un-sequenced euchromatic gaps, which may be rich in long polypurine/polypyrimidine stretches. Human chromosome 20 (chr 20) currently has three unfinished gaps remaining on its q-arm. All three gaps are within gene-dense regions and...

  2. New insights into human nondisjunction of chromosome 21 in oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Renee Oliver

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Nondisjunction of chromosome 21 is the leading cause of Down syndrome. Two risk factors for maternal nondisjunction of chromosome 21 are increased maternal age and altered recombination. In order to provide further insight on mechanisms underlying nondisjunction, we examined the association between these two well established risk factors for chromosome 21 nondisjunction. In our approach, short tandem repeat markers along chromosome 21 were genotyped in DNA collected from individuals with free trisomy 21 and their parents. This information was used to determine the origin of the nondisjunction error and the maternal recombination profile. We analyzed 615 maternal meiosis I and 253 maternal meiosis II cases stratified by maternal age. The examination of meiosis II errors, the first of its type, suggests that the presence of a single exchange within the pericentromeric region of 21q interacts with maternal age-related risk factors. This observation could be explained in two general ways: 1 a pericentromeric exchange initiates or exacerbates the susceptibility to maternal age risk factors or 2 a pericentromeric exchange protects the bivalent against age-related risk factors allowing proper segregation of homologues at meiosis I, but not segregation of sisters at meiosis II. In contrast, analysis of maternal meiosis I errors indicates that a single telomeric exchange imposes the same risk for nondisjunction, irrespective of the age of the oocyte. Our results emphasize the fact that human nondisjunction is a multifactorial trait that must be dissected into its component parts to identify specific associated risk factors.

  3. Heterogeneity of pericentric inversions of the human y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, S; Pasantes, J J; Thi, D A D; Schaller, F; Schempp, W

    2011-01-01

    Pericentric inversions of the human Y chromosome (inv(Y)) are the result of breakpoints in Yp and Yq. Whether these breakpoints occur recurrently on specific hotspots or appear at different locations along the repeat structure of the human Y chromosome is an open question. Employing FISH for a better definition and refinement of the inversion breakpoints in 9 cases of inv(Y) chromosomes, with seemingly unvarying metacentric appearance after banding analysis, unequivocally resulted in heterogeneity of the pericentric inversions of the human Y chromosome. While in all 9 inv(Y) cases the inversion breakpoints in the short arm fall in a gene-poor region of X-transposed sequences proximal to PAR1 and SRY in Yp11.2, there are clearly 3 different inversion breakpoints in the long arm. Inv(Y)-types I and II are familial cases showing inversion breakpoints that map in Yq11.23 or in Yq11.223, outside the ampliconic fertility gene cluster of DAZ and CDY in AZFc. Inv(Y)-type III shows an inversion breakpoint in Yq11.223 that splits the DAZ and CDY fertility gene-cluster in AZFc. This inversion type is representative of both familial cases and cases with spermatogenetic impairment. In a further familial case of inv(Y), with almost acrocentric morphology, the breakpoints are within the TSPY and RBMY repeat in Yp and within the heterochromatin in Yq. Therefore, the presence of specific inversion breakpoints leading to impaired fertility in certain inv(Y) cases remains an open question. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Keith, T.P. [Collaborative Research Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    A Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium map of human chromosome 16 has been constructed. The map contains 158 loci defined by 191 different probe/restriction enzyme combinations or primer pairs. The marker genotypes, contributed by 9 collaborating laboratories, originated from the CEPH families DNA. A total of 60 loci, with an average heterozygosity of 68%, have been placed on the framework genetic map. The genetic map contains 7 genes. The length of the sex-averaged map is 165 cM, with a mean genetic distance between loci of 2.8 cM; the median distance between markers is 2.0 cM. The male map length is 136 cM, and the female map length is 197 cM. The map covers virtually the entire chromosome, from D16S85, within 170 to 430 kb of the 16p telomere, to D16S303 at 16qter. The markers included in the linkage map have been physically mapped on a partial human chromosome 16 somatic cell hybrid panel, thus anchoring the genetic map to the cytogenetic-based physical map. 39 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozman, H M; Keith, T P; Donis-Keller, H; White, R L; Weissenbach, J; Dean, M; Vergnaud, G; Kidd, K; Gusella, J; Royle, N J

    1995-01-01

    A Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium map of human chromosome 16 has been constructed. The map contains 158 loci defined by 191 different probe/restriction enzyme combinations or primer pairs. The marker genotypes, contributed by 9 collaborating laboratories, originated from the CEPH families DNA. A total of 60 loci, with an average heterozygosity of 68%, have been placed on the framework genetic map. The genetic map contains 7 genes. The length of the sex-averaged map is 165 cM, with a mean genetic distance between loci of 2.8 cM; the median distance between markers is 2.0 cM. The male map length is 136 cM, and the female map length is 197 cM. The map covers virtually the entire chromosome, from D16S85, within 170 to 430 kb of the 16p telomere, to D16S303 at 16qter. The markers included in the linkage map have been physically mapped on a partial human chromosome 16 somatic cell hybrid panel, thus anchoring the genetic map to the cytogenetic-based physical map.

  6. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Sutherland, G.R. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium map of human chromosome 16 has been constructed. The map contains 158 loci defined by 191 different probe/restriction enzyme combinations or primer pairs. The marker genotypes, contributed by 9 collaborating laboratories, originated from the CEPH families DNA. A total of 60 loci, with an average heterozygosity of 68%, have been placed on the framework genetic map. The genetic map contains 7 genes. The length of the sex-average map is 165 cM, with a mean genetic distance between loci of 2.8 cM; the median distance between markers is 2.0 cM. The male map length is 136 cM and the female map length is 197 cM. The map virtually covers the entire chromosome, from D16S85, within 170 to 430 Kb of the 16p telomere, to D16S303 at 16qter. The markers included in the linkage map have been physically mapped on a partial human chromosome 16 somatic cell hybrid panel, thus anchoring the genetic map to the cytogenetic-based physical map.

  7. Chromosome surveys of human populations: between epidemiology and anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chadarevian, Soraya

    2014-09-01

    It is commonly held that after 1945 human genetics turned medical and focussed on the individual rather than on the study of human populations that had become discredited. However, a closer look at the research practices at the time quickly reveals that human population studies, using old and new tools, prospered in this period. The essay focuses on the rise of chromosome analysis as a new tool for the study of human populations. It reviews a broad array of population studies ranging from newborn screening programmes to studies of isolated or 'primitive' people. Throughout, it highlights the continuing role of concerns and opportunities raised by the propagation of atomic energy for civilian and military uses, the collection of large data bases and computers, and the role of international organisations like the World Health Organisation and the International Biological Programme in shaping research agendas and carving out a space for human heredity in the postwar era. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations.

  9. The human neurofilament gene (NEFL) is located on the short arm of chromosome 8.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hurst; D. Flavell (David); J-P. Julien (Jean-Pierre); D.N. Meijer (Dies); W. Mushynski (Walter); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractWe have localized the gene coding for the human neurofilament light chain (NEFL) to chromosome band 8p2.1 by Southern blotting of DNA from hybrid cell panels and in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes.

  10. Premature chromosome condensation in human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes without mitogen stimulation for chromosome aberration analysis using specific whole chromosome DNA hybridization probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rupak; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described a unique, simple, and rapid method for inducing premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in "resting" human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) without mitogen stimulation and an approach for studying numerical changes and/or structural aberrations involving a specific pair of human chromosomes. The current protocol incorporates improvements that provide better PCC, incorporates a high-throughput automated sample preparation unit and metaphase harvester to minimize manual labor and improve quality, and supports simultaneous painting of multiple sets of human autosomes in interphase nuclei. To induce PCC, isolated HPBLs are incubated at 37 °C in cell culture medium supplemented with a phosphatase inhibitor (okadaic acid or calyculin A), adenosine triphosphate, and p34(cdc2)/cyclin B kinase (an essential component of mitosis-promoting factor) for a short period of time. PCC spreads are prepared on glass slides using a humidity- and temperature-controlled chamber (an auto-spreader) after a brief hypotonic treatment and fixation. Aberrations involving specific sets of painted human chromosome are analyzed using fluorescence microscopy. Each of the normal (undamaged) painted homologous chromosome pairs displays two fluorescent spots, whereas cells with numerical and/or structural aberration involving specific painted chromosome sets show deviation in the number of fluorescent spots. The identification and quantification of aberration involving specific chromosomes in interphase nuclei have important applications in radiobiology, toxicology, radiation therapeutics, and cancer research.

  11. Human Chromosome 21: Mapping of the chromosomes and cloning of cDNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonarakis, S.E.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the research funded by DOE grant DE-FG02-89ER60857 from 6/15/89 to 8/31/91 was to contribute to the physical mapping of human chromosome 21 (HC21) by cloning large fragments of DNA into Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs) and identify YACs that map on HC21. A total of 54 sequence tagged sites (STS) have been developed and mapped in our laboratory to HC21 and can be used as initial reference points for YAC identification and construction of overlapping clones. A small YAC library was constructed which is HC21 specific. DNA from somatic cell hybrid WAV17 or from flow-sorted HC21 was partially digested with EcoRI, ligated into vectors PJS97, PJS98, and YACs have been obtained with average size insert of more than 300 kb. This library has been deposited in D. Patterson's lab for the Joint YAC screening effort. Additional YAC libraries from ICI Pharmaceuticals or from Los Alamos National Laboratories have been screened with several STS and positive YACs have been identified. Work in progress includes screening of YAC libraries in order to construct overlapping clones, characterization of the cloning ends of YACs, characterization of additional STS and cloning of HC21 specific cDNAs. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  13. Chromosome Aberration in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to a space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/micrometer. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction produces such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are LET dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  14. Cloning and chromosomal localization of the three human syntrophin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feener, C.A.; Anderson, M.D.S.; Selig, S. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Dystrophin, the protein product the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus, is normally found to be associated with a complex of proteins. Among these dystrophin-associated proteins are the syntrophins, a group of 59 kDa membrane-associated proteins. When the syntrophins are purified based upon their association with dystrophin, they have been shown previously to form two distinct groups, the acidic ({alpha}) and basic ({beta}) forms. Based on peptide and rodent cDNA sequences, three separate syntrophin genes have been cloned and characterized from human tissues. The predicted amino acid sequences from these cDNA reveal that these proteins are related but are distinct with respect to charge, as predicted from their biochemistry. The family consists of one acidic ({alpha}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-1) and two basic ({beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin; and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-2) genes. Each of the three genes are widely expressed in a variety of human tissues, but the relative abundance of the three are unique with respect to each other. {alpha}-syntrophin is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle and heart as a single transcript. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin is expressed widely in up to five distinct transcript sizes, and is most abundant in brain. The human chromosomal locations of the three syntrophins are currently being mapped. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin maps to chromosome 8q23-24 and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin to chromosome 16. The {alpha}-syntrophin gene will be mapped accordingly. Although all three genes are candidates for neuromuscular diseases, the predominant expression of {alpha}-syntrophin in skeletal muscle and heart makes it a strong candidate to be involved in a neuromuscular disease.

  15. Cloning, expression, and chromosome mapping of human galectin-7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H; Flint, T

    1995-01-01

    The galectins are a family of beta-galactoside-binding proteins implicated in modulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Here we report the cloning and expression of a novel member of this family (galectin-7) that correspond to IEF (isoelectric focusing) 17 (12,700 Da; pI, 7.6) in the human......14 keratinocytes imply a role in cell-cell and/or cell-matrix interactions necessary for normal growth control. The galectin-7 gene was mapped to chromosome 19. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Mar-17...

  16. Progress towards construction of a total restriction fragment map of a human chromosome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Vissing; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. Solomon; G. Moore; N. Lench; N. Shennan; R. Williamson

    1987-01-01

    textabstractWe present an approach to the construction of an overlapping restriction fragment map of a single human chromosome. A genomic cosmid library genome was constructed from a mouse-human hybrid cell line containing chromosome 17 as its only human genetic component. Cosmids containing human

  17. International study of factors affecting human chromosome translocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdson, Alice J.; Ha, Mina; Hauptmann, Michael; Bhatti, Parveen; Sram, Radim J.; Beskid, Olena; Tawn, E. Janet; Whitehouse, Caroline A.; Lindholm, Carita; Nakano, Mimako; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Nori; Vorobtsova, Irena; Oestreicher, Ursula; Stephan, Günther; Yong, Lee C.; Bauchinger, Manfred; Schmid, Ernst; Chung, Hai Won; Darroudi, Firouz; Roy, Laurence; Voisin, Phillipe; Barquinero, Joan F.; Livingston, Gordon; Blakey, David; Hayata, Isamu; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Chunyan; Bennett, L. Michelle; Littlefield, L. Gayle; Edwards, Alan A.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Tucker, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome translocations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of normal, healthy humans increase with age, but the effects of gender, race, and cigarette smoking on background translocation yields have not been examined systematically. Further, the shape of the relationship between age and translocation frequency (TF) has not been definitively determined. We collected existing data from sixteen laboratories in North America, Europe, and Asia on TFs measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridization whole chromosome painting among 1933 individuals. In Poisson regression models, age, ranging from newborns (cord blood) to 85 years, was strongly associated with TF and this relationship showed significant upward curvature at older ages vs. a linear relationship (p <0.001). Ever smokers had significantly higher TFs than non-smokers (rate ratio (RR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09–1.30) and smoking modified the effect of age on TFs with a steeper age-related increase among ever smokers compared to non-smokers (p<0.001). TFs did not differ by gender. Interpreting an independent effect of race was difficult owing to laboratory variation. Our study is three times larger than any pooled effort to date, confirming a suspected curvilinear relationship of TF with age. The significant effect of cigarette smoking has not been observed with previous pooled studies of TF in humans. Our data provide stable estimates of background TF by age, gender, race, and smoking status and suggest an acceleration of chromosome damage above age 60 and among those with a history of smoking cigarettes. PMID:18337160

  18. Comparative chromosome G-banding analysis of long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis and relationship to human (Homo sapiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alongkoad Tanomtong

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This research is the first report of the comparative chromosome between long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis and human (Homo sapiens using G-banding. Blood samples from four male and three female macaques were used. Their chromosomes were prepared using lymphocyte cultures at 37oC, 72 hours and detected using G-banding. The results showed the diploid chromosome number of 42, 18 metacentric and 22 submetacentric chromosomes. The satellite chromosome was on the short arm of chromosome 13. The X chromosome was a medium submetacentric and the Y was the smallest telocentric chromosome. By using G-banding, the macaque chromosome 5, 12, 13, 19 and X are identical to those of humans. The short arm and long arm of chromosome 13 of macaque were similar to chromosome 22 and 15 of human respectively. We indicate that macaque chromosome was split to two human chromosomes. The macaque and human chromosomes 1, 3, 6-11, 14, 17 and 20 were relatively similar. The macaque and human chromosome 1 is a pericentric inversion chromosome, indicating that the alternative construction of the chromosome cooperates with the centomere. There were 6 macaque chromosomes which were from different human, 2, 4, 15, 16, 18 and Y. All results demonstrate that the long-tailed macaque and human have are evolutionary relationship.

  19. The beta crystallin genes on human chromosome 22 define a new region of homology with mouse chromosome 5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T. J.; Jenkins, N. A.; Gilbert, D. J.; Copeland, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    The human beta crystallin genes CRYBB2, CRYBB2P1, CRYBB3, and CRYBA4 are located in 22q11.2. Using interspecific backcross analysis, we mapped the mouse homologues of CRYBB2, CRYBB3, and CRYBA4 (i.e., Crybb2, Crybb3, and Cryba4) to the central region of mouse chromosome 5. The homologue of human

  20. Evolutionary breakpoint analysis on Y chromosomes of higher primates provides insight into human Y evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, R; Kirsch, S; Rappold, G A; Schempp, W

    2005-01-01

    Comparative FISH mapping of PAC clones covering almost 3 Mb of the human AZFa region in Yq11.21 to metaphases of human and great apes unravels breakpoints that were involved in species-specific Y chromosome evolution. An astonishing clustering of evolutionary breakpoints was detected in the very proximal region on the long arm of the human Y chromosome in Yq11.21. These breakpoints were involved in deletions, one specific for the human and another for the orang-utan Y chromosome, in a duplicative translocation/transposition specific for bonobo and chimpanzee Y chromosomes and in a pericentric inversion specific for the gorilla Y chromosome. In addition, our comparative results allow the deduction of a model for the human Y chromosome evolution. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Microsatellite polymorphism linkage map of human chromosome 13q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowcock, A.; Osborne-Lawrence, S.; Barnes, R.; Dunn, C. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Center, Dallas (United States)); Chakravarti, A.; Washington, S. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Twelve polymorphic (CA)[sub n] microsatellites were isolated from a flow-sorted chromosome 13 genomic library. These, and two others that have been previously described, were genotyped in 41 families from the CEPH (Centre d'Etude Polomorphisme Humain, Paris) and a primary linkage map with considerable support for order (odds > 10,000:1) was constructed. Two RFLP-based markers, COL4A1 and D13S52, with heterozygosities above 0.67 and an RFLP-based centromeric marker at D13Z1 were include in this map which extend from 13cen to 13q34. The heterozygosity of all of the PCR-based markers is above 60%. The total map spans a genetic distance of 144 cM, extending from D13Z1 to D13S52 with a single maximum intermarker recombination distanct of 35 cM. All other intermarker recombination distance are 18 cM or less. Marker order was confirmed by sublocalizing many of the microsatellite-containing clones on a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids with deletions and rearrangements of chromosome 13. One spontaneous new mutation for these 14 (CA)[sub n] repeat markers was identified from a total of 8006 gametes, giving an overall observed spontaneous mutation rate of 0.00012 per locus per gamete. An integrated map of chromosome 13q was constructed with the microsatellite markers described here and previously genotyped RFLP-based markers. This sex-average map spans 209 cM with an average distance between unique map locations of 4.5 cM; the maximum intermarker distance was 14 cM. 35 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  3. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracopoli, N C; O'Connell, P; Elsner, T I; Lalouel, J M; White, R L; Buetow, K H; Nishimura, D Y; Murray, J C; Helms, C; Mishra, S K

    1991-04-01

    This paper describes the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium linkage map of human chromosome 1. The map contains 101 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 146 different contributions from 11 laboratories. A total of 58 loci are uniquely placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the terminal bands of both chromosome arms (locus D1Z2 in 1p36.3 and D1S68 in 1q44) and is anchored at the centromere by the D1Z5 alpha-satellite polymorphism. With the exception of a single locus, the remaining loci are arrayed on the fixed map in short intervals and their possible locations are indicated. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 308, 478, and 390 cM, respectively. The sex-averaged map contains only four intervals greater than 15 cM, and the mean genetic distance between the 58 uniquely placed loci is 6.7 cM.

  4. A calibrated human Y-chromosomal phylogeny based on resequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Ayub, Qasim; Chen, Yuan; McCarthy, Shane; Hou, Yiping; Carbone, Ignazio; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We have identified variants present in high-coverage complete sequences of 36 diverse human Y chromosomes from Africa, Europe, South Asia, East Asia, and the Americas, representing eight major haplogroups. After restricting our analysis to 8.97 Mb of the unique male-specific Y sequence, we identified 6662 high-confidence variants, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), multi-nucleotide polymorphisms (MNPs), and indels. We constructed phylogenetic trees using these variants, or subsets of them, and recapitulated the known structure of the tree. Assuming a male mutation rate of 1 × 10−9 per base pair per year, the time depth of the tree (haplogroups A3-R) was ∼101,000–115,000 yr, and the lineages found outside Africa dated to 57,000–74,000 yr, both as expected. In addition, we dated a striking Paleolithic male lineage expansion to 41,000–52,000 yr ago and the node representing the major European Y lineage, R1b, to 4000–13,000 yr ago, supporting a Neolithic origin for these modern European Y chromosomes. In all, we provide a nearly 10-fold increase in the number of Y markers with phylogenetic information, and novel historical insights derived from placing them on a calibrated phylogenetic tree. PMID:23038768

  5. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage......), resulting in deletion of varying amounts of 21q22.1 to 21qter. The data from one individual who had a Down syndrome phenotype were consistent with asymmetric breakage and reunion of 21q sequences from an intermediate isochromosome or Robertsonian translocation chromosome as reported by Wong et al. Another......). The phenotype of patients correlated well with the extent of deletion or duplication of chromosome 21 sequences. These data demonstrate three mechanisms of r(21) formation and show that the phenotype of r(21) patients varies with the extent of chromosome 21 monosomy or trisomy....

  6. Cytogenetic and molecular studies on a recombinant human X chromosome: implications for the spreading of X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandas, T.; Geller, R.L.; Yen, P.H.; Rosendorff, J.; Bernstein, R.; Yoshida, A.; Shapiro, L.J.

    1987-07-01

    A pericentric inversion of human X chromosome and a recombinant X chromosome (rec(X)) derived from crossing-over within the inversion was identified in a family. The rec(X) had a duplication of the segment Xq26.3 ..-->.. Xqter and a deletion of Xp22.3 ..-->.. Xpter and was interpreted to be Xqter ..-->.. Xq26.3::Xp22.3 ..-->.. Xqter. To characterize the rec(X) chromosome, dosage blots were done on genomic DNA from carriers of this rearranged X chromosome using a number of X chromosome probes. Results showed that anonymous sequences from the distal end of the long arm to which probes 4D8, Hx120A, DX13, and St14 bind as well as the locus for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) wee duplicated on the rec(X). Mouse-human cell hybrids were constructed that retained the rec(X) in the active or inactive state. Analyses of these hybrid clones for markers from the distal short arm of the X chromosome showed that the rec(X) retained the loci for steroid sulfatase (STS) and the cell surface antigen 12E7 (MIC2); but not the pseudoautosomal sequence 113D. These molecular studies confirm that the rec(X) is a duplication-deficiency chromosome as expected. In the inactive state in cell hybrids, STS and MIC2 (which usually escape X chromosome inactivation) were expressed from the rec(X), whereas G6PD was not. Therefore, in the rec(X) X chromosome inactivation has spread through STS and MIC2 leaving these loci unaffected and has inactivated G6PD in the absence of an inactivation center in the q26.3 ..-->.. qter region of the human X chromosome. The mechanism of spreading of inactivation appears to operate in a sequence-specific fashion. Alternatively, STS and MIC2 may have undergone inactivation initially but could not be maintained in an inactive state.

  7. A comparative of G-banded chromosome of Assam Macaque (Macaca assamensis and relationship to human (Homo sapiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunjongrat, R.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This research was the first to report a comparative analysis of G-banded chromosome of Assam macaque, Macaca assamensis (Primate, Cercopithecidae and relationship to human, Homo sapiens (Primate, Hominidae. Blood samples were taken from two males and two females held captive in Nakhonratchasima Zoo and Songkla Zoo. After the standard whole blood lymphocyte culture at 37ºC for 72 hr in presence of colchicine, metaphase spreads were performed on microscopic slides and air-dried. G-banding technique was applied to stain the chromosomes. The results showed that the number of diploid chromosomes of Assam macaque was 2n = 42. The type of autosomes are 18 metacentric and 22 submetacentric chromosomes. In addition, a pair of short arm chromosome 13 showed clearly observable satellite chromosome. X-chromosome was the submetacentric and Y chromosome was the smallest telocentric chromosome. We found that chromosome 5, 12, 13, 19 and X had the same G-banding patterns as those of human chromosomes. The short arm of chromosome 13 is similar to the chromosome 22 of human as indicated by G-banding techniques. In addition, the long arm of chromosome 13 is similar to the chromosome 15 of human. These results indicate that the chromosome 13 of the Assam macaque was split into 2 chromosomes. Chromosome 1, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 17 and 20 are similar to those of human chromosomes. This study suggest that the chromosome 1 is a pericentric inversion of human chromosome 1. Chromosomes 2, 4, 15, 16, 18 and Y are different from those of human chromosomes. These results show the evolutionary relationship between the Assam macaque and human.

  8. The Human Proteome Organization Chromosome 6 Consortium: integrating chromosome-centric and biology/disease driven strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, C H; Kast, J; Foster, L J; Siu, K W M; Overall, C M; Binkowski, T A; Hildebrand, W H; Scherer, A; Mansoor, M; Keown, P A

    2014-04-04

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) is designed to generate a comprehensive map of the protein-based molecular architecture of the human body, to provide a resource to help elucidate biological and molecular function, and to advance diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Within this framework, the chromosome-based HPP (C-HPP) has allocated responsibility for mapping individual chromosomes by country or region, while the biology/disease HPP (B/D-HPP) coordinates these teams in cross-functional disease-based groups. Chromosome 6 (Ch6) provides an excellent model for integration of these two tasks. This metacentric chromosome has a complement of 1002-1034 genes that code for known, novel or putative proteins. Ch6 is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, many with high population prevalence, devastating clinical impact and profound societal consequences. The unique combination of genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, phenomic and health services data being drawn together within the Ch6 program has enormous potential to advance personalized medicine by promoting robust biomarkers, subunit vaccines and new drug targets. The strong liaison between the clinical and laboratory teams, and the structured framework for technology transfer and health policy decisions within Canada will increase the speed and efficacy of this transition, and the value of this translational research. Canada has been selected to play a leading role in the international Human Proteome Project, the global counterpart of the Human Genome Project designed to understand the structure and function of the human proteome in health and disease. Canada will lead an international team focusing on chromosome 6, which is functionally associated with more than 120 major human diseases, including immune and inflammatory disorders affecting the brain, skeletal system, heart and blood vessels, lungs, kidney, liver, gastrointestinal tract and endocrine system. Many of these chronic and persistent

  9. Chromosomal preparations of human triploid zygotes and embryos fertilized in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macas, E; Suchanek, E; Grizelj, V; Puharic, I; Simunic, V

    1988-12-01

    Forty-eight zygotes with more than two pronuclei were identified after in vitro fertilization, representing 6.1% of all fertilized oocytes. The chromosome preparations from pronuclear stage to the cleaved human embryos were examined. Prophase was found in eight out of ten zygotes. The spreading of chromosomes allowed an adequate counting in only two cases. Six of the eight preparations displayed a late prophase. In this stage each haploid group of chromosomes can be analysed separately. Kariogamy usually occurred 4 to 5 h after the pronuclei had disappeared, and polyploid number of chromosomes were found in well-spread metaphases. The chromosomal preparations were made for eleven human embryos arising from zygotes with three pronuclei. Out of ten preparations, where the chromosomes could be counted, seven embryos (70%) contained hypodiploidic groups of chromosomes. In two of the cases, however, triploid metaphases were found, and in the last one a triploid/diploid mosaicism.

  10. Cell-autonomous correction of ring chromosomes in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershteyn, Marina; Hayashi, Yohei; Desachy, Guillaume; Hsiao, Edward C.; Sami, Salma; Tsang, Kathryn M.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Ring chromosomes are structural aberrations commonly associated with birth defects, mental disabilities and growth retardation. Rings form after fusion of the long and short arms of a chromosome, and are sometimes associated with large terminal deletions. Owing to the severity of these large aberrations that can affect multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have been proposed. During cell division, ring chromosomes can exhibit unstable behaviour leading to continuous production of aneuploid progeny with low viability and high cellular death rate. The overall consequences of this chromosomal instability have been largely unexplored in experimental model systems. Here we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient fibroblasts containing ring chromosomes with large deletions and found that reprogrammed cells lost the abnormal chromosome and duplicated the wild-type homologue through the compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD) mechanism. The karyotypically normal iPSCs with isodisomy for the corrected chromosome outgrew co-existing aneuploid populations, enabling rapid and efficient isolation of patient-derived iPSCs devoid of the original chromosomal aberration. Our results suggest a fundamentally different function for cellular reprogramming as a means of `chromosome therapy' to reverse combined loss-of-function across many genes in cells with large-scale aberrations involving ring structures. In addition, our work provides an experimentally tractable human cellular system for studying mechanisms of chromosomal number control, which is of critical relevance to human development and disease.

  11. The human homologue of the retroviral oncogene qin maps to chromosome 14q13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastury, K; Li, J; Druck, T; Su, H; Vogt, P K; Croce, C M; Huebner, K

    1994-01-01

    Chromosomal mapping of the human QIN gene (renamed FKH2 by the Human Genome Organization Nomenclature Committee) was initially accomplished by correlation of the presence of the QIN locus with specific chromosome regions in a rodent-human hybrid panel. This analysis revealed that the human QIN gene maps to chromosome region 14q11.2-->14q32, between the TCR and IGH loci. Further analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques with a human QIN genomic clone refined the human QIN gene localization to 14q13. Images PMID:8170957

  12. Three-dimensional positioning and structure of chromosomes in a human prophase nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Yusuf, Mohammed; Hashimoto, Teruo; Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Thompson, George; Robinson, Ian

    2017-01-01

    The human genetic material is packaged into 46 chromosomes. The structure of chromosomes is known at the lowest level, where the DNA chain is wrapped around a core of eight histone proteins to form nucleosomes. Around a million of these nucleosomes, each about 11 nm in diameter and 6 nm in thickness, are wrapped up into the complex organelle of the chromosome, whose structure is mostly known at the level of visible light microscopy to form a characteristic cross shape in metaphase. However, the higher-order structure of human chromosomes, between a few tens and hundreds of nanometers, has not been well understood. We show a three-dimensional (3D) image of a human prophase nucleus obtained by serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, with 36 of the complete set of 46 chromosomes captured within it. The acquired image allows us to extract quantitative 3D structural information about the nucleus and the preserved, intact individual chromosomes within it, including their positioning and full spatial morphology at a resolution of around 50 nm in three dimensions. The chromosome positions were found, at least partially, to follow the pattern of chromosome territories previously observed only in interphase. The 3D conformation shows parallel, planar alignment of the chromatids, whose occupied volumes are almost fully accounted for by the DNA and known chromosomal proteins. We also propose a potential new method of identifying human chromosomes in three dimensions, on the basis of the measurements of their 3D morphology. PMID:28776025

  13. CHARACTERIZATION AND CHROMOSOMAL ASSIGNMENT OF YEAST ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES CONTAINING HUMAN 3P13-P21-SPECIFIC SEQUENCE-TAGGED SITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MICHAELIS, SC; BARDENHEUER, W; LUX, A; SCHRAMM, A; GOCKEL, A; SIEBERT, R; WILLERS, C; SCHMIDTKE, K; TODT, B; VANDERHOUT, AH; BUYS, CHCM; HEPPELLPARTON, AC; RABBITTS, PH; UNGAR, S; SMITH, D; LEPASLIER, D; COHEN, D; OPALKA, B; SCHUTTE, J

    Human chromosomal region 3p12-p23 is proposed to harbor at least three tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and other neoplasias. In order to identify one of these genes we defined sequence tagged sites (STSs) specific for 3p13-p24.2 by analyzing a

  14. Conserved synteny in rat and mouse for a blood pressure QTL on human chromosome 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimdahl, Heike; Kreitler, Thomas; Gösele, Claudia; Ganten, Detlev; Hübner, Norbert

    2002-06-01

    Evidence for blood pressure quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on rat chromosome 10 has been found in multiple independent studies. Analysis of the homologous region on human chromosome 17 revealed significant linkage to blood pressure. The critical segment on human chromosome 17 spans a large interval containing the genes Itga2b, Gfap, and Itgb3. Therefore, findings in the rat may help to refine the position of blood pressure-regulating loci, assuming a common molecular cause across species. However, it has recently been suggested that the gene order in human, rat, and mouse is not conserved in this region, leaving uncertainty about the overlap of the blood pressure- regulating region between human chromosome 17 and rat chromosome 10. We have performed a detailed comparative analysis among human, mouse, and rat, defining the segment in question, by obtaining gene structure information in silico and by radiation hybrid mapping. It is of interest that this region also contains Wnk4, a gene previously identified to cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II and human hypertension. Our results definitively show that the conserved synteny extends among human chromosome 17, rat chromosome 10, and mouse chromosome 11, demonstrating an overlap between previously localized blood pressure QTLs in humans and rats.

  15. Identification of the human beta A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2): localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T. J.; Cerosaletti, K. M.; Fournier, R. E.; Sinke, R. J.; Rocchi, M.; Marzella, R.; Jenkins, N. A.; Gilbert, D. J.; Copeland, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine beta A2 crystallin gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe.

  16. Identification of the human beta A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2) : localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T J; Cerosaletti, K M; Fournier, R E; Sinke, R J; Rocchi, M; Marzella, R; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G

    1995-01-01

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine beta A2 crystallin gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe.

  17. Engineering of Systematic Elimination of a Targeted Chromosome in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic trisomy leads to abortion or congenital genetic disorders in humans. The most common autosomal chromosome abnormalities are trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21. Although alteration of gene dosage is thought to contribute to disorders caused by extra copies of chromosomes, genes associated with specific disease phenotypes remain unclear. To generate a normal cell from a trisomic cell as a means of etiological analysis or candidate therapy for trisomy syndromes, we developed a system to eliminate a targeted chromosome from human cells. Chromosome 21 was targeted by integration of a DNA cassette in HeLa cells that harbored three copies of chromosome 21. The DNA cassette included two inverted loxP sites and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk gene. This system causes missegregation of chromosome 21 after expression of Cre recombinase and subsequently enables the selection of cells lacking the chromosome by culturing in a medium that includes ganciclovir (GCV. Cells harboring only two copies of chromosome 21 were efficiently induced by transfection of a Cre expression vector, indicating that this approach is useful for eliminating a targeted chromosome.

  18. Engineering of Systematic Elimination of a Targeted Chromosome in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Kato, Hiroki; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Masuda, Keiji; Nguyen, Huong Thi Nguyen; Pham, Thanh Thi Mai; Han, Xu; Hirofuji, Yuta; Nonaka, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    Embryonic trisomy leads to abortion or congenital genetic disorders in humans. The most common autosomal chromosome abnormalities are trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21. Although alteration of gene dosage is thought to contribute to disorders caused by extra copies of chromosomes, genes associated with specific disease phenotypes remain unclear. To generate a normal cell from a trisomic cell as a means of etiological analysis or candidate therapy for trisomy syndromes, we developed a system to eliminate a targeted chromosome from human cells. Chromosome 21 was targeted by integration of a DNA cassette in HeLa cells that harbored three copies of chromosome 21. The DNA cassette included two inverted loxP sites and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene. This system causes missegregation of chromosome 21 after expression of Cre recombinase and subsequently enables the selection of cells lacking the chromosome by culturing in a medium that includes ganciclovir (GCV). Cells harboring only two copies of chromosome 21 were efficiently induced by transfection of a Cre expression vector, indicating that this approach is useful for eliminating a targeted chromosome.

  19. Allele specific gene expression on chromosome 7 in human tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, A.

    2017-01-01

    Both copy number losses and homozygosity of chromosome 7 are extremely rare events in many tumor types, indicating that the retention of both the maternal and paternal copies of chromosome 7 is essential for the tumor cells. This thesis compiles our research into the driving force that is behind the

  20. DNA Catenation Maintains Structure of Human Metaphase Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. V. Bauer, David; Marie, Rodolphe; Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted

    2012-01-01

    Mitotic chromosome structure is pivotal to cell division but difficult to observe in fine detail using conventional methods. DNA catenation has been implicated in both sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome condensation, but has never been observed directly. We have used a lab-on-a-chip microfl......Mitotic chromosome structure is pivotal to cell division but difficult to observe in fine detail using conventional methods. DNA catenation has been implicated in both sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome condensation, but has never been observed directly. We have used a lab......-on-a-chip microfluidic device and fluorescence microscopy, coupled with a simple image analysis pipeline, to digest chromosomal proteins and examine the structure of the remaining DNA, which maintains the canonical ‘X’ shape. By directly staining DNA, we observe that DNA catenation between sister chromatids (separated...... by fluid flow) is composed of distinct fibres of DNA concentrated at the centromeres. Disrupting the catenation of the chromosomes with Topoisomerase IIa significantly alters overall chromosome shape, suggesting that DNA catenation must be simultaneously maintained for correct chromosome condensation...

  1. Y chromosome structural and functional changes in human malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Néstor O

    2009-01-01

    The main Y chromosome abnormalities found in testicular cancer and other malignant diseases are microdeletions, entire chromosome loss and transcription deregulation of several genes mapping in the non-recombinant part of the Y chromosome. Yet, the role of these changes in the origin or evolution of malignancies is uncertain. The Y chromosome has experienced a long and intricate evolutionary history of deleterious, compensatory, and advantageous mutations. It is proposed that the compensatory mechanisms preventing Y decay in cancer cells are no longer working, and that deletions and gene down-expression reflect a very fast process of Y attrition. From this perspective, Y chromosome aberrations, mutations and unbalanced gene expression very likely play no role in the etiology of cell transformation, although in some forms of cancer, Y abnormalities may influence tumor progression.

  2. A new imprinted cluster on the human chromosome 7q21-q31, identified by human-mouse monochromosomal hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Chiga; Meguro, Makiko; Hoshiya, Hidetoshi; Haruta, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Yu-ki; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2003-06-01

    We have previously established a series of human monochromosomal hybrids containing a single human chromosome of defined parental origin as an in vitro resource for the investigation of human imprinted loci. Using the hybrids with a paternal or maternal human chromosome 7, we determined the allelic expression profiles of 76 ESTs mapped to the human chromosome 7q21-q31. Seven genes/transcripts, including PEG10 which has previously been reported to be imprinted, showed parent-of-origin-specific expression in monochromosomal hybrids. One of the 6 candidate genes/transcripts, i.e., DLX5 was confirmed to be imprinted in normal human lymphoblasts and brain tissues by a polymorphic analysis. Thus, an imprinted domain has been newly defined in the region of human chromosome 7q21-q31 using human-mouse monochromosomal hybrids.

  3. A high-resolution radiation hybrid map of chicken chromosome 5 and comparison with human chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitel, F.; Abasht, B.; Morrison, M.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Vignoles, F.; Leroux, S.; Feve, K.; Bardes, S.; Milan, D.; Lagarrigue, S.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Douaire, M.; Vignal, A.

    2004-01-01

    Background - The resolution of radiation hybrid (RH) maps is intermediate between that of the genetic and BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) contig maps. Moreover, once framework RH maps of a genome have been constructed, a quick location of markers by simple PCR on the RH panel is possible. The

  4. DNA methylation profiling of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Florian; Lewin, Joern; Cortese, Rene; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Attwood, John; Burger, Matthias; Burton, John; Cox, Tony V.; Davies, Rob; Down, Thomas A.; Haefliger, Carolina; Horton, Roger; Howe, Kevin; Jackson, David K.; Kunde, Jan; Koenig, Christoph; Liddle, Jennifer; Niblett, David; Otto, Thomas; Pettett, Roger; Seemann, Stefanie; Thompson, Christian; West, Tony; Rogers, Jane; Olek, Alex; Berlin, Kurt; Beck, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation constitutes the most stable type of epigenetic modifications modulating the transcriptional plasticity of mammalian genomes. Using bisulfite DNA sequencing, we report high-resolution methylation reference profiles of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22, providing a resource of about 1.9 million CpG methylation values derived from 12 different tissues. Analysis of 6 annotation categories, revealed evolutionary conserved regions to be the predominant sites for differential DNA methylation and a core region surrounding the transcriptional start site as informative surrogate for promoter methylation. We find 17% of the 873 analyzed genes differentially methylated in their 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTR) and about one third of the differentially methylated 5′-UTRs to be inversely correlated with transcription. While our study was controlled for factors reported to affect DNA methylation such as sex and age, we did not find any significant attributable effects. Our data suggest DNA methylation to be ontogenetically more stable than previously thought. PMID:17072317

  5. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Bassi, M.T. [Univ. of Siena (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinniss, M. J.; Kazazian, H. H.; Stetten, G.; Petersen, M. B.; Boman, H.; Engel, E.; Greenberg, F.; Hertz, J. M.; Johnson, A.; Laca, Z.; Mikkelsen, M.; Patil, S. R.; Schinzel, A. A.; Tranebjaerg, L.; Antonarakis, S. E.

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage analyses for 13 loci on 21q. Nine of 11 r(21)s, including the 5 familial r(21)s, showed no evidence for duplication of 21q sequences but did show molecular evidence of partial deletion of 21q. These data were consistent with the breakage and reunion of short- and long-arm regions to form the r(21), resulting in deletion of varying amounts of 21q22.1 to 21qter. The data from one individual who had a Down syndrome phenotype were consistent with asymmetric breakage and reunion of 21q sequences from an intermediate isochromosome or Robertsonian translocation chromosome as reported by Wong et al. Another patient, who also exhibited Down syndrome, showed evidence of a third mechanism of ring formation. The likely initial event was breakage and reunion of the short and long arms, resulting in a small r(21), followed by a sister-chromatid exchange resulting in a double-sized and symmetrically dicentric r(21). The phenotype of patients correlated well with the extent of deletion or duplication of chromosome 21 sequences. These data demonstrate three mechanisms of r(21) formation and show that the phenotype of r(21) patients varies with the extent of chromosome 21 monosomy or trisomy. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:1346075

  7. Expression of genes from the human active and inactive X chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, C J; Carrel, L; Willard, H F

    1997-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation results in the cis-limited inactivation of many, but not all, of the genes on one of the pair of X chromosomes in mammalian females. In addition to the genes from the pseudoautosomal region, which have long been anticipated to escape inactivation, genes from several other regions of the human X chromosome have now been shown to escape inactivation and to be expressed from both the active and inactive X chromosomes. The growing number of genes escaping inactivation em...

  8. European gene mapping project (EUROGEM) : Breakpoint panels for human chromosomes based on the CEPH reference families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attwood, J; Bryant, SP; Bains, R; Povey, R; Povey, S; Rebello, M; Kapsetaki, M; Moschonas, NK; Grzeschik, KH; Otto, M; Dixon, M; Sudworth, HE; Kooy, RF; Wright, A; Teague, P; Terrenato, L; Vergnaud, G; Monfouilloux, S; Weissenbach, J; Alibert, O; Dib, C; Faure, S; Bakker, E; Pearson, NM; Vossen, RHAM; Gal, A; MuellerMyhsok, B; Cann, HM; Spurr, NK

    1996-01-01

    Meiotic breakpoint panels for human chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 17; 18, 20 and X were constructed from genotypes from the CEPH reference families. Each recombinant chromosome included has a breakpoint well-supported with reference to defined quantitative criteria. The panels

  9. Report of the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.A.; Neuman, W.L. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States); McPherson, J.; Wasmuth, J. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Chemistry; Camper, S. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Medical School; Plaetke, R. [Eceles Inst. of Human Genetics, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Human Genetics; Williamson, R. [St. Mary`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics

    1993-12-31

    This report describes the accomplishments of the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 as was held May 11--13,1992 at the University of Chicago. Included in the report are abstract of individual presentations and a consensus map of the chromosome.

  10. The Relationship Between Spontaneous Telomere Loss and Chromosome Instability in a Human Tumor Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Fouladi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome instability plays an important role in cancer by promoting the alterations in the genome required for tumor cell progression. The loss of telomeres that protect the ends of chromosomes and prevent chromosome fusion has been proposed as one mechanism for chromosome instability in cancer cells, however, there is little direct evidence to support this hypothesis. To investigate the relationship between spontaneous telomere loss and chromosome instability in human cancer cells, clones of the EJ-30 tumor cell line were isolated in which a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk gene was integrated immediately adjacent to a telomere. Selection for HSV-tkdeficient cells with ganciclovir demonstrated a high rate of loss of the end these "marked" chromosomes (10-4 events/cell per generation. DNA sequence and cytogenetic analysis suggests that the loss of function of the HSV-tk gene most often involves telomere loss, sister chromatid fusion, and prolonged periods of chromosome instability. In some HSV-tk-deficient cells, telomeric repeat sequences were added on to the end of the truncated HSV-tk gene at a new location, whereas in others, no telomere was detected on the end of the marked chromosome. These results suggest that spontaneous telomere loss is a mechanism for chromosome instability in human cancer cells.

  11. Assignment of the human pancreatic regenerating (REG) gene to chromosome 2p12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, R.; Egan, J.M.; Zenilman, M.E.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Hawkins, A.L.; Griffin, C.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1994-03-15

    A cDNA termed reg (for regenerating gene) has been isolated and characterized from a rat pancreatic library. Expression of reg is markedly increased in regenerating islets and decreased when insulin gene expression is inhibited. These findings have led to the hypothesis that reg may be involved in the expansion [beta]-cell function. The human reg gene has a high degree of similarity to the rat reg gene. To determine the chromosomal location of the human reg gene, the authors analyzed two panels of mouse- or hamster-human hybrid cell lines containing a single human chromosome or several different human chromosomes. DNA extracts from these cell lines were analyzed for the presence of the human reg gene by polymerase chain reaction. In addition, human metaphase chromosomes were used for fluorescence in situ hybridization to further confirm the chromosomal assignment and to determine the subchromosomal localization. With these approaches, they show that the human reg gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 2 near the centromere at band 2p12. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  12. New binary polymorphisms reshape and increase resolution of the human Y chromosomal haplogroup tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karafet, Tatiana M; Mendez, Fernando L; Meilerman, Monica B; Underhill, Peter A; Zegura, Stephen L; Hammer, Michael F

    2008-05-01

    Markers on the non-recombining portion of the human Y chromosome continue to have applications in many fields including evolutionary biology, forensics, medical genetics, and genealogical reconstruction. In 2002, the Y Chromosome Consortium published a single parsimony tree showing the relationships among 153 haplogroups based on 243 binary markers and devised a standardized nomenclature system to name lineages nested within this tree. Here we present an extensively revised Y chromosome tree containing 311 distinct haplogroups, including two new major haplogroups (S and T), and incorporating approximately 600 binary markers. We describe major changes in the topology of the parsimony tree and provide names for new and rearranged lineages within the tree following the rules presented by the Y Chromosome Consortium in 2002. Several changes in the tree topology have important implications for studies of human ancestry. We also present demography-independent age estimates for 11 of the major clades in the new Y chromosome tree.

  13. Regional localization of the gene for thyroid peroxidase to human chromosome 2pter----p12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vijlder, J. J.; Dinsart, C.; Libert, F.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Bikker, H.; Bolhuis, P. A.; Vassart, G.

    1988-01-01

    A 2.0-kb thyroid peroxidase cDNA of human origin was used as probe for Southern blot hybridization of genomic DNA from human somatic cells and human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. The results showed that the gene coding for human thyroid peroxidase is located on chromosome. 2. Further analysis of

  14. A homologous subfamily of satellite III DNA on human chromosomes 14 and 22.

    OpenAIRE

    Choo, K H; Earle, E; McQuillan, C.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a new subfamily of human satellite III DNA that is represented on two different acrocentric chromosomes. This DNA is composed of a tandemly repeated array of diverged 5-base-pair monomer units of the sequence GGAAT or GGAGT. These monomers are organised into a 1.37-kilobase higher-order structure that is itself tandemly reiterated. Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing specific human chromosomes, this higher-order structure is demonstrated on chromosomes 14 and 22, but ...

  15. Interchromatidal central ridge and transversal symmetry in early metaphasic human chromosome one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello-Miranda, Orlando; Sáenz-Arce, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    The topographic structure of Giemsa-banded (G-banded) early metaphase human chromosomes adsorbed on glass was analyzed by atomic force microscope using amplitude modulation mode (AM-AFM). Longitudinal height measurements for early metaphasic human chromosomes showed a central ridge that was further characterized by transversal height measurements. The heterochromatic regions displayed a high level of transversal symmetry, while the euchromatic ones presented several peaks across the transversal height measurements. We suggest that this central ridge and symmetry patterns point out a transitional arrangement of the early metaphase chromosome and support evidence for interchromatidal interactions prior to disjunction. 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  16. Assignment of a Polycomb-like chromobox gene (CBX2) to human chromosome 17q25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gecz, J.; Gaunt, S.J.; Passage, E. [INSERM, Marseille (France)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    A human clone corresponding to the homolgue of the murine Polycomb-like gene M33 has been used to map this gene (CBX2) to human chromosomes. Both somatic cell hybrid panels and FISH on a metaphase chromosomes have been used. These techniques gave a consistent localization, at the tip of the long arm of chromosome 17 (17q25). This localization, as well as the the potential role of a mammalian Polycomb-like protein, suggests a potential involvement in two different pathologies: the campomelic syndrome, an inherited disorder, and neoplastic disorders linked to allele loss already described in this region. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  17. A homologous subfamily of satellite III DNA on human chromosomes 14 and 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, K H; Earle, E; McQuillan, C

    1990-10-11

    We describe a new subfamily of human satellite III DNA that is represented on two different acrocentric chromosomes. This DNA is composed of a tandemly repeated array of diverged 5-base-pair monomer units of the sequence GGAAT or GGAGT. These monomers are organised into a 1.37-kilobase higher-order structure that is itself tandemly reiterated. Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing specific human chromosomes, this higher-order structure is demonstrated on chromosomes 14 and 22, but not on the remaining acrocentric chromosomes. In situ hybridisation studies have localised the sequence to the proximal p-arm region of these chromosomes. Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) reveals that 70-110 copies of the higher-order structure are tandemly organised on a chromosome into a major domain which appears to be flanked on both sides by non-tandemly repeated genomic DNA. In addition, some of the satellite III sequences are interspersed over a number of other PFGE fragments. This study provides fundamental knowledge on the structure and evolution of the acrocentric chromosomes, and should extend our understanding of the complex process of interchromosomal interaction which may be responsible for Robertsonian translocation and meiotic nondisjunction involving these chromosomes.

