WorldWideScience

Sample records for human chondrocyte phenotype

  1. Immortalization of human articular chondrocytes and induction of their phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何清义; 李起鸿; 杨柳; 许建中

    2003-01-01

    Objective To immortalize human articular chondrocytes (HACs) using gene transfection and to maintain stable phenotype of transformed HACs after induction.Methods HACs were transfected with the retroviral vector pLXSN encoding human papillomavirus 16E7 (HPV16E7), and the transformed clones were sorted and proliferated. Karyotype analysis, clone forming tests and nude mice tumor forming tests were applied to check the characteristics of the transformation. Type Ⅱ collagen of transformed chondrocytes was inducted with free serum medium (FSM) supplemented with nutridoma-sp and ascorbate. Results Immortalized HACs were isolated with fifty passages achieved. The HPV16E7 transformed cells were confirmed to be benign. Induction of FSM with nutridoma-sp and ascorbate promoted type Ⅱ collagen of transformed chondrocytes to the high levels of normal chondrocytes. Conclusion HACs transformed with HPV16E7 survive for long periods in vitro, and type Ⅱ collagen can maintain stability after induction.

  2. Human platelet releasates combined with polyglycolic acid scaffold promote chondrocyte differentiation and phenotypic maintenance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Giulia Bernardini; Federico Chellini; Bruno Frediani; Adriano Spreafico; Annalisa Santucci

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate the differentiating properties of platelet-rich plasma releasates (PRPr) on human chondrocytes seeded on a polygtlycolic acid (PGA) 3D scaffold. Gene expression and biochemical analysis were carried out to assess the improved quality of our PGA-based cartilage constructs supplemented with PRPr. We observed that the use of PRPr as cell cultures supplementation to PGA-chondrocyte constructs may promote chondrocyte differentiation, and thus may contribute to maintaining the chondrogenic phenotype longer than conventional supplementation by increasing high levels of important chondrogenic markers (e.g. sox9, aggrecan and type II collagen), without induction of type I collagen. Moreover, our constructs were analysed for the secretion and deposition of important ECM molecules (sGAG, type II collagen, etc.). Our results indicate that PRPr supplementation may synergize with PGA-based scaffolds to stimulate human articular chondrocyte differentiation, maturation and phenotypic maintenance.

  3. Dynamic cyclic compression modulates the chondrogenic phenotype in human chondrocytes from late stage osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Hua Jia; Fung, Hon Sing; Yeung, Pan; Lam, K L; Yan, Chun Hoi; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2017-02-16

    Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes (hOACs) are characterized by their "dedifferentiated" and catabolic phenotype and lack the ability for restoring their inherent functions by themselves. Here we investigated whether extrinsically supplemented mechanical signal via compression loading would affect the phenotype of hOACs. Specifically, we applied cyclic compression loading on cultured hOACs-collagen constructs and measured the expression of the major chondrogenic factors, cell-matrix interaction molecules and matrix degradation enzymes. Dynamic compression loading stimulates the expression and nuclear localization of sox9 in hOACs and reduces the catabolic events via downregulated expression of collagenases. These results contribute to better understanding towards mechanoregulation of hOACs.

  4. Acquiring Chondrocyte Phenotype from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Inflammatory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kondo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An inflammatory milieu breaks down the cartilage matrix and induces chondrocyte apoptosis, resulting in cartilage destruction in patients with cartilage degenerative diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Because of the limited regenerative ability of chondrocytes, defects in cartilage are irreversible and difficult to repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are expected to be a new tool for cartilage repair because they are present in the cartilage and are able to differentiate into multiple lineages of cells, including chondrocytes. Although clinical trials using MSCs for patients with cartilage defects have already begun, its efficacy and repair mechanisms remain unknown. A PubMed search conducted in October 2014 using the following medical subject headings (MeSH terms: mesenchymal stromal cells, chondrogenesis, and cytokines resulted in 204 articles. The titles and abstracts were screened and nine articles relevant to “inflammatory” cytokines and “human” MSCs were identified. Herein, we review the cell biology and mechanisms of chondrocyte phenotype acquisition from human MSCs in an inflammatory milieu and discuss the clinical potential of MSCs for cartilage repair.

  5. Parathyroid hormone-related protein is induced by hypoxia and promotes expression of the differentiated phenotype of human articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Michele; Lazzarano, Stefano; Thoms, Brendan L; Murphy, Chris L

    2013-11-01

    PTHrP (parathyroid hormone-related protein) is crucial for normal cartilage development and long bone growth and acts to delay chondrocyte hypertrophy and terminal differentiation in the growth plate. After growth plate closure adult HACs (human articular chondrocytes) still produce PTHrP, suggesting a possible role for this factor in the permanent articular cartilage. However, the expression regulation and function of PTHrP in the permanent articular cartilage is unknown. Human articular cartilage is an avascular tissue and functions in a hypoxic environment. The resident chondrocytes have adapted to hypoxia and use it to drive their tissue-specific functions. In the present study, we explored directly in normal articular chondrocytes isolated from a range of human donors the effect of hypoxia on PTHrP expression and whether PTHrP can regulate the expression of the permanent articular chondrocyte phenotype. We show that in HACs PTHrP is up-regulated by hypoxia in a HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor)-1α and HIF-2α-dependent manner. Using recombinant PTHrP, siRNA-mediated depletion of endogenous PTHrP and by blocking signalling through its receptor [PTHR1 (PTHrP receptor 1)], we show that hypoxia-induced PTHrP is a positive regulator of the key cartilage transcription factor SOX9 [SRY (sex determining region on the Y chromosome)-box 9], leading to increased COL2A1 (collagen type II, α1) expression. Our findings thus identify PTHrP as a potential factor for cartilage repair therapies through its ability to promote the differentiated HAC phenotype.

  6. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Emi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Furumatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: matino@md.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  7. Interplay between cytoskeletal polymerization and the chondrogenic phenotype in chondrocytes passaged in monolayer culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreno, Justin; Nabavi Niaki, Mortah; Andrejevic, Katarina; Jiang, Amy; Wu, Po-Han; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    Tubulin and actin exist as monomeric units that polymerize to form either microtubules or filamentous actin. As the polymerization status (monomeric/polymeric ratio) of tubulin and/or actin have been shown to be important in regulating gene expression and phenotype in non-chondrocyte cells, the objective of this study was to examine the role of cytoskeletal polymerization on the chondrocyte phenotype. We hypothesized that actin and/or tubulin polymerization status modulates the chondrocyte phenotype during monolayer culture as well as in 3D culture during redifferentiation. To test this hypothesis, articular chondrocytes were grown and passaged in 2D monolayer culture. Cell phenotype was investigated by assessing cell morphology (area and circularity), actin/tubulin content, organization and polymerization status, as well as by determination of proliferation, fibroblast and cartilage matrix gene expression with passage number. Bovine chondrocytes became larger, more elongated, and had significantly (P  0.05) modulated, actin polymerization was increased in bovine P2 cells. Actin depolymerization, but not tubulin depolymerization, promoted the chondrocyte phenotype by inducing cell rounding, increasing aggrecan and reducing COL1 expression. Knockdown of actin depolymerization factor, cofilin, in these cells induced further P2 cell actin polymerization and increased COL1 gene expression. To confirm that actin status regulated COL1 gene expression in human P2 chondrocytes, human P2 chondrocytes were exposed to cytochalasin D. Cytochalasin D decreased COL1 gene expression in human passaged chondrocytes. Furthermore, culture of bovine P2 chondrocytes in 3D culture on porous bone substitute resulted in actin depolymerization, which correlated with decreased expression of COL1 and proliferation molecules. In 3D cultures, aggrecan gene expression was increased by cytochalasin D treatment and COL1 was further decreased. These results reveal that actin polymerization

  8. Doublecortin May Play a Role in Defining Chondrocyte Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxia Ge

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic development of articular cartilage has not been well understood and the role of doublecortin (DCX in determination of chondrocyte phenotype is unknown. Here, we use a DCX promoter-driven eGFP reporter mouse model to study the dynamic gene expression profiles in mouse embryonic handplates at E12.5 to E13.5 when the condensed mesenchymal cells differentiate into either endochondral chondrocytes or joint interzone cells. Illumina microarray analysis identified a variety of genes that were expressed differentially in the different regions of mouse handplate. The unique expression patterns of many genes were revealed. Cytl1 and 3110032G18RIK were highly expressed in the proximal region of E12.5 handplate and the carpal region of E13.5 handplate, whereas Olfr538, Kctd15, and Cited1 were highly expressed in the distal region of E12.5 and the metacarpal region of E13.5 handplates. There was an increasing gradient of Hrc expression in the proximal to distal direction in E13.5 handplate. Furthermore, when human DCX protein was expressed in human adipose stem cells, collagen II was decreased while aggrecan, matrilin 2, and GDF5 were increased during the 14-day pellet culture. These findings suggest that DCX may play a role in defining chondrocyte phenotype.

  9. Spontaneous Redifferentiation of Dedifferentiated Human Articular Chondrocytes on Hydrogel Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate into a more fibroblastic phenotype on a two-dimensional polystyrene substratum. This impedes fundamental research on these cells as well as their clinical application. This study investigated the redifferentiation behavior of dedifferentiated chondrocytes on a hydrogel substratum. Dedifferentiated normal human articular chondrocyte–knee (NHAC-kn) cells were released from the sixth-passage monolayer cultured on a polystyrene surface. These cells were then s...

  10. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  11. Isolation and characterization of human articular chondrocytes from surgical waste after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradišnik, Lidija; Gorenjak, Mario; Vogrin, Matjaž

    2017-01-01

    Background Cartilage tissue engineering is a fast-evolving field of biomedical engineering, in which the chondrocytes represent the most commonly used cell type. Since research in tissue engineering always consumes a lot of cells, simple and cheap isolation methods could form a powerful basis to boost such studies and enable their faster progress to the clinics. Isolated chondrocytes can be used for autologous chondrocyte implantation in cartilage repair, and are the base for valuable models to investigate cartilage phenotype preservation, as well as enable studies of molecular features, nature and scales of cellular responses to alterations in the cartilage tissue. Methods Isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes from the surgical waste obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was performed. To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of the isolated cells, gene expression of collagen type 2 (COL2), collagen 1 (COL1) and aggrecan (ACAN) was evaluated. Immunocytochemical staining of all mentioned proteins was performed to evaluate chondrocyte specific production. Results Cartilage specific gene expression of COL2 and ACAN has been shown that the proposed protocol leads to isolation of cells with a high chondrogenic potential, possibly even specific phenotype preservation up to the second passage. COL1 expression has confirmed the tendency of the isolated cells dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like phenotype already in the second passage, which confirms previous findings that higher passages should be used with care in cartilage tissue engineering. To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, immunocytochemical staining of the evaluated chondrocyte specific products was performed as well. Discussion In this study, we developed a protocol for isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes with the desired phenotype from the surgical waste obtained during TKA. TKA is a common and very

  12. Isolation and characterization of human articular chondrocytes from surgical waste after total knee arthroplasty (TKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Naranda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Cartilage tissue engineering is a fast-evolving field of biomedical engineering, in which the chondrocytes represent the most commonly used cell type. Since research in tissue engineering always consumes a lot of cells, simple and cheap isolation methods could form a powerful basis to boost such studies and enable their faster progress to the clinics. Isolated chondrocytes can be used for autologous chondrocyte implantation in cartilage repair, and are the base for valuable models to investigate cartilage phenotype preservation, as well as enable studies of molecular features, nature and scales of cellular responses to alterations in the cartilage tissue. Methods Isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes from the surgical waste obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA was performed. To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of the isolated cells, gene expression of collagen type 2 (COL2, collagen 1 (COL1 and aggrecan (ACAN was evaluated. Immunocytochemical staining of all mentioned proteins was performed to evaluate chondrocyte specific production. Results Cartilage specific gene expression of COL2 and ACAN has been shown that the proposed protocol leads to isolation of cells with a high chondrogenic potential, possibly even specific phenotype preservation up to the second passage. COL1 expression has confirmed the tendency of the isolated cells dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like phenotype already in the second passage, which confirms previous findings that higher passages should be used with care in cartilage tissue engineering. To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, immunocytochemical staining of the evaluated chondrocyte specific products was performed as well. Discussion In this study, we developed a protocol for isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes with the desired phenotype from the surgical waste obtained during TKA. TKA is a

  13. Precipitant induced porosity augmentation of polystyrene preserves the chondrogenicity of human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joergensen, Natasja L; Foldager, Casper B; Le, Dang Q S; Lind, Martin; Lysdahl, Helle

    2016-12-01

    Cells constantly sense and receive chemical and physical signals from neighboring cells, interstitial fluid, and extracellular matrix, which they integrate and translate into intracellular responses. Thus, the nature of the surface on which cells are cultured in vitro plays an important role for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Autologs chondrocyte implantation is considered the treatment of choice for larger cartilage defects in the knee. To obtain a sufficient number of chondrocytes for implantation multiple passaging is often needed, which raises concerns about the changes in the chondrogenic phenotype. In the present study, we analyzed the effect at cellular and molecular level of precipitant induced porosity augmentation (PIPA) of polystyrene surfaces on proliferation and differentiation of human chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were isolated from healthy patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and cultured on PIPA modified polystyrene surfaces. Microscopical analysis revealed topographically arranged porosity with micron pores and nanometer pits. Chondrocytes cultured on PIPA surfaces revealed no difference in cell viability and proliferation, but gene- and protein expressions of collagen type II were pronounced in the first passage of chondrocytes when compared to chondrocytes cultured on control surfaces. Additionally, an analysis of 40 kinases revealed that chondrocytes expanded on PIPA caused upregulated PI3K/mTOR pathway activation and inhibition of mTORC1 resulted in reduced sGAG synthesis. These findings indicate that PIPA modified polystyrene preserved the chondrogenicity of expanded human chondrocytes at gene and protein levels, which clinically may be attractive for the next generation of cell-culture surfaces for ex vivo cell growth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3073-3081, 2016.

  14. Softening Substrates Promote Chondrocytes Phenotype via RhoA/ROCK Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Lin, Shiyu; Liu, Yao; Zhou, Tengfei; Lin, Yunfeng

    2016-09-01

    Due to its evascular, aneural, and alymphatic conditions, articular cartilage shows extremely poor regenerative ability. Thus, directing chondrocyte toward a desired location and function by utilizing the mechanical cues of biomaterials is a promising approach for effective tissue regeneration. However, chondrocytes cultured on Petri dish will lose their typical phenotype which may lead to compromised results. Therefore, we fabricated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials with various stiffness as culture substrates. Cell morphology and focal adhesion of chondrocytes displayed significant changes. The cytoskeletal tension of the adherent cells observed by average myosin IIA fluorescent intensity increased as stiffness of the underlying substrates decreased, consistent with the alteration of chondrocyte phenotype in our study. Immunofluorescent images and q-PCR results revealed that chondrocyte cultured on soft substrates showed better chondrocyte functionalization by more type II collagen and aggrecan expression, related to the lowest mRNA level of Rac-1, RhoA, ROCK-1, and ROCK-2. Taken together, this work not only points out that matrix elasticity can regulate chondrocyte functionalization via RhoA/ROCK pathway, but also provides new prospect for biomechanical control of cell behavior in cell-based cartilage regeneration.

  15. bFGF influences human articular chondrocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Zwingmann, J; Fehrenbach, M

    2007-01-01

    FGF concentrations in supernatants of primary human articular chondrocytes peaked immediately after isolation and then declined. In a dose-dependent manner, bFGF enhanced cell amplification and viability. BFGF induced a decrease in the apoptotic cell population, while the number of proliferating cells remained......BACKGROUND: The possible functional role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in regulating the mitotic and metabolic activity of primary human articular chondrocytes was investigated. METHODS: [EF1]Chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from femoral head cartilage, and were cultured in vitro...

  16. Enhanced hyaline cartilage matrix synthesis in collagen sponge scaffolds by using siRNA to stabilize chondrocytes phenotype cultured with bone morphogenetic protein-2 under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Florence; Ollitrault, David; Hervieu, Magalie; Baugé, Catherine; Maneix, Laure; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Galera, Philippe; Demoor, Magali

    2013-07-01

    Cartilage healing by tissue engineering is an alternative strategy to reconstitute functional tissue after trauma or age-related degeneration. However, chondrocytes, the major player in cartilage homeostasis, do not self-regenerate efficiently and lose their phenotype during osteoarthritis. This process is called dedifferentiation and also occurs during the first expansion step of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). To ensure successful ACI therapy, chondrocytes must be differentiated and capable of synthesizing hyaline cartilage matrix molecules. We therefore developed a safe procedure for redifferentiating human chondrocytes by combining appropriate physicochemical factors: hypoxic conditions, collagen scaffolds, chondrogenic factors (bone morphogenetic protein-2 [BMP-2], and insulin-like growth factor I [IGF-I]) and RNA interference targeting the COL1A1 gene. Redifferentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes was evaluated using gene/protein analyses to identify the chondrocyte phenotypic profile. In our conditions, under BMP-2 treatment, redifferentiated and metabolically active chondrocytes synthesized a hyaline-like cartilage matrix characterized by type IIB collagen and aggrecan molecules without any sign of hypertrophy or osteogenesis. In contrast, IGF-I increased both specific and noncharacteristic markers (collagens I and X) of chondrocytes. The specific increase in COL2A1 gene expression observed in the BMP-2 treatment was shown to involve the specific enhancer region of COL2A1 that binds the trans-activators Sox9/L-Sox5/Sox6 and Sp1, which are associated with a decrease in the trans-inhibitors of COL2A1, c-Krox, and p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. Our procedure in which BMP-2 treatment under hypoxia is associated with a COL1A1 siRNA, significantly increased the differentiation index of chondrocytes, and should offer the opportunity to develop new ACI-based therapies in humans.

  17. Polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide inhibit proteoglycan synthesis of human chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Röhner, Eric; Hoff, Paula; Winkler, Tobias; von Roth, Philipp; Seeger, Jörn Bengt; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The use of local antiseptics is a common method in septic joint surgery. We tested polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide, two of the most frequently used antiseptics with high efficacy and low toxicity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both antiseptics on the extracellular cartilaginous matrix synthesis of human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were isolated from donated human knee joints, embedded in alginate beads, and incubated for 10 and 30 minutes with polyhexanide (0.04%)...

  18. Detecting new microRNAs in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes identifies miR-3085 as a human, chondrocyte-selective, microRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, N.; Swingler, T.E.; Le, L.T.T.; Barter, M.J.; Wheeler, G.; Pais, H.; Donell, S.T.; Young, D.A.; Dalmay, T.; Clark, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To use deep sequencing to identify novel microRNAs (miRNAs) in human osteoarthritic cartilage which have a functional role in chondrocyte phenotype or function. Design A small RNA library was prepared from human osteoarthritic primary chondrocytes using in-house adaptors and analysed by Illumina sequencing. Novel candidate miRNAs were validated by northern blot and qRT-PCR. Expression was measured in cartilage models. Targets of novel candidates were identified by microarray and computational analysis, validated using 3′-UTR-luciferase reporter plasmids. Protein levels were assessed by western blot and functional analysis by cell adhesion. Results We identified 990 known miRNAs and 1621 potential novel miRNAs in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, 60 of the latter were expressed in all samples assayed. MicroRNA-140-3p was the most highly expressed microRNA in osteoarthritic cartilage. Sixteen novel candidate miRNAs were analysed further, of which six remained after northern blot analysis. Three novel miRNAs were regulated across models of chondrogenesis, chondrocyte differentiation or cartilage injury. One sequence (novel #11), annotated in rodents as microRNA-3085-3p, was preferentially expressed in cartilage, dependent on chondrocyte differentiation and, in man, is located in an intron of the cartilage-expressed gene CRTAC-1. This microRNA was shown to target the ITGA5 gene directly (which encodes integrin alpha5) and inhibited adhesion to fibronectin (dependent on alpha5beta1 integrin). Conclusion Deep sequencing has uncovered many potential microRNA candidates expressed in human cartilage. At least three of these show potential functional interest in cartilage homeostasis and osteoarthritis (OA). Particularly, novel #11 (microRNA-3085-3p) which has been identified for the first time in man. PMID:26497608

  19. Low oxygen tension stimulates redifferentiation of dedifferentiated adult human nasal chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Geffen, van M.; Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.; Riesle, J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of dissolved oxygen tension (DO) on the redifferentiation of dedifferentiated adult human nasal septum chondrocytes cultured as pellets. Design: After isolation, human nasal chondrocytes were expanded in monolayer culture, which resulted in their dedifferentiation.

  20. Low oxygen tension stimulates the redifferentiation of dedifferentiated adult human nasal chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Geffen, van M.; Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.; Riesle, J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of dissolved oxygen tension (DO) on the redifferentiation of dedifferentiated adult human nasal septum chondrocytes cultured as pellets. - Design: After isolation, human nasal chondrocytes were expanded in monolayer culture, which resulted in their dedifferentiati

  1. Astaxanthin reduces matrix metalloproteinase expression in human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ping; Xiong, Yan; Shi, Yong-Xiang; Hu, Peng-Fei; Bao, Jia-Peng; Wu, Li-Dong

    2014-03-01

    Astaxanthin is a red carotenoid pigment which exerts multiple biological activities. However, little is known about the effects of astaxanthin on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in OA. The present study investigated the effects of astaxanthin on MMPs in human chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were pretreated with astaxanthin at 1, 10 or 50μM, then, cells were stimulated with IL-1β (10ng/ml) for 24h. MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-13 were observed. We found that astaxanthin reduced the expression of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-13 as well as the phosphorylation of two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p38 and ERK1/2) in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes. Astaxanthin also blocked the IκB-α degradation. These results suggest that astaxanthin may be beneficial in the treatment of OA.

  2. MRTF-A signaling regulates the acquisition of the contractile phenotype in dedifferentiated chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreno, Justin; Raju, Sneha; Wu, Po-Han; Kandel, Rita A

    2016-10-14

    Chondrocyte culture as a monolayer for cell number expansion results in dedifferentiation whereby expanded cells acquire contractile features and increased actin polymerization status. This study determined whether the actin polymerization based signaling pathway, myocardin-related transcription factor-a (MRTF-A) is involved in regulating this contractile phenotype. Serial passaging of chondrocytes in monolayer culture to passage 2 resulted in increased gene and protein expression of the contractile molecules alpha-smooth muscle actin, transgelin and vinculin compared to non-passaged, primary cells. This resulted in a functional change as passaged 2, but not primary, chondrocytes were capable of contracting type I collagen gels in a stress-relaxed contraction assay. These changes were associated with increased actin polymerization and MRTF-A nuclear localization. The involvement of actin was demonstrated by latrunculin B depolymerization of actin which reversed these changes. Alternatively cytochalasin D which activates MRTF-A increased gene and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transgelin and vinculin, whereas CCG1423 which deactivates MRTF-A decreased these molecules. The involvement of MRTF-A signaling was confirmed by gene silencing of MRTF or its co-factor serum response factor. Knockdown experiments revealed downregulation of α-smooth muscle actin and transgelin gene and protein expression, and inhibition of gel contraction. These findings demonstrate that passaged chondrocytes acquire a contractile phenotype and that this change is modulated by the actin-MRTF-A-serum response factor signaling pathway.

  3. In vitro exposure of human chondrocytes to pulsed electromagnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Nicolin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs on the proliferation and survival of matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI®-derived cells was studied to ascertain the healing potential of PEMFs. MACI-derived cells were taken from cartilage biopsies 6 months after surgery and cultured. No dedifferentiation towards the fibroblastic phenotype occurred, indicating the success of the surgical implantation. The MACI-derived cultured chondrocytes were exposed to 12 h/day (short term or 4 h/day (long term PEMFs exposure (magnetic field intensity, 2 mT; frequency, 75 Hz and proliferation rate determined by flow cytometric analysis. The PEMFs exposure elicited a significant increase of cell number in the SG2M cell cycle phase. Moreover, cells isolated from MACI® scaffolds showed the presence of collagen type II, a typical marker of chondrocyte functionality. The results show that MACI® membranes represent an optimal bioengineering device to support chondrocyte growth and proliferation in surgical implants. The surgical implant of MACI® combined with physiotherapy is suggested as a promising approach for a faster and safer treatment of cartilage traumatic lesions.

  4. Association between the chondrocyte phenotype and the expression of adipokines and their receptors: evidence for a role of leptin but not adiponectin in the expression of cartilage-specific markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francin, Pierre-Jean; Guillaume, Cécile; Humbert, Anne-Claude; Pottie, Pascale; Netter, Patrick; Mainard, Didier; Presle, Nathalie

    2011-11-01

    Although extensive evidence support the key role of adipokines in cartilage homeostasis, contradictory data have been found for their expression and their effects in chondrocytes. This study was then undertaken to determine whether a phenotypic modulation may affect the expression of adipokines and their receptors in human chondrocytes. The expression of leptin, adiponectin and their receptors, as well as cartilage-specific genes was examined in chondrocytes obtained from patients with osteoarthritis either directly after cells harvest or after culture in monolayer or in alginate beads. The results showed major changes in the gene expression pattern after culture in monolayer with a shift from the adipokines to their receptors. Interestingly, this downregulation of adipokines was associated with a loss of chondrocyte phenotype, and chondrocytes recovered a cartilage-like expression profile of leptin and adiponectin when cultured in a tridimensional chondrocyte phenotype-inducing system, but ceased expressing their receptors. Further experiments clearly showed that leptin but not adiponectin promoted the expression of cartilage-specific markers through mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling pathways. In conclusion, our data indicate that any phenotypic modulation could affect chondrocyte responsiveness to leptin or adiponectin, and provide evidence for an important role for leptin in regulating the expression of cartilage-specific markers.

  5. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ito

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and citrate synthase (CS, which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1 and aggrecan (ACAN, was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9, which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and

  6. Human serum provided additional values in growth factors supplemented medium for human chondrocytes monolayer expansion and engineered cartilage construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, K H; Aminuddin, B S; Fuzina, N H; Ruszymah, B H I

    2004-05-01

    We have previously formulated an optimized human chondrocytes growth medium based on 2% fetal bovine serum supplementation. For clinical usage, the animal serum must be replaced by patient own serum. We investigated the effects of human serum concentration for human nasal septum chondrocytes monolayer culture and cartilage reconstruction. Human serum demonstrated a dose dependent manner in promoting chondrocytes growth and cartilage engineering.

  7. Polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide inhibit proteoglycan synthesis of human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhner, Eric; Hoff, Paula; Winkler, Tobias; von Roth, Philipp; Seeger, Jörn Bengt; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-03-01

    The use of local antiseptics is a common method in septic joint surgery. We tested polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide, two of the most frequently used antiseptics with high efficacy and low toxicity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both antiseptics on the extracellular cartilaginous matrix synthesis of human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were isolated from donated human knee joints, embedded in alginate beads, and incubated for 10 and 30 minutes with polyhexanide (0.04%), hydrogen peroxide (3%), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for control. Cartilaginous matrix production was quantified through light microscopic analysis of Alcian blue staining. Cell number and morphology were detected by histological analysis. Chondrocytes showed a decreased intensity of blue colouring after antiseptic treatment versus PBS. In contrast to that, neither the cell number per view field nor the cell morphology differed between the groups. Polyhexanide has more toxic potential than hydrogen peroxide. Based on the fact that the cell number and morphology was not altered by the substances at the examined concentrations, the lower intensity of Alcian blue staining of treated chondrocytes indicates a decreased cartilage-specific matrix synthesis by polyhexanide more than by hydrogen peroxide and control.

  8. Low oxygen reduces the modulation to an oxidative phenotype in monolayer-expanded chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Hannah K; Lee, David A

    2010-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation requires a phase of in vitro cell expansion, achieved by monolayer culture under atmospheric oxygen levels. Chondrocytes reside under low oxygen conditions in situ and exhibit a glycolytic metabolism. However, oxidative phosphorylation rises progressively during culture, with concomitant reactive oxygen species production. We determine if the high oxygen environment in vitro provides the transformation stimulus. Articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer for up to 14 days under 2%, 5%, or 20% oxygen. Expansion under 2% and 5% oxygen reduced the rate at which the cells developed an oxidative phenotype compared to 20% oxygen. However, at 40 +/- 4 fmol cell(-1) h(-1) the oxygen consumption by chondrocytes expanded under 2% oxygen for 14 days was still 14 times the value observed for freshly isolated cells. Seventy-five to 78% of the increased oxygen consumption was accounted for by oxidative phosphorylation (oligomycin sensitive). Expansion under low oxygen also reduced cellular proliferation and 8-hydroxyguanosine release, a marker of oxidative DNA damage. However, these parameters remained elevated compared to freshly isolated cells. Thus, expansion under physiological oxygen levels reduces, but does not abolish, the induction of an oxidative energy metabolism. We conclude that simply transferring chondrocytes to low oxygen is not sufficient to either maintain or re-establish a normal energy metabolism. Furthermore, a hydrophobic polystyrene culture surface which promotes rounded cell morphology had no effect on the development of an oxidative metabolism. Although the shift towards an oxidative energy metabolism is often accompanied by morphological changes, this study does not support the hypothesis that it is driven by them.

  9. Rapamycin Maintains the Chondrocytic Phenotype and Interferes with Inflammatory Cytokine Induced Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Luna-Preitschopf

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is hallmarked by a progressive degradation of articular cartilage. Besides risk factors including trauma, obesity or genetic predisposition, inflammation has a major impact on the development of this chronic disease. During the course of inflammation, cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-α and interleukin (IL-1β are secreted by activated chondrocytes as well as synovial cells and stimulate the production of other inflammatory cytokines and matrix degrading enzymes. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin is a clinical approved immunosuppressant and several studies also verified its chondroprotective effects in OA. However, the effect of blocking the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex (mTORC1 on the inflammatory status within OA is not well studied. Therefore, we aimed to investigate if inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin can preserve and sustain chondrocytes in an inflammatory environment. Patient-derived chondrocytes were cultured in media supplemented with or without the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. To establish an inflammatory environment, either TNF-α or IL-1β was added to the media (=OA-model. The chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of rapamycin were evaluated using sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG release assay, Caspase 3/7 activity assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin reduced the release and therefore degradation of sGAGs, which are components of the extracellular matrix secreted by chondrocytes. Furthermore, blocking mTORC1 in OA chondrocytes resulted in an enhanced expression of the main chondrogenic markers. Rapamycin was able to protect chondrocytes from cell death in an OA-model shown by reduced Caspase 3/7 activity and diminished LDH release. Furthermore, inhibition of mTORC1 preserved the chondrogenic phenotype of OA chondrocytes, but also reduced inflammatory processes within the OA-model. This study

  10. Green fluorescent protein as marker in chondrocytes overexpressing human insulin-like growth factor-1 for repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shao-kun; LIU Yi; SONG Zhi-ming; FU Chang-feng; XU Xin-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To label the primary articular chondrocytes overexpressing human insulin-like growth factor ( hIGF-1 ) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) for repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Methods:GFP cDNA was inserted into pcDNA3.1-hIGF-1 to label the expression vector.The recombinant vector,pcGI,a mammalian expression vector with multiple cloning sites under two respective cytomegalovirus promoters/enhancers,was transfected into the primary articular chondrocytes with the help of lipofectamine.After the positive cell clones were selected by G418,G418-resistant chondrocytes were cultured in medium for 4 weeks.The stable expression of hIGF-1 in the articular chondrocytes was determined by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical analysis and the GFP was confirmed under a fluorescence microscope. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and flow cytometer methods were employed to determine the effect of transfection on proliferation of chondrocytes. Gray value was used to analyze quantitatively the expression of type Ⅱ collagen. Results:The expression of hIGF-1 and GFP was confirmed in transfected chondrocytes by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemical analysis and fluorescence microscope observation. Green articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1 could expand and maintain their chondrogenic phenotypes for more than 4 weeks.After the transfection of IGF-1,the proliferation of chondrocytes was enhanced and the chondrocytes could effectively maintain the expression of type Ⅱ collagen. Conclusions:The hIGF-1 eukaryotic expression vector containing GFP marker gene has been successfully constructed.GFP,which can be visualized in real time and in situ, is stably expressed in articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1.The labeled articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1 can be applied in cell-mediated gene therapy as well as for other biomedical purposes of transgenic chondrocytes.

  11. Bone marrow extract as a growth supplement for human iliac apophyseal chondrocyte culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Balakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Human bone marrow is rich in various growth factors which may support the chondrocyte growth. This study was conducted to compare the culture characteristics of human growth plate chondrocyte in foetal bovine serum (FBS and human autologous bone marrow extract (BME in monolayer culture. Methods: Iliac crest apophyseal cartilage was harvested from four donors, aged between two and nine years, undergoing hip surgery. Chondrocytes were propagated under two culture conditions, with 10 per cent FBS and 10 per cent autologous BME harvested from the same donors. Cells were harvested at 7, 14 and 21 days to assess viability, morphology, cell count and immunocytochemistry. Results: With an initial seeding density of 2500 cells/cm 2 , the average yield in monolayer cultured with FBS was 3.35 × 10 5 , 5.9 × 10 5 , 14.1 × 10 5 and BME was 0.66 × 10 5 , 1.57 × 10 5 and 3.48 × 10 5 at 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Viability was 98.21 per cent with FBS and 97.45 per cent with BME at 21 days. In BME supplemented cultures, hyaline phenotype was maintained up to 21 days. The yield was higher in the FBS supplemented group; however, the phenotype could not be maintained by the FBS group as long as BME group. Interpretation & conclusions: Autologous BME was found to be a safer alternative to FBS for human studies. BME could maintain the hyaline phenotype for a longer time. Ways to enhance the cell yield needs to be explored in future studies.

  12. COMP mutations: domain-dependent relationship between abnormal chondrocyte trafficking and clinical PSACH and MED phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tung-Ling L; Posey, Karen L; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Vertel, Barbara M

    2008-02-15

    Mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) produce clinical phenotypes ranging from the severe end of the spectrum, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), which is a dwarfing condition, to a mild condition, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). Patient chondrocytes have a unique morphology characterized by distended rER cisternae containing lamellar deposits of COMP and other extracellular matrix proteins. It has been difficult to determine why different mutations give rise to variable clinical phenotypes. Using our in vitro cell system, we previously demonstrated that the most common PSACH mutation, D469del, severely impedes trafficking of COMP and type IX collagen in chondrocytic cells, consistent with observations from patient cells. Here, we hypothesize that PSACH and MED mutations variably affect the cellular trafficking behavior of COMP and that the extent of defective trafficking correlates with clinical phenotype. Twelve different recombinant COMP mutations were expressed in rat chondrosarcoma cells and the percent cells with ER-retained COMP was assessed. For mutations in type 3 (T3) repeats, trafficking defects correlated with clinical phenotype; PSACH mutations had more cells retaining mutant COMP, while MED mutations had fewer. In contrast, the cellular trafficking pattern observed for mutations in the C-terminal globular domain (CTD) was not predictive of clinical phenotype. The results demonstrate that different COMP mutations in the T3 repeat domain have variable effects on intracellular transport, which correlate with clinical severity, while CTD mutations do not show such a correlation. These findings suggest that other unidentified factors contribute to the effect of the CTD mutations. J. Cell. Biochem. 103: 778-787, 2008. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. High glucose mediates endothelial-to-chondrocyte transition in human aortic endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Rining

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification is one of the common complications in diabetes mellitus. Many studies have shown that high glucose (HG caused cardiovascular calcification, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Recently, medial calcification has been most commonly described in the vessels of patients with diabetes. Chondrocytes were involved in the medial calcification. Recent studies have shown that the conversion into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs via the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT could be triggered in chondrocytes. Our previous research has indicated that HG induced EndMT in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs. Therefore, we addressed the question of whether HG-induced EndMT could be transitioned into MSCs and differentiated into chondrocytes. Methods HAECs were divided into three groups: a normal glucose (NG group, HG group (30 mmol/L, and mannitol (5.5 mmol/L NG + 24.5 mmol/L group. Pathological changes were investigated using fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to detect the co-expression of endothelial markers, such as CD31, and fibroblast markers, such as fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP-1. The expression of FSP-1 was detected by real time-PCR and western blots. Endothelial-derived MSCs were grown in MSC medium for one week. The expression of the MSCs markers STRO-1, CD44, CD10 and the chondrocyte marker SOX9 was detected by immunofluorescence staining and western blots. Chondrocyte expression was detected by alcian blue staining. Calcium deposits were analyzed by alizarin red staining. Results The incubation of HAECs exposed to HG resulted in a fibroblast-like phenotype. Double staining of the HAECs indicated a co-localization of CD31 and FSP-1. The expression of FSP-1 was significantly increased in the HG group, and the cells undergoing EndMT also expressed STRO-1, CD44 and SOX9 compared with the controls (P  Conclusions Our

  14. Immunophenotypic analysis of human articular chondrocytes: changes in surface markers associated with cell expansion in monolayer culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Romero, Jose; Gaillard, Jean Philippe; Grogan, Shawn Patrick; Nesic, Dobrila; Trub, Thomas; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre

    2005-03-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering relies on in vitro expansion of primary chondrocytes. Monolayer is the chosen culture model for chondrocyte expansion because in this system the proliferative capacity of chondrocytes is substantially higher compared to non-adherent systems. However, human articular chondrocytes (HACs) cultured as monolayers undergo changes in phenotype and gene expression known as "dedifferentiation." To gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in the dedifferentiation process, our research focused on the characterization of the surface molecule phenotype of HACs in monolayer culture. Adult HACs were isolated by enzymatic digestion of cartilage samples obtained post-mortem. HACs cultured in monolayer for different time periods were analyzed by flow cytometry for the expression of cell surface markers with a panel of 52 antibodies. Our results show that HACs express surface molecules belonging to different categories: integrins and other adhesion molecules (CD49a, CD49b, CD49c, CD49e, CD49f, CD51/61, CD54, CD106, CD166, CD58, CD44), tetraspanins (CD9, CD63, CD81, CD82, CD151), receptors (CD105, CD119, CD130, CD140a, CD221, CD95, CD120a, CD71, CD14), ectoenzymes (CD10, CD26), and other surface molecules (CD90, CD99). Moreover, differential expression of certain markers in monolayer culture was identified. Up-regulation of markers on HACs regarded as distinctive for mesenchymal stem cells (CD10, CD90, CD105, CD166) during monolayer culture suggested that dedifferentiation leads to reversion to a primitive phenotype. This study contributes to the definition of HAC phenotype, and provides new potential markers to characterize chondrocyte differentiation stage in the context of tissue engineering applications. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. A novel rat tail collagen type-I gel for the cultivation of human articular chondrocytes in low cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Rath, R; Gavénis, K; Andereya, S; Mumme, T; Schmidt-Rohlfing, B; Schneider, U

    2007-12-01

    Collagen type-I matrix systems have gained growing importance as a cartilage repair device. However, most of the established matrix systems use collagen type-I of bovine origin seeded in high cell densities. Here we present a novel collagen type-I gel system made of rat tail collagen for the cultivation of human chondrocytes in low cell densities. Rat tail collagen type-I gel (CaReS, Arthro Kinetics, Esslingen, Germany) was seeded with human passage 2 chondrocytes in different cell densities to evaluate the optimal cell number. In vitro, the proliferation factor of low density cultures was more than threefold higher compared with high density cultures. After 6 weeks of in vitro cultivation, freshly prepared chondrocytes with an initial cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL showed a proliferation factor of 33. A cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL was chosen for in vitro and in vivo cultivation using the common nude mouse model as an in vivo system. Chondrocytes stayed viable as a Live/Dead fluorescence assay and TUNEL staining revealed. During in vitro cultivation, passage 0 cells partly dedifferentiated morphologically. In vivo, passage 0 cells maintained the chondrocyte phenotype and demonstrated an increased synthesis of collagen type-II protein and gene expression compared to passage 2 cells. Passage 2 cells did not redifferentiate in vivo. Cultivating a cell-seeded collagen gel of bovine origin as a control (AtelocollagenTM, Koken, Tokyo, Japan) did not lead to superior results with regard to cell morphology, col-II protein production and col-II gene expression. With the CaReS collagen gel system the best quality of repair tissue was obtained by seeding freshly isolated chondrocytes.

  16. Study on the shape, phenotype and intercellular communication of chondrocyte%软骨细胞形态、表型与胞间通讯的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文涛; 卢世璧

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The chondrocytes cultured in vitro will grow in a thin layer and lose their pheootype, assuming fibroblast. There is no report about the relationship between the phenotype and intercellular communication of chondrocytes.OBJECTIVE: To study the proliferation, matrix synthesis, relationship between fluorescence stain intake and gap junction of various form chondrocytes cultured in vitro.DESIGN: An experimental study based on diagnosis was conducted.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: The experiment was conducted in the Institute of Orthopaedics, and Institute of Basic Sciences, General Hospital of PLA. The subjects were rabbit joint cartilages and human femoral head cartilages.INTERVENTIONS: Rabbit chondrocytes cultured in vitro were stained with hematoxylin-eosin(HE) and light green-safranin O respectively. The chondrocyte' s size was measured with microscope and the intracellular fluorescence intensity was measured with confocal laser microscope. The fluorescence stain in chondrocyte was quenched with laser.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Appearance, size and intracellular fluorescence intensity of chondrocytes.RESULTS: The chondrocytes became larger and lost their spherical form.Then their proliferation was accelerated. The average projection area was 1755.1 μm2 with the difference of 50 times. The matrix synthesis and gap junction disappeared. The intake of CFDA-AM increased in spherical chondrocytes(average 2057/30 cells) compared with the decreased intake in flat chondrocytes(average 80/30 cells) . There was intercellular communication in spherical rabbit chondrocytes in vitro and human chondrocytes in lacuna of cartilage germinal layer.CONCLUSION: There are certain relationships among the density, form,phenotype and gap junction in chondrocytes. The phenotype may be determined by chondrocytes form.%背景:在体外培养时软骨细胞会像成纤维细胞样成片生长并失去表型,软骨细胞胞间通讯与细胞表型的关系尚无报告.目的:了解体外

  17. New insight on FGFR3-related chondrodysplasias molecular physiopathology revealed by human chondrocyte gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Schibler

    Full Text Available Endochondral ossification is the process by which the appendicular skeleton, facial bones, vertebrae and medial clavicles are formed and relies on the tight control of chondrocyte maturation. Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR3 plays a role in bone development and maintenance and belongs to a family of proteins which differ in their ligand affinities and tissue distribution. Activating mutations of the FGFR3 gene lead to craniosynostosis and multiple types of skeletal dysplasia with varying degrees of severity: thanatophoric dysplasia (TD, achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia. Despite progress in the characterization of FGFR3-mediated regulation of cartilage development, many aspects remain unclear. The aim and the novelty of our study was to examine whole gene expression differences occurring in primary human chondrocytes isolated from normal cartilage or pathological cartilage from TD-affected fetuses, using Affymetrix technology. The phenotype of the primary cells was confirmed by the high expression of chondrocytic markers. Altered expression of genes associated with many cellular processes was observed, including cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle, cell adhesion, cell motility, metabolic pathways, signal transduction, cell cycle process and cell signaling. Most of the cell cycle process genes were down-regulated and consisted of genes involved in cell cycle progression, DNA biosynthesis, spindle dynamics and cytokinesis. About eight percent of all modulated genes were found to impact extracellular matrix (ECM structure and turnover, especially glycosaminoglycan (GAG and proteoglycan biosynthesis and sulfation. Altogether, the gene expression analyses provide new insight into the consequences of FGFR3 mutations in cell cycle regulation, onset of pre-hypertrophic differentiation and concomitant metabolism changes. Moreover, impaired motility and ECM properties may also provide clues about growth plate disorganization. These

  18. Expansion of human nasal chondrocytes on macroporous microcarriers enhances redifferentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Kreijveld, E.; Temenoff, J.S.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Riesle, J.

    2003-01-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited capacity for self-repair. To overcome this problem, it is expected that functional cartilage replacements can be created from expanded chondrocytes seeded in biodegradable scaffolds. Expansion of chondrocytes in two-dimensional culture systems often results in dedif

  19. Expansion of human nasal chondrocytes on macroporous macrocarriers enhances redifferentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Kreijveld, E.; Temenoff, J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Riesle, J.

    2003-01-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited capacity for self-repair. To overcome this problem, it is expected that functional cartilage replacements can be created from expanded chondrocytes seeded in biodegradable scaffolds. Expansion of chondrocytes in two-dimensional culture systems often results in dedif

  20. Expansion of human nasal chondrocytes on macroporous microcarriers enhances redifferentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Kreijveld, E.; Temenoff, J.S.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Riesle, J.U.

    2003-01-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited capacity for self-repair. To overcome this problem, it is expected that functional cartilage replacements can be created from expanded chondrocytes seeded in biodegradable scaffolds. Expansion of chondrocytes in two-dimensional culture systems often results in dedif

  1. Cartilage tissue engineering using pre-aggregated human articular chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Wolf

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we first aimed at determining whether human articular chondrocytes (HAC proliferate in aggregates in the presence of strong chondrocyte mitogens. We then investigated if the aggregated cells have an enhanced chondrogenic capacity as compared to cells cultured in monolayer. HAC from four donors were cultured in tissue culture dishes either untreated or coated with 1% agarose in the presence of TGFb-1, FGF-2 and PDGF-BB. Proliferation and stage of differentiation were assessed by measuring respectively DNA contents and type II collagen mRNA. Expanded cells were induced to differentiate in pellets or in Hyaff®-11 meshes and the formed tissues were analysed biochemically for glycosaminoglycans (GAG and DNA, and histologically by Safranin O staining. The amount of DNA in aggregate cultures increased significantly from day 2 to day 6 (by 3.2-fold, but did not further increase with additional culture time. Expression of type II collagen mRNA was about two orders of magnitude higher in aggregated HAC as compared to monolayer expanded cells. Pellets generated by aggregated HAC were generally more intensely stained for GAG than those generated by monolayer-expanded cells. Scaffolds seeded with aggregates accumulated more GAG (1.3-fold than scaffolds seeded with monolayer expanded HAC. In conclusion, this study showed that HAC culture in aggregates does not support a relevant degree of expansion. However, aggregation of expanded HAC prior to loading into a porous scaffold enhances the quality of the resulting tissues and could thus be introduced as an intermediate culture phase in the manufacture of engineered cartilage grafts.

  2. Strenuous Treadmill Running Induces a Chondrocyte Phenotype in Rat Achilles Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shao-Yong; Li, Shu-Fen; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Although tendinopathy is common, its underlying pathogenesis is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the possible pathogenesis of tendinopathy. Material/Methods In this study, a total of 24 rats were randomly and evenly divided into a control (CON) group and a strenuous treadmill running (STR) group. Animals in the STR group were subjected to a 12-week treadmill running protocol. Subsequently, all Achilles tendons were harvested to perform histological observation or biochemical analyses. Results Histologically, hypercellularity and round cells, as well as disorganized collagen fibrils, were presented in rat Achilles tendon sections from the STR group. Furthermore, our results showed that the expression of aggrecan, collagen type II (Col II), and Sex-Determining Region Y Box 9 (Sox 9) were markedly increased in the STR group compared with that in the CON group. Additionally, the mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and biglycan was significantly up-regulated in the STR group in contrast to that in CON group. Conclusions These results suggest that a 12-week strenuous treadmill running regimen can induce chondrocyte phenotype in rat Achilles tendons through chondrogenic differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs) by BMP-2 signaling. PMID:27742920

  3. Cartilage tissue engineering of nasal septal chondrocyte-macroaggregates in human demineralized bone matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Juliane; Marzahn, Ulrike; El Sayed, Karym; Pruss, Axel; Haisch, Andreas; Stoelzel, Katharina

    2013-06-01

    Tissue Engineering is an important method for generating cartilage tissue with isolated autologous cells and the support of biomaterials. In contrast to various gel-like biomaterials, human demineralized bone matrix (DBM) guarantees some biomechanical stability for an application in biomechanically loaded regions. The present study combined for the first time the method of seeding chondrocyte-macroaggregates in DBM for the purpose of cartilage tissue engineering. After isolating human nasal chondrocytes and creating a three-dimensional macroaggregate arrangement, the DBM was cultivated in vitro with the macroaggregates. The interaction of the cells within the DBM was analyzed with respect to cell differentiation and the inhibitory effects of chondrocyte proliferation. In contrast to chondrocyte-macroaggregates in the cell-DBM constructs, morphologically modified cells expressing type I collagen dominated. The redifferentiation of chondrocytes, characterized by the expression of type II collagen, was only found in low amounts in the cell-DBM constructs. Furthermore, caspase 3, a marker for apoptosis, was detected in the chondrocyte-DBM constructs. In another experimental setting, the vitality of chondrocytes as related to culture time and the amount of DBM was analyzed with the BrdU assay. Higher amounts of DBM tended to result in significantly higher proliferation rates of the cells within the first 48 h. After 96 h, the vitality decreased in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, this study provides the proof of concept of chondrocyte-macroaggregates with DBM as an interesting method for the tissue engineering of cartilage. The as-yet insufficient redifferentiation of the chondrocytes and the sporadic initiation of apoptosis will require further investigations.

  4. Adhesion-mediated signal transduction in human articular chondrocytes: the influence of biomaterial chemistry and tenascin-C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmood, Tahir A.; Jong, de Ruben; Riesle, Jens; Langer, Robert; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.

    2004-01-01

    Chondrocyte ‘dedifferentiation’ involves the switching of the cell phenotype to one that no longer secretes extracellular matrix found in normal cartilage and occurs frequently during chondrocyte expansion in culture. It is also characterized by the differential expression of receptors and intracell

  5. Human pituitary tissue secretes a potent growth factor for chondrocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, S; Friesen, H G

    1986-01-01

    We report the secretion from human pituitary tumor fragments in organ culture of a potent mitogen for chondrocyte proliferation. Primary human pituitary cell and organ cultures were established from pituitary fragments obtained from patients with acromegaly, prolactinomas, and nonfunctional adenomas. The conditioned culture medium contained a mitogenic factor(s) that stimulated rabbit fetal chondrocyte proliferation, causing up to an 8-fold increase in cell number when added to Ham's F-10 medium in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Blood leaking into the surgical field after the adenomectomy is known to contain very high concentrations of pituitary hormones. Serum samples, obtained from this venous "ooze" collected at the site of pituitary surgery, also were found to contain chondrocyte growth-promoting activity. Some venous serum samples stimulated chondrocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent manner down to a 1:10 dilution of 1 microliter serum, indicating that the material being secreted was very potent indeed. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 and analytical gel isoelectric focusing of culture media or serum samples from the pituitary fossa demonstrated that the growth factor secreted from the pituitary tumor fragments as well as from the venous serum is similar, if not identical, to chondrocyte growth factor (mol wt, 43,000; pI 7.6-7.9) purified from human pituitaries collected at autopsy. These results suggest that the chondrocyte growth-promoting factor(s) may not only be secreted by pituitary tumor fragments but by normal human pituitary tissue as well.

  6. [Effects of in vitro continuous passaging on the phenotype of mouse hyaline chondrocytes and the balance of the extra- cellular matrix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linyi, Cai; Xiangli, Kong; Jing, Xie

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of in vitro continuous passaging on the morphological phenotype and differentiation characteristics of mouse hyaline chondrocytes, as well as on the balance of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Enzymatic digestion was conducted to isolate mouse hyaline chondrocytes, which expanded over five passages in vitro. Hematoxylin-eosin stain was used to show the changes in chondrocyte morphology. Semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze the mRNA changes in the marker genes, routine genes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs) in chondrocytes. Zymography was carried out to elucidate changes in gelatinase activities. After continuous expansion in vitro, the morphology of round or polygonal chondrocytes changed to elongated and spindled shape. The expression of marker genes significantly decreased (P 0.05). Meanwhile, the ratio of MMPs/TIMPs was altered. At the protein level, the activities of gelatinases decreased after passaging, especially for P4 and P5 chondrocytes (P cartilage ECM became uncontrollable and led to the imbalance of ECM homeostasis. When hyaline chondrocytes are applied in research on relevant diseases or cartilage tissue engineering, P0-P2 chondrocytes should be used.

  7. Gypenoside inhibits interleukin-1β-induced inflammatory response in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Gypenoside (GP), the main active ingredient of Gynostemma pentaphyllum, possesses a variety of pharmacological capacities including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, and anti-tumor. However, the effects of GP on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes are still unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of GP on IL-1β-stimulated human OA chondrocytes and explore the possible mechanism. Our results showed that GP dose-dependently inhibited IL-1β-induced NO and PGE2 production in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, treatment of GP inhibited the expression of MMP3 and MMP13, which was increased by IL-1β. Finally, we found that pretreatment of GP obviously suppressed NF-κB activation in IL-1β-stimulated human OA chondrocytes. Taken together, the results demonstrated that GP has chondro-protective effects, at least in part, through inhibiting the activation of NF-κB signaling pathway in human OA chondrocytes. Thus, these findings suggest that GP may be considered as an alternative therapeutic agent for the management of OA patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Human chondrocytes respond discordantly to the protein encoded by the osteoarthritis susceptibility gene GDF5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhushika Ratnayake

    Full Text Available A genetic deficit mediated by SNP rs143383 that leads to reduced expression of GDF5 is strongly associated with large-joint osteoarthritis. We speculated that this deficit could be attenuated by the application of exogenous GDF5 protein and as a first step we have assessed what effect such application has on primary osteoarthritis chondrocyte gene expression. Chondrocytes harvested from cartilage of osteoarthritic patients who had undergone joint replacement were cultured with wildtype recombinant mouse and human GDF5 protein. We also studied variants of GDF5, one that has a higher affinity for the receptor BMPR-IA and one that is insensitive to the GDF5 antagonist noggin. As a positive control, chondrocytes were treated with TGF-β1. Chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer and micromass and the expression of genes coding for catabolic and anabolic proteins of cartilage were measured by quantitative PCR. The expression of the GDF5 receptor genes and the presence of their protein products was confirmed and the ability of GDF5 signal to translocate to the nucleus was demonstrated by the activation of a luciferase reporter construct. The capacity of GDF5 to elicit an intracellular signal in chondrocytes was demonstrated by the phosphorylation of intracellular Smads. Chondrocytes cultured with TGF-β1 demonstrated a consistent down regulation of MMP1, MMP13 and a consistent upregulation of TIMP1 and COL2A1 with both culture techniques. In contrast, chondrocytes cultured with wildtype GDF5, or its variants, did not show any consistent response, irrespective of the culture technique used. Our results show that osteoarthritis chondrocytes do not respond in a predictable manner to culture with exogenous GDF5. This may be a cause or a consequence of the osteoarthritis disease process and will need to be surmounted if treatment with exogenous GDF5 is to be advanced as a potential means to overcome the genetic deficit conferring osteoarthritis

  9. Efficiency of Human Epiphyseal Chondrocytes with Differential Replication Numbers for Cellular Therapy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiyo Nasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell-based therapy for cartilage or bone requires a large number of cells; serial passages of chondrocytes are, therefore, needed. However, fates of expanded chondrocytes from extra fingers remain unclarified. The chondrocytes from human epiphyses morphologically changed from small polygonal cells to bipolar elongated spindle cells and to large polygonal cells with degeneration at early passages. Gene of type II collagen was expressed in the cells only at a primary culture (Passage 0 and Passage 1 (P1 cells. The nodules by implantation of P0 to P8 cells were composed of cartilage and perichondrium. The cartilage consisted of chondrocytes with round nuclei and type II collagen-positive matrix, and the perichondrium consisted of spindle cells with type I collage-positive matrix. The cartilage and perichondrium developed to bone with marrow cavity through enchondral ossification. Chondrogenesis and osteogenesis by epiphyseal chondrocytes depended on replication number in culture. It is noteworthy to take population doubling level in correlation with pharmaceutical efficacy into consideration when we use chondrocytes for cell-based therapies.

  10. Hyaline cartilage tissue is formed through the co-culture of passaged human chondrocytes and primary bovine chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Drew W; Ahmed, Nazish; Hayes, Anthony J; Ferguson, Peter; Gross, Allan E; Caterson, Bruce; Kandel, Rita A

    2012-08-01

    To circumvent the problem of a sufficient number of cells for cartilage engineering, the authors previously developed a two-stage culture system to redifferentiate monolayer culture-expanded dedifferentiated human articular chondrocytes by co-culture with primary bovine chondrocytes (bP0). The aim of this study was to analyze the composition of the cartilage tissue formed in stage 1 and compare it with bP0 grown alone to determine the optimal length of the co-culture stage of the system. Biochemical data show that extracellular matrix accumulation was evident after 2 weeks of co-culture, which was 1 week behind the bP0 control culture. By 3 to 4 weeks, the amounts of accumulated proteoglycans and collagens were comparable. Expression of chondrogenic genes, Sox 9, aggrecan, and collagen type II, was also at similar levels by week 3 of culture. Immunohistochemical staining of both co-culture and control tissues showed accumulation of type II collagen, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and chondroitin sulfate in appropriate zonal distributions. These data indicate that co-cultured cells form cartilaginous tissue that starts to resemble that formed by bP0 after 3 weeks, suggesting that the optimal time to terminate the co-culture stage, isolate the now redifferentiated cells, and start stage 2 is just after 3 weeks.

  11. Adiponectin and leptin induce VCAM-1 expression in human and murine chondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Conde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the most common rheumatic diseases, are characterized by irreversible degeneration of the joint tissues. There are several factors involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases including pro-inflammatory cytokines, adipokines and adhesion molecules. OBJECTIVE: Up to now, the relationship between adipokines and adhesion molecules at cartilage level was not explored. Thus, the aim of this article was to study the effect of leptin and adiponectin on the expression of VCAM-1 in human and murine chondrocytes. For completeness, intracellular signal transduction pathway was also explored. METHODS: VCAM-1 expression was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis upon treatment with leptin, adiponectin and other pertinent reagents in cultured human primary chondrocytes. Signal transduction pathways have been explored by using specific pharmacological inhibitors in the adipokine-stimulated human primary chondrocytes and ATDC5 murine chondrocyte cell line. RESULTS: Herein, we demonstrate, for the first time, that leptin and adiponectin increase VCAM-1 expression in human and murine chondrocytes. In addition, both adipokines have additive effect with IL-1β. Finally, we demonstrate that several kinases, including JAK2, PI3K and AMPK are at a play in the intracellular signalling of VCAM-1 induction. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our results suggest that leptin and adiponectin could perpetuate cartilage-degrading processes by inducing also factors responsible of leukocyte and monocyte infiltration at inflamed joints.

  12. Toxicity of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide on human chondrocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhner, Eric; Seeger, Joern B; Hoff, Paula; Dähn-Wollenberg, Stephanie; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-07-07

    The treatment of acute joint infections has an important impact on long-term outcome and remains an unsolved problem. The most frequent bacteria are staphylococci, streptococci, and gram-negative bacteria. In septic surgery, polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide are the most frequently used local antiseptics. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that antiseptics induce cell death of human chondrocytes after a short incubation time.Human chondrocytes were treated with different concentrations of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide. Toxicity analysis was determined by visualization of cell structure using light microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release, and determination of living and total cell numbers after addition of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide. Light microscopic data revealed a defect cell structure after addition of both antiseptics. Lactate dehydrogenase activity showed a significant increase of enzyme expression after a short incubation with polyhexanide. The determination of vital chondrocytes showed a significant decrease of vital and total cell numbers after addition with polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide.Both antiseptic solutions induce significant cell death of human chondrocytes after a short incubation time. Polyhexanide possibly has more toxic potential than hydrogen peroxide against human chondrocytes after an application >15 minutes. Therefore, both substances should only be applied for a short time (<15 minutes) and the joint irrigated to wash out the antiseptic substance prior to wound closure. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. In vitro and in vivo validation of human and goat chondrocyte labeling by green fluorescent protein lentivirus transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miot, Sylvie; Gianni-Barrera, Roberto; Pelttari, Karoliina; Acharya, Chitrangada; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Juelke, Henriette; Jaquiery, Claude; Candrian, Christian; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2010-02-01

    We investigated whether human articular chondrocytes can be labeled efficiently and for long-term with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) lentivirus and whether the viral transduction would influence cell proliferation and tissue-forming capacity. The method was then applied to track goat articular chondrocytes after autologous implantation in cartilage defects. Expression of GFP in transduced chondrocytes was detected cytofluorimetrically and immunohistochemically. Chondrogenic capacity of chondrocytes was assessed by Safranin-O staining, immunostaining for type II collagen, and glycosaminoglycan content. Human articular chondrocytes were efficiently transduced with GFP lentivirus (73.4 +/- 0.5% at passage 1) and maintained the expression of GFP up to 22 weeks of in vitro culture after transduction. Upon implantation in nude mice, 12 weeks after transduction, the percentage of labeled cells (73.6 +/- 3.3%) was similar to the initial one. Importantly, viral transduction of chondrocytes did not affect the cell proliferation rate, chondrogenic differentiation, or tissue-forming capacity, either in vitro or in vivo. Goat articular chondrocytes were also efficiently transduced with GFP lentivirus (78.3 +/- 3.2%) and maintained the expression of GFP in the reparative tissue after orthotopic implantation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of efficient and relatively long-term labeling of human chondrocytes for co-culture on integration studies, and indicates the potential of this stable labeling technique for tracking animal chondrocytes for in cartilage repair studies.

  14. Single Cell Confocal Raman Spectroscopy of Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A great deal of effort has been focused on exploring the underlying molecular mechanism of osteoarthritis (OA especially at the cellular level. We report a confocal Raman spectroscopic investigation on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. The objective of this investigation is to identify molecular features and the stage of OA based on the spectral signatures corresponding to bio-molecular changes at the cellular level in chondrocytes. In this study, we isolated chondrocytes from human osteoarthritic cartilage and acquired Raman spectra from single cells. Major spectral differences between the cells obtained from different International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS grades of osteoarthritic cartilage were identified. During progression of OA, a decrease in protein content and an increase in cell death were observed from the vibrational spectra. Principal component analysis and subsequent cross-validation was able to associate osteoarthritic chondrocytes to ICRS Grade I, II and III with specificity 100.0%, 98.1%, and 90.7% respectively, while, sensitivity was 98.6%, 82.8%, and 97.5% respectively. The overall predictive efficiency was 92.2%. Our pilot study encourages further use of Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive and label free technique for revealing molecular features associated with osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

  15. Synoviocyte Derived-Extracellular Matrix Enhances Human Articular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Maintains Re-Differentiation Capacity at Both Low and Atmospheric Oxygen Tensions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Kean

    .Synoviocyte-derived matrix supports enhanced expansion of human chondrocytes such that the chondrocytes are maintained in a state from which they can re-differentiate into a cartilage phenotype after significantly more population doublings. Also, low oxygen tension supports GAG, but not collagen, accumulation. These findings are a step towards the production of a more functional, tissue engineered cartilage.

  16. Hyaluronic acid abrogates nitric oxide-dependent stimulation of collagen degradation in cultured human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surazynski, Arkadiusz; Miltyk, Wojciech; Czarnomysy, Robert; Grabowska, Joanna; Palka, Jerzy

    2009-07-01

    Experimental inflammation induced in cultured chondrocytes by inflammatory cytokine IL-1 beta stimulates collagen degradation by metalloproteinases. We propose that nitric oxide (NO) may represent down stream signaling molecule of IL-1-induced collagen degradation in chondrocytes. It was found that IL-1 beta induced the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 during the 48 h time course of the experiment, especially after 24h incubation, while DETA/NO, donor of NO, stimulated the process at 12h incubation. The mechanism of IL-1-dependent stimulation of NO production was found at the level of iNOS expression and activation of NF-kappaB. We found that hyaluronic acid (HA) counteracted IL-induced degradation of collagen in chondrocytes. Although, HA by itself had no effect on the metaloproteinases activity, when added to IL-1 beta or DETA/NO treated chondrocytes it contributed to the restoration of the MMPs activity to the control level. The mechanism of this phenomenon involves inhibition of NF-kappaB activation. The data suggest that NO may represent a target molecule for protective effect of hyaluronic acid on interleukin-1-induced stimulation of metaloproteinases activity in cultured human chondrocytes.

  17. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N

    2015-08-14

    Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (IHH), Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin like growth factor (IGF) and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC) repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint.

  18. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA. Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ, Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP, Indian hedgehog (IHH, Fibroblast growth factor (FGF, Insulin like growth factor (IGF and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF. This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint.

  19. Mechanotransduction in primary human osteoarthritic chondrocytes is mediated by metabolism of energy, lipids, and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zignego, Donald L; Hilmer, Jonathan K; June, Ronald K

    2015-12-16

    Chondrocytes are the sole cell type found in articular cartilage and are repeatedly subjected to mechanical loading in vivo. We hypothesized that physiological dynamic compression results in changes in energy metabolism to produce proteins for maintenance of the pericellular and extracellular matrices. The objective of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding for the short term (human chondrocytes harvested from femoral heads of osteoarthritic donors. Cell-seeded agarose constructs were randomly assigned to experimental groups, and dynamic compression was applied for 0, 15, or 30min. Following dynamic compression, metabolites were extracted and detected by HPLC-MS. Untargeted analyzes examined changes in global metabolomics profiles and targeted analysis examined the expression of specific metabolites related to central energy metabolism. We identified hundreds of metabolites that were regulated by applied compression, and we report the detection of 16 molecules not found in existing metabolite databases. We observed patient-specific mechanotransduction with aging dependence. Targeted studies found a transient increase in the ratio of NADP+ to NADPH and an initial decrease in the ratio of GDP to GTP, suggesting a flux of energy into the TCA cycle. By characterizing metabolomics profiles of primary chondrocytes in response to applied dynamic compression, this study provides insight into how OA chondrocytes respond to mechanical load. These results are consistent with increases in glycolytic energy utilization by mechanically induced signaling, and add substantial new data to a complex picture of how chondrocytes transduce mechanical loads.

  20. The Knee Joint Loose Body as a Source of Viable Autologous Human Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, J.

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are fragments of cartilage or bone present in the synovial fluid. In the present study we assessed if loose bodies could be used as a source of autologous human chondrocytes for experimental purposes. Histochemical examination of loose bodies and differential enzymatic digestions were undertaken, the isolated cells were cultured in alginate bead microspheres and immunolocalisations were undertaken for chondrogenic markers such as aggrecan, and type II collagen. Isolated loose body cells had high viability (≥90% viable), expressed chondrogenic markers (aggrecan, type II collagen) but no type I collagen. Loose bodies may be a useful source of autologous chondrocytes of high viability. PMID:27349321

  1. Differences in Cartilage-Forming Capacity of Expanded Human Chondrocytes From Ear and Nose and Their Gene Expression Profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellingman, C.A.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Slagt, I.; Koevoet, W.; Poublon, R.M.L.; Nolst-Trenite, G.J.; de Jong, R.J.B.; Jahr, H.; van Osch, G.J.V.M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of culture-expanded human auricular and nasoseptal chondrocytes as cell source for regeneration of stable cartilage and to analyze the differences in gene expression profile of expanded chondrocytes from these specific locations. Auricular chondroc

  2. Chondrogenic differentiation of human articular chondrocytes differs in biodegradable PGA/PLA scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwingmann, Joern; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Südkamp, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is applied clinically to cover and regenerate articular cartilage defects. Two bioresorbable nonwoven scaffolds, polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (90/10 copolymer of L-lactide and glycolide), were seeded with human chondrocytes after in...

  3. Acid ceramidase maintains the chondrogenic phenotype of expanded primary chondrocytes and improves the chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calogera M Simonaro

    Full Text Available Acid ceramidase is required to maintain the metabolic balance of several important bioactive lipids, including ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Here we show that addition of recombinant acid ceramidase (rAC to primary chondrocyte culture media maintained low levels of ceramide and led to elevated sphingosine by 48 hours. Surprisingly, after three weeks of expansion the chondrogenic phenotype of these cells also was markedly improved, as assessed by a combination of histochemical staining (Alcian Blue and Safranin-O, western blotting (e.g., Sox9, aggrecan, collagen 2A1, and/or qPCR. The same effects were evident in rat, equine and human cells, and were observed in monolayer and 3-D cultures. rAC also reduced the number of apoptotic cells in some culture conditions, contributing to overall improved cell quality. In addition to these effects on primary chondrocytes, when rAC was added to freshly harvested rat, equine or feline bone marrow cultures an ~2-fold enrichment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs was observed by one week. rAC also improved the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, as revealed by histochemical and immunostaining. These latter effects were synergistic with TGF-beta1. Based on these results we propose that rAC could be used to improve the outcome of cell-based cartilage repair by maintaining the quality of the expanded cells, and also might be useful in vivo to induce endogenous cartilage repair in combination with other techniques. The results also suggest that short-term changes in sphingolipid metabolism may lead to longer-term effects on the chondrogenic phenotype.

  4. Scaffold-free cartilage tissue engineering with a small population of human nasoseptal chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Loraine L Y; To, William T H; Lee, John M; Waldman, Stephen D

    2017-03-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a promising approach to provide suitable materials for nasal reconstruction; however, it typically requires large numbers of cells. We have previously shown that a small number of chondrocytes cultivated within a continuous flow bioreactor can elicit substantial tissue growth, but translation to human chondrocytes is not trivial. Here, we aimed to demonstrate the application of the bioreactor to generate large-sized tissues from a small population of primary human nasoseptal chondrocytes. Experimental study. Chondrocytes were cultured in the bioreactor using different medium compositions, with varying amounts of serum and with or without growth factors. Resulting engineered tissues were analyzed for physical properties, biochemical composition, tissue microstructure, and protein localization. Bioreactor-cultivated constructs grown with serum and growth factors (basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor beta 2) had greater thickness, as well as DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) contents, compared to low serum and no growth factor controls. These constructs also showed the most intense proteoglycan and collagen II staining. The combination of bioreactor conditions, serum, and growth factors allowed the generation of large, thick scaffold-free human cartilaginous tissues that resembled the native nasoseptal cartilage. There also may be implications for patient selection in future clinical applications of these engineered tissues because their GAG content decreased with donor age. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:E91-E99, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. The human adult cardiomyocyte phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bird, SD; Doevendans, PA; van Rooijen, MA; de la Riviere, AB; Hassink, RJ; Passier, R; Mummery, CL

    2003-01-01

    Aim: Determination of the phenotype of adult human atrial and ventricular myocytes based on gene expression and morphology. Methods: Atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery using a modified isolation procedure. Myocytes were isolated and cultured

  6. Interleukin-1 Acts via the JNK-2 Signaling Pathway to Induce Aggrecan Degradation by Human Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Heba M; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Vincent, Tonia L; Nagase, Hideaki; Troeberg, Linda; Saklatvala, Jeremy

    2015-07-01

    Aggrecan enables articular cartilage to bear load and resist compression. Aggrecan loss occurs early in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis and can be induced by inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). IL-1 induces cleavage of specific aggrecans characteristic of the ADAMTS proteinases. The aim of this study was to identify the intracellular signaling pathways by which IL-1 causes aggrecan degradation by human chondrocytes and to investigate how aggrecanase activity is controlled by chondrocytes. We developed a cell-based assay combining small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced knockdown with aggrecan degradation assays. Human articular chondrocytes were overlaid with bovine aggrecan after transfection with siRNAs against molecules of the IL-1 signaling pathway. After IL-1 stimulation, released aggrecan fragments were detected with AGEG and ARGS neoepitope antibodies. Aggrecanase activity and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) shedding was analyzed by Western blotting. ADAMTS-5 is a major aggrecanase in human chondrocytes, regulating aggrecan degradation in response to IL-1. The tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated 6 (TRAF-6)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK-1)/MKK-4 signaling axis is essential for IL-1-induced aggrecan degradation, while NF-κB is not. Of the 3 MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK), only JNK-2 showed a significant role in aggrecan degradation. Chondrocytes constitutively secreted aggrecanase, which was continuously endocytosed by LRP-1, keeping the extracellular level of aggrecanase low. IL-1 induced aggrecanase activity in the medium in a JNK-2-dependent manner, possibly by reducing aggrecanase endocytosis, because IL-1 caused JNK-2-dependent shedding of LRP-1. The signaling axis TRAF-6/TAK-1/MKK-4/JNK-2 mediates IL-1-induced aggrecanolysis. The level of aggrecanase is controlled by its

  7. Reconstruction of Hyaline Cartilage Deep Layer Properties in 3-Dimensional Cultures of Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Vibudha; Tattikota, Surendra Mohan; T, Avinash Raj; Sriramagiri, Vijaya Rama Rao; Kantipudi, Suma; Pande, Gopal

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) injuries and malformations are commonly noticed because of trauma or age-related degeneration. Many methods have been adopted for replacing or repairing the damaged tissue. Currently available AC repair methods, in several cases, fail to yield good-quality long-lasting results, perhaps because the reconstructed tissue lacks the cellular and matrix properties seen in hyaline cartilage (HC). To reconstruct HC tissue from 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) cultures of AC-derived human chondrocytes that would specifically exhibit the cellular and biochemical properties of the deep layer of HC. Descriptive laboratory study. Two-dimensional cultures of human AC-derived chondrocytes were established in classical medium (CM) and newly defined medium (NDM) and maintained for a period of 6 weeks. These cells were suspended in 2 mm-thick collagen I gels, placed in 24-well culture inserts, and further cultured up to 30 days. Properties of chondrocytes, grown in 2D cultures and the reconstructed 3D cartilage tissue, were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopic techniques, immunohistochemistry, and cartilage-specific gene expression profiling by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and were compared with those of the deep layer of native human AC. Two-dimensional chondrocyte cultures grown in NDM, in comparison with those grown in CM, showed more chondrocyte-specific gene activity and matrix properties. The NDM-grown chondrocytes in 3D cultures also showed better reproduction of deep layer properties of HC, as confirmed by microscopic and gene expression analysis. The method used in this study can yield cartilage tissue up to approximately 1.6 cm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness that satisfies the very low cell density and matrix composition properties present in the deep layer of normal HC. This study presents a novel and reproducible method for long-term culture of AC-derived chondrocytes and reconstruction of cartilage

  8. Regeneration of human-ear-shaped cartilage by co-culturing human microtia chondrocytes with BMSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; He, Aijuan; Yin, Zongqi; Yu, Zheyuan; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Guangdong

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we had addressed the issues of shape control/maintenance of in vitro engineered human-ear-shaped cartilage. Thus, lack of applicable cell source had become a major concern that blocks clinical translation of this technology. Autologous microtia chondrocytes (MCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were both promising chondrogenic cells that did not involve obvious donor site morbidity. However, limited cell availability of MCs and ectopic ossification of chondrogenically induced BMSCs in subcutaneous environment greatly restricted their applications in external ear reconstruction. The current study demonstrated that MCs possessed strong proliferation ability but accompanied with rapid loss of chondrogenic ability during passage, indicating a poor feasibility to engineer the entire ear using expanded MCs. Fortunately, the co-transplantation results of MCs and BMSCs (25% MCs and 75% BMSCs) demonstrated a strong chondroinductive ability of MCs to promote stable ectopic chondrogenesis of BMSCs in subcutaneous environment. Moreover, cell labeling demonstrated that BMSCs could transform into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche provided by co-cultured MCs. Most importantly, a human-ear-shaped cartilaginous tissue with delicate structure and proper elasticity was successfully constructed by seeding the mixed cells (MCs and BMSCs) into the pre-shaped biodegradable ear-scaffold followed by 12 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mouse. These results may provide a promising strategy to construct stable ectopic cartilage with MCs and stem cells (BMSCs) for autologous external ear reconstruction.

  9. Induction of vascular endothelial growth factor by nitric oxide in cultured human articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpaev, K; Litvinov, D; Dubovaya, V; Panasyuk, A; Ivanov, D; Prassolov, V

    2001-06-01

    We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the control of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) gene expression in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Cell treatment with the NO-generating compound nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) caused a significant accumulation of 4.4 kb VEGF mRNA, a major VEGF mRNA isoform expressing in chondrocytes. This is the first demonstration that NO can induce VEGF mRNA expression in chondrocytes. VEGF mRNA level was not affected in cells exposed to dibutyryl cGMP, a non-hydrolyzable analog of cGMP, suggesting that the cGMP system is not involved in NO-dependent transcriptional activation of VEGF gene. The GSNO-stimulated induction of VEGF mRNA was slightly attenuated by MAP protein kinase inhibitors PD98058 and SB203580, but was completely blocked in cells incubated with GSNO in the presence of catalase and superoxide dismutase, enzymes scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), or in the presence of thiol-containing antioxidants, N-acetyl cysteine and reduced glutathione. These results suggest that in articular chondrocytes the GSNO-induced VEGF gene transcriptional activation is dependent on endogenous ROS production and oxidative thiol modifications.

  10. Nanosized fibers' effect on adult human articular chondrocytes behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenhamre, Hanna [Biopolymer Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Thorvaldsson, Anna, E-mail: anna.thorvaldsson@swerea.se [Biopolymer Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Swerea IVF, Mölndal (Sweden); Enochson, Lars [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Walkenström, Pernilla [Swerea IVF, Mölndal (Sweden); Lindahl, Anders [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Brittberg, Mats [Cartilage Research Unit, University of Gothenburg, Department Orthopaedics, Kungsbacka Hospital, Kungsbacka (Sweden); Gatenholm, Paul [Biopolymer Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-04-01

    Tissue engineering with chondrogenic cell based therapies is an expanding field with the intention of treating cartilage defects. It has been suggested that scaffolds used in cartilage tissue engineering influence cellular behavior and thus the long-term clinical outcome. The objective of this study was to assess whether chondrocyte attachment, proliferation and post-expansion re-differentiation could be influenced by the size of the fibers presented to the cells in a scaffold. Polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds with different fiber morphologies were produced, i.e. microfiber (MS) scaffolds as well as nanofiber-coated microfiber scaffold (NMS). Adult human articular chondrocytes were cultured in the scaffolds in vitro up to 28 days, and the resulting constructs were assessed histologically, immunohistochemically, and biochemically. Attachment of cells and serum proteins to the scaffolds was affected by the architecture. The results point toward nano-patterning onto the microfibers influencing proliferation of the chondrocytes, and the overall 3D environment having a greater influence on the re-differentiation. In the efforts of finding the optimal scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering, studies as the current contribute to the knowledge of how to affect and control chondrocytes behavior. - Highlights: ► Chondrocyte behavior in nanofiber-coated microfiber versus microfiber scaffolds ► High porosity (> 90%) and large pore sizes (a few hundred μm) of nanofibrous scaffolds ► Proliferation enhanced by presence of nanofibers ► Differentiation not significantly affected ► Cell attachment improved in presence of both nanofibers and serum.

  11. Identification of a novel population of human cord blood cells with hematopoietic and chondrocytic potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karen E JAY; Anne ROULEAU; T Michael UNDERHILL; Mickie BHATIA

    2004-01-01

    With the exception of mature erythrocytes, cells within the human hematopoietic system are characterized by the cell surface expression of the pan-leukocyte receptor CD45. Here, we identify a novel subset among mononuclear cord blood cells depleted of lineage commitment markers (Lin-) that are devoid of CD45 expression. Surprisingly, functional examination of Lin-CD45- cells also lacking cell surface CD34 revealed they were capable of multipotential hematopoietic progenitor capacity. Co-culture with mouse embryonic limb bud cells demonstrated that Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were capable of contributing to cartilage nodules and differentiating into human chondrocytes. BMP-4, a mesodermal factor known to promote chondrogenesis, significantly augmented Lin-CD45-CD34- differentiation into chondrocytes.Moreover, unlike CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells, Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were unable to proliferate or survive in liquid cultures, whereas single Lin-CD45-CD34- cells were able to chimerize the inner cell mass (ICM) of murine blastocysts and proliferate in this embryonic environment. Our study identifies a novel population of Lin-CD45-CD34-cells capable of commitment into both hematopoietic and chondrocytic lineages, suggesting that human cord blood may provide a more ubiquitous source of tissue with broader developmental potential than previously appreciated.

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity of an ethanolic Caesalpinia sappan extract in human chondrocytes and macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengqian Q; Otero, Miguel; Unger, Frank M; Goldring, Mary B; Phrutivorapongkul, Ampai; Chiari, Catharina; Kolb, Alexander; Viernstein, Helmut; Toegel, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Caesalpinia sappan is a common remedy in Traditional Chinese Medicine and possesses diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory properties. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease with an inflammatory component that drives the degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix. In order to provide a scientific basis for the applicability of Caesalpinia sappan in arthritic diseases, the present study aimed to assess the effects of an ethanolic Caesalpinia sappan extract (CSE) on human chondrocytes and macrophages. Materials and Methods Primary human chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage specimens of OA patients. Primary cells, SW1353 chondrocytes and THP-1 macrophages were serum-starved and pretreated with different concentrations of CSE prior to stimulation with 10 ng/ml of interleukin-1beta (IL-1ß) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Following viability tests, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were evaluated by Griess assay and ELISA, respectively. Using validated real-time PCR assays, mRNA levels of IL-1ß, TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were quantified. SW1353 cells were cotransfected with a COX-2 luciferase reporter plasmid and nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-κB) p50 and p65 expression vectors in the presence or absence of CSE. Results CSE dose-dependently inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1ß and TNF-α in IL-1ß-stimulated chondrocytes and LPS-stimulated THP-1 macrophages. CSE further suppressed the synthesis of NO in primary OA chondrocytes by blocking iNOS mRNA expression. The inhibition of COX-2 transcription was found to be related with the CSE inhibition of the p65/p50-driven transactivation of the COX-2 promoter. Conclusions The present report is first to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of CSE in an in vitro cell model of joint inflammation. CSE can effectively abrogate the IL-1ß-induced over-expression of

  13. Piperine inhibits IL-β induced expression of inflammatory mediators in human osteoarthritis chondrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiaozhou; Chen, Xiaowei; Cheng, Shaowen; Shen, Yue; Peng, Lei; Xu, Hua Zi

    2013-10-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a common remedy in Traditional Chinese Medicine and possesses diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory properties. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease with an inflammatory component that drives the degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to assess the effects of piperine, the active phenolic component in black pepper extract, on human OA chondrocytes. In this study, human OA chondrocytes were pretreated with piperine at 10, 50 or 100μg/ml and subsequently stimulated with IL-1β (5ng/ml) for 24h. Production of PGE2 and NO was evaluated by the Griess reaction and an ELISA. Gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, iNOS and COX-2 was measured by real-time PCR. MMP-3 and MMP-13 proteins in culture medium were determined using cytokine-specific ELISA. Western immunoblotting was used to analyze the iNOS and COX-2 protein production in the culture medium. The regulation of NF-kB activity and the degradation of IkB were explored using luciferase and Western immunoblotting, respectively. We found that piperine inhibited the production of PGE2 and NO induced by IL-1β. Piperine significantly decreased the IL-1β-stimulated gene expression and production of MMP-3, MMP-13, iNOS and COX-2 in human OA chondrocytes. Piperine inhibited the IL-1β-mediated activation of NF-κB by suppressing the degradation of its inhibitory protein IκBα in the cytoplasm. The present report is first to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of piperine in human OA chondrocytes. Piperine can effectively abrogate the IL-1β-induced over-expression of inflammatory mediators; suggesting that piperine may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA.

  14. Investigation of the direct effects of salmon calcitonin on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Christian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcitonin has been demonstrated to have chondroprotective effects under pre-clinical settings. It is debated whether this effect is mediated through subchondral-bone, directly on cartilage or both in combination. We investigated possible direct effects of salmon calcitonin on proteoglycans and collagen-type-II synthesis in osteoarthritic (OA cartilage. Methods Human OA cartilage explants were cultured with salmon calcitonin [100 pM-100 nM]. Direct effects of calcitonin on articular cartilage were evaluated by 1 measurement of proteoglycan synthesis by incorporation of radioactive labeled 35SO4 [5 μCi] 2 quantification of collagen-type-II formation by pro-peptides of collagen type II (PIINP ELISA, 3 QPCR expression of the calcitonin receptor in OA chondrocytes using four individual primer pairs, 4 activation of the cAMP signaling pathway by EIA and, 5 investigations of metabolic activity by AlamarBlue. Results QPCR analysis and subsequent sequencing confirmed expression of the calcitonin receptor in human chondrocytes. All doses of salmon calcitonin significantly elevated cAMP levels (P 35SO4 incorporation, with a 96% maximal induction at 10 nM (P Conclusion Calcitonin treatment increased proteoglycan and collagen synthesis in human OA cartilage. In addition to its well-established effect on subchondral bone, calcitonin may prove beneficial to the management of joint diseases through direct effects on chondrocytes.

  15. Are surface antigens suited to verify the redifferentiation potential and culture purity of human chondrocytes in cell-based implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, M; Krüger, J P; Kinne, R W; Kaps, C; Endres, M

    2015-10-01

    Cell expansion in vitro is a prequisite to obtain a sufficient quantity of cells for cell-based cartilage repair of articular cartilage lesions. During this process verification of redifferentiation potential of highly expanded chondrocytes is required. Furthermore, cellular impurities of chondrocyte cultures have to be excluded. For this purpose, redifferentiation of expanded human chondrocytes in passage 3 or 5 was initiated in bioresorbable polyglycolic acid-fibrin (PGA-fibrin) scaffolds and selected potential markers were analysed during the process of cell expansion and redifferentiation. Chondrocyte expansion was accompanied by a decrease of collagen type II and COMP and an increase of collagen type I expression indicating cell dedifferentiation. Redifferentiation of chondrocytes in PGA-fibrin scaffolds was accompanied by an increase of collagen II/I ratio. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that in contrast to CD44 and CD49e, CD63 and CD166 showed significant changes in the number of positive cells during redifferentiation. CD14 and CD45 are not expressed by chondrocytes and are therefore possible candidates to detect specifically monocytes or haematopoetic cells in chondrocyte cultures. Characterization of surface antigen expression revealed two promising candidates (CD63 and CD166) to describe the process of redifferentiation, while CD14 and CD45 are suitable markers to exclude impurities by monocytes or haematopoetic cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Contribute to Chondrogenesis in Coculture with Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingfu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs have been shown as the most potential stem cell source for articular cartilage repair. In this study, we aimed to develop a method for long-term coculture of human articular chondrocytes (hACs and hUCB-MSCs at low density in vitro to determine if the low density of hACs could enhance the hUCB-MSC chondrogenic differentiation as well as to determine the optimal ratio of the two cell types. Also, we compared the difference between direct coculture and indirect coculture at low density. Monolayer cultures of hUCB-MSCs and hACs were investigated at different ratios, at direct cell-cell contact groups for 21 days. Compared to direct coculture, hUCB-MSCs and hACs indirect contact culture significantly increased type II collagen (COL2 and decreased type I collagen (COL1 protein expression levels. SRY-box 9 (SOX9 mRNA levels and protein expression were highest in indirect coculture. Overall, these results indicate that low density direct coculture induces fibrocartilage. However, indirect coculture in conditioned chondrocyte cell culture medium can increase expression of chondrogenic markers and induce hUCB-MSCs differentiation into mature chondrocytes. This work demonstrates that it is possible to promote chondrogenesis of hUCB-MSCs in combination with hACs, further supporting the concept of novel coculture strategies for tissue engineering.

  17. Adeno-Associated Vector mediated gene transfer of Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 to normal and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes stimulates cartilage anabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich-Vinther M.

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate whether cartilage anabolism in human primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes could be improved by adeno-associated virus (AAV vector-mediated gene transduction of transforming growth factor TGF-beta1 (TGF-beta1. A bi-cistronic AAV-TGF-beta1-IRES-eGFP (AAV-TGF-beta1 vector was generated and used for transduction of a normal human articular chondrocyte cell line (tsT/AC62 and primary human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes harvested from 8 patients receiving total knee joint arthroplasty. Transduction efficiency was detected by fluorescent microscopy for gene expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. TGF-beta1 synthesis was determined by ELISA. To assess the influence of TGF-beta1 gene therapy on chondrocyte cartilage metabolism, mRNA expressions of type II collagen, aggrecan, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3 were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. AAV-TGF-beta1 transduction resulted in increased synthesis of TGF-beta1 in both osteoarthritic chondrocytes and the normal articular chondrocyte cell line. The expression levels of the transduced genes were correlated to "multiplicity of infection" (MOI and post-infectious time. In both osteoarthritic chondrocytes and the normal articular chondrocyte cell line, AAV-TGF-beta1 treatment increased mRNA expression of both type II collagen and aggrecan, but decreased MMP-3 mRNA expression. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes and the normal articular chondrocyte cell line could be transduced with equal efficiencies. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that AAV-TGF-beta1 gene transfer stimulates cartilage anabolism and decreases expression of enzymes responsible for cartilage degradation in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. The results indicate that the AAV vector is an efficient mediator of growth factors to human articular chondrocytes, and that it might be useful in future chondrocyte gene therapy.

  18. TGFβ affects collagen cross-linking independent of chondrocyte phenotype but strongly depending on physical environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Koevoet, W.; Bart, A.C.W. de; Zuurmond, A.-M.; Bank, R.A.; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Groot, J. de; Osch, G.J.V.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) is often used in cartilage tissue engineering to increase matrix formation by cells with various phenotypes. However, adverse effects of TGFβ, such as extensive cross-linking in cultured fibroblasts, have also been reported. Our goal was to study effects of

  19. Interstitial Perfusion Culture with Specific Soluble Factors Inhibits Type I Collagen Production from Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes in Clinical-Grade Collagen Sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talò, Giuseppe; Lovati, Arianna B.; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Riboldi, Stefania A.; Moretti, Matteo; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor healing ability and cartilage injuries often evolve to osteoarthritis. Cell-based strategies aiming to engineer cartilaginous tissue through the combination of biocompatible scaffolds and articular chondrocytes represent an alternative to standard surgical techniques. In this context, perfusion bioreactors have been introduced to enhance cellular access to oxygen and nutrients, hence overcoming the limitations of static culture and improving matrix deposition. Here, we combined an optimized cocktail of soluble factors, the BIT (BMP-2, Insulin, Thyroxin), and clinical-grade collagen sponges with a bidirectional perfusion bioreactor, namely the oscillating perfusion bioreactor (OPB), to engineer in vitro articular cartilage by human articular chondrocytes (HACs) obtained from osteoarthritic patients. After amplification, HACs were seeded and cultivated in collagen sponges either in static or dynamic conditions. Chondrocyte phenotype and the nature of the matrix synthesized by HACs were assessed using western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Finally, the stability of the cartilaginous tissue produced by HACs was evaluated in vivo by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our results showed that perfusion improved the distribution and quality of cartilaginous matrix deposited within the sponges, compared to static conditions. Specifically, dynamic culture in the OPB, in combination with the BIT cocktail, resulted in the homogeneous production of extracellular matrix rich in type II collagen. Remarkably, the production of type I collagen, a marker of fibrous tissues, was also inhibited, indicating that the association of the OPB with the BIT cocktail limits fibrocartilage formation, favoring the reconstruction of hyaline cartilage. PMID:27584727

  20. Na+, K+-ATPase Subunit Composition in a Human Chondrocyte Cell Line; Evidence for the Presence of α1, α3, β1, β2 and β3 Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mobasheri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Membrane transport systems participate in fundamental activities such as cell cycle control, proliferation, survival, volume regulation, pH maintenance and regulation of extracellular matrix synthesis. Multiple isoforms of Na+, K+-ATPase are expressed in primary chondrocytes. Some of these isoforms have previously been reported to be expressed exclusively in electrically excitable cells (i.e., cardiomyocytes and neurons. Studying the distribution of Na+, K+-ATPase isoforms in chondrocytes makes it possible to document the diversity of isozyme pairing and to clarify issues concerning Na+, K+-ATPase isoform abundance and the physiological relevance of their expression. In this study, we investigated the expression of Na+, K+-ATPase in a human chondrocyte cell line (C-20/A4 using a combination of immunological and biochemical techniques. A panel of well-characterized antibodies revealed abundant expression of the α1, β1 and β2 isoforms. Western blot analysis of plasma membranes confirmed the above findings. Na+, K+-ATPase consists of multiple isozyme variants that endow chondrocytes with additional homeostatic control capabilities. In terms of Na+, K+-ATPase expression, the C-20/A4 cell line is phenotypically similar to primary and in situ chondrocytes. However, unlike freshly isolated chondrocytes, C-20/A4 cells are an easily accessible and convenient in vitro model for the study of Na+, K+-ATPase expression and regulation in chondrocytes.

  1. The effect of oxygen tension on human articular chondrocyte matrix synthesis: integration of experimental and computational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Oreffo, R O C; Sengers, B G; Tare, R S

    2014-09-01

    Significant oxygen gradients occur within tissue engineered cartilaginous constructs. Although oxygen tension is an important limiting parameter in the development of new cartilage matrix, its precise role in matrix formation by chondrocytes remains controversial, primarily due to discrepancies in the experimental setup applied in different studies. In this study, the specific effects of oxygen tension on the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix by human articular chondrocytes were studied using a combined experimental-computational approach in a "scaffold-free" 3D pellet culture model. Key parameters including cellular oxygen uptake rate were determined experimentally and used in conjunction with a mathematical model to estimate oxygen tension profiles in 21-day cartilaginous pellets. A threshold oxygen tension (pO2 ≈ 8% atmospheric pressure) for human articular chondrocytes was estimated from these inferred oxygen profiles and histological analysis of pellet sections. Human articular chondrocytes that experienced oxygen tension below this threshold demonstrated enhanced proteoglycan deposition. Conversely, oxygen tension higher than the threshold favored collagen synthesis. This study has demonstrated a close relationship between oxygen tension and matrix synthesis by human articular chondrocytes in a "scaffold-free" 3D pellet culture model, providing valuable insight into the understanding and optimization of cartilage bioengineering approaches.

  2. Millicurrent stimulation of human articular chondrocytes cultivated in a collagen type-I gel and of human osteochondral explants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silny Jiri

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we investigate the effect of millicurrent treatment on human chondrocytes cultivated in a collagen gel matrix and on human osteochondral explants. Methods Human chondrocytes from osteoarthritic knee joints were enzymatically released and transferred into a collagen type-I gel. Osteochondral explants and cell-seeded gel samples were cultivated in-vitro for three weeks. Samples of the verum groups were stimulated every two days by millicurrent treatment (3 mA, sinusoidal signal of 312 Hz amplitude modulated by two super-imposed signals of 0.28 Hz, while control samples remained unaffected. After recovery, collagen type-I, type-II, aggrecan, interleukin-1β, IL-6, TNFα and MMP13 were examined by immunohistochemistry and by real time PCR. Results With regard to the immunostainings 3 D gel samples and osteochondral explants did not show any differences between treatment and control group. The expression of all investigated genes of the 3 D gel samples was elevated following millicurrent treatment. While osteochondral explant gene expression of col-I, col-II and Il-1β was nearly unaffected, aggrecan gene expression was elevated. Following millicurrent treatment, IL-6, TNFα, and MMP13 gene expression decreased. In general, the standard deviations of the gene expression data were high, resulting in rarely significant results. Conclusions We conclude that millicurrent stimulation of human osteoarthritic chondrocytes cultivated in a 3 D collagen gel and of osteochondral explants directly influences cell metabolism.

  3. Mechanical Forces Induce Changes in VEGF and VEGFR-1/sFlt-1 Expression in Human Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Beckmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the pro-angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF stimulates angiogenesis and correlates with the progression of osteoarthritis. Mechanical joint loading seems to contribute to this cartilage pathology. Cyclic equibiaxial strains of 1% to 16% for 12 h, respectively, induced expression of VEGF in human chondrocytes dose- and frequency-dependently. Stretch-mediated VEGF induction was more prominent in the human chondrocyte cell line C-28/I2 than in primary articular chondrocytes. Twelve hours of 8% stretch induced VEGF expression to 175% of unstrained controls for at least 24 h post stretching, in promoter reporter and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA studies. High affinity soluble VEGF-receptor, sVEGFR-1/sFlt-1 was less stretch-inducible than its ligand, VEGF-A, in these cells. ELISA assays demonstrated, for the first time, a stretch-mediated suppression of sVEGFR-1 secretion 24 h after stretching. Overall, strained chondrocytes activate their VEGF expression, but in contrast, strain appears to suppress the secretion of the major VEGF decoy receptor (sVEGFR-1/sFlt-1. The latter may deplete a biologically relevant feedback regulation to inhibit destructive angiogenesis in articular cartilage. Our data suggest that mechanical stretch can induce morphological changes in human chondrocytes in vitro. More importantly, it induces disturbed VEGF signaling, providing a molecular mechanism for a stress-induced increase in angiogenesis in cartilage pathologies.

  4. Human-like collagen/nano-hydroxyapatite scaffolds for the culture of chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Liping; Duan, Zhiguang [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Degradable Biomedical Materials, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Shaanxi R and D Center of Biomaterials and Fermentation Engineering, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Degradable Biomedical Materials, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Shaanxi R and D Center of Biomaterials and Fermentation Engineering, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Mi, Yu; Hui, Junfeng [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Degradable Biomedical Materials, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Shaanxi R and D Center of Biomaterials and Fermentation Engineering, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Chang, Le [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China)

    2013-03-01

    Three dimensional (3D) biodegradable porous scaffolds play a key role in cartilage tissue repair. Freeze-drying and cross-linking techniques were used to fabricate a 3D composite scaffold that combined the excellent biological characteristics of human-like collagen (HLC) and the outstanding mechanical properties of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA). The scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and compression tests, using Relive Registered-Sign Artificial Bone (RAB) scaffolds as a control. HLC/nHA scaffolds displayed homogeneous interconnected macroporous structure and could withstand a compression stress of 2.67 {+-} 0.37 MPa, which was higher than that of the control group. Rabbit chondrocytes were seeded on the composite porous scaffolds and cultured for 21 days. Cell/scaffold constructs were examined using SEM, histological procedures, and biochemical assays for cell proliferation and the production of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The results indicated that HLC/nHA porous scaffolds were capable of encouraging cell adhesion, homogeneous distribution and abundant GAG synthesis, and maintaining natural chondrocyte morphology compared to RAB scaffolds. In conclusion, the presented data warrants the further exploration of HLC/nHA scaffolds as a potential biomimetic platform for chondrocytes in cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human-like collagen was first used to prepare cartilage tissue engineering scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genipin, a natural biological cross-linking agent, was introduced to treat scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We chose market product as a control.

  5. The cytotoxicity of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine on human chondrocytes and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breu, Anita; Rosenmeier, Katharina; Kujat, Richard; Angele, Peter; Zink, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Intraarticular injections of local anesthetics are frequently used as part of multimodal pain regimens. However, recent data suggest that local anesthetics affect chondrocyte viability. In this study, we assessed the chondrotoxic effects of mepivacaine, ropivacaine, and bupivacaine. We hypothesized that specific cytotoxic potencies directly correlate with analgesic potencies, and that cytotoxic effects in intact cartilage are different than in osteoarthritic tissue. Human articular chondrocytes were exposed to equal and equipotent concentrations of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine for 1 hour. Cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis were determined at predefined time points using flow cytometry, live-dead staining, and caspase detection. Intact and osteoarthritic human cartilage explants were treated with equipotent concentrations of named drugs to determine cell viability applying fluorescence microscopy. Chondrotoxic effects increased from ropivacaine to mepivacaine to bupivacaine in a time-dependent and concentration-dependent manner. Compared with control, bupivacaine 0.5% decreased chondrocyte viability to 78% ± 9% (P = 0.0183) 1 hour and 16% ± 10% (P mepivacaine 2%, viable cells were scored 36% ± 6% (P mepivacaine exposure (P = 0.0059). Exposure to concentrations up to 0.25% of bupivacaine, 0.5% of ropivacaine, and 0.5% of mepivacaine did not reveal significant chondrotoxicity in flow cytometry. However, chondrotoxicity did not correlate with potency of local anesthetics. Immediate cell death was mainly due to necrosis followed by apoptosis. Cellular death rates were clearly higher in osteoarthritic compared with intact cartilage after bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and ropivacaine treatment in a decreasing order. Bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine are chondrotoxic in a time-dependent, concentration-dependent, and drug-dependent manner. Chondrotoxic and analgesic potencies do not directly correlate. Cellular death rates were higher in

  6. THE EFFECT OF PIROXICAM ON THE METABOLISM OF ISOLATED HUMAN CHONDROCYTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULSTRA, SK; KUIJER, R; BUURMAN, WA; TERWINDTROUWENHORST, E; GUELEN, PJM; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    1992-01-01

    The effect of piroxicam on the metabolism of healthy and osteoarthrotic (OA) chondrocytes was studied in vitro. The chondrocytes were obtained from five healthy, five moderately OA, and four severely OA hips or knees. The chondrocytes were cultured in a high-density, short-term in vitro model. In th

  7. Fetal Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentiating towards Chondrocytes Acquire a Gene Expression Profile Resembling Human Growth Plate Cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, S.A.; Emons, J.A.M.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Decker, E.; Sticht, C.; van Houwelingen, J.C.; Goeman, J.J.; Kleijburg, C.; Scherjon, S.; Gretz, N.; Wit, J.M.; Rappold, G.; Post, Janine Nicole; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs) differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP). Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether

  8. JNK phosphorylation promotes degeneration of cervical endplate chondrocytes through down-regulation of the expression of ANK in humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hong-guang; SONG Jun-xing; CHENG Jia-feng; ZHANG Ping-Zhi; WANG Hong; LIU Ping; L(U) Kun

    2013-01-01

    Background C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway and ankylosis gene (ANK) play a critical role in endplate chondrocytes degeneration.The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the expression levels of ANK was associated with the activation of JNK.Methods Cartilage endplates of 49 patients were divided into the control group (n=19) and the experimental group (n=30).The patients in the control group were graded 0 and those in the experimental group were graded Ⅰ-Ⅲ according to Miller's classification.Endplate chondrocytes were isolated by enzyme digestion and cultured in vitro.The inverted phase contrast microscope,teluidine blue staining,HE staining,real time RT-PCR,and MTT were used to observe morphological appearances,biological characteristics,and growth curve of endplate chondrocytes from the cartilage endplate of the two groups.Real time RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to analyze the mRNA and protein expression levels of associated factors in the degeneration process in the cultured endplate chondrocytes with or without subjected SP600125.Results The expression levels of type Ⅱ collagen,aggrecan,and ANK in endplate chondrocytes of experimental group were lower than that of control group and phosphorylation level of JNK in the experimental group which was higher than that in the control group.Application of JNK phosphorylation inhibitor to degeneration chondrocytes resulted in a marked decrease in the phosphorylation level of JNK and a significant increase in the expression levels of type Ⅱ collagen,aggrecan,and ANK.Conclusion The degeneration of the human cervical endplate chondrocytes might be promoted by JNK phosphorylation by down-regulating the expression of ANK

  9. CD44 knock-down in bovine and human chondrocytes results in release of bound HYAL2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Daisuke; Danielson, Ben T.; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Knudson, Warren

    2015-01-01

    CD44 shedding occurs in osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Previous work of others has suggested that the hyaluronidase isoform HYAL2 has the capacity to bind to CD44, a binding that may itself induce CD44 cleavage. Experiments were developed to elucidate whether chondrocyte HYAL2: (1) was exposed on the extracellular plasma membrane of chondrocytes, (2) bound to CD44, (3) underwent shedding together with CD44 and lastly, (4) exhibited hyaluronidase activity within a near-neutral pH range. Enhancing CD44 shedding by IL-1β resulted in a proportional increase in HYAL2 released from human and bovine chondrocytes into the medium. CD44 knockdown by siRNA also resulted in increased accumulation of HYAL2 in the media of chondrocytes. By hyaluronan zymography only activity at pH 3.7 was observed and this activity was reduced by pre-treatment of chondrocytes with trypsin. CD44 and HYAL2 were found to co-immunoprecipitate, and to co-localize within intracellular vesicles and at the plasma membrane. Degradation of hyaluronan was visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis. With this approach, hyaluronidase activity could be observed at pH 4.8 under assay conditions in which CD44 and HYAL2 binding remained intact; additionally, weak hyaluronidase activity could be observed at pH 6.8 under these conditions. This study suggests that CD44 and HYAL2 are bound at the surface of chondrocytes. The release of HYAL2 when CD44 is shed could provide a mechanism for weak hyaluronidase activity to occur within the more distant extracellular matrix of cartilage. PMID:25864644

  10. Serum-free media for articular chondrocytes in vitro expansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Xin-xin; Neil A.Duncan; LIN Lin; FU Xin; ZHANG Ji-ying; YU Chang-long

    2013-01-01

    Background In vitro chondrocyte expansion is a major challenge in cell-based therapy for human articular cartilage repair.Classical culture conditions usually use animal serum as a medium supplement,which raises a number of undesirable questions.In the present study,two kinds of defined,serum-free media were developed to expand chondrocytes in monolayer culture for the purpose of cartilage tissue engineering.Methods Bovine chondrocytes were expanded in serum-free media supplemented with fibroblast growth factor-2 and platelet-derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor-2 and insulin-like growth factor.Expansion culture in a conventional 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) medium served as control.Fibronectin coating was used to help cell adhesion in serum-free medium.Next,in vitro three-dimensional pellet culture was used to evaluate the chondrocyte capacity.Cell pellets were expanded in different media to re-express the differentiated phenotype (re-differentiation) and to form cartilaginous tissue.The pellets were assessed by glycosaminoglycans contents,collagen II,collagen I and collagen X immunohistological staining.Results Chondrocytes cultured in serum-free media showed no proliferation difference than cells grown with 10% FBS medium.In addition,chondrocytes expanded in both serum-free media expressed more differentiated phenotypes at the end of monolayer culture,as indicated by higher gene expression ratios of collagen type Ⅱ to collagen type Ⅰ.Pellets derived from chondrocytes cultured in both serum-free media displayed comparable chondrogenic capacities to pellets from cells expanded in 10% FBS medium.Conclusion These findings provide alternative culture approaches for chondrocytes in vitro expansion,which may benefit the clinical use of autologous chondrocytes implantation.