  18. Proteomic analysis of human metaphase chromosomes reveals Topoisomerase II alpha as an Aurora B substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ciaran; Henzing, Alexander J; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    The essential Aurora B kinase is a chromosomal passenger protein that is required for mitotic chromosome alignment and segregation. Aurora B function is dependent on the chromosome passenger, INCENP. INCENP, in turn, requires sister chromatid cohesion for its appropriate behaviour. Relatively few...... substrates have been identified for Aurora B, so that the precise role it plays in controlling mitosis remains to be elucidated. To identify potential novel mitotic substrates of Aurora B, extracted chromosomes were prepared from mitotically-arrested HeLa S3 cells and incubated with recombinant human Aurora...... B in the presence of radioactive ATP. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the HeLa scaffold fraction to be enriched for known chromosomal proteins including CENP-A, CENP-B, CENP-C, ScII and INCENP. Mass spectrometry of bands excised from one-dimensional polyacrylamide gels further defined the protein...

  19. Non-random distribution of instability-associated chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints in human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Stephen R. [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Papworth, David [Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Grosovsky, Andrew J. [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, CA (United States)]. E-mail: Grosovsky@ucr.edu

    2006-08-30

    Genomic instability is observed in tumors and in a large fraction of the progeny surviving irradiation. One of the best-characterized phenotypic manifestations of genomic instability is delayed chromosome aberrations. Our working hypothesis for the current study was that if genomic instability is in part attributable to cis mechanisms, we should observe a non-random distribution of chromosomes or sites involved in instability-associated rearrangements, regardless of radiation quality, dose, or trans factor expression. We report here the karyotypic examination of 296 instability-associated chromosomal rearrangement breaksites (IACRB) from 118 unstable TK6 human B lymphoblast, and isogenic derivative, clones. When we tested whether IACRB were distributed across the chromosomes based on target size, a significant non-random distribution was evident (p < 0.00001), and three IACRB hotspots (chromosomes 11, 12, and 22) and one IACRB coldspot (chromosome 2) were identified. Statistical analysis at the chromosomal band-level identified four IACRB hotspots accounting for 20% of all instability-associated breaks, two of which account for over 14% of all IACRB. Further, analysis of independent clones provided evidence within 14 individual clones of IACRB clustering at the chromosomal band level, suggesting a predisposition for further breaks after an initial break at some chromosomal bands. All of these events, independently, or when taken together, were highly unlikely to have occurred by chance (p < 0.000001). These IACRB band-level cluster hotspots were observed independent of radiation quality, dose, or cellular p53 status. The non-random distribution of instability-associated chromosomal rearrangements described here significantly differs from the distribution that was observed in a first-division post-irradiation metaphase analysis (p = 0.0004). Taken together, these results suggest that genomic instability may be in part driven by chromosomal cis mechanisms.

  20. The CEPH consortium primary linkage map of human chromosome 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R L; Lalouel, J M; Nakamura, Y; Donis-Keller, H; Green, P; Bowden, D W; Mathew, C G; Easton, D F; Robson, E B; Morton, N E

    1990-03-01

    The first CEPH consortium map, that of chromosome 10, is presented. This primary linkage map contains 28 continuously linked loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 37 probe and enzyme combinations. Cytogenetic localization of some of the genetic markers indicates that the consortium map extends, at least, from 10p13 to 10q26. The order of loci on the consortium map agrees with the physical localization data. The female map spans 309 cM (206 cM if an approximation of interference is included in the mapping function used to construct the map), and the mean genetic distance of intervals is 11 cM (7 cM). Also presented are maps of chromosome 10 from each of five CEPH collaborating laboratories, based on genotypes for all relevant markers in the CEPH database. The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 10 should be useful for localization of any gene of interest falling within the span covered. The genotypes in the chromosome 10 consortium map database are now available to the scientific community.

  1. Mutational landscape of the human Y chromosome-linked genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013), repeated abortion. (Pathak et al. 2006; Yan et al. 2011) and other categories of disorders related to male infertility (Bashamboo et al. 2005;. Tian et al. 2014; Yadav et al. 2014). Despite the advances made on Y chromosome genetics, our understanding on the affected genes and loci in males with clinical condition of ...

  2. SDR-O: an orphan short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase localized at mouse chromosome 10/human chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiguo; Song, Min-Sun; Napoli, Joseph L

    2002-07-10

    We report cloning a cDNA that encodes a novel short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase, SDR-O, conserved in mouse, human and rat. Human and mouse liver express SDR-O (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase-orphan) mRNA intensely. The mouse embryo expresses SDR-O mRNA as early as day seven. Human SDR-O localizes on chromosome 12; mouse SDR-O localizes on chromosome 10 with CRAD1, CRAD2 and RDH4. SDR-O shares highest amino acid similarity with rat RoDH1 and mouse RDH1 (69-70%), but does not have the retinol and 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity of either, nor is it active as a 17beta- or 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases catalyse the metabolism of ligands that bind with nuclear receptors: the occurrence of 'orphan' nuclear receptors may imply existence of 'orphan' SDR, suggesting that SDR-O may catalyse the metabolism of another class of nuclear receptor ligand. Alternatively, SDR-O may not have a catalytic function, but may regulate metabolism by binding substrates/products and/or by serving as a regulatory factor.

  3. Highly stable maintenance of a mouse artificial chromosome in human cells and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuki, Kanako; Takehara, Shoko; Uno, Narumi; Imaoka, Natsuko; Abe, Satoshi; Takiguchi, Masato; Hiramatsu, Kei; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Kazuki, Yasuhiro

    2013-12-06

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) and mouse artificial chromosomes (MACs) display several advantages as gene delivery vectors, such as stable episomal maintenance that avoids insertional mutations and the ability to carry large gene inserts including the regulatory elements. Previously, we showed that a MAC vector developed from a natural mouse chromosome by chromosome engineering was more stably maintained in adult tissues and hematopoietic cells in mice than HAC vectors. In this study, to expand the utility for a gene delivery vector in human cells and mice, we investigated the long-term stability of the MACs in cultured human cells and transchromosomic mice. We also investigated the chromosomal copy number-dependent expression of genes on the MACs in mice. The MAC was stably maintained in human HT1080 cells in vitro during long-term culture. The MAC was stably maintained at least to the F8 and F4 generations in ICR and C57BL/6 backgrounds, respectively. The MAC was also stably maintained in hematopoietic cells and tissues derived from old mice. Transchromosomic mice containing two or four copies of the MAC were generated by breeding. The DNA contents were comparable to the copy number of the MACs in each tissue examined, and the expression of the EGFP gene on the MAC was dependent on the chromosomal copy number. Therefore, the MAC vector may be useful not only for gene delivery in mammalian cells but also for animal transgenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chromosome distribution in human sperm – a 3D multicolor banding-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrasek Kristin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear architecture studies in human sperm are sparse. By now performed ones were practically all done on flattened nuclei. Thus, studies close at the in vivo state of sperm, i.e. on three-dimensionally conserved interphase cells, are lacking by now. Only the position of 14 chromosomes in human sperm was studied. Results Here for the first time a combination of multicolor banding (MCB and three-dimensional analysis of interphase cells was used to characterize the position and orientation of all human chromosomes in sperm cells of a healthy donor. The interphase nuclei of human sperm are organized in a non-random way, driven by the gene density and chromosome size. Conclusion Here we present the first comprehensive results on the nuclear architecture of normal human sperm. Future studies in this tissue type, e.g. also in male patients with unexplained fertility problems, may characterize yet unknown mechanisms of infertility.

  5. Localization of the tight junction protein gene TJP1 to human chromosome 15q13, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region, and to mouse chromosome 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandas, T.K. [Darthmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    The gene encoding the tight junction (zonula occludens) protein, TJP1, was mapped to human chromosome 15q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a cDNA probe. The Jackson Laboratory backcross DNA panel derived from the cross (C57BL/6JEi X SPRET/Ei) F1 females X SPRET/Ei males was used to map the mouse Tjp1 to chromosome 7 near position 30 on the Chromosome Committee Map, a region with conserved homology to human chromosome 15q13. FISH studies on metaphases from patients with the Prader-Willi (PWS) or the Angelman syndrome (AS) showed that TJP1 maps close but distal to the PWS/AS chromosome region. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Use of chromosome translocations for measuring prior environment exposures in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in cytogenetic methodology are beginning to have a major impact upon our ability to provide assessments of environmental exposure in humans. The advent of fluorescent-based techniques for `painting` whole chromosomes has made the analysis of chromosome translocations rapid, specific, sensitive and routine. Chromosome painting has been used to address a wide variety of scientific questions, resulting in an increased understanding of the biological consequences of adverse environmental exposure. This paper describes the use of chromosome translocations as a biological marker of exposure and effect in humans. The relevance of translocations is discussed, as are the advantages and disadvantages of painting compared to classical cytogenetic methods for translocation evaluation. The factors to consider in the use of translocations as a retrospective indicator of exposure are then described. Several theoretical parameters that are important to the use of translocations are provided, and the paper concludes with a vision for the future of cytogenetic methodology.

  7. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowcock, A.M.; Barnes, R.I. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gerken, S.C.; Leppert, M. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shiang, R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Jabs, E.W.; Warren, A.C.; Antonarakis, S. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Retief, A.E. [Univ. of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg (South Africa); Vergnaud, G. [Centre d`Etudes du Bouchet, Vert le Petit (France)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 13 is presented. This map contains 59 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 94 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 9 laboratories. A total of 25 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the centromeric region of chromosome 13 to the terminal band of the long arm. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 158, 203, and 178cM respectively. The largest interval is 24 cM and is between D13Z1 (alphaRI) and ATP1AL1. The mean genetic distance between the 25 uniquely placed loci is 7 cM. 76 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowcock, A M; Gerken, S C; Barnes, R I; Shiang, R; Jabs, E W; Warren, A C; Antonarakis, S; Retief, A E; Vergnaud, G; Leppert, M

    1993-05-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 13 is presented. This map contains 59 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 94 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 9 laboratories. A total of 25 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the centromeric region of chromosome 13 to the terminal band of the long arm. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 158, 203, and 178 cM respectively. The largest interval is 24 cM and is between D13Z1 (alpha RI) and ATP1AL1. The mean genetic distance between the 25 uniquely placed loci is 7 cM.

  9. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spurr, N.K.; Cox, S.; Bryant, S.P. (Human Genetic Resources Unit, Herts (United Kingdom)); Attwood, J. (Univ. College London (United Kingdom)); Shields, D.C. (Princess Anne Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)); Steinbrueck, T.; Donis-Keller, H. (Washington Univ. School of medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Jenkins, T. (Univ. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)); Murray, J.C. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)); Kidd, K.K. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)) (and others)

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium linkage map of chromosome 2. The map contains 36 loci defined by genotyping generated from the CEPH family DNAs. A total of 73 different markers were typed by 14 contributing laboratories; of these, 36 loci are ordered on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. Markers are placed along the length of the chromosome but no markers were available to anchor the map at either telomere or the centromere. Multilocus linkage analysis has produced male, female, and sex-averaged maps extending for 261, 430, and 328 cM, respectively. The sex-averaged map contains five intervals greater than 15 cM and the mean genetic distance between the 36 uniquely placed loci is 9.1 cM. 25 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, N K; Cox, S; Bryant, S P; Attwood, J; Robson, E B; Shields, D C; Steinbrueck, T; Jenkins, T; Murray, J C; Kidd, K K

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium linkage map of chromosome 2. The map contains 36 loci defined by genotyping generated from the CEPH family DNAs. A total of 73 different markers were typed by 14 contributing laboratories; of these, 36 loci are ordered on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. Markers are placed along the length of the chromosome but no markers were available to anchor the map at either telomere or the centromere. Multilocus linkage analysis has produced male, female, and sex-averaged maps extending for 261, 430, and 328 cM, respectively. The sex-averaged map contains five intervals greater than 15 cM and the mean genetic distance between the 36 uniquely placed loci is 9.1 cM.

  11. Human male infertility, the Y chromosome, and dinosaur extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman J. Silber

    2011-06-01

    Our studies of the Y chromosome and male infertility suggest that the default mechanism for determining the sex of offspring is the temperature of egg incubation, and that genetic sex determination (based on sex chromosomes like X and Y has evolved many times over and over again in different ways, in different genera, as a more foolproof method than temperature variation of assuring a balanced sex ratio in offspring. The absence of such a genetic sex determining mechanism in dinosaurs may have led to a skewed sex ratio when global temperature dramatically changed 65,000,000 years ago, resulting in a preponderance of males, and consequentially a rapid decline in population.

  12. The sequence of human chromosome 21 and implications for research into Down syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Davisson, Muriel

    2000-01-01

    The recent completion of the DNA sequence of human chromosome 21 has provided the first look at the 225 genes that are candidates for involvement in Down syndrome (trisomy 21). A broad functional classification of these genes, their expression data and evolutionary conservation, and comparison with the gene content of the major mouse models of Down syndrome, suggest how the chromosome sequence may help in understanding the complex Down syndrome phenotype.

  13. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the techniques used to analyze the damage done to chromosome from ion radiation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromereprobes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. There is some comparison of the different results from the various techniques. The results of the study are summarized.

  14. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Progress report, July 1992--August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1993-09-01

    Progress in identification of chromosomal transformations associated with leukemogenesis is described. In particular progress in DNA cloning of chromosomal break points in human cancer patients is described.

  15. Towards a transcription map of human chromosome 21: Identification of expressed sequences by exon trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.M.; Chrast, R.; Rossier, C. [Geneva Univ. Medical School (Switzerland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome 21q contains about 1% of the human genome, and when triplicated is responsible for Down syndrome. The genetic and physical maps of this chromosome are amongst the most developed of all human chromosomes. A considerable international effort is now under way with the aims of cloning and mapping all chromosome 21 genes, assigning functions, and determining their involvement in disease phenotypes. We have used exon trapping/amplification methods to identify exons of genes that map on chromosome 21. EcoR1 or Bam HI-digested DNA from pools of 96 cosmids from the chromosome 21 library LL21NC02{open_quotes}Q{close_quotes} were used for cloning in vector pSLP3 (after elimination of cosmids positive for ribosomal RNR genes and mouse DNA); recombinant plasmids were transfected into cos7 cells and trapped sequences were subcloned. False positive clones, i.e. those containing vector self-spliced sequences (which represented between 8-30% of clones in different experiments), have been eliminated by hybridization of oligonucleotides corresponding to sequences of the vector self-spliced events. More than 100 different trapped {open_quotes}exons{close_quotes} have been identified to date after single or double pass sequencing. Two sequences matched exons of known genes on chromosome 21 (COL6A 1 and MX1). About 45% of the sequences were entirely new, i.e. there was no homology with entries in the nucleotide or protein databases (blastin and blastx searches). An additional 48% of the sequences were homologous but not identical to sequences in the databases. Only 4% were repetitive elements. Specific homologies will be presented. All of the trapped sequences that have been mapped by filter hybridization, PCR, or FISH, map back to cosmids or YACs of chromosome 21. This approach permits rapid identification of expressed sequences of this chromosome, the cloning of its genes, and the understanding of its disorders.

  16. Visualization of interphase chromosomes in postmitotic cells of the human brain by multicolour banding (MCB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iourov, I Y; Liehr, T; Vorsanova, S G; Kolotii, A D; Yurov, Y B

    2006-01-01

    Molecular cytogenetics offers the unique possibility of investigating numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations in interphase nuclei of somatic cells. Previous fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) investigations gave hints of numerical chromosomal imbalances in the human brain, present as low-level mosaicism. However, as precise identification of aneuploidy rates in somatic tissues faces major difficulties due to the limitations of FISH using whole chromosome painting or centromeric probes, in this study low-level mosaicism in the human brain was addressed for the first time using microdissection-based multicolour banding (MCB) probe sets. We demonstrated that MCB is suitable for this application and leads to more reliable results than the use of centromeric probes in parallel on the same samples. Autosomes and the active X chromosome appear as discrete metaphase chromosome-like structures, while the inactive X chromosome is condensed in more than 95% of interphase nuclei. The frequency of stochastic aneuploidy was found to be 0.2-0.5% (mean 0.35%) per autosome pair, 2% for the X chromosome in the female brain, and 0.4% in the male brain, giving a cumulative frequency of aneuploidy of approximately 10% in the adult brain. Moreover, MCB as well as multi-probe FISH using centromeric probes revealed associated signals in a large proportion of brain cells (10-40%). While co-localized signals could not be discriminated from numerical chromosome imbalances after FISH using centromeric probes, interphase MCB allows such differentiation. In summary, MCB is the only approach available at present that provides the possibility of characterizing the chromosomal integrity of arbitrary interphase cell populations. Thus, cytogenetics is no longer limited in its application to dividing cells, which is a great step forward for brain research.

  17. Increased chromosome exchange frequencies in iodo-deoxyuridine-sensitized human SW-1573 cells after gamma-irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, N. A.; van Bree, C.; Veltmaat, M. A.; Ludwików, G.; Kipp, J. B.; Barendsen, G. W.

    1999-01-01

    The induction of chromosome exchanges was investigated in SW-1573 human lung tumour cells radiosensitized with iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) and irradiated with gamma-rays. Following treatment chromosome 2 and X were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific DNA

  18. Dose-Response Curve of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma-Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lusiyanti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome aberration is a biomarker to predict the level of cell damage caused by exposure to ionizing radiation on human body. Dicentric chromosome is a specific chromosome aberration caused by ionizing radiation and is used as a gold standard biodosimetry of individuals over exposed to ionizing radiation. In radiation accident the dicentric assays has been applied as biological dosimetry to estimate radiation absorbed dose and also to confirm the radiation dose received to radiation workers.The purpose of this study was to generate a dose response curve of chromosome aberration (dicentric in human lymphocyte induced by gamma radiation. Peripheral blood samples from three non smoking healthy volunteers aged between 25-48 years old with informed consent were irradiated with dose between 0.1-4.0 Gy and a control using gamma teletherapy source. The culture procedure was conducted following the IAEA standard procedures with slight modifications. Analysis of dose-response curves used was LQ model Y = a + αD + βD2. The result showed that α and β values of the curve obtained were 0.018 ± 0.006 and 0.013 ± 0.002, respectively. Dose response calibration curve for dicentric chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by gamma-radiation fitted to linear quadratic model. In order to apply the dose response curve of chromosome aberration disentric for biodosimetry, this standar curve still need to be validated.

  19. Preneoplastic phenotype and chromosome changes of cultured human Bloom syndrome fibroblasts (strain GM 1492).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothman, A R; Cram, L S; Bartholdi, M F; Kraemer, P M

    1986-02-01

    The Bloom syndrome fibroblast strain, GM 1492, was examined for phenotypic properties generally associated with neoplastic cells. A serial clonogenicity assay indicated that these cells can proliferate in culture, achieving approximately twice the number of population doublings as compared to normal human skin fibroblasts. Strain GM 1492 appeared to be partially transformed in that these cells showed a slight degree of anchorage independence when grown in methylcellulose, and also appeared to have relaxed growth requirements compared to normal fibroblasts. GM 1492 cells are heteroploid, with 20 to 80 chromosomes/cell and a modal chromosome number of 44. Cytogenetic analysis of G-banded metaphase chromosomes indicated that most cells contained at least one copy of each normal human chromosome, and many cells exhibited only aneuploidies with no detectable chromosomal rearrangements. Minute chromosomes were seen in a few of the metaphase cells examined. GM 1492 cells did not form tumors in athymic nude mice. Since many of the characteristics of GM 1492 cells are similar to those seen only in tumor cells, but the strain is nontumorigenic, we suggest that GM 1492 cells are preneoplastic and thus represent an ideal system for the in vitro study of human neoplastic progression.

  20. Comparative mapping of mouse chromosome 4 and human chromosome 9: Lv, Orm, and Hxb are closely linked on mouse chromosome 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, A; Moseley, H; Peters, J; Abbott, C

    1992-01-01

    The genes for orosomucoid (ORM-1 and ORM-2), delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD), and hexabrachion or tenascin (HXB) all map to the q31-qter region of human Chromosome (Chr) 9. The mouse homolog of each of these genes has been mapped to Chr4, but hexabrachion has not previously been mapped by linkage analysis. We have now ordered Orm-1, Lv (the mouse homolog of ALAD), and Hxb in an interspecific backcross panel, by use of tyrosinase related protein-1, Tyrp-1, whose human homolog maps to 9p13-pter (Abbott et al., Genomics 1991) as a reference locus. No recombinants were identified in 124 animals between Lv and Orm-1. Hxb was found to be 1.6 cM distal to Lv and Orm-1, and 4.8 cM proximal to Tyrp-1, or b. These data therefore contribute to our knowledge of the conserved synteny between HSA 9q and MMU 4.

  1. The orphan nuclear receptor ROR{alpha} (RORA) maps to a conserved region of homology on human chromosome 15q21-q22 and mouse chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giguere, V. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada); Beatty, B.; Squire, J. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    ROR{alpha} is a novel member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid receptor superfamily with unique DNA-binding properties. We have mapped the RORA gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 15q21-q22. To map the mouse Rora gene, a partial mouse cDNA clone was isolated from brain. Using interspecific backcross analysis, we have mapped the Rora gene to mouse chromosome 9. This places the human RORA gene in the proximity of the PML gene, which is involved in a reciprocal chromosomal translocation t(15:17) with the RARA gene in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  2. An improved method for producing radiation hybrids applied to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    At the initiation of the grant we had just produced radiation hybrids from a monochromosomal microcell hybrid containing human chromosome 19 as its only human component. Radiation hybrids were produced using doses of radiation ranging from 1000--8000 rads. Lethally irradiated cells were then fused to hamster recipients (CHTG49) and selected for growth in histidinol. Approximately 240 clones were isolated and 75 clones were expanded for the isolation of DNA. This report describes in situ hybridization studies and the introduction of markers into human chromosome 19.

  3. Origin and evolution of candidate mental retardation genes on the human X chromosome (MRX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deakin Janine E

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human X chromosome has a biased gene content. One group of genes that is over-represented on the human X are those expressed in the brain, explaining the large number of sex-linked mental retardation (MRX syndromes. Results To determine if MRX genes were recruited to the X, or whether their brain-specific functions were acquired after relocation to the mammalian X chromosome, we examined the location and expression of their orthologues in marsupials, which diverged from human approximately 180 million years ago. We isolated and mapped nine tammar wallaby MRX homologues, finding that six were located on the tammar wallaby X (which represents the ancient conserved mammal X and three on chromosome 5, representing the recently added region of the human X chromosome. The location of MRX genes within the same synteny groups in human and wallaby does not support the hypothesis that genes with an important function in the brain were recruited in multiple independent events from autosomes to the mammalian X chromosome. Most of the tammar wallaby MRX homologues were more widely expressed in tammar wallaby than in human. Only one, the tammar wallaby ARX homologue (located on tammar chromosome 5p, has a restricted expression pattern comparable to its pattern in human. The retention of the brain-specific expression of ARX over 180 million years suggests that this gene plays a fundamental role in mammalian brain development and function. Conclusion Our results suggest all the genes in this study may have originally had more general functions that became more specialised and important in brain function during evolution of humans and other placental mammals.

  4. Structure, organization, and sequence of alpha satellite DNA from human chromosome 17: evidence for evolution by unequal crossing-over and an ancestral pentamer repeat shared with the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1986-09-01

    The centromeric regions of all human chromosomes are characterized by distinct subsets of a diverse tandemly repeated DNA family, alpha satellite. On human chromosome 17, the predominant form of alpha satellite is a 2.7-kilobase-pair higher-order repeat unit consisting of 16 alphoid monomers. We present the complete nucleotide sequence of the 16-monomer repeat, which is present in 500 to 1,000 copies per chromosome 17, as well as that of a less abundant 15-monomer repeat, also from chromosome 17. These repeat units were approximately 98% identical in sequence, differing by the exclusion of precisely 1 monomer from the 15-monomer repeat. Homologous unequal crossing-over is suggested as a probable mechanism by which the different repeat lengths on chromosome 17 were generated, and the putative site of such a recombination event is identified. The monomer organization of the chromosome 17 higher-order repeat unit is based, in part, on tandemly repeated pentamers. A similar pentameric suborganization has been previously demonstrated for alpha satellite of the human X chromosome. Despite the organizational similarities, substantial sequence divergence distinguishes these subsets. Hybridization experiments indicate that the chromosome 17 and X subsets are more similar to each other than to the subsets found on several other human chromosomes. We suggest that the chromosome 17 and X alpha satellite subsets may be related components of a larger alphoid subfamily which have evolved from a common ancestral repeat into the contemporary chromosome-specific subsets.

  5. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models, which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  6. Three-Dimensional Organization of Chromosome Territories and the Human Interphase Cell Nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  7. Three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories in the human interphase cell nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Münkel (Christian); J. Langowski (Jörg)

    1999-01-01

    markdownabstractTo study the three-dimensional organization of chromosome territories and the human interphase cell nucleus we developed models which could be compared to experiments. Despite the successful linear sequencing of the human genome its 3D-organization is widely unknown. Using Monte

  8. Complex FISH probes for the subtelomeric regions of all human chromosomes: comparative hybridization of CEPH YACs to chromosomes of the Old World monkey Presbytis cristata and great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, K; Wirth, J; van der Maarel, S; Freier, S; Ropers, H H; Haaf, T

    1997-01-01

    We have generated a human subtelomere probe panel, utilizing well characterized CEPH YACs, for the investigation of human chromosome pathology and evolution through fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Region-specific FISH probes will be extremely valuable for detecting cytogenetically cryptic telomere abnormalities. Here, we present the first comparative mapping study (with 29 subtelomere probes and 6 chromosome paints) to the Old World monkey Presbytis cristata, followed by hybridizations to the great apes, gorilla and orangutan, when rearrangements were detected. We observed that the position of telomere-associated genomic sequences has been only moderately conserved during primate evolution. YAC 364f9, specific for the subtelomeric long arm of human chromosome 3, contains an evolutionary inversion breakpoint that was involved in independent chromosome rearrangements in P. cristata and gorilla.

  9. Microfluidic extraction, stretching and analysis of human chromosomal DNA from single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Jaime J; Topolancik, Juraj; Tian, Harvey C; Wallin, Christopher B; Latulippe, David R; Szeto, Kylan; Murphy, Patrick J; Cipriany, Benjamin R; Levy, Stephen L; Soloway, Paul D; Craighead, Harold G

    2012-11-21

    We describe a microfluidic device for the extraction, purification and stretching of human chromosomal DNA from single cells. A two-dimensional array of micropillars in a microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane channel was designed to capture a single human cell. Megabase-long DNA strands released from the cell upon lysis are trapped in the micropillar array and stretched under optimal hydrodynamic flow conditions. Intact chromosomal DNA is entangled in the array, while other cellular components are washed from the channel. To demonstrate the entrapment principle, a single chromosome was hybridized to whole chromosome paints, and imaged by fluorescence microscopy. DNA extracted from a single cell and small cell populations (less than 100) was released from the device by restriction endonuclease digestion under continuous flow and collected for off-chip analysis. Quantification of the extracted material reveals that the microdevice efficiently extracts essentially all chromosomal DNA. The device described represents a novel platform to perform a variety of analyses on chromosomal DNA at the single cell level.

  10. Microfluidic extraction, stretching and analysis of human chromosomal DNA from single cells†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Jaime J.; Topolancik, Juraj; Tian, Harvey C.; Wallin, Christopher B.; Latulippe, David R.; Szeto, Kylan; Murphy, Patrick J.; Cipriany, Benjamin R.; Levy, Stephen L.; Soloway, Paul D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic device for the extraction, purification and stretching of human chromosomal DNA from single cells. A two-dimensional array of micropillars in a microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane channel was designed to capture a single human cell. Megabase-long DNA strands released from the cell upon lysis are trapped in the micropillar array and stretched under optimal hydrodynamic flow conditions. Intact chromosomal DNA is entangled in the array, while other cellular components are washed from the channel. To demonstrate the entrapment principle, a single chromosome was hybridized to whole chromosome paints, and imaged by fluorescence microscopy. DNA extracted from a single cell and small cell populations (less than 100) was released from the device by restriction endonuclease digestion under continuous flow and collected for offchip analysis. Quantification of the extracted material reveals that the microdevice efficiently extracts essentially all chromosomal DNA. The device described represents a novel platform to perform a variety of analyses on chromosomal DNA at the single cell level. PMID:23018789

  11. A second-generation YAC contig map of human chromosome 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, R M; Chumakov, I; Scott, P; Waggoner, B; Rigault, P; Cypser, J; Chen, Q; Weissenbach, J; Gardiner, K; Wang, H

    1995-09-28

    A map of human chromosome 3 which integrates both physical and genetic data has been developed from the fusion of two large collections of markers and corresponding yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones. The map contains 972 megabase-sized YACs identified with 593 primary markers, of which 162 are highly polymorphic sequence-tagged sites (STSs) and form a closely spaced genetic linkage map; the remaining markers are hybridization-based. Chromosome 3 is now represented by 24 large YAC contigs whose order and orientation is largely known. The map generated by fusion of these hybridization- and STS-based datasets covers about 80% (over 160 megabases) of the chromosome and will provide the foundation necessary for rapid development of a detailed genetic understanding for this large autosome.

  12. Early and Late Damages in Chromosome 3 of Human Lymphocytes After Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Kahdim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor formation in humans or animals is a multi-step process. An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. GI is defined as elevated or persistent genetic damages occurring many generations after the cells are exposed. While early studies have demonstrated radiation-induced GI in several cell types as detected in endpoints such as mutation, apoptosis and damages in chromosomes, the dependence of GI on the quality of radiation remains uncertain. To investigate GI in human lymphocytes induced by both low- and high-LET radiation, we initially exposed white blood cells collected from healthy subjects to gamma rays in vitro, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis post irradiation and at several intervals during the culture period. Among a number of biological endpoints planned for the project, the multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) allows identification of inversions that were expected to be stable. We present here early and late chromosome aberrations detected with mBAND in chromosome 3 after gamma exposure. Comparison of chromosome damages in between human lymphocytes and human epithelial cells is also discussed

  13. Developing de novo human artificial chromosomes in embryonic stem cells using HSV-1 amplicon technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralli, Daniela; Monaco, Zoia L

    2015-02-01

    De novo artificial chromosomes expressing genes have been generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) and are maintained following differentiation into other cell types. Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are small, functional, extrachromosomal elements, which behave as normal chromosomes in human cells. De novo HAC are generated following delivery of alpha satellite DNA into target cells. HAC are characterized by high levels of mitotic stability and are used as models to study centromere formation and chromosome organisation. They are successful and effective as gene expression vectors since they remain autonomous and can accommodate larger genes and regulatory regions for long-term expression studies in cells unlike other viral gene delivery vectors currently used. Transferring the essential DNA sequences for HAC formation intact across the cell membrane has been challenging for a number of years. A highly efficient delivery system based on HSV-1 amplicons has been used to target DNA directly to the ES cell nucleus and HAC stably generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) at high frequency. HAC were detected using an improved protocol for hESc chromosome harvesting, which consistently produced high-quality metaphase spreads that could routinely detect HAC in hESc. In tumour cells, the input DNA often integrated in the host chromosomes, but in the host ES genome, it remained intact. The hESc containing the HAC formed embryoid bodies, generated teratoma in mice, and differentiated into neuronal cells where the HAC were maintained. The HAC structure and chromatin composition was similar to the endogenous hESc chromosomes. This review will discuss the technological advances in HAC vector delivery using HSV-1 amplicons and the improvements in the identification of de novo HAC in hESc.

  14. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litt, M.; Kramer, P. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States); Kort, E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The CEPH consortium framework map of chromosome 11 is presented. The map was generated from CEPH family DNAs with 181 probe/enzyme combinations contributed by 20 laboratories. Seventy-seven of the loci are defined by microsatellite polymorphisms that can be typed by the PCR. A total of 42 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The female, male, and sex-average maps extend for 179.6, 110.8, and 145.3 cM, respectively. The largest interval on the sex-average map is less than 11 cM, and the average distance between uniquely placed loci is 4 cM. The genotypic data obtained for map construction have been used to identify the positions of crossovers on the chromosomes of CEPH family children, allowing the localization of new markers without computationally intensive likelihood models and providing a basis for efficient extension of the linkage map to higher resolution. 36 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, M; Kramer, P; Kort, E; Fain, P; Cox, S; Root, D; White, R; Weissenbach, J; Donis-Keller, H; Gatti, R

    1995-05-01

    The CEPH consortium framework map of chromosome 11 is presented. The map was generated from CEPH family DNAs with 181 probe/enzyme combinations contributed by 20 laboratories. Seventy-seven of the loci are defined by microsatellite polymorphisms that can be typed by the PCR. A total of 42 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The female, male, and sex-average maps extend for 179.6, 110.8, and 145.3 cM, respectively. The largest interval on the sex-average map is less than 11 cM, and the average distance between uniquely placed loci is 4 cM. The genotypic data obtained for map construction have been used to identify the positions of crossovers on the chromosomes of CEPH family children, allowing the localization of new markers without computationally intensive likelihood models and providing a basis for efficient extension of the linkage map to higher resolution.

  16. Specific chromosomal imbalances in human papillomavirus-transfected cells during progression toward immortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solinas-Toldo, Sabina; Dürst, Matthias; Lichter, Peter

    1997-01-01

    High risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) known to be closely associated with cervical cancer, such as HPV16 and HPV18, have the potential to immortalize human epithelial cells in culture. Four lines of HPV-transfected keratinocytes were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization at different time points after transfection. A number of chromosomal imbalances was found to be highly characteristic for the cultures progressing toward immortality. Whereas several of these were new and previously not found as recurrent aberrations in cervical tumors, some were identical to chromosomal changes observed during cervical carcinogenesis. The data put new emphasis on the studied cell system as a relevant model for HPV-induced pathogenesis. PMID:9108068

  17. Modified C-band technique for the analysis of chromosome abnormalities in irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Akifumi; Akiyama, Miho; Yamada, Yuji [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A., E-mail: myoshida@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    A modified C-band technique was developed in order to analyze more accurately dicentric, tricentric, and ring chromosomes in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes. Instead of the original method relying on treatment with barium hydroxide Ba(OH){sub 2}, C-bands were obtained using a modified form of heat treatment in formamide followed with DAPI staining. This method was tentatively applied to the analysis of dicentric chromosomes in irradiated human lymphocytes to examine its availability. The frequency of dicentric chromosome was almost the same with conventional Giemsa staining and the modified C-band technique. In the analysis using Giemsa staining, it is relatively difficult to identify the centromere on the elongated chromosomes, over-condensed chromosomes, fragment, and acentric ring. However, the modified C-band method used in this study makes it easier to identify the centromere on such chromosomes than with the use of Giemsa staining alone. Thus, the modified C-band method may give more information about the location of the centromere. Therefore, this method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation due to the analysis of the dicentric chromosome in human lymphocytes exposed to the radiation. Furthermore, this method is simpler and faster than the original C-band protocol and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method with the centromeric DNA probe. - Highlights: > The dicentric (dic) assay is the most effective for the radiation biodosimetry. > It is important to recognize the centromere of the dic. > We improved a C-band technique based on heat denaturation. > This technique enables the accurate detection of a centromere. > This method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation.

  18. A FISH approach for mapping the human genome using Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, R.S.; Chen, X.N.; Mitchell, S. [Univ. of Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    As the Human Genome Project progresses, large insert cloning vectors such as BACs, P1, and P1 Artificial Chromosomes (PACs) will be required to complement the YAC mapping efforts. The value of the BAC vector for physical mapping lies in the stability of the inserts, the lack of chimerism, the length of inserts (up to 300 kb), the ability to obtain large amounts of pure clone DNA and the ease of BAC manipulation. These features helped us design two approaches for generating physical mapping reagents for human genetic studies. The first approach is a whole genome strategy in which randomly selected BACs are mapped, using FISH, to specific chromosomal bands. To date, 700 BACs have been mapped to single chromosome bands at a resolution of 2-5 Mb in addition to BACs mapped to 14 different centromeres. These BACs represent more than 90 Mb of the genome and include >70% of all human chromosome bands at the 350-band level. These data revealed that >97% of the BACs were non-chimeric and have a genomic distribution covering most gaps in the existing YAC map with excellent coverage of gene-rich regions. In the second approach, we used YACs to identify BACs on chromosome 21. A 1.5 Mb contig between D21S339 and D21S220 nears completion within the Down syndrome congenital heart disease (DS-CHD) region. Seventeen BACs ranging in size from 80 kb to 240 kb were ordered using 14 STSs with FISH confirmation. We have also used 40 YACs spanning 21q to identify, on average, >1 BAC/Mb to provide molecular cytogenetic reagents and anchor points for further mapping. The contig generated on chromosome 21 will be helpful in isolating the genes for DS-CHD. The physical mapping reagents generated using the whole genome approach will provide cytogenetic markers and mapped genomic fragments that will facilitate positional cloning efforts and the identification of genes within most chromosomal bands.

  19. Identification of chromosomal errors in human preimplantation embryos with oligonucleotide DNA microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liang

    Full Text Available A previous study comparing the performance of different platforms for DNA microarray found that the oligonucleotide (oligo microarray platform containing 385K isothermal probes had the best performance when evaluating dosage sensitivity, precision, specificity, sensitivity and copy number variations border definition. Although oligo microarray platform has been used in some research fields and clinics, it has not been used for aneuploidy screening in human embryos. The present study was designed to use this new microarray platform for preimplantation genetic screening in the human. A total of 383 blastocysts from 72 infertility patients with either advanced maternal age or with previous miscarriage were analyzed after biopsy and microarray. Euploid blastocysts were transferred to patients and clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were measured. Chromosomes in some aneuploid blastocysts were further analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH to evaluate accuracy of the results. We found that most (58.1% of the blastocysts had chromosomal abnormalities that included single or multiple gains and/or losses of chromosome(s, partial chromosome deletions and/or duplications in both euploid and aneuploid embryos. Transfer of normal euploid blastocysts in 34 cycles resulted in 58.8% clinical pregnancy and 54.4% implantation rates. Examination of abnormal blastocysts by FISH showed that all embryos had matching results comparing microarray and FISH analysis. The present study indicates that oligo microarray conducted with a higher resolution and a greater number of probes is able to detect not only aneuploidy, but also minor chromosomal abnormalities, such as partial chromosome deletion and/or duplication in human embryos. Preimplantation genetic screening of the aneuploidy by DNA microarray is an advanced technology used to select embryos for transfer and improved embryo implantation can be obtained after transfer of the screened normal

  20. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 15q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowcock, A M; Barnes, R I; White, R L; Kruse, T A; Tsipouras, P; Sarfarazi, M; Jenkins, T; Viljoen, C; Litt, M; Kramer, P L

    1992-12-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 15q is presented. The map contains 41 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 45 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 10 laboratories. A total of 29 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from 15q13 to 15q25-qter. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 127, 190, and 158 cM, respectively. The largest interval is 21 cM and is between D15S37 and D15S74. The on-average locus spacing is 5.6 cM and the mean genetic distance between the 21 uniquely placed loci is 8 cM.

  1. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 15q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowcock, A.M.; Barnes, R.I. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)); White, R.L. (Univ. of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Kruse, T.A. (Aarhus Universitet (Denmark)); Tsipouras, P.; Sarfarazi, M. (Univ. of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT (United States)); Litt, M.; Kramer, P.L. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)); Jenkins, T.; Viljoen, C. (and others)

    1992-12-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 15q is presented. The map contains 41 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 45 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 10 laboratories. A total of 29 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from 15q13 to 15q25-qter. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 127, 190, and 158 cM, respectively. The largest interval is 21 cM and is between D15S37 and D15S74. The on-average locus spacing is 5.6 cM and the mean genetic distance between the 21 uniquely placed loci is 8 cM. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Search for a schizophrenia susceptibility locus of human chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coon, H.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J. [Univ. of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-15

    We used 10 highly informative DNA polymorphic markers and genetic linkage analysis to examine whether a gene locus predisposing to schizophrenia is located on chromosome 22, in 105 families with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. The LOD score method, including analysis for heterogeneity, provided no conclusive evidence of linkage under a dominant, recessive, or penetrance free model of inheritance. Affected sib-pair analysis was inconclusive. Affected Pedigree Member (APM) analysis gave only suggestive evidence for linkage. Multipoint APM analysis, using 4 adjacent loci including D22S281 and IL2RB, a region of interest from the APM analysis, gave non-significant results for the three different weighting functions. 18 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  3. Dysregulation of gene expression in the artificial human trisomy cells of chromosome 8 associated with transformed cell phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawata, Hisakatsu; Kashino, Genro; Tano, Keizo; Daino, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Yoshiya; Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Masami

    2011-01-01

    A change in chromosome number, known as aneuploidy, is a common characteristic of cancer. Aneuploidy disrupts gene expression in human cancer cells and immortalized human epithelial cells, but not in normal human cells. However, the relationship between aneuploidy and cancer remains unclear. To study the effects of aneuploidy in normal human cells, we generated artificial cells of human primary fibroblast having three chromosome 8 (trisomy 8 cells) by using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer technique. In addition to decreased proliferation, the trisomy 8 cells lost contact inhibition and reproliferated after exhibiting senescence-like characteristics that are typical of transformed cells. Furthermore, the trisomy 8 cells exhibited chromosome instability, and the overall gene expression profile based on microarray analyses was significantly different from that of diploid human primary fibroblasts. Our data suggest that aneuploidy, even a single chromosome gain, can be introduced into normal human cells and causes, in some cases, a partial cancer phenotype due to a disruption in overall gene expression.

  4. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  5. Damage of chromosoms under irradiation of human blood lymphocytes and development of bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetun, O V

    2016-12-01

    the research the distribution of radiation induced damages among chromosomes and their bands in irra diated in vitro human blood lymphocytes and in unirradiated bystander cells.Material and methods of research: cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by semi micromethod D.A. Hungerford, modeling of radiation induced bystander effect in mixed cultures consisting of irradiated in vitro and non irradiated blood lymphocytes from persons of different gender, GTG staining of metaphase chromosomes and their cytogenetic analysis. Break points in chromosomes under the formation of aberrations were identified in exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes in doses 0.25 Gy (95 breaks in 1248 cells) and 1.0 Gy (227 breaks in 726 cells) and in non irradiated bystander cells under their joint cultivation with irradiated in vitro human lymphocytes (51 breaks in 1137 cells at irradiation of adjacent populations of lymphocytes in dose 0.25 Gy and 75 breaks in 1321 cells at irradiation of adjacent population of lymphocytes in a dose 1.0 Gy). The distribution of injuries among the chromo somes and their bands was investigated. in radiation exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in bystander cells the fre quency of damaged bands and number of breaks which localized in them exceeded the control value (p bystander effect, chromosomes were damaged according to their relative length. Location of bands with increasing number of breaks coincided with the «hot spots» of chromosome damage following irradiation and fragile sites. More sensitive to damage were G negative euchromatin chromosome bands, in which were localized 82 88 % breaks. Damageability of telomeric regions in the irradiated cells had no significant difference from the control, while in bystander cells was lower than control value (p < 0.05). O. V. Shemetun.

  6. Linear increase of structural and numerical chromosome 9 abnormalities in human sperm regarding age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Mercè; Rajmil, Osvaldo; Egozcue, Josep; Templado, Cristina

    2003-10-01

    A simultaneous four-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) assay was used in human sperm in order to search for a paternal age effect on: (1) the incidence of structural aberrations and aneuploidy of chromosome 9, and (2) the sex ratio in both normal spermatozoa and spermatozoa with a numerical or structural abnormality of chromosome 9. The sperm samples were collected from 18 healthy donors, aged 24-74 years (mean 48.8 years old). Specific probes for the subtelomeric 9q region (9qter), centromeric regions of chromosomes 6 and 9, and the satellite III region of the Y chromosome were used for FISH analysis. A total of 190,117 sperms were evaluated with a minimum of 10,000 sperm scored from each donor. A significant linear increase in the overall level of duplications and deletions for the centromeric and subtelomeric regions of chromosome 9 (Pchromosome 9 disomy (Pchromosome 9 disomy, 18.8% for diploidy, and ranged from 14.6 to 28% for structural aberrations. Our results indicate a linear increase in structural aberrations and disomy for chromosome 9 in sperm with respect to age.

  7. Gender-specific gene expression in post-mortem human brain: localization to sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawter, Marquis P; Evans, Simon; Choudary, Prabhakara; Tomita, Hiroaki; Meador-Woodruff, Jim; Molnar, Margherita; Li, Jun; Lopez, Juan F; Myers, Rick; Cox, David; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Bunney, William E

    2004-02-01

    Gender differences in brain development and in the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression have been reported. Gender differences in human brain might be related to patterns of gene expression. Microarray technology is one useful method for investigation of gene expression in brain. We investigated gene expression, cell types, and regional expression patterns of differentially expressed sex chromosome genes in brain. We profiled gene expression in male and female dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and cerebellum using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platform. Differentially expressed genes between males and females on the Y chromosome (DBY, SMCY, UTY, RPS4Y, and USP9Y) and X chromosome (XIST) were confirmed using real-time PCR measurements. In situ hybridization confirmed the differential expression of gender-specific genes and neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY in three brain regions examined. The XIST gene, which silences gene expression on regions of the X chromosome, is expressed in a subset of neurons. Since a subset of neurons express gender-specific genes, neural subpopulations may exhibit a subtle sexual dimorphism at the level of differences in gene regulation and function. The distinctive pattern of neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY and other sex chromosome genes in neuronal subpopulations may possibly contribute to gender differences in prevalence noted for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of the protein expression of these sex-chromosome-linked genes in brain tissue are required to address the functional consequences of the observed gene expression differences.

  8. Colocalization of coregulated genes: a steered molecular dynamics study of human chromosome 19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Di Stefano

    Full Text Available The connection between chromatin nuclear organization and gene activity is vividly illustrated by the observation that transcriptional coregulation of certain genes appears to be directly influenced by their spatial proximity. This fact poses the more general question of whether it is at all feasible that the numerous genes that are coregulated on a given chromosome, especially those at large genomic distances, might become proximate inside the nucleus. This problem is studied here using steered molecular dynamics simulations in order to enforce the colocalization of thousands of knowledge-based gene sequences on a model for the gene-rich human chromosome 19. Remarkably, it is found that most (≈ 88% gene pairs can be brought simultaneously into contact. This is made possible by the low degree of intra-chromosome entanglement and the large number of cliques in the gene coregulatory network. A clique is a set of genes coregulated all together as a group. The constrained conformations for the model chromosome 19 are further shown to be organized in spatial macrodomains that are similar to those inferred from recent HiC measurements. The findings indicate that gene coregulation and colocalization are largely compatible and that this relationship can be exploited to draft the overall spatial organization of the chromosome in vivo. The more general validity and implications of these findings could be investigated by applying to other eukaryotic chromosomes the general and transferable computational strategy introduced here.

  9. Early and Late Chromosome Damages in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  10. Distribution of segmental duplications in the context of higher order chromatin organisation of human chromosome 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, Grit; Steininger, Anne; Weißmann, Robert

    2014-01-01

    such as the Williams-Beuren syndrome. Despite these adverse effects, SDs have become fixed in the human genome. Focusing on chromosome 7, which is particularly rich in interstitial SDs, we have investigated the distribution of SDs in the context of evolution and the three dimensional organisation of the chromosome...... sites during primate evolution, we can show by means of public data on long distance chromatin interactions that these three intervals, and consequently the paralogous SDs mapping to them, have retained their spatial proximity in the nucleus. Focusing on SD clusters implicated in the aetiology...... chromosome 7, either by promoting regional SD insertion or by contributing to the establishment of higher order chromatin organisation themselves. The latter could compensate for the high risk of structural rearrangements and thus may have contributed to their evolutionary fixation in the human genome....