  11. In vitro human chondrocyte culture on plasma-treated poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerathanagorn, Tharinee; Klangjorhor, Jeerawan; Sakulsombat, Morakot; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Janvikul, Wanida

    2015-01-01

    Porous poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) scaffolds were prepared using a salt leaching technique and subsequently surface modified by a low oxygen plasma treatment prior to the use in the in vitro culture of human chondrocytes. Condensation polymerization of glycerol and sebacic acid used at various mole ratios, i.e. 1:1, 1:1.25, and 1:1.5, was initially conducted to prepare PGS prepolymers. Porous elastomeric PGS scaffolds were directly fabricated from the mixtures of each prepolymer and 90% (w/w) NaCl particles and then subjected to the plasma treatment to enhance the surface hydrophilicity of the materials. The properties of both untreated and plasma-treated PGS scaffolds were comparatively evaluated, in terms of surface morphology, surface chemical composition, porosity, and storage modulus using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-computed tomography, and dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively. The responses of chondrocytes cultured on individual PGS scaffolds were assessed, in terms of cell proliferation and ECM production. The results revealed that average pore sizes and porosity of the scaffolds were increased with an increasing sebacic acid concentration used. The storage moduli of the scaffolds were raised after the plasma treatment, possibly due to the further crosslinking of PGS upon treatment. Moreover, the scaffold prepared with a higher sebacic acid content demonstrated a greater capability of promoting cell infiltration, proliferation, and ECM production, especially when it was plasma-treated; the greatest HA, sGAG, uronic acid, and collagen contents were detected in matrix of this scaffold. The H & E and safranin O staining results also strongly supported this finding. The storage modulus of the scaffold was intensified after incubation with the chondrocytes for 21 days, indicating the accretion and retention of matrix ECM on the cell-cultured scaffold.

  12. High seeding density of human chondrocytes in agarose produces tissue-engineered cartilage approaching native mechanical and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigan, Alexander D; Roach, Brendan L; Nims, Robert J; Tan, Andrea R; Albro, Michael B; Stoker, Aaron M; Cook, James L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-06-14

    Animal cells have served as highly controllable model systems for furthering cartilage tissue engineering practices in pursuit of treating osteoarthritis. Although successful strategies for animal cells must ultimately be adapted to human cells to be clinically relevant, human chondrocytes are rarely employed in such studies. In this study, we evaluated the applicability of culture techniques established for juvenile bovine and adult canine chondrocytes to human chondrocytes obtained from fresh or expired osteochondral allografts. Human chondrocytes were expanded and encapsulated in 2% agarose scaffolds measuring ∅3-4mm×2.3mm, with cell seeding densities ranging from 15 to 90×10(6)cells/mL. Subsets of constructs were subjected to transient or sustained TGF-β treatment, or provided channels to enhance nutrient transport. Human cartilaginous constructs physically resembled native human cartilage, and reached compressive Young's moduli of up to ~250kPa (corresponding to the low end of ranges reported for native knee cartilage), dynamic moduli of ~950kPa (0.01Hz), and contained 5.7% wet weight (%/ww) of glycosaminoglycans (≥ native levels) and 1.5%/ww collagen. We found that the initial seeding density had pronounced effects on tissue outcomes, with high cell seeding densities significantly increasing nearly all measured properties. Transient TGF-β treatment was ineffective for adult human cells, and tissue construct properties plateaued or declined beyond 28 days of culture. Finally, nutrient channels improved construct mechanical properties, presumably due to enhanced rates of mass transport. These results demonstrate that our previously established culture system can be successfully translated to human chondrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sesamin inhibits IL-1β-stimulated inflammatory response in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by activating Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Pengyu; Chen, Guanghua; Jiang, Anlong; Wang, Yufu; Song, Chengchao; Zhuang, Jinpeng; Xi, Chunyang; Wang, Guangxi; Ji, Ye; Yan, Jinglong

    2016-12-13

    Sesamin, a bioactive component extracted from sesame, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocytes and investigated the possible mechanism. Results demonstrated that sesamin treatment significantly inhibited PGE2 and NO production induced by IL-1β. Sesamin inhibited MMP1, MMP3, and MMP13 production in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes. Sesamin also inhibited IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα. Meanwhile, sesamin was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. However, Nrf2 siRNA reversed the anti-inflammatory effects of sesamin. In conclusion, our results suggested that sesamin showed anti-inflammatory effects in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes by activating Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  14. Three-dimensional scaffold-free fusion culture: the way to enhance chondrogenesis of in vitro propagated human articular chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lehmann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage regeneration based on isolated and culture-expanded chondrocytes has been studied in various in vitro models, but the quality varies with respect to the morphology and the physiology of the synthesized tissues. The aim of our study was to promote in vitro chondrogenesis of human articular chondrocytes using a novel three-dimensional (3-D cultivation system in combination with the chondrogenic differentiation factors transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-b2 and L-ascorbic acid. Articular chondrocytes isolated from six elderly patients were expanded in monolayer culture. A single-cell suspension of the dedifferentiated chondrocytes was then added to agar-coated dishes without using any scaffold material, in the presence, or absence of TGF-b2 and/or L-ascorbic acid. Three-dimensional cartilage-like constructs, called single spheroids, and microtissues consisting of several spheroids fused together, named as fusions, were formed. Generated tissues were mainly characterized using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. The morphology of the in vitro tissues shared some similarities to native hyaline cartilage in regard to differentiated S100-positive chondrocytes within a cartilaginous matrix, with strong collagen type II expression and increased synthesis of proteoglycans. Finally, our innovative scaffold-free fusion culture technique supported enhanced chondrogenesis of human articular chondrocytes in vitro. These 3-D hyaline cartilage-like microtissues will be useful for in vitro studies of cartilage differentiation and regeneration, enabling optimization of functional tissue engineering and possibly contributing to the development of new approaches to treat traumatic cartilage defects or osteoarthritis.

  15. The synovial microenvironment of osteoarthritic joints alters RNA-seq expression profiles of human primary articular chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewallen, E.A.; Bonin, C.A.; Li, Xin; Smith, J.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Larson, A.N.; Lewallen, D.G.; Cool, S.M.; Westendorf, J.J.; Krych, A.J.; Leontovich, A.A.; Im, Hee-Jeong; Wijnen, van A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling degenerative joint disease that prompts pain and has limited treatment options.To permit early diagnosis and treatment of OA, a high resolution mechanistic understanding of human chondrocytes in normal and diseased states is necessary. In this study, we assessed

  16. Meniscal repair in vivo using human chondrocyte-seeded PLGA mesh scaffold pretreated with platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Hong Suk; Nam, Jinwoo; Lee, Ji-Hye; Kim, Hee Joong; Yoo, Jeong Joon

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) pretreatment on a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) mesh scaffold enhances the healing capacity of the meniscus with human chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds in vivo, even when the seeded number of cells was reduced from 10 million to one million. A flexible PLGA mesh scaffold was pretreated with PRP using a centrifugal technique. One million human articular chondrocytes were seeded onto the scaffold by dynamic oscillation. After 7 days, scaffolds were placed between human meniscal discs and were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice for 6 weeks (n = 16/group). Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated uniform attachment of the chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds 24 h following seeding. Cell attachment analysis revealed a significantly increased number of chondrocytes on PRP-pretreated than non-treated scaffolds (p network at 24 h and day 7 of culture. Of the 16 constructs containing PRP-pretreated scaffolds implanted in mice, six menisci healed completely, nine healed incompletely and one did not heal. Histological results from the 16 control constructs containing non-treated scaffolds revealed that none had healed completely, four healed incompletely and 12 did not heal. The histological outcome between the groups was significantly different (p mesh scaffolds demonstrate increased cell attachment and enhance the healing capacity of meniscus with a reduced number of seeding cells in a meniscal repair mouse model. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Matrine inhibits IL-1β-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinases by suppressing the activation of MAPK and NF-κB in human chondrocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shijin; Xiao, Xungang; Cheng, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1β plays an important role in promoting osteoarthritis (OA) lesions by inducing chondrocytes to secrete matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which degrade the extracellular matrix and facilitate chondrocyte apoptosis. Matrine was shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects. However, the role of matrine in OA is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of matrine on the expression of MMPs in IL-1β-treated human chondrocytes and the underlying mechanism. The cell viability of chondrocytes was detected by MTT assay. The cell apoptosis of chondrocytes was measured by flow cytometric analysis. The protein production of MMPs was determined by ELISA. The protein expression of phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the inhibitor of kappaB alpha (IκBα) was determined by Western blot. Matrine significantly inhibited the IL-1β-induced apoptosis in chondrocytes. It also significantly inhibited the IL-1β-induced release of MMP-3 and MMP-13, and increased the production of TIMP-1. Furthermore, matrine inhibits the phosphorylation of p-38, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and IκBα degradation induced by IL-1β in chondrocytes. Taken together, our results show that matrine inhibits IL-1β-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinases by suppressing the activation of MAPK and NF-κB in human chondrocytes in vitro. Therefore,-matrine may be beneficial in the treatment of OA.

  18. Fluoroquinolone's effect on growth of human chondrocytes and chondrosarcomas. In vitro and in vivo correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Alvarez, J C; Rafferty, P A

    2001-01-01

    Clinical and in vitro studies have demonstrated that fluoroquinolones are toxic to chondrocytes; however, the exact mechanism of fluoroquinolone arthropathy is unknown. We investigated the toxicity of ciprofloxacin on normal cartilage and on cartilaginous tumors. Normal human cartilage, enchondroma......, and chondrosarcoma explants were cultured either alone or with the addition of ciprofloxacin at 1, 10, or 20 mg/L of medium. Samples were collected up to twenty-one days after treatment and were processed for electron microscopy and conventional light microscopy. The specimens were characterized morphologically...... droplets, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and prominent Golgi apparatus; and a proteoglycan layer surrounding the cells. With prolonged ciprofloxacin treatment and with increased doses, there was an increase in dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, the appearance of phagosomes, and disintegrated bundles...

  19. Regulation of MMP-3 expression and secretion by the chemokine eotaxin-1 in human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Pin-Zhir

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by the degradation of articular cartilage, marked by the breakdown of matrix proteins. Studies demonstrated the involvement of chemokines in this process, and some may potentially serve as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets; however, the underlying signal transductions are not well understood. Methods We investigated the effects of the CC chemokine eotaxin-1 (CCL11 on the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression and secretion in the human chondrocyte cell line SW1353 and primary chondrocytes. Results Eotaxin-1 significantly induced MMP-3 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and p38 kinase were able to repress eotaxin-1-induced MMP-3 expression. On the contrary, Rp-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-cAMPs, a competitive cAMP antagonist for cAMP receptors, and H-89, a protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor, markedly enhanced eotaxin-1-induced MMP-3 expression. These results suggest that MMP-3 expression is specifically mediated by the G protein-coupled eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Interestingly, little amount of MMP-3 protein was detected in the cell lysates of eotaxin-1-treated SW1353 cells, and most of MMP-3 protein was in the culture media. Furthermore we found that the eotaxin-1-dependent MMP-3 protein secretion was regulated by phospholipase C (PLC-protein kinase C (PKC cascade and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK/mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathways. These data indicate a specific regulation of MMP-3 secretion also by eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Conclusions Eotaxin-1 not only induces MMP-3 gene expression but also promotes MMP-3 protein secretion through G protein-coupled eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Chemokines, such as eotaxin-1, could be a potential candidate in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis.

  20. The Human Phenotype Ontology in 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sebastian; Vasilevsky, Nicole A.; Engelstad, Mark; Foster, Erin; McMurry, Julie; Aymé, Ségolène; Baynam, Gareth; Bello, Susan M.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Boycott, Kym M.; Brudno, Michael; Buske, Orion J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Cipriani, Valentina; Connell, Laureen E.; Dawkins, Hugh J.S.; DeMare, Laura E.; Devereau, Andrew D.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Firth, Helen V.; Freson, Kathleen; Greene, Daniel; Hamosh, Ada; Helbig, Ingo; Hum, Courtney; Jähn, Johanna A.; James, Roger; Krause, Roland; F. Laulederkind, Stanley J.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Lyon, Gholson J.; Ogishima, Soichi; Olry, Annie; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pontikos, Nikolas; Rath, Ana; Schaefer, Franz; Scott, Richard H.; Segal, Michael; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Sever, Richard; Smith, Cynthia L.; Straub, Volker; Thompson, Rachel; Turner, Catherine; Turro, Ernest; Veltman, Marijcke W.M.; Vulliamy, Tom; Yu, Jing; von Ziegenweidt, Julie; Zankl, Andreas; Züchner, Stephan; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Jacobsen, Julius O.B.; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Mungall, Christopher J.; Haendel, Melissa; Robinson, Peter N.

    2017-01-01

    Deep phenotyping has been defined as the precise and comprehensive analysis of phenotypic abnormalities in which the individual components of the phenotype are observed and described. The three components of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO; www.human-phenotype-ontology.org) project are the phenotype vocabulary, disease-phenotype annotations and the algorithms that operate on these. These components are being used for computational deep phenotyping and precision medicine as well as integration of clinical data into translational research. The HPO is being increasingly adopted as a standard for phenotypic abnormalities by diverse groups such as international rare disease organizations, registries, clinical labs, biomedical resources, and clinical software tools and will thereby contribute toward nascent efforts at global data exchange for identifying disease etiologies. This update article reviews the progress of the HPO project since the debut Nucleic Acids Research database article in 2014, including specific areas of expansion such as common (complex) disease, new algorithms for phenotype driven genomic discovery and diagnostics, integration of cross-species mapping efforts with the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, an improved quality control pipeline, and the addition of patient-friendly terminology. PMID:27899602

  1. THE EFFECT ON PROTEOGLYCAN METABOLISM OF DEOXYNIVALENOL AND SELENIUM IN THE CULTURED HUMAN FETAL CHONDROCYTES IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of deoxynivalenol (DON) and selenium (Se) on the morphology of chondrocytes and the metabolism of cartilage matrix, and the expression of aggrecanase-1, 2 mRNA in monolayer cultured chondrocytes in vitro. Methods To plant human fetal chondrocytes on the BMG, the expression of Aggrecanase-1, 2 mRNA were analyzed by RT-PCR, the immunohistochemistry of NITEGE epitope was quantitativly analyzed by the image collection and analysis system. Results With the increase of the concentration of DON, the damage of cultured chondrocytes was more and more severe; the expression of NITEGE epitope showed an increasing trend and the fluorescent bands of aggrecanase-1, 2 mRNA were more and more obvious. After adding Se, the damage was relieved, and there was a decreasing trend of NITEGE epitope expressed in matrix. Conclusion DON can enhance transcription of aggrecanase gene and increase the expression of NITEGE epitope which eventually lead to the metabolic disorder of cartilage proteoglycan. It suggested that Se can partially alleviate the damage of DON on cartilage, but can not completely prevent the occurrence of these changes.

  2. Echinocystic Acid Inhibits IL-1β-Induced COX-2 and iNOS Expression in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yanlong; Piao, Taikui; Liu, Jianyu

    2016-04-01

    Echinocystic acid (EA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from the fruits of Gleditsia sinensis Lam, displays a range of pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the effect of EA on IL-1β-stimulated osteoarthritis chondrocyte has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of EA on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocyte. Chondrocytes were stimulated with IL-1β in the absence or presence of EA. NO and PGE2 production were measured by Griess reagent and ELISA. The expression of COX-2, iNOS, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were detected by Western blot analysis. The results showed that EA suppressed IL-1β-induced collagenase-3 (MMP-13), NO, and PGE2 production in a dose-dependent manner. IL-1β up-regulated the expression of COX-2 and iNOS, and the increase was inhibited by EA. Furthermore, IL-1β-induced NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation were inhibited by EA. In conclusion, EA effectively attenuated IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in osteoarthritis chondrocyte which suggesting that EA may be a potential agent in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  3. Effects of sesamin on the biosynthesis of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in human articular chondrocytes in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Najarus, Sumet; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Kongtawelert, Prachya

    2014-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that progressively causes a loss of joint functions and the impaired quality of life. The most significant event in OA is a high degree of degradation of articular cartilage accompanied by the loss of chondroitin sulfate-proteoglycans (CS-PGs). Recently, the chondroprotective effects of sesamin, the naturally occurring substance found in sesame seeds, have been proved in a rat model of papain-induced osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that sesamin may be associated with possible promotion of the biosynthesis of CS-PGs in human articular chondrocytes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of sesamin on the major CS-PG biosynthesis in primary human chondrocyte. The effects of sesamin on the gene expression of the PG core and the CS biosynthetic enzymes as well as on the secretion of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in monolayer and pellet culture systems of articular chondrocytes. Sesamin significantly increased the GAGs content both in culture medium and pellet matrix. Real-time-quantitative PCR showed that sesamin promoted the expression of the genes encoding the core protein (ACAN) of the major CS-PG aggrecan and the biosynthetic enzymes (XYLT1, XYLT2, CHSY1 and CHPF) required for the synthesis of CS-GAG side chains. Safranin-O staining of sesamin treated chondrocyte pellet section confirmed the high degree of GAG accumulation. These results were correlated with an increased level of secreted GAGs in the media of cultured articular chondrocytes in both culture systems. Thus, sesamin would provide a potential therapeutic strategy for treating OA patients.

  4. Hydroxytyrosol prevents increase of osteoarthritis markers in human chondrocytes treated with hydrogen peroxide or growth-related oncogene α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Facchini

    Full Text Available Hydroxytyrosol (HT, a phenolic compound mainly derived from olives, has been proposed as a nutraceutical useful in prevention or treatment of degenerative diseases. In the present study we have evaluated the ability of HT to counteract the appearance of osteoarthritis (OA features in human chondrocytes. Pre-treatment of monolayer cultures of chondrocytes with HT was effective in preventing accumulation of reactive oxidant species (ROS, DNA damage and cell death induced by H2O2 exposure, as well as the increase in the mRNA level of pro-inflammatory, matrix-degrading and hypertrophy marker genes, such as iNOS, COX-2, MMP-13, RUNX-2 and VEGF. HT alone slightly enhanced ROS production, but did not enhance cell damage and death or the expression of OA-related genes. Moreover HT was tested in an in vitro model of OA, i.e. three-dimensional micromass cultures of chondrocytes stimulated with growth-related oncogene α (GROα, a chemokine involved in OA pathogenesis and known to promote hypertrophy and terminal differentiation of chondrocytes. In micromass constructs, HT pre-treatment inhibited the increases in caspase activity and the level of the messengers for iNOS, COX-2, MMP-13, RUNX-2 and VEGF elicited by GROα. In addition, HT significantly increased the level of SIRT-1 mRNA in the presence of GROα. In conclusion, the present study shows that HT reduces oxidative stress and damage, exerts pro-survival and anti-apoptotic actions and favourably influences the expression of critical OA-related genes in human chondrocytes treated with stressors promoting OA-like features.

  5. Cell-engineered human elastic chondrocytes regenerate natural scaffold in vitro and neocartilage with neoperichondrium in the human body post-transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Imai, Keisuke; Koga, Mika; Yanaga, Katsu

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a unique method that allows us to culture large volumes of chondrocyte expansion from a small piece of human elastic cartilage. The characteristic features of our culturing method are that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), which promotes proliferation of elastic chondrocytes, is added to a culture medium, and that cell-engineering techniques are adopted in the multilayered culture system that we have developed. We have subsequently discovered that once multilayered chondrocytes are transplanted into a human body, differentiation induction that makes use of surrounding tissue occurs in situ, and a large cartilage block is obtained through cartinogenesis and matrix formation. We have named this method two-stage transplantation. We have clinically applied this transplantation method to the congenital ear defect, microtia, and reported successful ear reconstruction. In our present study, we demonstrated that when FGF2 was added to elastic chondrocytes, the cell count increased and the level of hyaluronic acid, which is a major extracellular matrix (ECM) component, increased. We also demonstrated that these biochemical changes are reflected in the morphology, with the elastic chondrocytes themselves producing a matrix and fibers in vitro to form a natural scaffold. We then demonstrated that inside the natural scaffold thus formed, the cells overlap, connect intercellularly to each other, and reconstruct a cartilage-like three-dimensional structure in vitro. We further demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis and electron microscopic analysis that when the multilayered chondrocytes are subsequently transplanted into a living body (abdominal subcutaneous region) in the two-stage transplantation process, neocartilage and neoperichondrium of elastic cartilage origin are regenerated 6 months after transplantation. Further, evaluation by dynamic mechanical analysis showed the regenerated neocartilage to have the same viscoelasticity as normal auricular

  6. Co-culture of dedifferentiated and primary human chondrocytes obtained from cadaveric donor enhance the histological quality of repair tissue: an in-vivo animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivos-Meza, Anell; Velasquillo Martínez, Cristina; Olivos Díaz, Brenda; Landa-Solís, Carlos; Brittberg, Mats; Pichardo Bahena, Raul; Ortega Sanchez, Carmina; Martínez, Valentin; Alvarez Lara, Enrique; Ibarra-Ponce de León, José Clemente

    2017-06-05

    To compare the quality of the repair tissue in three-dimensional co-culture of human chondrocytes implanted in an in vivo model. Six cadaveric and five live human donors were included. Osteochondral biopsies from the donor knees were harvested for chondrocyte isolation. Fifty percent of cadaveric chondrocytes were expanded until passage-2 (P2) while the remaining cells were cryopreserved in passage-0 (P0). Fresh primary chondrocytes (P0f) obtained from live human donors were co-cultured. Three-dimensional constructs were prepared with a monolayer of passage-2 chondrocytes, collagen membrane (Geistlich Bio-Gide(®)), and pellet of non-co-cultured (P2) or co-cultured chondrocytes (P2 + P0c, P2 + P0f). Constructs were implanted in the subcutaneous tissue of athymic mice and left for 3 months growth. Safranin-O and Alcian blue staining were used to glycosaminoglycan content assessment. Aggrecan and type-II collagen were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. New-formed tissue quality was evaluated with an adaptation of the modified O'Driscoll score. Histological quality of non-co-cultured group was 4.37 (SD ±4.71), while co-cultured groups had a mean score of 8.71 (SD ±3.98) for the fresh primary chondrocytes and 9.57 (SD ±1.27) in the cryopreserved chondrocytes. In immunohistochemistry, Co-culture groups were strongly stained for type-II and aggrecan not seen in the non-co-cultured group. It is possible to isolate viable chondrocytes from cadaveric human donors in samples processed in the first 48-h of dead. There is non-significant difference between the numbers of chondrocytes isolated from live or cadaveric donors. Cryopreservation of cadaveric primary chondrocytes does not alter the capability to form cartilage like tissue. Co-culture of primary and passaged chondrocytes enhances the histological quality of new-formed tissue compared to non-co-cultured cells.

  7. 3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstedt, Kajsa; Mantas, Athanasios; Tournier, Ivan; Martínez Ávila, Héctor; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2015-05-11

    The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y, and Z directions, which enables the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study, a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast cross-linking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the noncytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs.

  8. Mangiferin Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Inflammatory Response by Activating PPAR-γ in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yanlong; Zhou, Li; Wang, Chunlei

    2017-02-01

    Inflammation has been reported to play critical roles in the development of osteoarthritis. In the present study, we investigated whether mangiferin (MFN) had anti-inflammatory effects in IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. The cells were treated with various concentrations of MFN in the presence or absence of IL-1β. The production of MMP-1, MMP-3, PGE2, and NO was measured in this study. The expression of NF-kB and PPAR-γ was detected by western blot analysis. MFN inhibited IL-1β-induced inflammatory mediators PGE2 and NO production. MFN also inhibited IL-1β-induced MMP1 and MMP3 production. IL-1β-induced NF-kB activation was significantly inhibited by MFN. In addition, MFN was found to up-regulate the expression of PPAR-γ in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. PPAR-γ inhibitor GW9662 significantly reversed the anti-inflammatory effects of MFN. These results suggest that MFN inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by activating PPAR-γ.

  9. Cultured articular chondrocytes sheets for partial thickness cartilage defects utilizing temperature-responsive culture dishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kaneshiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of articular cartilage has several functions that are unique to joints. Although a technique for transplanting cultured chondrocytes has already been introduced, it is difficult to collect intact ECM when using enzymes to harvest samples. Temperature-responsive culture dishes have already been clinically applied in the fields of myocardial and corneal transplantation. Earlier studies have shown that a sheet of cultured cells with intact ECM and adhesive factors can be harvested using such culture dishes, which allow the surface properties of the dish to be reversibly altered by changing the temperature. Human chondrocytes were subjected to enzymatic digestion and then were seeded in temperature-responsive culture dishes. A sheet of chondrocytes was harvested by only reducing the temperature after the cultured cells reached confluency. A real-time PCR analysis of the chondrocyte sheets confirmed that type II collagen, aggrecan, and fibronectin were present. These results suggested that, although chondrocytes undergo dedifferentiation in a monolayer culture, multilayer chondrocyte sheets grown in a similar environment to that of three-dimensional culture may be able to maintain a normal phenotype. A histological examination suggested that multilayer chondrocyte sheets could thus prevent the loss of proteoglycans because the area covered by the sheets was well stained by safranin-O. The present experiments suggested that temperature-responsive culture dishes are useful for obtaining cultured chondrocytes, which may then be clinically employed as a substitute for periosteal patches because such sheets can be applied without a scaffold.

  10. In vitro isolation and cultivation of human chondrocytes for osteoarthritis renovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaming; Zhang, Changqing

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the repair effects of chondrocytes that were cultured in vitro on osteoarthritis (OA). Chondrocytes were isolated from fetal rabbits and cultured in Biosilon microcarriers. Sixty rabbits were randomly divided into three groups equally (blank group, model group, treatment group). The rabbit knee OA model was established by inducing papain. Rabbits in the treatment group were injected with the chondrocytes that were cultured in vitro. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and gross morphologic observation were conducted. Expression level of cytokines such as IL-1bβ, IL-6, and TNF-α in cartilage synovial cells was also analyzed by an ELISA assay. The cultured chondrocyte was validated by a positive stain of type II collagen and vimentin by immunofluorescence. Compared to the model group, the articular cartilage of the rabbit knee in the treatment group showed a normal color, smooth surface, and none of malacia and coloboma. HE staining indicated that the articular surface of the treatment group tended to be smooth and flat; the matrix stained tinge and the cartilage destruction and fiber hyperplasia of the synovia were lightened. The expression levels of IL-1bβ, IL-6, and TNF-α also declined in the treatment group. OA symptoms were improved by treating with chondrocytes. In summary, the animal experiment in the present study indicated that chondrocyte injection played an active effect on renovation of OA.

  11. Curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract synergically inhibit inflammatory and catabolic mediator's synthesis by normal bovine and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes in monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comblain, Fanny; Sanchez, Christelle; Lesponne, Isabelle; Balligand, Marc; Serisier, Samuel; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract in normal bovine chondrocytes and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes cultured in monolayer. This study also investigated the synergic or additive effects of these compounds. Enzymatically isolated primary bovine or human chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer until confluence and then incubated for 24 hours or 48 hours in the absence or in the presence of interleukin-1β and with or without curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen or green tea extract, added alone or in combination, at different concentrations. Cell viability was neither affected by these compounds, nor by interleukin 1β. In the absence of interleukin-1β, compounds did not significantly affect bovine chondrocytes metabolism. In human chondrocytes and in the absence of interleukin 1β, curcuminoids extract alone or in combination with hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract significantly inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-3 production. In interleukin-1β-stimulated bovine chondrocytes, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase2, matrix metalloproteinase 3, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motifs 4 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motifs 5 expressions were decreased by curcuminoids extract alone or in combination with hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract. The combination of the three compounds was significantly more efficient to inhibit interleukin-1β stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression than curcuminoids extract alone. In interleukin-1β-stimulated human chondrocytes, nitric oxide, interleukin-6 and matrix metalloproteinase 3 productions were significantly reduced by curcuminoids extract alone or in combination with hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract. These findings indicate that a mixture of curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen and green tea

  12. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy A van Gool

    Full Text Available We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP. Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  13. Upregulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Synthesis and Consequent Collagen II Expression in Leptin-stimulated Human Chondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Fu Chang

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs play positive roles in cartilage development, but they can barely be detected in healthy articular cartilage. However, recent evidence has indicated that BMPs could be detected in osteoarthritic and damaged cartilage and their precise roles have not been well defined. Extremely high amounts of leptin have been reported in obese individuals, which can be associated with osteoarthritis (OA development. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BMPs could be induced in human primary chondrocytes during leptin-stimulated OA development and the underlying mechanism. We found that expression of BMP-2 mRNA, but not BMP-4, BMP-6, or BMP-7 mRNA, could be increased in human primary chondrocytes under leptin stimulation. Moreover, this BMP-2 induction was mediated through transcription factor-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 3 activation via JAK2-ERK1/2-induced Ser727-phosphorylation. Of note, histone deacetylases (HDACs 3 and 4 were both involved in modulating leptin-induced BMP-2 mRNA expression through different pathways: HDAC3, but not HDAC4, associated with STAT3 to form a complex. Our results further demonstrated that the role of BMP-2 induction under leptin stimulation is to increase collagen II expression. The findings in this study provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism of BMP-2 induction in leptin-stimulated chondrocytes and suggest that BMP-2 may play a reparative role in regulating leptin-induced OA development.

  14. Human articular chondrocytes express multiple gap junction proteins: differential expression of connexins in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayan, Maria D; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Martinez-de-Ilarduya, Oskar; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and involves progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate if chondrocytes from human articular cartilage express gap junction proteins called connexins (Cxs). We show that human chondrocytes in tissue express Cx43, Cx45, Cx32, and Cx46. We also find that primary chondrocytes from adults retain the capacity to form functional voltage-dependent gap junctions. Immunohistochemistry experiments in cartilage from OA patients revealed significantly elevated levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in the superficial zone and down through the next approximately 1000 μm of tissue. These zones corresponded with regions damaged in OA that also had high levels of proliferative cell nuclear antigen. An increased number of Cxs may help explain the increased proliferation of cells in clusters that finally lead to tissue homeostasis loss. Conversely, high levels of Cxs in OA cartilage reflect the increased number of adjacent cells in clusters that are able to interact directly by gap junctions as compared with hemichannels on single cells in normal cartilage. Our data provide strong evidence that OA patients have a loss of the usual ordered distribution of Cxs in the damaged zones and that the reductions in Cx43 levels are accompanied by the loss of correct Cx localization in the nondamaged areas. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of Xylosyltransferase I Gene Expression by Interleukin 1β in Human Primary Chondrocyte Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khair, Mostafa; Bourhim, Mustapha; Barré, Lydia; Li, Dong; Netter, Patrick; Magdalou, Jacques; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Xylosyltransferase I (XT-I) is an essential enzyme of proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis pathway catalyzing the initial and rate-limiting step in glycosaminoglycan chain assembly. It plays a critical role in the regulation of PG synthesis in cartilage; however, little is known about underlying mechanism. Here, we provide evidence that, in human primary chondrocytes, IL-1β regulates XT-I gene expression into an early phase of induction and a late phase of down-regulation. Based on promoter deletions, the region up to −850 bp was defined as a major element of XT-I gene displaying both constitutive and IL-1β-regulated promoter activity. Point mutation and signaling analyses revealed that IL-1β-induced promoter activity is achieved through AP-1 response elements and mediated by SAP/JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Transactivation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AP-1 is a potent transactivator of XT-I promoter and that IL-1β-induced activity is mediated through increased recruitment of AP-1 to the promoter. Finally, we show that Sp3 is a repressor of XT-I promoter and bring evidence that the repressive effect of IL-1β during the late phase is mediated through Sp3 recruitment to the promoter. This suggests that modulation of Sp3 in cartilage could prevent IL-1β inhibition of PG synthesis and limit tissue degradation. PMID:23223231

  16. Chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid (500-730 kda) inhibit stromelysin-1 synthesis in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfort, J; Nacher, M; Montell, E; Vila, J; Verges, J; Benito, P

    2005-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) and 500-730 kDa hyaluronic acid (HA) are symptomatic slow-acting drugs for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). In addition, a growing body of evidence suggests a role for CS and this specific HA as modifiers of the course of OA. The therapeutic efficacy of CS and HA lies in their different mechanisms of action. Stromelysin-1 (metalloprotease-3 [MMP-3]) is a cartilage proteolytic enzyme, which induces cartilage destruction and acts as a mediator of the inflammatory response. However, there are few studies evaluating the in vitro effect of CS and HA on MMP-3 synthesis in human chondrocyte cultures from OA patients. Thus, the aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of CS and HA (500-730 kDa) on MMP-3 synthesis induced by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in chondrocytes from patients with hip OA. Chondrocyte cultures were incubated for 48 h with IL-1beta (2.5 ng/ml) in the absence or presence of different HA 500-730 kDa (Hyalgan, Bioibérica Farma, Barcelona, Spain) concentrations, or alternatively, CS (Condro.san, Bioibérica Farma) at concentrations of 10, 50, 100, 150, 200 and 1,000 microg/ml. The results revealed that both CS and HA (500-730 kDa) inhibited MMP-3 synthesis induced by IL-1beta in human OA chondrocytes. Specifically, CS and HA (500-730 kDa) reduced MMP-3 expression levels at all tested concentrations. Therefore, our study provides new data on the mechanism of action of these drugs, which could help to explain their clinical efficacy in OA patients.

  17. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA.

  18. In-vitro interactions of human chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and of mouse macrophages with phospholipid-covered metallic implant materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Willumeit

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipid-coatings on metallic implant surfaces were evaluated in terms of adhesion, proliferation and matrix production of skeletal cells, and of macrophage stimulation. The working hypothesis is that mimicking a model biomembrane by phospholipids on surfaces to which cells adhere, the surface recognition by surrounding cells is altered. In this study, 1 mirror-like polished Ti-6Al-7Nb and 2 porous Ti-6Al-4V specimens were covered with the phospholipids POPE (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and POPC (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-choline, and the interactions of a human articular chondrocytes (HAC, b human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSC, and c mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 were tested in vitro. On POPE-covered polished surfaces adherence of HAC (42% of seeded cells after 2 hrs and metabolic activity (MTT after 3 days were reduced, while on porous surfaces 99% HAC adhered, and metabolic activity was significantly increased, compared to respective native surfaces. On both POPE-covered surfaces the chondrocyte phenotype was present. After 3 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation, cartilage matrix production (measuring chondroitin sulphate per HAC number was significantly increased by about 30% on both POPE-covered metallic surfaces. On both POPC-covered surfaces nearly no adhering and surviving HAC were found. HMSC grown on POPE-covered porous substrates showed osteogenic differentiation by improved osteopontin and collagen I expression in RT-PCR, and osteocalcin fluorescence and bone nodule formation was only detectable on POPE-covered porous surfaces. In contrast to POPC and other phospholipids used as positive controls, POPE did not stimulate the NO production in mouse macrophage cultures. We therefore conclude that a phospholipid coating by POPE shows potential as surface modification for metallic implant materials.

  19. Synergistic Effects of FGF-2 with Insulin or IGF-I on the Proliferation of Human Auricular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsuguharu; Ogasawara, Toru; Kishimoto, Junji; Liu, Guangyao; Asato, Hirotaka; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Uchinuma, Eijyu; Nakamura, Kozo; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2005-10-01

    Chondrocyte preparation with the safety and efficiency is the first step in cartilage regenerative medicine. To prepare a chondrocyte proliferation medium that does not contain fetal bovine serum (FBS) and that provides more than a 1000-fold increase in cell numbers within approximately 1 month, we attempted to use the medium containing 5% human serum (HS), but it exerted no more than twofold increase in 2 weeks. To compensate for the limited proliferation ability in HS, we investigated the combinational effects of 12 factors [i.e., fibroblast growth factor(FGF)-2, insulin-like growth factor(IGF)-I, insulin, bone morphogenetic protein-2, parathyroid hormone, growth hormone, dexamethasone, 1α25-dihydroxy vitamin D3, L-3,3',5'-triodothyronine, interleukine-1 receptor antagonist, 17β-estradiol, and testosterone] on the proliferation of human auricular chondrocytes by analysis of variance in fractional factorial design. As a result, FGF-2, dexamethasone, insulin, and IGF-I possessed promotional effects on proliferation, while the combination of FGF-2 with insulin or IGF-I synergistically enhanced the proliferation. Actually, the chondrocytes increased 7.5-fold in number in 2 weeks in a medium containing 5% HS with 10 ng/ml FGF-2, while the cell number synergistically gained a 10-12-fold increase with 5 μg/ml insulin or 100 ng/ml IGF-I in the same period. The proliferation effects were more enhanced at a concentration of 100 ng/ml for FGF-2, and especially for the combination of 100 ng/ml FGF-2 and 5 μg/ml insulin (approximately 16-fold within 2 weeks). In the long-term culture with repeated passaging, this combination provided more than 10,000-fold within 8 weeks (i.e., passage 4). Thus, we concluded that such a combination of FGF-2 with insulin or IGF-I may be useful for promotion of auricular chondrocyte proliferation in a clinical application for cartilage regeneration.

  20. Co-culture with human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibits inflammatory activity and increases cell proliferation of sodium nitroprusside-stimulated chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jae-Sung; Jung, Yeon-Hwa; Cho, Mi-Young; Yeo, Jee Eun; Choi, Yun-Jin; Kim, Yong Il; Koh, Yong-Gon, E-mail: yonseranglab@daum.net

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Co-culture of hSDMSCs with SNP-stimulated chondrocytes improves anti-inflammation. • Co-culture system produces IGF-1. • Co-culture system suppresses inflammatory genes expression. • Co-culture system improves cell proliferation. • Exogenous IGF-1 inhibits inflammatory activity in SNP-stimulated chondrocytes. - Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) are primarily chronic inflammatory diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to differentiate into cells of the mesodermal lineage, and to regulate immunomodulatory activity. Specifically, MSCs have been shown to secrete insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). The purpose of the present study was to examine the inhibitory effects on inflammatory activity from a co-culture of human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hSDMSCs) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-stimulated chondrocytes. First, chondrocytes were treated with SNP to generate an in vitro model of RA or OA. Next, the co-culture of hSDMSCs with SNP-stimulated chondrocytes reduced inflammatory cytokine secretion, inhibited expression of inflammation activity-related genes, generated IGF-1 secretion, and increased the chondrocyte proliferation rate. To evaluate the effect of IGF-1 on inhibition of inflammation, chondrocytes pre-treated with IGF-1 were treated with SNP, and then the production of inflammatory cytokines was analyzed. Treatment with IGF-1 was shown to significantly reduce inflammatory cytokine secretion in SNP-stimulated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that hSDMSCs offer a new strategy to promote cell-based cartilage regeneration in RA or OA.

  1. The upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase -2 and -9 genes caused by resistin in human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kürşat Oğuz Yaykaşlı

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available  OBJECTIVES: The articular cartilage allows movement by absorbing mechanical loading within a physiological range. However, the accumulation of excessive adipose tissue has catabolic effect on extracellular matrix (ECM components in some diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA. Resistin, inflammatory adipokines is secreted by adipose tissue, and the elevated serum level was reported in obese subjects and patients with RA and OA. Gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9, a subfamily of matrix metalloproteinases are responsible for destruction of collagen and matrix components. In this study, the effect of resistin on gelatinases genes expression was investigated. METHODS: Human chondrocytes was stimulated by resistin at 100 and 250 ng/ml doses for 3h, 6h, 12h, 24h and 48h. 2 µg RNA was subject to reverse transcription after RNA extraction. Gelatinases expressions were analyzed by quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction method. RESULTS: The expression levels of gelatinases were increased at both 100 and 250 ng/mL and peaked at 250 ng/ml dose for 48 hours. CONCLUSIONS: The clarification of etiology for irreversible destruction of ECM has a vital importance to develop new treatment strategies for RA and OA. In conclusion, increased levels of gelatinases expression caused by resistin were founded. The upregulation of gelatinases caused by resistin is might be a new target for obesity associated patients with RA and OA. However, the molecular pathways of this induction should be investigated in other studies. 

  2. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; van Rijen, M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; van Boxtel, A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently,

  3. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, D.B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; Rijen, van M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; Boxtel, van A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently, ho

  4. The chondrocytic journey in endochondral bone growth and skeletal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung Tsang, Kwok; Wa Tsang, Shun; Chan, Danny; Cheah, Kathryn S E

    2014-03-01

    The endochondral bones of the skeleton develop from a cartilage template and grow via a process involving a cascade of chondrocyte differentiation steps culminating in formation of a growth plate and the replacement of cartilage by bone. This process of endochondral ossification, driven by the generation of chondrocytes and their subsequent proliferation, differentiation, and production of extracellular matrix constitute a journey, deviation from which inevitably disrupts bone growth and development, and is the basis of human skeletal dysplasias with a wide range of phenotypic severity, from perinatal lethality to progressively deforming. This highly coordinated journey of chondrocyte specification and fate determination is controlled by a myriad of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. SOX9 is the master transcription factor that, in concert with varying partners along the way, directs the different phases of the journey from mesenchymal condensation, chondrogenesis, differentiation, proliferation, and maturation. Extracellular signals, including bone morphogenetic proteins, wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT), fibroblast growth factor, Indian hedgehog, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide, are all indispensable for growth plate chondrocytes to align and organize into the appropriate columnar architecture and controls their maturation and transition to hypertrophy. Chondrocyte hypertrophy, marked by dramatic volume increase in phases, is controlled by transcription factors SOX9, Runt-related transcription factor, and FOXA2. Hypertrophic chondrocytes mediate the cartilage to bone transition and concomitantly face a live-or-die situation, a subject of much debate. We review recent insights into the coordination of the phases of the chondrocyte journey, and highlight the need for a systems level understanding of the regulatory networks that will facilitate the development of therapeutic approaches for skeletal dysplasia. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals

  5. Piezo1 protein induces the apoptosis of human osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes by activating caspase-12, the signaling marker of ER stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Zhao; Chen, Zhu-Ke; Cui, Zhao-Wei; Zhang, Hai-Ning

    2017-09-01

    The present study was carried out to determine whether the mechanically activated cation channel Piezo1 protein plays a role as a signaling pathway which causes the apoptosis of human chondrocytes. The chondrocytes were isolated, cultured, and then subjected to mechanical stretch force for 0, 2, 12, 24 and 48 h, respectively. The expression levels of Piezo1 and the apoptosis-related protein caspase-12 were assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, as well as the apoptosis-related genes, B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was used to discern dead cells. Piezo1 expression was determined by immunofluorescence. In addition, Piezo1 inhibitor, GsMTx4, was used to block the mechanically activated (MA) cation channel Piezo1, and served as a positive control. The results showed that the osteoarthritis (OA)-derived chondrocytes showed a tendency to undergo late-stage apoptosis under compressive loading. Piezo1 and caspase-12 were significantly upregulated under static compressive stimuli and the expression was related to the rate of apoptosis of the OA-derived chondrocytes during compressive loading. The expression of caspase-12 and late-stage apoptosis of the human OA-derived chondrocytes were repressed by GsMTx4, the specific inhibitor of Piezo1, while the expression of Piezo1 and the induction of the apoptosis of the OA-derived chondrocytes during compressive loading was not totally blocked. Thus, we conclude that Piezo1 plays an important role in the apoptosis of human OA-derived chondrocytes through a caspase-12-dependent pathway. The expression of Piezo1 protein was not totally inhibited by GsMTx4.

  6. Effects of weak, low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (BEMER type) on gene expression of human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Markus; Mayer, Florian; Kafka, Wolf; Schütze, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    In vitro effects of electromagnetic fields appear to be related to the type of electromagnetic field applied. Previously, we showed that human osteoblasts display effects of BEMER type electromagnetic field (BTEMF) on gene regulation. Here, we analyze effects of BTEMF on gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes. Primary mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and the chondrocyte cell line C28I2 were stimulated 5 times at 12-h intervals for 8 min each with BTEMF. RNA from treated and control cells was analyzed for gene expression using the affymetrix chip HG-U133A. A limited number of regulated gene products from both cell types mainly affect cell metabolism and cell matrix structure. There was no increased expression of cancer-related genes. RT-PCR analysis of selected transcripts partly confirmed array data. Results indicate that BTEMF in human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes provide the first indications to understanding therapeutic effects achieved with BTEMF stimulation.

  7. BMP-2, hypoxia, and COL1A1/HtrA1 siRNAs favor neo-cartilage hyaline matrix formation in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollitrault, David; Legendre, Florence; Drougard, Carole; Briand, Mélanie; Benateau, Hervé; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Poulain, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Vivien, Denis; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Baldi, Alfonso; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Demoor, Magali; Galera, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an irreversible pathology that causes a decrease in articular cartilage thickness, leading finally to the complete degradation of the affected joint. The low spontaneous repair capacity of cartilage prevents any restoration of the joint surface, making OA a major public health issue. Here, we developed an innovative combination of treatment conditions to improve the human chondrocyte phenotype before autologous chondrocyte implantation. First, we seeded human dedifferentiated chondrocytes into a collagen sponge as a scaffold, cultured them in hypoxia in the presence of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), BMP-2, and transfected them with small interfering RNAs targeting two markers overexpressed in OA dedifferentiated chondrocytes, that is, type I collagen and/or HtrA1 serine protease. This strategy significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and HtrA1, and led to an improvement in the chondrocyte phenotype index of differentiation. The effectiveness of our in vitro culture process was also demonstrated in the nude mouse model in vivo after subcutaneous implantation. We, thus, provide here a new protocol able to favor human hyaline chondrocyte phenotype in primarily dedifferentiated cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also offers an innovative strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation and opens new opportunities for developing therapeutic targets.

  8. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits interleukin-1β induced matrix metalloproteinase and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase expression in human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, S L; Wilkinson, J M; Crawford, A; Le Maitre, C L; Bunning, R A D

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is involved in the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) leading to cartilage degradation. Cannabinoids are anti-inflammatory and reduce joint damage in animal models of arthritis. This study aimed to determine a mechanism whereby the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) may inhibit cartilage degradation. Effects of WIN-55 were studied on IL-1β stimulated production of MMP-3 and -13 and their inhibitors TIMP-1 and -2 in human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were obtained from articular cartilage of patients undergoing total knee replacement. Chondrocytes were grown in monolayer and 3D alginate bead cultures. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine the gene expression of MMP-3, -13, TIMP-1 and -2 and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) to measure the amount of MMP-3 and MMP-13 protein released into media. Immunocytochemistry was used to investigate the expression of cannabinoid receptors in chondrocyte cultures. Treatment with WIN-55 alone or in combination with IL-1β, decreased or abolished MMP-3, -13, TIMP-1 and -2 gene expression in human chondrocyte monolayer and alginate bead cultures in both a concentration and time dependent manner. WIN-55 treatment alone, and in combination with IL-1β, reduced MMP-3 and -13 protein production by chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated the expression of cannabinoid receptors in chondrocyte cultures. Cannabinoid WIN-55 can reduce both basal and IL-1β stimulated gene and protein expression of MMP-3 and -13. However WIN-55 also decreased basal levels of TIMP-1 and -2 mRNA. These actions of WIN-55 suggest a mechanism by which cannabinoids may act to prevent cartilage breakdown in arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Advances in human B cell phenotypic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise A Kaminski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (Big Biology, necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort.

  10. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H.V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G.C.M.; Brown, D.L.; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.; Helbig, I.; Hurst, J.A.; Jahn, J.; Jackson, L.G.; Kelly, A.M.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Mansour, S.; Martin, C.L.; Moss, C.; Mumford, A.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Park, S.M.; Riggs, E.R.; Scott, R.H.; Sisodiya, S.; Vooren, S. van der; Wapner, R.J.; Wilkie, A.O.; Wright, C.F.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Leeuw, N. de; Vries, B. de; Washingthon, N.L.; Smith, C.L.; Westerfield, M.; Schofield, P.; Ruef, B.J.; Gkoutos, G.V.; Haendel, M.; Smedley, D.; Lewis, S.E.; Robinson, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have d

  11. Study on human chondrocyte culture viability for autologous transplantation in clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Lombello

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The limited regenerative capacity of the cartilage tissuemakes the treatment of chondral lesions difficult. The techniquescurrently available to treat cartilage lesions may relieve symptoms,but do not regenerate the injured tissue. Autologous chondrocytetransplantation uses cell biology and cell culture techniques toregenerate the hyaline cartilage. Methods: In this study, we analyzechondrocyte biopsy collection and culture for autologoustransplantation. Ultrastructural analyses of hyaline cartilage biopsieswere performed 0, 6, 24 and 48 hours after collection. The tissue evenafter 48 hours. Eleven cell culture assays were performed to evaluateisolation, viability, morphology, proliferation and absence ofcontaminants. Results: The cell culture techniques used allowedchondrocyte proliferation. Rates on cell viability were maintained abovethe acceptable patterns (above 90. Control of cell culture laboratoryconditions showed absence of contaminants, assuring safety of theprocess. The chondrocytes obtained presented the morphology typicalof cultured cell monolayers. Conclusion: The results indicate viabilityof chondrocyte culture technique for clinical application in autologoustransplantation.

  12. Interleukin-6 synthesis in human chondrocytes is regulated via the antagonistic actions of prostaglandin (PGE2 and 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14-PGJ2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6, prostaglandin (PGE(2, PGD(2 and its dehydration end product 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14-PGJ(2 (15d-PGJ(2 have been detected in joint synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. PGE(2 directly stimulates IL-6 production in human articular chondrocytes. However, the effects of PGD(2 and 15d-PGJ(2 in the absence or presence of PGE(2 on IL-6 synthesis in human chondrocytes have yet to be determined. It is believed that dysregulated overproduction of IL-6 is responsible for the systemic inflammatory manifestations and abnormal laboratory findings in RA patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the T/C-28a2 chondrocyte cell line as a model system, we report that exogenous PGE(2 and PGD(2/15d-PGJ(2 exert antagonistic effects on IL-6 synthesis in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes. Using a synthesis of sophisticated molecular biology techniques, we determined that PGE(2 stimulates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 synthesis, which is in turn responsible for the activation of the ERK1/2, PI3K/Akt and PKA/CREB pathways that phosphorylate the NF-κB p65 subunit leading to NF-κB activation. Binding of the activated NF-κB p65 subunit to IL-6 promoter induces IL-6 synthesis in human T/C28a2 chondrocytes. PGD(2 or 15d-PGJ(2 concurrently downregulates TLR4 and upregulates caveolin-1, which in turn inhibit the PGE(2-dependent ERK1/2, PI3-K and PKA activation, and ultimately with NF-κB-dependent IL-6 synthesis in chondrocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have delineated the signaling cascade by which PGE(2 and PGD(2/15d-PGJ(2 exert opposing effects on IL-6 synthesis in human chondrocytes. Elucidation of the molecular pathway of IL-6 synthesis and secretion by chondrocytes will provide insights for developing strategies to reduce inflammation and pain in RA patients.

  13. MiR-15a-5p regulates viability and matrix degradation of human osteoarthritis chondrocytes via targeting VEGFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongwei; Tian, Yun

    2017-01-16

    Previous studies demonstrated that miR-15a-5p was probably associated with human hepatocellular carcinoma, while the function of miR-15a-5p in OA (Osteoarthritis) still remains unknown. Here, we uncovered the potential role of miR-15a-5p on OA pathogenesis and confirmed its predicted target VEGFA (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A). Measured by RT-PCR, miR-15a-5p expression increased remarkably while VEGFA expression was significantly decreased in OA chondrocytes compared with normal conditions. According to Luciferase activity assay, miR-15a-5p directly targeted the 3'-UTR of VEGFA to inhibit its expression. Functional analysis including CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry revealed that overexpression of VEGFA or inhibition of miR-15a-5p promoted cell proliferation, suppressed cell apoptosis and reduced matrix degradation in OA chondrocytes. Moreover, rescue assays carried out with both expression of VEGFA and miR-15a-5p demonstrated that miR-15a-5p contributes to cell apoptosis and matrix degradation via inhibiting VEGFA. We further provided evidence that multiple proteins related to matrix synthesis were regulated by miR-15a-5p and VEGFA using Western blot and ELISA assays. Taken together, our findings elucidated an underlying mechanism by which miR-15a-5p regulates viability and matrix degradation of OA and indicated a new target for OA diagnosis and therapy.

  14. Characterization of human primary chondrocytes of osteoarthritic cartilage at varying severity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Jing; YANG Zheng; CAO Yong-ping; GE Zi-gang

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a difficulty in evaluating the in vivo functionality of individual chondrocytes,and there is much heterogeneity among cartilage affected by osteoarthritis (OA).In this study,in vitro cultured chondrocytes harvested from varying stages of degeneration were studied as a projective model to further understand the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.Methods Cartilage of varying degeneration of end-stage OA was harvested,while cell yield and matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content were measured.Cell morphology,proliferation,and gene expression of collagen type Ⅰ,Ⅱ,and Ⅹ,aggrecan,matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13),and ADAMTS5 of the acquired chondrocytes were measured during subsequent in vitro culture.Results Both the number of cells and the GAG content increased with increasing severity of OA.Cell spreading area increased and gradually showed spindle-like morphology during in vitro culture.Gene expression of collagen type Ⅱ,collagen type X as well as GAG decreased with severity of cartilage degeneration,while expression of collagen type Ⅰ increased.Expression of MMP-13 increased with severity of cartilage degeneration,while expression of ADAMTS-5 remained stable.Expression of collagen type Ⅱ,X,GAG,and MMP-13 substantially decreased with in vitro culture.Expression of collagen type Ⅰ increased with in vitro cultures,while expression of ADAMTS 5 remained stable.Conclusions Expression of functional genes such as collagen type Ⅱ and GAG decreased during severe degeneration of OA cartilage and in vitro dedifferentiation.Gene expression of collagen Ⅰ and MMP-13 increased with severity of cartilage degeneration.

  15. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes by inhibiting expression of syndecan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    KONG, YING; WANG, WANCHUN; ZHANG, CHANGJIE; WU, YI; LIU, YANG; ZHOU, XIAORONG

    2016-01-01

    A central feature of osteoarthritis (OA) is the loss of articular cartilage, which is primarily attributed to cartilage breakdown. A group of metalloproteinases termed the A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family are reported to be important in cartilage breakdown. Recent studies have suggested that ADAMTS-4 is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of OA and that syndecan-1 is closely associated with activation of ADAMTS-4 in human chondrocytes. Accumulating evidence also suggests that cannabinoids have chondroprotective effects. The current study explored the effects of synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) on the expression of syndecan-1 and ADAMTS-4, as well as ADAMTS-4 activity, in unstimulated and interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Primary human OA articular chondrocytes were treated with WIN-55 in the presence or absence of IL-1β and cannabinoid receptor antagonists. The results of the present study demonstrated that WIN-55 inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated primary human OA articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) were constitutively expressed in human OA articular chondrocytes. Furthermore, selective CB2 antagonist, JTE907, but not selective CB1 antagonist, MJ15, abolished the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on ADAMTS-4 activity. WIN55 inhibited the expression of syndecan-1 but not ADAMTS-4, and overexpression of syndecan-1 reversed the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on the ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated human OA articular chondrocytes. Despite having no significant effect on syndecan-1 gene promoter activity, WIN-55 markedly decreased the stability of syndecan-1 mRNA via CB2. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first in vitro evidence supporting that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55 inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1

  16. Tenuigenin Prevents IL-1β-induced Inflammation in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes by Suppressing PI3K/AKT/NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlei; Zeng, Lihong; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Jiakun; Wang, Wenbo

    2016-04-01

    Tenuigenin (TEN), the main active component of Polygala tenuifolia, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of TEN on IL-1β-stimulated osteoarthritis chondrocytes have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanism of TEN on IL-1β-stimulated human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Human osteoarthritis chondrocytes were pretreated with or without TEN for 1 h and then stimulated with IL-1β. The production of NO and PGE2 were detected by the Griess reagent and ELISA. The expression of NF-κB and MAPKs (p38, JNK, ERK) were measured by Western blot analysis. The production of MMP-1, MMP3, and MMP13 were measured by ELISA. The results showed that treatment of TEN significantly inhibited IL-1β-induced NO and PGE2 production. TEN also suppressed IL-1β-induced MMP-1, MMP3, and MMP13 expression. Furthermore, TEN was found to inhibit IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation, PI3K, and AKT phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results suggest that TEN inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammation in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes by inhibiting PI3K/AKT/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  17. SERPINE2 Inhibits IL-1α-Induced MMP-13 Expression in Human Chondrocytes: Involvement of ERK/NF-κB/AP-1 Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Santoro

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic joint disease, characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage. During OA, proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin IL-1, induce the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in chondrocytes, contributing thus to the extracellular matrix (ECM degradation. Members of Serpine family, including plasminogen activator inhibitors have been reported to participate in ECM regulation. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of serpin peptidase inhibitor clade E member 2 (SERPINE2, under basal conditions and in response to increasing doses of IL-1α, in human cultured chondrocytes. We also examined the effects of SERPINE2 on IL-1α-induced MMP-13 expression. For completeness, the signaling pathway involved in this process was also explored.SERPINE2 mRNA and protein expression were evaluated by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis in human T/C-28a2 cell line and human primary chondrocytes. These cells were treated with human recombinant SERPINE2, alone or in combination with IL-1α. ERK 1/2, NFκB and AP-1 activation were assessed by western blot analysis.Human cultured chondrocytes express SERPINE2 in basal condition. This expression increased in response to IL-1α stimulation. In addition, recombinant SERPINE2 induced a clear inhibition of MMP-13 expression in IL-1α-stimulated chondrocytes. This inhibitory effect is likely regulated through a pathway involving ERK 1/2, NF-κB and AP-1.Taken together, these data demonstrate that SERPINE2 might prevent cartilage catabolism by inhibiting the expression of MMP-13, one of the most relevant collagenases, involved in cartilage breakdown in OA.

  18. Up-regulation of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23 and occurrence of apoptosis in human chondrocytes isolated from fractured calcaneal osteochondral fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Paola; Manfredini, Giuseppe; Benincasa, Marta; Mariani, Francesco; Smargiassi, Alberto; Catani, Fabio; Palumbo, Carla

    2014-06-01

    To study the expression level of a panel of pro/anti-apoptotic factors and inflammation-related receptors in chondral fragments from patients undergoing surgical treatment for intra-articular calcaneal fractures, cartilage fragments were retrieved from calcaneal fractures of 20 patients subjected to surgical treatment. Primary cultures were performed using chondral fragments from fractured and control patients. Chondrocyte cultures from each patient of the fractured and control groups were subjected to immunofluorescence staining and quantitatively analyzed under confocal microscopy. Proteins extracted from the cultured chondrocytes taken from the fractured and control groups were processed for Western blot experiments and densitometric analysis. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined using the cleaved PARP-1 antibody. The proportion of labelled cells was 35% for fractured specimens, compared with 7% for control samples. Quantification of caspase-3 active and Bcl-2 proteins in chondrocyte cultures showed a significant increase of the apoptotic process in fractured specimens compared with control ones. Fractured chondrocytes were positively stained for ChemR23 with statistically significant differences with respect to control samples. Densitometric evaluation of the immunoreactive bands confirmed these observations. Human articular chondrocytes obtained from patients with intra-articular calcaneal fractures express higher levels of pivotal pro-apoptotic factors, and of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23, compared with control cultures. On the basis of these observations, the authors hypothesize that consistent prolonged chondrocyte death, associated with the persistence of high levels of pro-inflammatory factors, could enhance the deterioration of cartilage tissue with consequent development of post-traumatic arthritis following intra-articular bone fracture.

  19. Expression of caspase-3 and -9 relevant to cartilage destruction and chondrocyte apoptosis in human osteoarthritic cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuo M

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the involvement of the caspase family in the pathway of NO-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, osteoarthritis (OA cartilage obtained from 8 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty were used for histopathological study. Cartilage samples taken from non-fibrillated areas of femoral head resected during surgery for femoral neck fracture were used for comparison. DNA fragmentation of chondrocytes was detected by the nick end-labeling (TUNEL method. Apoptosis was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The distributions of nitrotyrosine (NT, caspase-3, and -9 were examined immunohistochemically. The populations of apoptotic as well as NT-, caspase-3-, and -9-positive cells were quantified by counting the number of cells in the superficial, middle, and deep layers, respectively. The TUNEL-positive cells were observed primarily in superficial proliferating chondrocytes, clustering chondrocytes, and deep-layer chondrocytes of OA cartilage. Few positive cells were seen in the proliferating chondrocytes in the middle layer. Positive reactions for caspase-3 and -9 were observed in chondrocytes in similar areas. Histological OA grade showed significant correlations with the mean populations of apoptotic chondrocytes (% apoptosis over the 3 areas. The populations of NT-positive cells (% NT over the same areas also showed significant correlation with OA grade. Positivity for caspase-3 closely correlated with the OA grade, % apoptosis and %NT. It was concluded that caspase-3 and -9 could play a role in NO-induced chondrocyte apoptosis in OA cartilage.

  20. Short waves-induced enhancement of proliferation of human chondrocytes: involvement of extracellular signal-regulated map-kinase (erk).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue-Long; Chan, Rai-Chi; Cheng, He-Hsiung; Huang, Chun-Jen; Lu, Yih-Chau; Chen, I-Shu; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Chang, Hong-Tai; Huang, Jong-Khing; Chen, Jin-Shyr; Ho, Chin-Man; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2007-07-01

    1. Short-wave diathermy (SWD) is a form of radiofrequency radiation that is used therapeutically by physiotherapists. The cellular mechanisms of SWD are unclear. The present study was performed to explore the effect of different conditions of short-wave exposure on the proliferation of cultured human chondrocytes. 2. Cells exposed to short waves once per day for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in proliferation by 42% compared with the control cells. In cells that were treated with short waves twice per day for seven consecutive days, or only once on Day 1 and then examined for proliferation on Day 7, cell proliferation was greater than the control cells by 40% and 30%, respectively. 3. Given the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in the proliferation of different cell types, efforts were extended to explore the role of three major types of MAPK; that is, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38. 4. It was found that the level of phosphorylated ERK (phospho-ERK 1 and ERK 2) increased significantly within 5-120 min following consecutive exposure to short waves for 7 days. Exposure to short waves failed to alter the intensity of phosphorylated JNK and p38 within 0-240 min. 5. Cells were exposed to short waves once for seven consecutive days in the presence of 0, 10 micromol/L, 20 micromol/L or 50 micromol/L PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor). PD98059 totally inhibited short waves-induced enhancement of proliferation without altering normal control viability. In the presence of short waves and PD98059, the cell viability was lower than the normal control. Together, the data suggest that short waves could increase proliferation in human chondrocytes through activation of the ERK pathway, which is also involved in maintaining normal cell proliferation under physiological conditions.

  1. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease.

  2. Differentiation of synovial CD-105(+) human mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocyte-like cells through spheroid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arufe, M C; De la Fuente, A; Fuentes-Boquete, I; De Toro, Francisco J; Blanco, Francisco J

    2009-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into several cell lineages, some of which can generate bone, cartilage, or adipose tissue. The presence of MSCs in the synovial membrane was recently reported. Data from comparative studies of MSCs derived from various mesenchymal tissues suggest that MSCs from synovial membranes have a superior chondrogenesis capacity. Previous chondrogenic differentiation studies have used the total population of MSCs, including cells with several MSC markers, such as CD44, CD90, CD105, or CD73. However the chondrogenic capacity of an individual population of MSCs has not been examined. Our aim was to study the chondrogenic capacity of the cellular MSC subset, CD105(+), derived from synovial membrane tissues of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and normal donors. The tissues were digested with a cocktail of collagenase/dispase and the isolated MSCs were seeded into plates. The subpopulation of CD105(+)-MSCs was separated using a magnetic separator. The MSCs were then differentiated towards chondrocyte-like cells using a specific medium to promote spheroid formation. Spheroids were collected after 14, 28, and 46 days in chondrogenic medium and stained with hematoxylin, eosin, Safranin O or Alcian blue to evaluate the extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study collagen types I (COLI) and II (COLII) and aggrecan expression. Phenotypic characterization of the isolated CD105(+)-MSCs shows that these cells are also positive for CD90 and CD44, but negatives for CD34 and CD45. In addition, this cellular subset expressed Sox-9. Spheroids appeared after 7 days in culture in the presence of chondrogenic medium. Our studies show no differences between MSCs obtained from OA and normal synovial membranes during chondrogenesis. The morphological analysis of spheroids revealed characteristics typical of chondrocyte cells. The intensity of Safranin O, Alcian blue and aggrecan staining was positive and constant

  3. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Low-Frequency High-Magnitude Mechanical Strain of Articular Chondrocytes Activates p38 MAPK and Induces Phenotypic Changes Associated with Osteoarthritis and Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek H. Rosenzweig

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a debilitating joint disorder resulting from an incompletely understood combination of mechanical, biological, and biochemical processes. OA is often accompanied by inflammation and pain, whereby cytokines associated with chronic OA can up-regulate expression of neurotrophic factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF. Several studies suggest a role for cytokines and NGF in OA pain, however the effects of changing mechanical properties in OA tissue on chondrocyte metabolism remain unclear. Here, we used high-extension silicone rubber membranes to examine if high mechanical strain (HMS of primary articular chondrocytes increases inflammatory gene expression and promotes neurotrophic factor release. HMS cultured chondrocytes displayed up-regulated NGF, TNFα and ADAMTS4 gene expression while decreasing TLR2 expression, as compared to static controls. HMS culture increased p38 MAPK activity compared to static controls. Conditioned medium from HMS dynamic cultures, but not static cultures, induced significant neurite sprouting in PC12 cells. The increased neurite sprouting was accompanied by consistent increases in PC12 cell death. Low-frequency high-magnitude mechanical strain of primary articular chondrocytes in vitro drives factor secretion associated with degenerative joint disease and joint pain. This study provides evidence for a direct link between cellular strain, secretory factors, neo-innervation, and pain in OA pathology.

  5. Implantation of juvenile human chondrocytes demonstrates no adverse effect on spinal nerve tissue in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külling, Fabrice A; Liu, Jane J; Liebenberg, Ellen; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2016-09-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a common disabling condition for millions of individuals. Injection of xenogenic juvenile chondrocytes (XJC) into the disc space has been shown to have a therapeutic potential for disc repair. In the current study, XJC were injected extra-discally on neural structures in an in vivo rat hemilaminectomy model to compare the histological and behavioral effects on XJC and fibrin glue carrier. Twenty-four rats were assigned to four groups: cells plus carrier, carrier alone, sham hemi-laminectomy, and a positive control (nerve root ligation). A right-sided hemilaminectomy was performed and the study material was placed on and around the exposed L4 nerve root and the spinal cord. Pre- and postoperatively mechanical allodynia was tested on the ipsilateral hind paw using the von Frey up-down method. The lumbar spines were harvested after 6 and 12 weeks for nerve histology and TNF-α quantification. After a brief period of hyperalgesia, the von Frey data indicate there are no adverse effects of placing XJC on spinal nerve roots in rats. However ligation of nerve root showed significant allodynia compared to the other groups. These behavioral data were supported by histological analyses. While these results need to be confirmed over a larger period of time, they suggest that XJC transplantation into the disc space shows no adverse effect on nerve tissue.

  6. Lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius inhibits nuclear transcription Factor-kappa B activation, cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 production in stimulated human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Rasheed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is a progressive joint disorder, which remains the leading cause of chronic disability in aged people. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB is a major cellular event in OA and its activation by interleukin-1β (IL-1β plays a critical role in cartilage breakdown in these patients. Objective: In this study, we examined the effect of lactoferrin on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production in stimulated human articular chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Human chondrocytes were derived from OA articular cartilage and treated with camel lactoferrin and then stimulated with IL-1β. Gene expression was determined by TaqMan assays and protein expression was studied by Western immunoblotting. NF-κB activity and PGE2levels were determined by ELISA based assays. NF-κB activity was also determined by treatment of chondrocytes with NF-κB specific inhibitor Bay 11–7082. Results: Lactoferrin inhibited IL-1β-induced activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in human OA chondrocytes. Lactoferrin also inhibited mRNA/protein expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. Moreover, Bay 11–7082 also inhibited IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. The inhibitory effect of lactoferrin on the IL-1β induced expression of COX-2 or production of PGE2was mediated at least in part via suppression of NF-κB activation. Conclusions: Our data determine camel lactoferrin as a novel inhibitor of IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB signaling events and production of cartilage-degrading molecule PGE2via inhibition of COX-2 expressions. These results may have important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the prevention/treatment of OA and other degenerative/inflammatory diseases.

  7. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins in chondrocyte-derived matrices on chondrocyte functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yamada, Tomoe; Chen, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Loss of cartilaginous phenotype during in vitro expansion culture of chondrocytes is a major barrier to the application of chondrocytes for tissue engineering. In previous study, we showed that dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the passage culture was delayed by matrices formed by primary chondrocytes (P0-ECM). In this study, we investigated bovine chondrocyte functions when being cultured on isolated extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-coated substrata and P0-ECM. Low chondrocyte attachment was observed on aggrecan-coated substratum and P0-ECM. Cell proliferation on aggrecan- and type II collagen/aggrecan-coated substrata and P0-ECM was lower than that on the other ECM protein (type I collagen and type II collagen)-coated substrata. When chondrocytes were subcultured on aggrecan-coated substratum, decline of cartilaginous gene expression was delayed, which was similar to the cells subcultured on P0-ECM. These results indicate that aggrecan plays an important role in the regulation of chondrocyte functions and P0-ECM may be a good experimental control for investigating the role of each ECM protein in cartilage ECM.

  8. Effect of freezing on rabbit cultured chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R Filgueiras

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effect of freezing on chondrocytes maintained in culture, aiming the establishment of a cell bank for future application as heterologous implant. Chondrocytes extracted from joint cartilage of nine healthy New Zealand White rabbits were cultivated and frozen with the cryoprotector 5% dimethylsulfoxide for six months. Phenotypic and scanning electron microscopy analyses were carried out to identify morphological and functional differences between fresh and thawed cells. After enzymatic digestion, a total of 4.8x10(5cells per rabbit were obtained. Fresh chondrocytes showed a high mitotic rate and abundant matrix was present up to 60 days of culture. Loss of phenotypic stability was notable in the thawed chondrocytes, with a low labeling of proteoglycans and weak immunostaining of type II collagen. The present study showed important loss of chondrocyte viability under the freezing conditions. For future in vivo studies of heterologous implant, these results suggests that a high number of cells should be implanted in the host site in order to achieve an adequate number of viable cells. Furthermore, the chondrocytes should be implanted after two weeks of culture, when the highest viability rate is found

  9. Effect of hyaluronic acid and polysaccharides from Opuntia ficus indica (L.) cladodes on the metabolism of human chondrocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, A M; Cardile, V; Garufi, F; Puglia, C; Bonina, F; Ronsisvalle, S

    2007-05-04

    Conventional medications in articular disease are often effective for symptom relief, but they can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of the disease. Several natural substances have been shown to be effective as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA), and preliminary evidence suggests that some of these compounds may exert a favourable influence on the course of the disease. In this study, we assay the anti-inflammatory/chondroprotective effect of some lyophilised extracts obtained from Opuntia ficus indica (L.) cladodes and of hyaluronic acid (HA) on the production of key molecules released during chronic inflammatory events such as nitric oxide (NO), glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), prostaglandins (PGE(2)) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human chondrocyte culture, stimulated with proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta). Further the antioxidant effect of these extracts was evaluated in vitro employing the bleaching of the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH test). All the extracts tested in this study showed an interesting profile in active compounds. Particularly some of these extracts were characterized by polyphenolic and polysaccharidic species. In vitro results pointed out that the extracts of Opuntia ficus indica cladodes were able to contrast the harmful effects of IL-1 beta. Our data showed the protective effect of the extracts of Opuntia ficus indica cladodes in cartilage alteration, which appears greater than that elicited by hyaluronic acid (HA) commonly employed as visco-supplementation in the treatment of joint diseases.

  10. Osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes are a potential source of multipotent progenitor cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Hamada, Takashi; Ono, Yohei; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ishizuka, Shinya; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Saho; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-10-21

    The natural healing capacity of damaged articular cartilage is poor, rendering joint surface injuries a prime target for regenerative medicine. While autologous chondrocyte or mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) implantation can be applied to repair cartilage defects in young patients, no appropriate long-lasting treatment alternative is available for elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Multipotent progenitor cells are reported to present in adult human articular cartilage, with a preponderance in OA cartilage. These facts led us to hypothesize the possible use of osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes as a cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. We therefore analyzed chondrocyte- and stem cell-related markers, cell growth rate, and multipotency in OA chondrocytes (OACs) and bone marrow-derived MSCs, along with normal articular chondrocytes (ACs) as a control. OACs demonstrated similar phenotype and proliferation rate to MSCs. Furthermore, OACs exhibited multilineage differentiation ability with a greater chondrogenic differentiation ability than MSCs, which was equivalent to ACs. We conclude that chondrogenic capacity is not significantly affected by OA, and OACs could be a potential source of multipotent progenitor cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential gene expression of human chondrocytes cultured under short-term altered gravity conditions during parabolic flight maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehland, Markus; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Schulz, Herbert; Saar, Katrin; Hübner, Norbert; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Braun, Markus; Ma, Xiao; Frett, Timo; Warnke, Elisabeth; Riwaldt, Stefan; Pietsch, Jessica; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2015-03-20

    Chondrocytes are the main cellular component of articular cartilage. In healthy tissue, they are embedded in a strong but elastic extracelluar matrix providing resistance against mechanical forces and friction for the joints. Osteoarthritic cartilage, however, disrupted by heavy strain, has only very limited potential to heal. One future possibility to replace damaged cartilage might be the scaffold-free growth of chondrocytes in microgravity to form 3D aggregates. To prepare for this, we have conducted experiments during the 20th DLR parabolic flight campaign, where we fixed the cells after the first (1P) and the 31st parabola (31P). Furthermore, we subjected chondrocytes to isolated vibration and hypergravity conditions. Microarray and quantitative real time PCR analyses revealed that hypergravity regulated genes connected to cartilage integrity (BMP4, MMP3, MMP10, EDN1, WNT5A, BIRC3). Vibration was clearly detrimental to cartilage (upregulated inflammatory IL6 and IL8, downregulated growth factors EGF, VEGF, FGF17). The viability of the cells was not affected by the parabolic flight, but showed a significantly increased expression of anti-apoptotic genes after 31 parabolas. The IL-6 release of chondrocytes cultured under conditions of vibration was not changed, but hypergravity (1.8 g) induced a clear elevation of IL-6 protein in the supernatant compared with corresponding control samples. Taken together, this study provided new insights into the growth behavior of chondrocytes under short-term microgravity.

  12. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic plasticity in vitro

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maithili P Dalvi; Malati R Umrani; Mugdha V Joglekar; Anandwardhan A Hardikar

    2009-10-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is a phenomenon that describes the occurrence of 2 or more distinct phenotypes under diverse conditions. This article discusses the work carried out over the past few years in understanding the potential of human pancreatic islet-derived progenitors for cell replacement therapy in diabetes. The phenotypic plasticity exhibited by pancreatic progenitors during reversible epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and possible role of microRNAs in regulation of this process is also presented herein.

  13. Molecular identification of four phenotypes of human Demodex in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Zhao, Ya-E; Cheng, Juan; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2014-07-01

    Traditional classification of Demodex mites by hosts and phenotypic characteristics is defective because of environmental influences. In this study, we proposed molecular identification of four phenotypes of two human Demodex species based on mitochondrial cox1 fragments for the first time. Mites collected from sufferers' facial skin were classified into four phenotypes: phenotype A-C with finger-like terminus, and phenotype D with cone-like terminus. The results of molecular data showed that cox1 sequences were all 429 bp. Divergences, genetic distances and transition/transversion ratios among the three phenotypes with finger-like terminus were 0.0-3.0%, 0.000-0.031, and 6/3-5/0, respectively, in line with intraspecific differences. However, those measures between the phenotype with cone-like terminus and phenotypes with finger-like terminus were 19.6-20.5%, 0.256-0.271, and 0.58 (31/53)-0.66 (35/53), respectively, reaching interspecific level. Phylogenetic trees also showed that the three phenotypes with finger-like terminus clustered as one clade, and the phenotype with cone-like terminus formed another one. Therefore, we conclude that mitochondrial cox1 sequence is a good marker for identification of two human Demodex species. Molecular data indicate no subspecies differentiation. Terminus is an effective character for species identification. Mites with finger-like terminus are Demodex folliculorum, and those with cone-like terminus are Demodex brevis.

  14. Micromass co-culture of human articular chondrocytes and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to investigate stable neocartilage tissue formation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Giovannini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies for articular cartilage defects rely on expanded chondrocytes. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC represent an alternative cell source should their hypertrophic differentiation pathway be prevented. Possible cellular instruction between human articular chondrocytes (HAC and human bone marrow MSC was investigated in micromass pellets. HAC and MSC were mixed in different percentages or incubated individually in pellets for 3 or 6 weeks with and without TGF-beta1 and dexamethasone (±T±D as chondrogenic factors. Collagen II, collagen X and S100 protein expression were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Proteoglycan synthesis was evaluated applying the Bern score and quantified using dimethylmethylene blue dye binding assay. Alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP was detected on cryosections and soluble ALP measured in pellet supernatants. HAC alone generated hyaline-like discs, while MSC formed spheroid pellets in ±T±D. Co-cultured pellets changed from disc to spheroid shape with decreasing number of HAC, and displayed random cell distribution. In -T-D, HAC expressed S100, produced GAG and collagen II, and formed lacunae, while MSC did not produce any cartilage-specific proteins. Based on GAG, collagen type II and S100 expression chondrogenic differentiation occurred in -T-D MSC co-cultures. However, quantitative experimental GAG and DNA values did not differ from predicted values, suggesting only HAC contribution to GAG production. MSC produced cartilage-specific matrix only in +T+D but underwent hypertrophy in all pellet cultures. In summary, influence of HAC on MSC was restricted to early signs of neochondrogenesis. However, MSC did not contribute to the proteoglycan deposition, and HAC could not prevent hypertrophy of MSC induced by chondrogenic stimuli.

  15. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C; Mungall, Christopher J; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C M; Brown, Danielle L; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R; Eppig, Janan T; Jackson, Andrew P; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G; Kelly, Anne M; Ledbetter, David H; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Van Vooren, Steven; Wapner, Ronald J; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Wright, Caroline F; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B A; Washingthon, Nicole L; Smith, Cynthia L; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E; Robinson, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online.

  16. An RGD-restricted substrate interface is sufficient for the adhesion, growth and cartilage forming capacity of human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Vonwil

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at testing whether an RGD-restricted substrate interface is sufficient for adhesion and growth of human articular chondrocytes (HAC, and whether it enhances their post expansion chondrogenic capacity. HAC/substrate interaction was restricted to RGD by modifying tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS with a poly(ethylene glycol (PEG based copolymer system that renders the surface resistant to protein adsorption while at the same time presenting the bioactive RGD-containing peptide GCRGYGRGDSPG (RGD. As compared to TCPS, HAC cultured on RGD spread faster (1.9-fold, maintained higher type II collagen mRNA expression (4.9-fold and displayed a 19% lower spreading area. On RGD, HAC attachment efficiency (66±10% and proliferation rate (0.56±0.04 doublings/day, as well as type II collagen mRNA expression in the subsequent chondrogenic differentiation phase, were similar to those of cells cultured on TCPS. In contrast, cartilaginous matrix deposition by HAC expanded on RGD was slightly but consistently higher (15% higher glycosaminoglycan-to-DNA ratio. RDG (bioinactive peptide and PEG (no peptide ligand controls yielded drastically reduced attachment efficiency (lower than 11% and proliferation (lower than 0.20 doublings/day. Collectively, these data indicate that restriction of HAC interaction with a substrate through RGD peptides is sufficient to support their adhesion, growth and maintenance of cartilage forming capacity. The concept could thus be implemented in materials for cartilage repair, whereby in situ recruited/infiltrated chondroprogenitor cells would proliferate while maintaining their ability to differentiate and generate cartilage tissue.

  17. Effect of a Herbal-Leucine mix on the IL-1β-induced cartilage degradation and inflammatory gene expression in human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haqqi Tariq M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional treatments for the articular diseases are often effective for symptom relief, but can also cause significant side effects and do not slow the progression of the disease. Several natural substances have been shown to be effective at relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA, and preliminary evidence suggests that some of these compounds may exert a favorable influence on the course of the disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory/chondroprotective potential of a Herbal and amino acid mixture containing extract of the Uncaria tomentosa, Boswellia spp., Lepidium meyenii and L-Leucine on the IL-1β-induced production of nitric oxide (NO, glycosaminoglycan (GAG, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, aggrecan (ACAN and type II collagen (COL2A1 in human OA chondrocytes and OA cartilage explants. Methods Primary OA chondrocytes or OA cartilage explants were pretreated with Herbal-Leucine mixture (HLM, 1-10 μg/ml and then stimulated with IL-1β (5 ng/ml. Effect of HLM on IL-1β-induced gene expression of iNOS, MMP-9, MMP-13, ACAN and COL2A1 was verified by real time-PCR. Estimation of NO and GAG release in culture supernatant was done using commercially available kits. Results HLM tested in these in vitro studies was found to be an effective anti-inflammatory agent, as evidenced by strong inhibition of iNOS, MMP-9 and MMP-13 expression and NO production in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes (p Leucine mixture (HLM up-regulation of ACAN and COL2A1 expression in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes was also noted (p Conclusion Our data suggests that HLM could be chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory agent in arthritis, switching chondrocyte gene expression from catabolic direction towards anabolic and regenerative, and consequently this approach may be potentially useful as a new adjunct therapeutic/preventive agent for OA or injury recovery.

  18. Human brain evolution: from gene discovery to phenotype discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Todd M

    2012-06-26

    The rise of comparative genomics and related technologies has added important new dimensions to the study of human evolution. Our knowledge of the genes that underwent expression changes or were targets of positive selection in human evolution is rapidly increasing, as is our knowledge of gene duplications, translocations, and deletions. It is now clear that the genetic differences between humans and chimpanzees are far more extensive than previously thought; their genomes are not 98% or 99% identical. Despite the rapid growth in our understanding of the evolution of the human genome, our understanding of the relationship between genetic changes and phenotypic changes is tenuous. This is true even for the most intensively studied gene, FOXP2, which underwent positive selection in the human terminal lineage and is thought to have played an important role in the evolution of human speech and language. In part, the difficulty of connecting genes to phenotypes reflects our generally poor knowledge of human phenotypic specializations, as well as the difficulty of interpreting the consequences of genetic changes in species that are not amenable to invasive research. On the positive side, investigations of FOXP2, along with genomewide surveys of gene-expression changes and selection-driven sequence changes, offer the opportunity for "phenotype discovery," providing clues to human phenotypic specializations that were previously unsuspected. What is more, at least some of the specializations that have been proposed are amenable to testing with noninvasive experimental techniques appropriate for the study of humans and apes.

  19. The roles of canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling in human de-differentiated articular chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, N.; Laadhar, L.; Allouche, M.; Zandieh-Doulabi, B.; Hamdoun, M.; Klein-Nulend, J.; Makni, S.; Sellami, S.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent form of arthritis in the world and it is becoming a major public health problem. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes undergo morphological and biochemical changes that lead to de-differentiation. The involvement of signaling pathways, such as the Wnt pathway, during cart

  20. Proteome analysis during chondrocyte differentiation in a new chondrogenesis model using human umbilical cord stroma mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Alexandre; Mateos, Jesús; Lesende-Rodríguez, Iván; Calamia, Valentina; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; de Toro, Francisco J; Arufe, Maria C; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-02-01

    Umbilical cord stroma mesenchymal stem cells were differentiated toward chondrocyte-like cells using a new in vitro model that consists of the random formation of spheroids in a medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum on a nonadherent surface. The medium was changed after 2 days to one specific for the induction of chondrocyte differentiation. We assessed this model using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and secretome analyses. The purpose of this study was to determine which proteins were differentially expressed during chondrogenesis. Differential gel electrophoresis analysis was performed, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry protein identification. A total of 97 spots were modulated during the chondrogenesis process, 54 of these spots were identified as 39 different proteins and 15 were isoforms. Of the 39 different proteins identified 15 were down-regulated, 21 were up-regulated, and 3 were up- and down-regulated during the chondrogenesis process. Using Pathway Studio 7.0 software, our results showed that the major cell functions modulated during chondrogenesis were cellular differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Five proteins involved in cartilage extracellular matrix metabolism found during the differential gel electrophoresis study were confirmed using Western blot. The results indicate that our in vitro chondrogenesis model is an efficient and rapid technique for obtaining cells similar to chondrocytes that express proteins characteristic of the cartilage extracellular matrix. These chondrocyte-like cells could prove useful for future cell therapy treatment of cartilage pathologies.

  1. Proteome Analysis During Chondrocyte Differentiation in a New Chondrogenesis Model Using Human Umbilical Cord Stroma Mesenchymal Stem Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Alexandre; Mateos, Jesús; Lesende-Rodríguez, Iván; Calamia, Valentina; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; de Toro, Francisco J.; Arufe, Maria C.; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Umbilical cord stroma mesenchymal stem cells were differentiated toward chondrocyte-like cells using a new in vitro model that consists of the random formation of spheroids in a medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum on a nonadherent surface. The medium was changed after 2 days to one specific for the induction of chondrocyte differentiation. We assessed this model using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and secretome analyses. The purpose of this study was to determine which proteins were differentially expressed during chondrogenesis. Differential gel electrophoresis analysis was performed, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry protein identification. A total of 97 spots were modulated during the chondrogenesis process, 54 of these spots were identified as 39 different proteins and 15 were isoforms. Of the 39 different proteins identified 15 were down-regulated, 21 were up-regulated, and 3 were up- and down-regulated during the chondrogenesis process. Using Pathway Studio 7.0 software, our results showed that the major cell functions modulated during chondrogenesis were cellular differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Five proteins involved in cartilage extracellular matrix metabolism found during the differential gel electrophoresis study were confirmed using Western blot. The results indicate that our in vitro chondrogenesis model is an efficient and rapid technique for obtaining cells similar to chondrocytes that express proteins characteristic of the cartilage extracellular matrix. These chondrocyte-like cells could prove useful for future cell therapy treatment of cartilage pathologies. PMID:22008206

  2. The chrondoprotective actions of a natural product are associated with the activation of IGF-1 production by human chondrocytes despite the presence of IL-1β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrowski Paul

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage loss is a hallmark of arthritis and follows activation of catabolic processes concomitant with a disruption of anabolic pathways like insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1. We hypothesized that two natural products of South American origin, would limit cartilage degradation by respectively suppressing catabolism and activating local IGF-1 anabolic pathways. One extract, derived from cat's claw (Uncaria guianensis, vincaria®, is a well-described inhibitor of NF-κB. The other extract, derived from the vegetable Lepidium meyenii (RNI 249, possessed an uncertain mechanism of action but with defined ethnomedical applications for fertility and vitality. Methods Human cartilage samples were procured from surgical specimens with consent, and were evaluated either as explants or as primary chondrocytes prepared after enzymatic digestion of cartilage matrix. Assessments included IGF-1 gene expression, IGF-1 production (ELISA, cartilage matrix degradation and nitric oxide (NO production, under basal conditions and in the presence of IL-1β. Results RNI 249 enhanced basal IGF-1 mRNA levels in human chondrocytes by 2.7 fold, an effect that was further enhanced to 3.8 fold by co-administration with vincaria. Enhanced basal IGF-1 production by RNI 249 alone and together with vincaria, was confirmed in both explants and in primary chondrocytes (P Conclusion The identification of agents that activate the autocrine production of IGF-1 in cartilage, even in the face of suppressive pro-inflammatory, catabolic cytokines like IL-1β, represents a novel therapeutic approach to cartilage biology. Chondroprotection associated with prevention of the catabolic events and the potential for sustained anabolic activity with this natural product suggests that it holds significant promise in the treatment of debilitating joint diseases.

  3. Chondrocytes from congenital microtia possess an inferior capacity for in vivo cartilage regeneration to healthy ear chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yunpeng; Kang, Ning; Dong, Ping; Liu, Xia; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xin; Yan, Li; Jiang, Haiyue; Cao, Yilin; Xiao, Ran

    2016-11-15

    The remnant auricular cartilage from microtia has become a valuable cell source for ear regeneration. It is important to clarify the issue of whether the genetically defective microtia chondrocytes could engineer cartilage tissue comparable to healthy ear chondrocytes. In the current study, the histology and cell yield of native microtia and normal ear cartilage were investigated, and the biological characteristics of derived chondrocytes examined, including proliferation, chondrogenic phenotype and cell migration. Furthermore, the in vivo cartilage-forming capacity of passaged microtia and normal auricular chondrocytes were systematically compared by seeding them onto polyglycolic acid/polylactic acid scaffold to generate tissue engineered cartilage in nude mice. Through histological examinations and quantitative analysis of glycosaminoglycan, Young's modulus, and the expression of cartilage-related genes, it was found that microtia chondrocytes had a slower dedifferentiation rate with the decreased expression of stemness-related genes, and weaker migration ability than normal ear chondrocytes, and the microtia chondrocytes-engineered cartilage was biochemically and biomechanically inferior to that constructed using normal ear chondrocytes. This study provides valuable information for the clinical application of the chondrocytes derived from congenital microtia to engineer cartilage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) enables proliferation of chondrocytes producing a hyaline cartilage matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigout, A; Guehring, H; Froemel, D; Meurer, A; Ladel, C; Reker, D; Bay-Jensen, A C; Karsdal, M A; Lindemann, S

    2017-08-18

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 18 has been shown to increase cartilage volume when injected intra-articularly in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) and in patients with knee OA (during clinical development of the recombinant human FGF18, sprifermin). However, the exact nature of this effect is still unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of sprifermin at the cellular level. A combination of different chondrocyte culture systems was used and the effects of sprifermin on proliferation, the phenotype and matrix production were evaluated. The involvement of MAPKs in sprifermin signalling was also studied. In monolayer, we observed that sprifermin promoted a round cell morphology and stimulated both cellular proliferation and Sox9 expression while strongly decreasing type I collagen expression. In 3D culture, sprifermin increased the number of matrix-producing chondrocytes, improved the type II:I collagen ratio and enabled human OA chondrocytes to produce a hyaline extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, we found that sprifermin displayed a 'hit and run' mode of action, with intermittent exposure required for the compound to fully exert its anabolic effect. Finally, sprifermin appeared to signal through activation of ERK. Our results indicate that intermittent exposure to sprifermin leads to expansion of hyaline cartilage-producing chondrocytes. These in vitro findings are consistent with the increased cartilage volume observed in the knees of OA patients after intra-articular injection with sprifermin in clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Standardized butanol fraction of WIN-34B suppresses cartilage destruction via inhibited production of matrix metalloproteinase and inflammatory mediator in osteoarthritis human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huh Jeong-Eun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WIN-34B is a novel Oriental medicine, which represents the n-butanol fraction prepared from dried flowers of Lonicera japonica Thunb and dried roots of Anemarrhena asphodeloides BUNGE. The component herb of WIN-34B is used for arthritis treatment in East Asian countries. The aim of this study was to determine the cartilage-protective effects and mechanisms of WIN-34B and its major phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, in osteoarthritis (OA human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes. Methods The investigation focused on whether WIN-34B and its standard compounds protected cartilage in interleukin (IL-1β-stimulated cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes derived from OA patients. Also, the mechanisms of WIN-34B on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs, inflammatory mediators, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs pathways were assessed. Results WIN-34B was not cytotoxic to cultured cartilage explants or chondrocytes. WIN-34B dose-dependently inhibited the release of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen, increased the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen, and recovered the intensity of proteoglycan and collagen by histological analysis in IL-1β-stimulated human cartilage explants culture. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was similar to or better than that of chlorogenic acid and mangiferin. Compared to chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, WIN-34B displayed equal or greater decreases in the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, and markedly up-regulated TIMP-1 and TIMP-3. WIN-34B inhibited inflammatory mediators involved in cartilage destruction, such as prostaglandin E2, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-1β. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and p38 was significantly reduced by WIN-34B treatment, while phosphorylation of JNK was only

  6. Standardized butanol fraction of WIN-34B suppresses cartilage destruction via inhibited production of matrix metalloproteinase and inflammatory mediator in osteoarthritis human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background WIN-34B is a novel Oriental medicine, which represents the n-butanol fraction prepared from dried flowers of Lonicera japonica Thunb and dried roots of Anemarrhena asphodeloides BUNGE. The component herb of WIN-34B is used for arthritis treatment in East Asian countries. The aim of this study was to determine the cartilage-protective effects and mechanisms of WIN-34B and its major phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, in osteoarthritis (OA) human cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes. Methods The investigation focused on whether WIN-34B and its standard compounds protected cartilage in interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated cartilage explants culture and chondrocytes derived from OA patients. Also, the mechanisms of WIN-34B on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), inflammatory mediators, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways were assessed. Results WIN-34B was not cytotoxic to cultured cartilage explants or chondrocytes. WIN-34B dose-dependently inhibited the release of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen, increased the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen, and recovered the intensity of proteoglycan and collagen by histological analysis in IL-1β-stimulated human cartilage explants culture. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was similar to or better than that of chlorogenic acid and mangiferin. Compared to chlorogenic acid and mangiferin, WIN-34B displayed equal or greater decreases in the levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, and markedly up-regulated TIMP-1 and TIMP-3. WIN-34B inhibited inflammatory mediators involved in cartilage destruction, such as prostaglandin E2, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-1β. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 was significantly reduced by WIN-34B treatment, while phosphorylation of JNK was only inhibited by chlorogenic

  7. Mapping gene associations in human mitochondria using clinical disease phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Scharfe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects

  8. Salvianolic acid B inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammatory cytokine production in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes and has a protective effect in a mouse osteoarthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yiting; Wang, Chenggui; Zheng, Wenhao; Tang, Qian; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Xiaolei; Guo, Xiaoshan; Wang, Jianshun

    2017-02-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic progressive disease that has complicated mechanisms that involve inflammation and cartilage degradation. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory action of Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) in both human OA chondrocytes and a mouse OA model that was induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus. In vitro, chondrocytes were pretreated with Sal B (0, 25, 50, 100μM) for 2h, then incubated with IL-1β (10ng/mL) for 24h. NO production was determined by Griess method and PGE2 was assessed by ELISA. The expression of INOS, COX-2, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and NF-κB-related signaling molecules were tested by Western blotting. Immunofluorescence staining was used to detect P65 nuclear translocation. In vivo, the mouse OA model received intraperitoneal-injection of either Sal B (25mg/kg) or saline every other day. Hematoxylin and Eosin, as well as Safranin-O-Fast green staining, were utilized to evaluate the severity of cartilage lesions up to 8weeks following the surgery. Sal B inhibited the over-production of NO and PGE2, while the elevated expression of INOS, COX-2, MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5 were reversed by Sal B in IL-1β-induced chondrocytes. In addition, IL-1β significantly induced phosphorylation of NF-κB signaling, and this phosphorylation response was blocked by Sal B. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that Sal B could suppress IL-1β-induced p65 nuclear translocation. In vivo, the cartilage in Sal B-treated mice exhibited less cartilage degradation and lower OARSI scores. Taken together, Sal B possesses great potential value as a therapeutic agent for OA treatment.

  9. Quantitative proteomics reveals regulatory differences in the chondrocyte secretome from human medial and lateral femoral condyles in osteoarthritic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Johan; Rüetschi, Ulla; Skiöldebrand, Eva; Kärrholm, Johan; Lindahl, Anders

    2013-10-04

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a destructive joint disease and there are no known biomarkers available for an early diagnosis. To identify potential disease biomarkers and gain further insight into the disease mechanisms of OA we applied quantitative proteomics with SILAC technology on the secretomes from chondrocytes of OA knees, designated as high Mankin (HM) scored secretome. A quantitative comparison was made between the secretomes of the medial and lateral femur condyle chondrocytes in the same knee since the medial femur condyle is usually more affected in OA than the lateral condyle, which was confirmed by Mankin scoring. The medial/lateral comparison was also made on the secretomes from chondrocytes taken from one individual with no clinically apparent joint-disease, designated as low Mankin (LM) scored secretome. We identified 825 proteins in the HM secretome and 69 of these showed differential expression when comparing the medial and lateral femoral compartment. The LM scored femoral condyle showed early signs of OA in the medial compartment as assessed by Mankin score. We here report the identification and relative quantification of several proteins of interest for the OA disease mechanism e.g. CYTL1, DMD and STAB1 together with putative early disease markers e.g. TIMP1, PPP2CA and B2M. The present study reveals differences in protein abundance between medial/lateral femur condyles in OA patients. These regulatory differences expand the knowledge regarding OA disease markers and mechanisms.

  10. Chondrocyte physiopathology and drug efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serni, U; Mannoni, A

    1991-01-01

    After a brief exposition on the physiopathology of cartilage, and characteristic features of chondrocytes and proteoglycans (PGs) in osteoarthritis (OA), it is underlined how different molecules of GAGs and aggregated PGs added to the culture media can prevent damage and reduction of GAGs and fibril production in chondrocytes cultured with NSAIDs and corticosteroids. In animal models of OA, the local or general administration of GAGPS reduces the proteinase activity, the level of uronic acid in synovial fluid and the number of inflammatory cells in synovia. In the Pond-Nuki dog, GAGPS improves the cartilage surface. These favourable events can also occur in human OA, where it is, moreover, difficult to monitor the patients. For this purpose, patients must be selected in the first two stages of primary OA, and followed using NMR, the only device able to scan cartilage and subchondral bone, to determine their consistency and thickness, and to provide information on water content.

  11. The novel adipokine progranulin counteracts IL-1 and TLR4-driven inflammatory response in human and murine chondrocytes via TNFR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Vanessa; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; López, Verónica; Pirozzi, Claudio; Pino, Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Gualillo, Oreste

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a recently identified adipokine that is supposed to have anti-inflammatory actions. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL1β) stimulates several mediators of cartilage degradation. Toll like receptor-4 (TLR4) can bind to various damage-associated molecular patterns, leading to inflammatory condition. So far, no data exist of PGRN effects in inflammatory conditions induced by IL1β or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory potential of PGRN in IL1β- or LPS-induced inflammatory responses of chondrocytes. Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and ATDC-5 cells were treated with PGRN in presence or not of IL1β or LPS. First, we showed that recombinant PGRN had no effects on cell viability. We present evidence that PGRN expression was increased during the differentiation of ATDC-5 cell line. Moreover, PGRN mRNA and protein expression is increased in cartilage, synovial and infrapatellar fat pad tissue samples from OA patients. PGRN mRNA levels are upregulated under TNFα and IL1β stimulation. Our data showed that PGRN is able to significantly counteract the IL1β-induced expression of NOS2, COX2, MMP13 and VCAM-1. LPS-induced expression of NOS2 is also decreased by PGRN. These effects are mediated, at least in part, through TNFR1. Taken together, our results suggest that PGRN has a clear anti-inflammatory function. PMID:26853108

  12. IGF-1 Gene Transfer to Human Synovial MSCs Promotes Their Chondrogenic Differentiation Potential without Induction of the Hypertrophic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutoshi Ikeda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell- (MSC- based therapy is a promising treatment for cartilage. However, repair tissue in general fails to regenerate an original hyaline-like tissue. In this study, we focused on increasing the expression levels for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 to improve repair tissue quality. The IGF-1 gene was introduced into human synovial MSCs with a lentiviral vector and examined the levels of gene expression and morphological status of MSCs under chondrogenic differentiation condition using pellet cultures. The size of the pellets derived from IGF-1-MSCs were significantly larger than those of the control group. The abundance of glycosaminoglycan (GAG was also significantly higher in the IGF-1-MSC group. The histology of the IGF-1-induced pellets demonstrated similarities to hyaline cartilage without exhibiting features of a hypertrophic chondrocyte phenotype. Expression levels for the Col2A1 gene and protein were significantly higher in the IGF-1 pellets than in the control pellets, but expression levels for Col10, MMP-13, ALP, and Osterix were not higher. Thus, IGF-1 gene transfer to human synovial MSCs led to an improved chondrogenic differentiation capacity without the detectable induction of a hypertrophic or osteogenic phenotype.