  11. Unique signatures of natural background radiation on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Premi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most frequently observed major consequences of ionizing radiation are chromosomal lesions and cancers, although the entire genome may be affected. Owing to its haploid status and absence of recombination, the human Y chromosome is an ideal candidate to be assessed for possible genetic alterations induced by ionizing radiation. We studied the human Y chromosome in 390 males from the South Indian state of Kerala, where the level of natural background radiation (NBR is ten-fold higher than the worldwide average, and that from 790 unexposed males as control. RESULTS: We observed random microdeletions in the Azoospermia factor (AZF a, b and c regions in >90%, and tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism (CNP of 11 different Y-linked genes in about 80% of males exposed to NBR. The autosomal homologues of Y-linked CDY genes largely remained unaffected. Multiple polymorphic copies of the Y-linked genes showing single Y-specific signals suggested their tandem duplication. Some exposed males showed unilocus duplication of DAZ genes resulting in six copies. Notably, in the AZFa region, approximately 25% of exposed males showed deletion of the DBY gene, whereas flanking genes USP9Y and UTY remained unaffected. All these alterations were detected in blood samples but not in the germline (sperm samples. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to high levels of NBR correlated with several interstitial polymorphisms of the human Y chromosome. CNPs and enhanced transcription of the SRY gene after duplication are envisaged to compensate for the loss of Y chromosome in some cells. The aforesaid changes, confined to peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggest a possible innate mechanism protecting the germline DNA from the NBR. Genome analysis of a larger population focusing on greater numbers of genes may provide new insights into the mechanisms and risks of the resultant genetic damages. The present work demonstrates unique signatures of NBR on human Y chromosomes

  12. Application of next-generation sequencing for 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening of human preimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haiyan; Jin, Hua; Liu, Lian; Liu, Jianqiao; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy is a leading cause of repeat implantation failure and recurrent miscarriages. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) enables the assessment of the numeral and structural chromosomal errors of embryos before transfer in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has been demonstrated to be an accurate PGS method and in present thought to be the gold standard, but new technologies, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), continue to emerge. Validation of the new comprehensive NGS-based 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening technology is still needed to determine the preclinical accuracy before it might be considered as an alternative method for human PGS. In the present study, 43 human trophectoderm (TE) biopsy samples and 5 cytogenetically characterized cell lines (Coriell Cell Repositories) were tested. The same whole genome amplified product of each sample was blindly assessed with Veriseq NGS and Agilent aCGH to identify the aneuploidy status. The result showed that the NGS identified all abnormalities identified in aCGH including the numeral chromosomal abnormalities (again or loss) in the embryo samples and the structural (partial deletion and duplication) in the Coriell cell lines. Both technologies can identify a segmental imbalance as small as 1.8 Mb in size. Among the 41 TE samples with abnormal karyotypes in this study, eight (19.5 %) samples presented as multiple chromosome abnormalities. The abnormalities occurred to almost all chromosomes, except chromosome 6, 7, 17 and Y chromosome. Given its reliability and high level of consistency with an established aCGH methodology, NGS has demonstrated a robust high-throughput methodology ready for extensive clinical application in reproductive medicine, with potential advantages of reduced costs and enhanced precision. Then, a randomized controlled clinical trial confirming its clinical effectiveness is advisable to obtain a larger sequencing dataset

  13. Numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities detected in human sperm with a combination of multicolor FISH assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, A; Van Hummelen, P; Lowe, X R; Adler, I D; Wyrobek, A J

    1999-01-01

    A pair of multicolor FISH assays (X-Y-21 and A-M-16) was developed for human sperm to simultaneously measure sex ratios; aneuploidies involving chromosomes 1, 16, 21, X, and Y; meiotic diploidies; and structural aberrations involving chromosome 1p. Sex ratios in sperm were not significantly different from unity among healthy men. Baseline frequencies of disomic sperm for chromosomes 1, 8, and 21 were similar (6.7 per 10(4) sperm, 95% CI of 5.6-8.1), suggesting that among these three chromosomes, chromosome 21 was not especially prone to nondisjunction. Frequencies of disomy 16 sperm were significantly lower, however (3.5 per 10(4) sperm, 95% CI of 2.0-6.2; P chromosomes 16 and 21 were validated against aneuploidy data obtained by the hamster-egg technique for human sperm cytogenetics. The frequencies of X-X, Y-Y, X-Y ("Klinefelter") sperm and sex-null ("Turner") sperm were 5.5, 5.1, 5.5, and 7.8 per 10(4) sperm, respectively. For chromosomes 16 and 21, the frequencies of nullisomic and disomic sperm were similar, suggesting that gain and loss events occurred symmetrically. However, more gain than loss was reported for chromosomes 1, X, and Y. The frequency of MI and MII diploid sperm (with flagella) was approximately 12 per 10(4) (range 8.3-16.7 per 10(4) sperm). Based on flagella data, the frequency of somatic cells in the semen was estimated to be approximately 1.8 per 10(4) sperm. Loss or gain of a portion of chromosome-arm 1p occurred in 5.5 per 10(4) sperm, and the percentage of sperm carrying structural aberrations within the haploid genome as calculated from FISH (1.4%), was similar to that obtained with the hamster-egg technique. These complementary sperm FISH assays have promising applications in studies of chromosomally abnormal sperm after exposure to occupational, medical, and environmental toxicants.

  14. Neuropeptide Y receptor genes on human chromosome 4q31-q32 map to conserved linkage groups on mouse chromosomes 3 and 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, C.M.; Frankel, W.N. [Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States); Richards, J.E. [Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Npy1r and Npy2r, the genes encoding mouse type 1 and type 2 neuropeptide Y receptors, have been mapped by interspecific backcross analysis. Previous studies have localized the human genes encoding these receptors to chromosome 4q31-q32. We have now assigned Npy1r and Npy2r to conserved linkage groups on mouse Chr 8 and Chr 3, respectively, which correspond to the distal region of human chromosome 4q. Using yeast artificial chromosomes, we have estimated the distance between the human genes to be approximately 6 cM. Although ancient tandem duplication events may account for some closely spaced G-protein-coupled receptor genes, the large genetic distance between the human type 1 and type 2 neuropeptide Y receptor genes raises questions about whether this mechanism accounts for their proximity. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Orientation of loci within the human major histocompatibility complex by chromosomal in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, C C; Kirsch, I R; Nance, W E; Evans, G A; Korman, A J; Strominger, J L

    1984-05-01

    We have determined the localization and orientation of two genetic probes within the human major histocompatibility complex by chromosomal in situ hybridization. Our data indicate that a cloned genomic probe cross-hybridizing to HLA-A, -B, and -C heavy chain loci is homologous to sequences located on chromosome 6 at band p21.3 while a subclone of the genomic HLA-DR alpha-chain gene corresponding to the nonpolymorphic p34 protein is homologous to sequences in band 6p21.1. Our data suggest that this technique may permit the estimation of map distances between linked gene loci, assuming a uniform frequency of map units in the human genome. The relative positions of these genes was confirmed in a mother and son carrying a chromosome rearrangement involving 6p and 14p in which the sequences hybridizing to a DR alpha-chain genomic clone were found at the distal end of the 6p--chromosome [der(6)] while the sequences hybridizing to the HLA-A, -B, -C alpha-chain probe were found in the 14p+ chromosome [der(14)].

  16. Elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype of Bloom syndrome cells is complemented by human chromosome 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, L D; Schultz, R A

    1992-09-01

    Bloom syndrome (BSx) is a rare autosomal-recessive chromosome-instability disorder manifested by a constellation of clinical features including a significant predisposition to early onset of neoplasia. BSx cells display cytogenetic abnormalities, the pathognomonic feature being an increased rate of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), 10- to 15-fold more frequent than SCEs seen in control cells. Identification of the primary biochemical defect in BSx and its relationship to SCE frequency and neoplasia have been complicated by reports that BSx cell lines exhibit defects in the structure and/or activity of a number of different enzymes. The rare occurrence of the disorder and lack of informative families have precluded mapping of the primary defect by standard linkage analysis. We have utilized BSx cells as recipients for microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to map a locus that renders complementation of the elevated SCE phenotype. Studies with the BSx cell line GM08505 demonstrated a stable frequency of SCEs 10-fold higher than control values, offering a phenotype suitable for complementation studies. Transfer of different independent human chromosomes from somatic cell hybrids into BSx cells permitted identification of a single chromosome that dramatically reduced the SCE frequency to a level near that seen in control cells. Detailed characterization revealed this complementing element to be human chromosome 15.

  17. Cloning, chromosome localization and features of a novel human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We report cloning and some features of a novel human gene, MATH2, which encodes a protein of 337 amino acid residues with a basic helix–loop–helix domain and exhibits 98% similarity to mouse Math2. Results of Northern blot analysis revealed two transcripts of the MATH2 gene of 1.7 kb and 2.4 kb in human brain.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human Cytomegalovirus Strain AD169 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone

    OpenAIRE

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Spohn, Michael; Indenbirken, Daniela; Brune, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of the human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 (variant ATCC) cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (AD169-BAC, also known as HB15 or pHB15) was determined. The viral genome has a length of 230,290?bp and shows 52 nucleotide differences compared to a previously sequenced AD169varATCC clone.

  19. The inactive X chromosome in the human female is enriched in 5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 82; Issue 1-2. The inactive X chromosome in the human female is enriched in 5-methylcytosine to an unusual degree and appears to contain more of this modified nucleotide than the remainder of the genome. Deepti D. Deobagkar H. Sharat Chandra. Volume 82 Issue 1-2 ...

  20. Students as "Humans Chromosomes" in Role-Playing Mitosis and Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Joseph P.; Yue, Joyce W.; Torres, Kieron M.

    2004-01-01

    Students often find it challenging to understand mitosis and meiosis and determine their processes. To develop an easier way to understand these terms, students are asked to role-play mitosis and meiosis and students themselves act as human chromosomes, which help students to learn differences between mitosis and meiosis.

  1. Chromosomal Aberrations in Canine Gliomas Define Candidate Genes and Common Pathways in Dogs and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Peter J; York, Dan; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A; Joshi, Nikhil; Bannasch, Danika

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous gliomas in dogs occur at a frequency similar to that in humans and may provide a translational model for therapeutic development and comparative biological investigations. Copy number alterations in 38 canine gliomas, including diffuse astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligoastrocytomas, were defined using an Illumina 170K single nucleotide polymorphism array. Highly recurrent alterations were seen in up to 85% of some tumor types, most notably involving chromosomes 13, 22, and 38, and gliomas clustered into 2 major groups consisting of high-grade IV astrocytomas, or oligodendrogliomas and other tumors. Tumor types were characterized by specific broad and focal chromosomal events including focal loss of the INK4A/B locus in glioblastoma and loss of the RB1 gene and amplification of the PDGFRA gene in oligodendrogliomas. Genes associated with the 3 critical pathways in human high-grade gliomas (TP53, RB1, and RTK/RAS/PI3K) were frequently associated with canine aberrations. Analysis of oligodendrogliomas revealed regions of chromosomal losses syntenic to human 1p involving tumor suppressor genes, such as CDKN2C, as well as genes associated with apoptosis, autophagy, and response to chemotherapy and radiation. Analysis of high frequency chromosomal aberrations with respect to human orthologues may provide insight into both novel and common pathways in gliomagenesis and response to therapy. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A First Generation Comparative Chromosome Map between Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Svetlana A; Perelman, Polina L; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Serdyukova, Natalia A; Li, Tangliang; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ng, Bee L; Nie, Wenhui; Liehr, Thomas; Stanyon, Roscoe; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Yang, Fengtang

    2015-01-01

    The domesticated guinea pig, Cavia porcellus (Hystricomorpha, Rodentia), is an important laboratory species and a model for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, genomic tools for this species are lacking; even its karyotype is poorly characterized. The guinea pig belongs to Hystricomorpha, a widespread and important group of rodents; so far the chromosomes of guinea pigs have not been compared with that of other hystricomorph species or with any other mammals. We generated full sets of chromosome-specific painting probes for the guinea pig by flow sorting and microdissection, and for the first time, mapped the chromosomal homologies between guinea pig and human by reciprocal chromosome painting. Our data demonstrate that the guinea pig karyotype has undergone extensive rearrangements: 78 synteny-conserved human autosomal segments were delimited in the guinea pig genome. The high rate of genome evolution in the guinea pig may explain why the HSA7/16 and HSA16/19 associations presumed ancestral for eutherians and the three syntenic associations (HSA1/10, 3/19, and 9/11) considered ancestral for rodents were not found in C. porcellus. The comparative chromosome map presented here is a starting point for further development of physical and genetic maps of the guinea pig as well as an aid for genome assembly assignment to specific chromosomes. Furthermore, the comparative mapping will allow a transfer of gene map data from other species. The probes developed here provide a genomic toolkit, which will make the guinea pig a key species to unravel the evolutionary biology of the Hystricomorph rodents.

  3. Misregulation of Scm3p/HJURP causes chromosome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant K Mishra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinetochore (centromeric DNA and associated proteins is a key determinant for high fidelity chromosome transmission. Evolutionarily conserved Scm3p is an essential component of centromeric chromatin and is required for assembly and function of kinetochores in humans, fission yeast, and budding yeast. Overexpression of HJURP, the mammalian homolog of budding yeast Scm3p, has been observed in lung and breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis; however, the physiological relevance of these observations is not well understood. We overexpressed SCM3 and HJURP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and HJURP in human cells and defined domains within Scm3p that mediate its chromosome loss phenotype. Our results showed that the overexpression of SCM3 (GALSCM3 or HJURP (GALHJURP caused chromosome loss in a wild-type yeast strain, and overexpression of HJURP led to mitotic defects in human cells. GALSCM3 resulted in reduced viability in kinetochore mutants, premature separation of sister chromatids, and reduction in Cse4p and histone H4 at centromeres. Overexpression of CSE4 or histone H4 suppressed chromosome loss and restored levels of Cse4p at centromeres in GALSCM3 strains. Using mutant alleles of scm3, we identified a domain in the N-terminus of Scm3p that mediates its interaction with CEN DNA and determined that the chromosome loss phenotype of GALSCM3 is due to centromeric association of Scm3p devoid of Cse4p/H4. Furthermore, we determined that similar to other systems the centromeric association of Scm3p is cell cycle regulated. Our results show that altered stoichiometry of Scm3p/HJURP, Cse4p, and histone H4 lead to defects in chromosome segregation. We conclude that stringent regulation of HJURP and SCM3 expression are critical for genome stability.

  4. A First Generation Comparative Chromosome Map between Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A Romanenko

    Full Text Available The domesticated guinea pig, Cavia porcellus (Hystricomorpha, Rodentia, is an important laboratory species and a model for a number of human diseases. Nevertheless, genomic tools for this species are lacking; even its karyotype is poorly characterized. The guinea pig belongs to Hystricomorpha, a widespread and important group of rodents; so far the chromosomes of guinea pigs have not been compared with that of other hystricomorph species or with any other mammals. We generated full sets of chromosome-specific painting probes for the guinea pig by flow sorting and microdissection, and for the first time, mapped the chromosomal homologies between guinea pig and human by reciprocal chromosome painting. Our data demonstrate that the guinea pig karyotype has undergone extensive rearrangements: 78 synteny-conserved human autosomal segments were delimited in the guinea pig genome. The high rate of genome evolution in the guinea pig may explain why the HSA7/16 and HSA16/19 associations presumed ancestral for eutherians and the three syntenic associations (HSA1/10, 3/19, and 9/11 considered ancestral for rodents were not found in C. porcellus. The comparative chromosome map presented here is a starting point for further development of physical and genetic maps of the guinea pig as well as an aid for genome assembly assignment to specific chromosomes. Furthermore, the comparative mapping will allow a transfer of gene map data from other species. The probes developed here provide a genomic toolkit, which will make the guinea pig a key species to unravel the evolutionary biology of the Hystricomorph rodents.

  5. Direct amplification of a single dissected chromosomal segment by polymerase chain reaction: a human brain sodium channel gene is on chromosome 2q22-q23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J A; Lu, C M; Brown, G B; Rado, T A

    1991-01-01

    We have devised a general strategy for gene mapping based upon the direct amplification of a target sequence within a single microdissected Giemsa-banded chromosomal segment using the polymerase chain reaction. The usefulness of this approach was demonstrated by mapping a cloned human brain sodium channel (alpha subunit) gene sequence to chromosome 2q22-q23. When DNA from single, dissected chromosome segments 2q21-qter and 2q24-pter were used as templates, a sodium channel-specific 172-base-pair polymerase chain reaction product was obtained. This product was not synthesized when segments 2q21-pter and 2q24-qter were used. Chromosome microdissection-polymerase chain reaction is not only a simple, fast, and accurate method for gene mapping but also may offer significant advantages for other applications, such as cancer cytogenetics and linkage analysis. Images PMID:1846440

  6. Digging deeper into East African human Y chromosome lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Verónica; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Amorim, António; Carracedo, Angel; Gusmão, Leonor

    2010-03-01

    The most significant and widely studied remodeling of the African genetic landscape is the Bantu expansion, which led to an almost total replacement of the previous populations from the sub-Saharan region. However, a poor knowledge exists about other population movements, namely, the Nilotic migration, which is a pastoralist dispersal that, contrary to the Bantu expansion, impacted only East African populations. Here, samples from a Ugandan Nilotic-speaking population were studied for 37 Y chromosome-specific SNPs, and the obtained data were compared with those already available for other sub-Saharan population groups. Although Uganda lies on the fringe of both Bantu and Nilotic expansions, a low admixture with Bantu populations was detected, with haplogroups carrying M13, M182 and M75 mutations prevailing in Nilotes together with a low frequency of the main Bantu haplogroups from clade E1b1a-M2. The results of a comparative analysis with data from other population groups allowed a deeper characterization of some lineages in our sample, clarifying some doubts about the origin of some particular Y-SNPs in different ethnic groups, such as M150, M112 and M75. Moreover, it was also possible to identify a new Y-SNP apparently specific to Nilotic groups, as well as the presence of particular haplogroups that characterize Nilotic populations. The detection of a new haplogroup B2a1b defined by G1, could be, therefore, important to differentiate Nilotes from other groups, helping to trace migration and admixture events that occurred in eastern Africa.

  7. The gene for death agonist BID maps to the region of human 22q11.2 duplicated in cat eye syndrome chromosomes and to mouse chromosome 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footz, T K; Birren, B; Minoshima, S; Asakawa, S; Shimizu, N; Riazi, M A; McDermid, H E

    1998-08-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is associated with a duplication of a segment of human chromosome 22q11.2. Only one gene, ATP6E, has been previously mapped to this duplicated region. We now report the mapping of the human homologue of the apoptotic agonist Bid to human chromosome 22 near locus D22S57 in the CES region. Dosage analysis demonstrated that BID is located just distal to the CES region critical for the majority of malformations associated with the syndrome (CESCR), as previously defined by a single patient with an unusual supernumerary chromosome. However, BID remains a good candidate for involvement in CES-related mental impairment, and its overexpression may subtly add to the phenotype of CES patients. Our mapping of murine Bid confirms that the synteny of the CESCR and the 22q11 deletion syndrome critical region immediately telomeric on human chromosome 22 is not conserved in mice. Bid and adjacent gene Atp6e were found to map to mousechromosome 6, while the region homologous to the DGSCR is known to map to mouse chromosome 16. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  8. Chromosomal localization of the human heme oxygenase genes: Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) maps to chromosome 22q12 and heme oxygenase-2 (HMOX2) maps to chromosome 16p13. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutty, R.K.; Kutty, G.; Rodriguez, I.R.; Chader, G.J.; Wiggert, B. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Heme oxygenase catalyzes the oxidation of heme to biliverdin, the precursor of the bile pigment bilirubin, and carbon monoxide, a putative neurotransmitter. The authors have employed polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine the chromosome localization of the genes coding for the two known heme oxygenase isozymes. Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), the inducible form, was localized to human chromosome 22q12, while heme oxygenase-2 (HMOX2), the constitutive form, was localized to chromosome 16p13.3. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  9. A radiation hybrid map of 506 STS markers spanning human chromosome 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, M R; Richard, C W; Schott, J J; Yousry, C; Clark, K; Bell, J; Terwilliger, J D; Hazan, J; Dubay, C; Vignal, A

    1994-09-01

    We present a high resolution radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 11 using 506 sequence tagged sites (STSs) scored on a panel of 86 radiation hybrids. The 506 STSs fall into 299 unique positions (average resolution of about 480 kilobases (kb)) that span the whole chromosome. A subset of 260 STSs (143 positions) form a framework map that has a resolution of approximately 1 megabase between adjacent positions and is ordered with odds of at least 1,000:1. The centromere was clearly defined with pericentric markers unambiguously assigned to the short or long arm. The map contains most genes (125) and expressed sequence tags (26) currently assigned to chromosome 11 and more than half of the STSs are polymorphic microsatellite loci. These markers and the map can be used for high resolution physical and genetic mapping.

  10. Reactivation of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 by telomeric circle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupesh K Prusty

    Full Text Available More than 95% of the human population is infected with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 during early childhood and maintains latent HHV-6 genomes either in an extra-chromosomal form or as a chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. In addition, approximately 1% of humans are born with an inheritable form of ciHHV-6 integrated into the telomeres of chromosomes. Immunosuppression and stress conditions can reactivate latent HHV-6 replication, which is associated with clinical complications and even death. We have previously shown that Chlamydia trachomatis infection reactivates ciHHV-6 and induces the formation of extra-chromosomal viral DNA in ciHHV-6 cells. Here, we propose a model and provide experimental evidence for the mechanism of ciHHV-6 reactivation. Infection with Chlamydia induced a transient shortening of telomeric ends, which subsequently led to increased telomeric circle (t-circle formation and incomplete reconstitution of circular viral genomes containing single viral direct repeat (DR. Correspondingly, short t-circles containing parts of the HHV-6 DR were detected in cells from individuals with genetically inherited ciHHV-6. Furthermore, telomere shortening induced in the absence of Chlamydia infection also caused circularization of ciHHV-6, supporting a t-circle based mechanism for ciHHV-6 reactivation.

  11. Cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} gene in human and rat: Chromosomal localization and polymorphic markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, A.; Simon, J.S.; Jacob, H.J. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The authors report the chromosomal localization and a simple sequence repeat (SSR) in the cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) gene in both human and rat. A (CA){sub 18} repeat in the promoter of the rat gene was determined to exhibit length polymorphism when analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 19 different inbred rat strains. Genotyping for this marker in 234 F{sub 2} progeny of a SHRXBN intercross mapped the gene to rat chromosome 13. Using a PCR strategy, a fragment of the promoter for the human gene was isolated, and a (CA){sub 18} repeat was identified. Since this marker displayed a low heterozygosity index, they also identified a mononucleotide repeat in the promoter for cPLA{sub 2} that displayed a polymorphism information content value of 0.76. The human gene was mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosome 1q25. Of interest, the gene encoding the enzyme prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (cyclooxygenase-2), which acts on the arachidonic acid product of cPLA{sub 2}, was previously localized to this same chromosomal region, raising the possibility of coordinate regulation. Identification of intragenic markers may facilitate studies of polymorphic variants of these genes as candidates for disorders in which perturbations of the eicosanoid cascade may play a role. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Genetic aspects of human male infertility: the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in severe male factor infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicdan, Arzu; Vicdan, Kubilay; Günalp, Serdar; Kence, Aykut; Akarsu, Cem; Işik, Ahmet Zeki; Sözen, Eran

    2004-11-10

    The main purpose of this study is to detect the frequency and type of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in patients with severe male factor infertility and fertile control subjects. The association between the genetic abnormality and clinical parameters was also evaluated. This study was carried out in 208 infertile and 20 fertile men. Results of 208 patients, 119 had non-obstructive azoospermia and 89 had severe oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT). Seventeen out of 119 (14.3%) azoospermic patients and two out of 89 (2.2%) patients with OAT had Y chromosome microdeletions. In total, 19 cases with deletions were detected in 208 infertile men, with a frequency of 9.1%. The AZFc locus, mainly DAZ gene cluster was the most frequently deleted region. Five other cases with azoospermia (4.2%) and two cases with OAT (2.2%) had a chromosomal abnormality, with a total number of seven (3.4%). Including Y chromosome deletions and structural chromosome abnormalities, the rate of genetic abnormalities was 12.5% (26/208) in our patients. On the other hand, 20 men with proven fertility and fathers of five cases with microdeletions were genetically normal. Y chromosome deletions and chromosomal abnormalities were associated with various histological alterations in testis. Sertoli cell-only (SCO) syndrome and maturation arrest predominated in these cases, whereas hypospermatogenesis occurred more frequently in genetically normal patients. Various chromosomal abnormalities and deletions of Y chromosome can cause spermatogenic breakdown resulting in chromosomally derived infertility. All these findings strongly support the recommendation of genetic screening of infertile patients.

  13. Genomic Instability in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Arises from Replicative Stress and Chromosome Condensation Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Noa; Ben-David, Uri; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Storchová, Zuzana; Benvenisty, Nissim; Kerem, Batsheva

    2016-02-04

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) frequently acquire chromosomal aberrations such as aneuploidy in culture. These aberrations progressively increase over time and may compromise the properties and clinical utility of the cells. The underlying mechanisms that drive initial genomic instability and its continued progression are largely unknown. Here, we show that aneuploid hPSCs undergo DNA replication stress, resulting in defective chromosome condensation and segregation. Aneuploid hPSCs show altered levels of actin cytoskeletal genes controlled by the transcription factor SRF, and overexpression of SRF rescues impaired chromosome condensation and segregation defects in aneuploid hPSCs. Furthermore, SRF downregulation in diploid hPSCs induces replication stress and perturbed condensation similar to that seen in aneuploid cells. Together, these results suggest that decreased SRF expression induces replicative stress and chromosomal condensation defects that underlie the ongoing chromosomal instability seen in aneuploid hPSCs. A similar mechanism may also operate during initiation of instability in diploid cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Karyotyping of Chromosomes in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Transformed by High Energy Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Park, Seongmi; Story, Michael D.; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer induced from exposures to space radiation is one of the most significant health risks for long-term space travels. Evidences show that low- and high- Linear energy transfer (LET)-induced transformation of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) that are immortalized through the expression of Cdk4 and hTERT. The cells were exposed to gamma rays and high-energy Fe ions for the selection of transformed clones. Transformed HBEC are identified and analyzed chromosome aberrations (i.e. genomic instability) using the multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (mFISH), as well as the multi-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) techniques. Our results show chromosomal translocations between different chromosomes and several of the breaks occurred in the q-arm of chromosome 3. We also identified copy number variations between the transformed and the parental HBEC regardless of the exposure conditions. We observed chromosomal aberrations in the lowand high-LET radiation-induced transformed clones and they are imperfectly different from clones obtain in spontaneous soft agar growth.

  15. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M.; Huntley, Miriam H.; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K.; Durand, Neva C.; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P.; Lander, Eric S.; Chadwick, Brian P.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-01-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the “Barr body.” Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called “superdomains,” such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called “superloops.” DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4. We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  16. Dose Assessment using Chromosome Aberration Analyses in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The healthy five donors were recruited to establish the dose-response calibration curve for chromosomal aberrations by ionizing radiation exposure. Our cytogenetic results revealed that the mean frequency of chromosome aberration increased with increasing radiation dose. In this study, dicentric assay and CBMN assay were compared considering the sensitivity and accuracy of dose estimation. Therefore, these chromosome aberration analyses will be the foundation for biological dosimetric analysis with additional research methods such as translocation and PCC assay. The conventional analysis of dicentric chromosomes in HPBL was suggested by Bender and Gooch in 1962. This assay has been for many years, the golden standard and the most specific method for ionizing radiation damage. The dicentric assay technique in HPBL has been shown as the most sensitive biological method and reliable bio-indicator of quantifying the radiation dose. In contrast, the micronucleus assay has advantages over the dicentric assay since it is rapid and requires less specialized expertise, and accordingly it can be applied to monitor a big population. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is a suitable method for micronuceli measurement in cultured human as well as mammalian cells. The aim of our study was to establish the dose response curve of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in HPBL by analyzing the frequency of dicentrics and micronuclei.

  17. Amplification and chromosomal dispersion of human endogenous retroviral sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, P.E.; Martin, M.A.; Rabson, A.B.; Bryan, T.; O' Brien, S.J.

    1986-09-01

    Endogenous retroviral sequences have undergone amplification events involving both viral and flanking cellular sequences. The authors cloned members of an amplified family of full-length endogenous retroviral sequences. Genomic blotting, employing a flanking cellular DNA probe derived from a member of this family, revealed a similar array of reactive bands in both humans and chimpanzees, indicating that an amplification event involving retroviral and associated cellular DNA sequences occurred before the evolutionary separation of these two primates. Southern analyses of restricted somatic cell hybrid DNA preparations suggested that endogenous retroviral segments are widely dispersed in the human genome and that amplification and dispersion events may be linked.

  18. A DNA fragment from the human X chromosome short arm which detects a partially homologous sequence on the Y chromosomes long arm.

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, M; Camerino, G.; Heilig, R; Mandel, J L

    1984-01-01

    An X linked human DNA fragment (named DXS31 ) which detects partially homologous sequences on the Y chromosome has been isolated. Regional localisation of the two sex linked sequences was determined using a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. The X specific sequence is located at the tip of the short arm ( Xp22 .3-pter), i.e. within or close to the region which pairs with the Y chromosome short arm at meiosis. However the Y specific sequence is located in the heterochromatic region of...

  19. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N.; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sex and sex-chromosome dosage (SCD) are known to modulate human brain size and cortical anatomy, but very little is known regarding their impact on subcortical structures that work with the cortex to subserve a range of behaviors in health and disease. Moreover

  20. Chromosomal mapping of the human M6 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olinsky, S.; Loop, B.T.; DeKosky, A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    M6 is a neuronal membrane glycoprotein that may have an important role in neural development. This molecule was initially defined by a monoclonal antibody that affected the survival of cultured cerebellar neurons and the outgrowth of neurites. The nature of the antigen was discovered by expression cDNA cloning using this monoclonal antibody. Two distinct murine M6 cDNAs (designated M6a and M6b) whose deduced amino acid sequences were remarkably similar to that of the myelin proteolipid protein human cDNA and genomic clones encoding M6a and M6b and have characterized them by restriction mapping, Southern hybridization with cDNA probes, and sequence analysis. We have localized these genes within the human genome by FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). The human M6a gene is located at 4q34, and the M6b gene is located at Xp22.2 A number of human neurological disorders have been mapped to the Xp22 region, including Aicardi syndrome (MIM 304050), Rett syndrome (MIM 312750), X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (MIM 302801), and X-linked mental retardation syndromes (MRX1, MIM 309530). This raises the possibility that a defect in the M6b gene is responsible for one of these neurological disorders. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Assignment of human xanthine dehydrogenase gene to chromosome 2p33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ping; Huecksteadt, T.P.; Hoidal, J.R. [Univ. of Utah and VA Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH, EC 1.1.1.204) oxidizes a variety of purines, pterins, and other heterogenic nitrogen compounds, serving as a rate-limiting enzyme in nucleic acid degradation. The genetic defect of XDH results in hereditary xanthinuria and other disorders in purine metabolism. Based on the cloning and sequencing results of human XDH cDNA in our laboratory, we studied the localization and sublocalization of the XDH gene. A Version 3.0 human-hamster somatic cell hybrid PCRable DNA panel and specific PCR primers derived from human XDH cDNA for amplification were used to assign the XDH gene to human chromosome 2. The fidelity of the PCR product was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing the PCR product. The assignment of the XDH gene to chromosome 2 at band p22 was established by fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using a clone from a pWE 15 cosmid library containing the XDH gene. The results should be useful for further studies of the molecular basis for hereditary xanthinuria and other genetic disorders related to abnormal XDH activity. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Tissue-specific expression of the human laminin alpha5-chain, and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 and to distal mouse chromosome 2 near the locus for the ragged (Ra) mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1997-01-01

    , heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The human laminin alpha5-chain gene (LAMA5) was assigned to chromosome 20q13.2-q13.3 by in situ hybridization, and the mouse gene (Lama5) was mapped by linkage analysis to a syntonic region of distal chromosome 2, close to the locus for the ragged (Ra......) mutation....

  3. An integrated YAC-overlap and 'cosmid-pocket' map of the human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizetić, D; Gellen, L; Hamvas, R M; Mott, R; Grigoriev, A; Vatcheva, R; Zehetner, G; Yaspo, M L; Dutriaux, A; Lopes, C

    1994-05-01

    We describe here the construction of an ordered clone map of human chromosome 21, based on the identification of ordered sets of YAC clones covering > 90% of the chromosome, and their use to identify groups of cosmid clones (cosmid pockets) localised to subregions defined by the YAC clone map. This is to our knowledge the highest resolution map of one human chromosome to date, localising 530 YAC clones covering both arms of the chromosome, spanning > 36 Mbp, and localising more than 6300 cosmids to 145 intervals on both arms of the chromosome. The YAC contigs have been formed by hybridising a 6.1 equivalents chromosome 21 enriched YAC collection displayed on arrayed nylon membranes to a series of 115 DNA markers and Alu-PCR products from YACs. Forty eight mega-YACs from the previously published CEPH-Genethon map of sequence tagged sites (STS) have also been included in the contig building experiments. A YAC tiling path was then size-measured and confirmed by gel-fingerprinting. A minimal tiling path of 70 YACs were then used as probes against the 7.5 genome equivalents flow sorted chromosome 21 cosmid library in order to identify the lists of cosmids mapping to alternating shared--non-shared intervals between overlapping YACs ('cosmid pockets'). For approximately 1/5 of the minimal tiling path of YACs, locations and non-chimaerism have been confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and approximately 1/5 of all cosmid pocket assignments have independent, confirmatory marker hybridizations in the ICRF cosmid reference library system. We also demonstrate that 'pockets' contain overlapping sets of cosmids (cosmid contigs). In addition to being an important logical intermediate step between the YAC maps published so far and a future map of completely ordered cosmids, this map provides immediately available low-complexity cosmid material for high resolution FISH mapping of chromosomal aberrations on interphase nuclei, and for rapid positional isolation of

  4. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 gene maps to the Down syndrome region of human chromosome 21 and is overexpressed in mouse trisomy 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pash, J.; Popescu, N.; Matocha, M.; Rapoport, S.; Bustin, M. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The gene for human high-mobility-group (HMG) chromosomal protein HMG-14 is located in region 21q22.3, a region associated with the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, one of the most prevalent human birth defects. The expression of this gene is analyzed in mouse embryos that are trisomic in chromosome 16 and are considered to be an animal model for Down syndrome. RNA blot-hybridization analysis and detailed analysis of HMG-14 protein levels indicate that mouse trisomy 16 embryos have approximately 1.5 times more HMG-14 mRNA and protein than their normal littermates, suggesting a direct gene dosage effect. The HMG-14 gene may be an additional marker for the Down syndrome. Chromosomal protein HMG-14 is a nucleosomal binding protein that may confer distinct properties to the chromatin structure of transcriptionally active genes and therefore may be a contributing factor in the etiology of the syndrome.

  5. Nerve growth factor receptor gene is at human chromosome region 17q12-17q22, distal to the chromosome 17 breakpoint in acute leukemias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, K.; Isobe, M.; Chao, M.; Bothwell, M.; Ross, A.H.; Finan, J.; Hoxie, J.A.; Sehgal, A.; Buck, C.R.; Lanahan, A.

    1986-03-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones for the human nerve growth factor receptor have been used in conjunction with somatic cell hybrid analysis and in situ hybridization to localize the nerve growth factor receptor locus to human chromosome region 17q12-q22. Additionally, part, if not all, of the nerve growth factor receptor locus is present on the translocated portion of 17q (17q21-qter) from a poorly differential acute leukemia in which the chromosome 17 breakpoint was indistinguishable cytogenetically from the 17 breakpoint observed in the t(15;17)(q22;q21) translocation associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Thus the nerve growth factor receptor locus may be closely distal to the acute promyelocytic leukemia-associated chromosome 17 breakpoint at 17q21.

  6. Delayed Numerical Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblasts by Low Dose of Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hee Cho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced genomic instability refers to a type of damage transmitted over many generations following irradiation. This delayed impact of radiation exposure may pose a high risk to human health and increases concern over the dose limit of radiation exposure for both the public and radiation workers. Therefore, the development of additional biomarkers is still needed for the detection of delayed responses following low doses of radiation exposure. In this study, we examined the effect of X-irradiation on delayed induction of numerical chromosomal aberrations in normal human fibroblasts irradiated with 20, 50 and 100 cGy of X-rays using the micronucleus-centromere assay. Frequencies of centromere negative- and positive-micronuclei, and aneuploidy of chromosome 1 and 4 were analyzed in the surviving cells at 28, 88 and 240 h after X-irradiation. X-irradiation increased the frequency of micronuclei (MN in a dose-dependent manner in the cells at all measured time-points, but no significant differences in MN frequency among cell passages were observed. Aneuploid frequency of chromosomes 1 and 4 increased with radiation doses, and a significantly higher frequency of aneuploidy was observed in the surviving cells analyzed at 240 h compared to 28 h. These results indicate that low-dose of X-irradiation can induce delayed aneuploidy of chromosomes 1 and 4 in normal fibroblasts.

  7. [Frequency of various mini- and micro-satellite sequences in DNA of human chromosome 13].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryskov, A P; Kupriianova, N S; Kapanadze, B I; Nechvolodov, K K; Pozmogova, G E; Prosniak, M I; Iankovskiĭ, N K

    1993-10-01

    The frequency of specific mini- and micro-satellites known also as short tandem repeated sequences (STR) in the human 13 chromosome was estimated by hybridization of STR core oligonucleotides to recombinant cosmid clones transferred to a grid from a human 13 chromosome specific cosmid library ICRF Lawrist 4 C108 (DN L4/HS 13). Oligonucleotides: M13 and Jeffreys minisatellite core sequences and micro-satellite core sequences (TCC)5, (CAC)5, and (GACA)4 were [gamma-32P] end labeled and hybridized to membrane filters carrying good ordered cosmid clones. It was shown that great number of all these mini- and micro-satellite copies (besides of Jeffreys minisatellite) are spread independently along the 13th chromosome. It was also estimated that two or more (GACA)n blocks present in the same cosmid (i.e. on the stretch of 40-50 kb) forming similar groups of clustered micro-satellites. The interesting peculiarity has been recorded that some (GACA)n+ cosmids are also hybridizable to conservative 28SrDNA 3'-fragment that indicates that (GACA)n localization in the nucleoli area. As the result of it we began the creation of a new highly polymorphic markers collections for these chromosome.

  8. Comparative Genomic Sequence Analysis of the Human Chromosome 21 Down Syndrome Critical Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hideki; Taylor, Todd D.; Ito, Takehiko; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Reeves, Roger H.; Hattori, Masahira

    2002-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of the gene content of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) is essential for understanding the etiology of Down syndrome (DS). Here we report the largest comparison of finished mouse and human sequence to date for a 1.35-Mb region of mouse chromosome 16 (MMU16) that corresponds to human chromosome 21q22.2. This includes a portion of the commonly described “DS critical region,” thought to contain a gene or genes whose dosage imbalance contributes to a number of phenotypes associated with DS. We used comparative sequence analysis to construct a DNA feature map of this region that includes all known genes, plus 144 conserved sequences ≥100 bp long that show ≥80% identity between mouse and human but do not match known exons. Twenty of these have matches to expressed sequence tag and cDNA databases, indicating that they may be transcribed sequences from chromosome 21. Eight putative CpG islands are found at conserved positions. Models for two human genes, DSCR4 and DSCR8, are not supported by conserved sequence, and close examination indicates that low-level transcripts from these loci are unlikely to encode proteins. Gene prediction programs give different results when used to analyze the well-conserved regions between mouse and human sequences. Our findings have implications for evolution and for modeling the genetic basis of DS in mice. [Sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the DDBJ/GenBank under accession nos. AP003148 through AP003158, and AB066227. Supplemental material is available at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:12213769

  9. Chromosome loss caused by DNA fragmentation induced in main nuclei and micronuclei of human lymphoblastoid cells treated with colcemid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mika; Wakata, Akihiro; Aoki, Yoshinobu; Miyamae, Yoichi; Kodama, Seiji

    2014-04-01

    Aneuploidy, a change in the number of chromosomes, plays an essential role in tumorigenesis. Our previous study demonstrated that a loss of a whole chromosome is induced in human lymphocytes by colcemid, a well-known aneugen. Here, to clarify the mechanism for colcemid-induced chromosome loss, we investigated the relationship between chromosome loss and DNA fragmentation in human lymphoblastoid cells treated with colcemid (an aneugen) compared with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS; a clastogen). We analyzed the number of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) signals targeted for a whole chromosome 2 in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated TK6 cells and WTK-1 cells treated with colcemid and MMS, and concurrently detected DNA fragmentation by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results revealed that DNA fragmentation occurred in 60% of all binucleated TK6 cells harboring colcemid-induced chromosome loss (30% of micronuclei and 30% of main nuclei). DNA fragmentation was observed in colcemid-induced micronuclei containing a whole chromosome but not in MMS-induced micronuclei containing chromosome fragments. In contrast, colcemid-induced nondisjunction had no effect on induction of DNA fragmentation, suggesting that DNA fragmentation was triggered by micronuclei containing a whole chromosome but not by micronuclei containing chromosome fragments or nondisjunction. In addition, the frequency of binucleated cells harboring chromosome loss with DNA fragmentation in micronuclei or main nuclei was higher in wild-type p53 TK6 cells than in mutated-p53 WTK-1 cells treated with colcemid. Taken together, these present and previous results suggest that colcemid-induced chromosome loss is caused by DNA fragmentation, which is triggered by a micronucleus with a whole chromosome and controlled by the p53-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic integrity of the human Y chromosome exposed to groundwater arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a known human carcinogen reported to cause chromosomal deletions and genetic anomalies in cultured cells. The vast human population inhabiting the Ganges delta in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh is exposed to critical levels of arsenic present in the groundwater. The genetic and physiological mechanism of arsenic toxicity in the human body is yet to be fully established. In addition, lack of animal models has made work on this line even more challenging. Methods Human male blood samples were collected with their informed consent from 5 districts in West Bengal having groundwater arsenic level more than 50 μg/L. Isolation of genomic DNA and preparation of metaphase chromosomes was done using standard protocols. End point PCR was performed for established sequence tagged sites to ascertain the status of recombination events. Single nucleotide variants of candidate genes and amplicons were carried out using appropriate restriction enzymes. The copy number of DYZ1 array per haploid genome was calculated using real time PCR and its chromosomal localization was done by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH. Results We studied effects of arsenic exposure on the human Y chromosome in males from different areas of West Bengal focusing on known recombination events (P5-P1 proximal; P5-P1 distal; gr/gr; TSPY-TSPY, b1/b3 and b2/b3, single nucleotide variants (SNVs of a few candidate Y-linked genes (DAZ, TTY4, BPY2, GOLGA2LY and the amplicons of AZFc region. Also, possible chromosomal reorganization of DYZ1 repeat arrays was analyzed. Barring a few microdeletions, no major changes were detected in blood DNA samples. SNV analysis showed a difference in some alleles. Similarly, DYZ1 arrays signals detected by FISH were found to be affected in some males. Conclusions Our Y chromosome analysis suggests that the same is protected from the effects of arsenic by some unknown mechanisms maintaining its structural and functional

  11. Large-scale probabilistic 3D organization of human chromosome territories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Nitasha; Fritz, Andrew J.; Vecerova, Jaromira; Ding, Hu; Chen, Zihe; Stojkovic, Branislav; Bhattacharya, Sambit; Xu, Jinhui; Berezney, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that chromosome territories (CT) have a probabilistic non-random arrangement within the cell nucleus of mammalian cells including radial positioning and preferred patterns of interchromosomal interactions that are cell-type specific. While it is generally assumed that the three-dimensional (3D) arrangement of genes within the CT is linked to genomic regulation, the degree of non-random organization of individual CT remains unclear. As a first step to elucidating the global 3D organization (topology) of individual CT, we performed multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization using six probes extending across each chromosome in human WI38 lung fibroblasts. Six CT were selected ranging in size and gene density (1, 4, 12, 17, 18 and X). In-house computational geometric algorithms were applied to measure the 3D distances between every combination of probes and to elucidate data-mined structural patterns. Our findings demonstrate a high degree of non-random arrangement of individual CT that vary from chromosome to chromosome and display distinct changes during the cell cycle. Application of a classic, well-defined data mining and pattern recognition approach termed the ‘k-means’ generated 3D models for the best fit arrangement of each chromosome. These predicted models correlated well with the detailed distance measurements and analysis. We propose that the unique 3D topology of each CT and characteristic changes during the cell cycle provide the structural framework for the global gene expression programs of the individual chromosomes. PMID:26604142

  12. Canonical WNT signaling pathway and human AREG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-06-01

    AREG (Amphiregulin), BTC (beta-cellulin), EGF, EPGN (Epigen), EREG (Epiregulin), HBEGF, NRG1, NRG2, NRG3, NRG4 and TGFA (TGFalpha) constitute EGF family ligands for ERBB family receptors. Cetuximab (Erbitux), Pertuzumab (Omnitarg) and Trastuzumab (Herceptin) are anti-cancer drugs targeted to EGF family ligands, while Gefitinib (Iressa), Erlotinib (Tarceva) and Lapatinib (GW572016) are anti-cancer drugs targeted to ERBB family receptors. AREG and TGFA are biomarkers for Gefitinib non-responders. The TCF/LEF binding sites within the promoter region of human EGF family members were searched for by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (Humint). Because three TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human AREG gene, comparative genomics analyses on AREG orthologs were further performed. The EPGN-EREG-AREG-BTC cluster at human chromosome 4q13.3 was linked to the PPBP-CXCL segmental duplicons. AREG was the paralog of HBEGF at human chromosome 5q31.2. Chimpanzee AREG gene, consisting of six exons, was located within NW_105918.1 genome sequence. Chimpanzee AREG was a type I transmembrane protein showing 98.0% and 71.4% total amino-acid identity with human AREG and mouse Areg, respectively. Three TCF/LEF-binding sites within human AREG promoter were conserved in chimpanzee AREG promoter, but not in rodent Areg promoters. Primate AREG promoters were significantly divergent from rodent Areg promoters. AREG mRNA was expressed in a variety of human tumors, such as colorectal cancer, liver cancer, gastric cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, esophageal cancer and myeloma. Because human AREG was characterized as potent target gene of WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway, WNT signaling activation could lead to Gefitinib resistance through AREG upregulation. AREG is a target of systems medicine in the field of oncology.

  13. Large scale chromosomal mapping of human microRNA structural clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathelier, Anthony; Carbone, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can group together along the human genome to form stable secondary structures made of several hairpins hosting miRNAs in their stems. The few known examples of such structures are all involved in cancer development. A large scale computational analysis of human chromosomes crossing sequence analysis and deep sequencing data revealed the presence of >400 structural clusters of miRNAs in the human genome. An a posteriori analysis validates predictions as bona fide miRNAs. A functional analysis of structural clusters position along the chromosomes co-localizes them with genes involved in several key cellular processes like immune systems, sensory systems, signal transduction and development. Immune systems diseases, infectious diseases and neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by genes that are especially well organized around structural clusters of miRNAs. Target genes functional analysis strongly supports a regulatory role of most predicted miRNAs and, notably, a strong involvement of predicted miRNAs in the regulation of cancer pathways. This analysis provides new fundamental insights on the genomic organization of miRNAs in human chromosomes. PMID:23444140

  14. An improved method for producing radiation hybrids applied to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, C.L.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1992-01-01

    Using radiation hybrids from a monochromosomal microcell hybrid containing human chromosome 19 as its only human component (PK87-19), we have initiated analysis of a panel of hybrids for markers in known locations on human chromosome 19. Also begun was a fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis of the hybrid cell lines using biotinylated total human DNA as a hybridization probe to metaphase chromosomes prepared from the hybrids cell lines. We are analyzing our panel of 94 hybrids for additional markers obtained from the literature, or the genome data base as well as to complete the analysis of any hybrids not yet scored for the markers iii the table. The hybrid panel has been tested for apolipoprotein C{sub 2} for the radiation hybrids for D19Sl77 (mfd 120), D19Sl78 (mfd 139) and for HRC (histidine rich calcium binding protein). In addition we have also analyzed for the presence of slow troponin 1 (TNNT1) and GPI (glucose phosphate isomerase).

  15. An improved method for producing radiation hybrids applied to human chromosome 19. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, C.L.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1992-11-01

    Using radiation hybrids from a monochromosomal microcell hybrid containing human chromosome 19 as its only human component (PK87-19), we have initiated analysis of a panel of hybrids for markers in known locations on human chromosome 19. Also begun was a fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis of the hybrid cell lines using biotinylated total human DNA as a hybridization probe to metaphase chromosomes prepared from the hybrids cell lines. We are analyzing our panel of 94 hybrids for additional markers obtained from the literature, or the genome data base as well as to complete the analysis of any hybrids not yet scored for the markers iii the table. The hybrid panel has been tested for apolipoprotein C{sub 2} for the radiation hybrids for D19Sl77 (mfd 120), D19Sl78 (mfd 139) and for HRC (histidine rich calcium binding protein). In addition we have also analyzed for the presence of slow troponin 1 (TNNT1) and GPI (glucose phosphate isomerase).

  16. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding "...

  17. The fate of the mosaic embryo: Chromosomal constitution and development of Day 4, 5 and 8 human embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Santos; G. Teklenburg (Gijs); N.S. Macklon (Nick); D. van Opstal (Diane); G.H. Schuring-Blom (Heleen); P-J. Krijtenburg (Pieter-Jaap); J. de Vreeden-Elbertse (Johanna); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); E.B. Baart (Esther)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Post-zygotic chromosome segregation errors are very common in human embryos after in vitro fertilization, resulting in mosaic embryos. However, the significance of mosaicism for the developmental potential of early embryos is unknown. We assessed chromosomal constitution and

  18. 1ST-TRIMESTER MATERNAL SERUM HUMAN CHORIONIC-GONADOTROPIN AS A MARKER FOR FETAL CHROMOSOMAL DISORDERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLITH, JMM

    The Dutch Working Party on Prenatal Diagnosis has initiated a study on the possibilities of first-trimester screening for fetal chromosomal disorders. We report on maternal serum human chorionic gonadotrophin (MS-hCG) measurements in 1348 pregnancies with a chromosomally normal fetus and 53

  19. Assignment of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) gene(s) to human chromosome 2 in rodent-human somatic cell hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbschleb-Voogt, E; Grzeschik, K H; Pearson, P L; Meera Khan, P

    1981-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper indicate that the expression of human adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human-rodent somatic cell hybrids is influenced by the state of confluency of the cells and the background rodent genome. Thus, the complement of the L-cell derived A9 or B82 mouse parent apparently prevents the expression of human ADCP in the interspecific somatic cell hybrids. In the a3, E36, or RAG hybrids the human ADCP expression was not prevented by the rodent genome and was found to be proportional to the degree of confluency of the cell in the culture as in the case of primary human fibroblasts. An analysis of human chromosomes, chromosome specific enzyme markers, and ADCP in a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids optimally maintained and harvested at full confluency has shown that the expression of human ADCP in the mouse (RAG)-human as well as in the hamster (E36 or a3)-human hybrids is determined by a gene(s) in human chromosome 2 and that neither chromosome 6 nor any other of the chromosomes of man carry any gene(s) involved in the formation of human ADCP at least in the Chinese hamster-human hybrids. A series of rodent-human hybrid clones exhibiting a mitotic separation of IDH1 and MDH1 indicated that ADCP is most probably situated between corresponding loci in human chromosome 2.