  13. RNA Directed Modulation of Phenotypic Plasticity in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakman, Laura; Hewson, Chris; Burdach, Jon; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-01-01

    Natural selective processes have been known to drive phenotypic plasticity, which is the emergence of different phenotypes from one genome following environmental stimulation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been observed to modulate transcriptional and epigenetic states of genes in human cells. We surmised that lncRNAs are governors of phenotypic plasticity and drive natural selective processes through epigenetic modulation of gene expression. Using heat shocked human cells as a model we find several differentially expressed transcripts with the top candidates being lncRNAs derived from retro-elements. One particular retro-element derived transcripts, Retro-EIF2S2, was found to be abundantly over-expressed in heat shocked cells. Over-expression of Retro-EIF2S2 significantly enhanced cell viability and modulated a predisposition for an adherent cellular phenotype upon heat shock. Mechanistically, we find that this retro-element derived transcript interacts directly with a network of proteins including 40S ribosomal protein S30 (FAU), Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (EIF5A), and Ubiquitin-60S ribosomal protein L40 (UBA52) to affect protein modulated cell adhesion pathways. We find one motif in Retro-EIF2S2 that exhibits binding to FAU and modulates phenotypic cell transitions from adherent to suspension states. The observations presented here suggest that retroviral derived transcripts actively modulate phenotypic plasticity in human cells in response to environmental selective pressures and suggest that natural selection may play out through the action of retro-elements in human cells.

  14. Tissue engineering applications: cartilage lesions repair by the use of autologous chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. De Franceschi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Promising new therapies based on tissue engineering have been recently developed for cartilage repair. The association of biomaterials with autologous chondrocytes expanded in vitro can represent a useful tool to regenerate this tissue. The scaffolds utilised in such therapeutical applications should provide a pre-formed three-dimensional shape, prevent cells from floating out of the defect, have sufficient mechanical strength, facilitate uniform spread of cells and stimulate the phenotype of transplanted cells. Hyaff®-11 is a hyaluronic-acid based biodegradable polymer, that has been shown to provide successful cell carrier for tissue-engineered repair. From our findings we can state that human chondrocytes seeded on Hyaff®-11 are able to maintain in vitro the characteristic of differentiated cells, expressing and producing collagen type II and aggrecan which are the main markers of cartilage phenotype, down-regulating collagen type I. Moreover, it seems to be a useful scaffold for cartilage repair both in animal models and clinical trials in humans, favouring the formation of a hyaline-like tissue. In the light of these data, we can hypothesise, for the future, the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation together with gene therapy as a treatment for rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  15. Chondrocyte behavior on nanostructured micropillar polypropylene and polystyrene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prittinen, Juha [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Jiang, Yu [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu (Finland); Ylärinne, Janne H. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Pakkanen, Tapani A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu (Finland); Lammi, Mikko J., E-mail: mikko.lammi@uef.fi [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Qu, Chengjuan [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland)

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate whether patterned polypropylene (PP) or polystyrene (PS) could enhance the chondrocytes' extracellular matrix (ECM) production and phenotype maintenance. Bovine primary chondrocytes were cultured on smooth PP and PS, as well as on nanostructured micropillar PP (patterned PP) and PS (patterned PS) for 2 weeks. Subsequently, the samples were collected for fluorescein diacetate-based cell viability tests, for immunocytochemical assays of types I and II collagen, actin and vinculin, for scanning electronic microscopic analysis of cell morphology and distribution, and for gene expression assays of Sox9, aggrecan, procollagen α{sub 1}(II), procollagen α{sub 1}(X), and procollagen α{sub 2}(I) using quantitative RT-PCR assays. After two weeks of culture, the bovine primary chondrocytes had attached on both patterned PP and PS, while practically no adhesion was observed on smooth PP. However, the best adhesion of the cells was on smooth PS. The cells, which attached on patterned PP and PS surfaces synthesized types I and II collagen. The chondrocytes' morphology was extended, and an abundant ECM network formed around the attached chondrocytes on both patterned PP and PS. Upon passaging, no significant differences on the chondrocyte-specific gene expression were observed, although the highest expression level of aggrecan was observed on the patterned PS in passage 1 chondrocytes, and the expression level of procollagen α{sub 1}(II) appeared to decrease in passaged chondrocytes. However, the expressions of procollagen α{sub 2}(I) were increased in all passaged cell cultures. In conclusion, the bovine primary chondrocytes could be grown on patterned PS and PP surfaces, and they produced extracellular matrix network around the adhered cells. However, neither the patterned PS nor PP could prevent the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes. - Highlights: • Methods to avoid chondrocyte dedifferentiation would be useful for cartilage

  16. Cryptotanshinone protects against IL-1β-induced inflammation in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes and ameliorates the progression of osteoarthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhenhua; Zheng, Wenhao; Li, Xiaobin; Lin, Jian; Xie, Chenglong; Li, Hang; Cheng, Liang; Wu, Aimin; Ni, Wenfei

    2017-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative disease characterized by progressive erosion of articular cartilage, subchondral bone sclerosis and synovitis. Cryptotanshinone (CTS), an active component extracted from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, has been shown to have potent anti-inflammatory effects. However, its effects on OA have not been clearly elucidated. This study aimed to assess the effect of CTS on human OA chondrocytes and mice OA models. Human OA chondrocytes were pretreated with CTS (5, 10 and 20μM) for 2h and subsequently stimulated with IL-1β for 24h. Production of NO, PGE2, IL-6, TNF-α was evaluated by the Griess reaction and ELISA. The protein expression of COX-2, iNOs, MMP-3, MMP13, COX-2, ADAMTS-5, JNK, p-JNK, ERK, p-ERK, p38, p-p38, p-IKKα/β, p65, p-p65, IκB-α, and p-IκB-α was tested by Western blot. In vivo, the severity of OA was determined by histological analysis. We found that CTS significantly inhibited the IL-1β-induced production of NO and PGE2; expression of COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-13, and ADAMTS-5. Furthermore, CTS in dramatically suppressed IL-1β-stimulated NF-κB and MAPK activation. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that CTS could suppress IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of p65 nuclear translocation. In vivo, treatment of CTS prevented the destruction of cartilage and the thickening of subchondral bone in mice OA models. These results indicate that the therapeutic effect of CTS on OA is accomplished through the inhibition of both NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Our findings provide the evidence to develop CTS as a potential therapeutic agent f or patients with OA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Human adult chondrocytes express hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) isoforms but not HgF: potential implication of osteoblasts on the presence of HGF in cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guévremont, Melanie; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Massicotte, Frédéric; Tardif, Ginette; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Lajeunesse, Daniel; Reboul, Pascal

    2003-06-01

    HGF is increased in human OA cartilage, possibly from Ob's. RT-PCR shows HGF isoforms are differently regulated between chondrocytes and Ob. A paracrine cross-talk between subchondral bone and cartilage may occur during OA. Recently, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been identified by immunohistochemistry in cartilage and more particularly in the deep zone of human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. By investigating HGF expression in cartilage, we found that chondrocytes did not express HGF; however, they expressed the two truncated isoforms, namely HGF/NK1 and HGF/NK2. Because the only other cells localized near the deep zone are osteoblasts from the subchondral bone plate, we hypothesized that they were expressing HGF. Indeed, we found that HGF was synthesized by osteoblasts from the subchondral bone plate. Moreover, OA osteoblasts produced five times more HGF than normal osteoblasts and almost no HGF/NK1, unlike normal osteoblasts. Because prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 are involved in OA progression, we investigated whether these factors impact HGF produced by normal osteoblasts. PGE2 was the only factor tested that was able to stimulate HGF synthesis. However, the addition of NS398, a selective inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) had no effect on HGF produced by OA osteoblasts. HGF/NK2 had a moderate stimulating effect on HGF production by normal osteoblasts, whereas osteocalcin was not modulated by either HGF or HGF/NK2. When investigating signaling routes that might be implicated in OA osteoblast-produced HGF, we found that protein kinase A was at least partially involved. In summary, this study raises the hypothesis that the HGF found in articular cartilage is produced by osteoblasts, diffuses into the cartilage, and may be implicated in the OA process.

  18. Edible Bird’s nest extract as a chondro-protective agent for human chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritic knee: in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua Kien-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease that results in the destruction of cartilage. Edible Bird’s Nest (EBN extract contains important components, which can reduce the progression of osteoarthritis and helps in the regeneration of the cartilage. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of EBN extract on the catabolic and anabolic activities of the human articular chondrocytes (HACs isolated from the knee joint of patients with OA. Methods A single batch of EBN extract was prepared with hot-water extraction and coded as HMG. HACs were isolated from the knee joint cartilage removed during surgery. The optimum concentration of HMG for HAC cultures was determined using MTT assay. The effect of HMG on the catabolic and anabolic genes’ expression in HACs was measured by real-time PCR. The total amount of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production was determined by ELISA method, and the total sulphated glycosaminoglycan (GAGs production was quantified by 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB assay. Results MTT assay showed 0.50% - 1.00% HMG supplementation promoted HACs proliferation. HMG supplementation was able to reduce the catabolic genes’ expression in cultured HACs such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP1 & MMP3, Interleukin 1, 6 and 8 (IL-1, IL-6 & IL-8, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production was significantly reduced in HAC cultures supplemented with HMG. With regard to anabolic activity assessment, type II collagen, Aggrecan and SOX-9 gene expression as well as sGAG production was increased in the HMG supplemented groups. Conclusion Edible Bird’s Nest extract coded as HMG demonstrated chondro-protection ability on human articular chondrocytes in vitro. It reduced catabolic activities and increased cartilage extracellular matrix synthesis. It is concluded that HMG is a potential agent in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  19. Toxicity of antiseptics against chondrocytes: What is best for the cartilage in septic joint surgery?

    OpenAIRE

    Röhner, Eric; Kolar, Paula; Seeger, Joern B.; Arnholdt, Joerg; Thiele, Kathi; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In septic joint surgery, the most frequently used antiseptics are polyhexanide, hydrogen peroxide and taurolidine. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of these antiseptics on viability of human chondrocytes. Our hypothesis was that antiseptics and supplemental irrigation with sodium chloride lavage are less toxic on human chondrocytes than treatment with antiseptics only. Primary human chondrocytes were isolated and cultured from six donated human knee joints. Polyhexanide, hydro...

  20. The epigenetic effect of glucosamine and a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) inhibitor on primary human chondrocytes - Implications for osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imagawa, Kei, E-mail: k.Imagawa@soton.ac.uk [University of Southampton Medical School, Bone and Joint Research Group, Southampton (United Kingdom); Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Andres, MC de [University of Southampton Medical School, Bone and Joint Research Group, Southampton (United Kingdom); Hashimoto, Ko [Hospital for Special Surgery, NY (United States); Pitt, Dominic [University of Southampton Medical School, Bone and Joint Research Group, Southampton (United Kingdom); Itoi, Eiji [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Goldring, Mary B. [Hospital for Special Surgery, NY (United States); Roach, Helmtrud I.; Oreffo, Richard O.C. [University of Southampton Medical School, Bone and Joint Research Group, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Glucosamine and a NF-kB inhibitor reduce inflammation in OA. {yields} Cytokine induced demethylation of CpG site in IL1{beta} promoter prevented by glucosamine. {yields} Glucosamine and NF-kB inhibitor have epigenetic effects on human chondrocytes. -- Abstract: Objective: Idiopathic osteoarthritis is the most common form of osteoarthritis (OA) world-wide and remains the leading cause of disability and the associated socio-economic burden in an increasing aging population. Traditionally, OA has been viewed as a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and changes in the subchondral bone culminating in joint failure. However, the etiology of OA is multifactorial involving genetic, mechanical and environmental factors. Treatment modalities include analgesia, joint injection with steroids or hyaluronic acid, oral supplements including glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, as well as physiotherapy. Thus, there is significant interest in the discovery of disease modifying agents. One such agent, glucosamine (GlcN) is commonly prescribed even though the therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action remain controversial. Inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1{beta}, and proteinases such as MMP-13 have been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of OA together with an associated CpG demethylation in their promoters. We have investigated the potential of GlcN to modulate NF-kB activity and cytokine-induced abnormal gene expression in articular chondrocytes and, critically, whether this is associated with an epigenetic process. Method: Human chondrocytes were isolated from the articular cartilage of femoral heads, obtained with ethical permission, following fractured neck of femur surgery. Chondrocytes were cultured for 5 weeks in six separate groups; (i) control culture, (ii) cultured with a mixture of 2.5 ng/ml IL-1{beta} and 2.5 ng/ml oncostatin M (OSM), (iii) cultured with 2 mM N

  1. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes to col...

  2. The effect of ancient population bottlenecks on human phenotypic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Andrea; Amos, William; Balloux, François; Hanihara, Tsunehiko

    2007-07-19

    The origin and patterns of dispersal of anatomically modern humans are the focus of considerable debate. Global genetic analyses have argued for one single origin, placed somewhere in Africa. This scenario implies a rapid expansion, with a series of bottlenecks of small amplitude, which would have led to the observed smooth loss of genetic diversity with increasing distance from Africa. Analyses of cranial data, on the other hand, have given mixed results, and have been argued to support multiple origins of modern humans. Using a large data set of skull measurements and an analytical framework equivalent to that used for genetic data, we show that the loss in genetic diversity has been mirrored by a loss in phenotypic variability. We find evidence for an African origin, placed somewhere in the central/southern part of the continent, which harbours the highest intra-population diversity in phenotypic measurements. We failed to find evidence for a second origin, and we confirm these results on a large genetic data set. Distance from Africa accounts for an average 19-25% of heritable variation in craniometric measurements-a remarkably strong effect for phenotypic measurements known to be under selection.

  3. Growth differentiation factor-5 stimulates the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Peng; Guo Xiong; Yao Jianfeng; Zhang Yingang; Klaus von der Mark

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) on the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods: The articular chondrocytes isolated from rats were treated with various concentrations of rmGDF-5, and the growth of chondrocytes measured by MTT assay, the cellular cartilage matrices formation detected sulfated glycosaminoglycan by Alcian blue staining and type Ⅱ collagen by RT-PCR,the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes detected by immunofluorescence. Results: After 7 days culture,MTT assay showed that GDF-5 enhanced the growth of chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner, RT-PCR showed that GDF-5 clearly induced the synthesis of type Ⅱ collagen because of the col2a1 mRNA band more and more strong in a dose-dependent. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 14 days, the intensity of Alcian blue staining was greatly enhanced, especially, at a high concentration of 1000ng/ml, and GDF-5 enhanced the accumulation of the Alcian blue-stainable material in a concentration-dependent manner and in a does-dependent manner. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 21 days, immunofluorescent staining of type Ⅱ collagen was clear, the type Ⅰ and X collagen were negative. Conclusion: GDF-5 enhanced the growth of mature articular chondrocytes, and stimulated the cellular cartilage matrices formation, but did not change the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes in mono-layer culture.

  4. Phenotype and functions of memory Tfh cells in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Ueno, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of the origin and functions of human blood CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells found in human blood has changed dramatically in the past years. These cells are currently considered to represent a circulating memory compartment of T follicular helper (Tfh) lineage cells. Recent studies have shown that blood memory Tfh cells are composed of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Here, we review the current understanding of human blood memory Tfh cells and the subsets within this compartment. We present a strategy to define these subsets based on cell surface profiles. Finally, we discuss how increased understanding of the biology of blood memory Tfh cells may contribute insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and the mode of action of vaccines.

  5. Moderate alterations of the cytoskeleton in human chondrocytes after short-term microgravity produced by parabolic flight maneuvers could be prevented by up-regulation of BMP-2 and SOX-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Wehland, Markus; Sahana, Jayashree; Bauer, Johann; Corydon, Thomas J; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Frett, Timo; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Grosse, Jirka; Grimm, Daniela

    2015-06-01

    Real and simulated microgravity induce a variety of changes in human cells. Most importantly, changes in the cytoskeleton have been noted, and studies on microtubules have shown that they are gravisensitive. This study focuses on the effects of short-term real microgravity on gene expression, protein content, and cytoskeletal structure of human chondrocytes. We cultivated human chondrocytes, took them along a parabolic flight during the 24th Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Parabolic (DLR) Flight Campaign, and fixed them after the 1st and the 31st parabola. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed no changes after the 1st parabola, but disruptions of β-tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratin networks after the 31st parabola. No F-actin stress fibers were detected even after 31 parabolas. Furthermore, mRNA and protein quantifications after the 31st parabola showed a clear up-regulation of cytoskeletal genes and proteins. The mRNAs were significantly up-regulated as follows: TUBB, 2-fold; VIM, 1.3-fold; KRT8, 1.8-fold; ACTB, 1.9-fold; ICAM1, 4.8-fold; OPN, 7-fold; ITGA10, 1.5-fold; ITGB1, 1.2-fold; TGFB1, 1.5-fold; CAV1, 2.6-fold; SOX9, 1.7-fold; BMP-2, 5.3-fold. However, SOX5 (-25%) and SOX6 (-28%) gene expression was decreased. Contrary, no significant changes in gene expression levels were observed during vibration and hypergravity experiments. These data suggest that short-term microgravity affects the gene expression of distinct proteins. In contrast to poorly differentiated follicular thyroid cancer cells or human endothelial cells, chondrocytes only exert moderate cytoskeletal alterations. The up-regulation of BMP-2, TGF-β1, and SOX9 in chondrocytes may play a key role in preventing cytoskeletal alterations. © FASEB.

  6. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roider, Tobias; Katzfuß, Michael; Matos, Carina; Singer, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Oefner, Peter J; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst; Kreutz, Marina; Peter, Katrin

    2016-12-11

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon(®)) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  7. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Roider

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antithymocyte globulin (ATG is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon® on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC. ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  8. The species-specific regenerative effects of notochordal cell-conditioned medium on chondrocyte-like cells derived from degenerated human intervertebral discs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bach, F C; de Vries, S A; Krouwels, A; Creemers, L B; Ito, K; Meij, B P; Tryfonidou, M A

    2015-01-01

    During intervertebral disc (IVD) maturation, the main cell type shifts from notochordal cells (NCs) to chondrocyte-like cells (CLCs). NCs secrete factors with regenerative potential, making them an interesting focus for regenerative treatments. During initial development, these strategies preferably

  9. The species-specific regenerative effects of notochordal cell-conditioned medium on chondrocyte-like cells derived from degenerated human intervertebral discs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bach, FC; de Vries, S A H; Krouwels, A; Creemers, L B; Ito, K; Meij, B P; Tryfonidou, M A

    2015-01-01

    During intervertebral disc (IVD) maturation, the main cell type shifts from notochordal cells (NCs) to chondrocyte-like cells (CLCs). NCs secrete factors with regenerative potential, making them an interesting focus for regenerative treatments. During initial development, these strategies preferably

  10. Human cytotrophoblasts acquire aneuploidies as they differentiateto an invasive phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Jung, Christine J.; Gormley, Matthew; Zhou, Yuan; Chu, Lisa W.; Genbacev, Olga; Wright, AlexiA.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2004-12-15

    Through an unusual differentiation process, human trophoblast progenitors (cytotrophoblasts) give rise to tumor-like cells that invade the uterus. By an unknown mechanism, invasive cytotrophoblasts exhibit permanent cell cycle withdrawal. Here we report molecular cytogenetic data showing that {approx} 20 to 60 percent of these interphase cells had acquired aneusomies involving chromosomes X, Y, o r16. The incidence positively correlated with gestational age and differentiation to an invasive phenotype. Scoring 12 chromosomes in flow-sorted cytotrophoblasts showed that more than 95 percent of the cells were hyperdiploid. Thus, aneuploidy appears to be an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of cytotrophoblasts within the uterus.

  11. Phenotypic changes of human cells in human-rat liver during partial hepatectomy-induced regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Sun; Dong Xiao; Hong-An Li; Jin-Fang Jiang; Qing Li; Ruo-Shuang Zhang; Xi-Gu Chen

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components in rat liver and the phenotypic changes of human cells in liver of human-rat chimera (HRC) generated by in utero transplantation of human cells during partial hepatectomy (PHx)-induced liver regeneration. METHODS: Human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components and phenotypic changes of human cells during liver regeneration were examined by flow cytometry, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: ISH analysis demonstrated human Alupositive cells in hepatic parenchyma and stroma of recipient liver. Functional human hepatocytes generated in this model potentially constituted human hepatic functional units with the presence of donor-derived human endothelial and biliary duct cells in host liver. Alpha fetoprotein (AFP)+, CD34+ and CD45+ cells were observed in the chimeric liver on day 10 after PHxinduced liver regeneration and then disappeared in PHx group, but not in non-PHx group, suggesting that dynamic phenotypic changes of human cells expressing AFP, CD34 and CD45 cells may occur during the chimeric liver regeneration. Additionally, immunostaining for human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) showed that the number of PCNA-positive cells in the chimeric liver of PHx group was markedly increased, as compared to that of control group, indicating that donor-derived human cells are actively proliferated during PHx-induced regeneration of HRC liver.

  12. The properties of bioengineered chondrocyte sheets for cartilage regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ota Naoshi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the clinical results of autologous chondrocyte implantation for articular cartilage defects have recently improved as a result of advanced techniques based on tissue engineering procedures, problems with cell handling and scaffold imperfections remain to be solved. A new cell-sheet technique has been developed, and is potentially able to overcome these obstacles. Chondrocyte sheets applicable to cartilage regeneration can be prepared with this cell-sheet technique using temperature-responsive culture dishes. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of the cells in these sheets and to identify their similarities to naive cartilage. Results The expression of SOX 9, collagen type 2, 27, integrin α10, and fibronectin genes in triple-layered chondrocyte sheets was significantly increased in comparison to those in conventional monolayer culture and in a single chondrocyte sheet, implying a nature similar to ordinary cartilage. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that collagen type II, fibronectin, and integrin α10 were present in the triple-layered chondrocyte sheets. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that these chondrocyte sheets with a consistent cartilaginous phenotype and adhesive properties may lead to a new strategy for cartilage regeneration.

  13. Regulation of xylosyltransferase I gene expression by interleukin 1β in human primary chondrocyte cells: mechanism and impact on proteoglycan synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khair, Mostafa; Bourhim, Mustapha; Barré, Lydia; Li, Dong; Netter, Patrick; Magdalou, Jacques; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2013-01-18

    Xylosyltransferase I (XT-I) is an essential enzyme of proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis pathway catalyzing the initial and rate-limiting step in glycosaminoglycan chain assembly. It plays a critical role in the regulation of PG synthesis in cartilage; however, little is known about underlying mechanism. Here, we provide evidence that, in human primary chondrocytes, IL-1β regulates XT-I gene expression into an early phase of induction and a late phase of down-regulation. Based on promoter deletions, the region up to -850 bp was defined as a major element of XT-I gene displaying both constitutive and IL-1β-regulated promoter activity. Point mutation and signaling analyses revealed that IL-1β-induced promoter activity is achieved through AP-1 response elements and mediated by SAP/JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Transactivation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AP-1 is a potent transactivator of XT-I promoter and that IL-1β-induced activity is mediated through increased recruitment of AP-1 to the promoter. Finally, we show that Sp3 is a repressor of XT-I promoter and bring evidence that the repressive effect of IL-1β during the late phase is mediated through Sp3 recruitment to the promoter. This suggests that modulation of Sp3 in cartilage could prevent IL-1β inhibition of PG synthesis and limit tissue degradation.

  14. Regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α expression by interleukin-1β (IL-1 β, insulin-like growth factors I (IGF-I and II (IGF-II in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Rossi Sartori-Cintra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha regulates genes related to cellular survival under hypoxia. This factor is present in osteroarthritic chondrocytes, and cytokines, such as interleukin-1 beta, participate in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, thereby increasing the activities of proteolytic enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases, and accelerating cartilage destruction. We hypothesize that Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α can regulate cytokines (catabolic action and/or growth factors (anabolic action in osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the modulation of HIF-1α in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β and insulin-like growth factors I (IGF-I and II (IGF-II and to determine the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol-3kinase (PI-3K pathway in this process. METHODS: Human osteroarthritic chondrocytes were stimulated with IL-1β, IGF-I and IGF-II and LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3K. Nuclear protein levels and gene expression were analyzed by western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses, respectively. RESULTS: HIF-1α expression was upregulated by IL-1β at the protein level but not at the gene level. IGF-I treatment resulted in increases in both the protein and mRNA levels of HIF-1α , whereas IGF-II had no effect on its expression. However, all of these stimuli exploited the PI-3K pathway. CONCLUSION: IL-1β upregulated the levels of HIF-1α protein post-transcriptionally, whereas IGF-I increased HIF-1α at the transcript level. In contrast, IGF-II did not affect the protein or gene expression levels of HIF-1α . Furthermore, all of the tested stimuli exploited the PI-3K pathway to some degree. Based on these findings, we are able to suggest that Hypoxia inducible Factor-1 exhibits protective activity in chondrocytes during osteoarthritis.

  15. Resveratrol inhibits the IL-1β-induced expression of MMP-13 and IL-6 in human articular chondrocytes via TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hailun; Jiao, Yongliang; Yu, Xiaolu; Li, Xingyao; Wang, Wei; Ding, Lifeng; Liu, Li

    2017-03-01

    The natural polyphenolic compound, resveratrol, has been shown to exhibit anti-osteoarthritic activity. Therefore it is hypothesized that resveratrol may serve as a nutritional supplement to counteract osteoarthritis (OA). However, the mechanisms responsible for these anti-osteoarthritic effects have not yet been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether the biological effects of resveratrol against interleukin (IL)-1β‑induced inflammation in human articular chondrocytes involved both Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent and -independent signaling pathways. Human articular chondrocytes derived from patients with OA were stimulated with IL-1β, and then co-treated with resveratrol. Cell viability was subsequently evaluated by MTS assays, and the concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and the pro-inflammatory factor, IL-6, were detected in culture supernatants using ELISA. The mRNA and protein levels of downstream mediators of TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways were also assayed by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Our results revealed that resveratrol prevented the IL-1β-induced reduction in cell viability. Furthermore, stimulation of the chondrocytes with IL-1β resulted in a significant upregulation of TLR4 and downstream targets of both TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways that are associated with the synthesis of MMP-13 and IL-6. Correspondingly, IL-1β-induced catabolic and inflammatory responses were effectively reversed by resveratrol. Taken together, these data suggest that resveratrol exerted protective effects against matrix degradation and inflammation in OA-affected chondrocytes by inhibiting both TLR4/MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling pathways. Thus, resveratrol represents a potential treatment for OA and warrants further investigation.

  16. Genetic and phenotypic consequences of introgression between humans and Neanderthals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Strong evidence for introgression of Neanderthal genes into parts of the modern human gene pool has recently emerged. The evidence indicates that some populations of modern humans have received infusions of genes from two different groups of Neanderthals. One of these Neanderthal groups lived in the Middle East and Central Europe and the other group (the Denisovans) is known to have lived in Central Asia and was probably more widespread. This review examines two questions. First, how were these introgressions detected and what does the genetic evidence tell us about their nature and extent? We will see that an unknown but possibly large fraction of the entire Neanderthal gene complement may have survived in modern humans. Even though each modern European and Asian carries only a few percent of genes that can be traced back to Neanderthals, different individuals carry different subgroups of these introgressed genes. Second, what is the likelihood that this Neanderthal genetic legacy has had phenotypic effects on modern humans? We examine evidence for and against the possibility that some of the surviving fragments of Neanderthal genomes have been preserved by natural selection, and we explore the ways in which more evidence bearing on this question will become available in the future.

  17. Deciphering chondrocyte behaviour in matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation to undergo accurate cartilage repair with hyaline matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoor, M; Maneix, L; Ollitrault, D; Legendre, F; Duval, E; Claus, S; Mallein-Gerin, F; Moslemi, S; Boumediene, K; Galera, P

    2012-06-01

    Since the emergence in the 1990s of the autologous chondrocytes transplantation (ACT) in the treatment of cartilage defects, the technique, corresponding initially to implantation of chondrocytes, previously isolated and amplified in vitro, under a periosteal membrane, has greatly evolved. Indeed, the first generations of ACT showed their limits, with in particular the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the monolayer culture, inducing the synthesis of fibroblastic collagens, notably type I collagen to the detriment of type II collagen. Beyond the clinical aspect with its encouraging results, new biological substitutes must be tested to obtain a hyaline neocartilage. Therefore, the use of differentiated chondrocytes phenotypically stabilized is essential for the success of ACT at medium and long-term. That is why researchers try now to develop more reliable culture techniques, using among others, new types of biomaterials and molecules known for their chondrogenic activity, giving rise to the 4th generation of ACT. Other sources of cells, being able to follow chondrogenesis program, are also studied. The success of the cartilage regenerative medicine is based on the phenotypic status of the chondrocyte and on one of its essential component of the cartilage, type II collagen, the expression of which should be supported without induction of type I collagen. The knowledge accumulated by the scientific community and the experience of the clinicians will certainly allow to relief this technological challenge, which influence besides, the validation of such biological substitutes by the sanitary authorities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. HPOSim: an R package for phenotypic similarity measure and enrichment analysis based on the human phenotype ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yue; Gao, Lin; Wang, Bingbo; Guo, Xingli

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic features associated with genes and diseases play an important role in disease-related studies and most of the available methods focus solely on the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database without considering the controlled vocabulary. The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) provides a standardized and controlled vocabulary covering phenotypic abnormalities in human diseases, and becomes a comprehensive resource for computational analysis of human disease phenotypes. Most of the existing HPO-based software tools cannot be used offline and provide only few similarity measures. Therefore, there is a critical need for developing a comprehensive and offline software for phenotypic features similarity based on HPO. HPOSim is an R package for analyzing phenotypic similarity for genes and diseases based on HPO data. Seven commonly used semantic similarity measures are implemented in HPOSim. Enrichment analysis of gene sets and disease sets are also implemented, including hypergeometric enrichment analysis and network ontology analysis (NOA). HPOSim can be used to predict disease genes and explore disease-related function of gene modules. HPOSim is open source and freely available at SourceForge (https://sourceforge.net/p/hposim/).

  19. Curcumin Inhibits Chondrocyte Hypertrophy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells through IHH and Notch Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhen; Dou, Ce; Dong, Shiwu

    2017-01-01

    Using tissue engineering technique to repair cartilage damage caused by osteoarthritis is a promising strategy. However, the regenerated tissue usually is fibrous cartilage, which has poor mechanical characteristics compared to hyaline cartilage. Chondrocyte hypertrophy plays an important role in this process. Thus, it is very important to find out a suitable way to maintain the phenotype of chondrocytes and inhibit chondrocyte hypertrophy. Curcumin deriving from turmeric was reported with anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor pharmacological effects. However, the role of curcumin in metabolism of chondrocytes, especially in the chondrocyte hypertrophy remains unclear. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in cartilage tissue engineering as seed cells. So we investigated the effect of curcumin on chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy in MSCs through examination of cell viability, glycosaminoglycan synthesis and specific gene expression. We found curcumin had no effect on expression of chondrogenic markers including Sox9 and Col2a1 while hypertrophic markers including Runx2 and Col10a1 were down-regulated. Further exploration showed that curcumin inhibited chondrocyte hypertrophy through Indian hedgehog homolog (IHH) and Notch signalings. Our results indicated curcumin was a potential agent in modulating cartilage homeostasis and maintaining chondrocyte phenotype.

  20. Growth Differentiation Factor-5 Stimulates the Growth and Anabolic Metabolism of Articular Chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Peng; Yao Jianfeng; Guo Xiong; Zhang Yingang; Klaus von der Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) on the growth and anabolic metabolism of articular chondrocytes. Methods: The articular chondrocytes isolated from rats were treated with various concentrations of rmGDF-5, and the growth of chondrocytes measured by MTr assay, the cellular cartilage matrices formation detected sulfated glycosaminoglycan by Alcian blue staining and type 11 collagen by RT-PCR, the collagen phenotypic expression of chondrocytes detected by immunofluorescence. Results: After 7 days culture, MTF assay showed that GDF-5 enhanced the growth of ehondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner, RT-PCR showed that GDF-5 clearly induced the synthesis of type Ⅱ collagen because of the colal mRNA band more and more strong in a dose-dependent. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 14 days, the intensity of Alcian blue staining was gready enhanced, especially, at a high concentration of 1000ng/ml, and GDF-5 enhanced the accumulation of the Alcian blue-stainable material in a concentration-dependent manner and in a does-dependent manner. Chondrocytes were cultured with GDF-5 for 21 days, immunofluorescent staining of type Ⅱ collagen was clear, the type Ⅰ and Ⅹ collagen were negative. Conclusion: GDF-5 enhanced the growth of mature articular chon-drocytes, and stimulated the cellular cartilage matrices formation, but did not change the collagen phenotypic ex-pression of chondrocytes in mono-layer culture.

  1. The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1α and tumor necrosis factor α promote the expression and secretion of proteolytically active cathepsin S from human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglič, Dejan; Repnik, Urška; Jedeszko, Christopher; Kosec, Gregor; Miniejew, Catherine; Kindermann, Maik; Vasiljeva, Olga; Turk, Vito; Wendt, K Ulrich; Sloane, Bonnie F; Goldring, Mary B; Turk, Boris

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are destructive joint diseases that involve the loss of articular cartilage. Degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix is believed to occur due to imbalance between the catabolic and anabolic processes of resident chondrocytes. Previous work has suggested that various lysosomal cysteine cathepsins participate in cartilage degeneration; however, their exact roles in disease development and progression have not been elucidated. In order to study degradation processes under conditions resembling the in vivo milieu of the cartilage, we cultivated chondrocytes on a type II collagen-containing matrix. Stimulation of the cultivated chondrocytes with interleukin-1α and/or tumor necrosis factor α resulted in a time-dependent increase in cathepsin S expression and induced its secretion into the conditioned media. Using a novel bioluminescent activity-based probe, we were able to demonstrate a significant increase in proteolytic activity of cathepsin S in the conditioned media of proinflammatory cytokine-stimulated chondrocytes. For the first time, cathepsin S was demonstrated to be secreted from chondrocytes upon stimulation with the proinflammatory cytokines, and displayed proteolytic activity in culture supernatants. Its stability at neutral pH and potent proteolytic activity on extracellular matrix components mean that cathepsin S may contribute significantly to cartilage degradation and may thus be considered a potential drug target in joint diseases.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhancer-binding protein 3 is essential for the expression of asparagine-linked glycosylation 2 in the regulation of osteoblast and chondrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Katsuyuki; Maeda, Shingo; Kawamura, Ichiro; Matsuyama, Kanehiro; Shinohara, Naohiro; Yahiro, Yuhei; Nagano, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Takao; Yokouchi, Masahiro; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Komiya, Setsuro

    2014-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhancer-binding protein 3 (Hivep3) suppresses osteoblast differentiation by inducing proteasomal degradation of the osteogenesis master regulator Runx2. In this study, we tested the possibility of cooperation of Hivep1, Hivep2, and Hivep3 in osteoblast and/or chondrocyte differentiation. Microarray analyses with ST-2 bone stroma cells demonstrated that expression of any known osteochondrogenesis-related genes was not commonly affected by the three Hivep siRNAs. Only Hivep3 siRNA promoted osteoblast differentiation in ST-2 cells, whereas all three siRNAs cooperatively suppressed differentiation in ATDC5 chondrocytes. We further used microarray analysis to identify genes commonly down-regulated in both MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts and ST-2 cells upon knockdown of Hivep3 and identified asparagine-linked glycosylation 2 (Alg2), which encodes a mannosyltransferase residing on the endoplasmic reticulum. The Hivep3 siRNA-mediated promotion of osteoblast differentiation was negated by forced Alg2 expression. Alg2 suppressed osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in cultured calvarial bone. Alg2 was immunoprecipitated with Runx2, whereas the combined transfection of Runx2 and Alg2 interfered with Runx2 nuclear localization, which resulted in suppression of Runx2 activity. Chondrocyte differentiation was promoted by Hivep3 overexpression, in concert with increased expression of Creb3l2, whose gene product is the endoplasmic reticulum stress transducer crucial for chondrogenesis. Alg2 silencing suppressed Creb3l2 expression and chondrogenesis of ATDC5 cells, whereas infection of Alg2-expressing virus promoted chondrocyte maturation in cultured cartilage rudiments. Thus, Alg2, as a downstream mediator of Hivep3, suppresses osteogenesis, whereas it promotes chondrogenesis. To our knowledge, this study is the first to link a mannosyltransferase gene to osteochondrogenesis.

  3. Salvianolic acid B regulates gene expression and promotes cell viability in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohong; Liu, Shaojie; Li, Siming; Wang, Pengzhen; Zhu, Weicong; Liang, Peihong; Tan, Jianrong; Cui, Shuliang

    2017-02-28

    Articular chondrocytes reside in lacunae distributed in cartilage responsible for the remodelling of the tissue with limited ability of damage repairing. The in vitro expanded chondrocytes enhanced by factors/agents to obtain large numbers of cells with strengthened phenotype are essential for successful repair of cartilage lesions by clinical cell implantation therapies. Because the salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a major hydrophilic therapeutic agent isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been widely used to treat diseases and able to stimulate activity of cells, this study examines the effects of Sal B on passaged chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were treated with various concentrations of Sal B in monolayer culture, their morphological properties and changes, and mitochondrial membrane potential were analysed using microscopic analyses, including cellular biochemical staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The proteins were quantified by BCA and Western blotting, and the transcription of genes was detected by qRT-PCR. The passaged chondrocytes treated with Sal B showed strengthened cellular synthesis and stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential with upregulated expression of the marker genes for chondrocyte phenotype, Col2-α1, Acan and Sox9, the key Wnt signalling molecule β-catenin and paracrine cytokine Cytl-1. The treatments using CYTL-1 protein significantly increased expression of Col2-α1 and Acan with no effect on Sox9, indicating the paracrine cytokine acts on chondrocytes independent of SOX9. Sal B has ultimately promoted cell growth and enhanced chondrocyte phenotype. The chondrocytes treated with pharmaceutical agent and cytokine in the formulated medium for generating large number of differentiated chondrocytes would facilitate the cell-based therapies for cartilage repair.

  4. Dissecting phenotypic traits linked to human resilience to Alzheimer's pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Stein, Thor D; Tai, Hwan-Ching; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Scotton, Thomas C; Barroeta-Espar, Isabel; Fernandez-Carballo, Leticia; de Munain, Estibaliz Lopez; Perez, Jesus; Marquie, Marta; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Frosch, Mathew P; Lowe, Val; Parisi, Joseph E; Petersen, Ronald C; Ikonomovic, Milos D; López, Oscar L; Klunk, William; Hyman, Bradley T; Gómez-Isla, Teresa

    2013-08-01

    Clinico-pathological correlation studies and positron emission tomography amyloid imaging studies have shown that some individuals can tolerate substantial amounts of Alzheimer's pathology in their brains without experiencing dementia. Few details are known about the neuropathological phenotype of these unique cases that might prove relevant to understanding human resilience to Alzheimer's pathology. We conducted detailed quantitative histopathological and biochemical assessments on brains from non-demented individuals before death whose brains were free of substantial Alzheimer's pathology, non-demented individuals before death but whose post-mortem examination demonstrated significant amounts of Alzheimer's changes ('mismatches'), and demented Alzheimer's cases. Quantification of amyloid-β plaque burden, stereologically-based counts of neurofibrillary tangles, neurons and reactive glia, and morphological analyses of axons were performed in the multimodal association cortex lining the superior temporal sulcus. Levels of synaptic integrity markers, and soluble monomeric and multimeric amyloid-β and tau species were measured. Our results indicate that some individuals can accumulate equivalent loads of amyloid-β plaques and tangles to those found in demented Alzheimer's cases without experiencing dementia. Analyses revealed four main phenotypic differences among these two groups: (i) mismatches had striking preservation of neuron numbers, synaptic markers and axonal geometry compared to demented cases; (ii) demented cases had significantly higher burdens of fibrillar thioflavin-S-positive plaques and of oligomeric amyloid-β deposits reactive to conformer-specific antibody NAB61 than mismatches; (iii) strong and selective accumulation of hyperphosphorylated soluble tau multimers into the synaptic compartment was noted in demented cases compared with controls but not in mismatches; and (iv) the robust glial activation accompanying amyloid-β and tau pathologies in

  5. Identification of the calcitonin receptor in osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Tjorbjoern

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that salmon calcitonin has cartilage protective effects in joint degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis (OA. However, the presence of the calcitonin receptor (CTR in articular cartilage chondrocytes is yet to be identified. In this study, we sought to further investigate the expression of the CTR in naïve human OA articular chondrocytes to gain further confirmation of the existents of the CTR in articular cartilage. Methods Total RNA was purified from primary chondrocytes from articular cartilage biopsies from four OA patients undergoing total knee replacement. High quality cDNA was produced using a dedicated reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR protocol. From this a nested PCR assay amplifying the full coding region of the CTR mRNA was completed. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to characterize CTR protein on protein level in chondrocytes. Results The full coding transcript of the CTR isoform 2 was identified in all four individuals. DNA sequencing revealed a number of allelic variants of the gene including two potentially novel polymorphisms: a frame shift mutation, +473del, producing a shorter form of the receptor protein, and a single nucleotide polymorphism in the 3' non coding region of the transcript, +1443 C>T. A 53 kDa protein band, consistent with non-glycosylated CTR isoform 2, was detected in chondrocytes with a similar size to that expressed in osteoclasts. Moreover the CTR was identified in the plasma membrane and the chondrocyte lacuna of both primary chondrocytes and OA cartilage section. Conclusions Human OA articular cartilage chondrocytes do indeed express the CTR, which makes the articular a pharmacological target of salmon calcitonin. In addition, the results support previous findings suggesting that calcitonin has a direct anabolic effect on articular cartilage.

  6. Expression of adhesion molecules and collagen on rat chondrocyte seeded into alginate and hyaluronate based 3D biosystems. Influence of mechanical stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigant-Huselstein, C; Hubert, P; Dumas, D; Dellacherie, E; Netter, P; Payan, E; Stoltz, J F

    2004-01-01

    Chondrocytes use mechanical signals, via interactions with their environment, to synthesize an extracellular matrix capable to withstanding high loads. Most chondrocyte-matrix interactions are mediated via transmembrane receptors such as integrins or non-integrins receptors (i.e. annexin V and CD44). The aim of this study was to analyze, by flow cytometry, the adhesion molecules (alpha5/beta1 integrins and CD44) on rat chondrocytes seeded into 3D biosystem made of alginate and hyaluronate. These biosystems were submitted to mechanical stress by knocking the biosystems between them for 48 hours. The expression of type I and type II collagen was also evaluated. The results of the current study showed that mechanical stress induced an increase of type II collagen production and weak variations of alpha5/beta1 receptors expression no matter what biosystems. Moreover, our results indicated that hyaluronan receptor CD44 expression depends on extracellular matrix modifications. Thus, these receptors were activated by signals resulted from cell environment variations (HA addition and modifications owing to mechanical stress). It suggested that this kind of receptor play a crucial role in extracellular matrix homeostasis. Finally, on day 24, no dedifferentiation of chondrocytes was noted either in biosystems or under mechanical stress. For all biosystems, the neosynthesized matrix contained an important level of collagen, which was type II, whatever biosystems. In conclusion, it appeared that the cells, under mechanical stress, maintained their phenotype. In addition, it seems that, on rat chondrocytes, alpha5/beta1 integrins did not act as the main mechanoreceptor (as described for human chondrocytes). In return, hyaluronan receptor CD44 seems to be in relation with matrix composition.

  7. The Biological Effects of Sex Hormones on Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes from Different Genders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwu Jen Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the biological effects of sex hormones (17β-estradiol and testosterone on rabbit articular chondrocytes from different genders. We cultured primary rabbit articular chondrocytes from both genders with varying concentration of sex hormones. We evaluate cell proliferation and biochemical functions by MTT and GAG assay. The chondrocyte function and phenotypes were analyzed by mRNA level using RT-PCR. Immunocytochemical staining was also used to evaluate the generation of collagen-II. This study demonstrated that 17β-estradiol had greater positive regulation on the biological function and gene expressions of articular chondrocytes than testosterone, with the optimal concentrations of 10−6 and 10−7 M, particularly for female chondrocytes.

  8. Isolation and differentiation of chondrocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells using dlk1/FA1 as a novel surface marker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Mahmood, Amer

    2009-01-01

    was not expressed by undifferentiated hESC, but expressed during in vitro embryoid bodies (hEBs) formation upon down-regulation of undifferentiated markers e.g. Oct 3/4. Similarly, dlk1/FA1 was expressed in chondrocytic cells during in vivo teratoma formation. Interestingly, treatment of hEBs with Activin B...

  9. Evolutionary history of human disease genes reveals phenotypic connections and comorbidity among genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Solip; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Juyong; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which evolutionary changes have impacted the phenotypic relationships among human diseases remains unclear. In this work, we report that phenotypically similar diseases are connected by the evolutionary constraints on human disease genes. Human disease groups can be classified into slowly or rapidly evolving classes, where the diseases in the slowly evolving class are enriched with morphological phenotypes and those in the rapidly evolving class are enriched with physiological phenotypes. Our findings establish a clear evolutionary connection between disease classes and disease phenotypes for the first time. Furthermore, the high comorbidity found between diseases connected by similar evolutionary constraints enables us to improve the predictability of the relative risk of human diseases. We find the evolutionary constraints on disease genes are a new layer of molecular connection in the network-based exploration of human diseases.

  10. Linking human diseases to animal models using ontology-based phenotype annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Washington

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientists and clinicians who study genetic alterations and disease have traditionally described phenotypes in natural language. The considerable variation in these free-text descriptions has posed a hindrance to the important task of identifying candidate genes and models for human diseases and indicates the need for a computationally tractable method to mine data resources for mutant phenotypes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ontological annotation of disease phenotypes will facilitate the discovery of new genotype-phenotype relationships within and across species. To describe phenotypes using ontologies, we used an Entity-Quality (EQ methodology, wherein the affected entity (E and how it is affected (Q are recorded using terms from a variety of ontologies. Using this EQ method, we annotated the phenotypes of 11 gene-linked human diseases described in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM. These human annotations were loaded into our Ontology-Based Database (OBD along with other ontology-based phenotype descriptions of mutants from various model organism databases. Phenotypes recorded with this EQ method can be computationally compared based on the hierarchy of terms in the ontologies and the frequency of annotation. We utilized four similarity metrics to compare phenotypes and developed an ontology of homologous and analogous anatomical structures to compare phenotypes between species. Using these tools, we demonstrate that we can identify, through the similarity of the recorded phenotypes, other alleles of the same gene, other members of a signaling pathway, and orthologous genes and pathway members across species. We conclude that EQ-based annotation of phenotypes, in conjunction with a cross-species ontology, and a variety of similarity metrics can identify biologically meaningful similarities between genes by comparing phenotypes alone. This annotation and search method provides a novel and efficient means to identify

  11. Fibroblast growth factor-1 is a mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted factor stimulating proliferation of osteoarthritic chondrocytes in co-culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Ling; Leijten, Jeroen; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.; Karperien, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we showed that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in co-culture with primary chondrocytes secrete soluble factors that increase chondrocyte proliferation. The objective of this study is to identify these factors. Human primary chondrocytes (hPCs) isolated from late-stage osteoarthritis pat

  12. Chondrocyte hypertrophy and osteoarthritis: role in initiation and progression of cartilage degeneration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, P.M. van der; Berg, W.B. van den

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on the role and regulation of chondrocyte terminal differentiation (hypertrophy-like changes) in osteoarthritis (OA) and to integrate this in a conceptual model of primary OA development. METHODS: Papers investigating chondrocyte terminal differentiation in human

  13. Chondrocyte hypertrophy and osteoarthritis: role in initiation and progression of cartilage degeneration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, P.M. van der; Berg, W.B. van den

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on the role and regulation of chondrocyte terminal differentiation (hypertrophy-like changes) in osteoarthritis (OA) and to integrate this in a conceptual model of primary OA development. METHODS: Papers investigating chondrocyte terminal differentiation in human

  14. Basic fibroblast growth factor induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 via ERK MAP kinase-altered phosphorylation and sumoylation of Elk-1 in human adult articular chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jeong Im

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Hee-Jeong Im,1–4 Andrew D Sharrocks,5 Xia Lin,6 Dongyao Yan,1 Jaesung Kim,1 Andre J van Wijnen,7 Robert A Hipskind81Departments of Biochemistry, 2Internal Medicine, 3Section of Rheumatology, Orthopedic Surgery, 4Rush University Medical Center, and Department of Bioengineering; University of Illinois at Chicago, IL USA; 5Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, UK; 6Michael D DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA; 7Department of Cell Biology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 8Institute De Genetique Moleculaire de Montpellier, FranceAbstract: Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF are principal aspects of the pathology of osteoarthritis (OA. ECM disruption leads to bFGF release, which activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK pathway and its downstream target the Ets-like transcription factor Elk-1. Previously we demonstrated that the bFGF-ERK-Elk-1 signaling axis is responsible for the potent induction of MMP-13 in human primary articular chondrocytes. Here we report that, in addition to phosphorylation of Elk-1, dynamic posttranslational modification of Elk-1 by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO serves as an important mechanism through which MMP-13 gene expression is regulated. We show that bFGF activates Elk-1 mainly through the ERK pathway and that increased phosphorylation of Elk-1 is accompanied by decreased conjugation of SUMO to Elk-1. Reporter gene assays reveal that phosphorylation renders Elk-1 competent for induction of MMP-13 gene transcription, while sumoylation has the opposite effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the SUMO-conjugase Ubc9 acts as a key mediator for Elk-1 sumoylation. Taken together, our results suggest that sumoylation antagonizes the phosphorylation

  15. The trans-well coculture of human synovial mesenchymal stem cells with chondrocytes leads to self-organization, chondrogenic differentiation, and secretion of TGFβ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Heidt, Emanuel; Bernstein, Anke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSC) possess a high chondrogenic differentiation potential, which possibly supports natural and surgically induced healing of cartilage lesions. We hypothesized enhanced chondrogenesis of SMSC caused by the vicinity of chondrocytes (CHDR). METHODS....... RESULTS: After 7 days, phase-contrast microscopy revealed cell aggregation of SMSC in coculture with CHDR. Afterwards, cells formed spheres and lost adherence. However, this phenomenon was not observed when culturing SMSC alone. Fluorescence labeling showed concurrent collagen type II expression. Addition...

  16. Serum-free medium supplemented with high-concentration FGF2 for cell expansion culture of human ear chondrocytes promotes redifferentiation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Erik W; van der Veen, Simone W; Verhaar, Jan A N; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2002-08-01

    For tissue engineering of autologous cartilage, cell expansion is needed to obtain the cell numbers required. Standard expansion media contain bovine serum. This has several disadvantages, that is, the risk of transmitting diseases and serum-batch variations. The aim of this study was to find a serum-free medium with at least the same potential to expand cell numbers as serum-containing media. Ear chondrocytes of three young children were expanded in either serum-containing medium (SCM; DMEM with 10% fetal calf serum) or serum-free medium (SFM; DMEM with ITS+) supplemented with 5 or 100 ng/mL fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). To promote cell adherence onto the culture flask, the serum-free conditions were cultured with 10% serum for 1 day after each trypsinization. After the fourth passage, the chondrocytes were encapsuled in alginate beads and redifferentiated in a SFM (DMEM with ITS+, hydrocortisone, and L-ascorbic acid) supplemented with 10 ng/mL IGF-I and 10 ng/mL TGFbeta-2. Results showed that expansion in SFM with 100 ng/mL FGF2 was comparable to expansion in SCM. Redifferentiation with SFM with IGF-I and TGFbeta-2 showed high collagen type II expression and high GAG/DNA production regardless of which expansion medium had been used. However, chondrocytes expanded in SFM with 100 ng/mL FGF2 resulted in less positive cells for collagen type I and 11-fibrau (a fibroblast membrane marker). The present study shows that it is possible to use serum-free medium for tissue engineering of cartilage. Expansion of immature ear chondrocytes in SFM supplemented with high-concentration FGF2 resulted in high cell numbers, which in addition had better redifferentiation capacity than cells expanded in medium with 10% serum.

  17. Use of non-degenerate human osteochondral tissue and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the study of chondrocyte death at cartilage surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huntley J. S.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Although autologous osteochondral grafting has been widely applied in humans, most in vitro work has been on animal models. The aims of this study were to: (i elaborate a full thickness human femoral condylar model using discard material from knee arthroplasty resections, and (ii use this model to assess chondrocyte viability in response to surgical trauma. Homogeneous regions of human lateral femoral condyle bone-cartilage were procured from knee arthroplasty resections. These were graded prospectively, firstly by visual inspection, and then by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Samples were subjected to tests of tissue hydration, including analysis of water content and swelling after excision from underlying bone. Surgical cuts were made in explants that were macroscopically and microscopically normal (i.e. Grade 0. Associated margins of death were assessed from both transverse and surface perspectives. Thirty-nine samples were obtained from anterior and distal femoral cuts (16 knees from 13 patients for (1 macroscopic grading, (2 microscopic analysis, (3 analyses of water content as cut and on re-equilibration after excision from bone. Thirteen were Grade 0 on macroscopic viewing - however one showed fibrillation on microscopy and was therefore reassigned Grade 1. Grade 0 tissue had a water content of 73.8±0.38%, in agreement with control values from the literature. Tissues of Grades 2 and 3 were significantly (P=0.03, and P=0.004 more hydrated (76.0±0.59%, 76.7±0.99% than Grade 0 tissue. Grade 0 tissue from the anterior cut did not swell significantly following excision from subchondral bone. However Grade 0 tissue from the distal cut showed a small but statistically significant (P=0.019 increase in water content (1.68±0.39% following excision. With increasing grade there was increased tendency to swell off the bone (P<0.0001. Transverse imaging showed that the Acufex MP surgical harvester caused a greater margin of cell death

  18. 15-Deoxy-delta12,14-PGJ2, but not troglitazone, modulates IL-1beta effects in human chondrocytes by inhibiting NF-kappaB and AP-1 activation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyault, S; Simonin, M A; Bianchi, A; Compe, E; Liagre, B; Mainard, D; Bécuwe, P; Dauça, M; Netter, P; Terlain, B; Bordji, K

    2001-07-13

    The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) has been shown to inhibit the production and the effects of proinflammatory cytokines. Since interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) directly mediates cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis, we investigated the capability of PPARgamma ligands to modulate IL-1beta effects on human chondrocytes. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that PPARgamma expression was decreased by IL-1beta. 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), in contrast to troglitazone, was highly potent to counteract IL-1beta-induced cyclooxygenase-2 and inductible nitric oxide synthase expression, NO production and the decrease in proteoglycan synthesis. Western blot and gel-shift analyses demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2 inhibited NF-kappaB activation, while troglitazone was ineffective. Although 15d-PGJ2 attenuated activator protein-1 binding on the DNA, it potentiated c-jun migration in the nucleus. The absence or the low effect of troglitazone suggests that 15d-PGJ2 action in human chondrocytes is mainly PPARgamma-independent.

  19. Expression of osteogenic proteins during the intrasplenic transplantation of Meckel's chondrocytes: A histochemical and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizeki, Kiyoto; Kagiya, Tadayoshi; Fujiwara, Naoki; Otsu, Keishi; Harada, Hidemitsu

    2009-03-01

    Meckel's chondrocytes, derived from the ectomesenchyme, have the potential to transform into other phenotypes. In this study, we transplanted cell pellets of Meckel's chondrocytes into isogenic mouse spleens and analyzed their phenotypic transformation into osteogenic cells using histological and immunohistochemical methods. With the increasing duration of transplantation, chondrocytes were incorporated into splenic tissues and formed a von Kossa-positive calcified matrix containing calcium and phosphoric acid, similar to that of intact bone. Type I, II, and X collagens, and the bone-marker proteins osteocalcin, osteopontin, osteonectin, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were immunolocalized in the matrix formed by the transplanted chondrocytes. Osteopontin and osteonectin were detected in the calcified matrix at earlier stages than osteocalcin and BMP-2. Type II collagen was expressed during the first week of transplantation, and type X collagen-positive cells appeared scattered during the initial stage of calcification, these collagens being later replaced by type I collagen formed by osteocyte-like cells. Electron microscopic observations revealed that chondrocytes surrounded by the calcified matrix transformed into spindle-shaped osteocytic cells accompanying the formation of bone-type thick-banded collagen fibrils. These results suggest that phenotypic switching of Meckel's chondrocytes can occur under in vivo conditions at a cellular morphological level.

  20. Characterization of pediatric microtia cartilage: a reservoir of chondrocytes for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; García-López, J; Brena-Molina, A M; Gutiérrez-Gómez, C; Ibarra, C; Velasquillo, C

    2016-09-01

    The external ear is composed of elastic cartilage. Microtia is a congenital malformation of the external ear that involves a small reduction in size or a complete absence. The aim of tissue engineering is to regenerate tissues and organs clinically implantable based on the utilization of cells and biomaterials. Remnants from microtia represent a source of cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering. To examine the macromolecular architecture of microtia cartilage and behavior of chondrocytes, in order to enrich the knowledge of this type of cartilage as a cell reservoir. Auricular cartilage remnants were obtained from pediatric patients with microtia undergoing reconstructive procedures. Extracellular matrix composition was characterized using immunofluorescence and histological staining methods. Chondrocytes were isolated and expanded in vitro using a mechanical-enzymatic protocol. Chondrocyte phenotype was analyzed using qualitative PCR. Microtia cartilage preserves structural organization similar to healthy elastic cartilage. Extracellular matrix is composed of typical cartilage proteins such as type II collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. Chondrocytes displayed morphological features similar to chondrocytes derived from healthy cartilage, expressing SOX9, COL2 and ELN, thus preserving chondral phenotype. Cell viability was 94.6 % during in vitro expansion. Elastic cartilage from microtia has similar characteristics, both architectural and biochemical to healthy cartilage. We confirmed the suitability of microtia remnant as a reservoir of chondrocytes with potential to be expanded in vitro, maintaining phenotypical features and viability. Microtia remnants are an accessible source of autologous cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

  1. Cyclic Equibiaxial Tensile Strain Alters Gene Expression of Chondrocytes via Histone Deacetylase 4 Shuttling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongwei Chen

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate whether equibiaxial tensile strain alters chondrocyte gene expression via controlling subcellular localization of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4.Murine chondrocytes transfected with GFP-HDAC4 were subjected to 3 h cyclic equibiaxial tensile strain (CTS, 6% strain at 0.25 Hz by a Flexcell® FX-5000™ Tension System. Fluorescence microscope and western blot were used to observe subcellular location of HDAC4. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The concentration of Glycosaminoglycans in culture medium was quantified by bimethylmethylene blue dye; Collagen II protein was evaluated by western blot. Cells phenotype was identified by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability was evaluated by live-dead cell detect kit. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of HDAC4 nuclear relocation, was used to further validate whether HDAC4 nuclear relocation plays a role in gene expression in response to tension stimulation.87.5% of HDAC4 was located in the cytoplasm in chondrocytes under no loading condition, but it was relocated to the nucleus after CTS. RT-PCR analysis showed that levels of mRNA for aggrecan, collagen II, LK1 and SOX9 were all increased in chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to no loading control chondrocytes; in contrast, the levels of type X collagen, MMP-13, IHH and Runx2 gene expression were decreased in the chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to control chondrocytes. Meanwhile, CTS contributed to elevation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen II protein, but did not change collagen I production. When Okadaic acid blocked HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus, the changes of the chondrocytes induced by CTS were abrogated. There was no chondrocyte dead detected in this study in response to CTS.CTS is able to induce HDAC4 relocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. Thus, CTS alters chondrocytes gene expression in association with the relocation of HDAC4 induced by CTS.

  2. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  3. Antiangiogenic treatment delays chondrocyte maturation and bone formation during limb skeletogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Melinda; Gentili, Chiara; Koyama, Eiki; Zasloff, Michael; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic chondrocytes have important roles in promoting invasion of cartilage by blood vessels and its replacement with bone. However, it is unclear whether blood vessels exert reciprocal positive influences on chondrocyte maturation and function. Therefore, we implanted beads containing the antiangiogenic molecule squalamine around humeral anlagen in chick embryo wing buds and monitored the effects over time. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the drug diffused from the beads and accumulated in humeral perichondrial tissues, indicating that these tissues were the predominant targets of drug action. Diaphyseal chondrocyte maturation was indeed delayed in squalamine-treated humeri, as indicated by reduced cell hypertrophy and expression of type X collagen, transferrin, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh). Although reduced in amount, Ihh maintained a striking distribution in treated and control humeri, being associated with diaphyseal chondrocytes as well as inner perichondrial layer. These decreases were accompanied by lack of cartilage invasion and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) cells and a significant longitudinal growth retardation. Recovery occurred at later developmental times, when in fact expression in treated humeri of markers such as matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) appeared to exceed that in controls. Treating primary cultures of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteoblasts with squalamine revealed no obvious changes in cell phenotype. These data provide evidence that perichondrial tissues and blood vessels in particular influence chondrocyte maturation in a positive manner and may cooperate with hypertrophic chondrocytes in dictating the normal pace and location of the transition from cartilage to bone.

  4. Systematic validation of specific phenotypic markers for in vitro polarized human macrophages.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambarus, C.A.; Krausz, S.; Eijk, M. van der; Hamann, J.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Reedquist, K.A.; Tak, P.P.; Baeten, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polarization of macrophages by specific micro-environmental conditions impacts upon their function following subsequent activation. This study aimed to systematically validate robust phenotypic markers for in vitro polarized human macrophages in order to facilitate the study of macrophag

  5. Mouse, man, and meaning: bridging the semantics of mouse phenotype and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, John M; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Beck, Tim; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Mungall, Chris; Schofield, Paul N

    2009-08-01

    Now that the laboratory mouse genome is sequenced and the annotation of its gene content is improving, the next major challenge is the annotation of the phenotypic associations of mouse genes. This requires the development of systematic phenotyping pipelines that use standardized phenotyping procedures which allow comparison across laboratories. It also requires the development of a sophisticated informatics infrastructure for the description and interchange of phenotype data. Here we focus on the current state of the art in the description of data produced by systematic phenotyping approaches using ontologies, in particular, the EQ (Entity-Quality) approach, and what developments are required to facilitate the linking of phenotypic descriptions of mutant mice to human diseases.

  6. Cell manipulation in autologous chondrocyte implantation: from research to cleanroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseti, Livia; Serra, Marta; Tigani, Domenico; Brognara, Irene; Lopriore, Annamaria; Bassi, Alessandra; Fornasari, Pier Maria

    2008-04-01

    In the field of orthopaedics, autologous chondrocyte implantation is a technique currently used for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. There is evidence of the neo-formation of tissue displaying characteristics similar to hyaline cartilage. In vitro chondrocyte manipulation is a crucial phase of this therapeutic treatment consisting of different steps: cell isolation from a cartilage biopsy, expansion in monolayer culture and growth onto a three-dimensional biomaterial to implant in the damaged area. To minimise the risk of in vitro cell contamination, the manipulation must be performed in a controlled environment such as a cleanroom. Moreover, the choice of reagents and raw material suitable for clinical use in humans and the translation of research protocols into standardised production processes are important. In this study we describe the preliminary results obtained by the development of chondrocyte manipulation protocols (isolation and monolayer expansion) in cleanrooms for the application of autologous implantation.

  7. Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in developing skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shan; Grover, Monica; Sibai, Tarek; Black, Jennifer; Rianon, Nahid; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Munivez, Elda; Bertin, Terry; Dawson, Brian; Chen, Yuqing; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Lee, Brendan; Yang, Tao; Bae, Yangjin

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are a group of anti-hypertensive drugs that are widely used to treat pediatric hypertension. Recent application of ARBs to treat diseases such as Marfan syndrome or Alport syndrome has shown positive outcomes in animal and human studies, suggesting a broader therapeutic potential for this class of drugs. Multiple studies have reported a benefit of ARBs on adult bone homeostasis; however, its effect on the growing skeleton in children is unknown. We investigated the effect of Losartan, an ARB, in regulating bone mass and cartilage during development in mice. Wild type mice were treated with Losartan from birth until 6 weeks of age, after which bones were collected for microCT and histomorphometric analyses. Losartan increased trabecular bone volume vs. tissue volume (a 98% increase) and cortical thickness (a 9% increase) in 6-weeks old wild type mice. The bone changes were attributed to decreased osteoclastogenesis as demonstrated by reduced osteoclast number per bone surface in vivo and suppressed osteoclast differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in RAW cells was attenuated by Losartan. Similarly, RANKL-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was suppressed by Losartan, suggesting a convergence of RANKL and angiotensin signaling at the level of ERK1/2 regulation. To assess the effect of Losartan on cartilage development, we examined the cartilage phenotype of wild type mice treated with Losartan in utero from conception to 1 day of age. Growth plates of these mice showed an elongated hypertrophic chondrocyte zone and increased Col10a1 expression level, with minimal changes in chondrocyte proliferation. Altogether, inhibition of the angiotensin pathway by Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in growth plate during skeletal development.

  8. Prediction of gene-phenotype associations in humans, mice, and plants using phenologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, John O; Singh-Blom, Ulf Martin; Laurent, Jon M; McGary, Kriston L; Marcotte, Edward M

    2013-06-21

    Phenotypes and diseases may be related to seemingly dissimilar phenotypes in other species by means of the orthology of underlying genes. Such "orthologous phenotypes," or "phenologs," are examples of deep homology, and may be used to predict additional candidate disease genes. In this work, we develop an unsupervised algorithm for ranking phenolog-based candidate disease genes through the integration of predictions from the k nearest neighbor phenologs, comparing classifiers and weighting functions by cross-validation. We also improve upon the original method by extending the theory to paralogous phenotypes. Our algorithm makes use of additional phenotype data--from chicken, zebrafish, and E. coli, as well as new datasets for C. elegans--establishing that several types of annotations may be treated as phenotypes. We demonstrate the use of our algorithm to predict novel candidate genes for human atrial fibrillation (such as HRH2, ATP4A, ATP4B, and HOPX) and epilepsy (e.g., PAX6 and NKX2-1). We suggest gene candidates for pharmacologically-induced seizures in mouse, solely based on orthologous phenotypes from E. coli. We also explore the prediction of plant gene-phenotype associations, as for the Arabidopsis response to vernalization phenotype. We are able to rank gene predictions for a significant portion of the diseases in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database. Additionally, our method suggests candidate genes for mammalian seizures based only on bacterial phenotypes and gene orthology. We demonstrate that phenotype information may come from diverse sources, including drug sensitivities, gene ontology biological processes, and in situ hybridization annotations. Finally, we offer testable candidates for a variety of human diseases, plant traits, and other classes of phenotypes across a wide array of species.

  9. Chondrocyte Culture in Three Dimensional Alginate Sulfate Hydrogels Promotes Proliferation While Maintaining Expression of Chondrogenic Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhanna, Rami; Kashyap, Aditya; Palazzolo, Gemma; Vallmajo-Martin, Queralt; Becher, Jana; Möller, Stephanie; Schnabelrauch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The loss of expression of chondrogenic markers during monolayer expansion remains a stumbling block for cell-based treatment of cartilage lesions. Here, we introduce sulfated alginate hydrogels as a cartilage biomimetic biomaterial that induces cell proliferation while maintaining the chondrogenic phenotype of encapsulated chondrocytes. Hydroxyl groups of alginate were converted to sulfates by incubation with sulfur trioxide–pyridine complex (SO3/pyridine), yielding a sulfated material cross-linkable with calcium chloride. Passage 3 bovine chondrocytes were encapsulated in alginate and alginate sulfate hydrogels for up to 35 days. Cell proliferation was five-fold higher in alginate sulfate compared with alginate (p=0.038). Blocking beta1 integrins in chondrocytes within alginate sulfate hydrogels significantly inhibited proliferation (p=0.002). Sulfated alginate increased the RhoA activity of chondrocytes compared with unmodified alginate, an increase that was blocked by β1 blocking antibodies (p=0.017). Expression and synthesis of type II collagen, type I collagen, and proteoglycan was not significantly affected by the encapsulation material evidenced by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Alginate sulfate constructs showed an opaque appearance in culture, whereas the unmodified alginate samples remained translucent. In conclusion, alginate sulfate provides a three dimensional microenvironment that promotes both chondrocyte proliferation and maintenance of the chondrogenic phenotype and represents an important advance for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair therapies providing a material in which cell expansion can be done in situ. PMID:24320935

  10. Do cell junction protein mutations cause an airway phenotype in mice or humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eugene H; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Zabner, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Cell junction proteins connect epithelial cells to each other and to the basement membrane. Genetic mutations of these proteins can cause alterations in some epithelia leading to varied phenotypes such as deafness, renal disease, skin disorders, and cancer. This review examines if genetic mutations in these proteins affect the function of lung airway epithelia. We review cell junction proteins with examples of disease mutation phenotypes in humans and in mouse knockout models. We also review which of these genes are expressed in airway epithelium by microarray expression profiling and immunocytochemistry. Last, we present a comprehensive literature review to find the lung phenotype when cell junction and adhesion genes are mutated or subject to targeted deletion. We found that in murine models, targeted deletion of cell junction and adhesion genes rarely result in a lung phenotype. Moreover, mutations in these genes in humans have no obvious lung phenotype. Our research suggests that simply because a cell junction or adhesion protein is expressed in an organ does not imply that it will exhibit a drastic phenotype when mutated. One explanation is that because a functioning lung is critical to survival, redundancy in the system is expected. Therefore mutations in a single gene might be compensated by a related function of a similar gene product. Further studies in human and animal models will help us understand the overlap in the function of cell junction gene products. Finally, it is possible that the human lung phenotype is subtle and has not yet been described.

  11. Classifying human audiometric phenotypes of age-related hearing loss from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubno, Judy R; Eckert, Mark A; Lee, Fu-Shing; Matthews, Lois J; Schmiedt, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbyacusis) has a complex etiology. Results from animal models detailing the effects of specific cochlear injuries on audiometric profiles may be used to understand the mechanisms underlying hearing loss in older humans and predict cochlear pathologies associated with certain audiometric configurations ("audiometric phenotypes"). Patterns of hearing loss associated with cochlear pathology in animal models were used to define schematic boundaries of human audiograms. Pathologies included evidence for metabolic, sensory, and a mixed metabolic + sensory phenotype; an older normal phenotype without threshold elevation was also defined. Audiograms from a large sample of older adults were then searched by a human expert for "exemplars" (best examples) of these phenotypes, without knowledge of the human subject demographic information. Mean thresholds and slopes of higher frequency thresholds of the audiograms assigned to the four phenotypes were consistent with the predefined schematic boundaries and differed significantly from each other. Significant differences in age, gender, and noise exposure history provided external validity for the four phenotypes. Three supervised machine learning classifiers were then used to assess reliability of the exemplar training set to estimate the probability that newly obtained audiograms exhibited one of the four phenotypes. These procedures classified the exemplars with a high degree of accuracy; classifications of the remaining cases were consistent with the exemplars with respect to average thresholds and demographic information. These results suggest that animal models of age-related hearing loss can be used to predict human cochlear pathology by classifying audiograms into phenotypic classifications that reflect probable etiologies for hearing loss in older humans.

  12. Role of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium in Auricular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Engineered Cartilage Formation in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to determine the effects of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium (ITS on proliferation of auricular chondrocytes and formation of engineered cartilage in vitro. Pig auricular monolayer chondrocytes and chondrocyte pellets were cultured in media containing 1% ITS at different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS, 10%, 6%, 2%, 0%, or 10% FBS alone as a control for four weeks. Parameters including cell proliferation in monolayer, wet weight, collagen type I/II/X (Col I, II, X and glycosaminoglycan (GAG expression, GAG content of pellets and gene expression associated with cartilage formation/dedifferentiation (lost cartilage phenotype/hypertrophy within the chondrocyte pellets were assessed. The results showed that chondrocytes proliferation rates increased when FBS concentrations increased (2%, 6%, 10% FBS in ITS supplemented groups. In addition, 1% ITS plus 10% FBS significantly promoted cell proliferation than 10% FBS alone. No chondrocytes grew in ITS alone medium. 1% ITS plus 10% FBS enhanced cartilage formation in terms of size, wet weight, cartilage specific matrices, and homogeneity, compared to 10% FBS alone group. Furthermore, ITS prevented engineered cartilage from dedifferentiation (i.e., higher index of Col II/Col I mRNA expression and expression of aggrecan and hypertrophy (i.e., lower mRNA expression of Col X and MMP13. In conclusion, our results indicated that ITS efficiently enhanced auricular chondrocytes proliferation, retained chondrogenic phenotypes, and promoted engineered cartilage formation when combined with FBS, which is potentially used as key supplementation in auricular chondrocytes and engineered cartilage culture.

  13. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-06-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  14. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-06-08

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  15. Influence of age, irradiation and humanization on NSG mouse phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn S. Knibbe-Hollinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Humanized mice are frequently utilized in bench to bedside therapeutic tests to combat human infectious, cancerous and degenerative diseases. For the fields of hematology-oncology, regenerative medicine, and infectious diseases, the immune deficient mice have been used commonly in basic research efforts. Obstacles in true translational efforts abound, as the relationship between mouse and human cells in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic studies requires lengthy investigations. The interplay between human immunity and mouse biology proves ever more complicated when aging, irradiation, and human immune reconstitution are considered. All can affect a range of biochemical and behavioral functions. To such ends, we show age- and irradiation-dependent influences for the development of macrocytic hyper chromic anemia, myelodysplasia, blood protein reductions and body composition changes. Humanization contributes to hematologic abnormalities. Home cage behavior revealed day and dark cycle locomotion also influenced by human cell reconstitutions. Significant age-related day-to-day variability in movement, feeding and drinking behaviors were observed. We posit that this data serves to enable researchers to better design translational studies in this rapidly emerging field of mouse humanization.

  16. Cultivation-based multiplex phenotyping of human gut microbiota allows targeted recovery of previously uncultured bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rettedal, Elizabeth; Gumpert, Heidi; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is linked to a variety of human health issues and implicated in antibiotic resistance gene dissemination. Most of these associations rely on culture-independent methods, since it is commonly believed that gut microbiota cannot be easily or sufficiently cultured. Here, we...... show that carefully designed conditions enable cultivation of a representative proportion of human gut bacteria, enabling rapid multiplex phenotypic profiling. We use this approach to determine the phylogenetic distribution of antibiotic tolerance phenotypes for 16 antibiotics in the human gut...... microbiota. Based on the phenotypic mapping, we tailor antibiotic combinations to specifically select for previously uncultivated bacteria. Utilizing this method we cultivate and sequence the genomes of four isolates, one of which apparently belongs to the genus Oscillibacter; uncultivated Oscillibacter...

  17. Notochordal cells maintain the proliferation and phenotype of chondrocyte-like cells in the disc nucleus pulposus%脊索细胞维持椎间盘髓核软骨样细胞增殖与表型的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨哲; 李树文

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The immature disc nucleus pulposus is composed of notochordal cels, but there is no notochordal cel in the mature human intervertebral disc, in which the notochordal cels are replaced by chondrocyte-like cels. It is very important to comprehend the disappearance of the notochordal cels; however, it is stil unknown at present. OBJECTIVE: To elaborate the feasibility of notochordal cels to maintain the proliferation and phenotype of chondrocyte-like cels and to induce the cartilage-like differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cels. METHODS: The first author used the computer to retrieve PubMed and Wanfang databases using the key words of “notochord cels; nucleus pulposus cels; identify” in English and Chinese, respectively. Totaly 9 896 relevant articles published from January 1999 to August 2015 were retrieved. Repetitive studies were excluded, and finaly 36 articles were in accordance with the inclusion criteria. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Now, the main functions of notochordal cels are to promote synthesis of extracelular matrix in the nucleus pulposus, induce directional differentiation of mesenchymal cels into nucleus pulposus cels or act as “seed cels” to form the nucleus pulposus cels. The presence and disappearance of notochordal cels is related to intervertebral disc degeneration. Cel apoptosis is involved in static compressionviadeath receptor signals, and then leads to intervertebral disc degeneration. fas ligand can mediate the reduction of notochordal cels, and hypoxia-inducible factor can induce spinal cord injury thereby triggering cel death and complete disappearance of nucleus pulposus. The measurement and verification of immune makers of notochordal cels, CK-8, CK-18 and galectin-3, can benefit to the identification and isolation of notochordal cels, and thereby help the studies on cel growth and differentiation, function and its mechanism of apoptosis.%背景:未成熟的椎间盘髓核是由脊索细胞所组成,但在

  18. Increased adipogenesis in cultured embryonic chondrocytes and in adult bone marrow of dominant negative Erg transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Flajollet

    Full Text Available In monolayer culture, primary articular chondrocytes have an intrinsic tendency to lose their phenotype during expansion. The molecular events underlying this chondrocyte dedifferentiation are still largely unknown. Several transcription factors are important for chondrocyte differentiation. The Ets transcription factor family may be involved in skeletal development. One family member, the Erg gene, is mainly expressed during cartilage formation. To further investigate the potential role of Erg in the maintenance of the chondrocyte phenotype, we isolated and cultured chondrocytes from the rib cartilage of embryos of transgenic mice that express a dominant negative form of Erg (DN-Erg during cartilage formation. DN-Erg expression in chondrocytes cultured for up to 20 days did not affect the early dedifferentiation usually observed in cultured chondrocytes. However, lipid droplets accumulated in DN-Erg chondrocytes, suggesting adipocyte emergence. Transcriptomic analysis using a DNA microarray, validated by quantitative RT-PCR, revealed strong differential gene expression, with a decrease in chondrogenesis-related markers and an increase in adipogenesis-related gene expression in cultured DN-Erg chondrocytes. These results indicate that Erg is involved in either maintaining the chondrogenic phenotype in vitro or in cell fate orientation. Along with the in vitro studies, we compared adipocyte presence in wild-type and transgenic mice skeletons. Histological investigations revealed an increase in the number of adipocytes in the bone marrow of adult DN-Erg mice even though no adipocytes were detected in embryonic cartilage or bone. These findings suggest that the Ets transcription factor family may contribute to the homeostatic balance in skeleton cell plasticity.

  19. Pulsed electromagnetic fields increased the anti-inflammatory effect of A₂A and A₃ adenosine receptors in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes and hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Vincenzi

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (ARs have an important role in the regulation of inflammation and their activation is involved in the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release. The effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs on inflammation have been reported and we have demonstrated that PEMFs increased A2A and A3AR density and functionality in different cell lines. Chondrocytes and osteoblasts are two key cell types in the skeletal system that play important role in cartilage and bone metabolism representing an interesting target to study the effect of PEMFs. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate if PEMF exposure potentiated the anti-inflammatory effect of A2A and/or A3ARs in T/C-28a2 chondrocytes and hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts. Immunofluorescence, mRNA analysis and saturation binding assays revealed that PEMF exposure up-regulated A2A and A3AR expression. A2A and A3ARs were able to modulate cAMP production and cell proliferation. The activation of A2A and A3ARs resulted in the decrease of some of the most relevant pro-inflammatory cytokine release such as interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8, following the treatment with IL-1β as an inflammatory stimuli. In human chondrocyte and osteoblast cell lines, the inhibitory effect of A2A and A3AR stimulation on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, an important lipid inflammatory mediator, was observed. In addition, in T/C-28a2 cells, the activation of A2A or A3ARs elicited an inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion. In hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts, PEMF exposure determined an increase of osteoprotegerin (OPG production. The effect of the A2A or A3AR agonists in the examined cells was enhanced in the presence of PEMFs and completely blocked by using well-known selective antagonists. These results demonstrated that PEMF exposure significantly increase the anti-inflammatory effect of A2A or A3ARs suggesting their potential therapeutic use in the therapy of inflammatory bone and joint

  20. Genetic studies of two inherited human phenotypes : Hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Balciuniene, Jorune

    2001-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the identification of genetic factors underlying two inherited human phenotypes: hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity. Non-syndromic hearing loss segregating in a Swedish family was tested for linkage to 13 previously reported candidate loci for hearing disabilities. Linkage was found to two loci: DFNA12 (llq22-q24) and DFNA2 (lp32). A detailed analysis of the phenotypes and haplotypes shared by the affected individuals supported the hypothesis of digenic inheri...

  1. Potassium channels and human epileptic phenotypes: an updated overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eVilla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Potassium (K+ channels are expressed in almost every cells and are ubiquitous in neuronal and glial cell membranes. These channels have been implicated in different disorders, in particular in epilepsy. K+ channel diversity depends on the presence in the human genome of a large number of genes either encoding pore-forming or accessory subunits. More than 80 genes encoding the K+ channels were cloned and they represent the largest group of ion channels regulating the electrical activity of cells in different tissues, including the brain. It is therefore not surprising that mutations in these genes lead to K+ channels dysfunctions linked to inherited epilepsy in humans and non-human model animals.This article reviews genetic and molecular progresses in exploring the pathogenesis of different human epilepsies, with special emphasis on the role of K+ channels in monogenic forms.

  2. Recapitulation of physiological spatiotemporal signals promotes in vitro formation of phenotypically stable human articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yiyong; Zhou, Bin; Bernhard, Jonathan; Robinson, Samuel; Burapachaisri, Aonnicha; Guo, X. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Standard isotropic culture fails to recapitulate the spatiotemporal gradients present during native development. Cartilage grown from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is poorly organized and unstable in vivo. We report that human cartilage with physiologic organization and in vivo stability can be grown in vitro from self-assembling hMSCs by implementing spatiotemporal regulation during induction. Self-assembling hMSCs formed cartilage discs in Transwell inserts following isotropic chondrogenic induction with transforming growth factor β to set up a dual-compartment culture. Following a switch in the basal compartment to a hypertrophic regimen with thyroxine, the cartilage discs underwent progressive deep-zone hypertrophy and mineralization. Concurrent chondrogenic induction in the apical compartment enabled the maintenance of functional and hyaline cartilage. Cartilage homeostasis, chondrocyte maturation, and terminal differentiation markers were all up-regulated versus isotropic control groups. We assessed the in vivo stability of the cartilage formed under different induction regimens. Cartilage formed under spatiotemporal regulation in vitro resisted endochondral ossification, retained the expression of cartilage markers, and remained organized following s.c. implantation in immunocompromised mice. In contrast, the isotropic control groups underwent endochondral ossification. Cartilage formed from hMSCs remained stable and organized in vivo. Spatiotemporal regulation during induction in vitro recapitulated some aspects of native cartilage development, and potentiated the maturation of self-assembling hMSCs into stable and organized cartilage resembling the native articular cartilage. PMID:28228529

  3. 3D Culture of Chondrocytes in Gelatin Hydrogels with Different Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gelatin hydrogels can mimic the microenvironments of natural tissues and encapsulate cells homogeneously, which makes them attractive for cartilage tissue engineering. Both the mechanical and biochemical properties of hydrogels can affect the phenotype of chondrocytes. However, the influence of each property on chondrocyte phenotype is unclear due to the difficulty in separating the roles of these properties. In this study, we aimed to study the influence of hydrogel stiffness on chondrocyte phenotype while excluding the role of biochemical factors, such as adhesion site density in the hydrogels. By altering the degree of methacryloyl functionalization, gelatin hydrogels with different stiffnesses of 3.8, 17.1, and 29.9 kPa Young’s modulus were prepared from the same concentration of gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA macromers. Bovine articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the hydrogels and cultured for 14 days. The influence of hydrogel stiffness on the cell behaviors including cell viability, cell morphology, and maintenance of chondrogenic phenotype was evaluated. GelMA hydrogels with high stiffness (29.9 kPa showed the best results on maintaining chondrogenic phenotype. These results will be useful for the design and preparation of scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. Comparison between Chondrogenic Markers of Differentiated Chondrocytes from Adipose Derived Stem Cells and Articular Chondrocytes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohmmad Mardani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diseases in middle-aged population in the world. Cartilage tissue engineering (TE has been presented as an effort to introduce the best combination of cells, biomaterial scaffolds and stimulating growth factors to produce a cartilage tissue similar to the natural articular cartilage. In this study, the chondrogenic potential of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs was compared with natural articular chondrocytes cultured in alginate scaffold.   Materials and Methods: Human ADSCs were obtained from subcutaneous adipose tissue and human articular chondrocytes from non-weight bearing areas of knee joints. Cells were seeded in 1.5% alginate and cultured in chondrogenic media for three weeks with and without TGFβ3. The genes expression of types II and X collagens was assessed by Real Time PCR and the amount of aggrecan (AGC and type I collagen measured by ELISA and the content of glycosaminoglycan evaluated by GAG assay. Results: Our findings showed that type II collagen, GAG and AGC were expressed, in differentiated ADSCs. Meanwhile, they produced a lesser amount of types II and X collagens but more AGC, GAG and type I collagen in comparison with natural chondrocytes (NCs. Conclusion: Further attempt should be carried out to optimize achieving type II collagen in DCs, as much as, natural articular chondrocytes and decline of the production of type I collagen in order to provide efficient hyaline cartilage after chondrogenic induction, prior to the usage of harvested tissues in clinical trials.

  5. Toxicity of antiseptics against chondrocytes: what is best for the cartilage in septic joint surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhner, Eric; Kolar, Paula; Seeger, Joern B; Arnholdt, Joerg; Thiele, Kathi; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-11-01

    In septic joint surgery, the most frequently used antiseptics are polyhexanide, hydrogen peroxide and taurolidine. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of these antiseptics on viability of human chondrocytes. Our hypothesis was that antiseptics and supplemental irrigation with sodium chloride lavage are less toxic on human chondrocytes than treatment with antiseptics only. Primary human chondrocytes were isolated and cultured from six donated human knee joints. Polyhexanide, hydrogen peroxide or taurolidine were added to the cultures. Toxicity analysis was performed by visualisation of cell structure using light microscopy and LDH activity. The determination of vital cells and total cell numbers of chondrocytes treated with antiseptics partly followed by irrigation with sodium chloride solution was performed by using Casy Cell-Counter. Light microscopic data revealed a defect in cell structure after addition of antiseptics. We showed a significant increase of LDH enzyme activity after the treatment with polyhexanide or taurolidine. After treatment with antiseptics followed by sodium chloride solution a significant increase of vital and total cell numbers resulted in comparison with the chondrocytes that were only treated with antiseptics. The data show that treatment with polyhexanid, hydrogen peroxide or taurolidine induces cell death of human chondroctes in vitro. The application of sodium chloride solution after the treatment with polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide possibly has a protective effect on chondrocyte viability.

  6. Human Stem Cell-Derived Spinal Cord Astrocytes with Defined Mature or Reactive Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Roybon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation of astrocytes from human stem cells has significant potential for analysis of their role in normal brain function and disease, but existing protocols generate only immature astrocytes. Using early neuralization, we generated spinal cord astrocytes from mouse or human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells with high efficiency. Remarkably, short exposure to fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1 or FGF2 was sufficient to direct these astrocytes selectively toward a mature quiescent phenotype, as judged by both marker expression and functional analysis. In contrast, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1β, but not FGFs, induced multiple elements of a reactive inflammatory phenotype but did not affect maturation. These phenotypically defined, scalable populations of spinal cord astrocytes will be important both for studying normal astrocyte function and for modeling human pathological processes in vitro.

  7. Escherichia coli RecG functionally suppresses human Bloom syndrome phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killen Michael W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Defects in the human BLM gene cause Bloom syndrome, notable for early development of tumors in a broad variety of tissues. On the basis of sequence similarity, BLM has been identified as one of the five human homologs of RecQ from Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization of the BLM protein indicates far greater functional similarity to the E. coli RecG protein and there is no known RecG homolog in human cells. To explore the possibility that the shared biochemistries of BLM and RecG may represent an example of convergent evolution of cellular function where in humans BLM has evolved to fulfill the genomic stabilization role of RecG, we determined whether expression of RecG in human BLM-deficient cells could suppress established functional cellular Bloom syndrome phenotypes. We found that RecG can indeed largely suppress both the definitive elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype and the more recently demonstrated gene cluster instability phenotype of BLM-deficient cells. In contrast, expression of RecG has no impact on either of these phenotypes in human cells with functional BLM protein. These results suggest that the combination of biochemical activities shared by RecG and BLM fill the same evolutionary niche in preserving genomic integrity without requiring exactly identical molecular mechanisms.

  8. Escherichia coli RecG functionally suppresses human Bloom syndrome phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Michael W; Stults, Dawn M; Wilson, William A; Pierce, Andrew J

    2012-10-30

    Defects in the human BLM gene cause Bloom syndrome, notable for early development of tumors in a broad variety of tissues. On the basis of sequence similarity, BLM has been identified as one of the five human homologs of RecQ from Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization of the BLM protein indicates far greater functional similarity to the E. coli RecG protein and there is no known RecG homolog in human cells. To explore the possibility that the shared biochemistries of BLM and RecG may represent an example of convergent evolution of cellular function where in humans BLM has evolved to fulfill the genomic stabilization role of RecG, we determined whether expression of RecG in human BLM-deficient cells could suppress established functional cellular Bloom syndrome phenotypes. We found that RecG can indeed largely suppress both the definitive elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype and the more recently demonstrated gene cluster instability phenotype of BLM-deficient cells. In contrast, expression of RecG has no impact on either of these phenotypes in human cells with functional BLM protein. These results suggest that the combination of biochemical activities shared by RecG and BLM fill the same evolutionary niche in preserving genomic integrity without requiring exactly identical molecular mechanisms.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress participates in the progress of senescence and apoptosis of osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yake; Zhu, Hai; Yan, Xin; Gu, Haoye; Gu, Zhifeng; Liu, Fan

    2017-09-16

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) has been shown to participate in many disease pathologies. Recent reports have reported that ERS exists in human osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes. During OA, chondrocytes exhibit increased level of some senescence marker, such as senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity. However, the persistence and accumulation of senescent cells in various tissues can also impair function and have been involved in the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases, including OA. In this present study, we used IL-1β (10 ng/ml) to mimic OA chondrocytes and we found that IL-1β stimulated chondrocytes caused the increasing expression of ADAMTS5 and MMP13, decreasing COL2A1 expression, which were in accord with OA chondrocytes changes. Our data also showed that ERS is involved in the OA chondrocytes, SA β-gal activity significantly increases and inhibition of ERS can decrease the SA β-gal activity, apoptosis of OA chondrocytes and increase cell viability. These results help us to open new perspectives for the development of molecular-targeted treatment approaches and thus present an effective novel therapeutic approach for OA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Canine chondrocytes seeded in type I and type II collagen implants investigated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrer, S; Breinan, H A; Ramappa, A; Shortkroff, S; Young, G; Minas, T; Sledge, C B; Yannas, I V; Spector, M

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic and natural absorbable polymers have been used as vehicles for implantation of cells into cartilage defects to promote regeneration of the articular joint surface. Implants should provide a pore structure that allows cell adhesion and growth, and not provoke inflammation or toxicity when implanted in vivo. The scaffold should be absorbable and the degradation should match the rate of tissue regeneration. To facilitate cartilage repair the chemical structure and pore architecture of the matrix should allow the seeded cells to maintain the chondrocytic phenotype, characterized by synthesis of cartilage-specific proteins. We investigated the behavior of canine chondrocytes in two spongelike matrices in vitro: a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) copolymer produced from bovine hide consisting of type I collagen and a porous scaffold made of type II collagen by extraction of porcine cartilage. Canine chondrocytes were seeded on both types of matrices and cultured for 3 h, 7 days, and 14 days. The histology of chondrocyte-seeded implants showed a significantly higher percentage of cells with spherical morphology, consistent with chondrocytic morphology, in the type II sponge at each time point. Pericellular matrix stained for proteoglycans and for type II collagen after 14 days. Biochemical analysis of the cell seeded sponges for GAG and DNA content showed increases with time. At day 14 there was a significantly higher amount of DNA and GAG in the type II matrix. This is the first study that directly compares the behavior of chondrocytes in type I and type II collagen matrices. The type II matrix may be of value as a vehicle for chondrocyte implantation on the basis of the higher percentage of chondrocytes retaining spherical morphology and greater biosynthetic activity that was reflected in the greater increase of GAG content.

  11. Effect of microcavitary alginate hydrogel with different pore sizes on chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Lei; Yao, Yongchang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Dong-an, E-mail: DAWang@ntu.edu.sg [National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Chen, Xiaofeng, E-mail: chenxf@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, a novel microcavitary hydrogel was proven to be effective for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we further investigated whether the size of microcavity would affect the growth and the function of chondrocytes. By changing the stirring rate, gelatin microspheres in different sizes including small size (80–120 μm), middle size (150–200 μm) and large size (250–300 μm) were prepared. And then porcine chondrocytes were encapsulated into alginate hydrogel with various sizes of gelatin microspheres. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), Live/dead staining and real-time PCR were used to analyze the effect of the pore size on cell proliferation and expression of specific chondrocytic genes. According to all the data, cells cultivated in microcavitary hydrogel, especially in small size, had preferable abilities of proliferation and higher expression of cartilaginous markers including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Furthermore, it was shown by western blot assay that the culture of chondrocytes in microcavitary hydrogel could improve the proliferation of cells potentially by inducing the Erk1/2-MAPK pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrated that chondrocytes favored microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm for better growth and ECM synthesis, in which Erk1/2 pathway was involved. This culture system would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel model with microcavitary structure was set up to study the interaction between cells and materials. • Microcavitary alginate hydrogel could enhance the proliferation of chondrocytes and promote the expression of cartilaginous genes as compared with plain alginate hydrogel. • Cells in microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm were capable of better growth and ECM synthesis.

  12. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of human newborns' B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandy, A; Thuillier, L; Forveille, M; Fischer, A

    1990-01-01

    It has been demonstrated two major facts concerning human newborns' B lymphocytes: 1) they differentiate poorly into Ig-producing cells and 2) they express CD5 and CD1c membrane proteins. We have further analyzed human newborns' B cell characteristics and found that approximately half of them express activation Ag, i.e., 4F2 and IL-2R, both associated in significant proportions with CD23 and Bac-1. These membrane Ag were found both on CD5(+) and CD5(-) B cells. Newborns' B cells do not exhibit other activation markers because they express surface IgD, and because their size, RNA, and DNA contents do not differ from those of adults' B cells, indicating that they are in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Newborns' B cell proliferation can be induced by rIL-2, rIL-4, low m.w. B cell growth factor, and by Staphylococcus aureus protein A. It is presently difficult to build a hypothesis accounting for all the specific findings made on newborns' B cells. It is not known for instance whether CD5(+) and (-) B cells belong to distinct subsets as suggested by the fluorescence intensity curve obtained with an anti-CD5 antibody or to distinct stages in a unique pattern of B cell maturation during fetal and newborn life. This may indicate that partially activated B cells actually produce natural polyspecific autoantibodies of the IgM isotype found in newborns' human serum.

  13. MicroRNA-33 suppresses CCL2 expression in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Meng; Xie, Qingyun; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Yue; Guo, Dongyang; Wang, Ying; Mo, Liweng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-06-01

    CCL2-mediated macrophage infiltration in articular tissues plays a pivotal role in the development of the osteoarthritis (OA). miRNAs regulate the onset and progression of diseases via controlling the expression of a series of genes. How the CCL2 gene was regulated by miRNAs was still not fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the binding sites of miR-33 in the 3'UTR of CCL2 gene were conserved in human, mouse and rat species. By performing gain- or loss-of-function studies, we verified that miR-33 suppressed CCL2 expression in the mRNA and protein levels. We also found that miR-33 suppressed the CCL2 levels in the supernatant of cultured primary mouse chondrocytes. With reporter gene assay, we demonstrated that miR-33 targeted at AAUGCA in the 3'UTR of CCL2 gene. In transwell migration assays, we demonstrated that the conditional medium (CM) from miR-33 deficient chondrocytes potentiated the monocyte chemotaxis in a CCL2 dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrated that the level of miR-33 was decreased, whereas the CCL2 level was increased in the articular cartilage from the OA patients compared with the control group. In summary, we identified miR-33 as a novel suppressor of CCL2 in chondrocytes. The miR-33/CCL2 axis in chondrocytes regulates monocyte chemotaxis, providing a potential mechanism of macrophage infiltration in OA.

  14. Comparative Analyses of QTLs Influencing Obesity and Metabolic Phenotypes in Pigs and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer D Pant

    Full Text Available The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564 designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits was ensured by using breeds highly divergent with respect to obesity traits in the parental generation. Several obesity and metabolic phenotypes were recorded (n = 35 from birth to slaughter (242 ± 48 days, including body composition determined at about two months of age (63 ± 10 days via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA scanning. All pigs were genotyped using Illumina Porcine 60k SNP Beadchip and a combined linkage disequilibrium-linkage analysis was used to identify genome-wide significant associations for collected phenotypes. We identified 229 QTLs which associated with adiposity- and metabolic phenotypes at genome-wide significant levels. Subsequently comparative analyses were performed to identify the extent of overlap between previously identified QTLs in both humans and pigs. The combined analysis of a large number of obesity phenotypes has provided insight in the genetic architecture of the molecular mechanisms underlying these traits indicating that QTLs underlying similar phenotypes are clustered in the genome. Our analyses have further confirmed that genetic heterogeneity is an inherent characteristic of obesity traits most likely caused by segregation or fixation of different variants of the individual components belonging to cellular pathways in different populations. Several important genes previously associated to obesity in human studies, along with novel genes were identified. Altogether, this study provides novel

  15. Prolonged application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive mechanical loading of articular cartilage producing hydrostatic stress, tensile strain and fluid flow leads to irreversible cartilage erosion and osteoarthritic (OA disease. Since application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates some of the earmarks of OA, we aimed to screen the gene expression profiles of shear-activated chondrocytes and assess potential similarities with OA chondrocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a cDNA microarray technology, we screened the differentially-regulated genes in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes subjected to high fluid shear (20 dyn/cm(2 for 48 h and 72 h relative to static controls. Confirmation of the expression patterns of select genes was obtained by qRT-PCR. Using significance analysis of microarrays with a 5% false discovery rate, 71 and 60 non-redundant transcripts were identified to be ≥2-fold up-regulated and ≤0.6-fold down-regulated, respectively, in sheared chondrocytes. Published data sets indicate that 42 of these genes, which are related to extracellular matrix/degradation, cell proliferation/differentiation, inflammation and cell survival/death, are differentially-regulated in OA chondrocytes. In view of the pivotal role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in the pathogenesis and/or progression of OA in vivo and regulation of shear-induced inflammation and apoptosis in vitro, we identified a collection of genes that are either up- or down-regulated by shear-induced COX-2. COX-2 and L-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS induce reactive oxygen species production, and negatively regulate genes of the histone and cell cycle families, which may play a critical role in chondrocyte death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Prolonged application of high fluid shear stress to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis. Our data suggest a potential link between exposure of chondrocytes/cartilage to abnormal mechanical loading and the pathogenesis

  16. R-spondin 2 facilitates differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes by enhancing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endochondral ossification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegami, Yasuhiko [Division of Neurogenetics, Center of Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio [Division of Neurogenetics, Center of Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ohno, Kinji, E-mail: ohnok@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Division of Neurogenetics, Center of Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-04-22

    Endochondral ossification is a crucial process for longitudinal growth of bones. Differentiating chondrocytes in growth cartilage form four sequential zones of proliferation, alignment into column, hypertrophy, and substitution of chondrocytes with osteoblasts. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of R-spondin family, is an agonist for Wnt signaling, but its role in chondrocyte differentiation remains unknown. Here we report that growth cartilage of Rspo2-knockout mice shows a decreased amount of β-catenin and increased amounts collagen type II (CII) and Sox9 in the abnormally extended proliferating zone. In contrast, expression of collagen type X (CX) in the hypertrophic zone remains unchanged. Differentiating chondrogenic ATDC5 cells, mimicking proliferating chondrocytes, upregulate Rspo2 and its putative receptor, Lgr5, in parallel. Addition of recombinant human Rspo2 to differentiating ATDC5 cells decreases expressions of Col2a1, Sox9, and Acan, as well as production of proteoglycans. In contrast, lentivirus-mediated knockdown of Rspo2 has the opposite effect. The effect of Rspo2 on chondrogenic differentiation is mediated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and not by Wnt/PCP or Wnt/Ca{sup 2+} signaling. We propose that Rspo2 activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling to reduce Col2a1 and Sox9 and to facilitate differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. - Highlights: • Rspo2 is a secreted activator of Wnt, and its knockout shows extended proliferating chondrocytes in endochondral ossification. • In proliferating chondrocytes of Rspo2-knockout mice, Sox9 and collagen type 2 are increased and β-catenin is decreased. • Rspo2 and its receptor Lgr5, as well as Sox9 and collagen type 2, are expressed in differentiating ATDC5 chondrogenic cells. • In ATDC5 cells, Rspo2 decreases

  17. Tracking modern human population history from linguistic and cranial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Harvati, Katerina; Jäger, Gerhard

    2016-11-11

    Languages and genes arguably follow parallel evolutionary trajectories, descending from a common source and subsequently differentiating. However, although common ancestry is established within language families, it remains controversial whether language preserves a deep historical signal. To address this question, we evaluate the association between linguistic and geographic distances across 265 language families, as well as between linguistic, geographic, and cranial distances among eleven populations from Africa, Asia, and Australia. We take advantage of differential population history signals reflected by human cranial anatomy, where temporal bone shape reliably tracks deep population history and neutral genetic changes, while facial shape is more strongly associated with recent environmental effects. We show that linguistic distances are strongly geographically patterned, even within widely dispersed groups. However, they are correlated predominantly with facial, rather than temporal bone, morphology, suggesting that variation in vocabulary likely tracks relatively recent events and possibly population contact.

  18. The effect of receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein on phenotype expression of collagen and proteoglycan of chondrocyte%三羟基异黄酮对关节软骨细胞合成胶原和蛋白多糖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张超; 陈飞雁; 夏军; 姜建元; 黄煌渊

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the protective role of the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor in chondrocyte in vitro.MethodsReverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunocytochemistry (ICC) and toluidine blue staining were used to understand the changes of phenotype expression of collagenⅠ, Ⅱ and proteoglycan in chondrocyte in vitro. Results Genistein of 20 μg/mL and 25 μg/mL concentrations decreased the expression of collagen Ⅰ and increased the expression of collagen Ⅱ and proteoglycan (P< 0. 05). Conclusions This study showes that genistein can effectively inhibit the expression of collagen Ⅰ above certain concentration, and it can improve the expression of collagen Ⅱ and increase the synthesis of proteoglycan.%目的 通过对体外培养软骨细胞的实验研究,探寻受体酪氨酸激酶抑制剂对软骨细胞在细胞分子水平的影响及其可能机制.方法 对软骨细胞进行原代及传代培养.通过对培养细胞形态学及甲苯胺蓝染色观察,选择适合传代软骨细胞,应用三羟基异黄酮干预后1、2、3、4天RT-PCR、ICC及甲苯胺蓝染色观察法比较药物干预对体外培养软骨细胞Ⅰ、Ⅱ型胶原的转录和翻译水平及蛋白多糖的表达变化.结果 20 μg/mL及25μg/mL 三羟基异黄酮干预可以抑制Ⅰ型胶原表达.同时增加Ⅱ型胶原及蛋白多糖的表达.结论 三羟基异黄酮可以抑制脂多糖刺激诱导的软骨细胞反分化,对体外培养关节软骨细胞的正常表型具有一定的保护作用,其保护作用与三羟基异黄酮浓度呈现一定的相关性.