  20. The human gene for xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is localized on chromosome band 2q22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytkönen, E M; Halila, R; Laan, M; Saksela, M; Kallioniemi, O P; Palotie, A; Raivio, K O

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the xanthine dehydrogenase gene (XDH), which codes for the last enzyme of the purine catabolic pathway in man, cause the autosomal recessive disease xanthinuria. We obtained cDNA clones from a human breast cDNA library and confirmed one of the two different sequences proposed for human XDH. Using a somatic cell hybrid mapping panel and specific primers for human XDH, we assigned the gene to chromosome 2. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, the gene was localized to bands 2p22.3-->p22.2. The FLpter probe location was 0.135 (SD = 0.016), as determined by digital image analysis.

  1. Chromosomal assignment of human genomic NotI restriction fragments in a two-dimensional electrophoresis profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hirohide; Nagai, Hisaki; Matsubara, Kenichi [Osaka Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Using DNA from sorted human chromosomes and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we assigned 2295 NotI sites, 43% of the total, to specific chromosomes and designated the procedure CA-RLGS (chromosome-assigned restriction landmark genomic scanning). Although the NotI enzyme is sensitive to DNA methylation, our results suggested that the majority of the spots did not seem to be affected by this modification. The NotI sites were distributed at higher levels in chromosomes 17, 19, and 22, suggesting higher gene content in these chromosomes. Most spots were assigned to unique chromosomes, but some spots were found on two or more chromosomes. Quantitative analysis revealed the intensity of the DNA spots on the sex chromosomes to be haploid and that of the chromosome 21 spots in DNA from a male with Down syndrome to be trisomic, although there were exceptions. We report here the first-generation CA-RLGS map of the human genome. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  3. Exposure to acrylonitrile induced DNA strand breakage and sex chromosome aneuploidy in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, De-Xiang; Zhu, Qi-Xing; Zheng, Lu-Kang; Wang, Qu-Nan; Shen, Han-Ming; Deng, Li-Xia; Ong, Choon-Nam

    2003-05-09

    To explore acrylonitrile (ACN)-induced DNA strand breakage and sex chromosome aneuploidy in human spermatozoa, semen parameters were examined among 30 acrylonitrile-exposed workers according to WHO laboratory manual for the examination of human sperm. DNA strand breakage of sperm cells was investigated among 30 ACN-exposed workers using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). The frequency of sex chromosome aneuploidy in sperm cells was analyzed among nine ACN-exposed workers using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The geometrical mean of sperm density was 75 x 10(6)ml(-1) in exposure group, significantly lower than 140 x 10(6)ml(-1) in the control. The geometrical mean of sperm number per ejaculum was 205 x 10(6) in exposure group, significantly lower than 280 x 10(6) in the control. The rates of comet sperm nuclei were 28.7% in exposure group, significantly higher than 15.0% in the control. Mean tail length was 9.8 microm in exposure group, longer than 4.3 microm in the control. The frequency of sex chromosome disomy was 0.69% in exposure group, significantly higher than 0.35% in the control. XY-bearing sperm was the most common sex chromosome disomy, with an average rate of 0.37% in exposure group, and 0.20% in the control. XX- and YY-bearing sperm accounted for an additional 0.09 and 0.23% in exposure group, and 0.05 and 0.10% in the control. The results indicate that ACN affect semen quality among ACN-exposed workers. ACN or its metabolites could induce reproductive defects as an in vivo multipotent genotoxic agent by inducing DNA strand breakage and sex chromosome non-disjunction in spermatogenesis.

  4. FISH-mapped CEPH YACs spanning 0 to 46 cM on human chromosome 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray-Ward, P.; Bowlus, C.; Choi, J. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-15

    Seventy-six CEPH YACs were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to human metaphase chromosomes. These clones have been ordered from pter to 46 cM by combining the results of FISH with sequence-tagged site content mapping using data from the public databases. This created a minimal tiling path containing at least 37 Mb of human genomic DNA from 0 to 46 cM on chromosome 6 that contains up to four gaps not greater than 200 kb. These data provide an integration of the FLpter physical map values with cytogenetic band localization and markers on the genetic and radiation hybrid maps. We also assessed YAC chimerism and placed three additional Whitehead contigs within the integrated map. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. FISH-Mapped CEPH YACs spanning 0 to 46 cM on human chromosome 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray-Ward, P; Bowlus, C; Choi, J; Paslier, D L; Weissenbach, J; Gruen, J R

    1996-08-15

    Seventy-six CEPH YACs were mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to human metaphase chromosomes. These clones have been ordered from pter to 46 cM by combining the results of FISH with sequence-tagged site content mapping using data from the public databases. This created a minimal tiling path containing at least 37 Mb of human genomic DNA from 0 to 46 cM on chromosome 6 that contains up to four gaps not greater than 200 kb. These data provide an integration of the FLpter physical map values with cytogenetic band localization and markers on the genetic and radiation hybrid maps. We also assessed YAC chimerism and placed three additional Whitehead contigs (WC952, WC799, WC436) within the integrated map.

  6. New, male-specific microsatellite markers from the human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P S; Tatum, O L; Deaven, L L; Longmire, J L

    1999-05-01

    Seven novel microsatellite markers have been developed from a new cosmid library constructed from flow-sorted human Y chromosomes. These microsatellites are tetranucleotide GATA repeats and are polymorphic among unrelated individuals. Five of the seven markers are male-specific, with no PCR product being generated from female DNA. One marker produces male-specific, polymorphic PCR products but occasionally produces a much larger, invariant product from female DNA. The remaining marker is polymorphic in both males and females with many shared alleles between the sexes. This report of six new, male-specific markers doubles the number of tetranucleotide markers that are currently available for the human Y chromosome. These new markers will be valuable where nonrecombining, gender-specific DNA markers are desired, including forensic investigations as well as studies of populations and their evolutionary histories. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  7. Evolution of the human X--a smart and sexy chromosome that controls speciation and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, J A M; Gécz, J; Hameister, H

    2002-01-01

    In humans, as in other mammals, sex is determined by an XX female/XY male chromosome system. Most attention has focused on the small, degenerate Y chromosome, which bears the male-dominant gene SRY. The X, in contrast, has been considered a well-behaved and immaculately conserved element that has hardly changed since the pre-mammal days when it was just another autosome pair. However, the X, uniquely in the genome, is present in two copies in females and only one in males. This has had dire consequences genetically on the evolution of its activity--and now it appears, on its gene content and/or the function of its genes. Here we will discuss the origin of the human X, and the evolution of dosage compensation and gene content, in the light of recent demonstrations that particular functions in sex and reproduction and cognition have accumulated on it. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human Cytomegalovirus Strain AD169 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Spohn, Michael; Indenbirken, Daniela; Brune, Wolfram

    2016-03-31

    The complete sequence of the human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 (variant ATCC) cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (AD169-BAC, also known as HB15 or pHB15) was determined. The viral genome has a length of 230,290 bp and shows 52 nucleotide differences compared to a previously sequenced AD169varATCC clone. Copyright © 2016 Ostermann et al.

  9. Report of the first international workshop on human chromosome 14 mapping 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    The first International Workshop on Human Chromosome 14 mapping was held at Novotel in Toronto, Canada on June 9-12, 1993. There were 23 participants from nine countries. The goals of the workshop were to compile physical maps and a consensus linkage map, to consolidate available data on disease loci, to catalogue and facilitate distribution of resources and to encourage new collaborations and data sharing.

  10. Gold nanoparticle-assisted primer walking for closing the human chromosomal gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, H; Shi, B; Li, X

    2013-01-01

    NPs) to improve the efficiency in primer walking amplification. We used this strategy to close a gap in human chromosome 5 containing a DNA stretch composed of the 12SAT repeat. The obtained gap sequence is highly conserved among several mammalian genomes. The demonstrated AuNP-assisted primer walking strategy...... is capable of effectively improving the specificity of PCR amplification and enriching the yield of target DNA fragments; it offers a new avenue for closing gaps left by current sequencing methods...

  11. Chromosomal Rearrangements as Barriers to Genetic Homogenization between Archaic and Modern Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Rebekah L.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements, which shuffle DNA throughout the genome, are an important source of divergence across taxa. Using a paired-end read approach with Illumina sequence data for archaic humans, I identify changes in genome structure that occurred recently in human evolution. Hundreds of rearrangements indicate genomic trafficking between the sex chromosomes and autosomes, raising the possibility of sex-specific changes. Additionally, genes adjacent to genome structure changes in Neanderthals are associated with testis-specific expression, consistent with evolutionary theory that new genes commonly form with expression in the testes. I identify one case of new-gene creation through transposition from the Y chromosome to chromosome 10 that combines the 5′-end of the testis-specific gene Fank1 with previously untranscribed sequence. This new transcript experienced copy number expansion in archaic genomes, indicating rapid genomic change. Among rearrangements identified in Neanderthals, 13% are transposition of selfish genetic elements, whereas 32% appear to be ectopic exchange between repeats. In Denisovan, the pattern is similar but numbers are significantly higher with 18% of rearrangements reflecting transposition and 40% ectopic exchange between distantly related repeats. There is an excess of divergent rearrangements relative to polymorphism in Denisovan, which might result from nonuniform rates of mutation, possibly reflecting a burst of transposable element activity in the lineage that led to Denisovan. Finally, loci containing genome structure changes show diminished rates of introgression from Neanderthals into modern humans, consistent with the hypothesis that rearrangements serve as barriers to gene flow during hybridization. Together, these results suggest that this previously unidentified source of genomic variation has important biological consequences in human evolution. PMID:26399483

  12. Human sperm sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage assessed by the neutral comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, M E; Williams, P L; Korrick, S A; Dadd, R; Marchetti, F; Martenies, S E; Perry, M J

    2014-10-10

    Is there an association between human sperm sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage? An increase in human sperm XY disomy was associated with higher comet extent; however, there was no other consistent association of sex chromosome disomies with DNA damage. There is limited published research on the association between sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage and the findings are not consistent across studies. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 190 men (25% ever smoker, 75% never smoker) from subfertile couples presenting at the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Clinic from January 2000 to May 2003. Multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes X, Y and 18 was used to determine XX, YY, XY and total sex chromosome disomy in sperm nuclei using an automated scoring method. The neutral comet assay was used to measure sperm DNA damage, as reflected by comet extent, percentage DNA in the comet tail, and tail distributed moment. Univariate and multiple linear regression models were constructed with sex chromosome disomy (separate models for each of the four disomic conditions) as the independent variable, and DNA damage parameters (separate models for each measure of DNA damage) as the dependent variable. Men with current or past smoking history had significantly greater comet extent (µm: regression coefficients with 95% CI) [XX18: 15.17 (1.98, 28.36); YY18: 14.68 (1.50, 27.86); XY18: 15.41 (2.37, 28.45); Total Sex Chromosome Disomy: 15.23 (2.09, 28.38)], and tail distributed moment [XX18: 3.01 (0.30, 5.72); YY18: 2.95 (0.24, 5.67); XY18: 3.04 (0.36, 5.72); Total Sex Chromosome Disomy: 3.10 (0.31, 5.71)] than men who had never smoked. In regression models adjusted for age and smoking, there was a positive association between XY disomy and comet extent. For an increase in XY disomy from 0.56 to 1.47% (representing the 25th to 75th percentile), there was a mean increase of 5.08 µm in comet extent. No other statistically significant

  13. Trans effects of chromosome aneuploidies on DNA methylation patterns in human Down syndrome and mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendioroz, Maite; Do, Catherine; Jiang, Xiaoling; Liu, Chunhong; Darbary, Huferesh K; Lang, Charles F; Lin, John; Thomas, Anna; Abu-Amero, Sayeda; Stanier, Philip; Temkin, Alexis; Yale, Alexander; Liu, Meng-Min; Li, Yang; Salas, Martha; Kerkel, Kristi; Capone, George; Silverman, Wayne; Yu, Y Eugene; Moore, Gudrun; Wegiel, Jerzy; Tycko, Benjamin

    2015-11-25

    Trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome (DS), but the mechanisms by which the extra chromosome leads to deficient intellectual and immune function are not well understood. Here, we profile CpG methylation in DS and control cerebral and cerebellar cortex of adults and cerebrum of fetuses. We purify neuronal and non-neuronal nuclei and T lymphocytes and find biologically relevant genes with DS-specific methylation (DS-DM) in each of these cell types. Some genes show brain-specific DS-DM, while others show stronger DS-DM in T cells. Both 5-methyl-cytosine and 5-hydroxy-methyl-cytosine contribute to the DS-DM. Thirty percent of genes with DS-DM in adult brain cells also show DS-DM in fetal brains, indicating early onset of these epigenetic changes, and we find early maturation of methylation patterns in DS brain and lymphocytes. Some, but not all, of the DS-DM genes show differential expression. DS-DM preferentially affected CpGs in or near specific transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), implicating a mechanism involving altered TFBS occupancy. Methyl-seq of brain DNA from mouse models with sub-chromosomal duplications mimicking DS reveals partial but significant overlaps with human DS-DM and shows that multiple chromosome 21 genes contribute to the downstream epigenetic effects. These data point to novel biological mechanisms in DS and have general implications for trans effects of chromosomal duplications and aneuploidies on epigenetic patterning.

  14. Alphoid satellite DNA is tightly associated with centromere antigens in human chromosomes throughout the cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masumoto, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Kenji; Okazaki, Tuneko (Nagoya Univ. (Japan))

    1989-03-01

    In this study, the authors have examined a DNA element specific to the centromere domain of human chromosomes. Purified HeLa chromosomes were digested with the restriction enzyme Sau3AI and fractionated by sedimentation through a sucrose gradient. Fractions showing antigenicity to anticentromere (kinetochore) serum obtained from a scleroderma CREST patient were used to construct a DNA library. From this library they found one clone which has specifically hybridized to the centromere domain of metaphase chromosomes using a biotinylated probe DNA and FITC-conjugated avidin. The clone contained a stretch of alphoid DNA dimer. To determine precisely the relative location of the alphoid DNA stretch and the centromere antigen, a method was developed to carry out in situ hybridization of DNA and indirect immunofluorescent staining of antigen on the same cell preparation. Using this method, they have found perfect overlapping of the alphoid DNA sites with the centromere antigen in both metaphase chromosomes and nuclei at various stages in the cell cycle. They have also observed this exact correlation at the attachment sites of artificially extended sister chromatids. These results suggest the possibility that alphoid DNA repeats are a key component of kinetochore structure.

  15. [Sister chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations as parameters for human risk of cancer development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, K

    1987-04-01

    Chromosome alterations, which are directly visible changes in the DNA, have close associations to cancer development, non-specific ageing, and heritable genetic status. Human lymphocyte cultures can be used for cytogenetic monitoring of genetic health because many cancers and genetic effects are caused by long-term unhealthy life-styles. We have investigated the sensitivities of lymphocytes from inherited-cancer-prone diseases to the induction of the chromosome alterations by mutagens and carcinogens, and the correlations between the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in peripheral lymphocytes and life-styles or daily ways of living. Lymphocytes from patients with Down syndrome, Fanconi anemia, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia telangiectasia, and Bloom syndromes showed altered (usually enhanced) susceptibilities to the induction of chromosome aberrations and SCEs by mutagens and carcinogens in our environments. Mean frequencies of baseline SCEs in lymphocytes from normal men with poor life-styles have also been shown to be significantly higher than those in cells from men having good life-styles. The former cells have further been shown to have hyper sensitivities to the induction of SCEs by mitomycin-C' treatment compared to latter cells. Unhealthy life-styles also make the lymphocytes to be more sensitive to ara-C's enhancement of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

  16. Human Sgo1 downregulation leads to chromosomal instability in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaizumi, M; Shinmura, K; Mori, H; Yamada, H; Suzuki, M; Kitayama, Y; Igarashi, H; Nakamura, T; Suzuki, H; Watanabe, Y; Hishida, A; Ikuma, M; Sugimura, H

    2009-02-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is recognised as a hallmark of cancer and is caused by a spindle assembly checkpoint disorder or chromosome mis-segregation during mitosis. Although the recent identification of human shugoshin (hSgo1), an important player in proper chromosome segregation, has suggested the involvement of hSgo1 in colorectal tumourigenesis, little is known about how it is involved. The aim of this study was to obtain information about the status of hSgo1 in human colorectal cancer. Among the 46 colorectal cancer cases, hSgo1 mRNA expression was decreased in the tumour tissue in comparison with the corresponding normal tissue (p = 0.032). Human Sgo1-downregulated tumours (tumour to normal mucosa ratiocatastrophes were also noted in hSgo1 knockdown cells. These findings suggest that hSgo1-downregulated colorectal cancers have a clinicopathological character of CIN, and hSgo1 downregulation leads to CIN in colorectal cancer cells.

  17. [Instability of chromosomes in human nerve cells (normal and with neuromental diseases)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurov, Iu B; Vorsanova, S G; Solov'ev, I V; Iurov, I Iu

    2010-10-01

    It is assumed that the genetic mechanism of pathogenesis of such widely spread neural and mental diseases as schizophrenia (SZ), autism, ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with structural and functional genomi? instaility in brain cells. Aneuploidy is one of the most important biological markers of genomic instability. The currently available methods of molecular cytogenetics (I-mFISH, QFISH, and ICS-MCB) facilitate the solution of numerous fundamental biological problems, including analysis ofgenomic variations in brain cells. Using these methods, we have studied for the first time aneuploidy in human embryo and adult brain cells (normal and with AT, AD, and SZ) as well as in blood cells of children with autism. The level of aneuploidy was increased two- to threefold in the embryo brain with a subsequent reduction of the number of abnormal cells in the adult brain. In the case of SZ, mosaic aneuploidy for chromosomes 1, 18, and X was found. The study of blood cells from children with autism showed chromosomal mosaicism for chromosomes X, 9, and 15. In the case of AT, we observed a global expression of aneuploidy in up to 20-50% of cortex and cerebellum neurons. In addition, a local instability of chromosome 14 was revealed in the degenerating cerebellum in the form of breaks in the 14q12 region. In the case of AD, a tenfold increase was observed in the level ofaneuploidy for chromosome 21 in brain sections subjected to neurodegeneration. These data indicate that mosaic genomic instability in nerve cells is one of the mechanism of neurodegenerative and mental diseases.

  18. Genetic linkage analysis of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using human chromosome 21 microsatellite DNA markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, D.R.; Sapp, P.; O`Regan, J.; McKenna-Yasek, D.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Haines, J.L.; Gusella, J.F.; Horvitz, H.R.; Brown, R.H. Jr. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-05-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig`s Disease) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease of upper and lower motorneurons in the brain and spinal cord. We previously reported linkage of a gene for familial ALS (FALS) to human chromosome 21 using 4 restriction fragment length polymorphism DNA markers and identified disease-associated mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1 gene in some ALS families. We report here the genetic linkage data that led us to examine the SOD-1 gene for mutations. We also report a new microsatellite DNA marker for D21S63, derived from the cosmid PW517. Ten microsatellite DNA markers, including the new marker D21S63, were used to reinvestigate linkage of FALS to chromosome 21. Genetic linkage analysis performed with 13 ALS familes for these 10 DNA markers confirmed the presence of a FALS gene on chromosome 21. The highest total 2-point LOD score for all families was 4.33, obtained at a distance of 10 cM from the marker D21S223. For 5 ALS families linked to chromosome 21, a peak 2-point LOD score of 5.94 was obtained at the DNA marker D21S223. A multipoint score of 6.50 was obtained with the markers D21S213, D21S223, D21S167, and FALS for 5 chromosome 21-linked ALS families. The haplotypes of these families for the 10 DNA markers reveal recombination events that further refined the location of the FALS gene to a segment of approximately 5 megabases (Mb) between D21S213 and D21S219. The only characterized gene within this segment was SOD-1, the structural gene for Cu, Zn SOD. 30 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  20. Engineering human tumour-associated chromosomal translocations with the RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Torres, R; Martin, M C; Garcia, A; Cigudosa, Juan C; Ramirez, J C; Rodriguez-Perales, S

    2014-01-01

    .... Here we present a strategy for generating cancer-related human chromosomal translocations in vitro based on the ability of the RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system to induce DSBs at defined positions...

  1. The Biological Effectiveness of Four Energies of Neon Ions for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kerry; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to neon ions at energies of 64, 89, 142, or 267. The corresponding LET values for these energies of neon ranged from 38-103 keV/micrometers and doses delivered were in the 10 to 80 cGy range. Chromosome exchanges were assessed in metaphase and G2 phase cells at first division after exposure using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes and dose response curves were generated for different types of chromosomal exchanges. The yields of total chromosome exchanges were similar for the 64, 89, and 142 MeV exposures, whereas the 267 MeV/u neon with LET of 38 keV/micrometers produced about half as many exchanges per unit dose. The induction of complex type chromosome exchanges (exchanges involving three or more breaks and two or more chromosomes) showed a clear LET dependence for all energies. The ratio of simple to complex type exchanges increased with LET from 18 to 51%. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The RBE(sub max) values for total chromosome exchanges for the 64 MeV/u was around 30.

  2. Human sperm chromosome analysis after subzonal sperm insemination of hamster oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, J. [Medical School of Grenoble (France)

    1994-09-01

    Sperm microinjection techniques, subzonal sperm insemination (SUZI) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), have achieved a wide spread clinical application for the treatment of male infertility. To date, only one study has focused on sperm karyotypes after microinjection. Martin et al. reported a very high incidence of abnormal human sperm complements after ICSI into hamster oocytes. In the present study, are reported the first human sperm karyotypes after SUZI of hamster oocytes. Spermatozoa from two control donors were treated by calcium ionophore A23187 and injected under the zona of hamster eggs. The microinjected eggs were then cultured for cytogenetic analysis of the pronuclei. Out of 47 analyzed sperm chromosome metaphases, 5 (10.6%) were abnormal, 4 (8.5%) were hypohaploid and 1 (2.1%) had a structural abnormality. The sex ratio was not significantly different from the expected 1:1 ratio. Rates of chromosomal abnormalities in microinjected spermatozoa were similar to those observed in spermatozoa inseminated with zona free eggs, suggesting that SUZI procedure per se does not increase sperm chromosomal abnormalities.

  3. Human Y chromosome copy number variation in the next generation sequencing era and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaia, Andrea; Xue, Yali

    2017-05-01

    The human Y chromosome provides a fertile ground for structural rearrangements owing to its haploidy and high content of repeated sequences. The methodologies used for copy number variation (CNV) studies have developed over the years. Low-throughput techniques based on direct observation of rearrangements were developed early on, and are still used, often to complement array-based or sequencing approaches which have limited power in regions with high repeat content and specifically in the presence of long, identical repeats, such as those found in human sex chromosomes. Some specific rearrangements have been investigated for decades; because of their effects on fertility, or their outstanding evolutionary features, the interest in these has not diminished. However, following the flourishing of large-scale genomics, several studies have investigated CNVs across the whole chromosome. These studies sometimes employ data generated within large genomic projects such as the DDD study or the 1000 Genomes Project, and often survey large samples of healthy individuals without any prior selection. Novel technologies based on sequencing long molecules and combinations of technologies, promise to stimulate the study of Y-CNVs in the immediate future.

  4. A new generation of human artificial chromosomes for functional genomics and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalay; Earnshaw, William C; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Larionov, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Since their description in the late 1990s, human artificial chromosomes (HACs) carrying a functional kinetochore were considered as a promising system for gene delivery and expression with a potential to overcome many problems caused by the use of viral-based gene transfer systems. Indeed, HACs avoid the limited cloning capacity, lack of copy number control and insertional mutagenesis due to integration into host chromosomes that plague viral vectors. Nevertheless, until recently, HACs have not been widely recognized because of uncertainties of their structure and the absence of a unique gene acceptor site. The situation changed a few years ago after engineering of HACs with a single loxP gene adopter site and a defined structure. In this review, we summarize recent progress made in HAC technology and concentrate on details of two of the most advanced HACs, 21HAC generated by truncation of human chromosome 21 and alphoid(tetO)-HAC generated de novo using a synthetic tetO-alphoid DNA array. Multiple potential applications of the HAC vectors are discussed, specifically the unique features of two of the most advanced HAC cloning systems.

  5. Frequency of chromosomally-integrated human herpesvirus 6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Gravel

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 is a ubiquitous pathogen infecting nearly 100% of the human population. Of these individuals, between 0.2% and 1% of them carry chromosomally-integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. The biological consequences of chromosomal integration by HHV-6 remain unknown.To determine and compare the frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia to healthy blood donors.A total of 293 DNA samples from children with pre-B (n=255, pre-pre-B (n=4, pre-T (n=26 and undetermined (n=8 leukemia were analyzed for ciHHV-6 by quantitative TaqMan PCR (QPCR using HHV-6 specific primers and probe. As control, DNA samples from 288 healthy individuals were used. Primers and probe specific to the cellular GAPDH gene were used to estimate integrity and DNA content.Out of 293 DNA samples from the leukemic cohort, 287 contained amplifiable DNA. Of these, only 1 (0.35% contained ciHHV-6. Variant typing indicates that the ci-HHV-6 corresponds to variant A. None of the 288 DNA samples from healthy individuals contained ciHHV-6.The frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia is similar (p=0.5 to that of healthy individuals. These results suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia does not originate as a consequence to integration of HHV-6 within the chromosomes.

  6. Gene expression, nucleotide composition and codon usage bias of genes associated with human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of codon usage pattern is important to understand the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of genomes. We have used bioinformatic approaches to analyze the codon usage bias (CUB) of the genes located in human Y chromosome. Codon bias index (CBI) indicated that the overall extent of codon usage bias was low. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis suggested that approximately half of the codons out of 59 synonymous codons were most frequently used, and possessed a T or G at the third codon position. The codon usage pattern was different in different genes as revealed from correspondence analysis (COA). A significant correlation between effective number of codons (ENC) and various GC contents suggests that both mutation pressure and natural selection affect the codon usage pattern of genes located in human Y chromosome. In addition, Y-linked genes have significant difference in GC contents at the second and third codon positions, expression level, and codon usage pattern of some codons like the SPANX genes in X chromosome.

  7. Complex Variant t(9;22 Chromosome Translocations in Five Cases of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Valencia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia (Ph1 chromosome arising from the reciprocal t(9;22 translocation is found in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients and results in the formation of the chimeric fusion gene BCR-ABL. However, a small proportion of patients with CML have simple or complex variants of this translocation, involving various breakpoints in addition to 9q34 and 22q11. We report five CML cases carrying variant Ph translocations involving both chromosomes 9 and 22 as well as chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 8, or 10. G-banding showed a reciprocal three-way translocation involving 3q21, 5q31, 7q32, 8q24, and 10q22 bands. BCR-ABL fusion signal on der(22 was found in all of the cases by FISH.

  8. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Daniela, E-mail: d.kraft@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Ritter, Sylvia, E-mail: s.ritter@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco, E-mail: m.durante@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Physics Department, Technical University Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6-8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Seifried, Erhard, E-mail: e.seifried@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Fournier, Claudia, E-mail: c.fournier@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tonn, Torsten, E-mail: t.tonn@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Med. Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Institute for Transfusion Medicine Dresden, German Red Cross Blood Donation Service North-East, Blasewitzer Straße 68/70, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiation induced formation and transmission of chromosomal aberrations were assessed. • Cytogenetic analysis was performed in human CD34+ HSPC by mFISH. • We report transmission of stable aberrations in irradiated, clonally expanded HSPC. • Unstable aberrations in clonally expanded HSPC occur independently of irradiation. • Carbon ions and X-rays bear a similar risk for propagation of cytogenetic changes. - Abstract: In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34{sup +} cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60–85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼30–35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼70% and

  9. Localization of serum biotinidase (BTD) to human chromosome 3 in band p25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, H.; Wolf, B. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States); Weremowicz, S. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    Biotinidase (EC 3.5.1.12) recycles the vitamin biotin by catalyzing the hydrolysis of biocytin, the product of biotin-dependent carboxylase degradation, to biotin and lysine. Biotinidase deficiency is a metabolic disorder that is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and can be successfully treated with biotin supplementation. Children with biotinidase deficiency who are not treated usually exhibit neurological and cutaneous abnormalities. We have cloned and sequenced the cDNA for human serum biotinidase and now report the chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the enzyme. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques using a genomic fragment mapped the locus of the biotinidase gene to chromosome 3 in band p25. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Repression of hTERT transcription by the introduction of chromosome 3 into human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Sachiyo [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Biopathological Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Department of Biomedical Science, Institute of Regenerative Medicine and Biofunction, Graduate School of Medical Science, Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Ohira, Takahito; Sunamura, Naohiro [Department of Biomedical Science, Institute of Regenerative Medicine and Biofunction, Graduate School of Medical Science, Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Oshimura, Mitsuo [Chromosome Engineering Research Center, Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Ryoke, Kazuo [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Biopathological Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 86 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Kugoh, Hiroyuki, E-mail: kugoh@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Science, Institute of Regenerative Medicine and Biofunction, Graduate School of Medical Science, Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan); Chromosome Engineering Research Center, Tottori University, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503 (Japan)

    2015-10-30

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that maintains telomere length. Telomerase activity is primarily attributed to the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). It has been reported that introduction of an intact human chromosome 3 into the human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line HSC3 suppresses the tumorigenicity of these cells. However, the mechanisms that regulate tumorigenicity have not been elucidated. To determine whether this reduction in tumorigenicity was accompanied by a reduction in telomerase activity, we investigated the transcriptional activation of TERT in HSC3 microcell hybrid clones with an introduced human chromosome 3 (HSC3#3). HSC#3 cells showed inhibition of hTERT transcription compared to that of the parental HSC3 cells. Furthermore, cell fusion experiments showed that hybrids of HSC3 cells and cells of the RCC23 renal carcinoma cell line, which also exhibits suppression of TERT transcription by the introduction of human chromosome 3, also displayed suppressed TERT transcription. These results suggested that human chromosome 3 may carry functionally distinct, additional TERT repressor genes. - Highlights: • hTERT mRNA expression level decreased in the chromosome 3 introduced HSC3 clones. • hTERT mRNA expression level was tend to suppressed in HSC3 and RCC23 hybrid cells. • We provide evidence that human chromosome 3 carries at least two distinct hTERT regulatory factors.

  11. Replication of alpha-satellite DNA arrays in endogenous human centromeric regions and in human artificial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erliandri, Indri; Fu, Haiqing; Nakano, Megumi; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Miga, Karen H; Liskovykh, Mikhail; Earnshaw, William C; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Kouprina, Natalay; Aladjem, Mirit I; Larionov, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    In human chromosomes, centromeric regions comprise megabase-size arrays of 171 bp alpha-satellite DNA monomers. The large distances spanned by these arrays preclude their replication from external sites and imply that the repetitive monomers contain replication origins. However, replication within these arrays has not previously been profiled and the role of alpha-satellite DNA in initiation of DNA replication has not yet been demonstrated. Here, replication of alpha-satellite DNA in endogenous human centromeric regions and in de novo formed Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) was analyzed. We showed that alpha-satellite monomers could function as origins of DNA replication and that replication of alphoid arrays organized into centrochromatin occurred earlier than those organized into heterochromatin. The distribution of inter-origin distances within centromeric alphoid arrays was comparable to the distribution of inter-origin distances on randomly selected non-centromeric chromosomal regions. Depletion of CENP-B, a kinetochore protein that binds directly to a 17 bp CENP-B box motif common to alpha-satellite DNA, resulted in enrichment of alpha-satellite sequences for proteins of the ORC complex, suggesting that CENP-B may have a role in regulating the replication of centromeric regions. Mapping of replication initiation sites in the HAC revealed that replication preferentially initiated in transcriptionally active regions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Intermediate Variant Alleles DYS392.2, DYS449.2, and DYS385.2 Delineate New Phylogenetic Substructure in Human Y-chromosome Haplogroup Tree

    OpenAIRE

    Myres, Natalie M.; Ritchie, Kathleen H.; Lin, Alice A.; Hughes, Robert H.; Woodward, Scott R.; Underhill, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim To determine the human Y-chromosome haplogroup backgrounds of intermediate-sized variant alleles displayed by short tandem repeat (STR) loci DYS392, DYS449, and DYS385, and to valuate the potential of each intermediate variant to elucidate new phylogenetic substructure within the human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree. Methods Molecular characterization of lineages was achieved using a combination of Y-chromosome haplogroup defining binary polymorphisms and up to 37 ...

  13. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  14. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  15. Human twinning is not linked to the region of chromosome 4 syntetic with the sheep twinning gene FecB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffy, DL; Montgomery, GW; Hall, J.; Mayne, C.; Healy, S.C.; Brown, J; Boomsma, D.I.; Martin, N.G.

    2001-01-01

    The tendency to dizygotic (DZ) twinning is inherited in both humans and sheep, and a fecundity gene in sheep (FecB) maps to sheep chromosome 6, syntenic with human 4q21-25. Our aim was to see whether a gene predisposing to human DZ twinning mapped to this region. DNA was collected from 169 pairs and

  16. Synteny of human chromosomes 14 and 15 in the platyrrhines (Primates, Platyrrhini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiani Gifalli-Iughetti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the intra- and interspecific variability of the 14/15 association in Platyrrhini, we analyzed 15 species from 13 genera, including species that had not been described yet. The DNA libraries of human chromosomes 14 and 15 were hybridized to metaphases of Alouatta guariba clamitans, A. caraya, A. sara, Ateles paniscus chamek, Lagothrix lagothricha, Brachyteles arachnoides, Saguinus midas midas, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, Callimico goeldii, Callithrix sp., Cebus apella, Aotus nigriceps, Cacajao melanocephalus, Chiropotes satanas and Callicebus caligatus. The 14/15 hybridization pattern was present in 13 species, but not in Alouatta sara that showed a 14/15/14 pattern and Aotus nigriceps that showed a 15/14/15/14 pattern. In the majority of the species, the HSA 14 homologue retained synteny for the entire chromosome, whereas the HSA 15 homologue displayed fragmented segments. Within primates, the New World monkeys represent the taxon with the highest variability in chromosome number (2n = 16 to 62. The presence of the HSA 14/15 association in all species and subspecies studied herein confirms that this association is the ancestral condition for platyrrhines and that this association has been retained in most platyrrhines, despite the occurrence of extensive inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements in this infraorder of Primates.

  17. Chromosome conformation capture uncovers potential genome-wide interactions between human conserved non-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Robyr

    Full Text Available Comparative analyses of various mammalian genomes have identified numerous conserved non-coding (CNC DNA elements that display striking conservation among species, suggesting that they have maintained specific functions throughout evolution. CNC function remains poorly understood, although recent studies have identified a role in gene regulation. We hypothesized that the identification of genomic loci that interact physically with CNCs would provide information on their functions. We have used circular chromosome conformation capture (4C to characterize interactions of 10 CNCs from human chromosome 21 in K562 cells. The data provide evidence that CNCs are capable of interacting with loci that are enriched for CNCs. The number of trans interactions varies among CNCs; some show interactions with many loci, while others interact with few. Some of the tested CNCs are capable of driving the expression of a reporter gene in the mouse embryo, and associate with the oligodendrocyte genes OLIG1 and OLIG2. Our results underscore the power of chromosome conformation capture for the identification of targets of functional DNA elements and raise the possibility that CNCs exert their functions by physical association with defined genomic regions enriched in CNCs. These CNC-CNC interactions may in part explain their stringent conservation as a group of regulatory sequences.

  18. Linkage of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome with polymorphic DNA sequences from the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peacocke, M.; Siminovitch, K.A.

    1987-05-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is one of several human immunodeficiency diseases inherited as an X-linked trait. The location of WAS on the X chromosome is unknown. The authors have studied 10 kindreds segregating for WAS for linkage with cloned, polymorphic DNA markers and have demonstrated significant linkage between WAS and two loci, DXS14 and DXS7, that map to the proximal short arm of the X chromosome. Maximal logarithm of odds (lod scores) for WAS-DXS14 and WAS-DWS7 were 4.29 (at 0 = 0.03) and 4.12 (at 0 = 0.00), respectively. Linkage data between WAS and six markers loci indicate the order of the loci to be (DXYS1-DXS1)-WAS-DXS14-DXS7-(DXS84-OTC). These results suggest that the WAS locus lies within the pericentric region of the X chromosome and provide an initial step toward identifying the WAS gene and improving the genetic counselling WAS families.

  19. Chromosomal mutations and chromosome loss measured in a new human-hamster hybrid cell line, ALC: studies with colcemid, ultraviolet irradiation, and 137Cs gamma-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, S. M.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Small mutations, megabase deletions, and aneuploidy are involved in carcinogenesis and genetic defects, so it is important to be able to quantify these mutations and understand mechanisms of their creation. We have previously quantified a spectrum of mutations, including megabase deletions, in human chromosome 11, the sole human chromosome in a hamster-human hybrid cell line AL. S1- mutants have lost expression of a human cell surface antigen, S1, which is encoded by the M1C1 gene at 11p13 so that mutants can be detected via a complement-mediated cytotoxicity assay in which S1+ cells are killed and S1- cells survive. But loss of genes located on the tip of the short arm of 11 (11p15.5) is lethal to the AL hybrid, so that mutants that have lost the entire chromosome 11 die and escape detection. To circumvent this, we fused AL with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to produce a new hybrid, ALC, in which the requirement for maintaining 11p15.5 is relieved, allowing us to detect mutations events involving loss of 11p15.5. We evaluated the usefulness of this hybrid by conducting mutagenesis studies with colcemid, 137Cs gamma-radiation and UV 254 nm light. Colcemid induced 1000 more S1- mutants per unit dose in ALC than in AL; the increase for UV 254 nm light was only two-fold; and the increase for 137Cs gamma-rays was 12-fold. The increase in S1- mutant fraction in ALC cells treated with colcemid and 137Cs gamma-rays were largely due to chromosome loss and 11p deletions often containing a breakpoint within the centromeric region.

  20. Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6: Models of Viral Genome Release from the Telomere and Impacts on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Wood

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B, alongside some other herpesviruses, have the striking capacity to integrate into telomeres, the terminal repeated regions of chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated forms, ciHHV-6A and ciHHV-6B, are proposed to be a state of latency and it has been shown that they can both be inherited if integration occurs in the germ line. The first step in full viral reactivation must be the release of the integrated viral genome from the telomere and here we propose various models of this release involving transcription of the viral genome, replication fork collapse, and t-circle mediated release. In this review, we also discuss the relationship between ciHHV-6 and the telomere carrying the insertion, particularly how the presence and subsequent partial or complete release of the ciHHV-6 genome may affect telomere dynamics and the risk of disease.

  1. Chromosome 7 and 19 trisomy in cultured human neural progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhruv Sareen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stem cell expansion and differentiation is the foundation of emerging cell therapy technologies. The potential applications of human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs are wide ranging, but a normal cytogenetic profile is important to avoid the risk of tumor formation in clinical trials. FDA approved clinical trials are being planned and conducted for hNPC transplantation into the brain or spinal cord for various neurodegenerative disorders. Although human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are known to show recurrent chromosomal abnormalities involving 12 and 17, no studies have revealed chromosomal abnormalities in cultured hNPCs. Therefore, we investigated frequently occurring chromosomal abnormalities in 21 independent fetal-derived hNPC lines and the possible mechanisms triggering such aberrations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: While most hNPC lines were karyotypically normal, G-band karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH analyses revealed the emergence of trisomy 7 (hNPC(+7 and trisomy 19 (hNPC(+19, in 24% and 5% of the lines, respectively. Once detected, subsequent passaging revealed emerging dominance of trisomy hNPCs. DNA microarray and immunoblotting analyses demonstrate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR overexpression in hNPC(+7 and hNPC(+19 cells. We observed greater levels of telomerase (hTERT, increased proliferation (Ki67, survival (TUNEL, and neurogenesis (beta(III-tubulin in hNPC(+7 and hNPC(+19, using respective immunocytochemical markers. However, the trisomy lines underwent replicative senescence after 50-60 population doublings and never showed neoplastic changes. Although hNPC(+7 and hNPC(+19 survived better after xenotransplantation into the rat striatum, they did not form malignant tumors. Finally, EGF deprivation triggered a selection of trisomy 7 cells in a diploid hNPC line. CONCLUSIONS: We report that hNPCs are susceptible to accumulation of chromosome 7 and 19 trisomy in long-term cell culture. These

  2. Identification of 200,000-dalton human cell surface protein encoded by gene mapped to long arm of chromosome 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, M; Kao, F T; Law, M L; Jones, C

    1986-03-01

    Cell surface proteins and glycoproteins of human and Chinese hamster cells and their hybrid cell clones were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The J1 clone of human-Chinese hamster hybrid cells contained chromosome 11 as its only human chromosome. The J1 cells expressed a glycoprotein of 200,000 daltons which was shared by human fibroblasts but not by the parental Chinese hamster ovary cells. The 200,000-dalton protein was identified as a cell surface protein by the method of lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. The protein was electrophoretically purified from radioiodinated cultures of human fibroblasts and J1 cells and subjected to the analysis of tryptic peptides by thin-layer electrophoresis followed by chromatography. The protein from both sources gave rise to fingerprints which closely resembled to each other. The results are consistent with a hypothesis that the 200,000-dalton protein of the J1 clone is of human origin. Analysis of segregant clones of J1 cells, which have deletions on human chromosome 11, has further suggested that the gene for this glycoprotein maps to the long arm of chromosome 11. A gene coding for the 200,000-dalton protein has not been previously mapped to this chromosome.

  3. Dysregulation of gene expression in the artificial human trisomy cells of chromosome 8 associated with transformed cell phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisakatsu Nawata

    Full Text Available A change in chromosome number, known as aneuploidy, is a common characteristic of cancer. Aneuploidy disrupts gene expression in human cancer cells and immortalized human epithelial cells, but not in normal human cells. However, the relationship between aneuploidy and cancer remains unclear. To study the effects of aneuploidy in normal human cells, we generated artificial cells of human primary fibroblast having three chromosome 8 (trisomy 8 cells by using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer technique. In addition to decreased proliferation, the trisomy 8 cells lost contact inhibition and reproliferated after exhibiting senescence-like characteristics that are typical of transformed cells. Furthermore, the trisomy 8 cells exhibited chromosome instability, and the overall gene expression profile based on microarray analyses was significantly different from that of diploid human primary fibroblasts. Our data suggest that aneuploidy, even a single chromosome gain, can be introduced into normal human cells and causes, in some cases, a partial cancer phenotype due to a disruption in overall gene expression.

  4. The X chromosome Alu insertions as a tool for human population genetics: data from European and African human groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiadis, Georgios; Esteban, Esther; Via, Marc; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Moschonas, Nicholas; Chaabani, Hassen; Moral, Pedro

    2007-05-01

    Alu elements are the most abundant mobile elements in the human genome (approximately 1,100,000 copies). Polymorphic Alu elements have been proved to be useful in studies of human origins and relationships owing to two important advantages: identity by descent and absence of the Alu element known to be the ancestral state. Alu variation in the X chromosome has been described previously in human populations but, as far as we know, these elements have not been used in population relationship studies. Here, we describe the allele frequencies of 13 'young' Alu elements of the X chromosome (Ya5DP62, Ya5DP57, Yb8DP49, Ya5a2DP1, Yb8DP2, Ya5DP3, Ya5NBC37, Yd3JX437, Ya5DP77, Ya5NBC491, Yb8NBC578, Ya5DP4 and Ya5DP13) in six human populations from sub-Saharan Africa (the Ivory Coast), North Africa (Moroccan High Atlas, Siwa oasis in Egypt, Tunisia), Greece (Crete Island) and Spain (Basque Country). Eight out of 13 Alu elements have shown remarkably high gene diversity values in all groups (average heterozygosities: 0.342 in the Ivory Coast, 0.250 in North Africa, 0.209 in Europe). Genetic relationships agree with a geographical pattern of differentiation among populations, with some peculiar features observed in North Africans. Crete Island and the Basque Country show the lowest genetic distance (0.0163) meanwhile Tunisia, in spite of its geographical location, lies far from the other two North African samples. The results of our work demonstrate that X chromosome Alu elements comprise a reliable set of genetic markers useful to describe human population relationships for fine-scale geographical studies.

  5. Chromosomal mapping, gene structure and characterization of the human and murine RAB27B gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huxley Clare

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab GTPases are regulators of intracellular membrane traffic. The Rab27 subfamily consists of Rab27a and Rab27b. Rab27a has been recently implicated in Griscelli Disease, a disease combining partial albinism with severe immunodeficiency. Rab27a plays a key role in the function of lysosomal-like organelles such as melanosomes in melanocytes and lytic granules in cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Little is known about Rab27b. Results The human RAB27B gene is organised in six exons, spanning about 69 kb in the chromosome 18q21.1 region. Exon 1 is non-coding and is separated from the others by 49 kb of DNA and exon 6 contains a long 3' untranslated sequence (6.4 kb. The mouse Rab27b cDNA shows 95% identity with the human cDNA at the protein level and maps to mouse chromosome 18. The mouse mRNA was detected in stomach, large intestine, spleen and eye by RT-PCR, and in heart, brain, spleen and kidney by Northern blot. Transient over-expression of EGF-Rab27b fusion protein in cultured melanocytes revealed that Rab27b is associated with melanosomes, as observed for EGF-Rab27a. Conclusions Our results indicate that the Rab27 subfamily of Ras-like GTPases is highly conserved in mammals. There is high degree of conservation in sequence and gene structure between RAB27A and RAB27B genes. Exogenous expression of Rab27b in melanocytes results in melanosomal association as observed for Rab27a, suggesting the two Rab27 proteins are functional homologues. As with RAB27A in Griscelli Disease, RAB27B may be also associated with human disease mapping to chromosome 18.

  6. Integration sites of Epstein-Barr virus genome on chromosomes of human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuu, K.D.; Chen, Y.J.; Wang-Wuu, S. [Institute of Genetics, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the pathogen of infectious mononucleosis. The viral genome is present in more than 95% of the African cases of Burkitt lymphoma and it is usually maintained in episomal form in the tumor cells. Viral integration has been described only for Nanalwa which is a Burkitt lymphoma cell line lacking episomes. In order to examine the role of EBV in the immortalization of human Blymphocytes, we investigated whether the EBV integration into the human genome is essential. If the integration does occur, we would like to know whether the integration is randomly distributed or whether the viral DNA integrates preferentially at certain sites. Fourteen in vitro immortalized human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a biotinylated EBV BamHI w DNA fragment as probe. The episomal form of EBV DNA was found in all cells of these cell lines, while only about 65% of the cells have the integrated viral DNA. This might suggest that integration is not a pre-requisite for cell immortalization. Although all chromosomes, except Y, have been found with integrated viral genome, chromsomes 1 and 5 are the most frequent EBV DNA carrier (p<0.05). Nine chromosome bands, namely, 1p31, 1q31, 2q32, 3q13, 3q26, 5q14, 6q24, 7q31 and 12q21, are preferential targets for EBV integration (p<0.001). Eighty percent of the total 938 EBV hybridization signals were found to be at G-band-positive area. This suggests that the mechanism of EBV integration might be different from that of the retroviruses, which specifically integrate to G-band-negative areas. Thus, we conclude that the integration of EBV to host genome is non-random and it may have something to do with the structure of chromosome and DNA sequences.

  7. Localization of Shaw-related K+ channel genes on mouse and human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, M; Ward, D C; Lee, J; Roses, A D; Clarke, V; D'Eustachio, P; Lau, D; Vega-Saenz de Miera, E; Rudy, B

    1993-12-01

    Four related genes, Shaker, Shab, Shaw, and Shal, encode voltage-gated K+ channels in Drosophila. Multigene subfamilies corresponding to each of these Drosophila genes have been identified in rodents and primates; this suggests that the four genes are older than the common ancestor of present-day insects and mammals and that the expansion of each into a family occurred before the divergence of rodents and primates. In order to define these evolutionary relationships more precisely and to facilitate the search for mammalian candidate K+ channel gene mutations, we have mapped members of the Shaw-homologous gene family in humans and mice. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of human metaphase chromosomes mapped KCNC2 (KShIIIA, KV3.2) and KCNC3 (KShIIID, KV3.3) to Chromosome (Chr) 19q13.3-q13.4. Inheritance patterns of DNA restriction fragment length variants in recombinant inbred strains of mice placed the homologous mouse genes on distal Chr 10 near Ms15-8 and Mdm-1. The mouse Kcnc1 (KShIIIB, NGK2-KV4, KV3.1) gene mapped to Chr7 near Tam-1. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the generation of the mammalian KCNC gene family included both duplication events to generate family members in tandem arrays (KCNC2, KCNC3) and dispersion of family members to unlinked chromosomal sites (KCNC1). The KNCN2 and KCNC3 genes define a new synteny group between humans and mice.