  19. Aberrant phenotypes of transgenic mice expressing dimeric human erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Seong-Jo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimeric human erythropoietin (dHuEPO peptides are reported to exhibit significantly higher biological activity than the monomeric form of recombinant EPO. The objective of this study was to produce transgenic (tg mice expressing dHuEPO and to investigate the characteristics of these mice. Methods A dHuEPO-expressing vector under the control of the goat beta-casein promoter, which produced a dimer of human EPO molecules linked by a 2-amino acid peptide linker (Asp-Ile, was constructed and injected into 1-cell fertilized embryos by microinjection. Mice were screened using genomic DNA samples obtained from tail biopsies. Blood samples were obtained by heart puncture using heparinized tubes, and hematologic parameters were assessed. Using the microarray analysis tool, we analyzed differences in gene expression in the spleens of tg and control mice. Results A high rate of spontaneous abortion or death of the offspring was observed in the recipients of dHuEPO embryos. We obtained 3 founder lines (#4, #11, and #47 of tg mice expressing the dHuEPO gene. However, only one founder line showed stable germline integration and transmission, subsequently establishing the only transgenic line (#11. We obtained 2 F1 mice and 3 F2 mice from line #11. The dHuEPO protein could not be obtained because of repeated spontaneous abortions in the tg mice. Tg mice exhibited symptoms such as short lifespan and abnormal blood composition. The red blood cell count, white blood cell count, and hematocrit levels in the tg mice were remarkably higher than those in the control mice. The spleens of the tg mice (F1 and F2 females were 11- and -21-fold larger than those of the control mice. Microarray analysis revealed 2,672 spleen-derived candidate genes; more genes were downregulated than upregulated (849/764. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were used for validating the results of the microarray

  20. The mouse genome database: genotypes, phenotypes, and models of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human biology because all life stages can be accessed experimentally, a completely sequenced reference genome is publicly available and there exists a myriad of genomic tools for comparative and experimental research. In the current era of genome scale, data-driven biomedical research, the integration of genetic, genomic and biological data are essential for realizing the full potential of the mouse as an experimental model. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org), the community model organism database for the laboratory mouse, is designed to facilitate the use of the laboratory mouse as a model system for understanding human biology and disease. To achieve this goal, MGD integrates genetic and genomic data related to the functional and phenotypic characterization of mouse genes and alleles and serves as a comprehensive catalog for mouse models of human disease. Recent enhancements to MGD include the addition of human ortholog details to mouse Gene Detail pages, the inclusion of microRNA knockouts to MGD's catalog of alleles and phenotypes, the addition of video clips to phenotype images, providing access to genotype and phenotype data associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) and improvements to the layout and display of Gene Ontology annotations.

  1. The in vitro biocompatibility of d-(+) raffinose modified chitosan: Two-dimensional and three-dimensional systems for culturing of horse articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Elena; Ravanetti, Francesca; Martelli, Paolo; Cacchioli, Antonio; Ivanovska, Ana; Corradi, Attilio; Nasi, Sonia; Bianchera, Annalisa; Passeri, Benedetta; Canelli, Elena; Bettini, Ruggero; Borghetti, Paolo

    2017-06-15

    The present study investigated the biocompatibility of chitosan films and scaffolds modified with d-(+)raffinose and their capability to support the growth and maintenance of the differentiation of articular chondrocytes in vitro. Primary equine articular chondrocytes were cultured on films and scaffolds of modified d-(+) raffinose chitosan. Their behavior was compared to that of chondrocytes grown in conventional bi- and three-dimensional culture systems, such as micromasses and alginate beads. Chitosan films maintained the phenotype of differentiated chondrocytes (typical round morphology) and sustained the synthesis of cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM), even at 4weeks of culture. Indeed, starting from 2weeks of culture, chondrocytes seeded on chitosan scaffolds were able to penetrate the surface pores and to colonize the internal matrix. Moreover they produced ECM expressing the genes of typical chondrocytes differentiation markers such as collagen II and aggrecan. In conclusion, chitosan modified with d-raffinose represents an ideal support for chondrocyte adhesion, proliferation and for the maintenance of cellular phenotypic and genotypic differentiation. This novel biomaterial could potentially be a reliable support for the re-differentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Downregulation of protein kinase CK2 activity facilitates tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated chondrocyte death through apoptosis and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Won Lee

    Full Text Available Despite the numerous studies of protein kinase CK2, little progress has been made in understanding its function in chondrocyte death. Our previous study first demonstrated that CK2 is involved in apoptosis of rat articular chondrocytes. Recent studies have suggested that CK2 downregulation is associated with aging. Thus examining the involvement of CK2 downregulation in chondrocyte death is an urgently required task. We undertook this study to examine whether CK2 downregulation modulates chondrocyte death. We first measured CK2 activity in articular chondrocytes of 6-, 21- and 30-month-old rats. Noticeably, CK2 activity was downregulated in chondrocytes with advancing age. To build an in vitro experimental system for simulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-induced cell death in aged chondrocytes with decreased CK2 activity, chondrocytes were co-treated with CK2 inhibitors and TNF-α. Viability assay demonstrated that CK2 inhibitors facilitated TNF-α-mediated chondrocyte death. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, nuclear staining, flow cytometry, TUNEL staining, confocal microscopy, western blot and transmission electron microscopy were conducted to assess cell death modes. The results of multiple assays showed that this cell death was mediated by apoptosis. Importantly, autophagy was also involved in this process, as supported by the appearance of a punctuate LC3 pattern and autophagic vacuoles. The inhibition of autophagy by silencing of autophage-related genes 5 and 7 as well as by 3-methyladenine treatment protected chondrocytes against cell death and caspase activation, indicating that autophagy led to the induction of apoptosis. Autophagic cells were observed in cartilage obtained from osteoarthritis (OA model rats and human OA patients. Our findings indicate that CK2 down regulation facilitates TNF-α-mediated chondrocyte death through apoptosis and autophagy. It should be clarified in the future if autophagy observed is a consequence

  3. Effect of polystyrene and polyether imide cell culture inserts with different roughness on chondrocyte metabolic activity and gene expression profiles of aggrecan and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Josephine; Kohl, Benjamin; Kratz, Karl; Jung, Friedrich; Lendlein, Andreas; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cultured autologous chondrocytes can be used for implantation to support cartilage repair. For this purpose, a very small number of autologous cells harvested from a biopsy have to be expanded in monolayer culture. Commercially available polymer surfaces lead to chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Hence, the demanding need for optimized polymers and surface topologies supporting chondrocytes' differentiated phenotypes in vitro arises. In this study we explored the effect of tailored cell culture plate inserts prepared from polystyrene (PS) and polyether imide (PEI) exhibiting three different roughness levels (R0, RI, RII) on chondrocyte morphology, metabolism and gene expression profile. As a control, commercially available tissue culture plastic (TCP) dishes were included. Primary porcine articular chondrocytes were seeded on tailored PS and PEI inserts with three different roughness levels. The metabolic activity of the chondrocytes was determined after 24 hours using alamar blue assay. Chondrocyte gene expression profiles (aggrecan, type I and type II collagen) were monitored after 48 hours using Real Time Detection (RTD)-PCR. Chondrocytes cultured on PS and PEI surfaces formed cell clusters after 24 and 48 hours, which was not observed on TCP. The metabolic activity of chondrocytes cultured on PS was lower than of chondrocytes cultured on PEI, but also lower than on TCP. Gene expression analyses revealed an elevated expression of cartilage-specific aggrecan and an impaired expression of both collagen types by chondrocytes on PS and PEI compared with TCP. In summary, PEI is a biocompatible biomaterial suitable for chondrocyte culturing, which can be further chemically functionalized for generating specific surface interactions or covalent binding of biomolecules.

  4. Phenotypes and karyotypes of human malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Relan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumour of serosal surfaces most commonly pleura. Characterised cell lines represent a valuable tool to study the biology of mesothelioma. The aim of this study was to develop and biologically characterise six malignant mesothelioma cell lines to evaluate their potential as models of human malignant mesothelioma. METHODS: Five lines were initiated from pleural biopsies, and one from pleural effusion of patients with histologically proven malignant mesothelioma. Mesothelial origin was assessed by standard morphology, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and immunocytochemistry. Growth characteristics were assayed using population doubling times. Spectral karyotyping was performed to assess chromosomal abnormalities. Authentication of donor specific derivation was undertaken by DNA fingerprinting using a panel of SNPs. RESULTS: Most of cell lines exhibited spindle cell shape, with some retaining stellate shapes. At passage 2 to 6 all lines stained positively for calretinin and cytokeratin 19, and demonstrated capacity for anchorage-independent growth. At passage 4 to 16, doubling times ranged from 30-72 hours, and on spectral karyotyping all lines exhibited numerical chromosomal abnormalities ranging from 41 to 113. Monosomy of chromosomes 8, 14, 22 or 17 was observed in three lines. One line displayed four different karyotypes at passage 8, but only one karyotype at passage 42, and another displayed polyploidy at passage 40 which was not present at early passages. At passages 5-17, TEM showed characteristic features of mesothelioma ultrastructure in all lines including microvilli and tight intercellular junctions. CONCLUSION: These six cell lines exhibit varying cell morphology, a range of doubling times, and show diverse passage-dependent structural chromosomal changes observed in malignant tumours. However they retain characteristic immunocytochemical protein expression profiles of

  5. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-06-25

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration.

  6. Fabrication of cartilage in predetermined shapes from human nasoseptal chondrocytes with tissue engineering method%鼻中隔软骨细胞组织工程法构建预定形态软骨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔鹏程; 陈文弦; 罗家胜

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨利用人鼻中隔软骨细胞组织工程方法构建预定形态软骨的可能性。方法将人鼻中隔软骨细胞播种在聚乙醇酸(polyglycolic acid, PGA)无纺网支架材料上,制成片状和管状结构,埋入裸鼠体内,经4、6、8周后取材作大体及组织学观察。结果大体观察见裸鼠体内形成了预定的片状和管状软骨。组织学观察:6周时软骨细胞基本成熟, Masson 三色染色显示胶原形成,番红花-“O”染色证实其基质中存在糖氨多糖。对照组于6周时PGA纤维基本消失。结论人鼻中隔软骨细胞与PGA无纺网复合可在裸鼠体内形成预定形态软骨。%Objective To investigate the feasibility of fabricating a new cartilage in predetermined shapes with tissue engineering methods. Methods Human nasoseptal chondrocytes were seeded onto a nonwoven mesh of polyglycolic acid(PGA) to form a cell-PGA construct. The construction was then configured in sheet and tube shapes, and implanted subcutaneously into the dorsa of 11 athymic mice. The specimens were harvested 4,6,8 weeks after implantation and subjected to gross morphologic and histologic analysis. Results Gross observation showed that the predetermined sheet and tube shapes of new cartilage were formed. Histological observation demonstrated that new mature cartilages were formed in 6-week. A Masson's trichrome stain showed the interwining bands of collagen at the periphery of the cartilage. Staining of Safranin O evaluated that the new cartilage was bound of glycosaminoglycan. In the control group, the PGA of the specimens were completely absorbed at 6 weeks. Conclusion Human nasoseptal chondrocytes-PGA construct could develop into a new cartilage in predetermined shapes in athymic mice.

  7. Fisetin inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes through activating SIRT1 and attenuates the progression of osteoarthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenhao; Feng, Zhenhua; You, Shengban; Zhang, Hui; Tao, Zhenyu; Wang, Quan; Chen, Hua; Wu, Yaosen

    2017-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by cartilage degradation and inflammation. Fisetin, a polyphenol extracted from fruits and vegetables, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of fisetin on OA both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, chondrocytes were pretreated with fisetin alone or fisetin combined with sirtinol (an inhibitor of SIRT1) for 2h before IL-1β stimulation. Production of NO, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-6 were evaluated by the Griess reaction and ELISAs. The mRNA (COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, Sox-9, aggrecan and collagen-II) and protein expression (COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and SIRT1) were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot respectively. Immunofluorescence was used to assess the expression of collagen-II and SIRT1. SIRT1 activity was quantified with SIRT1 fluorometric assay kit. The in vivo effect of fisetin was evaluated by gavage in mice OA models induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). We found that fisetin inhibited IL-1β-induced expression of NO, PGE2, TNF-α, IL-6, COX-2, iNOS, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5. Besides, fisetin remarkably decreased IL-1β-induced degradation of Sox-9, aggrecan and collagen-II. Furthermore, fisetin significantly inhibited IL-1β-induced SIRT1 decrease and inactivation. However, the inhibitory effect of fisetin was obvious abolished by sirtinol, suggesting that fisetin exerts anti-inflammatory effects through activating SIRT1. In vivo, fisetin-treated mice exhibited less cartilage destruction and lower OARSI scores. Moreover, fisetin reduced subchondral bone plate thickness and alleviated synovitis. Taken together, these findings indicate that fisetin may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  9. Andrographolide Enhances Proliferation and Prevents Dedifferentiation of Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ke Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the main active constituent of Andrographis paniculata that was applied in treatment of many diseases including inflammation in ancient China, andrographolide (ANDRO was found to facilitate reduction of edema and analgesia in arthritis. This suggested that ANDRO may be promising anti-inflammatory agent to relieve destruction and degeneration of cartilage after inflammation. In this study, the effect of ANDRO on rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro was investigated. Results showed that not more than 8 μM ANDRO did no harm to chondrocytes (P0.05. The viability assay, hematoxylin-eosin, safranin O, and immunohistochemical staining also showed better performances in ANDRO groups. As to the doses, 3 μM ANDRO showed the best performance. The results indicate that ANDRO can accelerate proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and meanwhile maintain the phenotype, which may provide valuable references for further exploration on arthritis.

  10. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N.; Beck, Tim; Vasant, Drashtti; Brookes, Anthony J.; Zankl, Andreas; Washington, Nicole L.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Parkinson, Helen; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000 rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available. PMID:26119816

  11. Mechanical vibrations increase the proliferation of articular chondrocytes in high-density culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupp, J A; Waldman, S D

    2008-07-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach for articular cartilage repair; however, it still has proven a challenge to produce tissue from the limited number of cells that can be extracted from a single individual. Relatively few cell expansion methods exist without the problems of dedifferentiation and/or loss of potency. Previously, it has been shown that mechanical vibrations can enhance chondrocyte proliferation in monolayer culture. Thus, it was hypothesized that chondrocytes grown in high-density culture would respond in a similar fashion while maintaining phenotypic stability. Isolated bovine articular chondrocytes were seeded in high-density culture on Millicell filters and subjected to mechanical vibrations 48 h after seeding. Mechanical vibrations enhanced chondrocyte proliferation at frequencies above 350 Hz, with the peak response occurring at a 1g amplitude for a duration of 30 min. Under these conditions, the gene expression of cartilage-specific and dedifferentiation markers (collagen II, collagen I, and aggrecan) were unchanged by the imposed stimulus. To determine the effect of accumulated extracellular matrix (ECM) on this proliferative response, selected cultures were stimulated under the same conditions after varying lengths of preculture. The amount of accumulated ECM (collagen and proteoglycans) decreased this proliferative response, with the cultures becoming insensitive to the stimulus after 1 week of preculture. Thus, mechanical vibration can serve as an effective means preferentially to stimulate the proliferation of chondrocytes during culture, but its effects appear to be limited to the early stages where ECM accumulation is at a minimum.

  12. Normal proliferation and differentiation of Hoxc-8 transgenic chondrocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello Maria

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hox genes encode transcription factors that are involved in pattern formation in the skeleton, and recent evidence suggests that they also play a role in the regulation of endochondral ossification. To analyze the role of Hoxc-8 in this process in more detail, we applied in vitro culture systems, using high density cultures of primary chondrocytes from neonatal mouse ribs. Results Cultured cells were characterized on the basis of morphology (light microscopy and production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (sulfated proteoglycans and type II Collagen. Hypertrophy was demonstrated by increase in cell size, alkaline phosphatase activity and type X Collagen immunohistochemistry. Proliferation was assessed by BrdU uptake and flow cytometry. Unexpectedly, chondrocytes from Hoxc-8 transgenic mice, which exhibit delayed cartilage maturation in vivo 1, were able to proliferate and differentiate normally in our culture systems. This was the case even though freshly isolated Hoxc-8 transgenic chondrocytes exhibited significant molecular differences as measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Conclusions The results demonstrate that primary rib chondrocytes behave similar to published reports for chondrocytes from other sources, validating in vitro approaches for studies of Hox genes in the regulation of endochondral ossification. Our analysis of cartilage-producing cells from Hoxc-8 transgenic mice provides evidence that the cellular phenotype induced by Hoxc-8 overexpression in vivo is reversible in vitro.

  13. Expression of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV Channels in Different Passages of Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Barrett-Jolley

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels play important roles in chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV subfamily of ion channels consists of six members. TRPV1-4 are temperature sensitive calcium-permeable, relatively non-selective cation channels whereas TRPV5 and TRPV6 show high selectivity for calcium over other cations. In this study we investigated the effect of time in culture and passage number on the expression of TRPV4, TRPV5 and TRPV6 in articular chondrocytes isolated from equine metacarpophalangeal joints. Polyclonal antibodies raised against TRPV4, TRPV5 and TRPV6 were used to compare the expression of these channels in lysates from first expansion chondrocytes (P0 and cells from passages 1–3 (P1, P2 and P3 by western blotting. TRPV4, TRPV5 and TRPV6 were expressed in all passages examined. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence confirmed the presence of these channels in sections of formalin fixed articular cartilage and monolayer cultures of methanol fixed P2 chondrocytes. TRPV5 and TRPV6 were upregulated with time and passage in culture suggesting that a shift in the phenotype of the cells in monolayer culture alters the expression of these channels. In conclusion, several TRPV channels are likely to be involved in calcium signaling and homeostasis in chondrocytes.

  14. Access to Chondrocyte Culture, with Alginate, In Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Esfandiary

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, chondrocyte culture was established for the first time in Iran,and calcium alginate was used for longer culture of chondrocyte in vitro. Thestudy was programmed in order to be used for future human chondrocytetransplantation. The cartilage specimen obtained from 50 patients whounderwent total knee and hip operations in Isfahan University of MedicalSciences. Cartilage specimens were used for monolayer as well as suspensionculture in alginate beads. Approximately 12±1 millions cells were harvestedfrom the 3rd passage. The cells were round with large euchromatic nucleusand several nucleoli and small vacuoles. The cells derived from passages 1to 4, which were grown up then, in alginate beads, showed higher stainingwith alcian blue. The harvested cells in some patients were immediately andsuccessfully used for autologus transplantation. This later work will be reportedseparately.

  15. Comparative analyses of QTLs influencing obesity and metabolic phenotypes in pigs and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pant, Sameer Dinkar; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jacobsen, Mette Juul;

    2015-01-01

    The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice) do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological...... features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564) designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits was ensured by using breeds highly divergent with respect to obesity traits...... in the parental generation. Several obesity and metabolic phenotypes were recorded (n = 35) from birth to slaughter (242 ± 48 days), including body composition determined at about two months of age (63 ± 10 days) via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. All pigs were genotyped using Illumina Porcine...

  16. A feeder-free, human plasma-derived hydrogel for maintenance of a human embryonic stem cell phenotype in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Fiona C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs represent a tremendous resource for cell therapies and the study of human development; however to maintain their undifferentiated state in vitro they routinely require the use of mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF feeder-layers and exogenous protein media supplementation. Results These well established requirements can be overcome and in this study, it will be demonstrated that phenotypic stability of hESCs can be maintained using a novel, human plasma protein-based hydrogel as an extracellular culture matrix without the use of feeder cell co-culture. hESCs were resuspended in human platelet poor plasma (PPP, which was gelled by the addition of calcium containing DMEM-based hESC culture medium. Phenotypic and genomic expression of the pluripotency markers OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 were measured using immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR respectively. Typical hESC morphology was demonstrated throughout in vitro culture and both viability and phenotypic stability were maintained throughout extended culture, up to 25 passages. Conclusions PPP-derived hydrogel has demonstrated to be an efficacious alternative to MEF co-culture with its hydrophilicity allowing for this substrate to be delivered via minimally invasive procedures in a liquid phase with polymerization ensuing in situ. Together this provides a novel technique for the study of this unique group of stem cells in either 2D or 3D both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of the noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae: adaptation and pathogenesis in the human airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Junkal; Martí-Lliteras, Pau; Moleres, Javier; Puig, Carmen; Bengoechea, José A

    2012-12-01

    The human respiratory tract contains a highly adapted microbiota including commensal and opportunistic pathogens. Noncapsulated or nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a human-restricted member of the normal airway microbiota in healthy carriers and an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. The duality of NTHi as a colonizer and as a symptomatic infectious agent is closely related to its adaptation to the host, which in turn greatly relies on the genetic plasticity of the bacterium and is facilitated by its condition as a natural competent. The variable genotype of NTHi accounts for its heterogeneous gene expression and variable phenotype, leading to differential host-pathogen interplay among isolates. Here we review our current knowledge of NTHi diversity in terms of genotype, gene expression, antigenic variation, and the phenotypes associated with colonization and pathogenesis. The potential benefits of NTHi diversity studies discussed herein include the unraveling of pathogenicity clues, the generation of tools to predict virulence from genomic data, and the exploitation of a unique natural system for the continuous monitoring of long-term bacterial evolution in human airways exposed to noxious agents. Finally, we highlight the challenge of monitoring both the pathogen and the host in longitudinal studies, and of applying comparative genomics to clarify the meaning of the vast NTHi genetic diversity and its translation to virulence phenotypes.

  18. Systematic analysis, comparison, and integration of disease based human genetic association data and mouse genetic phenotypic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S Alex

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic contributions to human common disorders and mouse genetic models of disease are complex and often overlapping. In common human diseases, unlike classical Mendelian disorders, genetic factors generally have small effect sizes, are multifactorial, and are highly pleiotropic. Likewise, mouse genetic models of disease often have pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes. Moreover, phenotypic descriptions in the literature in both human and mouse are often poorly characterized and difficult to compare directly. Methods In this report, human genetic association results from the literature are summarized with regard to replication, disease phenotype, and gene specific results; and organized in the context of a systematic disease ontology. Similarly summarized mouse genetic disease models are organized within the Mammalian Phenotype ontology. Human and mouse disease and phenotype based gene sets are identified. These disease gene sets are then compared individually and in large groups through dendrogram analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Results Human disease and mouse phenotype gene sets are shown to group into disease and phenotypically relevant groups at both a coarse and fine level based on gene sharing. Conclusion This analysis provides a systematic and global perspective on the genetics of common human disease as compared to itself and in the context of mouse genetic models of disease.

  19. Posttraumatic Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Murine Xiphoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher G.; Eisner, Eric; McGlynn, Margaret; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate posttraumatic chondrocyte apoptosis in the murine xiphoid after a crush-type injury and to ultimately determine the pathway (i.e., intrinsic or extrinsic) by which chondrocytes undergo apoptosis in response to mechanical injury. Design. The xiphoids of adult female wild-type mice were injured with the use of a modified Kelly clamp. Postinjury xiphoid cartilage was analyzed via 3 well-described independent means of assessing apoptosis in chondrocytes: hematoxylin and eosin staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay, and activated caspase-3 staining. Results. Injured specimens contained many chondrocytes with evidence of apoptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, and the liberation of apoptotic bodies. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of chondrocytes undergoing apoptosis in the injured specimens as compared with the uninjured specimens. Conclusions. Chondrocytes can be stimulated to undergo apoptosis as a result of mechanical injury. These experiments involving predominantly cartilaginous murine xiphoid in vivo establish a baseline for future investigations that employ the genetic and therapeutic modulation of chondrocyte apoptosis in response to mechanical injury. PMID:26069679

  20. Expression Profiling and Functional Implications of a Set of Zinc Finger Proteins, ZNF423, ZNF470, ZNF521, and ZNF780B, in Primary Osteoarthritic Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mesuraca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular chondrocytes are responsible for the maintenance of healthy articulations; indeed, dysregulation of their functions, including the production of matrix proteins and matrix-remodeling proteases, may result in fraying of the tissue and development of osteoarthritis (OA. To explore transcriptional mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of chondrocyte homeostasis and may be implicated in OA development, we compared the gene expression profile of a set of zinc finger proteins potentially linked to the control of chondrocyte differentiation and/or functions (ZNF423, ZNF470, ZNF521, and ZNF780B in chondrocytes from patients affected by OA and from subjects not affected by OA. This analysis highlighted a significantly lower expression of the transcript encoding ZNF423 in chondrocytes from OA, particularly in elderly patients. Interestingly, this decrease was mirrored by the similarly reduced expression of PPARγ, a known target of ZNF423 with anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective properties. The ZNF521 mRNA instead was abundant in all primary chondrocytes studied; the RNAi-mediated silencing of this gene significantly altered the COL2A/COL1 expression ratio, associated with the maintenance of the differentiated phenotype, in chondrocytes cultivated in alginate beads. These results suggest a role for ZNF423 and ZNF521 in the regulation of chondrocyte homeostasis and warrant further investigations to elucidate their mechanism of action.

  1. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  2. [Chondrocyte mecanobiology. Application in cartilage tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Jean François; Netter, Patrick; Huselstein, Céline; de Isla, Natalia; Wei Yang, Jing; Muller, Sylvaine

    2005-11-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated connective tissue that withstands and distributes mechanical forces within joints. Chondrocytes utilize mechanical signals to maintain cartilaginous tissue homeostasis. They regulate their metabolic activity through complex biological and biophysical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Some mechanotransduction mechanisms are known, while many others no doubt remain to be discovered. Various aspects of chondrocyte mechanobiology have been applied to tissue engineering, with the creation of replacement tissue in vitro from bioresorbable or non-bioresorbable scaffolds and harvested cells. The tissues are maintained in a near-physiologic mechanical and biochemical environment. This paper is an overview of both chondrocyte mechanobiology and cartilage tissue engineering

  3. THE ACTIVATION OF MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES AND CHONDROCYTE DIFFERENTIATION, WHICH ACCOMPANIES THE INDUCTION OF COLLAGEN DECOMPOSITION UNDER THE ACTION OF COLLAGEN PEPTIDE IN THE CARTILAGE OFHEALTHY INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. This study has shown that the induction of collagenase activity by CB12-2 in the human articular cartilage chondrocytes is attended by terminal differentiation/hypertrophy of these cells. The terminal differentiation of chondrocytes may be one of the mechanisms of chondrolysis in osteoarthrosis since it naturally occurs not only in endochondrial ossification, but also in the development of pathology.

  4. The perivascular phenotype and behaviors of dedifferentiated cells derived from human mature adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ning; Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Sugawara, Atsunori; Shimizu, Yutaka; Wu, Min-Ke; Du, Li; Wang, Hang; Sato, Soh; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2015-02-13

    Derived from mature adipocytes, dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells represent a special group of multipotent cells. However, their phenotype and cellular nature remain unclear. Our study found that human DFAT cells adopted perivascular characteristics and behaviors. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescent staining revealed that human DFAT cells positively expressed markers highly related to perivascular cell lineages, such as CD140b, NG2 and desmin, but were negative for common endothelial markers, including CD31, CD34, and CD309. Furthermore, DFAT cells displayed vascular network formation ability in Matrigel, and they noticeably promoted and stabilized the vessel structures formed by human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. These results provide novel evidence on the pericyte nature of human DFAT cells, further supporting the recent model for the perivascular origin of adult stem cells, in which tissue-specific progenitor cells in mesenchymal tissues associate with blood vessels, exhibiting perivascular characteristics and functions.

  5. Comparative analyses of QTLs influencing obesity and metabolic phenotypes in pigs and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pant, Sameer Dinkar; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jacobsen, Mette Juul

    2015-01-01

    in different populations. Several important genes previously associated to obesity in human studies, along with novel genes were identified. Altogether, this study provides novel insight that may further the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human obesity.......The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice) do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological...... features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564) designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits was ensured by using breeds highly divergent with respect to obesity traits...

  6. The Effect of Chondroitin Sulphate and Hyaluronic Acid on Chondrocytes Cultured within a Fibrin-Alginate Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Little

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a painful degenerative joint disease that could be better managed if tissue engineers can develop methods to create long-term engineered articular cartilage tissue substitutes. Many of the tissue engineered cartilage constructs currently available lack the chemical stimuli and cell-friendly environment that promote the matrix accumulation and cell proliferation needed for use in joint cartilage repair. The goal of this research was to test the efficacy of using a fibrin-alginate hydrogel containing hyaluronic acid (HA and/or chondroitin sulphate (CS supplements for chondrocyte culture. Neonatal porcine chondrocytes cultured in fibrin-alginate hydrogels retained their phenotype better than chondrocytes cultured in monolayer, as evidenced by analysis of their relative expression of type II versus type I collagen mRNA transcripts. HA or CS supplementation of the hydrogels increased matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG production during the first week of culture. However, the effects of these supplements on matrix accumulation were not additive and were no longer observed after two weeks of culture. Supplementation of the hydrogels with CS or a combination of both CS and HA increased the chondrocyte cell population after two weeks of culture. Statistical analysis indicated that the HA and CS treatment effects on chondrocyte numbers may be additive. This research suggests that supplementation with CS and/or HA has positive effects on cartilage matrix production and chondrocyte proliferation in three-dimensional (3D fibrin-alginate hydrogels.

  7. Phenotypic and genotypic profile of human tympanic membrane derived cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Sharon L; Levin, Brett; Heel, Kathryn A; Atlas, Marcus D; Marano, Robert J

    2011-02-01

    The human tympanic membrane (hTM), known more commonly as the eardrum, is a thin, multi-layered membrane that is unique in the body as it is suspended in air. When perforated, the hTM's primary function of sound-pressure transmission is compromised. For the purposes of TM reconstruction, we investigated the phenotype and genotype of cultured primary cells derived from hTM tissue explants, compared to epithelial (HaCaT cells) and mesenchymal (human dermal fibroblasts (HDF)) reference cells. Epithelium-specific ets-1 (ESE-1), E-cadherin, keratinocyte growth factor-1 (KGF-1/FGF-7), keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2/FGF10), fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), variants of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), fibroblast surface protein (FSP), and vimentin proteins were used to assess the phenotypes of all cultured cells. Wholemount and paraffin-embedded hTM tissues were stained with ESE-1 and E-cadherin proteins to establish normal epithelial-specific expression patterns within the epithelial layers. Immunofluorescent (IF) cell staining of hTM epithelial cells (hTMk) demonstrated co-expression of both epithelial- and mesenchymal-specific proteins. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis further demonstrated co-expression of these epithelial and mesenchymal-specific proteins, indicating the subcultured hTMk cells possessed a transitional phenotype. Gene transcript analysis of hTMk cells by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed a down regulation of ESE-1, E-cadherin, FGFR2, variant 1 and variant 2 (FGFR2v1 and FGFR2v2) between low and high passages, and up-regulation of KGF-1, KGF-2, and FGFR1. All results indicate a gradual shift in cell phenotype of hTMk-derived cells from epithelial to mesenchymal.

  8. Phenotypic and functional analysis of human fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollini, Pierre; Faes-Van't Hull, Eveline; Kaiser, Stefan; Kapp, Ursula; Leyvraz, Serge

    2007-04-01

    Steady-state hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transplantation rely on the unique potential of stem cells to undergo both self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Fetal liver (FL) represents a promising alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but limited by the total cell number obtained in a typical harvest. We reported that human FL nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) repopulating cells (SRCs) could be expanded under simple stroma-free culture conditions. Here, we sought to further characterize FL HSC/SRCs phenotypically and functionally before and following culture. Unexpanded or cultured FL cell suspensions were separated into various subpopulations. These were tested for long-term culture potential and for in vivo repopulating function following transplantation into NOD/SCID mice. We found that upon culture of human FL cells, a tight association between classical stem cell phenotypes, such as CD34(+) /CD38(-) and/or side population, and NOD/SCID repopulating function was lost, as observed with other sources. Although SRC activity before and following culture consistently correlated with the presence of a CD34(+) cell population, we provide evidence that, contrary to umbilical cord blood and adult sources, stem cells present in both CD34(+) and CD34(-) FL populations can sustain long-term hematopoietic cultures. Furthermore, upon additional culture, CD34-depleted cell suspensions, devoid of SRCs, regenerated a population of CD34(+) cells possessing SRC function. Our studies suggest that compared to neonatal and adult sources, the phenotypical characteristics of putative human FL HSCs may be less strictly defined, and reinforce the accumulated evidence that human FL represents a unique, valuable alternative and highly proliferative source of HSCs for clinical applications.

  9. Effects of RNAi-mediated inhibition of aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2 on rat costochondral chondrocytes in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-hui WANG; Zhuang-qun YANG; Xi-jing HE; Li WANG; Li-xia LI; Jun-bo TU

    2008-01-01

    Aim:Failure of transplanted cartilage or allogenic chondrocytes is attributed mainly to immunological rejection and cartilage degradation.A major feature is the loss of aggrecan from the cartilage matrix,primarily due to the action of the specific proteinases aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2.The aim of this in vitro study was to determine whether the specific inhibition of aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2 by RNAi would mitigate aggrecan loss from cultured chondrocytes.Methods:Expression plasmid vectors of shRNA targeting aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2 were constructed and transfected into cultured rattus costochondral chondrocytes.The transfected cells were induced with interleukin-1 β (IL-1β).Gene mRNA levels were analyzed by RT-PCR.Aggrecan and collagen Ⅱ content were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting.Results:As the chondrocytes underwent dedifferentiation,agggrecanase-1 increased significantly.The specific inhibition of aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2 by RNAi had no negative effect on the morphology and growth velocity of the chondrocytes.The mRNA of aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2 decreased significantly.The α-2-macroglobulin expression level was increased by the shRNA specific for aggrecanase-1.Other genes of the chondrocytic extracellular matrix were not affected.RNAi significantly increased the aggrecan and collagen Ⅱ content of chondrocytes treated with IL-1β.Conclusion:The results suggest that inhibition of aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2 by RNAi can mitigate aggrecan degradation,without interfering with chondrocytic gene phenotype recovery.RNAi technology can be a useful tool for studying degenerative processes in cartilage.

  10. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    (hGPCs), derived from either human embryonic stem cells or mHTT-transduced fetal hGPCs. Here we show that mHTT glia can impart disease phenotype to normal mice, since mice engrafted intrastriatally with mHTT hGPCs exhibit worse motor performance than controls, and striatal neurons in mHTT glial......The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells...... survival in R6/2 HD mice. These observations suggest a causal role for glia in HD, and further suggest a cell-based strategy for disease amelioration in this disorder....

  11. Combining Targeted Metabolomic Data with a Model of Glucose Metabolism: Toward Progress in Chondrocyte Mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Daniel; Carlson, Ross P.; McCutchen, Carley N.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a debilitating disease likely involving altered metabolism of the chondrocytes in articular cartilage. Chondrocytes can respond metabolically to mechanical loads via cellular mechanotransduction, and metabolic changes are significant because they produce the precursors to the tissue matrix necessary for cartilage health. However, a comprehensive understanding of how energy metabolism changes with loading remains elusive. To improve our understanding of chondrocyte mechanotransduction, we developed a computational model to calculate the rate of reactions (i.e. flux) across multiple components of central energy metabolism based on experimental data. We calculated average reaction flux profiles of central metabolism for SW1353 human chondrocytes subjected to dynamic compression for 30 minutes. The profiles were obtained solving a bounded variable linear least squares problem, representing the stoichiometry of human central energy metabolism. Compression synchronized chondrocyte energy metabolism. These data are consistent with dynamic compression inducing early time changes in central energy metabolism geared towards more active protein synthesis. Furthermore, this analysis demonstrates the utility of combining targeted metabolomic data with a computational model to enable rapid analysis of cellular energy utilization. PMID:28056047

  12. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, G; Loreto, C; Carnazza, M L; Coppolino, F; Cardile, V; Leonardi, R

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  13. Ski inhibits TGF-β/phospho-Smad3 signaling and accelerates hypertrophic differentiation in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Ok; Sampson, Erik R; Maynard, Robert D; O'Keefe, Regis J; Chen, Di; Drissi, Hicham; Rosier, Randy N; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J

    2012-06-01

    Since transforming growing factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling inhibits chondrocyte maturation, endogenous negative regulators of TGF-β signaling are likely also important regulators of the chondrocyte differentiation process. One such negative regulator, Ski, is an oncoprotein that is known to inhibit TGF-β/Smad3 signaling via its interaction with phospho-Smad3 and recruitment of histone deacetylases (HDACs) to the DNA binding complex. Based on this, we hypothesized that Ski inhibits TGF-β signaling and accelerates maturation in chondrocytes via recruitment of HDACs to transcriptional complexes containing Smads. We tested this hypothesis in chick upper sternal chondrocytes (USCs), where gain and loss of Ski expression experiments were performed. Over-expression of Ski not only reversed the inhibitory effect of TGF-β on the expression of hypertrophic marker genes such as type X collagen (colX) and osteocalcin, it induced these genes basally as well. Conversely, knockdown of Ski by RNA interference led to a reduction of colX and osteocalcin expression under basal conditions. Furthermore, Ski blocked TGF-β induction of cyclinD1 and caused a basal up-regulation of Runx2, consistent with the observed acceleration of hypertrophy. Regarding mechanism, not only does Ski associate with phospho-Smad2 and 3, but its association with phospho-Smad3 is required for recruitment of HDAC4 and 5. Implicating this recruitment of HDACs in the phenotypic effects of Ski in chondrocytes, the HDAC inhibitor SAHA reversed the up-regulation of colX and osteocalcin in Ski over-expressing cells. These results suggest that inhibition of TGF-β signaling by Ski, which involves its association with phospho-Smad3 and recruitment of HDAC4 and 5, leads to accelerated chondrocyte differentiation.

  14. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured with salivary gland biopsies adopt an epithelial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Ola M; Tran, Simon D

    2011-06-01

    Sjogren's syndrome and radiotherapy for head and neck cancer result in severe xerostomia and irreversible salivary gland damage for which no effective treatment is currently available. Cell culture methods of primary human salivary gland epithelial cells (huSGs) are slow and cannot provide a sufficient number of cells. In addition, the majority of cultured huSGs are of a ductal phenotype and thus not fluid/saliva secretory cells. Some reports indicated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possessed the potential to differentiate into epithelial cells. To test this hypothesis with huSGs, a coculture system containing 2 chambers separated by a polyester membrane was used to study the capacity of human MSCs to adopt an epithelial phenotype when cocultured with human salivary gland biopsies. Results were that 20%-40% of cocultured MSCs expressed tight junction proteins [claudin-1 (CLDN-1), -2, -3, and -4; occludin; junctional adhesion molecule-A; and zonula occludens-1] as well as other epithelial markers [aquaporin-5, α-amylase (α-AMY), and E-cadherin], and generated a higher transepithelial electrical resistance. Electron microscopy demonstrated that these MSCs had comparable cellular structures to huSGs, such as tight junction structures and numerous secretory granules. Quantitative real time (RT)-polymerase chain reaction revealed an upregulation of several salivary genes (aquaporin-5, AMY, and CLDN-2). Moreover, the amounts of α-AMY detected in cocultured MSCs were comparable to those detected in huSGs control cultures. These data suggest that cocultured MSCs can demonstrate a temporary change into a salivary gland acinar phenotype.

  15. Genetic heterogeneity among slow acetylator N-acetyltransferase 2 phenotypes in cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Mark A; Hein, David W

    2017-07-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in human N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) modify the metabolism of numerous drugs and carcinogens. These genetic polymorphisms modify both drug efficacy and toxicity and cancer risk associated with carcinogen exposure. Previous studies have suggested phenotypic heterogeneity among different NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes. NAT2 phenotype was investigated in vitro and in situ in samples of human hepatocytes obtained from various NAT2 slow and intermediate NAT2 acetylator genotypes. NAT2 gene dose response (NAT2*5B/*5B > NAT2*5B/*6A > NAT2*6A/*6A) was observed towards the N-acetylation of the NAT2-specific drug sulfamethazine by human hepatocytes both in vitro and in situ. N-acetylation of 4-aminobiphenyl, an arylamine carcinogen substrate for both N-acetyltransferase 1 and NAT2, showed the same trend both in vitro and in situ although the differences were not significant (p > 0.05). The N-acetylation of the N-acetyltransferase 1-specific substrate p-aminobenzoic acid did not follow this trend. In comparisons of NAT2 intermediate acetylator genotypes, differences in N-acetylation between NAT2*4/*5B and NAT2*4/*6B hepatocytes were not observed in vitro or in situ towards any of these substrates. These results further support phenotypic heterogeneity among NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes, consistent with differential risks of drug failure or toxicity and cancer associated with carcinogen exposure.

  16. Regulation of α5 and αV Integrin Expression by GDF-5 and BMP-7 in Chondrocyte Differentiation and Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garciadiego-Cázares, David; Aguirre-Sánchez, Hilda I.; Abarca-Buis, René F.; Kouri, Juan B.; Velasquillo, Cristina; Ibarra, Clemente

    2015-01-01

    The Integrin β1 family is the major receptors of the Extracellular matrix (ECM), and the synthesis and degradation balance of ECM is seriously disrupted during Osteoarthritis (OA). In this scenario, integrins modify their pattern expression and regulate chondrocyte differen-tiation in the articular cartilage. Members of the Transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β) Su-perfamily, such as Growth differentiation factor 5 (Gdf-5) and Bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp-7), play a key role in joint formation and could regulate the integrin expression during chondrocyte differentiation and osteoarthritis progression in an experimental OA rat model. Decrease of α5 integrin expression in articular cartilage was related with chondrocyte dedif-ferentiation during OA progression, while increase of α1, α2, and α3 integrin expression was related with fibrous areas in articular cartilage during OA. Hypertrophic chondrocytes expressedαV integrin and was increased in the articular cartilage of rats with OA. Integrin expression during chondrocyte differentiation was also analyzed in a micromass culture system of mouse embryo mesenchymal cells, micromass cultures was treated with Gdf-5 or Bmp-7 for 4 and 6 days, respectively. Gdf-5 induced the expression of theα5 sub-unit, while Bmp-7 induced the expression of the αV sub-unit. This suggests a switch in signaling for prehypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation towards hypertrophy, where Gdf-5 could maintain the articular chondrocyte phenotype and Bmp-7 would induce hypertrophy. Decrease of Ihh expression during late stages of OA in rat model suggest that the ossification in OA rat knees and endochondral ossification could be activated by Bmp-7 and αV integrin in absence of Ihh. Thus, chondrocyte phenotype in articular cartilage is similar to prehypetrophic chondrocyte in growth plate, and is preserved due to the presence of Indian hedgehog (Ihh), Gdf-5 and α5 integrin to maintain articular cartilage and prevent hy

  17. Disease Modeling and Phenotypic Drug Screening for Diabetic Cardiomyopathy using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye M. Drawnel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a complication of type 2 diabetes, with known contributions of lifestyle and genetics. We develop environmentally and genetically driven in vitro models of the condition using human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes. First, we mimic diabetic clinical chemistry to induce a phenotypic surrogate of diabetic cardiomyopathy, observing structural and functional disarray. Next, we consider genetic effects by deriving cardiomyocytes from two diabetic patients with variable disease progression. The cardiomyopathic phenotype is recapitulated in the patient-specific cells basally, with a severity dependent on their original clinical status. These models are incorporated into successive levels of a screening platform, identifying drugs that preserve cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro during diabetic stress. In this work, we present a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC model of a complex metabolic condition, showing the power of this technique for discovery and testing of therapeutic strategies for a disease with ever-increasing clinical significance.

  18. Structural determinants of phenotypic diversity and replication rate of human prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri G Safar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The infectious pathogen responsible for prion diseases is the misfolded, aggregated form of the prion protein, PrPSc. In contrast to recent progress in studies of laboratory rodent-adapted prions, current understanding of the molecular basis of human prion diseases and, especially, their vast phenotypic diversity is very limited. Here, we have purified proteinase resistant PrPSc aggregates from two major phenotypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, determined their conformational stability and replication tempo in vitro, as well as characterized structural organization using recently emerged approaches based on hydrogen/deuterium (H/D exchange coupled with mass spectrometry. Our data clearly demonstrate that these phenotypically distant prions differ in a major way with regard to their structural organization, both at the level of the polypeptide backbone (as indicated by backbone amide H/D exchange data as well as the quaternary packing arrangements (as indicated by H/D exchange kinetics for histidine side chains. Furthermore, these data indicate that, in contrast to previous observations on yeast and some murine prion strains, the replication rate of sCJD prions is primarily determined not by conformational stability but by specific structural features that control the growth rate of prion protein aggregates.

  19. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In Situ Characterizing Membrane Lipid Phenotype of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines Using Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolisms are closely associated with cancers. In this study, mass spectrometry was employed to in situ investigate the associations of membrane lipid phenotypes of six human lung cancer cell lines (i.e., A549, H1650, H1975 from adenocarcinoma, H157 and H1703 from squamous cell carcinomas, and H460 from a large cell carcinoma) with cancer cell types and finally total 230 lipids were detected. Based these 230 lipids, partial least-square discriminant analysis indicated that fi...

  2. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human mammary stem/progenitor cells in long term culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaveena Dey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer stem cells exhibit close resemblance to normal stem cells in phenotype as well as function. Hence, studying normal stem cell behavior is important in understanding cancer pathogenesis. It has recently been shown that human breast stem cells can be enriched in suspension cultures as mammospheres. However, little is known about the behavior of these cells in long-term cultures. Since extensive self-renewal potential is the hallmark of stem cells, we undertook a detailed phenotypic and functional characterization of human mammospheres over long-term passages. METHODOLOGY: Single cell suspensions derived from human breast 'organoids' were seeded in ultra low attachment plates in serum free media. Resulting primary mammospheres after a week (termed T1 mammospheres were subjected to passaging every 7th day leading to the generation of T2, T3, and T4 mammospheres. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that primary mammospheres contain a distinct side-population (SP that displays a CD24(low/CD44(low phenotype, but fails to generate mammospheres. Instead, the mammosphere-initiating potential rests within the CD44(high/CD24(low cells, in keeping with the phenotype of breast cancer-initiating cells. In serial sphere formation assays we find that even though primary (T1 mammospheres show telomerase activity and fourth passage T4 spheres contain label-retaining cells, they fail to initiate new mammospheres beyond T5. With increasing passages, mammospheres showed an increase in smaller sized spheres, reduction in proliferation potential and sphere forming efficiency, and increased differentiation towards the myoepithelial lineage. Significantly, staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity revealed a dramatic increase in the number of senescent cells with passage, which might in part explain the inability to continuously generate mammospheres in culture. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the self-renewal potential of human breast stem cells is

  3. The identification of CD163 expressing phagocytic chondrocytes in joint cartilage and its novel scavenger role in cartilage degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Jiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cartilage degradation is a typical characteristic of arthritis. This study examined whether there was a subset of phagocytic chondrocytes that expressed the specific macrophage marker, CD163, and investigated their role in cartilage degradation. METHODS: Cartilage from the knee and temporomandibular joints of Sprague-Dawley rats was harvested. Cartilage degradation was experimentally-induced in rat temporomandibular joints, using published biomechanical dental methods. The expression levels of CD163 and inflammatory factors within cartilage, and the ability of CD163(+ chondrocytes to conduct phagocytosis were investigated. Cartilage from the knees of patients with osteoarthritis and normal cartilage from knee amputations was also investigated. RESULTS: In the experimentally-induced degrading cartilage from temporomandibular joints, phagocytes were capable of engulfing neighboring apoptotic and necrotic cells, and the levels of CD163, TNF-α and MMPs were all increased (P0.05. CD163(+ chondrocytes were found in the cartilage mid-zone of temporomandibular joints and knee from healthy, three-week old rats. Furthermore, an increased number of CD163(+ chondrocytes with enhanced phagocytic activity were present in Col-II(+ chondrocytes isolated from the degraded cartilage of temporomandibular joints in the eight-week experimental group compared with their age-matched controls. Increased number with enhanced phagocytic activity of CD163(+ chondrocytes were also found in isolated Col-II(+ chondrocytes stimulated with TNF-α (P<0.05. Mid-zone distribution of CD163(+ cells accompanied with increased expression of CD163 and TNF-α were further confirmed in the isolated Col-II(+ chondrocytes from the knee cartilage of human patients with osteoarthritis, in contrast to the controls (both P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: An increased number of CD163(+ chondrocytes with enhanced phagocytic activity were discovered within degraded joint cartilage, indicating a

  4. The identification of CD163 expressing phagocytic chondrocytes in joint cartilage and its novel scavenger role in cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Mian; Wei, Yuying; Wu, Yaoping; Qiu, Zhong Ying; He, Jianjun; Cao, Yunxin; Hu, Jintao; Zhu, Han; Niu, Li-Na; Cao, Xu; Yang, Kun; Wang, Mei-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage degradation is a typical characteristic of arthritis. This study examined whether there was a subset of phagocytic chondrocytes that expressed the specific macrophage marker, CD163, and investigated their role in cartilage degradation. Cartilage from the knee and temporomandibular joints of Sprague-Dawley rats was harvested. Cartilage degradation was experimentally-induced in rat temporomandibular joints, using published biomechanical dental methods. The expression levels of CD163 and inflammatory factors within cartilage, and the ability of CD163(+) chondrocytes to conduct phagocytosis were investigated. Cartilage from the knees of patients with osteoarthritis and normal cartilage from knee amputations was also investigated. In the experimentally-induced degrading cartilage from temporomandibular joints, phagocytes were capable of engulfing neighboring apoptotic and necrotic cells, and the levels of CD163, TNF-α and MMPs were all increased (P0.05). CD163(+) chondrocytes were found in the cartilage mid-zone of temporomandibular joints and knee from healthy, three-week old rats. Furthermore, an increased number of CD163(+) chondrocytes with enhanced phagocytic activity were present in Col-II(+) chondrocytes isolated from the degraded cartilage of temporomandibular joints in the eight-week experimental group compared with their age-matched controls. Increased number with enhanced phagocytic activity of CD163(+) chondrocytes were also found in isolated Col-II(+) chondrocytes stimulated with TNF-α (PCD163(+) cells accompanied with increased expression of CD163 and TNF-α were further confirmed in the isolated Col-II(+) chondrocytes from the knee cartilage of human patients with osteoarthritis, in contrast to the controls (both PCD163(+) chondrocytes with enhanced phagocytic activity were discovered within degraded joint cartilage, indicating a role in eliminating degraded tissues. Targeting these cells provides a new strategy for the treatment of arthritis.

  5. Human embryonic stem cell microenvironment suppresses the tumorigenic phenotype of aggressive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Margaryan, Naira V; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Lipavsky, Alina; Wheaton, William W; Abbott, Daniel E; Seftor, Richard E B; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2008-03-18

    Embryonic stem cells sustain a microenvironment that facilitates a balance of self-renewal and differentiation. Aggressive cancer cells, expressing a multipotent, embryonic cell-like phenotype, engage in a dynamic reciprocity with a microenvironment that promotes plasticity and tumorigenicity. However, the cancer-associated milieu lacks the appropriate regulatory mechanisms to maintain a normal cellular phenotype. Previous work from our laboratory reported that aggressive melanoma and breast carcinoma express the embryonic morphogen Nodal, which is essential for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) pluripotency. Based on the aberrant expression of this embryonic plasticity gene by tumor cells, this current study tested whether these cells could respond to regulatory cues controlling the Nodal signaling pathway, which might be sequestered within the microenvironment of hESCs, resulting in the suppression of the tumorigenic phenotype. Specifically, we discovered that metastatic tumor cells do not express the inhibitor to Nodal, Lefty, allowing them to overexpress this embryonic morphogen in an unregulated manner. However, exposure of the tumor cells to a hESC microenvironment (containing Lefty) leads to a dramatic down-regulation in their Nodal expression concomitant with a reduction in clonogenicity and tumorigenesis accompanied by an increase in apoptosis. Furthermore, this ability to suppress the tumorigenic phenotype is directly associated with the secretion of Lefty, exclusive to hESCs, because it is not detected in other stem cell types, normal cell types, or trophoblasts. The tumor-suppressive effects of the hESC microenvironment, by neutralizing the expression of Nodal in aggressive tumor cells, provide previously unexplored therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment.