  8. A high density of human communication-associated genes in chromosome 7q31-q36: differential expression in human and non-human primate cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E; Jensen, L R; Farcas, R; Kondova, I; Bontrop, R E; Navarro, B; Fuchs, E; Kuss, A W; Haaf, T

    2012-01-01

    The human brain is distinguished by its remarkable size, high energy consumption, and cognitive abilities compared to all other mammals and non-human primates. However, little is known about what has accelerated brain evolution in the human lineage. One possible explanation is that the appearance of advanced communication skills and language has been a driving force of human brain development. The phenotypic adaptations in brain structure and function which occurred on the way to modern humans may be associated with specific molecular signatures in today's human genome and/or transcriptome. Genes that have been linked to language, reading, and/or autism spectrum disorders are prime candidates when searching for genes for human-specific communication abilities. The database and genome-wide expression analyses we present here revealed a clustering of such communication-associated genes (COAG) on human chromosomes X and 7, in particular chromosome 7q31-q36. Compared to the rest of the genome, we found a high number of COAG to be differentially expressed in the cortices of humans and non-human primates (chimpanzee, baboon, and/or marmoset). The role of X-linked genes for the development of human-specific cognitive abilities is well known. We now propose that chromosome 7q31-q36 also represents a hot spot for the evolution of human-specific communication abilities. Selective pressure on the T cell receptor beta locus on chromosome 7q34, which plays a pivotal role in the immune system, could have led to rapid dissemination of positive gene variants in hitchhiking COAG. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Localization of the gene for the ciliary neutrotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR) to human chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, D.H.; Jones, C.; Patterson, D. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Denver, CO (United States) Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, CO (United States)); Britt, D.E.; Jackson, C.L. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to be important for the survival of motor neurons and has shown activity in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). CNTF therefore holds promise as a treatment for ALS, and it and its receptor (CNTFR) are candidates for a gene involved in familial ALS. The CNTFR gene was mapped to chromosome 9 by PCR on a panel of human/CHO somatic cell hybrids and localized to 9p13 by PCR on a panel of radiation hybrids. 18 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Human artificial chromosome-based gene delivery vectors for biomedicine and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalay; Tomilin, Alexey N; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C; Larionov, Vladimir

    2014-04-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have several advantages over viruses as gene delivery vectors, including stable episomal maintenance in a single copy and the ability to carry large gene inserts. In this review, we summarise recent work on gene transfer into mammalian cells using the HACs. HACs allow therapeutic transgenes to be expressed in target cells under conditions that recapitulate the physiological regulation of endogenous loci. Based on the published data, the HAC vectors have a great potential for gene therapy, regenerative medicine, screening of anticancer drugs and biotechnology.

  11. Localization of a human homolog of the mouse pericentrin gene (PCNT) to chromosome 21qter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haiming [Univ. of Geneva Medical School (Switzerland); Gos, A.; Morris, M.A. [Cantonal Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Exon trapping was used to identify portions of genes from cosmid DNA of a human chromosome 21-specific library LL21NC02-Q. More than 650 potential exons have been cloned and characterized to date. Among these, 3 trapped {open_quotes}exons{close_quotes} showed strong homology to different regions of the cDNA for the mouse pericentrin (Pcnt) gene, indicating that these 3 exons are portions of a human homolog of the mouse pericentrin gene. With PCR amplification, Southern blot analysis, and FISH, we have mapped this presumed human pericentrin gene (PCNT) to the long arm of chromosome 21 between marker PFKL and 21qter. Pericentrin is a conserved protein component of the filamentous matrix of the centrosome involved in the initial establishment of the organized microtubule array. No candidate hereditary disorder for pericentrin deficiency/abnormality has yet been mapped in the most distal region of 21q; in addition the role of triplication of the pericentrin gene in the pathophysiology or etiology of trisomy 21 is currently unknown. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Sodium arsenite induces chromosome endoreduplication and inhibits protein phosphatase activity in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong-Nan Huang; I-Ching Ho; Ling-Hui Yih [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Taiwan (China)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic, strongly associated with increased risks of human cancers, is a potent clastogen in a variety of mammalian cell systems. The effect of sodium arsenite (a trivalent arsenic compound) on chromatid separation was studied in human skin fibroblasts (HFW). Human fibroblasts were arrested in S phase by the aid of serum starvation and aphidicolin blocking and then these cells were allowed to synchronously progress into G2 phase. Treatment of the G2-enriched HFW cells with sodium arsenite (0-200 {mu}M) resulted in arrest of cells in the G2 phase, interference with mitotic division, inhibition of spindle assembly, and induction of chromosome endoreduplication in their second mitosis. Sodium arsenite treatment also inhibited the activities of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and enhanced phosphorylation levels of a small heat shock protein (HSP27). These results suggest that sodium arsenite may mimic okadaic acid to induce chromosome endoreduplication through its inhibitory effect on protein phosphatase activity. 61 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Hi-C-constrained physical models of human chromosomes recover functionally-related properties of genome organization

    CERN Document Server

    Di Stefano, Marco; Lien, Tonje G; Hovig, Eivind; Micheletti, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Combining genome-wide structural models with phenomenological data is at the forefront of efforts to understand the organizational principles regulating the human genome. Here, we use chromosome-chromosome contact data as knowledge-based constraints for large-scale three-dimensional models of the human diploid genome. The resulting models remain minimally entangled and acquire several functional features that are observed in vivo and that were never used as input for the model. We find, for instance, that gene-rich, active regions are drawn towards the nuclear center, while gene poor and lamina-associated domains are pushed to the periphery. These and other properties persist upon adding local contact constraints, suggesting their compatibility with non-local constraints for the genome organization. The results show that suitable combinations of data analysis and physical modelling can expose the unexpectedly rich functionally-related properties implicit in chromosome-chromosome contact data. Specific directi...

  14. Genetic control of chromosome behaviour: Implications in evolution, crop improvement, and human biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes and chromosome pairing are pivotal to all biological sciences. The study of chromosomes helps unravel several aspects of an organism. Although the foundation of genetics occurred with the formulation of the laws of heredity in 1865, long before the discovery of chromosomes, their subsequ...

  15. Isolation of anonymous, polymorphic DNA fragments from human chromosome 22q12-qter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Dumanski (Jan); A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); M. Ruttledge (Martin); A. Wladis (Andreas); N. Sugawa (Noriaki); V.P. Collins (Peter); M. Nordenskjöld

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA series of 195 random chromosome 22-specific probes, equivalent to approximately 1% of the size of this chromosome, have been isolated from a chromosome 22-specific bacteriophage lambda genomic library. These probes were mapped to four different regions of chromosome 22 on a panel of

  16. Tissue-specific expression of the human laminin alpha5-chain, and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 and to distal mouse chromosome 2 near the locus for the ragged (Ra) mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the function of the laminin alpha5-chain, previously identified in mice, cDNA clones encoding the 953-amino-acid carboxy terminal G-domain of the human laminin alpha5-chain were characterized. Northern blot analysis showed that the laminin alpha5-chain is expressed in human placenta......, heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The human laminin alpha5-chain gene (LAMA5) was assigned to chromosome 20q13.2-q13.3 by in situ hybridization, and the mouse gene (Lama5) was mapped by linkage analysis to a syntonic region of distal chromosome 2, close to the locus for the ragged (Ra...

  17. Comparative analysis of the gene-dense ACHE/TFR2 region on human chromosome 7q22 with the orthologous region on mouse chromosome 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M D; Riemer, C; Martindale, D W; Schnupf, P; Boright, A P; Cheung, T L; Hardy, D M; Schwartz, S; Scherer, S W; Tsui, L C; Miller, W; Koop, B F

    2001-03-15

    Chromosome 7q22 has been the focus of many cytogenetic and molecular studies aimed at delineating regions commonly deleted in myeloid leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes. We have compared a gene-dense, GC-rich sub-region of 7q22 with the orthologous region on mouse chromosome 5. A physical map of 640 kb of genomic DNA from mouse chromosome 5 was derived from a series of overlapping bacterial artificial chromosomes. A 296 kb segment from the physical map, spanning ACHE: to Tfr2, was compared with 267 kb of human sequence. We identified a conserved linkage of 12 genes including an open reading frame flanked by ACHE: and Asr2, a novel cation-chloride cotransporter interacting protein Cip1, Ephb4, Zan and Perq1. While some of these genes have been previously described, in each case we present new data derived from our comparative sequence analysis. Adjacent unfinished sequence data from the mouse contains an orthologous block of 10 additional genes including three novel cDNA sequences that we subsequently mapped to human 7q22. Methods for displaying comparative genomic information, including unfinished sequence data, are becoming increasingly important. We supplement our printed comparative analysis with a new, Web-based program called Laj (local alignments with java). Laj provides interactive access to archived pairwise sequence alignments via the WWW. It displays synchronized views of a dot-plot, a percent identity plot, a nucleotide-level local alignment and a variety of relevant annotations. Our mouse-human comparison can be viewed at http://web.uvic.ca/~bioweb/laj.html. Laj is available at http://bio.cse.psu.edu/, along with online documentation and additional examples of annotated genomic regions.

  18. Inter-chromosomal variation in the pattern of human population genetic structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baye Tesfaye M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emerging technologies now make it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of genetic variations in individuals, across the genome. The study of loci at finer scales will facilitate the understanding of genetic variation at genomic and geographic levels. We examined global and chromosomal variations across HapMap populations using 3.7 million single nucleotide polymorphisms to search for the most stratified genomic regions of human populations and linked these regions to ontological annotation and functional network analysis. To achieve this, we used five complementary statistical and genetic network procedures: principal component (PC, cluster, discriminant, fixation index (FST and network/pathway analyses. At the global level, the first two PC scores were sufficient to account for major population structure; however, chromosomal level analysis detected subtle forms of population structure within continental populations, and as many as 31 PCs were required to classify individuals into homogeneous groups. Using recommended population ancestry differentiation measures, a total of 126 regions of the genome were catalogued. Gene ontology and networks analyses revealed that these regions included the genes encoding oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2, hect domain and RLD 2 (HERC2, ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR and solute carrier family 45, member 2 (SLC45A2. These genes are associated with melanin production, which is involved in the development of skin and hair colour, skin cancer and eye pigmentation. We also identified the genes encoding interferon-γ (IFNG and death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1, which are associated with cell death, inflammatory and immunological diseases. An in-depth understanding of these genomic regions may help to explain variations in adaptation to different environments. Our approach offers a comprehensive strategy for analysing chromosome-based population structure and differentiation, and demonstrates the

  19. Copy number variation arising from gene conversion on the human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wentao; Massaia, Andrea; Louzada, Sandra; Banerjee, Ruby; Hallast, Pille; Chen, Yuan; Bergström, Anders; Gu, Yong; Leonard, Steven; Quail, Michael A; Ayub, Qasim; Yang, Fengtang; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Xue, Yali

    2018-01-01

    We describe the variation in copy number of a ~ 10 kb region overlapping the long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) gene, TTTY22, within the IR3 inverted repeat on the short arm of the human Y chromosome, leading to individuals with 0-3 copies of this region in the general population. Variation of this CNV is common, with 266 individuals having 0 copies, 943 (including the reference sequence) having 1, 23 having 2 copies, and two having 3 copies, and was validated by breakpoint PCR, fibre-FISH, and 10× Genomics Chromium linked-read sequencing in subsets of 1234 individuals from the 1000 Genomes Project. Mapping the changes in copy number to the phylogeny of these Y chromosomes previously established by the Project identified at least 20 mutational events, and investigation of flanking paralogous sequence variants showed that the mutations involved flanking sequences in 18 of these, and could extend over > 30 kb of DNA. While either gene conversion or double crossover between misaligned sister chromatids could formally explain the 0-2 copy events, gene conversion is the more likely mechanism, and these events include the longest non-allelic gene conversion reported thus far. Chromosomes with three copies of this CNV have arisen just once in our data set via another mechanism: duplication of 420 kb that places the third copy 230 kb proximal to the existing proximal copy. Our results establish gene conversion as a previously under-appreciated mechanism of generating copy number changes in humans and reveal the exceptionally large size of the conversion events that can occur.

  20. Chromatin remodeling of human subtelomeres and TERRA promoters upon cellular senescence: commonalities and differences between chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Peter E; Tobi, Elmar W; Balog, Judit; Schouten, Suzanne G; Kremer, Dennis; El Bouazzaoui, Fatiha; Henneman, Peter; Putter, Hein; Eline Slagboom, P; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2013-05-01

    Subtelomeres are patchworks of evolutionary conserved sequence blocks and harbor the transcriptional start sites for telomere repeat containing RNAs (TERRA). Recent studies suggest that the interplay between telomeres and subtelomeric chromatin is required for maintaining telomere function. To further characterize chromatin remodeling of subtelomeres in relation to telomere shortening and cellular senescence, we systematically quantified histone modifications and DNA methylation at the subtelomeres of chromosomes 7q and 11q in primary human WI-38 fibroblasts. Upon senescence, both subtelomeres were characterized by a decrease in markers of constitutive heterochromatin, suggesting relative chromatin relaxation. However, we did not find increased levels of markers of euchromatin or derepression of the 7q VIPR2 gene. The repressed state of the subtelomeres was maintained upon senescence, which could be attributed to a rise in levels of facultative heterochromatin markers at both subtelomeres. While senescence-induced subtelomeric chromatin remodeling was similar for both chromosomes, chromatin remodeling at TERRA promoters displayed chromosome-specific patterns. At the 7q TERRA promoter, chromatin structure was co-regulated with the more proximal subtelomere. In contrast, the 11q TERRA promoter, which was previously shown to be bound by CCCTC-binding factor CTCF, displayed lower levels of markers of constitutive heterochromatin that did not change upon senescence, whereas levels of markers of facultative heterochromatin decreased upon senescence. In line with the chromatin state data, transcription of 11q TERRA but not 7q TERRA was detected. Our study provides a detailed description of human subtelomeric chromatin dynamics and shows distinct regulation of the TERRA promoters of 7q and 11q upon cellular senescence.

  1. The Biological Effectiveness of Different Radiation Qualities for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to Si-28-ions with energies ranging from 90 to 600 MeV/u, Ti-48-ions with energies ranging from 240 to 1000 MeV/u, or to Fe-56-ions with energies ranging from 200 to 5,000 MeV/u. The LET of the various Si beams in this study ranged from 48 to 158 keV/ m, the LET of the Ti ions ranged from 107 to 240 keV/micron, and the LET of the Fe-ions ranged from 145 to 440 keV/ m. Doses delivered were in the 10- to 200-cGy range. Dose-response curves for chromosome exchanges in cells at first division after exposure, measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes, were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The estimates of RBEmax values for total chromosome exchanges ranged from 4.4+/-0.4 to 31.5+/-2.6 for Fe ions, 21.4+/-1.7 to 28.3+/-2.4 for Ti ions, and 11.8+/-1.0 to 42.2+/-3.3 for Si ions. The highest RBEmax value for Fe ions was obtained with the 600 MeV/u beam, the highest RBEmax value for Ti ions was obtained 1000 MeV/u beam, and the highest RBEmax value for Si ions was obtained with the 170 MeV/u beam. For Si and Fe ions the RBEmax values increased with LET, reaching a maximum at about 180 keV/micron for Fe and about 100 keV/micron for Si, and decreasing with further increase in LET. Additional studies for low doses Si-28-ions down to 0.02 Gy will be discussed.

  2. Clinical effect of increasing doses of lenalidomide in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with chromosome 5 abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllgård, Lars; Saft, Leonie; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with chromosome 5 abnormalities and high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes or acute myeloid leukemia have a poor outcome. We hypothesized that increasing doses of lenalidomide may benefit this group of patients by inhibiting the tumor clone, as assessed by fluorescence in situ...... hybridization for del(5q31). DESIGN AND METHODS: Twenty-eight patients at diagnosis or with relapsed disease and not eligible for standard therapy (16 with acute myeloid leukemia, 12 with intermediate-risk 2 or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome) were enrolled in this prospective phase II multicenter trial...

  3. Comparison of Radiosensitivity of Human Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 from One Healthy Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ramadhani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In general, it was assumed that the chromosome aberration induced by ionizing radiation is proportional to the chromosome size. From this viewpoint, the higher chromosome size, the more resistant to radiation. However, different opinions, in which chromosomes are particularly sensitive or resistant to radiation, are also still followed until now. Here in this research, we compared the chromosome sensitivity between chromosomes number 1, 2, and 4 using the FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization technique. From this research, we expect that the information obtained could show clearly whether a longer chromosome is more frequently involved in translocations and also more resistant to radiation than a shorter one. The type of chromosome aberration considered was limited only to translocation and we used one sample donor in order to avoid donor variability. The whole blood from a healthy female was irradiated with γ-rays with doses of 1, 3 and 5 Gy, respectively. Isolated lymphocytes from the whole blood were then cultured for 48 hours. After the culture process was completed, preparations of harvest and metaphase chromosomes were carried out. Chromosomes 1, 2, and 4 were stained with different fluorochromes. The translocation of each chromosome at each dose point was subsequently evaluated from 50 images obtained from an automated metaphase finder and capturing system. An additional analysis was performed to identify which chromosome arm was more frequently involved in translocation. Further analyses were also conducted with the aim of determining which chromosome band had a higher frequency of radiation-induced breakage. The experimental results showed that chromosome number 4 was more frequently involved in translocations compared to chromosomes 1 and 2 at 5 Gy. In contrast, at doses of 1 and 3 Gy translocations involving chromosomes number 1 and 2 were more numerous compared to the ones involving chromosome 4. However, if the number of

  4. Recombination rates and genomic shuffling in human and chimpanzee--a new twist in the chromosomal speciation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Marta; Micheletti, Diego; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2013-04-01

    A long-standing question in evolutionary biology concerns the effect of recombination in shaping the genomic architecture of organisms and, in particular, how this impacts the speciation process. Despite efforts employed in the last decade, the role of chromosomal reorganizations in the human-chimpanzee speciation process remains unresolved. Through whole-genome comparisons, we have analyzed the genome-wide impact of genomic shuffling in the distribution of human recombination rates during the human-chimpanzee speciation process. We have constructed a highly refined map of the reorganizations and evolutionary breakpoint regions in the human and chimpanzee genomes based on orthologous genes and genome sequence alignments. The analysis of the most recent human and chimpanzee recombination maps inferred from genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data revealed that the standardized recombination rate was significantly lower in rearranged than in collinear chromosomes. In fact, rearranged chromosomes presented significantly lower recombination rates than chromosomes that have been maintained since the ancestor of great apes, and this was related with the lineage in which they become fixed. Importantly, inverted regions had lower recombination rates than collinear and noninverted regions, independently of the effect of centromeres. Our observations have implications for the chromosomal speciation theory, providing new evidences for the contribution of inversions in suppressing recombination in mammals.

  5. Differential radio-sensitivities of human chromosomes 1 and 2 in one donor in interphase- and metaphase-spreads after 60Co ?-irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pathak, Rupak; Ramakumar, Adarsh; Subramanian, Uma; Prasanna, Pataje GS

    2009-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations lead to a plethora of detrimental effects at cellular level. Chromosome aberrations provide broad spectrum of information ranging from probability of malignant transformation to assessment of absorbed dose. Studies mapping differences in radiation sensitivities between human chromosomes are seldom undertaken. Consequently, health risk assessment based on radio-sensitivities of individual chromosomes may be erroneous. Our efforts in this arti...

  6. X chromosome inactivation in human pluripotent stem cells as a model for human development: back to the drawing board?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geens, Mieke; Chuva De Sousa Lopes, Susana M

    2017-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC), both embryonic and induced (hESC and hiPSC), are regarded as a valuable in vitro model for early human development. In order to fulfil this promise, it is important that these cells mimic as closely as possible the in vivo molecular events, both at the genetic and epigenetic level. One of the most important epigenetic events during early human development is X chromosome inactivation (XCI), the transcriptional silencing of one of the two X chromosomes in female cells. XCI is important for proper development and aberrant XCI has been linked to several pathologies. Recently, novel data obtained using high throughput single-cell technology during human preimplantation development have suggested that the XCI mechanism is substantially different from XCI in mouse. It has also been suggested that hPSC show higher complexity in XCI than the mouse. Here we compare the available recent data to understand whether XCI during human preimplantation can be properly recapitulated using hPSC. We will summarize what is known on the timing and mechanisms of XCI during human preimplantation development. We will compare this to the XCI patterns that are observed during hPSC derivation, culture and differentiation, and comment on the cause of the aberrant XCI patterns observed in hPSC. Finally, we will discuss the implications of the aberrant XCI patterns on the applicability of hPSC as an in vitro model for human development and as cell source for regenerative medicine. Combinations of the following keywords were applied as search criteria in the PubMed database: X chromosome inactivation, preimplantation development, embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, primordial germ cells, differentiation. Recent single-cell RNASeq data have shed new light on the XCI process during human preimplantation development. These indicate a gradual inactivation on both XX chromosomes, starting from Day 4 of development and followed by a random choice

  7. A DNA fragment from the human X chromosome short arm which detects a partially homologous sequence on the Y chromosomes long arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, M; Camerino, G; Heilig, R; Mandel, J L

    1984-05-25

    An X linked human DNA fragment (named DXS31 ) which detects partially homologous sequences on the Y chromosome has been isolated. Regional localisation of the two sex linked sequences was determined using a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. The X specific sequence is located at the tip of the short arm ( Xp22 .3-pter), i.e. within or close to the region which pairs with the Y chromosome short arm at meiosis. However the Y specific sequence is located in the heterochromatic region of the long arm ( Yq11 -qter) and lies outside from the pairing region. DNAs from several XX male subjects were probed with DXS31 and in all cases a double dose of the X linked fragment was found, and the Y specific fragment was absent. DXS31 detects in chimpanzee a male-female differential pattern identical to that found in man. However results obtained in a more distantly related species, the brown lemur, suggest that the sequences detected by DXS31 in this species might be autosomally coded. The features observed with these X-Y related sequences do not fit with that expected from current hypotheses of homology between the pairing regions of the two sex chromosomes, nor with the pattern observed with other X-Y homologous sequences recently characterized. Our results suggest also that the rule of conservation of X linkage in mammals might not apply to sequences present on the tip of the X chromosome short arm, in bearing with the controversial issue of steroid sulfatase localisation in mouse.

  8. Prevalence of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 in patients with human herpesvirus 6-central nervous system dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joshua A; Sedlak, Ruth Hall; Zerr, Danielle M; Huang, Meei-Li; Yeung, Cecilia; Myerson, David; Jerome, Keith R; Boeckh, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    We identified 37 hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) central nervous system dysfunction and tested donor-recipient pairs for chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6). One patient had ciHHV-6A with possible HHV-6A reactivation and encephalitis. There was no ciHHV-6 enrichment in this group, but larger studies are needed to determine if patients with ciHHV-6 are at increased risk for HHV-6-associated diseases or other complications. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of 62 hybrid assembled human Y chromosomes exposes rapid structural changes and high rates of gene conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Skov, Laurits; Maretty, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    The human Y-chromosome does not recombine across its male-specific part and is therefore an excellent marker of human migrations. It also plays an important role in male fertility. However, its evolution is difficult to fully understand because of repetitive sequences, inverted repeats...

  10. The human thyroglobulin gene: a polymorphic marker localized distal to C-MYC on chromosome 8 band q24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, F.; Bikker, H.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Melsert, R.; Pearson, P. L.; de Vijlder, J. J.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    The human thyroglobulin (Tg) gene is localized to chromosome 8 and regionally to band q24 as shown independently by both in situ hybridization techniques and Southern blot analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Analysis of hybrids derived from a Burkitt lymphoma, with a translocation

  11. Assignment of the human organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) gene to chromosome 12p12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kullak-Ublick, G. A.; Beuers, U.; Meier, P. J.; Domdey, H.; Paumgartner, G.

    1996-01-01

    The organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) of human liver mediates the basolateral hepatocellular uptake of numerous cholephilic anions and steroidal compounds. The aim of this study was to clone the human OATP gene and to map its chromosomal localization by fluorescence in situ

  12. Stabilization of Telomere G-Quadruplexes Interferes with Human Herpesvirus 6A Chromosomal Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Gravel, Annie; Artusi, Sara; Richter, Sara N; Wallaschek, Nina; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2017-07-15

    Human herpesviruses 6A and 6B (HHV-6A/B) can integrate their genomes into the telomeres of human chromosomes using a mechanism that remains poorly understood. To achieve a better understanding of the HHV-6A/B integration mechanism, we made use of BRACO-19, a compound that stabilizes G-quadruplex secondary structures and prevents telomere elongation by the telomerase complex. First, we analyzed the folding of telomeric sequences into G-quadruplex structures and their binding to BRACO-19 using G-quadruplex-specific antibodies and surface plasmon resonance. Circular dichroism studies indicate that BRACO-19 modifies the conformation and greatly stabilizes the G-quadruplexes formed in G-rich telomeric DNA. Subsequently we assessed the effects of BRACO-19 on the HHV-6A initial phase of infection. Our results indicate that BRACO-19 does not affect entry of HHV-6A DNA into cells. We next investigated if stabilization of G-quadruplexes by BRACO-19 affected HHV-6A's ability to integrate its genome into host chromosomes. Incubation of telomerase-expressing cells with BRACO-19, such as HeLa and MCF-7, caused a significant reduction in the HHV-6A integration frequency ( P integration frequency in U2OS cells that lack telomerase activity and elongate their telomeres through alternative lengthening mechanisms. Our data suggest that the fluidity of telomeres is important for efficient chromosomal integration of HHV-6A and that interference with telomerase activity negatively affects the generation of cellular clones containing integrated HHV-6A. IMPORTANCE HHV-6A/B can integrate their genomes into the telomeres of infected cells. Telomeres consist of repeated hexanucleotides (TTAGGG) of various lengths (up to several kilobases) and end with a single-stranded 3' extension. To avoid recognition and induce a DNA damage response, the single-stranded overhang folds back on itself and forms a telomeric loop (T-loop) or adopts a tertiary structure, referred to as a G-quadruplex. In the

  13. The use of premature chromosome condensation to study in interphase cells the influence of environmental factors on human genetic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki I. Hatzi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is a constantly increasing concern regarding the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a variety of harmful environmental factors to which humans are exposed in their natural and anthropogenic environment. These factors exert their hazardous potential in humans' personal (diet, smoking, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and occupational environment that constitute part of the anthropogenic environment. It is well known that genetic damage due to these factors has dramatic implications for human health. Since most of the environmental genotoxic factors induce arrest or delay in cell cycle progression, the conventional analysis of chromosomes at metaphase may underestimate their genotoxic potential. Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC induced either by means of cell fusion or specific chemicals, enables the microscopic visualization of interphase chromosomes whose morphology depends on the cell cycle stage, as well as the analysis of structural and numerical aberrations at the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. The PCC has been successfully used in problems involving cell cycle analysis, diagnosis and prognosis of human leukaemia, assessment of interphase chromosome malformations resulting from exposure to radiation or chemicals, as well as elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the conversion of DNA damage into chromosomal damage. In this report, particular emphasis is given to the advantages of the PCC methodology used as an alternative to conventional metaphase analysis in answering questions in the fields of radiobiology, biological dosimetry, toxicogenetics, clinical cytogenetics and experimental therapeutics.

  14. Physical mapping in the Cri du Chat region on human chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, D.M.; Bengtsson, U. [Univ. of California, Irvine (United States); Niebuhr, E. [Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Cri du Chat syndrome is a segmental aneusomy associated with deletions in the short arm of human chromosome 5. More specifically, the cytogenetic band 5p15.2 must be deleted in order to manifest the typical phenotypic signs. We have studied several cell lines from individuals who have chromosomal abnormalities within this cytogenetic band but who do not have typical Cri du Chat syndrome. In fact, several individual studied have no discernible features of this syndrome. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and PCR analysis on somatic cell hybrids we have mapped the breakpoints relative to each other within this band. There is a great degree of phenotypic heterogeneity between several of the patients, even those which share common breakpoints. This heterogeneity makes it very difficult to narrow the region of interest to a very small (<1 Mb) region. In order to more thoroughly analyze this region, we have assembled a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of part of this region. This contig has been analyzed for STS content and covers approximately a 1.5-2.0 Mb region within 5p15.2. In addition, we have constructed a radiation hybrid map of the region. The YACs contained within the minimal contig have been used as hybridization probes to isolate corresponding cosmid clones within the region of interest. These cosmids, in turn, are being utilized to obtain potential exons using exon amplification. Several cosmids within this region have been isolated by STS content and potential exons have been isolated from them. These exons have been used as probes to isolate cDNA clones from the region. It is our hope that isolation of genes throughout the region of interest will allow a better understanding of the etiology of Cri du Chat.

  15. An unusual haplotype structure on human chromosome 8p23 derived from the inversion polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Libin; Zhang, Yuezheng; Kang, Jian; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Hongbin; Gao, Yang; Li, Chaohua; Pan, Hao; Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Dunmei; Niu, Tianhua; Yang, Huanming; Zeng, Changqing

    2008-10-01

    Chromosomal inversion is an important type of genomic variations involved in both evolution and disease pathogenesis. Here, we describe the refined genetic structure of a 3.8-Mb inversion polymorphism at chromosome 8p23. Using HapMap data of 1,073 SNPs generated from 209 unrelated samples from CEPH-Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe (CEU); Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI); and Asian (ASN) samples, which were comprised of Han Chinese from Beijing, China (CHB) and Japanese from Tokyo, Japan (JPT)-we successfully deduced the inversion orientations of all their 418 haplotypes. In particular, distinct haplotype subgroups were identified based on principal component analysis (PCA). Such genetic substructures were consistent with clustering patterns based on neighbor-joining tree reconstruction, which revealed a total of four haplotype clades across all samples. Metaphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in a subset of 10 HapMap samples verified their inversion orientations predicted by PCA or phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Positioning of the outgroup haplotype within one of YRI clades suggested that Human NCBI Build 36-inverted order is most likely the ancestral orientation. Furthermore, the population differentiation test and the relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH) analysis in this region discovered multiple selection signals, also in a population-specific manner. A positive selection signal was detected at XKR6 in the ASN population. These results revealed the correlation of inversion polymorphisms to population-specific genetic structures, and various selection patterns as possible mechanisms for the maintenance of a large chromosomal rearrangement at 8p23 region during evolution. In addition, our study also showed that haplotype-based clustering methods, such as PCA, can be applied in scanning for cryptic inversion polymorphisms at a genome-wide scale.

  16. Isolation of the human chromosomal band Xq28 within somatic cell hybrids by fragile X site breakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S.T.; Knight, S.J.L.; Peters, J.F.; Stayton, C.L.; Consalez, G.G.; Zhang, F. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The chromosomal fragile-site mapping to Xq27.3 is associated with a frequent form of mental retardation and is prone to breakage after induced deoxyribonucleotide pool perturbation. The human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) genes flank the fragile X chromosome site and can be used to monitor integrity of the site in human-hamster somatic cell hybrids deficient in the rodent forms of these activities. After induction of the fragile X site, negative selection for HPRT and positive enrichment for G6PD resulted in 31 independent colonies of HPRT{sup {minus}}, G6PD{sup +} phenotype. Southern blot analysis demonstrated the loss of all tested markers proximal to the fragile X site with retention of all tested human Xq28 loci in a majority of the hybrids. In situ hybridization with a human-specific probe demonstrated the translocation of a small amount of human DNA to rodent chromosomes in these hybrids, suggesting chromosome breakage at the fragile X site and the subsequent translocation of Xq28. Southern blot hybridization of hybrid-cell DNA, resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, for human-specific repetitive sequences revealed abundant CpG-islands within Xq28, consistent with its known gene density. The electrophoretic banding patterns of human DNA among the hybrids were remarkably consistent, suggesting that fragile X site breakage is limited to a relatively small region in Xq27-28.

  17. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome. Progress report, September 1991--November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  18. Chromosome fragility at FRAXA in human cleavage stage embryos at risk for fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdyck, Pieter; Berckmoes, Veerle; De Vos, Anick; Verpoest, Willem; Liebaers, Inge; Bonduelle, Maryse; De Rycke, Martine

    2015-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited intellectual disability syndrome, is caused by expansion and hypermethylation of the CGG repeat in the 5' UTR of the FMR1 gene. This expanded repeat, also known as the rare fragile site FRAXA, causes X chromosome fragility in cultured cells from patients but only when induced by perturbing pyrimidine synthesis. We performed preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) on 595 blastomeres biopsied from 442 cleavage stage embryos at risk for FXS using short tandem repeat (STR) markers. In six blastomeres, from five embryos an incomplete haplotype was observed with loss of all alleles telomeric to the CGG repeat. In all five embryos, the incomplete haplotype corresponded to the haplotype carrying the CGG repeat expansion. Subsequent analysis of additional blastomeres from three embryos by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) confirmed the presence of a terminal deletion with a breakpoint close to the CGG repeat in two blastomeres from one embryo. A blastomere from another embryo showed the complementary duplication. We conclude that a CGG repeat expansion at FRAXA causes X chromosome fragility in early human IVF embryos at risk for FXS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Induction of complete and incomplete chromosome aberrations by bleomycin in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkhaled, L.; Xuncla, M.; Caballin, M.R. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Unitat d' Antropologia Biologica, Departament de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal i Ecologia, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Barrios, L. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Unitat de Biologia Cel.lular, Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Unitat d' Antropologia Biologica, Departament de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal i Ecologia, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)], E-mail: Francesc.Barquinero@uab.es

    2008-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a clastogenic compound, which due to the overdispersion in the cell distribution of induced dicentrics has been compared to the effect of high-LET radiation. Recently, it has been described that in fibroblast derived cell lines BLM induces incomplete chromosome elements more efficiently than any type of ionizing radiation. The objective of the present study was to evaluate in human lymphocytes the induction of dicentrics and incomplete chromosome elements by BLM. Peripheral blood samples have been treated with different concentrations of BLM. Two cytogenetic techniques were applied, fluorescence plus Giemsa (FPG) and FISH using pan-centromeric and pan-telomeric probes. The observed frequency of dicentric equivalents increases linearly with the BLM concentration, and for all BLM concentrations the distribution of dicentric equivalents was overdispersed. In the FISH study the ratio between total incomplete elements and multicentrics was 0.27. The overdispersion in the dicentric cell distribution, and the linear BLM-concentration dependence of dicentrics can be compared to the effect of high-LET radiation, on the contrary the ratio of incomplete elements and multicentrics is similar to the one induced by low-LET radiation ({approx}0.40). The elevated proportion of interstitial deletions in relation to total acentric fragments, higher than any type of ionizing radiation could be a characteristic signature of the clastogenic effect of BLM.

  20. Abnormal X : autosome ratio, but normal X chromosome inactivation in human triploid cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norwood Thomas H

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X chromosome inactivation (XCI is that aspect of mammalian dosage compensation that brings about equivalence of X-linked gene expression between females and males by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes (Xi in normal female cells, leaving them with a single active X (Xa as in male cells. In cells with more than two X's, but a diploid autosomal complement, all X's but one, Xa, are inactivated. This phenomenon is commonly thought to suggest 1 that normal development requires a ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set, and 2 that an early event in XCI is the marking of one X to be active, with remaining X's becoming inactivated by default. Results Triploids provide a test of these ideas because the ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set cannot be achieved, yet this abnormal ratio should not necessarily affect the one-Xa choice mechanism for XCI. Previous studies of XCI patterns in murine triploids support the single-Xa model, but human triploids mostly have two-Xa cells, whether they are XXX or XXY. The XCI patterns we observe in fibroblast cultures from different XXX human triploids suggest that the two-Xa pattern of XCI is selected for, and may have resulted from rare segregation errors or Xi reactivation. Conclusion The initial X inactivation pattern in human triploids, therefore, is likely to resemble the pattern that predominates in murine triploids, i.e., a single Xa, with the remaining X's inactive. Furthermore, our studies of XIST RNA accumulation and promoter methylation suggest that the basic features of XCI are normal in triploids despite the abnormal X:autosome ratio.

  1. Replication domains are self-interacting structural chromatin units of human chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, Alain

    2011-03-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the absence of specific sequence motifs marking the origins of replication has been a serious hindrance to the understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the initiation and the maintenance of the replication program in different cell types. In silico analysis of nucleotide compositional skew has predicted the existence, in the germline, of replication N-domains bordered by putative replication origins and where the skew decreases rather linearly as the signature of a progressive inversion of the average fork polarity. Here, from the demonstration that the average fork polarity can be directly extracted from the derivative of replication timing profiles, we develop a wavelet-based pattern recognition methodology to delineate replication U-domains where the replication timing profile is shaped as a U and its derivative as a N. Replication U-domains are robustly found in seven cell lines as covering a significant portion (40-50%) of the human genome where the replication timing data actually displays some plasticity between cell lines. The early replication initiation zones at U-domains borders are found to be hypersensitive to DNase I cleavage, to be associated with transcriptional activity and to present a significant enrichment in insular-binding proteins CTCF, the hallmark of an open chromatin structure. A comparative analysis of genome-wide chromatin interaction (HiC) data shows that replication-U domains correspond to self-interacting structural high order chromatin units of megabase characteristic size. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that the epigenetic compartmentalization of the human genome into autonomous replication U-domains comes along with an extensive remodelling of the threedimensional chromosome architecture during development or in specific diseases. The observed cell specific conservation of the replication timing between the human and mouse genomes strongly suggests that this chromosome organization into

  2. Tissue-specific extinguisher loci in the human genome: a screening study based on random marking and transfer of human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapero, M H; Langston, A A; Fournier, R E

    1994-05-01

    Expression of many liver-specific genes is extinguished when cultured hepatoma cells are fused with fibroblasts, but liver genes can be reexpressed in hybrid segregants that have lost fibroblast chromosomes. To map extinguisher loci involved in this process, hepatoma microcell hybrids retaining single fibroblast chromosomes have been employed. Two different, transdominant loci that affect liver gene expression have been defined in this way. To determine whether other monochromosomal extinction phenotypes could be observed, we inserted a selectable marker into many human chromosomal sites and transferred the marked human chromosomes into rat hepatoma recipient cells by microcell fusion. Nearly 200 microcell hybrid clones were isolated and screened for expression of liver-specific mRNAs. Most liver transcripts continued to be expressed. However, PEPCK mRNA was extinguished in 12 hybrid clones. Some of these hybrids contained human TSE1, the previously characterized extinguisher locus on chromosome 17, but others contained a novel extinguishing function that mapped to human chromosome 14. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. Fine mapping of a region of common deletion on chromosome arm 10p in human glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voesten, A. M.; Bijleveld, E. H.; Westerveld, A.; Hulsebos, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    Allelic loss on chromosome 10 is a frequent event in high grade gliomas. Earlier studies have shown that in most cases a complete copy of chromosome 10 is lost in the tumor. To define more accurately and specifically the region of common deletion on chromosome arm 10p, we have screened a large

  4. Chromosomal aberrations and DNA damage in human populations exposed to the processing of electronics waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Cao, Jia; Li, Ke Qiu; Miao, Xu Hong; Li, Guang; Fan, Fei Yue; Zhao, Yong Cheng

    2009-05-01

    It has been known that the pollutants of electronic wastes (E-wastes) can lead to severe pollution to the environment. It has been reported that about 50% to 80% of E-wastes from developed countries are exported to Asia and Africa. It has become a major global environmental problem to deal with 'E-wastes'. E-waste recycling has remained primitive in Jinghai, China. This not only produces enormous environmental pollution but also can bring about toxic or genotoxic effects on the human body, threatening the health of both current residents and future generations living in the local environment. The concentration of lead in the blood of children in the E-waste polluted area in China is higher than that of the control area. But little is known about the cytogenetic effect to human beings caused by the pollution of E-wastes. In the present study, experiments have been performed to investigate the genetics of permanent residents of three villages with numerous E-waste disposal sites and to analyze the harmful effects of exposure to E-wastes. In total, 171 villagers (exposed group) were randomly selected from permanent residents of three villages located in Jinghai County of Tianjin, China, where there has been massive disposal of E-wastes. Thirty villagers were selected from the neighboring towns without E-waste disposal sites to serve as controls. Chromosomal aberrations and cytokinesis blocking micronucleus were performed to detect the cytogenetic effect, dic + r (dicentric and ring chromosome), monomer, fragments (acentric fragments, minute chromosomes, and acentric rings), translocation, satellite, quadriradial, total aberrations, and micronuclear rate were scored for each subject. DNA damage was detected using comet assay; the DNA percentage in the comet tail (TDNA%), tail moment (TM), and Olive tail moment (OTM) were recorded to describe DNA damage to lymphocytes. The total chromosome aberration rates (5.50%) and micronuclear rates (16.99%) of the exposure group

  5. Identification of a single chromosome in the normal human genome essential for suppression of hamster cell transformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Stoler, A; Bouck, N

    1985-01-01

    Normal human fibroblasts were fused to carcinogen-transformed baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells and found to be able to suppress the anchorage-independent transformed phenotype of the hamster cells. This suppression was not due to interspecies incompatibility, for transformation could be effectively expressed in hybrids if either the human or the BHK parent had initially been transformed by a dominantly acting viral genome. Upon growth of suppressed hybrids, loss of human chromosomes was accomp...

  6. Conservation of human chromosome 13 polymorphic microsatellite (CA){sub n} repeats in chimpanzees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, R.; Shriver, M.D.; Yu, L.M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    Tandemly repeated (dC-dA){sub n} {center_dot} (dG-dT){sub n} sequences occur abundantly and are found in most eukaryotic genomes. To investigate the level of conservation of these repeat sequences in nonhuman primates, the authors have analyzed seven human chromosome 13 dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeat loci in chimpanzees by DNA amplification using primers designed for analysis of human loci. Comparable levels of polymorphism at these loci in the two species, revealed by the number of alleles, heterozygosity, and allele sizes, suggest that the (CA){sub n} repeat arrays and their genomic locations are highly conserved. Even though the proportion of shared alleles between the two species varies enormously and the modal alleles are not the same, allelic lengths at each locus in the chimpanzees are detected within the bounds of the allele size range observed in humans. A similar observation has been noted in a limited number of gorillas and orangutans. Using a new measure of genetic distance that takes into account the size of alleles, they have compared the genetic distance between humans and chimpanzees. The genetic distance between these two species was found to be ninefold smaller than expected assuming there is no selection or mutational bias toward retention of (CA){sub n} repeat arrays. These findings suggest a functional significance for these microsatellite loci. 34 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Localization of a renal sodium-phosphate cotransporter gene to human chromosome 5q35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kos, C.H.; Tenenhouse, H.S. (McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)); Tihy, F.; Lemieux, N. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Econs, M.J. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)); Murer, H. (Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland))

    1994-01-01

    Several Mendelian disorders of renal phosphate reabsorption, associated with hypophosphatemia and bone disease, have been described. These include X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets with hypercalciuria, hypophosphatemic bone disease, and autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets. The underlying mechanisms for renal phosphate wasting in these disorders remain unknown. The proximal tubule is the major site of renal phosphate reabsorption. Thus, mutations in genes that participate in the transepithelial transport of phosphate in this segment of the nephron may be responsible for these disorders. Recently, a cDNA encoding a renal proximal tubular, brush-border membrane Na[sup +]-phosphate cotransporter (NaP[sub i]-3) was cloned from human kidney cortex. As a first step in establishing whether mutations in the NaP[sub i]-3 gene are the cause of inherited disorders in phosphate homeostasis, the authors sought to determine its chromosomal localization. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  8. mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  9. Localization of the human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) gene to the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkin, D.J.; Jones, C. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Denver, CO (United States)); Kimbro, K.S.; Taylor, M.W. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)); Barr, B.L.; Gupta, S.L. (Hipple Cancer Research Center, Dayton, OH (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the first enzyme in the catabolic pathway for tryptophan. This extrahepatic enzyme differs from the hepatic enzyme, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), in molecular as well as enzymatic characteristics, although both enzymes catalyze the same reaction: cleavage of tryptophan into N-formylkynurenine. The induction of IDO by IFN-[gamma] plays a role in the antigrowth effect of IFN-[gamma] in cell cultures and in the inhibition of intracellular pathogens, e.g., Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci. Tryptophan is also the precursor for the synthesis of serotonin, and reduced levels of tryptophan and serotonin found in AIDS patients have been correlated with the presence of IFN-[gamma] and consequent elevation of IDO activity. The IDO enzyme has been purified and characterized, and its cDNA and genomic DNA clones have been isolated and analyzed. DNA from hybrid cells containing fragments of human chromosome 8 was used to determine the regional localization of the IDO gene on chromosome 8. The hybrids R30-5B and R30-2A contain 8p11 [yields] qter and 8q13 [yields] qter, respectively. Hybrid 229-3A contains the 8pter [yields] q11. The hybrid R30-2A was negative for the IDO gene, whereas R30-5B and 229-3A were positive as analyzed by PCR and verified by Southern blotting. Only the region close to the centromere is shared by R30-5B and 229-3A hybrids. The results indicate that the IDO gene is located on chromosome 8p11 [yields] q11.

  10. ChromSorter PC: a database of chromosomal regions associated with human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, Ann; Zhou, Guohui; Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Hang; Ruotti, Victor; Twigger, Simon; Jin, Weihong; Matysiak, Brian; Mathis, Jedidiah; Tonellato, Peter J; Datta, Milton W

    2004-04-28

    Our increasing use of genetic and genomic strategies to understand human prostate cancer means that we need access to simplified and integrated information present in the associated biomedical literature. In particular, microarray gene expression studies and associated genetic mapping studies in prostate cancer would benefit from a generalized understanding of the prior work associated with this disease. This would allow us to focus subsequent laboratory studies to genomic regions already related to prostate cancer by other scientific methods. We have developed a database of prostate cancer related chromosomal information from the existing biomedical literature. The input material was based on a broad literature search with subsequent hand annotation of information relevant to prostate cancer. The database was then analyzed for identifiable trends in the whole scale literature. We have used this database, named ChromSorter PC, to present graphical summaries of chromosomal regions associated with prostate cancer broken down by age, ethnicity and experimental method. In addition we have placed the database information on the human genome using the Generic Genome Browser tool that allows the visualization of the data with respect to user generated datasets. We have used this database as an additional dataset for the filtering of genes identified through genetics and genomics studies as warranting follow-up validation studies. We would like to make this dataset publicly available for use by other groups. Using the Genome Browser allows for the graphical analysis of the associated data http://www.prostategenomics.org/datamining/chrom-sorter_pc.html. Additional material from the database can be obtained by contacting the authors (mdatta@mcw.edu).

  11. ChromSorter PC: A database of chromosomal regions associated with human prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathis Jedidiah

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our increasing use of genetic and genomic strategies to understand human prostate cancer means that we need access to simplified and integrated information present in the associated biomedical literature. In particular, microarray gene expression studies and associated genetic mapping studies in prostate cancer would benefit from a generalized understanding of the prior work associated with this disease. This would allow us to focus subsequent laboratory studies to genomic regions already related to prostate cancer by other scientific methods. We have developed a database of prostate cancer related chromosomal information from the existing biomedical literature. The input material was based on a broad literature search with subsequent hand annotation of information relevant to prostate cancer. Description The database was then analyzed for identifiable trends in the whole scale literature. We have used this database, named ChromSorter PC, to present graphical summaries of chromosomal regions associated with prostate cancer broken down by age, ethnicity and experimental method. In addition we have placed the database information on the human genome using the Generic Genome Browser tool that allows the visualization of the data with respect to user generated datasets. Conclusions We have used this database as an additional dataset for the filtering of genes identified through genetics and genomics studies as warranting follow-up validation studies. We would like to make this dataset publicly available for use by other groups. Using the Genome Browser allows for the graphical analysis of the associated data http://www.prostategenomics.org/datamining/chrom-sorter_pc.html. Additional material from the database can be obtained by contacting the authors (mdatta@mcw.edu.

  12. Efficient assembly of de novo human artificial chromosomes from large genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Gregory

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Artificial Chromosomes (HACs are potentially useful vectors for gene transfer studies and for functional annotation of the genome because of their suitability for cloning, manipulating and transferring large segments of the genome. However, development of HACs for the transfer of large genomic loci into mammalian cells has been limited by difficulties in manipulating high-molecular weight DNA, as well as by the low overall frequencies of de novo HAC formation. Indeed, to date, only a small number of large (>100 kb genomic loci have been reported to be successfully packaged into de novo HACs. Results We have developed novel methodologies to enable efficient assembly of HAC vectors containing any genomic locus of interest. We report here the creation of a novel, bimolecular system based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs for the construction of HACs incorporating any defined genomic region. We have utilized this vector system to rapidly design, construct and validate multiple de novo HACs containing large (100–200 kb genomic loci including therapeutically significant genes for human growth hormone (HGH, polycystic kidney disease (PKD1 and ß-globin. We report significant differences in the ability of different genomic loci to support de novo HAC formation, suggesting possible effects of cis-acting genomic elements. Finally, as a proof of principle, we have observed sustained ß-globin gene expression from HACs incorporating the entire 200 kb ß-globin genomic locus for over 90 days in the absence of selection. Conclusion Taken together, these results are significant for the development of HAC vector technology, as they enable high-throughput assembly and functional validation of HACs containing any large genomic locus. We have evaluated the impact of different genomic loci on the frequency of HAC formation and identified segments of genomic DNA that appear to facilitate de novo HAC formation. These genomic loci

  13. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for radiation molecular cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Repin Mikhail V

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this work is to obtain the correct relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for the use at FISH analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Results The relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the male and female human diploid genomes have been calculated from the publicly available international Human Genome Project data. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of human chromosomes were compared with the data recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2001. The differences in the values of the relative DNA contents of chromosomes obtained by using different approaches for 15 human chromosomes, mainly for large chromosomes, were below 2%. For the chromosomes 13, 17, 20 and 22 the differences were above 5%. Conclusion New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes were obtained. This approach, based on the genome sequence, can be recommended for the use in radiation molecular cytogenetics.

  14. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization of cattle and sheep chromosomes with cloned human fragile-X DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Ahmd; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl; Babar, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive study on spontaneous and 5-Fluorodeoxyuridine induced fragile sites identified Xq31 in cattle (Bos taurus) and (Xq24, Xq26) in sheep (Ovis aries) in addition to several autosomal fragile sites (under publication). A ZOO-FISH study using three cloned human fragile-X probes with CCG....../CGG(n) trinucleotide repeat sequence was carried out to determine homology between human and bovine fragile-X. The hybridisation results showed only a weak signal on a human chromosome that was not an X with all three fragile site probes. No signals were detected in sheep chromosomes. The signal of all three human...... showed no signals whatsoever. It was therefore concluded that no homology existed between human and bovine fragile-X....

  15. [Comparative analysis of a new human cell line 4BL karyotype at long-term cultivation. Ploidy of chromosomal set].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopian, H R; Huleiuk, N L; Kushniruk, V O; Mykytenko, D O; Iatsyshyna, A P; Lukash, L L

    2013-01-01

    Long-term cultivation of human cells, including stem cells, can lead to substantial transformation of the karyotype and occurrence of genetic instability. The aim of this research was a comparative cytogenetic study of the karyotype of a new human stem cell line 4BL at 160 and 205 passages. The absence of 10 and 13 pairs of chromosomes and the monosomy of chromosomes 4, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 21, X were observed; also six regular marker chromosomes were detected. Chromosomes 1, 15 and 21 are involved in translocations t(l;11), t(5;15), t(12; 15), t(16;21). Modal class of the karyotype is within 41-43 chromosomes at both 160 and 205 passages. The frequency of polyploid cells have been increased from 2.8% at 160 passage up to 36% at 205 passage. Cells with a near-haploid karyotype were not detected at 205 passage (in contrast to 24.6% at 160 passages) and a decline of the level of premature separation of chromatids was observed. We assume stabilization of karyotype of the cell line 4BL at 205 passage and consider that further research is needed to predict the direction of karyotypic evolution of these cells in vitro.

  16. Assignment of the beta B1 crystallin gene (CRYBB1) to human chromosome 22 and mouse chromosome 5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T. J.; Gilbert, D. J.; Delattre, O.; Smink, L. J.; Dunham, I.; Westerveld, A.; Thomas, G.; Jenkins, N. A.; Copeland, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    By using primers complementary to the rat beta B1 crystallin gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the orthologous human gene (CRYBB1). The amplified human segments displayed greater than 88% sequence homology to the corresponding rat and bovine sequences. CRYBB1 was assigned to the group 5

  17. Intergenic DNA sequences from the human X chromosome reveal high rates of global gene flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Jeffrey D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive efforts devoted to collecting human polymorphism data, little is known about the role of gene flow in the ancestry of human populations. This is partly because most analyses have applied one of two simple models of population structure, the island model or the splitting model, which make unrealistic biological assumptions. Results Here, we analyze 98-kb of DNA sequence from 20 independently evolving intergenic regions on the X chromosome in a sample of 90 humans from six globally diverse populations. We employ an isolation-with-migration (IM model, which assumes that populations split and subsequently exchange migrants, to independently estimate effective population sizes and migration rates. While the maximum effective size of modern humans is estimated at ~10,000, individual populations vary substantially in size, with African populations tending to be larger (2,300–9,000 than non-African populations (300–3,300. We estimate mean rates of bidirectional gene flow at 4.8 × 10-4/generation. Bidirectional migration rates are ~5-fold higher among non-African populations (1.5 × 10-3 than among African populations (2.7 × 10-4. Interestingly, because effective sizes and migration rates are inversely related in African and non-African populations, population migration rates are similar within Africa and Eurasia (e.g., global mean Nm = 2.4. Conclusion We conclude that gene flow has played an important role in structuring global human populations and that migration rates should be incorporated as critical parameters in models of human demography.

  18. Assignment of the gene coding for human peroxisomal 3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase (ACAA) to chromosome region 3p22----p23

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bout, A.; Hoovers, J. M.; Bakker, E.; Mannens, M. M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Westerveld, A.; Tager, J. M.; Benne, R.

    1989-01-01

    The chromosomal location of the human gene coding for peroxisomal 3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolase (ACAA) was determined with the aid of cDNA and genomic probes by screening of rodent x human somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization. The results localize the gene to chromosome region 3p22----p23

  19. Polymorphism and genetic mapping of the human oxytocin receptor gene on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelini, S.; Urbanek, M.; Goldman, D. [National Institute of Health-National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-19

    Centrally administered oxytocin has been reported to facilitate affiliative and social behaviors, in functional harmony with its well-known peripheral effects on uterine contraction and milk ejection. The biological effects of oxytocin could be perturbed by mutations occurring in the sequence of the oxytocin receptor gene, and it would be of interest to establish the position of this gene on the human linkage map. Therefore we identified a polymorphism at the human oxytocin receptor gene. A portion of the 3{prime} untranslated region containing a 30 bp CA repeat was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), revealing a polymorphism with two alleles occurring with frequencies of 0.77 and 0.23 in a sample of Caucasian CEPH parents (n = 70). The CA repeat polymorphism we detected was used to map the human oxytocin receptor to chromosome 3p25-3p26, in a region which contains several important genes, including loci for Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) and renal cell carcinoma. 53 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Early embryonic chromosome instability results in stable mosaic pattern in human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasmik Mkrtchyan

    Full Text Available The discovery of copy number variations (CNV in the human genome opened new perspectives on the study of the genetic causes of inherited disorders and the aetiology of common diseases. Here, a single-cell-level investigation of CNV in different human tissues led us to uncover the phenomenon of mitotically derived genomic mosaicism, which is stable in different cell types of one individual. The CNV mosaic ratios were different between the 10 individuals studied. However, they were stable in the T lymphocytes, immortalized B lymphoblastoid cells, and skin fibroblasts analyzed in each individual. Because these cell types have a common origin in the connective tissues, we suggest that mitotic changes in CNV regions may happen early during embryonic development and occur only once, after which the stable mosaic ratio is maintained throughout the differentiated tissues. This concept is further supported by a unique study of immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines obtained with 20 year difference from two subjects. We provide the first evidence of somatic mosaicism for CNV, with stable variation ratios in different cell types of one individual leading to the hypothesis of early embryonic chromosome instability resulting in stable mosaic pattern in human tissues. This concept has the potential to open new perspectives in personalized genetic diagnostics and can explain genetic phenomena like diminished penetrance in autosomal dominant diseases. We propose that further genomic studies should focus on the single-cell level, to better understand the aetiology of aging and diseases mediated by somatic mutations.

  1. Human papillomavirus type influences the extent of chromosomal lag during mitosis in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, M. P.; van Leeuwen, A. M.; Hollema, H.; Quint, W. G.; Pieters, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    The level of risk for carcinoma in the uterine cervix depends on the type of human papillomavirus (HPV) present. We examined whether the HPV type influences the proliferation rate and occurrence of mitotic figures with lagging chromosomes in the precursor of cervical carcinoma. The study group

  2. Human papillomavirus type influences the extent of chromosomal lag during mitosis in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, MPM; VanLeeuwen, AM; Hollema, H; Quint, WGV; Pieters, WJLM

    The level of risk for carcinoma in the uterine cervix depends on the type of human papillomavirus (HPV) present. We examined whether the HPV type influences the proliferation rate and occurrence of mitotic figures with lagging chromosomes in the precursor of cervical carcinoma. The study group

  3. Slit-scanning technique using standard cell sorter instruments for analyzing and sorting nonacrocentric human chromosomes, including small ones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rens, W.; van Oven, C. H.; Stap, J.; Jakobs, M. E.; Aten, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the performance of two types of standard flow cell sorter instruments, a System 50 Cytofluorograph and a FACSTar PLUS cell sorter, for the on-line centromeric index (CI) analysis of human chromosomes. To optimize the results, we improved the detection efficiency for centromeres

  4. Aneuploidy involving chromosome 1 in failed-fertilized human oocytes is unrelated to maternal age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Nureddin, Aida.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Racowsky, Catherine

    2004-12-04

    Purpose: To study whether maternal meiotic errors in failed-fertilized oocytes involving chromosome 1 occur at frequencies similar to those involving other autosomes, and whether their frequency is affected by maternal age. Methods: Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), frequencies of aneusomy and chromatid pre-division involving chromosomes 1, 16, 18, and 21 were determined for 273 failed-fertilized oocytes. Results: The aneuploidy rate for chromosome 1 was 15.8 percent, and was neither age-dependent nor significantly different from that for chromosomes 16,18 or 21. Only chromosome 16 exhibited an age-dependent increase in aneusomy rates. The frequency of chromatid pre-division was lower for chromosome 1 than for chromosome 18 (11.9 percent vs. 25.4 percent; P=0.01), but not different from that for chromosomes 16 or 21. Conclusion: Aneuploidy involving chromosome 1 in failed-fertilized oocytes is unrelated to maternal age and occurs at a frequency similar to that for chromosomes 16, 18 and 21.

  5. Cell Culture Systems To Study Human Herpesvirus 6A/B Chromosomal Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Wallaschek, Nina; Gilbert-Girard, Shella; Collin, Vanessa; Hall-Sedlak, Ruth; Jerome, Keith R; Mori, Yasuko; Carbonneau, Julie; Boivin, Guy; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Flamand, Louis

    2017-07-15

    Human herpesviruses 6A/B (HHV-6A/B) can integrate their viral genomes in the telomeres of human chromosomes. The viral and cellular factors contributing to HHV-6A/B integration remain largely unknown, mostly due to the lack of efficient and reproducible cell culture models to study HHV-6A/B integration. In this study, we characterized the HHV-6A/B integration efficiencies in several human cell lines using two different approaches. First, after a short-term infection (5 h), cells were processed for single-cell cloning and analyzed for chromosomally integrated HHV-6A/B (ciHHV-6A/B). Second, cells were infected with HHV-6A/B and allowed to grow in bulk for 4 weeks or longer and then analyzed for the presence of ciHHV-6. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), droplet digital PCR, and fluorescent in situ hybridization, we could demonstrate that HHV-6A/B integrated in most human cell lines tested, including telomerase-positive (HeLa, MCF-7, HCT-116, and HEK293T) and telomerase-negative cell lines (U2OS and GM847). Our results also indicate that inhibition of DNA replication, using phosphonoacetic acid, did not affect HHV-6A/B integration. Certain clones harboring ciHHV-6A/B spontaneously express viral genes and proteins. Treatment of cells with phorbol ester or histone deacetylase inhibitors triggered the expression of many viral genes, including U39 , U90 , and U100 , without the production of infectious virus, suggesting that the tested stimuli were not sufficient to trigger full reactivation. In summary, both integration models yielded comparable results and should enable the identification of viral and cellular factors contributing to HHV-6A/B integration and the screening of drugs influencing viral gene expression, as well as the release of infectious HHV-6A/B from the integrated state. IMPORTANCE The analysis and understanding of HHV-6A/B genome integration into host DNA is currently limited due to the lack of reproducible and efficient viral integration systems. In the

  6. Localization of the homolog of a mouse craniofacial mutant to human chromosome 18q11 and evaluation of linkage to human CLP and CPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D.C.; Yu, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-15

    The transgene-induced mutation 9257 and the spontaneous mutation twirler cause craniofacial and inner ear malformations and are located on mouse chromosome 18 near the ataxia locus ax. To map the human homolog of 9257, a probe from the transgene insertion site was used to screen a human genomic library. Analysis of a cross-hybridizing human clone identified a 3-kb conserved sequence block that does not appear to contain protein coding sequence. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels assigned the human locus to 18q11. The polymorphic microsatellite markers D18S1001 and D18S1002 were isolated from the human locus and mapped by linkage analysis using the CEPH pedigrees. The 9257 locus maps close to the centromeres of human chromosome 18q and mouse chromosome 18 at the proximal end of a conserved linkage group. To evaluate the role of this locus in human craniofacial disorders, linkage to D18S1002 was tested in 11 families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 3 families with autosomal dominant cleft palate only. Obligatory recombinants were observed in 8 of the families, and negative lod scores from the other families indicated that these disorders are not linked to the chromosome 18 loci. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  8. Assignment of the human pro-melanin-concentrating hormone gene (PMCH) to chromosome 12q23-q24 and two variant genes (PMCHL1 and PMCHL2) to chromosome 5p14 and 5q12-q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedeutour, F. (Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire des Cancers Humans, Nice (France)); Szpirer, C. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Rhode-St-Genese (Belgium)); Nahon, J.L. (Institut de Pharmacologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Valbonne (France))

    1994-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a peptide that has been isolated from salmon pituitary and rat hypothalamus. In mammals, pro-MCH (PMCH) encodes two putative peptides, named NEI and NGE, in addition to MCH. Those peptides are expressed predominantly in hypothalamus and display a broad array of functions in rat brain. The authors have previously mapped the PMCH locus on human chromosome 12q and rat chromosome 7. Genomic cloning has revealed the existence of two distinct MCH genes in human: one authentic and one variant. In this report, they describe Southern blotting analysis with DNA from a panel of somatic cell hybrids and demonstrate that the authentic human MCH (hMCH) gene is located as expected on chromosome 12, while the variant form of hMCH gene is located on chromosome 5. Direct chromosomal assignment of the authentic and variant hMCH genes was obtained by using fluorescence in situ hybridization on metaphase chromosomes. A strong signal was observed in 12q23-q24 with the authentic HMCH genomic DNA probe. Surprisingly, two signals were conspicuously found in 5p14 and 5q12-q13 with different variant hMCH genomic DNA probes. These loci were designated PMCHL1 and PMCHL2. Evidence of physiological and pathological data in rodents together with locus linkage analyses in human suggests that hMCH authentic and variant genes may be involved in human brain disorders. 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A Bayesian analysis of the chromosome architecture of human disorders by integrating reductionist data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Tripathi, Shailesh; Glazko, Galina V; Dehmer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a Bayesian approach to estimate a chromosome and a disorder network from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. In contrast to other approaches, we obtain statistic rather than deterministic networks enabling a parametric control in the uncertainty of the underlying disorder-disease gene associations contained in the OMIM, on which the networks are based. From a structural investigation of the chromosome network, we identify three chromosome subgroups that reflect architectural differences in chromosome-disorder associations that are predictively exploitable for a functional analysis of diseases.

  10. A device for extraction, manipulation and stretching of DNA from single human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted; Marie, Rodolphe; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2011-01-01

    We describe the structure and operation of a micro/nanofluidic device in which individual metaphase chromosomes can be isolated and processed without being displaced during exchange of reagents. The change in chromosome morphology as a result of introducing protease into the device was observed...... by time-lapse imaging; pressure-driven flow was then used to shunt the chromosomal DNA package into a nanoslit. A long linear DNA strand (>1.3 Mbp) was seen to stretch out from the DNA package and along the length of the nanoslit. Delivery of DNA in its native metaphase chromosome package as well...

  11. Stable maintenance of de novo assembled human artificial chromosomes in embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskovykh, Mikhail; Ponomartsev, Sergey; Popova, Elena; Bader, Michael; Kouprina, Natalay; Larionov, Vladimir; Alenina, Natalia; Tomilin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    De novo assembled alphoid(tetO)-type human artificial chromosomes (HACs) represent a novel promising generation of high capacity episomal vectors. Their function and persistence, and any adverse effects, in various cell types in live animals, have not, however, been explored. In this study we transferred the alphoid(tetO)-HAC into mouse ES cells and assessed whether the presence of this extra chromosome affects their pluripotent properties. Alphoid(tetO)-HAC-bearing ES cells were indistinguishable from their wild-type counterparts: they retained self-renewal potential and full capacity for multilineage differentiation during mouse development, whereas the HAC itself was mitotically and transcriptionally stable during this process. Our data provide the first example of fully synthetic DNA behaving like a normal chromosome in cells of living animals. It also opens a new perspective into functional genetic studies in laboratory animals as well as stem cell-based regenerative medicine.

  12. Localization of a human homolog of the mouse Tiam-1 gene to chromosome 21q22.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haiming Chen; Antonarakis, S.E. [Univ. of Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)

    1995-11-01

    Exon trapping was applied to genomic DNA from a chromosome 21-specific cosmid library (LL21NC02-Q) to clone portions of genes from this chromosome. Among a large number of trapped exons, three showed striking homology to different regions of the cDNA for the mouse T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene (Tiam-1) at both nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence levels, suggesting that these three exons are part of a human homolog of the mouse Tiam-1 gene. We mapped this presumed human TIAM1 gene to chromosome 21 by using appropriate somatic cell hybrids, YACs, and cosmids. The TIAM1 gene localizes to YAC 760H5 of the I. Chumakov et al. YAC contig between markers D21S298 and D21S404 in band 21q22.1. This human gene (which is a member of the group of guanine nucleotide-dissociation stimulators that modulate the activity of Rho-like proteins) may be important in the development or metastasis of malignancies that are associated with abnormalities on chromosome 21, including the various forms of leukemia frequent in trisomy 21. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  13. High-resolution mapping of DNA copy alterations in human chromosome 22 using high-density tiling oligonucleotide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Korbel, Jan O; Selzer, Rebecca; Richmond, Todd; Hacker, April; Popescu, George V; Cubells, Joseph F; Green, Roland; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gerstein, Mark B; Weissman, Sherman M; Snyder, Michael

    2006-03-21

    Deletions and amplifications of the human genomic sequence (copy number polymorphisms) are the cause of numerous diseases and a potential cause of phenotypic variation in the normal population. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been developed as a useful tool for detecting alterations in DNA copy number that involve blocks of DNA several kilobases or larger in size. We have developed high-resolution CGH (HR-CGH) to detect accurately and with relatively little bias the presence and extent of chromosomal aberrations in human DNA. Maskless array synthesis was used to construct arrays containing 385,000 oligonucleotides with isothermal probes of 45-85 bp in length; arrays tiling the beta-globin locus and chromosome 22q were prepared. Arrays with a 9-bp tiling path were used to map a 622-bp heterozygous deletion in the beta-globin locus. Arrays with an 85-bp tiling path were used to analyze DNA from patients with copy number changes in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 22q. Heterozygous deletions and duplications as well as partial triploidies and partial tetraploidies of portions of chromosome 22q were mapped with high resolution (typically up to 200 bp) in each patient, and the precise breakpoints of two deletions were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Additional peaks potentially corresponding to known and novel additional CNPs were also observed. Our results demonstrate that HR-CGH allows the detection of copy number changes in the human genome at an unprecedented level of resolution.

  14. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Screening of human chromosome 21 genes in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Ning; Xu, Xue-Ju; Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Jiang, Miao

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to identify the genes on human chromosome 21 (HC21) that may serve important functions in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome (DS). The microarray data GSE5390 were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which contained 7 DS and 8 healthy normal samples. The data were then normalized and the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the LIMMA package and Bonferroni correction. Furthermore, the DEGs underwent clustering and gene ontology analysis. Additionally, the locations of the DEGs on HC21 were confirmed using human genome 19 in the University of California, Santa Cruz Interaction Browser. A total of 25 upregulated and 275 downregulated genes were screened between DS and healthy samples with a false discovery rate of 1. The expression levels of these genes in the two samples were different. In addition, the up‑ and downregulated genes were markedly enriched in organic substance biological processes (P=4.48x10‑10) and cell‑cell signaling (P=0.000227). Furthermore, 17 overexpressed genes were identified on the 21q21‑22 area, including COL6A2, TTC3 and ABCG1. Together, these observations suggest that 17 upregulated genes on HC21 may be involved in the development of DS and provide the basis for understanding this disability.

  16. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  17. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  18. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Hieter, Philip

    2016-09-06

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1 Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors.

  19. Organization of synthetic alphoid DNA array in human artificial chromosome (HAC) with a conditional centromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalay; Samoshkin, Alexander; Erliandri, Indri; Nakano, Megumi; Lee, Hee-Sheung; Fu, Haiging; Iida, Yuichi; Aladjem, Mirit; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C; Larionov, Vladimir

    2012-12-21

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) represent a novel promising episomal system for functional genomics, gene therapy, and synthetic biology. HACs are engineered from natural and synthetic alphoid DNA arrays upon transfection into human cells. The use of HACs for gene expression studies requires the knowledge of their structural organization. However, none of the de novo HACs constructed so far has been physically mapped in detail. Recently we constructed a synthetic alphoid(tetO)-HAC that was successfully used for expression of full-length genes to correct genetic deficiencies in human cells. The HAC can be easily eliminated from cell populations by inactivation of its conditional kinetochore. This unique feature provides a control for phenotypic changes attributed to expression of HAC-encoded genes. This work describes organization of a megabase-size synthetic alphoid DNA array in the alphoid(tetO)-HAC that has been formed from a ~50 kb synthetic alphoid(tetO)-construct. Our analysis showed that this array represents a 1.1 Mb continuous sequence assembled from multiple copies of input DNA, a significant part of which was rearranged before assembling. The tandem and inverted alphoid DNA repeats in the HAC range in size from 25 to 150 kb. In addition, we demonstrated that the structure and functional domains of the HAC remains unchanged after several rounds of its transfer into different host cells. The knowledge of the alphoid(tetO)-HAC structure provides a tool to control HAC integrity during different manipulations. Our results also shed light on a mechanism for de novo HAC formation in human cells.

  20. Microarray Analysis of Copy Number Variants on the Human Y Chromosome Reveals Novel and Frequent Duplications Overrepresented in Specific Haplogroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M Johansson

    Full Text Available The human Y chromosome is almost always excluded from genome-wide investigations of copy number variants (CNVs due to its highly repetitive structure. This chromosome should not be forgotten, not only for its well-known relevance in male fertility, but also for its involvement in clinical phenotypes such as cancers, heart failure and sex specific effects on brain and behaviour.We analysed Y chromosome data from Affymetrix 6.0 SNP arrays and found that the signal intensities for most of 8179 SNP/CN probes in the male specific region (MSY discriminated between a male, background signals in a female and an isodicentric male containing a large deletion of the q-arm and a duplication of the p-arm of the Y chromosome. Therefore, this SNP/CN platform is suitable for identification of gain and loss of Y chromosome sequences. In a set of 1718 males, we found 25 different CNV patterns, many of which are novel. We confirmed some of these variants by PCR or qPCR. The total frequency of individuals with CNVs was 14.7%, including 9.5% with duplications, 4.5% with deletions and 0.7% exhibiting both. Hence, a novel observation is that the frequency of duplications was more than twice the frequency of deletions. Another striking result was that 10 of the 25 detected variants were significantly overrepresented in one or more haplogroups, demonstrating the importance to control for haplogroups in genome-wide investigations to avoid stratification. NO-M214(xM175 individuals presented the highest percentage (95% of CNVs. If they were not counted, 12.4% of the rest included CNVs, and the difference between duplications (8.9% and deletions (2.8% was even larger.Our results demonstrate that currently available genome-wide SNP platforms can be used to identify duplications and deletions in the human Y chromosome. Future association studies of the full spectrum of Y chromosome variants will demonstrate the potential involvement of gain or loss of Y chromosome sequence in

  1. Impact of types of lymphocyte chromosomal aberrations on human cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagmar, Lars; Strömberg, Ulf; Bonassi, Stefano

    2004-01-01

    The frequency of cells with structural chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in peripheral blood lymphocytes is the first genotoxicity biomarker that has shown an association with cancer risk. CAs are usually divided into chromosome-type (CSAs) and chromatid-type aberrations (CTAs), with different...

  2. Low doses of UVB or UVA induce chromosomal aberrations in cultured human skin cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emri, G.; Wenczl, E.; Erp, P. van; Jans, J.; Roza, L.; Horkay, I.; Schothorst, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal defects are frequently present in malignant and premalignant skin disorders; however, it is not known whether ultraviolet radiation from sunlight plays a role in their induction. To obtain information on the ability of ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B to induce chromosomal aberrations,

  3. An efficient multiplex genotyping approach for detecting the major worldwide human Y-chromosome haplogroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Oven (Mannis); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); A. Ralf (Arwin)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The Y chromosome is paternally inherited and therefore serves as an evolutionary marker of patrilineal descent. Worldwide DNA variation within the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome can be represented as a monophyletic phylogenetic tree in which the branches

  4. Chromosomal localization of the genes encoding the kinetochore proteins CENPE and DENPF to human chromosomes 4q24{r_arrow}q25 and 1q32{r_arrow}q41, respectively, by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, J.R.; Zhou, J.Y.; Bell, D.W.; Yen, T.J. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    CENPE and CENPF are human kinetochore proteins of 312 and {approximately}400 kDa, respectively. As part of an effort to characterize the functions of these two proteins, we have used their respective cDNAs to map their human chromosomal locations by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The gene that encodes CENPE, a kinetochore-associated motor protein that is postulated to segregate chromosomes during mitosis, maps to chromosome 4q24{r_arrow}q25. The CENPF gene, which encodes a structural protein of the kinetochore, maps to chromosome 1q32{r_arrow}q41 within close proximity to the genetic locus that is linked to Van der Woude syndrome. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Strong Selective Sweeps on the X Chromosome in the Human-Chimpanzee Ancestor Explain Its Low Divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Y Dutheil

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The human and chimpanzee X chromosomes are less divergent than expected based on autosomal divergence. We study incomplete lineage sorting patterns between humans, chimpanzees and gorillas to show that this low divergence can be entirely explained by megabase-sized regions comprising one-third of the X chromosome, where polymorphism in the human-chimpanzee ancestral species was severely reduced. We show that background selection can explain at most 10% of this reduction of diversity in the ancestor. Instead, we show that several strong selective sweeps in the ancestral species can explain it. We also report evidence of population specific sweeps in extant humans that overlap the regions of low diversity in the ancestral species. These regions further correspond to chromosomal sections shown to be devoid of Neanderthal introgression into modern humans. This suggests that the same X-linked regions that undergo selective sweeps are among the first to form reproductive barriers between diverging species. We hypothesize that meiotic drive is the underlying mechanism causing these two observations.

  6. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Cendes, I. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada); Mulley, J.C. [Alelaide Children`s Hospital (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  7. Hi-C-constrained physical models of human chromosomes recover functionally-related properties of genome organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Stefano, Marco; Paulsen, Jonas; Lien, Tonje G.; Hovig, Eivind; Micheletti, Cristian

    2016-10-01

    Combining genome-wide structural models with phenomenological data is at the forefront of efforts to understand the organizational principles regulating the human genome. Here, we use chromosome-chromosome contact data as knowledge-based constraints for large-scale three-dimensional models of the human diploid genome. The resulting models remain minimally entangled and acquire several functional features that are observed in vivo and that were never used as input for the model. We find, for instance, that gene-rich, active regions are drawn towards the nuclear center, while gene poor and lamina associated domains are pushed to the periphery. These and other properties persist upon adding local contact constraints, suggesting their compatibility with non-local constraints for the genome organization. The results show that suitable combinations of data analysis and physical modelling can expose the unexpectedly rich functionally-related properties implicit in chromosome-chromosome contact data. Specific directions are suggested for further developments based on combining experimental data analysis and genomic structural modelling.

  8. Integration-Free iPS Cells Engineered Using Human Artificial Chromosome Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Uno, Narumi; Ueda, Kana; Kurosaki, Hajime; Imaoka, Natsuko; Kazuki, Kanako; Ueno, Etsuya; Akakura, Yutaro; Katoh, Motonobu; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Masato; Yamanaka, Shinya; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have unique characteristics as gene-delivery vectors, including episomal transmission and transfer of multiple, large transgenes. Here, we demonstrate the advantages of HAC vectors for reprogramming mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Two HAC vectors (iHAC1 and iHAC2) were constructed. Both carried four reprogramming factors, and iHAC2 also encoded a p53-knockdown cassette. iHAC1 partially reprogrammed MEFs, and iHAC2 efficiently reprogrammed MEFs. Global gene expression patterns showed that the iHACs, unlike other vectors, generated relatively uniform iPS cells. Under non-selecting conditions, we established iHAC-free iPS cells by isolating cells that spontaneously lost iHAC2. Analyses of pluripotent markers, teratomas and chimeras confirmed that these iHAC-free iPS cells were pluripotent. Moreover, iHAC-free iPS cells with a re-introduced HAC encoding Herpes Simplex virus thymidine kinase were eliminated by ganciclovir treatment, indicating that the HAC safeguard system functioned in iPS cells. Thus, the HAC vector could generate uniform, integration-free iPS cells with a built-in safeguard system. PMID:21998730

  9. RBE of thermal neutrons for induction of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, E; Wagner, F M; Canella, L; Romm, H; Schmid, T E

    2013-03-01

    The induction of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with slow neutrons was examined to assess the maximum low-dose RBE (RBE(M)) relative to (60)Co γ-rays. For the blood irradiations, cold neutron beam available at the prompt gamma activation analysis facility at the Munich research reactor FRM II was used. The given flux of cold neutrons can be converted into a thermally equivalent one. Since blood was taken from the same donor whose blood had been used for previous irradiation experiments using widely varying neutron energies, the greatest possible accuracy was available for such an estimation of the RBE(M) avoiding the inter-individual variations or differences in methodology usually associated with inter-laboratory comparisons. The magnitude of the coefficient α of the linear dose-response relationship (α = 0.400 ± 0.018 Gy(-1)) and the derived RBE(M) of 36.4 ± 13.3 obtained for the production of dicentrics by thermal neutrons confirm our earlier observations of a strong decrease in α and RBE(M) with decreasing neutron energy lower than 0.385 MeV (RBE(M) = 94.4 ± 38.9). The magnitude of the presently estimated RBE(M) of thermal neutrons is-with some restrictions-not significantly different to previously reported RBE(M) values of two laboratories.

  10. Systematic Functional Characterization of Human 21st Chromosome Orthologs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordquist, Sarah K; Smith, Sofia R; Pierce, Jonathan T

    2018-01-24

    Individuals with Down syndrome have neurological and muscle impairments due to an additional copy of the human 21st chromosome (HSA21). Only a few of ~200 HSA21 genes encoding protein have been linked to specific Down syndrome phenotypes, while the remainder are understudied. To identify poorly characterized HSA21 genes required for nervous system function, we studied behavioral phenotypes caused by loss-of-function mutations in conserved HSA21 orthologs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans We identified ten HSA21 orthologs that are required for neuromuscular behaviors: cle-1 (COL18A1), cysl-2 (CBS), dnsn-1 (DONSON), eva-1 (EVA1C), mtq-2 (N6ATM1), ncam-1 (NCAM2), pad-2 (POFUT2), pdxk-1 (PDXK), rnt-1 (RUNX1), and unc-26 (SYNJ1).  We also found that three of these genes are required for normal release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. This includes a known synaptic gene unc-26 (SYNJ1), as well as uncharacterized genes pdxk-1 (PDXK) and mtq-2 (N6ATM1). As the first systematic functional analysis of HSA21 orthologs, this study may serve as a platform to understand genes that underlie phenotypes associated with Down syndrome. Copyright © 2018, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

  11. Nucleotide, cytogenetic and expression impact of the human chromosome 8p23.1 inversion polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Nina; Morell, Marta; Ponsa, Immaculada; Mercader, Josep Maria; Armengol, Lluís; Estivill, Xavier

    2009-12-14

    The human chromosome 8p23.1 region contains a 3.8-4.5 Mb segment which can be found in different orientations (defined as genomic inversion) among individuals. The identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tightly linked to the genomic orientation of a given region should be useful to indirectly evaluate the genotypes of large genomic orientations in the individuals. We have identified 16 SNPs, which are in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the 8p23.1 inversion as detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The variability of the 8p23.1 orientation in 150 HapMap samples was predicted using this set of SNPs and was verified by FISH in a subset of samples. Four genes (NEIL2, MSRA, CTSB and BLK) were found differentially expressed (pinversion occurred. Moreover, an impact of 8p23.1 inversion on gene expression levels cannot be ruled out, since four genes from this region have statistically significant different expression levels depending on the inversion status. FISH results in lymphoblastoid cell lines suggest the presence of mosaicism regarding the 8p23.1 inversion.

  12. Correlating CpG islands, motifs, and sequence variants in human chromosome 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cercone Nick

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CpG islands are important regions in DNA. They usually appear at the 5’ end of genes containing GC-rich dinucleotides. When DNA methylation occurs, gene regulation is affected and it sometimes leads to carcinogenesis. We propose a new detection program using a hidden-markov model alongside the Viterbi algorithm. Methods Our solution provides a graphical user interface not seen in many of the other CGI detection programs and we unify the detection and analysis under one program to allow researchers to scan a genetic sequence, detect the significant CGIs, and analyze the sequence once the scan is complete for any noteworthy findings. Results Using human chromosome 21, we show that our algorithm finds a significant number of CGIs. Running an analysis on a dataset of promoters discovered that the characteristics of methylated and unmethylated CGIs are significantly different. Finally, we detected significantly different motifs between methylated and unmethylated CGI promoters using MEME and MAST. Conclusions Developing this new tool for the community using powerful algorithms has shown that combining analysis with CGI detection will improve the continued research within the field of epigenetics.

  13. In situ hybridization of bat chromosomes with human (TTAGGGn probe, after previous digestion with Alu I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina de Cassia Faria

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to verify the ability of the enzyme Alu I to cleave and/or remove satellite DNA sequences from heterochromatic regions in chromosomes of bats, by identifying the occurrence of modifications in the pattern of fluorescence in situ hybridization with telomeric DNA. The localization and fluorescence intensity of the telomeric DNA sites of the Alu-digested and undigested chromosomes of species Eumops glaucinus, Carollia perspicillata, and Platyrrhinus lineatus were analyzed. Telomeric sequences were detected at the termini of chromosomes of all three species, although, in C. perspicillata, the signals were very faint or absent in most chromosomes. This finding was interpreted as being due to a reduced number of copies of the telomeric repeat, resulting from extensive telomeric association and/or rearrangements undergone by the chromosomes of Carollia. Fluorescent signals were also observed in centromeric and pericentromeric regions in several two-arm chromosomes of E. glaucinus and C. perspicillata. In E. glaucinus and P. lineatus, some interstitial and terminal telomeric sites were observed to be in association with regions of constitutive heterochromatin and ribosomal DNA (NORs. After digestion, these telomeric sites showed a significant decrease in signal intensity, indicating that enzyme Alu I cleaves and/or removes part of the satellite DNA present in these regions. These results suggest that the telomeric sequence is a component of the heterochromatin, and that the C-band- positive regions of bat chromosomes have a different DNA composition.

  14. Fine Mapping of the Body Fat QTL on Human Chromosome 1q43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Aissani

    Full Text Available Evidence for linkage and association of obesity-related quantitative traits to chromosome 1q43 has been reported in the Quebec Family Study (QFS and in populations of Caribbean Hispanic ancestries yet no specific candidate locus has been replicated to date.Using a set of 1,902 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs genotyped in 525 African American (AA and 391 European American (EA women enrolled in the NIEHS uterine fibroid study (NIEHS-UFS, we generated a fine association map for the body mass index (BMI across a 2.3 megabase-long interval delimited by RGS7 (regulator of G-protein signaling 7 and PLD5 (Phospholipase D, member 5. Multivariable-adjusted linear regression models were fitted to the data to evaluate the association in race-stratified analyses and meta-analysis.The strongest associations were observed in a recessive genetic model and peaked in the 3' end of RGS7 at intronic rs261802 variant in the AA group (p = 1.0 x 10-4 and in meta-analysis of AA and EA samples (p = 9.0 x 10-5. In the EA group, moderate associations peaked at rs6429264 (p = 2.0 x 10-3 in the 2 Kb upstream sequence of RGS7. In the reference populations for the European ancestry in the 1,000 genomes project, rs6429264 occurs in strong linkage disequilibrium (D' = 0.94 with rs1341467, the strongest candidate SNP for total body fat in QFS that failed genotyping in the present study. Additionally we report moderate associations at the 3' end of PLD5 in meta-analysis (3.2 x 10-4 ≤ p ≤ 5.8 x 10-4.We report replication data suggesting that RGS7, a gene abundantly expressed in the brain, might be a putative body fat QTL on human chromosome 1q43. Future genetic and functional studies are required to substantiate our observations and to potentially link them to the neurobehavioral phenotypes associated with the RGS7 region.

  15. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of Fucus vesiculosus extract on cultured human lymphocytes using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleide Leite-Silva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fucales, Fucaceae was screened for its protective activity using doxorubicin-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. In this study, we assessed the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of three different concentrations (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 of F. vesiculosus aqueous extract using the chromosome aberration and Comet assays. Treatment of human lymphocyte cultures with 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL-1 F. vesiculosus aqueous extract had no effect on the chromosome aberration frequency or on the extent of DNA damage detected by the Comet assay. The antigenotoxic effects of the extract were tested in human lymphocyte cultures treated with 15 µg mL-1 of doxorubicin, either alone or combined with the different concentrations of the extract, which was added to the cultures before, simultaneously with or after the doxorubicin. Only when lymphocytes were pre-treated with extract there was a reduction in doxorubicin-induced chromosome aberrations and DNA damage as detected by the Comet assay. These results demonstrate that F. vesiculosus aqueous extract is not genotoxic in cultured human lymphocytes and indicate that when added to lymphocyte cultures before doxorubicin it has antigenotoxic activity against doxorubicin-induced DNA damage.

  16. Human Y chromosome base-substitution mutation rate measured by direct sequencing in a deep-rooting pedigree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yali; Wang, Qiuju; Long, Quan; Ng, Bee Ling; Swerdlow, Harold; Burton, John; Skuce, Carl; Taylor, Ruth; Abdellah, Zahra; Zhao, Yali; MacArthur, Daniel G; Quail, Michael A; Carter, Nigel P; Yang, Huanming; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2009-09-15

    Understanding the key process of human mutation is important for many aspects of medical genetics and human evolution. In the past, estimates of mutation rates have generally been inferred from phenotypic observations or comparisons of homologous sequences among closely related species. Here, we apply new sequencing technology to measure directly one mutation rate, that of base substitutions on the human Y chromosome. The Y chromosomes of two individuals separated by 13 generations were flow sorted and sequenced by Illumina (Solexa) paired-end sequencing to an average depth of 11x or 20x, respectively. Candidate mutations were further examined by capillary sequencing in cell-line and blood DNA from the donors and additional family members. Twelve mutations were confirmed in approximately 10.15 Mb; eight of these had occurred in vitro and four in vivo. The latter could be placed in different positions on the pedigree and led to a mutation-rate measurement of 3.0 x 10(-8) mutations/nucleotide/generation (95% CI: 8.9 x 10(-9)-7.0 x 10(-8)), consistent with estimates of 2.3 x 10(-8)-6.3 x 10(-8) mutations/nucleotide/generation for the same Y-chromosomal region from published human-chimpanzee comparisons depending on the generation and split times assumed.

  17. Assignment of the human gene for the water channel of renal collecting duct Aquaporin 2 (AQP2) to chromosome 12 region q12-->q13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, P M; Weghuis, D O; Sinke, R J; Geurts van Kessel, A; Wieringa, B; van Os, C H

    1994-01-01

    The chromosomal localization of the gene encoding Aquaporin 2 (previously called WCH-CD), which acts as a water channel in the collecting tubules of the kidney, was determined. Southern blot hybridizations of chromosomal DNA from a panel of 25 different human-rodent hybrid cell lines assigned AQP2

  18. VERIFICATION OF ISOCHROMOSOME-12P AND IDENTIFICATION OF OTHER CHROMOSOME-12 ABERRATIONS IN GONADAL AND EXTRAGONADAL HUMAN GERM-CELL TUMORS BY BICOLOR DOUBLE FLUORESCENCE INSITU HYBRIDIZATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SUIJKERBUIJK, RF; LOOIJENGA, L; DEJONG, B; OOSTERHUIS, JW; CASSIMAN, JJ; VANKESSEL, AG

    1992-01-01

    A diverse group of gonadal and extragonadal human germ cell tumors (GCT) and GCT-derived cell lines was examined for the presence of an i(12p) marker chromosome and/or other abnormalities involving chromosome 12, especially 12p, by bicolor double fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For this

  19. Report of the Fourth International Workshop on human X chromosome mapping 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlessinger, D.; Mandel, J.L.; Monaco, A.P.; Nelson, D.L.; Willard, H.F. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    Vigorous interactive efforts by the X chromosome community have led to accelerated mapping in the last six months. Seventy-five participants from 12 countries around the globe contributed progress reports to the Fourth International X Chromosome Workshop, at St. Louis, MO, May 9-12, 1993. It became clear that well over half the chromosome is now covered by YAC contigs that are being extended, verified, and aligned by their content of STSs and other markers placed by cytogenetic or linkage mapping techniques. The major aim of the workshop was to assemble the consensus map that appears in this report, summarizing both consensus order and YAC contig information.

  20. Protective effect of apigenin on radiation-induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Tungjai, Montree; Whorton, Elbert B.

    2005-01-01

    The potential use of flavonoids as a radioprotector is of increasing interest because of their high antioxidant activity and abundance in the diet. The aim of this study is to examine genotoxic and radioprotective effects of one of the most common flavonoids, apigenin, on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to evaluate such effects of apigenin. Blood samples were collected from two non-smoking healthy male volunteers who had no history of previous exposure to other clastogenic agents. Isolated lymphocytes were cultured. There were two tubes per concentration for all treatments. To evaluate the genotoxicity of apigenin, cells were first treated with different concentrations of apigenin (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 25 microg/mL) at 24 h after culture initiation, followed by cytochalasin-B (Cyt-B) treatment (3 microg/mL) and cell harvest at 44 and 72 h, respectively. Secondly, to investigate the radioprotective effect, cell cultures were exposed to different concentrations of apigenin as described above for 30 min before being irradiated to 2 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (at a dose rate of 0.75 Gy/min). In all instances, the frequency of MN was scored in binucleated (BN) cells. The nuclear proliferation index also was calculated. We did not detect an increase in the frequency of MN in non-irradiated human lymphocyte cultures treated with 2.5, 5.0 or 10 microg/mL apigenin; although, we did observe an increase in cultures treated with 25 microg/mL apigenin (the highest concentration of apigenin used in our study). We also observed a significant increase in the frequency of MN in irradiated cells overall; however, the frequency was decreased as the concentration of apigenin increased, suggesting a radioprotective effect. These findings provide a basis for additional studies to help clarify the potential use and benefit of apigenin as a radioprotector.

  1. The dynamic changes of X chromosome inactivation during early culture of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Pingyuan; Ouyang, Qi; Leng, Lizhi; Hu, Liang; Cheng, Dehua; Tan, Yueqiu; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2016-07-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is required for dosage compensation of X-linked genes in human female cells. Several previous reports have described the promiscuous XCI status in long-term cultured female human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and the majority of them exhibit non-random XCI. However, when and how such female hESCs acquire the aberrant XCI states during culture is unknown. Herein, through comparing the XCI states in 18 paired hES cell lines throughout early culture, we revealed a uniform dynamic change during this culture period under a widely used culture condition. The female initial hESCs (ihESCs, P4-P9) expressed XIST RNA, H3K27me3 punctate enrichment and displayed random XCI pattern. By further culturing, the female early hESCs (ehESCs, P20-P30) lost the expression of XIST RNA, H3K27me3 punctate enrichment and exhibited a completely skewed XCI pattern. Importantly, a subset of X-linked genes was up-regulated in ehESCs, including some cancer-related genes. At last, we found 5% physiological oxygen was beneficial for the expression of XIST and H3K27me3 punctate enrichment, but not for the XCI pattern. We conclude that the XCI dynamic change is a frequent epigenetic instability event during early culture, which is accompanied by the up-regulation of some X-linked genes. Furthermore, we emphasize that physiological oxygen is beneficial for XCI fidelity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of nonalbumin rats by transplantation of immortalized hepatocytes using artificial human chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, M; Ikeno, M; Nagata, H; Yamamoto, T; Hiroguchi, A; Fox, I J; Miyakawa, S

    2009-01-01

    The shortage of organ donors has impeded the development of human hepatocyte transplantation. Immortalized hepatocytes, however, could provide an unlimited supply of transplantable cells. To determine whether immortalized hepatocytes could provide global metabolic support in end-stage liver disease, rat hepatocyte clones were developed by transduction with the gene encoding the simian virus 40 T antigen (SVLT) using the new technique of human artificial mini chromosome (HAC). Immortalized rat hepatocyte clones were developed by transduction with the gene encoding the SV40 using HAC. Many clones were obtained using this technique. From comparison of the properties of all these clones using the normal hepatocytes and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the characteristics of the cell clones (at least partially characterized, and assayed for albumin, glucose-6-phosphate and dipeptidyl peptidase-4, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, SVLT and beta-actin expression by RT-PCR) showed no differences other than the immortalization. We compared the albumin bands of the first-day (0-day) and 30-day cells by RT-PCR, showing conditions to be stable for at least 1 month. Three experimental animal model groups were used for albumin analysis: nonalbumin rats with 2/3 hepatectomy only (R-NARs; n = 4); R-NARs with intrasplenic transplantation of 3 x 10(7) primary hepatocytes (pHTx; n = 4); and R-NARs with intrasplenic transplantation of 3 x 10(7) immortalized hepatocytes (iHTx; n = 4). All HTx groups produced albumin, but the immortalized hepatocyte group did not generate significantly elevated albumin levels compared with primary hepatocytes. The results presented herein have demonstrated an initial step toward the development of immortalized hepatocytes for transplantable cells or artificial organs using HAC technology.

  3. Pericentric Inversion of Human Chromosome 9 Epidemiology Study in Czech Males and Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šípek, A; Panczak, A; Mihalová, R; Hrčková, L; Suttrová, E; Sobotka, V; Lonský, P; Kaspříková, N; Gregor, V

    2015-01-01

    Pericentric inversion of human chromosome 9 [inv(9)] is a relatively common cytogenetic finding. It is largely considered a clinically insignificant variant of the normal human karyotype. However, numerous studies have suggested its possible association with certain pathologies, e.g., infertility, habitual abortions or schizophrenia. We analysed the incidence of inv(9) and the spectrum of clinical indications for karyotyping among inv(9) carriers in three medical genetics departments in Prague. In their cytogenetic databases, among 26,597 total records we identified 421 (1.6 %) cases of inv(9) without any concurrent cytogenetic pathology. This study represents the world's largest epidemiological study on inv(9) to date. The incidence of inv(9) calculated in this way from diagnostic laboratory data does not differ from the incidence of inv(9) in three specific populationbased samples of healthy individuals (N = 4,166) karyotyped for preventive (amniocentesis for advanced maternal age, gamete donation) or legal reasons (children awaiting adoption). The most frequent clinical indication in inv(9) carriers was "idiopathic reproductive failure" - 37.1 %. The spectra and percentages of indications in individuals with inv(9) were further statistically evaluated for one of the departments (N = 170) by comparing individuals with inv(9) to a control group of 661 individuals with normal karyotypes without this inversion. The proportion of clinical referrals for "idiopathic reproductive failure" among inv(9) cases remains higher than in controls, but the difference is not statistically significant for both genders combined. Analysis in separated genders showed that the incidence of "idiopathic reproductive failure" could differ among inv(9) female and male carriers.

  4. Detecting evolutionary strata on the human x chromosome in the absence of gametologous y-linked sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ravi Shanker; Wilson Sayres, Melissa A; Azad, Rajeev K

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian sex chromosomes arose from a pair of homologous autosomes that differentiated into the X and Y chromosomes following a series of recombination suppression events between the X and Y. The stepwise recombination suppressions from the distal long arm to the distal short arm of the chromosomes are reflected as regions with distinct X-Y divergence, referred to as evolutionary strata on the X. All current methods for stratum detection depend on X-Y comparisons but are severely limited by the paucity of X-Y gametologs. We have developed an integrative method that combines a top-down, recursive segmentation algorithm with a bottom-up, agglomerative clustering algorithm to decipher compositionally distinct regions on the X, which reflect regions of unique X-Y divergence. In application to human X chromosome, our method correctly classified a concatenated set of 35 previously assayed X-linked gene sequences by evolutionary strata. We then extended our analysis, applying this method to the entire sequence of the human X chromosome, in an effort to define stratum boundaries. The boundaries of more recently formed strata on X-added region, namely the fourth and fifth strata, have been defined by previous studies and are recapitulated with our method. The older strata, from the first up to the third stratum, have remained poorly resolved due to paucity of X-Y gametologs. By analyzing the entire X sequence, our method identified seven evolutionary strata in these ancient regions, where only three could previously be assayed, thus demonstrating the robustness of our method in detecting the evolutionary strata.

  5. Comparative chromosome painting of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) karyotypes with human and dromedary camel probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulemzina, Anastasia I; Perelman, Polina L; Grafodatskaya, Darya A; Nguyen, Trung T; Thompson, Mary; Roelke-Parker, Melody E; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2014-06-12

    Pronghorn (Antilocapridae, 2n = 58) and saola (Bovidae, 2n = 50) are members of Pecora, a highly diversified group of even-toed hoofed mammals. Karyotypes of these species were not involved in chromosome painting studies despite their intriguing phylogenetic positions in Pecora. To trace the chromosome evolution during very fast radiation of main families from the common Pecoran ancestor, high-resolution comparative chromosome maps of pronghorn and saola with human (HSA) and dromedary camel (CDR) painting probes were established. The human and dromedary camel painting probes revealed 50 and 64 conserved segments respectively in the pronghorn genome, while 51 and 63 conserved segments respectively in the saola genome. Integrative analysis with published comparative maps showed that inversions in chromosomes homologous to CDR19/35/19 (HSA 10/20/10), CDR12/34/12 (HSA12/22/12/22), CDR10/33/10 (HSA 11) are present in representatives of all five living Pecoran families. The pronghorn karyotype could have formed from a putative 2n = 58 Pecoran ancestral karyotype by one fission and one fusion and that the saola karyotype differs from the presumed 2n = 60 bovid ancestral karyotype (2n = 60) by five fusions. The establishment of high-resolution comparative maps for pronghorn and saola has shed some new insights into the putative ancestral karyotype, chromosomal evolution and phylogenic relationships in Pecora. No cytogenetic signature rearrangements were found that could unite the Antilocapridae with Giraffidae or with any other Pecoran families. Our data on the saola support a separate position of Pseudorigyna subtribe rather than its affinity to either Bovina or Bubalina, but the saola phylogenetic position within Bovidae remains unresolved.

  6. Comparative chromosome painting of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) karyotypes with human and dromedary camel probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Pronghorn (Antilocapridae, 2n = 58) and saola (Bovidae, 2n = 50) are members of Pecora, a highly diversified group of even-toed hoofed mammals. Karyotypes of these species were not involved in chromosome painting studies despite their intriguing phylogenetic positions in Pecora. Results To trace the chromosome evolution during very fast radiation of main families from the common Pecoran ancestor, high-resolution comparative chromosome maps of pronghorn and saola with human (HSA) and dromedary camel (CDR) painting probes were established. The human and dromedary camel painting probes revealed 50 and 64 conserved segments respectively in the pronghorn genome, while 51 and 63 conserved segments respectively in the saola genome. Integrative analysis with published comparative maps showed that inversions in chromosomes homologous to CDR19/35/19 (HSA 10/20/10), CDR12/34/12 (HSA12/22/12/22), CDR10/33/10 (HSA 11) are present in representatives of all five living Pecoran families. The pronghorn karyotype could have formed from a putative 2n = 58 Pecoran ancestral karyotype by one fission and one fusion and that the saola karyotype differs from the presumed 2n = 60 bovid ancestral karyotype (2n = 60) by five fusions. Conclusion The establishment of high-resolution comparative maps for pronghorn and saola has shed some new insights into the putative ancestral karyotype, chromosomal evolution and phylogenic relationships in Pecora. No cytogenetic signature rearrangements were found that could unite the Antilocapridae with Giraffidae or with any other Pecoran families. Our data on the saola support a separate position of Pseudorigyna subtribe rather than its affinity to either Bovina or Bubalina, but the saola phylogenetic position within Bovidae remains unresolved. PMID:24923361

  7. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  8. Micronucleus assay in human fibroblasts: a measure of spontaneous chromosomal instability and mutagen hypersensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, N.L.; Hoar, D.I.; Greentree, C.L.; Dimnik, L.S.; Hennig, U.S.S.

    1988-01-01

    By comparing fibroblast strains derived from individuals exhibiting chromosome instability and/or mutagen hypersensitivity (Cockayne syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi anemia) with strains derived from health donors, the fibroblast micronucleus assay has been established as a reproducible measure of the genotypic variation in spontaneous or mitomycin C (MMC)-induced chromosomal instability. The patient strains that were moderately or exquisitely sensitive to MMC could be distinguished readily from the control strains, both in levels of spontaneous micronuclei and in sensitivity to MMC, whereas the mildly sensitive strain (Cockayne syndrome) overlapped with the control range. The reproducibility of the assay was evaluated within and between experiments. In addition to its value as a test system for genotoxins, the fibroblast micronucleus assay may be useful for investigating genetically determined hypersensitivity to mutagens, elevated spontaneous chromosomal breakage, and chromosome segregation errors.

  9. Development of affinity technology for isolating individual human chromosomes by third strand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresco, Jacques R.

    2003-06-01

    The overall goal was to explore whether nucleic acid third strands could be used to bind with very high specificity to specific targets within whole genomes. Towards this end conditions had to be found to keep erroneous binding to an absolute minimum. The goal to use third strands (linked to magnetic beads) to ''capture'' large particles such as plasmids, cosmids, and whole chromosomes from complex mixtures was partially met; their use to serve as cytogenetic probes of metaphase chromosomes and to deliver reactive reagents to unique target sites on chromosomes in vivo for the purpose of mutagenizing specific base pairs was fully met; and their use as cytogenetic probes of chromosomal DNA in sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue has been met since the DOE support was terminated.

  10. Use of fluorescent sequence-specific polyamides to discriminate human chromosomes by microscopy and flow cytometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gygi, Melanie P; Ferguson, Mark D; Mefford, Heather C; Lund, Kevin P; O'Day, Christine; Zhou, Peiwen; Friedman, Cynthia; van den Engh, Ger; Stolowitz, Mark L; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-01-01

    .... Polyamides bind to the minor groove of DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Unlike conventional sequence-specific DNA or RNA probes, polyamides can recognize their target sequence without the need to subject chromosomes to harsh denaturing conditions...

  11. Chromosomal Mosaicism in Human Feto-Placental Development: Implications for Prenatal Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Romana Grati

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal mosaicism is one of the primary interpretative issues in prenatal diagnosis. In this review, the mechanisms underlying feto-placental chromosomal mosaicism are presented. Based on the substantial retrospective diagnostic experience with chorionic villi samples (CVS of a prenatal diagnosis laboratory the following items are discussed: (i The frequency of the different types of mosaicism (confined placental, CPM, and true fetal mosaicisms, TFM; (ii The risk of fetal confirmation after the detection of a mosaic in CVS stratified by chromosome abnormality and placental tissue involvement; (iii The frequency of uniparental disomy for imprinted chromosomes associated with CPM; (iv The incidence of false-positive and false-negative results in CVS samples analyzed by only (semi-direct preparation or long term culture; and (v The implications of the presence of a feto-placental mosaicism for microarray analysis of CVS and non-invasive prenatal screening (NIPS.

  12. An additional human chromosome 21 causes suppression of neural fate of pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells in a teratoma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher Elizabeth

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation in humans. Among complex phenotypes, it displays a number of neural pathologies including smaller brain size, reduced numbers of neurons, reduced dendritic spine density and plasticity, and early Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration. Mouse models for DS show behavioural and cognitive defects, synaptic plasticity defects, and reduced hippocampal and cerebellar neuron numbers. Early postnatal development of both human and mouse-model DS shows the reduced capability of neuronal precursor cells to generate neurons. The exact molecular cause of this reduction, and the role played by increased dosage of individual HSA21 genes, remain unknown. Results We have subcutaneously injected mouse pluripotent ES cells containing a single freely segregating supernumerary human chromosome 21 (HSA21 into syngeneic mice, to generate transchromosomic teratomas. Transchromosomic cells and parental control cells were injected into opposite flanks of thirty mice in three independent experiments. Tumours were grown for 30 days, a time-span equivalent to combined intra-uterine, and early post-natal mouse development. When paired teratomas from the same animals were compared, transchromosomic tumours showed a three-fold lower percentage of neuroectodermal tissue, as well as significantly reduced mRNA levels for neuron specific (Tubb3 and glia specific (Gfap genes, relative to euploid controls. Two thirds of transchromosomic tumours also showed a lack of PCR amplification with multiple primers specific for HSA21, which were present in the ES cells at the point of injection, thus restricting a commonly retained trisomy to less than a third of HSA21 genes. Conclusion We demonstrate that a supernumerary chromosome 21 causes Inhibition of Neuroectodermal DIfferentiation (INDI of pluripotent ES cells. The data suggest that trisomy of less

  13. Temporal differentiation across a West-European Y-chromosomal cline: genealogy as a tool in human population genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Larmuseau, Maarten HD; Ottoni, Claudio; Raeymaekers, Joost AM; Vanderheyden, Nancy; Larmuseau, Hendrik FM; Decorte, Ronny

    2011-01-01

    The pattern of population genetic variation and allele frequencies within a species are unstable and are changing over time according to different evolutionary factors. For humans, it is possible to combine detailed patrilineal genealogical records with deep Y-chromosome (Y-chr) genotyping to disentangle signals of historical population genetic structures because of the exponential increase in genetic genealogical data. To test this approach, we studied the temporal pattern of the ‘autochthon...

  14. Chromosomal localization of the human V3 pituitary vasopressin receptor gene (AVPR3) to 1q32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau-Merck, M.F.; Derre, J.; Berger, R. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-11-20

    Vasopressin exerts its physiological effects on liver metabolism, fluid osmolarity, and corticotrophic response to stress through a set of at least three receptors, V1a, V2, and V3 (also called V1b), respectively. These receptors constitute a distinct group of the superfamily of G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors. When bound to vasopressin, they couple to G proteins activating phospholipase C for the V1a and V3 types and adenylate cyclase for the V2. The vasopressin receptor subfamily also includes the receptor for oxytocin, a structurally related hormone that signals through the activation of phospholipase C. The chromosomal position of the V2 receptor gene has been assigned to Xq28-qter by PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrids, whereas the oxytocin receptor gene has been mapped to chromosome 3q26.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The chromosomal location of the V1a gene is currently unknown. We recently cloned the cDNA and the gene coding for the human pituitary-specific V3 receptor (HGMW-approved symbol AVPR3). We report here the chromosomal localization of this gene by two distinct in situ hybridization techniques using radioactive and fluorescent probes. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Localization of the human fibromodulin gene (FMOD) to chromosome 1q32 and completion of the cDNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the human fibromodulin cDNA and its use to map the gene. For somatic cell hybrids, the generation of the PCR product was concordant with the presence of chromosome 1 and discordant with the presence of all other chromosomes, confirming that the fibromodulin gene is located within region q32 of chromosome 1. The physical mapping of genes is a critical step in the process of identifying which genes may be responsible for various inherited disorders. Specifically, the mapping of the fibromodulin gene now provides the information necessary to evaluate its potential role in genetic disorders of connective tissues. The analysis of previously reported diseases mapped to chromosome 1 reveals two genes located in the proximity of the fibromodulin locus. These are Usher syndrome type II, a recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, and Van der Woude syndrome, a dominant condition associated with abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate and hyperdontia. The genes for both of these disorders have been projected to be localized to 1q32 of a physical map that integrates available genetic linkage and physical data. However, it seems improbable that either of these disorders, exhibiting restricted tissue involvement, could be linked to the fibromodulin gene, given the wide tissue distribution of the encoded proteoglycan, although it remains possible that the relative importance of the quantity and function of the proteoglycan may avry between tissues. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Effect of peyote on human chromosomes. Cytogenetic study of the Huichol Indians of Northern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrance, D L; Janiger, O; Teplitz, R L

    1975-10-20

    Fify-seven Huichol Indians with a lifelong individual history and a 1,600-year cultural tradition of ingestion of peyote, a mescaline-containing cactus possessing hallucinogenic properties, were compared with 50 Huichol Indian controls and ten laboratory controls for effects on lymphocyte chromosomes. The frequency of abnormalities in the experimental and control groups did not differ significantly. Our results indicate that multigenerational ingestion of peyote is not associated with abnormalities in lymphocyte chromosomes.

  17. Molecular cloning, expression, and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding a human myeloid membrane antigen (gp150).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, A T; Peiper, S C; Rebentisch, M B; Ashmun, R A; Roussel, M F; Lemons, R S; Le Beau, M M; Rubin, C M; Sherr, C J

    1986-10-01

    DNA from a tertiary mouse cell transformant containing amplified human sequences encoding a human myeloid membrane glycoprotein, gp150, was used to construct a bacteriophage lambda library. A single recombinant phage containing 12 kilobases (kb) of human DNA was isolated, and molecular subclones were then used to isolate the complete gp150 gene from a human placental genomic DNA library. The intact gp150 gene, assembled from three recombinant phages, proved to be biologically active when transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. Molecular probes from the gp150 locus annealed with a 4.0-kb polyadenylated RNA transcript derived from human myeloid cell lines and from tertiary mouse cell transformants. The gp150 gene was assigned to human chromosome 15, and was subchromosomally localized to bands q25-26 by in situ hybridization. The chromosomal location of the gp150 gene coincides cytogenetically with the region assigned to the c-fes proto-oncogene, another human gene specifically expressed by myeloid cells.

  18. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K. [Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Multicolor detection of every chromosome as a means of detecting mosaicism and nuclear organization in human embryonic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kara; Fowler, Katie; Fonseka, Gothami; Griffin, Darren; Ioannou, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revolutionized cytogenetics using fluorescently labelled probes with high affinity with target (nuclear) DNA. By the early 1990s FISH was adopted as a means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) sexing for couples at risk of transmitting X-linked disorders and later for detection of unbalanced translocations. Following a rise in popularity of PGD by FISH for sexing and the availability of multicolor probes (5-8 colors), the use of FISH was expanded to the detection of aneuploidy and selective implantation of embryos more likely to be euploid, the rationale being to increase pregnancy rates (referral categories were typically advanced maternal age, repeated IVF failure, repeated miscarriage or severe male factor infertility). Despite initial reports of an increase in implantation rates, reduction in trisomic offspring and spontaneous abortions criticism centered around experimental design (including lack of randomization), inadequate control groups and lack of report on live births. Eleven randomized control trials (RCTs) (2004-2010) showed that preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) with FISH did not increase delivery rates with some demonstrating adverse outcomes. These RCTs, parallel improvements in culturing and cryopreservation and a shift to blastocyst biopsy essentially outdated FISH as a tool for PGS and it has now been replaced by newer technologies (array CGH, SNP arrays, qRT-PCR and NGS). Cell-by-cell follow up analysis of individual blastomeres in non-transferred embryos is however usually prohibitively expensive by these new approaches and thus FISH remains an invaluable resource for the study of mosaicism and nuclear organization. We thus developed the approach described herein for the FISH detection of chromosome copy number of all 24 human chromosomes. This approach involves 4 sequential layers of hybridization, each with 6 spectrally distinct fluorochromes and a bespoke capturing system. Here we report

  20. Generation of a novel human cytomegalovirus bacterial artificial chromosome tailored for transduction of exogenous sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, William L; Bhandari, Amit; Hojeij, Marwa; Pellett, Philip E

    2017-10-15

    The study of herpesviruses, including human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), is complicated by viral genome complexity and inefficient methods for genetic manipulation in tissue culture. Reverse genetics of herpesviruses has been facilitated by propagating their genomes in E. coli as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), which enables complex and precise genetic manipulation using bacterial recombinational systems. Internal capsid volume imposes a strict limit on the length of genome that can be packaged efficiently. This necessitates deletion of presumably nonessential segments of the viral genome to allow for incorporation of the E. coli mini-F plasmid propagation sequence. To avoid deleting viral genes, several BACs utilize a Cre/LoxP system to self-excise the mini-F sequence upon reconstitution of virus in tissue culture. Here, we describe the adaptation of Cre/LoxP to modify the mini-F sequence of the HCMV TB40/E BAC, thus generating a new self-excisable BAC, TB40/E/Cre. After excision of the E. coli propagation sequence, a 2.7 kbp genome length deficit is created due to a preexisting deletion within the US2-US6 coding region. We exploited this deficit and an FKBP12 protein destabilization domain (ddFKBP) to create a novel gene transduction system for studying exogenous proteins during HCMV infection. Using TB40/E/Cre, we: i) found genome length-associated differences in growth and ii) demonstrated its utility as a system capable of efficient transduction of exogenous proteins and regulation of their accumulation over periods as short as 2h. TB40/E/Cre is a powerful tool of broad applicability that can be adapted to study HCMV replication and cell biology in a variety of contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A gene for familial psoriasis susceptibility maps to the distal end of human chromosome 17q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowcock, A.; Tomfohrde, J.; Barnes, R. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis that affects approximately 2% of the population. A gene for psoriasis susceptibility was localized to the distal region of human chromosome 17q as a result of a genome wide linkage-analysis with polymorphic microsatellites and eight multiply affected psoriasis kindreds. With one large kindred a maximum two-point lod score with D17S784 was 5.70 at 15% recombination. Heterogeneity testing indicated that psoriasis susceptibility in 50% of the families was linked to distal 17q. Susceptibility to psoriasis has repeatedly been found to be associated with HLA-Cw6 and associated HLA alleles. We therefore genotyped the families for loci within and flanking HLA; these included PCR assays for susceptibility alleles. By lod score analysis no evidence of linkage of psoriasis susceptibility to HLA was detected. The distribution of HLA-Cw6 and HLA-Class II alleles showed that HLA-Cw6 was frequent among patients, particularly in 4 of the 5 unlinked families. All affected members of two of these unlinked families carried HLA-Cw6 (empirical P values of 0.027 and 0.004). In 2 other families 4 of 6 and 6 of 7 had HLA-Cw6. In some of these families, an inability to detect linkage to HLA may have been due to the occurrence of multiple haplotypes carrying the psoriasis associated allele, HLA-Cw6. Contrasting with these findings, we observed a lack of association between HLA-Cw6 and psoriasis in the 3 families in which 17q markers were linked to susceptibility. The ability to detect linkage to 17q confirms that some forms of familial psoriasis are due to molecular defects at a single major genetic locus other than HLA.

  2. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyoyeon [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyeon, E-mail: jylee@kist.re.kr [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. - Highlights: • We prepared a probe linked between QD and telomeric oligonucleotide with platinum-guanine bonding. • Telomeres were detected by our new telomere probes successfully in three different human metaphase chromosomes. • QDPt-DNA probe has high fluorescence intensity in comparison with organic dye-DNA probe.

  3. Break Point Distribution on Chromosome 3 of Human Epithelial Cells exposed to Gamma Rays, Neutrons and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the reported studies of break point distribution on the damaged chromosomes from radiation exposure were carried out with the G-banding technique or determined based on the relative length of the broken chromosomal fragments. However, these techniques lack the accuracy in comparison with the later developed multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique that is generally used for analysis of intrachromosomal aberrations such as inversions. Using mBAND, we studied chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells exposed in vitro to both low or high dose rate gamma rays in Houston, low dose rate secondary neutrons at Los Alamos National Laboratory and high dose rate 600 MeV/u Fe ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed after neutron or Fe ion exposure, and the majority of inversions in gamma-irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations. In addition, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges. We further compared the distribution of break point on chromosome 3 for the three radiation types. The break points were found to be randomly distributed on chromosome 3 after neutrons or Fe ions exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering break points was observed for gamma-rays. The break point distribution may serve as a potential fingerprint of high-LET radiation exposure.

  4. Assignment of the creatine transporter gene (SLC6A8) to human chromosome Xq28 telomeric to G6PD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor, P. [National Inst. on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD (United States); Nash, S.R.; Caron, M.G. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    The creatine-phosphocreatine shuttle has important functions in the temporal and spatial maintenance of the energy supply to skeletal and cardiac muscle. Muscle cells do not synthesize creatine, but take it up via a specific sodium-dependent transporter - the creatine transporter. Thus, the creatine transporter has an important role in muscular physiology. Furthermore, inhibition of creatine transport in experimental animals causes muscle weakness. Recently, creatine transporter cDNAs have been isolated and characterized from rabbit and human. In this communication we report mapping of the creatine transporter gene to human chromosome Xq28. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  5. The gene encoding human glutathione synthetase (GSS) maps to the long arm of chromosome 20 at band 11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.C.; Vaska, V.L.; Ford, J.H. [Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    Two forms of glutathione synthetase deficiency have been described. While one form is mild, causing hemolytic anemia, the other more severe form causes 5-oxoprolinuria with secondary neurological involvement. Despite the existence of two deficiency phenotypes, Southern blots hybridized with a glutathione synthetase cDNA suggest that there is a single glutathione synthetase gene in the human genome. Analysis of somatic cell hybrids showed the human glutathione synthetase gene (GSS) to be located on chromosome 20, and this assignment has been refined to subband 20q11.2 using in situ hybridization. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Adaptive Resistance to an Inhibitor of Chromosomal Instability in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Orr

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Karyotype diversity is a hallmark of solid tumors that contributes to intratumor heterogeneity. This diversity is generated by persistent chromosome mis-segregation associated with chromosomal instability (CIN. CIN correlates with tumor relapse and is thought to promote drug resistance by creating a vast genomic landscape through which karyotypically unique clones survive lethal drug selection. We explore this proposition using a small molecule (UMK57 that suppresses chromosome mis-segregation in CIN cancer cells by potentiating the activity of the kinesin-13 protein MCAK. Sublethal doses of UMK57 destabilize kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT attachments during mitosis to increase chromosome segregation fidelity. Surprisingly, chromosome mis-segregation rebounds in UMK57-treated cancer cells within a few days. This rapid relapse is driven by alterations in the Aurora B signaling pathway that hyper-stabilize k-MT attachments and is reversible following UMK57 removal. Thus, cancer cells display adaptive resistance to therapies targeting CIN through rapid and reversible changes to mitotic signaling networks.

  7. [Analysis of fragments of intergenome spacers of human body observed in chromosomes containing no nuclear organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanova, N S; Nechvolodov, K K; Korsunenko, A V

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repetitions of rDNA provide so-called nuclear organizations (NOR). On the other hand, rDNA-structures are observed in some NOR chromosomes. It was demonstrated that, in addition to ribosome biogenesis, nucleoli provided a number of functions: cell cycle regulation, stress-induced response, transcription regulation, which often induced cell cascades. The mechanisms of the induction of rDNA segments in NOR chromosomes are obscure and require further research. About 1/3 repetitions are associated with nucleoli and SINE/Alu repetitions, homogeneous repetition, and tandem repetition. Perhaps, relative position of nucleoli and chromosomes may facilitate/prevent interaction of chromosomes with rDNA clusters. The variability of two larger repetitions in the central part of rMGS, LR1, and LR2 similar by -90% and separated by several hundred pairs of bases from each other was studied in our previous works. This work was devoted to the search for the LR1-LR2 segments in other chromosomes, characterization of their terminal tips at rupture points and genome areas of incorporation of the LR1-LR2 segments.

  8. Transfection of normal human and Chinese hamster DNA corrects diepoxybutane-induced chromosomal hypersensitivity of Fanconi anemia fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaham, M.; Adler, B.; Ganguly, S.; Chaganti, R.S.K.

    1987-08-01

    Cultured cells from individuals affected with Fanconi anemia (FA) exhibit spontaneous chromosome breakage and hypersensitivity to the cell killing and clastogenic effects of the difunctional alkylating agent diepoxybutane (DEB). The authors report here the correction of both of these DEB-hypersensitivity phenotypes of FA cells achieved by cotransfection of normal placental of Chinese hamster lung cell DNA and the plasmid pSV2-neo-SVgpt. Transfectants were selected for clonogenic survival after treatment with DEB at a dose of 5 ..mu..gml. At this dose of DEB, the clonogenicity of normal fibroblasts was reduced to 50% and that of FA fibroblasts was reduced to zero. DEB-resistant (DEB/sup r/) colonies selected in this system exhibited a normal response to DEB-induced chromosome breakage and resistance to repeated DEB treatment. The neo and gpt sequences were detected by Southern blot analysis of DNA from one of four DEB/sup r/ colonies independently derived from transfection of human DNA and one of three DEB/sup r/ colonies independently derived from transfection of Chinese hamster DNA. The results demonstrate that DNA sequences that complement the two hallmark cellular phenotypes (cellular and chromosomal hypersensitivity to alkylating agents) of FA are present in human as well as Chinese hamster DNA. The cloning of these genes using transfection strategies can be expected to enable molecular characterization of FA

  9. Construction, arraying, and high-density screening of large insert libraries of human chromosomes X and 21: their potential use as reference libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizetić, D; Zehetner, G; Monaco, A P; Gellen, L; Young, B D; Lehrach, H

    1991-01-01

    We have constructed cosmid libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes X and 21, each of which contains greater than 30 genome equivalents, and have developed systems allowing permanent storage of primary clones, easy screening of libraries in high-density filter formats, and the simultaneous generation of fingerprinting and mapping data on the same set of cosmid clones. Clones are picked into microtiter plate wells and stored at -70 degrees C. A semiautomatic robot system allows the generation of filter replicas containing up to 10,000 clones per membrane. Sets of membranes containing 15-20 chromosome equivalents of both chromosomes will be used for the construction of ordered clone libraries by hybridization fingerprinting protocols. In addition, multiple sets of two membranes containing 4 chromosome equivalents of the human X chromosome, and one membrane containing 3 chromosome equivalents of chromosome 21, have been distributed to other interested laboratories as part of a system of reference libraries. This system allows other groups easy access to the clones and offers an efficient protocol to combine results generated in different laboratories using these libraries. Here we describe the construction of the libraries and demonstrate the use of high-density screening filters in oligonucleotide probe hybridizations and the isolation of cosmids by hybridization with probes from the X chromosome. Images PMID:2014245

  10. Construction and characterization of a NotI linking library from human chromosome region 1q25-qter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, C.B.; Zhen, Dong-Kai; Wang, Ji-Yi [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Chromosome 1q25-qter-specific NotI linking clones have been isolated from a NotI linking library that was constructed using DNA from MCH206.1 somatic cell hybrid cells. These cells contain chromosome 1q25-qter translocated to human chromosome Xp22 as the only human genetic material in mouse background. Sixty-eight NotI linking clones have been mapped by a combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization and R-banding to cytogenetic bands on the long arm of chromosome 1. The relative order of 11 NotI clones and their relation to known chromosome 1 markers have also been determined in 1q32 and 1q41, where the genes of Van der Woude and Usher syndrome type IIa have been previously mapped: cen-chr1.14-chr1.79-chr1.56-chr1.11-chr1.95-chr1.58 (chr1.74)-D1S70-chr1.15-chr1.82 (chr1.143)-chr1.62-D1S81-tel. The 1q32- and 1q41-specific NotI linking clones were sequenced in the vicinity of the NotI site. They were analyzed in terms of nucleotide composition, G+C content, frequency of CpG dinucleotides, and protein coding potentials. Most of the 1q32-q41-specific NotI linking clones were derived from CpG islands. Sequences of three NotI linking clones proved to be identical with known genes. Six of the remaining eight had a high potential for coding regions and shared short homologous regions with sequences in the GenBank database. The NotI linking clones and the identified CpG islands will provide valuable resources for constructing a long-range restriction map of chromosome 1q25-q44 and for the eventual isolation of disease genes of Van der Woude syndrome (1q32-q41) and Usher syndrome type IIa (1q41). 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Chromosomal assignment of human nuclear envelope protein genes LMNA, LMNB1, and LBR by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wydner, K.L.; McNeil, J.A. [Univ. of Masssachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States); Lin, Feng [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to establish precise chromosomal localizations for three human genes encoding four different nuclear envelope proteins. Lamin A/C (LMN1, HGMW-approved symbol LMNA) mapped to 1q21.2-q21.3, with a most probable gene assignment to 1q21.3; lamin B receptor (LBR) was localized to 1q42.1; and lamin B1 (LMNB1) was mapped to the interface of bands 5q23.3-q31.1. Assignments were determined by direct placement of signals relative to high-resolution DAPI or G-bands. Comparison of these results of band positions predicted from fractional length measurements to signal placement indicated that more accurate predictions are made using Francke idiograms and that measurement strategy avoids variance due to polymorphic chromosome segments. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Chromosome Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... XX), and males have an X and a Y chromosome (XY). The mother and father each contribute one ... chromosome has attached to another at the centromere. Inversions: A portion of the chromosome has broken off, turned upside down, and reattached. ...

  13. De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R.; Lieberman Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G.; Onuchic, José N.

    2017-01-01

    Inside the cell nucleus, genomes fold into organized structures that are characteristic of cell type. Here, we show that this chromatin architecture can be predicted de novo using epigenetic data derived from chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We exploit the idea that chromosomes encode a 1D sequence of chromatin structural types. Interactions between these chromatin types determine the 3D structural ensemble of chromosomes through a process similar to phase separation. First, a neural network is used to infer the relation between the epigenetic marks present at a locus, as assayed by ChIP-Seq, and the genomic compartment in which those loci reside, as measured by DNA-DNA proximity ligation (Hi-C). Next, types inferred from this neural network are used as an input to an energy landscape model for chromatin organization [Minimal Chromatin Model (MiChroM)] to generate an ensemble of 3D chromosome conformations at a resolution of 50 kilobases (kb). After training the model, dubbed Maximum Entropy Genomic Annotation from Biomarkers Associated to Structural Ensembles (MEGABASE), on odd-numbered chromosomes, we predict the sequences of chromatin types and the subsequent 3D conformational ensembles for the even chromosomes. We validate these structural ensembles by using ChIP-Seq tracks alone to predict Hi-C maps, as well as distances measured using 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. Both sets of experiments support the hypothesis of phase separation being the driving process behind compartmentalization. These findings strongly suggest that epigenetic marking patterns encode sufficient information to determine the global architecture of chromosomes and that de novo structure prediction for whole genomes may be increasingly possible. PMID:29087948

  14. De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R; Lieberman Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G; Onuchic, José N

    2017-11-14

    Inside the cell nucleus, genomes fold into organized structures that are characteristic of cell type. Here, we show that this chromatin architecture can be predicted de novo using epigenetic data derived from chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We exploit the idea that chromosomes encode a 1D sequence of chromatin structural types. Interactions between these chromatin types determine the 3D structural ensemble of chromosomes through a process similar to phase separation. First, a neural network is used to infer the relation between the epigenetic marks present at a locus, as assayed by ChIP-Seq, and the genomic compartment in which those loci reside, as measured by DNA-DNA proximity ligation (Hi-C). Next, types inferred from this neural network are used as an input to an energy landscape model for chromatin organization [Minimal Chromatin Model (MiChroM)] to generate an ensemble of 3D chromosome conformations at a resolution of 50 kilobases (kb). After training the model, dubbed Maximum Entropy Genomic Annotation from Biomarkers Associated to Structural Ensembles (MEGABASE), on odd-numbered chromosomes, we predict the sequences of chromatin types and the subsequent 3D conformational ensembles for the even chromosomes. We validate these structural ensembles by using ChIP-Seq tracks alone to predict Hi-C maps, as well as distances measured using 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. Both sets of experiments support the hypothesis of phase separation being the driving process behind compartmentalization. These findings strongly suggest that epigenetic marking patterns encode sufficient information to determine the global architecture of chromosomes and that de novo structure prediction for whole genomes may be increasingly possible. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  15. The Roles of Chromosome Breaks and Telomere Dynamics in the Genomic Instability Associated with Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, John

    2000-01-01

    ... of telomeres from chromosome ends. Loss of telomeres allows chromosomes to fuse end-to-end, triggering chromosome fusion-bridge-breakage cycles that lead to genome rearrangements, loss of heterozygosity, and gene amplification...

  16. Localization of two new DNA markers on the linkage map of human chromosome 6q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byth, B C; Love, D R; Murray, J C; Davies, K E

    1992-01-01

    Recently, an autosomal homolog of the dystrophin gene (DMDL) was identified on chromosome 6q24. As part of our analysis of the DMDL locus, we endeavoured to isolate DNA markers to further define the genetic map of this region. We have isolated and characterized two new genetic markers in the region of the DMDL locus, the RFLP D6S129 and a (CA)n dinucleotide repeat polymorphism within the DMDL gene itself and have positioned them on the existing genetic map of chromosome 6q. These markers will be important in testing the hypothesis that the DMDL gene is the locus responsible for autosomal forms of neuromuscular disease.

  17. Molecular cloning and chromosomal assignment of the human brain-type phosphodiesterase I/nucleotide pyrophosphatase gene (PDNP2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Soma, Osamu; Goji, Junko [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1995-11-20

    Phosphodiesterase I/nucleotide pyrophosphatase is a widely expressed membrane-bound enzyme that cleaves diester bonds of a variety of substrates. We have cloned brain-type cDNA for this enzyme from rat brain and designated it PD-I{alpha}. In this study we have isolated cDNA and genomic DNA encoding human PD-I{alpha}. Human PD-I{alpha} cDNA, designated PDNP2 in HGMW nomenclature, has a 2589-nucleotide open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 863 amino acids with a calculated M{sub r} of 99,034. Northern blot analysis revealed that human PD-I{alpha} transcript was present in brain, lung, placenta, and kidney. The database analysis showed that human PD-I{alpha} was identical with human autotaxin (ATX), a novel tumor motility-stimulating factor, except that human PD-I{alpha} lacks 156 nucleotides and 52 amino acids of human ATX. Human PD-I{alpha} and human ATX are likely to be alternative splicing products from the same gene. The 5{prime} region of the human PDNP2 gene contains four putative binding sites of transcription factor Sp1 without typical TATA or CAAT boxes, and there is a potential octamer binding motif in intron 2. From the results of fluorescence in situ hybridization, the human PDNP2 gene is located at chromosome 8q24.1. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  18. GAD2 on chromosome 10p12 is a candidate gene for human obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Boutin

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The gene GAD2 encoding the glutamic acid decarboxylase enzyme (GAD65 is a positional candidate gene for obesity on Chromosome 10p11-12, a susceptibility locus for morbid obesity in four independent ethnic populations. GAD65 catalyzes the formation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, which interacts with neuropeptide Y in the paraventricular nucleus to contribute to stimulate food intake. A case-control study (575 morbidly obese and 646 control subjects analyzing GAD2 variants identified both a protective haplotype, including the most frequent alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs +61450 C>A and +83897 T>A (OR = 0.81, 95% CI [0.681-0.972], p = 0.0049 and an at-risk SNP (-243 A>G for morbid obesity (OR = 1.3, 95% CI [1.053-1.585], p = 0.014. Furthermore, familial-based analyses confirmed the association with the obesity of SNP +61450 C>A and +83897 T>A haplotype (chi(2 = 7.637, p = 0.02. In the murine insulinoma cell line betaTC3, the G at-risk allele of SNP -243 A>G increased six times GAD2 promoter activity (p G SNP was associated with higher hunger scores (p = 0.007 and disinhibition scores (p = 0.028, as assessed by the Stunkard Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire. As GAD2 is highly expressed in pancreatic beta cells, we analyzed GAD65 antibody level as a marker of beta-cell activity and of insulin secretion. In the control group, -243 A>G, +61450 C>A, and +83897 T>A SNPs were associated with lower GAD65 autoantibody levels (p values of 0.003, 0.047, and 0.006, respectively. SNP +83897 T>A was associated with lower fasting insulin and insulin secretion, as assessed by the HOMA-B% homeostasis model of beta-cell function (p = 0.009 and 0.01, respectively. These data support the hypothesis of the orexigenic effect of GABA in humans and of a contribution of genes involved in GABA metabolism in the modulation of food intake and in the development of morbid obesity.

  19. Genetic variation in the major mitotic checkpoint genes associated with chromosomal aberrations in healthy humans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Försti, A.; Frank, Ch.; Smolková, B.; Kazimírová, A.; Barančoková, M.; Vymetálková, Veronika; Kroupa, M.; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Buchancová, J.; Dusinská, M.; Musak, L.; Vodička, Pavel; Hemminki, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 380, č. 2 (2016), s. 442-446 ISSN 0304-3835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14789S Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : chromosomal integrity * cytogenetics * spindle checkpoint Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.375, year: 2016

  20. A case of human chimerism established by blood grouping and chromosome heteromorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Tatsuro, IKEUCHI; Eiko, Ishibashi; Megumi, Murata; Satoko, Fukuda; Miyao, Yamada; Kohtaro, Yamamoto; Hachiro, Nakajima; Division of Genetics, Medical Research Institute; Tochigi Red Cross Blood Center; Division of Virology and Immunology, Medical Research Institute; Department of Forensic Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University

    2000-01-01

    An apparently normal adult male blood donor was detected to be a chimera, which was proved by polymorphic genetic marker systems (ABO and Kidd blood groups, phosphoglucomutase 1 and esterase D), and confirmed by Q-banding heteromorphic chromosome markers. The mechanism of chimera formation could not be established.

  1. A novel MCPH1 isoform complements the defective chromosome condensation of human MCPH1-deficient cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Gavvovidis

    Full Text Available Biallelic mutations in MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly (MCPH with the cellular phenotype of defective chromosome condensation. MCPH1 encodes a multifunctional protein that notably is involved in brain development, regulation of chromosome condensation, and DNA damage response. In the present studies, we detected that MCPH1 encodes several distinct transcripts, including two major forms: full-length MCPH1 (MCPH1-FL and a second transcript lacking the six 3' exons (MCPH1Δe9-14. Both variants show comparable tissue-specific expression patterns, demonstrate nuclear localization that is mediated independently via separate NLS motifs, and are more abundant in certain fetal than adult organs. In addition, the expression of either isoform complements the chromosome condensation defect found in genetically MCPH1-deficient or MCPH1 siRNA-depleted cells, demonstrating a redundancy of both MCPH1 isoforms for the regulation of chromosome condensation. Strikingly however, both transcripts are regulated antagonistically during cell-cycle progression and there are functional differences between the isoforms with regard to the DNA damage response; MCPH1-FL localizes to phosphorylated H2AX repair foci following ionizing irradiation, while MCPH1Δe9-14 was evenly distributed in the nucleus. In summary, our results demonstrate here that MCPH1 encodes different isoforms that are differentially regulated at the transcript level and have different functions at the protein level.

  2. Report of the fifth international workshop on human X chromosome mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, H.F.; Cremers, F.; Mandel, J.L.; Monaco, A.P.; Nelson, D.L.; Schlessinger, D.

    1994-12-31

    A high-quality integrated genetic and physical map of the X chromosome from telomere to telomere, based primarily on YACs formatted with probes and STSs, is increasingly close to reality. At the Fifth International X Chromosome Workshop, organized by A.M. Poustka and D. Schlessinger in Heidelberg, Germany, April 24--27, 1994, substantial progress was recorded on extension and refinement of the physical map, on the integration of genetic and cytogenetic data, on attempts to use the map to direct gene searches, and on nascent large-scale sequencing efforts. This report summarizes physical and genetic mapping information presented at the workshop and/or published since the reports of the fourth International X Chromosome Workshop. The principle aim of the workshop was to derive a consensus map of the chromosome, in terms of physical contigs emphasizing the location of genes and microsatellite markers. The resulting map is presented and updates previous versions. This report also updates the list of highly informative microsatellites. The text highlights the working state of the map, the genes known to reside on the X, and the progress toward integration of various types of data.

  3. A neocentromere on human chromosome 3 without detectable alpha-satellite DNA forms morphologically normal kinetochores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, A; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, Niels

    1998-01-01

    A neocentromere at 3q26 was observed in a father and his daughter on a chromosome 3 with deleted centromeric region. No alpha-satellite DNA was detectable at the 3q26 neocentromere, but it was weakly positive with anticentromere (CREST) antibodies. Electron microscopy showed that the neocentromere...

  4. A cluster of transfer RNA genes (TRM1, TRR3, and TRAN) on the short arm of human chromosome 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckland, R.A.; Maule, J.C.; Sealey, P.G. [Western General Hospital, Ediniburgh (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-01

    We have isolated two lambda clones that contain three transfer RNA (tRNA) genes (TRM1, TRR3, and TRAN). Both clones map to the same region (6p21.2-p22.3) of the short arm of chromosome 6. One clone contains a methionine tRNA gene and also an arginine tRNA gene, the first such human gene to be described. The other clone contains an alanine tRNA gene, again the first such human gene to be reported, and it differs from the species of human alanine tRNA transcripts sequenced to date. These clones have been used to investigate the structure at this location. The other clone is not located within this domain and appears to be a unique segment of DNA. Nevertheless, we also show that at least half of the methionine tRNA genes are located on the short arm of this chromosome, and if these are also located at 6p21.2-p22.3, and if these are also located at 6p21.2-p22.3, this would constitute another major tRNA locus in human. 55 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Assignment of the gene for human tetranectin (TNA) to chromosome 3p22-->p21.3 by somatic cell hybrid mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Naylor, S L; Albrechtsen, R

    1997-01-01

    Tetranectin is a plasminogen-binding protein that is induced during the mineralization phase of osteogenesis. By screening a human chromosome 3 somatic cell hybrid mapping panel, we have localized the human tetranectin gene (TNA) to 3p22-->p21.3, which is distinct from the loci of two human...

  6. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  7. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes from the plateau region of the Bragg curve for a carbon-ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manti, L. [Department of Physical Sciences, Universita di Napoli Federico II (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli (Italy)]. E-mail: manti@na.infn.it; Durante, M. [Department of Physical Sciences, Universita di Napoli Federico II (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Grossi, G. [Department of Physical Sciences, Universita di Napoli Federico II (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Pugliese, M. [Department of Physical Sciences, Universita di Napoli Federico II (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Scampoli, P. [Department of Physical Sciences, Universita di Napoli Federico II (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Gialanella, G. [Department of Physical Sciences, Universita di Napoli Federico II (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli (Italy)

    2007-06-15

    Radiotherapy with high-energy carbon ion beams can be more advantageous compared to photons because of better physical dose distribution and higher biological efficiency in tumour cell sterilization. Despite enhanced normal tissue sparing, damage incurred by normal cells at the beam entrance is unavoidable and may affect the progeny of surviving cells in the form of inheritable cytogenetic alterations. Furthermore, the quality of the beam along the Bragg curve is modified by nuclear fragmentation of projectile and target nuclei in the body. We present an experimental approach based on the use of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom that allows the simultaneous exposure to a particle beam of several biological samples positioned at various depths along the beam path. The device was used to measure the biological effectiveness of a 60 MeV/amu carbon-ion beam at inducing chromosomal aberrations in G{sub 0}-human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Chromosome spreads were obtained from prematurely condensed cells and all structural aberration types were scored in Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH)-painted chromosomes 1 and 2. Our results show a marked increase with depth in the aberration frequency prior to the Bragg peak, which is consistent with a linear energy transfer (LET)-dependent increase in biological effectiveness.

  8. Close but Distinct Regions of Human Herpesvirus 8 Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen 1 Are Responsible for Nuclear Targeting and Binding to Human Mitotic Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piolot, Tristan; Tramier, Marc; Coppey, Maité; Nicolas, Jean-Claude; Marechal, Vincent

    2001-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 is associated with all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, AIDS-associated body cavity-based lymphomas, and some forms of multicentric Castleman's disease. Herpesvirus 8, like other gammaherpesviruses, can establish a latent infection in which viral genomes are stably maintained as multiple episomes. The latent nuclear antigen (LANA or LNAI) may play an essential role in the stable maintenance of latent episomes, notably by interacting concomitantly with the viral genomes and the metaphase chromosomes, thus ensuring an efficient transmission of the neoduplicated episomes to the daughter cells. To identify the regions responsible for its nuclear and subnuclear localization in interphase and mitotic cells, LNAI and various truncated forms were fused to a variant of green fluorescent protein. This enabled their localization and chromosome binding activity to be studied by low-light-level fluorescence microscopy in living HeLa cells. The results demonstrate that nuclear localization of LNAI is due to a unique signal, which maps between amino acids 24 and 30. Interestingly, this nuclear localization signal closely resembles those identified in EBNA1 from Epstein-Barr virus and herpesvirus papio. A region encompassing amino acids 5 to 22 was further proved to mediate the specific interaction of LNA1 with chromatin during interphase and the chromosomes during mitosis. The presence of putative phosphorylation sites in the chromosome binding sites of LNA1 and EBNA1 suggests that their activity may be regulated by specific cellular kinases. PMID:11264383

  9. Chromosome analyses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann-Berg, N; Bullerdiek, J; Murua Escobar, H; Nolte, I

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetics is the study of normal and abnormal chromosomes. Every species is characterized by a given number of chromosomes that can be recognized by their specific shape. The chromosomes are arranged according to standard classification schemes for the respective species. While pre- and postnatal chromosome analyses investigate the constitutional karyotype, tumor cytogenetics is focused on the detection of clonal acquired, tumor-associated chromosome aberrations. Cytogenetic investigations in dogs are of great value especially for breeders dealing with fertility problems within their pedigrees, for veterinarians and last but not least for the dog owners. Dogs and humans share a variety of genetic diseases, including cancer. Thus, the dog has become an increasingly important model for genetic diseases. However, cytogenetic analyses of canine cells are complicated by the complex karyotype of the dog. Only just 15 years ago, a standard classification scheme for the complete canine karyotype was established. For chromosome analyses of canine cells the same steps of chromosome preparation are used as in human cytogenetics. There are few reports about cytogenetic changes in non-neoplastic cells, involving predominantly the sex chromosomes. Cytogenetic analyses of different entities of canine tumors revealed that, comparable to human tumors, tumors of the dog are often characterized by clonal chromosome aberrations, which might be used as diagnostic and prognostic markers. The integration of modern techniques (molecular genetic approaches, adaptive computer programs) will facilitate and complete conventional cytogenetic studies. However, conventional cytogenetics is still non-replaceable.

  10. Comparative mapping on the mouse and human X chromosomes of a human cDNA clone encoding the vasopressin renal-type receptor (AVP2R)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faust, C.J.; Gonzales, J.C.; Seibold, A.; Birnbaumer, M.; Herman, G.E. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Mutation in the gene for the human renal-type vasopressin receptor (V2R) have recently been identified in patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Both V2R and NDI have been independently mapped to Xq28. Using a combination of genetic and physical mapping, we have localized the murine V2r locus to within 100 kb of L1Cam on the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with human Xq28. Based on conserved gene order of mouse and human loci in this region, physical mapping using DNA derived form human lymphoblasts has established that the corresponding human loci V2R and L1CAM are linked within 210 kb. The efficiency and precision of genetic mapping of V2r and other loci in the mouse suggest that it might be easier to map additional human genes in the mouse first and infer the corresponding human location. More precise physical mapping in man could then be performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and/or yeast artificial chromosomes. 16 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  11. The mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar) maps to chromosome 2 in a region homologous to human 9q33-q34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunialti, A.L.B.; Guenet, J.L. [Institut Pasteur a Paris (France); Harding, C.O.; Wolff, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-08-15

    The autosomal recessive mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar), which was discovered segregating in the progeny of a male whose premeiotic germ cells had been treated with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea, is characterized by a deficiency in sarcosine dehydrogenase activity. Using an intersubspecific cross, we mapped the sar locus to mouse chromosome 2, approximately 15-18 cM from the centromere. The genetic localization of this locus in the mouse allows the identification of a candidate region in human (9q33-q34) where the homologous disease should map. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Human Y chromosome haplogroup R-V88: a paternal genetic record of early mid Holocene trans-Saharan connections and the spread of Chadic languages

    OpenAIRE

    Cruciani, Fulvio; Trombetta, Beniamino; Sellitto, Daniele; Massaia, Andrea; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Watson, Elizabeth; Beraud Colomb, Eliane; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Moral, Pedro; Scozzari, Rosaria

    2010-01-01

    Although human Y chromosomes belonging to haplogroup R1b are quite rare in Africa, being found mainly in Asia and Europe, a group of chromosomes within the paragroup R-P25* are found concentrated in the central-western part of the African continent, where they can be detected at frequencies as high as 95%. Phylogenetic evidence and coalescence time estimates suggest that R-P25* chromosomes (or their phylogenetic ancestor) may have been carried to Africa by an Asia-to-Africa back migration in ...

  13. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the {alpha} receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, D.M.; Rojas, E.; McClain, J. [Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor {alpha} (CNTFR{alpha}). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR{alpha}. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain in encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Platelet lysate consisting of a natural repair proteome supports human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and chromosomal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Diaz, Ruben; Behfar, Atta; Butler, Greg W; Padley, Douglas J; Sarr, Michael G; Bartunek, Jozef; Dietz, Allan B; Terzic, Andre

    2011-01-01

    With favorable regenerative and immunotolerant profiles, patient-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are increasingly considered in cell therapy. Derived from bone marrow (BM) and standardized with culture in fetal bovine serum (FBS), translation of hMSC-based approaches is impeded by protracted expansion times, risk of xenogenic response, and exposure to zoonoses. Here, human platelet lysate adherent to good manufacturing practices (GMP-hPL) provided a nonzoonotic adjuvant that enhanced the capacity of BM-hMSC to proliferate. The nurturing benefit of GMP-hPL was generalized to hMSC from adipose tissue evaluated as an alternative to bone marrow. Long-term culture in GMP-hPL maintained the multipotency of hMSC, while protecting against clonal chromosomal instability detected in the FBS milieu. Proteomic dissection identified TGF-β, VEGF, PDGF, FGF, and EGF as highly ranked effectors of hPL activity, revealing a paradigm of healing that underlies platelet lysate adjuvancy. Thus, GMP-adherent human platelet lysate accelerates hMSC proliferation with no chromosomal aberrancy, through an innate repair paradigm.

  15. Report of the first international workshop on human chromosome 8 mapping. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, S.; Ben Othmane, K.; Bergerheim, U.S.R. [and others

    1993-12-31

    The first international chromosome 8 workshop was held in Vancouver, Canada May 2--4, 1993. The conference was attended by 23 participants from Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the US. Twenty three abstracts are included from this workshop. The workshop was supported by CGAT/CTAG (Canadian Genome Analysis & Technology Program/Programme Canadien de Technologie & D`Analyse du Genome) as well as by travel funds allocated by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy of the United States and by agencies within the countries of overseas participants. The goals of the workshop were to evaluate new locus assignments, review new data obtained for previously assigned loci, develop a consensus marker order for chromosome 8, assess and integrate physical mapping information, identify resources and foster collaboration.

  16. The gene for human erythrocyte protein 4. 2 maps to chromosome 15q15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najfeld, V. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY (United States)); Ballard, S.G.; Menninger, J.; Ward, D.C. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)); Bouhassira, E.E.; Schwartz, R.S.; Nagel, R.L.; Rybicki, A.C. (Albert Einstein Coll. of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Protein 4.2 (P4.2), one of the major components of the red-blood-cell membrane, is located on the interior surface, where it binds with high affinity to the cytoplasmic domain of band 3. Individuals whose red blood cells are deficient in P4.2 have osmotically fragile, abnormally shaped cells and moderate hemolytic anemia. cDNA clones from both the 5{prime} and the 3{prime} coding regions of the P4.2 gene were used to map its chromosomal location by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The probes, individually or in combination, gave specific hybridization signals on chromosome 15. The hybridization locus was identified by combining fluorescence images of the probe signals with fluorescence banding patterns generated by Alu-PCR (R-like) probe and by DAPI staining (G-like). The authors results demonstrate that the locus of the P4.2 gene is located within 15q15.

  17. Elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype of Bloom syndrome cells is complemented by human chromosome 15.

    OpenAIRE

    McDaniel, L. D.; Schultz, R A

    1992-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BSx) is a rare autosomal-recessive chromosome-instability disorder manifested by a constellation of clinical features including a significant predisposition to early onset of neoplasia. BSx cells display cytogenetic abnormalities, the pathognomonic feature being an increased rate of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), 10- to 15-fold more frequent than SCEs seen in control cells. Identification of the primary biochemical defect in BSx and its relationship to SCE freq...

  18. [Assessment of relative biological effectiveness of tritium using chromosome aberration frequency in human blood lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigireva, G P; Khaĭmovich, T I; Nagiba, V I

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta-irradiation using chromosome aberration frequency in peripheral blood lymphocytes after radiation exposure in vitro and in vivo. The results of the experimental estimation of tritium beta-irradiation RBE in comparison with 60Co gamma-irradiation using analysis of unstable chromosome aberration frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes in reference to concrete conditions of the investigation were presented. It was demonstrated that tritium beta-irradiation is in total more effective than gamma-irradiation up to 1 Gy. RBE of tritium beta-irradiation was determined as 2.2 at minimum doses and decreased at higher doses (1 Gy) up to 1.25. For the first time results of the comparative analysis of frequencies of stable chromosome aberrations in two groups of professional nuclear workers (town Sarov) exposed to chronic tritium beta- and gamma-irradiation in remote period were presented. The grater RBE of tritium beta-irradiation was demonstrated. It has been estimated as 2.5.

  19. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  20. Y-chromosome short tandem repeat intermediate variant alleles DYS392.2, DYS449.2, and DYS385.2 delineate new phylogenetic substructure in human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myres, Natalie M; Ritchie, Kathleen H; Lin, Alice A; Hughes, Robert H; Woodward, Scott R; Underhill, Peter A

    2009-06-01

    To determine the human Y-chromosome haplogroup backgrounds of intermediate-sized variant alleles displayed by short tandem repeat (STR) loci DYS392, DYS449, and DYS385, and to evaluate the potential of each intermediate variant to elucidate new phylogenetic substructure within the human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree. Molecular characterization of lineages was achieved using a combination of Y-chromosome haplogroup defining binary polymorphisms and up to 37 short tandem repeat loci. DNA sequencing and median-joining network analyses were used to evaluate Y-chromosome lineages displaying intermediate variant alleles. We show that DYS392.2 occurs on a single haplogroup background, specifically I1*-M253, and likely represents a new phylogenetic subdivision in this European haplogroup. Intermediate variants DYS449.2 and DYS385.2 both occur on multiple haplogroup backgrounds, and when evaluated within specific haplogroup contexts, delineate new phylogenetic substructure, with DYS449.2 being informative within haplogroup A-P97 and DYS385.2 in haplogroups D-M145, E1b1a-M2, and R1b*-M343. Sequence analysis of variant alleles observed within the various haplogroup backgrounds showed that the nature of the intermediate variant differed, confirming the mutations arose independently. Y-chromosome short tandem repeat intermediate variant alleles, while relatively rare, typically occur on multiple haplogroup backgrounds. This distribution indicates that such mutations arise at a rate generally intermediate to those of binary markers and STR loci. As a result, intermediate-sized Y-STR variants can reveal phylogenetic substructure within the Y-chromosome phylogeny not currently detected by either binary or Y-STR markers alone, but only when such variants are evaluated within a haplogroup context.

  1. Partial trisomy 5q resulting from chromosome 7 insertion: An expansion of the phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, M.H.; Reilly, P.A.; Williams, T.C. [Keesler Medical Center, MS (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Partial trisomy 5q has been categorized into three separate phenotypes; however, a distinctive phenotype has not been described for duplications spanning 5q23-q35. We report a case of partial trisomy 5q for this region as a result of a ins(7,5)(q31.3;q23.2q35.1)mat. The liveborn male infant was delivered by emergency cesarean section at 37 weeks after a pregnancy notable for oligohydramnios, with birth weight 1792 g (<3%). Postnatal course was marked by psychomotor delay, failure to thrive, and biopsy demonstrated neonatal giant cell hepatitis with a paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts. His appearance was remarkable for lack of subcutaneous fat, midline displaced hair whorl, bitemporal narrowing with frontal bossing, wide anterior fontanel, widow`s peak, protuberant eyes with periorbital and lid edema, short flat nasal bridge with broad flattened nasal tip, long smooth philtrum, wide mouth with thin lips, wide gingival ridges, micrognathia, posteriorly rotated low-set ears, hepatomegaly, flexion contractions of elbows, and generalized hypertonicity. Urine organic acids, oligosaccharide/mucopolysaccharide screen, and plasma amino acids were negative. GTG-banding on prometaphase chromosomes showed an unbalanced translocation involving chr. 7. This was identified as an insertion of chr. 5 (q23.2q35.1) into distal 7q after FISH using chr. 5 and chr. 7 painting probes. The infant`s mother carries the balanced insertional rearrangement: 46,XX,dir ins(7,5)(q31.3;q23.2q35.1). This phenotype overlaps that of previously described duplications with the addition of giant cell hepatitis, coarsened facial features, gingival thickening, and flexion contractures, suggestive of a yet undiagnosed storage disorder.

  2. The effects of biological and life-style factors on baseline frequencies of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilada Nefic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the influence of sex and ageing on chromosomal damage and the role of life-style habits on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CAs in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs of healthy Bosnian subjects. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 100 healthy, unrelated individuals in Bosnia and Herzegovina during 2010 and 2011. Chromosome preparations were made by dropping and air drying and slides were stained with 10% Giemsa solution (pH 6.8. The cytogenetic analysis was carried out in a cytogenetic laboratory in the Department of Biology of the Faculty of Science in Sarajevo. The category of total structural CAs was sub classified as chromosome-type aberrations (CSAs and chromatid-type aberrations (CTAs while the category of total numerical CAs was sub classified as aneuploid and polyploid mitoses. All statistical analyses were carried out using Microsoft Excel 2010 (Microsoft Corporation and the Windows Kwikstat Winks SDA 7.0.2 statistical software package (Texa Soft Cedar Hill, Texas. Results: Cytogenetic analysis revealed the average number of structural CAs was 2.84 and of numerical CAs was 9.56. There was a significant increase in the frequency of chromosome-type aberrations (1.92 compared with chromatid-type aberrations (CTAs (0.92 and a significant increase in the frequency of aneuploid (8.83 compared with polyploid (0.73 mitoses. Significant positive correlations between age and CTAs in human PBLs were also demonstrated. Additional statistical analysis showed that ageing increase number of numerical CAs in lymphocytes of drinkers. The frequency of structural CAs of females exposed to radiation was significantly greater than in males. Analysis indicates the presence of a positive association between CAs and smoking in younger subjects but a negative correlation between aberrant cells frequencies and alcohol in older drinkers. Conclusion: The results of the study support the

  3. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature.

  4. An improved method for producing radiation hybrids applied to human chromosome 19. Technical progress report, March 1, 1991--February 28, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, C.L.

    1992-04-01

    At the initiation of the grant we had just produced radiation hybrids from a monochromosomal microcell hybrid containing human chromosome 19 as its only human component. Radiation hybrids were produced using doses of radiation ranging from 1000--8000 rads. Lethally irradiated cells were then fused to hamster recipients (CHTG49) and selected for growth in histidinol. Approximately 240 clones were isolated and 75 clones were expanded for the isolation of DNA. This report describes in situ hybridization studies and the introduction of markers into human chromosome 19.

  5. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  6. Prediction of a rare chromosomal aberration simultaneously with next generation sequencing-based comprehensive chromosome screening in human preimplantation embryos for recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Xuan; Chen, Chien-Wen; Lin, Yi-Hui; Tzeng, Chii-Ruey; Chen, Chi-Huang

    2017-09-30

    Preimplantation genetic testing has been used widely in recent years as a part of assisted reproductive technology (ART) owing to the breakthrough development of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequencing. With the advancement of technology and increased resolution of next generation sequencing (NGS), extensive comprehensive chromosome screening along with small clinically significant deletions and duplications can possibly be performed simultaneously. Here, we present a case of rare chromosomal aberrations: 46,XY,dup(15)(q11.2q13),t(16;18)(q23;p11.2), which resulted in a normally developed adult but abnormal gametes leading to recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). To our best knowledge, this is the first report of t(16;18) translocation with such a small exchanged segment detected by NGS platform of MiSeq system in simultaneous 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening.

  7. Induction and prevention of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations in cultured human lymphocytes exposed to the light of halogen tungsten lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostini, F; Caimo, A; De Filippi, S; De Flora, S

    1999-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the light emitted by halogen tungsten lamps contains UV radiation in the UV-A, UV-B and UV-C regions, induces mutations and irreparable DNA damage in bacteria, enhances the frequency of micronuclei in cultured human lymphocytes and is potently carcinogenic to the skin of hairless mice. The present study showed that the light emitted by an uncovered, traditional halogen lamp induces a significant, dose-related and time-related increase not only in micronuclei but also in chromosome-type aberrations, such as breaks, and even more in chromatid-type aberrations, such as isochromatid breaks, exchanges and isochromatid/chromatid interchanges, all including gaps or not, in cultured human lymphocytes. All these genotoxic effects were completely prevented by shielding the same lamp with a silica glass cover, blocking UV radiation. A new model of halogen lamp, having the quartz bulb treated in order to reduce the output of UV radiation, was considerably less genotoxic than the uncovered halogen lamp, yet induction of chromosomal alterations was observed at high illuminance levels.

  8. Molecular cloning of the human homolog of a striatum-enriched phosphatase (STEP) gene and chromosomal mapping of the human and murine loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xu; Luna, J. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Francke, U. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)]|[Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1995-08-10

    A gene for a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) was isolated from a human fetal brain cDNA library by PCR amplification. Sequence analysis revealed that the PTPase has a single phosphatase catalytic domain located at the C-terminus that includes the highly conserved amino acid domain [I/V]HCXAGXXR[S/T]GX[F/Y] found in all tyrosine phosphatases. Two proline-rich regions located at the N-terminus may contain putative Src homology domain 3 (SH3) binding motifs. Comparison of the PTPase with a previously cloned striatum enriched phosphatase (STEP) from rat and from mouse exhibited a high degree of identity ({approximately}85-90%) at both the nucleotide and the amino acid levels, indicating that the human PTPase is the homolog of the rat and murine STEP gene. By using a combination of somatic cell hybrid analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the human STEP locus to chromosome 11p15.2-p15.1 and the murine STEP gene to chromosome 7B3-B5. These are two regions of known conserved synteny, providing further evidence that the human STEP is a true homolog of the murine STEP gene. Candidate disease genes in the vicinity include Usher syndrome type 1C in human and a mouse mutant locus, twister (twt). 50 refs., 3 figs.

  9. mBAND Analysis of Early and Late Damages in the Chromosome of Human Lymphocytes after Exposures to Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2013-01-01

    Stable type chromosome aberrations that survive multiple generations of cell division include translocation and inversions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. At the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Detailed analysis of breaks participating in total chromosome exchanges within the first cell cycle post irradiation revealed a common hotspot located in the 3p21 region, which is a known fragile site corresponding to the band 6 in the mBand analysis. The breakpoint distribution in chromosomes collected at 7 days, but not at 14 days, post irradiation appeared similar to the distribution in cells collected within the first cell cycle post irradiation. The breakpoint distribution for human lymphocytes after radiation exposure was different from the previously published distribution for human

  10. Generation of a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing fragments of human chromosome 12P by X-ray irradiation and cell fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinke, R J; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Herbergs, J; Janssen, H; Cassiman, J J; Geurts van Kessel, A

    We have employed an irradiation and fusion procedure to generate somatic cell hybrids containing various fragments of the short arm of human chromosome 12 using a 12p-only hybrid (M28) as starting material. For the initial identification of hybrids retaining human DNA, nonradioactive in situ

  11. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Generation of meiomaps of genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottolini, Christian S; Capalbo, Antonio; Newnham, Louise

    2016-01-01

    -nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genome-wide by microarray. Informative maternal heterozygous SNPs are phased using a haploid PB2 or oocyte as a reference. A simple algorithm is then used to identify the maternal haplotypes for each chromosome, in all of the products of meiosis for each oocyte. This allows mapping...... of artificial oocyte activation avoids the creation of embryos for research purposes. In addition, compared with next-generation sequencing, targeted SNP genotyping is cost-effective and it simplifies the bioinformatic analysis, as only one haploid reference sample is required to establish phase for maternal...

  13. Chromosome band 16q24 is frequently deleted in human gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Y; Matsunaga, M; Abe, T.; Fukushige, S; Miura, K; Sunamura, M; Shiiba, K; Sato, M.; Nukiwa, T.; Horii, A

    1999-01-01

    We have analysed the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome bands 16q22?q24 in 24 primary gastric cancer tissues and found three regions of frequent allelic loss (16q22, 16q24.1?q24.3 and 16q24.3). The region for the most frequent allelic loss (63%) was in 16q24.1?q24.3. LOH of this region had no relationship with histological subtype, but a significant association between LOH and microscopic lymphangial invasion was observed. Although not significant, vascular and gastric wall invasions ...

  14. Orc1 Binding to Mitotic Chromosomes Precedes Spatial Patterning during G1 Phase and Assembly of the Origin Recognition Complex in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Nihan; Hossain, Manzar; Prasanth, Supriya G; Stillman, Bruce

    2015-05-08

    Replication of eukaryotic chromosomes occurs once every cell division cycle in normal cells and is a tightly controlled process that ensures complete genome duplication. The origin recognition complex (ORC) plays a key role during the initiation of DNA replication. In human cells, the level of Orc1, the largest subunit of ORC, is regulated during the cell division cycle, and thus ORC is a dynamic complex. Upon S phase entry, Orc1 is ubiquitinated and targeted for destruction, with subsequent dissociation of ORC from chromosomes. Time lapse and live cell images of human cells expressing fluorescently tagged Orc1 show that Orc1 re-localizes to condensing chromatin during early mitosis and then displays different nuclear localization patterns at different times during G1 phase, remaining associated with late replicating regions of the genome in late G1 phase. The initial binding of Orc1 to mitotic chromosomes requires C-terminal amino acid sequences that are similar to mitotic chromosome-binding sequences in the transcriptional pioneer protein FOXA1. Depletion of Orc1 causes concomitant loss of the mini-chromosome maintenance (Mcm2-7) helicase proteins on chromatin. The data suggest that Orc1 acts as a nucleating center for ORC assembly and then pre-replication complex assembly by binding to mitotic chromosomes, followed by gradual removal from chromatin during the G1 phase. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Kinship and Y-chromosome analysis of 7th century human remains: novel DNA extraction and typing procedure for ancient material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Daniel; Saskova, Lenka; Koch, Hubert

    2009-06-01

    To develop novel DNA extraction and typing procedure for DNA identification of the 7th century human remains, determine the familiar relationship between the individuals, estimate the Y-chromosome haplogroup, and compare the Y-chromosome haplotype with the contemporary populations. DNA from preserved femur samples was extracted using the modified silica-based extraction technique. Polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed using human identification kits MiniFiler, Identifiler, and Y-filer and also laboratory-developed and validated Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) pentaplexes with short amplicons. For 244A, 244B, 244C samples, full autosomal DNA profiles (15 STR markers and Amelogenin) and for 244D, 244E, 244F samples, MiniFiler profiles were produced. Y-chromosome haplotypes consisting of up to 24 STR markers were determined and used to predict the Y-chromosome haplogroups and compare the resulting haplotypes with the current population. Samples 244A, 244B, 244C, and 244D belong to Y-chromosome haplogroup R1b and the samples 244E and 244F to haplogroup G2a. Comparison of ancient haplotypes with the current population yielded numerous close matches with genetic distance below 2. Application of forensic genetics in archaeology enables retrieving new types of information and helps in data interpretation. The number of successfully typed autosomal and Y-STR loci from ancient specimens in this study is one of the largest published so far for aged samples.

  16. Construction, arraying, and high-density screening of large insert libraries of human chromosomes X and 21: Their potential use as reference libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nizetic, D.; Zehetner, G.; Monaco, A.P.; Gellen, L.; Lehrach, H. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (England)); Young, B.D. (St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (England))

    1991-04-15

    The authors have constructed cosmid libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes X and 21, each of which contains {gt}30 genome equivalents, and have developed systems allowing permanent storage of primary clones, easy screening of libraries in high-density filter formats, and the simultaneous generation of fingerprinting and mapping data on the same set of cosmid clones. Clones are picked into microtiter plate wells and stored at {minus}70C. A semiautomatic robot system allows the generation of filter replicas containing up to 10,000 clones per membrane. Sets of membranes containing 15-20 chromosome equivalents of both chromosomes will be used for the construction of ordered clone libraries by hybridization fingerprinting protocols. The authors describe the construction of the libraries and demonstrate the use of high-density screening filters in oligonucleotide probe hybridizations and the isolation of cosmids by hybridization with probes from the X chromosome.

  17. A high resolution physical and RH map of pig chromosome 6q1.2 and comparative analysis with human chromosome 19q13.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robic Annie

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The generation of BAC/PAC contigs in targeted genome regions is a powerful method to establish high-resolution physical maps. In domestic animal species the generation of such contigs is typically initiated with the screening of libraries with probes derived from human genes that are expected to be located in the region of interest by comparative mapping. However, in many instances the available gene-derived probes are too far apart to allow the cloning of BAC/PAC contigs larger than a few hundred kb. High resolution physical mapping allows to estimate the sizes of gaps and to control the orientation of the individual sub-contigs, which helps to avoid errors during the assembly of smaller contigs into final Mb-sized contigs. The recently constructed porcine IMNpRH2 panel allowed us to use this approach for the construction of high-resolution physical maps of SSC 6q1.2. Results Two sequence-ready BAC/PAC contigs of the gene-rich region on porcine chromosome 6q1.2 (SSC 6q1.2 containing the RYRl gene were constructed. The two contigs spanned about 1.2 Mb and 2.0 Mb respectively. The construction of these contigs was monitored by the results provided by the mapping of 15 markers on the IMpRH7000rad and 35 markers on the IMNpRH212000rad radiation hybrid panels. Analyses on the IMpRH panel allowed us to globally link and orientate preliminary smaller contigs, whereas analyses on the high resolution IMNpRH2 panel allowed us to finally identify the order of genes and markers. Conclusions A framework map of 523 cR12000 was established covering the whole studied region. The order of markers on the framework 1000:1 RH map was found totally consistent with the data deduced from the contig map. The kb/cR ratio was very constant in the whole region, with an average value of 6.6 kb/cR. We estimate that the size of the remaining gap between the two contigs is of about 300 kb. The integrated physical and RH map of the investigated region on

  18. The defect in the AT-like hamster cell mutants is complemented by mouse chromosome 9 but not by any of the human chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Jongmans; G. Verhaegh (Gerald); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); P. Demant (Peter); A.T. Natarajan; Y. Shiloh (Yosef); M. Oshimura (Mitsuo); E.J. Stanbridge (Eric); R.S. Athwal (Raghbir); A.P. Cuthbert (Andrew); R.F. Newbold (Robert); P.H.M. Lohmann (Paul); M.Z. Zdzienicka (Malgorzata)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractX-ray-sensitive Chinese hamster V79 cells mutants, V-C4, V-E5 and V-G8, show an abnormal response to X-ray-induced DNA damage. Like ataxia telangiectasia (AT) cells, they display increased cell killing, chromosomal instability and a diminished inhibition of DNA synthesis following

  19. Chromosomal damage to human lymphocytes induced by hyperthermia pre and post extremely low dose neutron or gamma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Fatehi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundOne of the most important problems in radiotherapy(RT with χ and γ-rays is hypoxic cells, in the centre ofsolids tumours. Due to insufficient blood perfusion,these cells are more resistant to RT. The purpose ofthe study is to assess the effect of heating cells onchromosomal damages induced by an extremely lowdose of neutron or γ irradiation, in humanlymphocytes.MethodHuman blood samples were exposed to hyperthermia(HT, 6 cGy neutron (or γ-rays, HT+neutron/γ, andneutron/γ+HT. HT was applied at 41.5°C for 30 and60min as well as 43°C for 15 and 30min. The timeinterval between the two treatments was 1hr. Aftercell culture, harvesting, fixation, and staining, thechromosomal damages were scored in metaphasestage and statistical analyses were performed.ResultsIn comparison to the control groups, HT alone at41.5°C (neither for 30 nor 60min did not inducesignificantly higher chromosomal damages (p=0.8;however, the number of damages was significantlyhigher at 43°C for 30min (p<0.05. Furthermore,compared to the control groups the chromosomaldamages was significantly different when cellsirradiated with neutron/γ-rays (p<0.05. Comparisonbetween applying HT 1hr before and after irradiation,HT after neutron/γ irradiation significantly inducedhigher chromosome damages (p<0.05. Comparingneutron and γ irradiation, the number of chromosomaldamages was remarkably higher when cells irradiatedwith neutron (p<0.01.ConclusionSince applying an extremely low dose of neutron plusHT caused more chromosomal damages, incomparison to neutron/γ alone, or HT plus neutron/γ;and because cell death is directly related to thechromosomal damage; thus, this combined regimemight be considered as a treatment modality in cancertreatment.

  20. Massively parallel sequencing reveals the complex structure of an irradiated human chromosome on a mouse background in the Tc1 model of Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Gribble

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is caused by trisomy of chromosome 21 (Hsa21 and presents a complex phenotype that arises from abnormal dosage of genes on this chromosome. However, the individual dosage-sensitive genes underlying each phenotype remain largely unknown. To help dissect genotype--phenotype correlations in this complex syndrome, the first fully transchromosomic mouse model, the Tc1 mouse, which carries a copy of human chromosome 21 was produced in 2005. The Tc1 strain is trisomic for the majority of genes that cause phenotypes associated with DS, and this freely available mouse strain has become used widely to study DS, the effects of gene dosage abnormalities, and the effect on the basic biology of cells when a mouse carries a freely segregating human chromosome. Tc1 mice were created by a process that included irradiation microcell-mediated chromosome transfer of Hsa21 into recipient mouse embryonic stem cells. Here, the combination of next generation sequencing, array-CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization technologies has enabled us to identify unsuspected rearrangements of Hsa21 in this mouse model; revealing one deletion, six duplications and more than 25 de novo structural rearrangements. Our study is not only essential for informing functional studies of the Tc1 mouse but also (1 presents for the first time a detailed sequence analysis of the effects of gamma radiation on an entire human chromosome, which gives some mechanistic insight into the effects of radiation damage on DNA, and (2 overcomes specific technical difficulties of assaying a human chromosome on a mouse background where highly conserved sequences may confound the analysis. Sequence data generated in this study is deposited in the ENA database, Study Accession number: ERP000439.

  1. Field-flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giddings, J.C.

    1990-09-01

    Research continued on field flow fractionation of chromosomes. Progress in the past year can be organized into three main categories: (1) chromosome sample preparation; (2) preliminary chromosome fractionation; (3) fractionation of a polystyrene aggregate model which approximates the chromosome shape. We have been successful in isolating metaphase chromosomes from the Chinese hamster. We also received a human chromosome sample from Dr. Carolyn Bell-Prince of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results are discussed. 2 figs.

  2. Chromosomal mosaicism goes global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular differences of chromosomal content in the same individual are defined as chromosomal mosaicism (alias intercellular or somatic genomic variations or, in a number of publications, mosaic aneuploidy. It has long been suggested that this phenomenon poorly contributes both to intercellular (interindividual diversity and to human disease. However, our views have recently become to change due to a series of communications demonstrated a higher incidence of chromosomal mosaicism in diseased individuals (major psychiatric disorders and autoimmune diseases as well as depicted chromosomal mosaicism contribution to genetic diversity, the central nervous system development, and aging. The later has been produced by significant achievements in the field of molecular cytogenetics. Recently, Molecular Cytogenetics has published an article by Maj Hulten and colleagues that has provided evidences for chromosomal mosaicism to underlie formation of germline aneuploidy in human female gametes using trisomy 21 (Down syndrome as a model. Since meiotic aneuploidy is suggested to be the leading genetic cause of human prenatal mortality and postnatal morbidity, these data together with previous findings define chromosomal mosaicism not as a casual finding during cytogenetic analyses but as a more significant biological phenomenon than previously recognized. Finally, the significance of chromosomal mosaicism can be drawn from the fact, that this phenomenon is involved in genetic diversity, normal and abnormal prenatal development, human diseases, aging, and meiotic aneuploidy, the intrinsic cause of which remains, as yet, unknown.

  3. The Roles of Chromosome Breaks and Telomere Dynamics in the Genomic Instability Associated With Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, John

    1998-01-01

    .... Loss of telomeres allows chromosomes to fuse end-to-end, triggering chromosome fusion- bridge-breakage cycles that lead to genome rearrangements, loss of heterozygosity, and gene amplification...

  4. A two-step protocol for the detection of rearrangements at the AZFc region on the human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y-W; Hsu, C-L; Yen, Pauline H

    2006-05-01

    The AZFc region on the human Y chromosome consists mainly of very long direct and inverted repeats and is prone to rearrangement. Although deletion of the entire AZFc is found only in subfertile men, duplications and deletions of portions of AZFc as well as inversions are quite common and represent major polymorphisms of the Y chromosome. Several methods are available to detect these rearrangements, and each has its own advantages and limits. We designed a two-step PCR protocol to study the polymorphic structure of AZFc. The first PCR determines the copy number of the Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ) genes within AZFc using the autosomal DAZ-Like gene as a dosage control, and the results could be verified by dosage Southern blot analyses. The second PCR simultaneously detects five sequence tagged sites (STSs) that are either present or absent in the various AZFc partial deletions. One of the STSs, sY1291, was found to be polymorphic in size due to varying lengths of a poly-T stretch. A combination of the DAZ dosage PCR and the 5-STS multiplex PCR reaction detects most, if not all, deletions and duplications at AZFc. It offers a simple and reliable way to screen large populations for AZFc rearrangements and study their effects on male fertility.

  5. Depletion of the bloom syndrome helicase stimulates homology-dependent repair at double-strand breaks in human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibin; Smith, Krissy; Waldman, Barbara Criscuolo; Waldman, Alan S

    2011-04-03

    Mutation of BLM helicase causes Blooms syndrome, a disorder associated with genome instability, high levels of sister chromatid exchanges, and cancer predisposition. To study the influence of BLM on double-strand break (DSB) repair in human chromosomes, we stably transfected a normal human cell line with a DNA substrate that contained a thymidine kinase (tk)-neo fusion gene disrupted by the recognition site for endonuclease I-SceI. The substrate also contained a closely linked functional tk gene to serve as a recombination partner for the tk-neo fusion gene. We derived two cell lines each containing a single integrated copy of the DNA substrate. In these cell lines, a DSB was introduced within the tk-neo fusion gene by expression of I-SceI. DSB repair events that occurred via homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) were recovered by selection for G418-resistant clones. DSB repair was examined under conditions of either normal BLM expression or reduced BLM expression brought about by RNA interference. We report that BLM knockdown in both cell lines specifically increased the frequency of HR events that produced deletions by crossovers or single-strand annealing while leaving the frequency of gene conversions unchanged or reduced. We observed no change in the accuracy of individual HR events and no substantial alteration of the nature of individual NHEJ events when BLM expression was reduced. Our work provides the first direct evidence that BLM influences DSB repair pathway choice in human chromosomes and suggests that BLM deficiency can engender genomic instability by provoking an increased frequency of HR events of a potentially deleterious nature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cloning, structural analysis, and chromosomal localization of the human CSRP2 gene encoding the LIM domain protein CRP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskirchen, R; Erdel, M; Utermann, G; Bister, K

    1997-08-15

    The CSRP2 gene encoding the LIM domain protein CRP2 was originally identified in quail based on its strong transcriptional suppression in transformed avian fibroblasts. Here we have isolated a human CSRP2 cDNA clone encoding a 193-amino-acid human CRP2 (hCRP2) protein with 96.4% amino acid sequence identity to the avian homolog. The CSRP2 cDNA clone was used to isolate CSRP2-related clones from gamma EMBL3 and P1 libraries of human genomic DNA. The complete organization of the CSRP2 gene was determined by nucleic acid hybridization, transcriptional mapping, and nucleotide sequence analysis. The gene spans a total of approximately 22 kb and contains six exons. The coding region is confined to exons 2-6 and predicts a hCRP2 protein identical in its amino acid sequence to the protein deduced from the CSRP2 cDNA clone. By fluorescence in situ hybridization using both lambda EMBL3 and P1 library clones as hybridization probes and a new method for computerized signal localization, CSRP2 was mapped to chromosome subband 12q21.1, a region frequently affected by deletion or breakage events in various tumor types. The library screens also led to the isolation of a CSRP2-related pseudogene, CSRP2P, which carried several extensive deletions and nucleotide substitutions but no intervening sequences in comparison to the CSRP2 cDNA sequence. By physical linkage and fluorescence in situ hybridization, CSRP2P was mapped to chromosome subband 3q21.1.

  7. Linkage of preaxial polydactyly type II within human chromosome 7q36

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hing, A.; Helms, C.; Burgess, A. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Preaxial polydactyly refers to duplication of part or all of a digital element on the radial side of the limb. Type II preaxial polydactyly (PPD-2) includes polydactyly of the thumbs/triphalangeal thumbs with duplication of the great toes. PPD-2 can be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with variable expressivity and high penetrance. Recently a locus for triphalangeal thumb/preaxial polydactyly was mapped to a region of 7q36 between D7S594 and D7S550 in two large Dutch kindreds. Another pedigree segregating a complex form of polysyndactyly was mapped to 7q36 near D7S550. We have characterized a six-generation North American Caucasian pedigree consisting of 78 living individuals (20 known affected) segregating a form of preaxial PPD-22. Physical examination and/or radiographs of hands and feet has been completed for 34 individuals. Autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expressivity was noted. Linkage analysis using genotypic data from the pedigree at four independent 7q loci (D7S594, D7S593, D7S559, D7S550) produced LOD scores greater than 4.0, confirming the chromosomal localization of PPD-2 to this region. No recombination was observed for D7S594 and D7S550 and PPD-2. Genotype data from the telomere marker, D7S594, revealed loss of heterozygosity of one of the pair of parental alleles in affected individuals, suggesting a chromosomal deletion or rearrangement associated with PPD-2. Karyotype analysis did not show microscopic deletions/rearrangements. Haplotype and Southern blot analysis indicated a deletion that spanned no more than 30 kb that is in phase with PPD-2. However, an identical chromosomal deletion was subsequently indentified in a normal pedigree indicating that the deletion is not causally related to PPD-2. The molecular basis of the deletion is under continuing investigation, and the development of more informative genetic markers and collection of additional pedigrees are in progress as a means to further refine the PPD-2 locus.

  8. Over half of breakpoints in gene pairs involved in cancer-specific recurrent translocations are mapped to human chromosomal fragile sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce Levi CT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations have been shown to contribute to cancer development. Human chromosomal fragile sites are regions of the genome especially prone to breakage, and have been implicated in various chromosome abnormalities found in cancer. However, there has been no comprehensive and quantitative examination of the location of fragile sites in relation to all chromosomal aberrations. Results Using up-to-date databases containing all cancer-specific recurrent translocations, we have examined 444 unique pairs of genes involved in these translocations to determine the correlation of translocation breakpoints and fragile sites in the gene pairs. We found that over half (52% of translocation breakpoints in at least one gene of these gene pairs are mapped to fragile sites. Among these, we examined the DNA sequences within and flanking three randomly selected pairs of translocation-prone genes, and found that they exhibit characteristic features of fragile DNA, with frequent AT-rich flexibility islands and the potential of forming highly stable secondary structures. Conclusion Our study is the first to examine gene pairs involved in all recurrent chromosomal translocations observed in tumor cells, and to correlate the location of more than half of breakpoints to positions of known fragile sites. These results provide strong evidence to support a causative role for fragile sites in the generation of cancer-specific chromosomal rearrangements.

  9. Quantitative variation in obesity-related traits and insulin precursors linked to the OB gene region on human chromosome 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggirala, R.; Stern, M.P.; Reinhart, L.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Despite the evidence that human obesity has strong genetic determinants, efforts at identifying specific genes that influence human obesity have largely been unsuccessful. Using the sibship data obtained from 32 low-income Mexican American pedigrees ascertained on a type II diabetic proband and a multipoint variance-components method, we tested for linkage between various obesity-related traits plus associated metabolic traits and 15 markers on human chromosome 7. We found evidence for linkage between markers in the OB gene region and various traits, as follows: D7S514 and extremity skinfolds (LOD = 3.1), human carboxypeptidase A1 (HCPA1) and 32,33-split proinsulin level (LOD = 4.2), and HCPA1 and proinsulin level (LOD = 3.2). A putative susceptibility locus linked to the marker D7S514 explained 56% of the total phenotypic variation in extremity skinfolds. Variation at the HCPA1 locus explained 64% of phenotypic variation in proinsulin level and {approximately}73% of phenotypic variation in split proinsulin concentration, respectively. Weaker evidence for linkage to several other obesity-related traits (e.g., waist circumference, body-mass index, fat mass by bioimpedance, etc.) was observed for a genetic location, which is {approximately}15 cM telomeric to OB. In conclusion, our study reveals that the OB region plays a significant role in determining the phenotypic variation of both insulin precursors and obesity-related traits, at least in Mexican Americans. 66 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Use of Recombination-Mediated Genetic Engineering for Construction of Rescue Human Cytomegalovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Dulal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning.

  11. Mapping of the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit gene (GLCLC) to human chromosome 6p12 and mouse chromosome 9D-E and of the regulatory subunit gene (GLCLR) to human chromosome 1p21-p22 and mouse chromosome 3H1-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Disteche, C.M.; Reid, L.L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    Glutamate-cysteine ligase (EC 6.3.2.2, GLCL), formerly called {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCS), is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of the antioxidant tripeptide glutathione. GLCL consists of a heavy subunit, which possesses catalytic activity and is the site of glutathione feedback inhibition, and a light subunit, which has a regulatory function. Glutathione is ubiquitous in mammalian tissues and performs a variety of functions, including protection from reactive oxygen species through antioxidant properties; detoxification of xenobiotics, organic peroxides, and heavy metals; and maintenance of sulfhydryl groups of other molecules. Increased intracellular levels of glutathione have also been found in tumor cells resistant to chemotherapeutic agents. Increased expression of GLCL in melphalan-resistant myeloma and prostate carcinoma cells and cisplatinum-resistant ovarian carcinoma cells suggests that this enzyme may be involved in glutathione-associated drug resistance. Moreover, GLCL has been shown to be induced by phenolic antioxidants and heavy metals. Recently, Mulcahy and Gipp have shown that the GLCL catalytic subunit gene (GLCLC) contains a putative antioxidant regulatory element, which may explain the responsiveness of this gene to agents that induce oxidative stress. To further our understanding of GLCL, which is linked to such a wide variety of metabolic and physiological functions through its role in glutathione synthesis, we have mapped both the catalytic and regulatory subunit genes (GLCLC and GLCLR) to human and mouse chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). 16 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Cloning of the cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila white gene and mapping to chromosome 21q22.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haiming Chen; Lalioti, M.D.; Perrin, G.; Antonarakis, S.E. [Univ. of Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    In an effort to contribute to the transcript map of human chromosome 21 and the understanding of the pathophysiology of trisomy 21, we have used exon trapping to identify fragments of chromosome 21 genes. Two trapped exons, from pools of chromosome 21-specific cosmids, showed homology to the Drosophila white (w) gene. We subsequently cloned the corresponding cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila w gene (hW) from human retina and fetal brain cDNA libraries. The gene belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family and is homologous to Drosophila w (and to 2 genes from other species) and to a lesser extent to Drosophila brown (bw) and scarlet (st) genes that are all involved in the transport of eye pigment precursor molecules. A DNA polymorphism with 62% heterozygosity due to variation of a poly (T) region in the 3{prime} UTR of the hW has been identified and used for the incorporation of this gene to the genetic map of chromosome 21. The hW is located at 21q22.3 between DNA markers D21S212 and D21S49 in a P1 clone that also contains marker BCEI. The gene is expressed at various levels in many human tissues. The contributions of this gene to the Down syndrome phenotypes, to human eye color, and to the resulting phenotypes of null or missense mutations are presently unknown. 56 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Human spermatogenic failure purges deleterious mutation load from the autosomes and both sex chromosomes, including the gene DMRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Alexandra M; Aston, Kenneth I; Thompson, Emma; Carvalho, Filipa; Gonçalves, João; Huang, Ni; Matthiesen, Rune; Noordam, Michiel J; Quintela, Inés; Ramu, Avinash; Seabra, Catarina; Wilfert, Amy B; Dai, Juncheng; Downie, Jonathan M; Fernandes, Susana; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao; Amorim, António; Barros, Alberto; Carracedo, Angel; Hu, Zhibin; Hurles, Matthew E; Moskovtsev, Sergey; Ober, Carole; Paduch, Darius A; Schiffman, Joshua D; Schlegel, Peter N; Sousa, Mário; Carrell, Douglas T; Conrad, Donald F

    2013-03-01

    Gonadal failure, along with early pregnancy loss and perinatal death, may be an important filter that limits the propagation of harmful mutations in the human population. We hypothesized that men with spermatogenic impairment, a disease with unknown genetic architecture and a common cause of male infertility, are enriched for rare deleterious mutations compared to men with normal spermatogenesis. After assaying genomewide SNPs and CNVs in 323 Caucasian men with idiopathic spermatogenic impairment and more than 1,100 controls, we estimate that each rare autosomal deletion detected in our study multiplicatively changes a man's risk of disease by 10% (OR 1.10 [1.04-1.16], pautism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and intellectual disability, we propose that the CNV burden in spermatogenic impairment is distinct from the burden of large, dominant mutations described for neurodevelopmental disorders. We identified two patients with deletions of DMRT1, a gene on chromosome 9p24.3 orthologous to the putative sex determination locus of the avian ZW chromosome system. In an independent sample of Han Chinese men, we identified 3 more DMRT1 deletions in 979 cases of idiopathic azoospermia and none in 1,734 controls, and found none in an additional 4,519 controls from public databases. The combined results indicate that DMRT1 loss-of-function mutations are a risk factor and potential genetic cause of human spermatogenic failure (frequency of 0.38% in 1306 cases and 0% in 7,754 controls, p = 6.2 × 10(-5)). Our study identifies other recurrent CNVs as potential causes of idiopathic azoospermia and generates hypotheses for directing future studies on the genetic basis of male infertility and IVF outcomes.

  14. Karyotype evolution of giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) revealed by cross-species chromosome painting with Chinese muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi) and human (Homo sapiens) paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Nesterenko, A; Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2008-01-01

    Considering the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis, GCA, 2n = 30) as a primitive species, its comparative genomic data are critical for our understanding of the karyotype evolution of pecorans. Here, we have established genome-wide chromosomal homologies between giraffe, Chinese muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi, MRE, 2n = 46) and human (Homo sapiens, HSA, 2n = 46) with whole sets of chromosome-specific paints from Chinese muntjac and human, in addition to providing a high-resolution G-banding karyotype of giraffe. Chinese muntjac and human chromosome paints detected 32 and 45 autosomal homologs in the genome of giraffe, respectively. Our results suggest that it would require at least thirteen fissions, six fusions and three intrachromosomal rearrangements to 'transform' the 2n = 44 eutherian ancestral karyotype to the 2n = 58 pecoran ancestral karyotype. During giraffe evolution, some ancestral eutherian syntenies (i.e. association of HSA3/21, 4/8, 7/16, 14/15, 16/19 and two forms of 12/22) have been retained, while several derived syntenies (i.e. associations of human homologous segments 2/1, 2/9, 5/19, 4/12/22, 8/9, and 10/20) have been produced. The reduction of chromosome number in giraffe from the 2n = 58 pecoran ancestral karyotype could be primarily attributed to extensive Robertsonian translocations of ancestral chromosomal segments. More complex chromosomal rearrangements (including tandem fusion, centromere repositioning and pericentric inversion) have happened during the evolution of GCA2 and GCA8. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Suppression of tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells by transfer of human chromosome 17 does not require transferred BRCA1 and p53 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, M; Hartmann, S; Scherthan, H; Arnold, W; Deppert, W; Frege, R; Glaab, F; Haensch, W; Scherneck, S

    1995-02-02

    A number of candidate tumor suppressor genes located on the human chromosome 17 are thought to have a role to play in the development of breast cancer. In addition to the p53 gene on 17p13.1 and the BRCA1 gene mapped to 17q12-21, other chromosomal regions for tumor suppressor genes have been suggested to exist on 17p13.3 and both the central and the distal parts of 17q, although definitive functional proof of their involvement in breast cancer tumorigenesis is still lacking. In this report we show that microcell transfer of a human chromosome 17 into wild-type p53 breast cancer cells CAL51 results in loss of tumorigenicity and anchorage-independent growth, changes in cell morphology and a reduction of cell growth rates of the neo-selected microcell hybrids. In the hybrid cells, which express the p53 wild-type protein, only the p- and the distal parts of the q arm of donor chromosome 17 are transferred. Thus, our results provide functional evidence for the presence of one or more tumor suppressor gene(s) on chromosome 17, which are distinct from the p53 and the BRCA1 genes.

  16. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  17. Human paternal and maternal demographic histories: insights from high-resolution Y chromosome and mtDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, Sebastian; Xu, Hongyang; Ko, Albert; Li, Mingkun; Renaud, Gabriel; Butthof, Anne; Schröder, Roland; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Comparisons of maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and paternally-inherited non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) variation have provided important insights into the impact of sex-biased processes (such as migration, residence pattern, and so on) on human genetic variation. However, such comparisons have been limited by the different molecular methods typically used to assay mtDNA and NRY variation (for example, sequencing hypervariable segments of the control region for mtDNA vs. genotyping SNPs and/or STR loci for the NRY). Here, we report a simple capture array method to enrich Illumina sequencing libraries for approximately 500 kb of NRY sequence, which we use to generate NRY sequences from 623 males from 51 populations in the CEPH Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP). We also obtained complete mtDNA genome sequences from the same individuals, allowing us to compare maternal and paternal histories free of any ascertainment bias. We identified 2,228 SNPs in the NRY sequences and 2,163 SNPs in the mtDNA sequences. Our results confirm the controversial assertion that genetic differences between human populations on a global scale are bigger for the NRY than for mtDNA, although the differences are not as large as previously suggested. More importantly, we find substantial regional variation in patterns of mtDNA versus NRY variation. Model-based simulations indicate very small ancestral effective population sizes (<100) for the out-of-Africa migration as well as for many human populations. We also find that the ratio of female effective population size to male effective population size (Nf/Nm) has been greater than one throughout the history of modern humans, and has recently increased due to faster growth in Nf than Nm. The NRY and mtDNA sequences provide new insights into the paternal and maternal histories of human populations, and the methods we introduce here should be widely applicable for further such studies.

  18. A YAC contig encompassing the Treacher Collins syndrome critical region at 5q31.3-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, J.; Gladwin, A. J.; Loftus, S. K.; Riley, J. H.; Perveen, R.; Wasmuth, J. J.; Anand, R.; Dixon, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. Previous studies have localized the TCOF1 locus between D5S519 (proximal) and SPARC (distal), a region of 22 centirays as estimated by radiation hybrid mapping. In the current investigation we have created a contig across the TCOF1 critical region, using YAC clones. Isolation of a novel short tandem repeat polymorphism corresponding to the end of one of the YACs has allowed us to reduce the size of the critical region to approximately 840 kb, which has been covered with three nonchimeric YACs. Restriction mapping has revealed that the region contains a high density of clustered rare-cutter restriction sites, suggesting that it may contain a number of different genes. The results of the present investigation have further allowed us to confirm that the RPS14 locus lies proximal to the critical region and can thereby be excluded from a role in the pathogenesis of TCOF1, while ANX6 lies within the TCOF1 critical region and remains a potential candidate for the mutated gene. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8037214

  19. A YAC contig encompassing the Treacher Collins syndrome critical region at 5q31. 3-32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Perveen, R.; Dixon, M.J. (Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)); Loftus, S.K.; Wasmuth, J.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)); Riley, J.H.; Anand, R.

    1994-08-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. Previous studies have localized the TCOF1 locus between D5S519 (proximal) and SPARC (distal), a region of 22 centirays as estimated by radiation hybrid mapping. In the current investigation the authors have created a contig across the TCOF1 critical region, using YAC clones. Isolation of a novel short tandem repeat polymorphism corresponding to the end of one of the YACs has allowed reduction of the size of the critical region to [approximately] 840 kb, which has been covered with three nonchimeric YACs. Restriction mapping has revealed that the region contains a high density of clustered rare-cutter restriction sites, suggesting that it may contain a number of different genes. The results of the present investigation have further allowed confirmation that the RPS14 locus lies proximal to the critical region and can thereby be excluded from a role in the pathogenesis of TCOF1, while ANX6 lies within the TCOF1 critical region and remains a potential candidate for the mutated gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shuohao [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kamihira, Masamichi, E-mail: kamihira@chem-eng.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  1. Succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid transferase (SCOT): Human cDNA and genomic cloning and chromosomal mapping of the human gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassovska-Bratinova, S.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Ste-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Duncan, A. [Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    SCOT (EC 2.8.3.5) mediates the activation and utilization of ketone bodies in extrahepatic tissues, especially brain, heart and kidney. Children with hereditary SCOT deficiency have episodes of severe ketoacidosis. Using a partial human heart SCOT cDNA, hSCOT-G, we detected a single {approximately}3 Kb mRNA in human heart and leukocytes, but not in liver. The length of the mouse SCOT mRNA detected with hSCOT-G in muscle, heart, kidney and brain is {approximately}3 Kb. We mapped the human SCOT gene to chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization. To date we have isolated human heart cDNAs spanning 2.9 Kb and including a 1248 bp open reading frame. The 3{prime} nontranslated region of the human SCOT mRNA extends at least 1712 bp, in contrast to the 209 bp sequence reported for pig SCOT cDNA. In one heart cDNA clone we detected a 58 bp insertion 258 bp downstream from the stop codon. We performed RT-PCR using a 5{prime} degenerate-sequence primer designed from the pig SCOT leader peptide sequence and 3{prime} human-specific primers. We obtained a fragment of the expected 320 bp length which strongly hybridizes to an internal oligonucleotide and which we are now characterizing. Human genomic Southern blot analysis with a partial human cDNA as probe suggests that the length of the human SCOT gene is about 40 K. Using hSCOT-G as a probe, we screened a human leukocyte genomic library in EMBL-3 phage and isolated two genomic clones. One of them contains a processed pseudogene. The other contains at least two exons of the human SCOT gene spanning cDNA residues 431 to 734. These findings will be useful for mutation analysis in SCOT-deficient patients.

  2. Assignment of casein kinase 2 alpha sequences to two different human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Klett, C; Göttert, E

    1992-01-01

    Human casein kinase 2 alpha gene (CK-2-alpha) sequences have been localized within the human genome by in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis using a CK-2 alpha cDNA as a probe. By in situ hybridization, the CK-2 alpha cDNA could be assigned to two different loci, one on 11p15.1-ter...

  3. The three-dimensional structure of human interphase chromosomes is related to the transcriptome map

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goetze, S.; Mateos-Langerak, J.; Gierman, H.J.; de Leeuw, W.; Giromus, O.; Indemans, M.H.G.; Koster, J.; Ondřej, Vladan; Versteeg, R.; van Driel, R.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 12 (2007), s. 4475-4487 ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1K04112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : in situ hybridization * human cell-nuclei * human genome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.420, year: 2007

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a Cytomegalovirus Towne-BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) Isolate Maintained in Escherichia?coli for 10?Years and Then Serially Passaged in Human Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Brechtel, Teal; Tyner, Molly; Tandon, Ritesh

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a cytomegalovirus, the Towne-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) isolate, which was maintained in bacterial cells for 10?years and then serially passaged in human fibroblasts for 10 passages. A total of 132 nucleotide differences were discovered in the Towne sequence compared to the reference sequence (GenBank accession no. AC146851).

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Cytomegalovirus Towne-BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) Isolate Maintained in Escherichia coli for 10 Years and Then Serially Passaged in Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechtel, Teal; Tyner, Molly; Tandon, Ritesh

    2013-09-26

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a cytomegalovirus, the Towne-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) isolate, which was maintained in bacterial cells for 10 years and then serially passaged in human fibroblasts for 10 passages. A total of 132 nucleotide differences were discovered in the Towne sequence compared to the reference sequence (GenBank accession no. AC146851).

  6. Identification of a yeast artificial chromosome that spans the human papillary renal cell carcinoma-associated t(X;1) breakpoint in Xp11.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijkerbuijk, R F; Meloni, A M; Sinke, R J; de Leeuw, B; Wilbrink, M; Janssen, H A; Geraghty, M T; Monaco, A P; Sandberg, A A; Geurts van Kessel, A

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a specific chromosome abnormality, t(X;1)(p11;q21), was described fo