  6. Human and feline adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells have comparable phenotype, immunomodulatory functions, and transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kaitlin C; Fierro, Fernando A; Ko, Emily Mills; Walker, Naomi J; Arzi, Boaz; Tepper, Clifford G; Dahlenburg, Heather; Cicchetto, Andrew; Kol, Amir; Marsh, Lyndsey; Murphy, William J; Fazel, Nasim; Borjesson, Dori L

    2017-03-20

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are a promising cell therapy to treat inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases. Development of appropriate pre-clinical animal models is critical to determine safety and attain early efficacy data for the most promising therapeutic candidates. Naturally occurring diseases in cats already serve as valuable models to inform human clinical trials in oncologic, cardiovascular, and genetic diseases. The objective of this study was to complete a comprehensive side-by-side comparison of human and feline ASCs, with an emphasis on their immunomodulatory capacity and transcriptome. Human and feline ASCs were evaluated for phenotype, immunomodulatory profile, and transcriptome. Additionally, transwells were used to determine the role of cell-cell contact in ASC-mediated inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation in both humans and cats. Similar to human ASCs, feline ASCs were highly proliferative at low passages and fit the minimal criteria of multipotent stem cells including a compatible surface protein phenotype, osteogenic capacity, and normal karyotype. Like ASCs from all species, feline ASCs inhibited mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, with or without direct ASC-lymphocyte contact. Feline ASCs mimic human ASCs in their mediator secretion pattern, including prostaglandin E2, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, transforming growth factor beta, and interleukin-6, all augmented by interferon gamma secretion by lymphocytes. The transcriptome of three unactivated feline ASC lines were highly similar. Functional analysis of the most highly expressed genes highlighted processes including: 1) the regulation of apoptosis; 2) cell adhesion; 3) response to oxidative stress; and 4) regulation of cell differentiation. Finally, feline ASCs had a similar gene expression profile to noninduced human ASCs. Findings suggest that feline ASCs modulate lymphocyte proliferation using soluble mediators that mirror the human ASC secretion

  7. Molecular identification of four phenotypes of human Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Hu, Li; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Classification of Demodex mites has long depended on hosts and morphological characteristics. However, the fact that two species coexist in the same host and phenotype is easily influenced by environment causes difficulty and indeterminacy in traditional classification. Genotype, which directly reflects the molecular structure characteristics, is relatively stable. In this study, species identification of four phenotypes of human Demodex mites was conducted. Mites were morphologically classified into four phenotypes: long- and short-bodied Demodex folliculorum with finger-like terminus and Demodex brevis with finger- or cone-like terminus. The mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragment of individual mite was amplified, cloned, sequenced, and aligned. Sequence divergences, genetic distances, transition/transversion rates, and phylogenetic trees were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the 16S rDNA sequence of three phenotypes with finger-like terminus was 337 bp, and that of phenotype with cone-like terminus was 342 bp. The divergences, genetic distances, and transition/transversion rates among the three phenotypes with finger-like terminus were 0.0-2.7%, 0.000-0.029, and 5.0-7/0 (5/1-7/0), respectively, indicating an intraspecific variation. Yet, those between these three phenotypes and the one with cone-like terminus were 21.6-22.8%, 2.510-2.589, and 0.47-0.59 (22/47-27/46), respectively, suggesting an interspecific variation. The five phylogenetic trees showed that the three phenotypes with finger-like terminus clustered into one branch, while the phenotype with cone-like terminus clustered into another. In conclusion, terminus is a major morphological characteristic for the identification of human Demodex species. The three phenotypes with finger-like terminus belong to D. folliculorum, while the phenotype with cone-like terminus belongs to D. brevis. Molecular identification can verify and replenish morphological identification.

  8. Genetic architecture for human aggression: A study of gene-phenotype relationship in OMIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-James, Yanli; Faraone, Stephen V

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies of human aggression have mainly focused on known candidate genes and pathways regulating serotonin and dopamine signaling and hormonal functions. These studies have taught us much about the genetics of human aggression, but no genetic locus has yet achieved genome-significance. We here present a review based on a paradoxical hypothesis that studies of rare, functional genetic variations can lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying complex multifactorial disorders such as aggression. We examined all aggression phenotypes catalogued in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), an Online Catalog of Human Genes and Genetic Disorders. We identified 95 human disorders that have documented aggressive symptoms in at least one individual with a well-defined genetic variant. Altogether, we retrieved 86 causal genes. Although most of these genes had not been implicated in human aggression by previous studies, the most significantly enriched canonical pathways had been previously implicated in aggression (e.g., serotonin and dopamine signaling). Our findings provide strong evidence to support the causal role of these pathways in the pathogenesis of aggression. In addition, the novel genes and pathways we identified suggest additional mechanisms underlying the origins of human aggression. Genome-wide association studies with very large samples will be needed to determine if common variants in these genes are risk factors for aggression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. PGE2 signal through EP2 promotes the growth of articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Tomoki; Liang, Bojian; Okamoto, Takeshi; Matsusaki, Takashi; Nishijo, Koichi; Ishibe, Tatsuya; Yasura, Ko; Nagayama, Satoshi; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Toguchida, Junya

    2005-03-01

    EP2 was identified as the major PGE2 receptor expressed in articular cartilage. An EP2 agonist increased intracellular cAMP in articular chondrocytes, stimulating DNA synthesis in both monolayer and 3D cultures. Hence, the EP2 agonist may be a potent therapeutic agent for degenerative cartilage diseases. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) exhibits pleiotropic effects in various types of tissue through four types of receptors, EP1-4. We examined the expression of EPs and effects of agonists for each EP on articular chondrocytes. The expression of each EP in articular chondrocytes was examined by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. A chondrocyte cell line, MMA2, was established from articular cartilage of p53(-/-) mice and used to analyze the effects of agonists for each EP. A search for molecules downstream of the PGE2 signal through the EP2 agonist was made by cDNA microarray analysis. The growth-promoting effect of the EP2 agonist on chondrocytes surrounded by cartilage matrix was examined in an organ culture of rat femora. EP2 was identified as the major EP expressed in articular cartilage. Treatment of MMA2 cells with specific agonists for each EP showed that only the EP2 agonist significantly increased intracellular cAMP levels in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression profiling of MMA2 revealed a set of genes upregulated by the EP2 agonist, including several growth-promoting and apoptosis-protecting genes such as the cyclin D1, fibronectin, integrin alpha5, AP2alpha, and 14-3-3gamma genes. The upregulation of these genes by the EP2 agonist was confirmed in human articular chondrocytes by quantitative mRNA analysis. On treatment with the EP2 agonist, human articular chondrocytes showed an increase in the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuracil (BrdU), and the organ culture of rat femora showed an increase of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining in articular chondrocytes surrounded by cartilage matrix, suggesting growth-promoting effects of the PGE2 signal

  10. Direct phenotypical and functional dysregulation of primary human B cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Judith Perisé-Barrios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and phenotype of primary B cells in vitro. Moreover, we examined expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID mRNA that is responsible for class switch recombination (CSR and somatic hypermutation (SHM. Here, we report that changes observed in cellular proliferation, phenotypes and activation of B cells could be caused by direct contact between HIV-1 particles and primary B cells in vitro. Finally, direct HIV-1-derived B cells activation led to the increase of AID mRNA expression and its subsequent CSR function was detected in vitro. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that HIV-1 could directly induce primary B cells dysregulation triggering phenotypical and functional abilities of B cells in vitro that could explain in some extent early B-cell abnormalities in HIV disease.

  11. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J; Cervantes, Thomas M; Kimura, Anya M; Neville, Craig M; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P; Randolph, Mark A; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2016-02-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  12. Let-7b inhibits human cancer phenotype by targeting cytochrome P450 epoxygenase 2J2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiong Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, noncoding RNA molecules of 20 to 22 nucleotides that regulate gene expression by binding to their 3' untranslated region (3'UTR. Increasing data implicate altered miRNA participation in the progress of cancer. We previously reported that CYP2J2 epoxygenase promotes human cancer phenotypes. But whether and how CYP2J2 is regulated by miRNA is not understood. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using bioinformatics analysis, we found potential target sites for miRNA let-7b in 3'UTR of human CYP2J2. Luciferase and western blot assays revealed that CYP2J2 was regulated by let-7b. In addition, let-7b decreased the enzymatic activity of endogenous CYP2J2. Furthermore, let-7b may diminish cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis of tumor cells via posttranscriptional repression of CYP2J2. Tumor xenografts were induced in nude mice by subcutaneous injection of MDA-MB-435 cells. The let-7b expression vector, pSilencer-let-7b, was injected through tail vein every 3 weeks. Let-7b significantly inhibited the tumor phenotype by targeting CYP2J2. Moreover, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to determine the expression levels of let-7b and CYP2J2 protein from 18 matched lung squamous cell cancer and adjacent normal lung tissues; the expression level of CYP2J2 was inversely proportional to that of let-7b. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated that the decreased expression of let-7b could lead to the high expression of CYP2J2 protein in cancerous tissues. These findings suggest that miRNA let-7b reduces CYP2J2 expression, which may contribute to inhibiting tumor phenotypes.

  13. An EMT–Driven Alternative Splicing Program Occurs in Human Breast Cancer and Modulates Cellular Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Balsamo, Michele; Condeelis, John S.; Oktay, Maja H.; Burge, Christopher B.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA–Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT–dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell–cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT–associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT–associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT–associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT–associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT–dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT–associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT–associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression. PMID:21876675

  14. The Effects of Vitamin D3 on Proliferation and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Chondrocytes from Human Articular Cartilage%活性维生素D3对体外原代培养人骨关节炎软骨细胞的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张良; 郭艾

    2012-01-01

    Objective To obtain articular chondrocyte from patients with osteoarthritis by primary culture,to explore the relationship between different concentrate [1, 25-(OH)2D3]and proliferation, apoptosis of chondrocytes. Methods Human articular chondrocytes were obtained by modified digestive method with enzyme in vitro and inden-tified by alkaline phosphatase (AKP) staining. OA Chondrocytes were cultured in medium with different concentrate [1,25-(OH)2D3]. MMT method was used to assay proliferation of chondrocytes. Optical density(OD) at 490nm was determined by ELISA. Flow cytometry was used to assay the apoptosis ratio at different time point. Results 10~5 u-mol/L[l ,25-(OH)2D3]can promote the proliferation of chondrocytes obviously,and the proper react time point is 48 hour(P<0. 01). At the same time 10-5 umol/L[1, 25-(OH)2D3]can inhibit the apoptosis ratio obviously at 48 hour time point. Conclusion To promote the proliferation and inhibit the apoptosis of OA chondrocytes in vitro,the better concentration of [1,25-(OH)2D3]is 1×10-5 umol/L. 48 hour after[1,25-(OH)2D3]added is the best time for the experiment objective.%目的 探讨不同浓度的1α,25二羟基维生素D3[1,25 -(OH)2D3]对体外培养的人骨关节炎患者关节软骨细胞的增殖及凋亡率的影响.方法 酶二步消化法体外分离培养人软骨细胞,以碱性磷酸酶染色法鉴定.加入不同剂量的[1,25 (OH)2D3],通过噻唑蓝比色试验检测细胞存活和增殖情况,以及用流式细胞仪检测软骨细胞在不同药物浓度、不同作用时间的凋亡率.结论 [1,25 (OH)2D3]作用于入骨关节炎软骨细胞的最佳作用浓度为1×10-5umol/L,最佳作用时间点为48h.高浓度的[1,25-(OH)2D3]能明显促进细胞坏死,极低浓度的[1,25 -(OH)2D3]对软骨细胞增殖、凋亡无明显影响.

  15. Blue eyes in lemurs and humans: same phenotype, different genetic mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Brenda J; Pedersen, Anja; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2009-01-01

    Almost all mammals have brown or darkly-pigmented eyes (irises), but among primates, there are some prominent blue-eyed exceptions. The blue eyes of some humans and lemurs are a striking example of convergent evolution of a rare phenotype on distant branches of the primate tree. Recent work...... on humans indicates that blue eye color is associated with, and likely caused by, a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs12913832) in an intron of the gene HERC2, which likely regulates expression of the neighboring pigmentation gene OCA2. This raises the immediate question of whether blue eyes in lemurs might...... have a similar genetic basis. We addressed this by sequencing the homologous genetic region in the blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur macaco flavifrons; N = 4) and the closely-related black lemur (Eulemur macaco macaco; N = 4), which has brown eyes. We then compared a 166-bp segment corresponding...

  16. The expression of HSP in human skeletal muscle. Effects of muscle fiber phenotype and training background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Mattias; Mackey, Abigail L; Langberg, Henning;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Exercise-induced adaptations of skeletal muscle are related to training mode and can be muscle fibre type specific. This study aimed to investigate heat shock protein expression in type I and type II muscle fibres in resting skeletal muscle of subjects with different training backgrounds...... HSPs in human skeletal muscle is influenced by muscle fibre phenotype. The fibre type specific expression of HSP70 is influenced by resistance and endurance training whereas those of αB-crystallin and HSP27 are influenced only by endurance training suggesting the existence of a training......-modality specific action on the adaptive processes including heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  17. Heritability maps of human face morphology through large-scale automated three-dimensional phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Hysi, Pirro; Spector, Tim; Montana, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    The human face is a complex trait under strong genetic control, as evidenced by the striking visual similarity between twins. Nevertheless, heritability estimates of facial traits have often been surprisingly low or difficult to replicate. Furthermore, the construction of facial phenotypes that correspond to naturally perceived facial features remains largely a mystery. We present here a large-scale heritability study of face geometry that aims to address these issues. High-resolution, three-dimensional facial models have been acquired on a cohort of 952 twins recruited from the TwinsUK registry, and processed through a novel landmarking workflow, GESSA (Geodesic Ensemble Surface Sampling Algorithm). The algorithm places thousands of landmarks throughout the facial surface and automatically establishes point-wise correspondence across faces. These landmarks enabled us to intuitively characterize facial geometry at a fine level of detail through curvature measurements, yielding accurate heritability maps of the human face (www.heritabilitymaps.info).

  18. Chondrocytes, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, and Their Combination in Articular Cartilage Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazempour, A; Van Wie, B J

    2016-05-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly organized connective tissue lining, covering the ends of bones within articulating joints. Its highly ordered structure is essential for stable motion and provides a frictionless surface easing load transfer. AC is vulnerable to lesions and, because it is aneural and avascular, it has limited self-repair potential which often leads to osteoarthritis. To date, no fully successful treatment for osteoarthritis has been reported. Thus, the development of innovative therapeutic approaches is desperately needed. Autologous chondrocyte implantation, the only cell-based surgical intervention approved in the United States for treating cartilage defects, has limitations because of de-differentiation of articular chondrocytes (AChs) upon in vitro expansion. De-differentiation can be abated if initial populations of AChs are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which not only undergo chondrogenesis themselves but also support chondrocyte vitality. In this review we summarize studies utilizing AChs, non-AChs, and MSCs and compare associated outcomes. Moreover, a comprehensive set of recent human studies using chondrocytes to direct MSC differentiation, MSCs to support chondrocyte re-differentiation and proliferation in co-culture environments, and exploratory animal intra- and inter-species studies are systematically reviewed and discussed in an innovative manner allowing side-by-side comparisons of protocols and outcomes. Finally, a comprehensive set of recommendations are made for future studies.

  19. Coumestrol Counteracts Interleukin-1β-Induced Catabolic Effects by Suppressing Inflammation in Primary Rat Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae-Seek; Cho, In-A; Kang, Kyeong-Rok; Oh, Ji-Su; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Seo, Yo-Seob; Kim, Su-Gwan; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Do Kyung; Im, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the anti-catabolic effects of coumestrol, a phytoestrogen derived from herbal plants, against interleukin-1β-induced cartilage degeneration in primary rat chondrocytes and articular cartilage. Coumestrol did not affect the viability of human normal oral keratinocytes and primary rat chondrocytes treated for 24 h and 21 days, respectively. Although coumestrol did not significantly increase the proteoglycan contents in long-term culture, it abolished the interleukin-1β-induced loss of proteoglycans in primary rat chondrocytes and knee articular cartilage. Furthermore, coumestrol suppressed the expression of matrix-degrading enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinase-13, -3, and -1 in primary rat chondrocytes stimulated with interleukin-1β. Moreover, the expression of catabolic factors such as nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2, and inflammatory cytokines in interleukin-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes was suppressed by coumestrol. In summary, these results indicate that coumestrol counteracts the catabolic effects induced by interleukin-1β through the suppression of inflammation. Therefore, based on its biological activity and safety profile, coumestrol could be used as a potential anti-catabolic biomaterial for osteoarthritis.

  20. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Mishra, Anurag [Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Krynetskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: ekrynets@temple.edu [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  1. Human endometrial side population cells exhibit genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of somatic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cervelló

    Full Text Available During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC population. Here we explore the hypothesis that human endometrial side population (SP cells correspond to somatic stem cells. We isolated, identified and characterized the SP corresponding to the stromal and epithelial compartments using endometrial SP genes signature, immunophenotyping and characteristic telomerase pattern. We analyzed the clonogenic activity of SP cells under hypoxic conditions and the differentiation capacity in vitro to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Finally, we demonstrated the functional capability of endometrial SP to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. Briefly, SP cells of human endometrium from epithelial and stromal compartments display genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of SSC.

  2. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, Gabriella; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the conservation of this process across divergent cancer

  3. Using changes in hydrostatic and osmotic pressure to manipulate metabolic function in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Shuichi; Ogawa, Rei

    2011-06-01

    Articular cartilage has distinct histological depth zones. In each zone, chondrocytes are subject to different hydrostatic (HP) and osmotic pressure (OP) due to weight-bearing and joint-loading. Previous in vitro studies of regeneration and pathophysiology in cartilage have failed to consider the characteristics of histological heterogeneity and the effects of combinations of changes in HP and OP. Thus, we have constructed molecular, biochemical, and histological profiles of anabolic and catabolic molecules produced by chondrocytes from each depth zone isolated from bovine articular cartilage in response to changes in HP and OP. We cultured the chondrocytes with combinations of loading or off-loading of HP at 0-0.5 MPa, 0.5 Hz, and changes in OP of 300-450 mosM over 1 wk, and evaluated mRNA expression and immunohistology of both anabolic and catabolic molecules and amounts of accumulated sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Any changes in HP and OP upregulated mRNA of anabolic and catabolic molecules in surface-, middle-, and deep-zone cells, in descending order of magnitude. Off-loading HP maintained the anabolic and reduced the catabolic mRNA; high OP retained upregulation of catabolic mRNA. These molecular profiles were consistent with immunohistological and biochemical findings. Changes in HP and OP are essential for simulating chondrocyte physiology and useful for manipulating phenotypes.

  4. Surviving endoplasmic reticulum stress is coupled to altered chondrocyte differentiation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Yeung Tsang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In protein folding and secretion disorders, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling (ERSS protects cells, alleviating stress that would otherwise trigger apoptosis. Whether the stress-surviving cells resume normal function is not known. We studied the in vivo impact of ER stress in terminally differentiating hypertrophic chondrocytes (HCs during endochondral bone formation. In transgenic mice expressing mutant collagen X as a consequence of a 13-base pair deletion in Col10a1 (13del, misfolded alpha1(X chains accumulate in HCs and elicit ERSS. Histological and gene expression analyses showed that these chondrocytes survived ER stress, but terminal differentiation is interrupted, and endochondral bone formation is delayed, producing a chondrodysplasia phenotype. This altered differentiation involves cell-cycle re-entry, the re-expression of genes characteristic of a prehypertrophic-like state, and is cell-autonomous. Concomitantly, expression of Col10a1 and 13del mRNAs are reduced, and ER stress is alleviated. ERSS, abnormal chondrocyte differentiation, and altered growth plate architecture also occur in mice expressing mutant collagen II and aggrecan. Alteration of the differentiation program in chondrocytes expressing unfolded or misfolded proteins may be part of an adaptive response that facilitates survival and recovery from the ensuing ER stress. However, the altered differentiation disrupts the highly coordinated events of endochondral ossification culminating in chondrodysplasia.

  5. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  6. Optimizing human hepatocyte models for metabolic phenotype and function: effects of treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Green, Charlotte J; Gunn, Pippa J; Hodson, Leanne; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2016-11-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are considered to be the "gold standard" cellular model for studying hepatic fatty acid and glucose metabolism; however, they come with limitations. Although the HepG2 cell line retains many of the primary hepatocyte metabolic functions they have a malignant origin and low rates of triglyceride secretion. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dimethyl sulfoxide supplementation in the media of HepG2 cells would enhance metabolic functionality leading to the development of an improved in vitro cell model that closely recapitulates primary human hepatocyte metabolism. HepG2 cells were cultured in media containing 1% dimethyl sulfoxide for 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days. Gene expression, protein levels, intracellular triglyceride, and media concentrations of triglyceride, urea, and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured. Dimethyl sulfoxide treatment altered the expression of genes involved in lipid (FAS, ACC1, ACC2, DGAT1, DGAT2, SCD) and glucose (PEPCK, G6Pase) metabolism as well as liver functionality (albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, AFP). mRNA changes were paralleled by alterations at the protein level. DMSO treatment decreased intracellular triglyceride content and lactate production and increased triglyceride and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in the media in a time-dependent manner. We have demonstrated that the addition of 1% dimethyl sulfoxide to culture media changes the metabolic phenotype of HepG2 cells toward a more primary human hepatocyte phenotype. This will enhance the currently available in vitro model systems for the study of hepatocyte biology related to pathological processes that contribute to disease and their response to specific therapeutic interventions. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  7. Human severe combined immunodeficiency disease: phenotypic and functional characteristics of peripheral B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougeon, M L; Drean, G; Le Deist, F; Dousseau, M; Fevrier, M; Diu, A; Theze, J; Griscelli, C; Fischer, A

    1990-11-01

    Human severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) includes an X-chromosome-linked type characterized by a complete absence of mature T cells, hypogammaglobulinemia but normal or elevated number of B cells, suggesting that the disease results from a block in early T cell differentiation. It has been shown that B cells from obligate carrier women of this disorder exhibit the preferential use of the nonmutant X chromosome as the active X (as shown for T cells), suggesting that the SCID gene product has a direct effect on B cells as well as on T cells. To examine this question, we analyzed the phenotypic and functional characteristics of peripheral B cells from nine infants with SCID. We found a constant absence of spontaneously expressed activation Ag on B cell membrane from all SCID patients tested which contrasts with the phenotypic pattern exhibited by age-matched infants whom all cells bearing surface Ig express the 4F2 Ag and to a lesser extent the transferrin receptor. Concurrently, B cells from SCID patients have a profound impairment in their responses to stimuli that induce in vitro B cell proliferation and differentiation. Although rIL-2 and low-Mr B cell growth factor are potent inducers of proliferation on age-matched infants' B cells, they are poorly efficient in inducing proliferation of anti-mu-activated SCID B cells. This impairment is not related to the resting B cell phenotype of SCID B cells as shown by comparison with normal resting B cells. Furthermore, we observed an apparent block in B cell differentiation inasmuch as neither rIL-2 nor rIL-6 could support SAC-activated SCID B cell differentiation, both lymphokines being very efficient in inducing SAC-activated age-matched infants' B cell or purified resting B cell differentiation. These results suggest that the SCID gene defect has a direct effect on B cells and is required during B cell maturation.

  8. A Computational Protein Phenotype Prediction Approach to Analyze the Deleterious Mutations of Human MED12 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaganapalli, Babajan; Mohammed, Kaleemuddin; Khan, Imran Ali; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu; Shaik, Noor Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Genetic mutations in MED12, a subunit of Mediator complex are seen in a broad spectrum of human diseases. However, the underlying basis of how these pathogenic mutations elicit protein phenotype changes in terms of 3D structure, stability and protein binding sites remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the structural and functional impacts of MED12 mutations, using computational methods as an alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. The MED12 gene mutations details and their corresponding clinical associations were collected from different databases and by text-mining. Initially, diverse computational approaches were applied to categorize the different classes of mutations based on their deleterious impact to MED12. Then, protein structures for wild and mutant types built by integrative modeling were analyzed for structural divergence, solvent accessibility, stability, and functional interaction deformities. Finally, this study was able to identify that genetic mutations mapped to exon-2 region, highly conserved LCEWAV and Catenin domains induce biochemically severe amino acid changes which alters the protein phenotype as well as the stability of MED12-CYCC interactions. To better understand the deleterious nature of FS-IDs and Indels, this study asserts the utility of computational screening based on their propensity towards non-sense mediated decay. Current study findings may help to narrow down the number of MED12 mutations to be screened for mediator complex dysfunction associated genetic diseases. This study supports computational methods as a primary filter to verify the plausible impact of pathogenic mutations based on the perspective of evolution, expression and phenotype of proteins. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2023-2035, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. 高强度周期性静水压对人软骨细胞超微结构及II 型胶原分泌的影响%Effects of high-intensity cyclical hydrostatic pressures on the ultrastructure and type II collagen expression of chondrocytes of knee joint in human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫; 白倩; 徐奎; 裘秀春; 范清宇; 马保安

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of high-intensity cyclic hydrostatic pressures on the ultrastructure and type II collagen contents of chondrocytes of the knee joint cultured in vitro in human. Methods The normal chondrocytes of human knee joint were isolated and cultured in vitro. The 3rd generation of chondrocytes were treated with high-intensity cyclical hydrostatic pressures ( 10.0 mPa ) by the multifunctional thermostatic high-insensitive hydrostatic pressure loading device for 2 h per day lasting for 5 days. Toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemical staining of type II collagen were employed to identify the chondrocytes. Cell morphology was observed by light microscopy. The ultrastructure of chondrocytes were observed by transmission electron microscopy ( TEM ). Type II collagen immunohistochemical staining and semi-quantitative analysis were performed to measure contents and expression of type II collagen of chondrocytes in 2 groups. Results Compared with the control group, cell morphology changed from irregular polygon into long spindle, membrane and cytoplasm retracted, the number of cells was reduced significantly and grew sparsely in the 10.0 mPa group. TEM showed that various apoptosis indications such as uneven distribution and margination of chromosomes in the 10.0 mPa group. Collagen type II immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative analysis showed that the percent of stained area of control group and 10.0 mPa group was ( 61.64 ± 6.19 ) % and ( 43.76 ± 5.61 ) %, compared with the control group, the stained area and extent of chondrocytes were significantly decreased in the 10.0 mPa group ( P < 0.05 ). Conclusions The high-intensity pressure over human physiological range can be regarded as a mechanical injury to result in cell apoptosis, morphology and intracellular ultrastructural changes of human chondrocytes, and also decrease protein expression of human chondrocytes. These data provide the experimental basis for studying the

  10. Iterative design of peptide-based hydrogels and the effect of network electrostatics on primary chondrocyte behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinthuvanich, Chomdao; Haines-Butterick, Lisa A; Nagy, Katelyn J; Schneider, Joel P

    2012-10-01

    Iterative peptide design was used to generate two peptide-based hydrogels to study the effect of network electrostatics on primary chondrocyte behavior. MAX8 and HLT2 peptides have formal charge states of +7 and +5 per monomer, respectively. These peptides undergo triggered folding and self-assembly to afford hydrogel networks having similar rheological behavior and local network morphologies, yet different electrostatic character. Each gel can be used to directly encapsulate and syringe-deliver cells. The influence of network electrostatics on cell viability after encapsulation and delivery, extracellular matrix deposition, gene expression, and the bulk mechanical properties of the gel-cell constructs as a function of culture time was assessed. The less electropositive HLT2 gel provides a microenvironment more conducive to chondrocyte encapsulation, delivery, and phenotype maintenance. Cell viability was higher for this gel and although a moderate number of cells dedifferentiated to a fibroblast-like phenotype, many retained their chondrocytic behavior. As a result, gel-cell constructs prepared with HLT2, cultured under static in vitro conditions, contained more GAG and type II collagen resulting in mechanically superior constructs. Chondrocytes delivered in the more electropositive MAX8 gel experienced a greater degree of cell death during encapsulation and delivery and the remaining viable cells were less prone to maintain their phenotype. As a result, MAX8 gel-cell constructs had fewer cells, of which a limited number were capable of laying down cartilage-specific ECM.

  11. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Holly A; McNulty, Amy L; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E; Gloss, Bernd; Kirby, Margaret L; Hutson, Mary R; Cohn, Daniel H; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Point mutations in the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel have been identified as the cause of autosomal-dominant human motor neuropathies, arthropathies, and skeletal malformations of varying severity. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which TRPV4 channelopathy mutations cause skeletal dysplasia. The human TRPV4(V620I) channelopathy mutation was transfected into primary porcine chondrocytes and caused significant (2.6-fold) up-regulation of follistatin (FST) expression levels. Pore altering mutations that prevent calcium influx through the channel prevented significant FST up-regulation (1.1-fold). We generated a mouse model of the TRPV4(V620I) mutation, and found significant skeletal deformities (e.g., shortening of tibiae and digits, similar to the human disease brachyolmia) and increases in Fst/TRPV4 mRNA levels (2.8-fold). FST was significantly up-regulated in primary chondrocytes transfected with 3 different dysplasia-causing TRPV4 mutations (2- to 2.3-fold), but was not affected by an arthropathy mutation (1.1-fold). Furthermore, FST-loaded microbeads decreased bone ossification in developing chick femora (6%) and tibiae (11%). FST gene and protein levels were also increased 4-fold in human chondrocytes from an individual natively expressing the TRPV4(T89I) mutation. Taken together, these data strongly support that up-regulation of FST in chondrocytes by skeletal dysplasia-inducing TRPV4 mutations contributes to disease pathogenesis. © FASEB.

  12. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. PMID:27601585

  13. Stress signaling from human mammary epithelial cells contributes to phenotypes of mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFilippis, Rosa Anna; Fordyce, Colleen; Patten, Kelley; Chang, Hang; Zhao, Jianxin; Fontenay, Gerald V; Kerlikowske, Karla; Parvin, Bahram; Tlsty, Thea D

    2014-09-15

    Telomere malfunction and other types of DNA damage induce an activin A-dependent stress response in mortal nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells that subsequently induces desmoplastic-like phenotypes in neighboring fibroblasts. Some characteristics of this fibroblast/stromal response, such as reduced adipocytes and increased extracellular matrix content, are observed not only in tumor tissues but also in disease-free breast tissues at high risk for developing cancer, especially high mammographic density tissues. We found that these phenotypes are induced by repression of the fatty acid translocase CD36, which is seen in desmoplastic and disease-free high mammographic density tissues. In this study, we show that epithelial cells from high mammographic density tissues have more DNA damage signaling, shorter telomeres, increased activin A secretion and an altered DNA damage response compared with epithelial cells from low mammographic density tissues. Strikingly, both telomere malfunction and activin A expression in epithelial cells can repress CD36 expression in adjacent fibroblasts. These results provide new insights into how high mammographic density arises and why it is associated with breast cancer risk, with implications for the definition of novel invention targets (e.g., activin A and CD36) to prevent breast cancer.

  14. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-12-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. Copyright © 2016 Suzuki et al.

  15. Rapamycin Conditioning of Dendritic Cells Differentiated from Human ES Cells Promotes a Tolerogenic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Silk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While human embryonic stem cells (hESCs may one day facilitate the treatment of degenerative diseases requiring cell replacement therapy, the success of regenerative medicine is predicated on overcoming the rejection of replacement tissues. Given the role played by dendritic cells (DCs in the establishment of immunological tolerance, we have proposed that DC, rendered tolerogenic during their differentiation from hESC, might predispose recipients to accept replacement tissues. As a first step towards this goal, we demonstrate that DC differentiated from H1 hESCs (H1-DCs are particularly responsive to the immunosuppressive agent rapamycin compared to monocyte-derived DC (moDC. While rapamycin had only modest impact on the phenotype and function of moDC, H1-DC failed to upregulate CD40 upon maturation and displayed reduced immunostimulatory capacity. Furthermore, coculture of naïve allogeneic T cells with rapamycin-treated H1-DC promoted an increased appearance of CD25hi Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, compared to moDC. Our findings suggest that conditioning of hESC-derived DC with rapamycin favours a tolerogenic phenotype.

  16. Human haptoglobin phenotypes and concentration determination by nanogold-enhanced electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Tsai-Mu; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Tseng, Shin-Hua; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Chang, Chia-Ching [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ju-Pin, E-mail: ccchang01@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China)

    2011-06-17

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an acute phase protein that binds free hemoglobin (Hb), preventing Hb-induced oxidative damage in the vascular system. There are three phenotypes in human Hp, whose heterogeneous polymorphic structures and varying concentrations in plasma have been attributed to the cause of diseases and outcome of clinical treatments. Different phenotypes of Hp may be composed of the same subunits but different copy numbers, rendering their determination difficult by a single procedure. In this study, we have developed a simple, fast, reliable and sensitive method, using label-free nanogold-modified bioprobes coupled with self-development electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). By this method, probe surface charge transfer resistance is detected. The relative charge transfer resistance ratios for Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2 were characterized. We were able to determine protein size difference within 3 nm, and the linear region of the calibration curve for Hp levels in the range of 90 pg ml{sup -1} and 90 {mu}g ml{sup -1} ({approx}1 fM to 1 pM). We surmise that similar approaches can be used to investigate protein polymorphism and altered protein-protein interaction associated with diseases.

  17. Enteropeptidase: a gene associated with a starvation human phenotype and a novel target for obesity treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Braud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity research focuses essentially on gene targets associated with the obese phenotype. None of these targets have yet provided a viable drug therapy. Focusing instead on genes that are involved in energy absorption and that are associated with a "human starvation phenotype", we have identified enteropeptidase (EP, a gene associated with congenital enteropeptidase deficiency, as a novel target for obesity treatment. The advantages of this target are that the gene is expressed exclusively in the brush border of the intestine; it is peripheral and not redundant. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Potent and selective EP inhibitors were designed around a boroarginine or borolysine motif. Oral administration of these compounds to mice restricted the bioavailability of dietary energy, and in a long-term treatment it significantly diminished the rate of increase in body weight, despite ad libitum food intake. No adverse reactions of the type seen with lipase inhibitors, such as diarrhea or steatorrhea, were observed. This validates EP as a novel, druggable target for obesity treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In vivo testing of novel boroarginine or borolysine-based EP inhibitors validates a novel approach to the treatment of obesity.

  18. Nicotine acts on growth plate chondrocytes to delay skeletal growth through the alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Kawakita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking adversely affects endochondral ossification during the course of skeletal growth. Among a plethora of cigarette chemicals, nicotine is one of the primary candidate compounds responsible for the cause of smoking-induced delayed skeletal growth. However, the possible mechanism of delayed skeletal growth caused by nicotine remains unclarified. In the last decade, localization of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, a specific receptor of nicotine, has been widely detected in non-excitable cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that nicotine affect growth plate chondrocytes directly and specifically through nAChR to delay skeletal growth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effect of nicotine on human growth plate chondrocytes, a major component of endochondral ossification. The chondrocytes were derived from extra human fingers. Nicotine inhibited matrix synthesis and hypertrophic differentiation in human growth plate chondrocytes in suspension culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Both human and murine growth plate chondrocytes expressed alpha7 nAChR, which constitutes functional homopentameric receptors. Methyllycaconitine (MLA, a specific antagonist of alpha7 nAChR, reversed the inhibition of matrix synthesis and functional calcium signal by nicotine in human growth plate chondrocytes in vitro. To study the effect of nicotine on growth plate in vivo, ovulation-controlled pregnant alpha7 nAChR +/- mice were given drinking water with or without nicotine during pregnancy, and skeletal growth of their fetuses was observed. Maternal nicotine exposure resulted in delayed skeletal growth of alpha7 nAChR +/+ fetuses but not in alpha7 nAChR -/- fetuses, implying that skeletal growth retardation by nicotine is specifically mediated via fetal alpha7 nAChR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that nicotine, from cigarette smoking, acts directly on growth plate chondrocytes to decrease

  19. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  20. The Effect of Salvia miltiorrhiza Injection on phenotype Expression of Collagen and Proteoglycan of Chondrocyte%丹参注射液对大鼠关节软骨细胞合成胶原和蛋白多糖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵忠; 刘德春; 宋阳春

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chondrocytes in vitro experimental study , to explore the impact of Danshen injection on the cartilage cells to synthesize collagen and proteoglycan. Methods On cartilage cells and passage of culture through on morphology of cultured cells and toluidine blue staining and immunocytochemical identification of articular cartilage cells, select the appropriate passage of chondrocytes, TNF-alpha compare danshen injection after intervention on chondrocytes in vitro expression of type II collagen and proteoglycan change. Results 2.5% , 5% , 10% Danshen injection can increase the expression of TNF-α -induced articular chondrocytes collagen type Ⅱ and proteoglycans. Conclusion Danshen injection to promote extracellular matrix synthesis in chondrocytes , reducing the catabolism of chondrocytes , play a protective effect on articular cartilage.%目的 通过对体外培养软骨细胞的实验研究,探寻丹参注射液对软骨细胞合成胶原和蛋白多糖的影响.方法 对软骨细胞进行原代及传代培养,通过对培养细胞形态学及甲苯胺蓝染色和免疫细胞化学方法鉴定关节软骨细胞,选择适合传代软骨细胞,应用TNF-α干预后比较丹参注射液干预对体外培养软骨细胞Ⅱ型胶原和蛋白多糖的表达变化.结果 2.5%、5%、10%丹参注射液可以增加TNF-α诱导的关节软骨细胞Ⅱ型胶原及蛋白多糖的表达.结论 丹参注射液有促进软骨细胞外基质合成的作用,减少软骨细胞分解代谢,对关节软骨起到保护作用.

  1. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lore Becker

    Full Text Available Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1 were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  2. Mutagenesis and phenotyping resources in zebrafish for studying development and human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important model organism for studying development and human disease. The zebrafish has an excellent reference genome and the functions of hundreds of genes have been tested using both forward and reverse genetic approaches. Recent years have seen an increasing number of large-scale mutagenesis projects and the number of mutants or gene knockouts in zebrafish has increased rapidly, including for the first time conditional knockout technologies. In addition, targeted mutagenesis techniques such as zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short sequences (CRISPR) or CRISPR-associated (Cas), have all been shown to effectively target zebrafish genes as well as the first reported germline homologous recombination, further expanding the utility and power of zebrafish genetics. Given this explosion of mutagenesis resources, it is now possible to perform systematic, high-throughput phenotype analysis of all zebrafish gene knockouts. PMID:24162064

  3. Functional and phenotypic changes in human lymphocytes after coincubation with Leishmania donovani in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Sørensen, A L; Kharazmi, A

    1990-01-01

    that the inhibition of the proliferative response to PHA by live L. donovani in vitro is associated with early processes in lymphocyte activation. Further studies on the inhibitory phenomena described may be of potential significance in the investigation of the suppressive mechanisms in human visceral leishmaniasis.......In this paper we describe functional and phenotypic changes in T cells after in vitro coincubation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and Leishmania donovani parasites at different parasite/peripheral blood mononuclear cell ratios. The phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced lymphoproliferative...... response was reduced by the coincubation, and at the maximal parasite/peripheral blood mononuclear cell ratio used (7.5:1), the average response was less than 40% of the response in the absence of parasites. The cause of the reduction in lymphoproliferation is not clear, but it requires live parasites...

  4. Natural variation in populations of persistently colonizing bacteria affect human host cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rahul A; Lee, Yongchan; Kim, Sung-Kook; Israel, Dawn; Peek, Richard M; Blaser, Martin J

    2003-08-15

    The highly diverse bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which persistently colonizes the human stomach, provides models to study the role of genome plasticity in host adaptation. Within H. pylori populations from 2 colonized individuals, intragenomic recombination between cagA DNA repeat sequences leads to deletion or duplication of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the CagA protein, which is injected by a type IV secretion system into host cells. Experimental coculture of gastric epithelial cells with the strains containing these naturally occurring CagA phosphorylation site variants induced markedly divergent host cell morphologic responses. Mutants were constructed in which a phosphorylation site was either added or deleted in the expressed CagA protein; coculture studies confirmed that the naturally occurring differences in CagA phosphorylation are responsible for the observed phenotypic variation. These findings indicate that within an individual host, intragenomic recombination between H. pylori repetitive DNA produces strain variants differing in their signals to host cells.

  5. Human breast microvascular endothelial cells retain phenotypic traits in long-term finite life span culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Valgardur; Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Kjartansson, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to study endothelial-epithelial interactions in the human breast have been hampered by lack of protocols for long-term cultivation of breast endothelial cells (BRENCs). The aim of this study was to establish long-term cultures of BRENCs and to compare their phenotypic traits...... with the tissue of origin. Microvasculature was localized in situ by immunohistochemistry in breast samples. From this tissue, collagen-rich stroma and adipose tissue were dissected mechanically and further disaggregated to release microvessel organoids. BRENCs were cultured from these organoids in endothelial...... uptake of low-density lipoprotein, and had E-selectin induced upon treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The first signs of senescence in passage 14 were accompanied by gain of trisomy 11. At passage 18 cells showed chromosomal aberrations and growth arrest as revealed by beta...

  6. Expression of ZFX gene correlated with the central features of the neoplastic phenotype in human brain tumors with distinct phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzali, Azita; Emadi-Baygi, Modjtaba; Nikpour, Parvaneh; Nazemroaya, Fatemehe; Kheirollahi, Majid

    2015-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor zinc finger protein, X-linked (ZFX) acts as an important director of self-renewal in several stem cell types. Moreover, ZFX expression abnormally increases in various cancers and relates to tumor grade. We performed this study, to examine its role in the pathogenesis of astrocytoma and meningioma. We used real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for evaluation of ZFX expression in 25 astrocytoma tumoral tissue and 25 meningioma tumoral tissues with different WHO grades. Furthermore, the association of gene expression with various clinic-pathological characteristics was examined. We found that there is a significant association between gene expression and different tumor grades, the presence or absence of invasion, forming and nonforming of glomeruloid vessels, the age over or under 50 and the presence or absence of calcification in astrocytomas. This is the first report that shows that ZFX was directly correlated with the central features of the neoplastic phenotype, including the growth of cancer cells, angiogenesis, and invasion. Regarding all the above-mentioned studies, it is highly plausible that silencing the expression of ZFX gene in gliomas has a major role in the therapeutic interventions of the disease in future.

  7. Consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes when catchability depends on encounters among human predators and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Together with life-history and underlying physiology, the behavioural variability among fish is one of the three main trait axes that determines the vulnerability to fishing. However, there are only a few studies that have systematically investigated the strength and direction of selection acting on behavioural traits. Using in situ fish behaviour revealed by telemetry techniques as input, we developed an individual-based model (IBM) that simulated the Lagrangian trajectory of prey (fish) moving within a confined home range (HR). Fishers exhibiting various prototypical fishing styles targeted these fish in the model. We initially hypothesised that more active and more explorative individuals would be systematically removed under all fished conditions, in turn creating negative selection differentials on low activity phenotypes and maybe on small HR. Our results partly supported these general predictions. Standardised selection differentials were, on average, more negative on HR than on activity. However, in many simulation runs, positive selection pressures on HR were also identified, which resulted from the stochastic properties of the fishes' movement and its interaction with the human predator. In contrast, there was a consistent negative selection on activity under all types of fishing styles. Therefore, in situations where catchability depends on spatial encounters between human predators and fish, we would predict a consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes and have less faith in the direction of the selection on HR size. Our study is the first theoretical investigation on the direction of fishery-induced selection of behaviour using passive fishing gears. The few empirical studies where catchability of fish was measured in relation to passive fishing techniques, such as gill-nets, traps or recreational fishing, support our predictions that fish in highly exploited situations are, on average, characterised by low swimming activity, stemming, in

  8. Consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes when catchability depends on encounters among human predators and fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Alós

    Full Text Available Together with life-history and underlying physiology, the behavioural variability among fish is one of the three main trait axes that determines the vulnerability to fishing. However, there are only a few studies that have systematically investigated the strength and direction of selection acting on behavioural traits. Using in situ fish behaviour revealed by telemetry techniques as input, we developed an individual-based model (IBM that simulated the Lagrangian trajectory of prey (fish moving within a confined home range (HR. Fishers exhibiting various prototypical fishing styles targeted these fish in the model. We initially hypothesised that more active and more explorative individuals would be systematically removed under all fished conditions, in turn creating negative selection differentials on low activity phenotypes and maybe on small HR. Our results partly supported these general predictions. Standardised selection differentials were, on average, more negative on HR than on activity. However, in many simulation runs, positive selection pressures on HR were also identified, which resulted from the stochastic properties of the fishes' movement and its interaction with the human predator. In contrast, there was a consistent negative selection on activity under all types of fishing styles. Therefore, in situations where catchability depends on spatial encounters between human predators and fish, we would predict a consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes and have less faith in the direction of the selection on HR size. Our study is the first theoretical investigation on the direction of fishery-induced selection of behaviour using passive fishing gears. The few empirical studies where catchability of fish was measured in relation to passive fishing techniques, such as gill-nets, traps or recreational fishing, support our predictions that fish in highly exploited situations are, on average, characterised by low swimming activity

  9. Bayesian Network Inference Enables Unbiased Phenotypic Anchoring of Transcriptomic Responses to Cigarette Smoke in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennen, Danyel G J; van Leeuwen, Danitsja M; Hendrickx, Diana M; Gottschalk, Ralph W H; van Delft, Joost H M; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2015-10-19

    Microarray-based transcriptomic analysis has been demonstrated to hold the opportunity to study the effects of human exposure to, e.g., chemical carcinogens at the whole genome level, thus yielding broad-ranging molecular information on possible carcinogenic effects. Since genes do not operate individually but rather through concerted interactions, analyzing and visualizing networks of genes should provide important mechanistic information, especially upon connecting them to functional parameters, such as those derived from measurements of biomarkers for exposure and carcinogenic risk. Conventional methods such as hierarchical clustering and correlation analyses are frequently used to address these complex interactions but are limited as they do not provide directional causal dependence relationships. Therefore, our aim was to apply Bayesian network inference with the purpose of phenotypic anchoring of modified gene expressions. We investigated a use case on transcriptomic responses to cigarette smoking in humans, in association with plasma cotinine levels as biomarkers of exposure and aromatic DNA-adducts in blood cells as biomarkers of carcinogenic risk. Many of the genes that appear in the Bayesian networks surrounding plasma cotinine, and to a lesser extent around aromatic DNA-adducts, hold biologically relevant functions in inducing severe adverse effects of smoking. In conclusion, this study shows that Bayesian network inference enables unbiased phenotypic anchoring of transcriptomics responses. Furthermore, in all inferred Bayesian networks several dependencies are found which point to known but also to new relationships between the expression of specific genes, cigarette smoke exposure, DNA damaging-effects, and smoking-related diseases, in particular associated with apoptosis, DNA repair, and tumor suppression, as well as with autoimmunity.

  10. Global Nav1.7 knockout mice recapitulate the phenotype of human congenital indifference to pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinthe Gingras

    Full Text Available Clinical genetic studies have shown that loss of Nav1.7 function leads to the complete loss of acute pain perception. The global deletion is reported lethal in mice, however, and studies of mice with promoter-specific deletions of Nav1.7 have suggested that the role of Nav1.7 in pain transduction depends on the precise form of pain. We developed genetic and animal husbandry strategies that overcame the neonatal-lethal phenotype and enabled construction of a global Nav1.7 knockout mouse. Knockouts were anatomically normal, reached adulthood, and had phenotype wholly analogous to human congenital indifference to pain (CIP: compared to littermates, knockouts showed no defects in mechanical sensitivity or overall movement yet were completely insensitive to painful tactile, thermal, and chemical stimuli and were anosmic. Knockouts also showed no painful behaviors resulting from peripheral injection of nonselective sodium channel activators, did not develop complete Freund's adjuvant-induced thermal hyperalgesia, and were insensitive to intra-dermal histamine injection. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current recorded from cell bodies of isolated sensory neurons and the mechanically-evoked spiking of C-fibers in a skin-nerve preparation each were reduced but not eliminated in tissue from knockouts compared to littermates. Results support a role for Nav1.7 that is conserved between rodents and humans and suggest several possibly translatable biomarkers for the study of Nav1.7-targeted therapeutics. Results further suggest that Nav1.7 may retain its key role in persistent as well as acute forms of pain.

  11. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Ogawa

    Full Text Available Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors.

  12. Genotypic and phenotypic variation among Staphylococcus saprophyticus from human and animal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören; Sakinc, Türkan

    2010-06-10

    The main aim of this study was to examine the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates from human and animal origin. In total, 236 clinical isolates and 15 animal isolates of S. saprophyticus were characterized in respect of the occurrence of 9 potential virulence genes and four surface properties. All strains were PCR positive for the regulatory genes agr, sar >it>A and rot as well as for the surface proteins UafA and Aas. Nearly 90% of the clinical isolates were found to possess the gene for the surface-associated lipase Ssp and 10% for the collagen binding MSCRAMM SdrI. All animal isolates were negative forsdrI. Lipolytic activity could be detected in 66% of the clinical and 46% of the animal isolates. Adherence to collagen type I was shown of 20% of the clinical strains and 6% of the strains of animal origin. Most S. saprophyticus strains showed hydrophobic properties and only few could agglutinate sheep erythrocytes. We described a broad analysis of animal and human S. saprophyticus isolates regarding virulence genes and phenotypic properties such as lipase activity, hydrophobicity, and adherence. While S. saprophyticus strains from animal sources have prerequisites for colonization of the urinary tract like the D-serine-deaminase, out findings suggested that they need to acquire new genes e.g. MSCRAMMS for adherence like sdrI and to modulate their existing properties e.g. increasing the lipase activity or reducing hydrophobicity. These apparently important new genes or properties for virulence have to be further analyzed.

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic variation among Staphylococcus saprophyticus from human and animal isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakinc Türkan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main aim of this study was to examine the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates from human and animal origin. Findings In total, 236 clinical isolates and 15 animal isolates of S. saprophyticus were characterized in respect of the occurrence of 9 potential virulence genes and four surface properties. All strains were PCR positive for the regulatory genes agr, sar>it>A and rot as well as for the surface proteins UafA and Aas. Nearly 90% of the clinical isolates were found to possess the gene for the surface-associated lipase Ssp and 10% for the collagen binding MSCRAMM SdrI. All animal isolates were negative forsdrI. Lipolytic activity could be detected in 66% of the clinical and 46% of the animal isolates. Adherence to collagen type I was shown of 20% of the clinical strains and 6% of the strains of animal origin. Most S. saprophyticus strains showed hydrophobic properties and only few could agglutinate sheep erythrocytes. Conclusions We described a broad analysis of animal and human S. saprophyticus isolates regarding virulence genes and phenotypic properties such as lipase activity, hydrophobicity, and adherence. While S. saprophyticus strains from animal sources have prerequisites for colonization of the urinary tract like the D-serine-deaminase, out findings suggested that they need to acquire new genes e.g. MSCRAMMS for adherence like sdrI and to modulate their existing properties e.g. increasing the lipase activity or reducing hydrophobicity. These apparently important new genes or properties for virulence have to be further analyzed.

  14. Genome-wide genetic interaction analysis of glaucoma using expert knowledge derived from human phenotype networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ting; Darabos, Christian; Cricco, Maria E; Kong, Emily; Moore, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The large volume of GWAS data poses great computational challenges for analyzing genetic interactions associated with common human diseases. We propose a computational framework for characterizing epistatic interactions among large sets of genetic attributes in GWAS data. We build the human phenotype network (HPN) and focus around a disease of interest. In this study, we use the GLAUGEN glaucoma GWAS dataset and apply the HPN as a biological knowledge-based filter to prioritize genetic variants. Then, we use the statistical epistasis network (SEN) to identify a significant connected network of pairwise epistatic interactions among the prioritized SNPs. These clearly highlight the complex genetic basis of glaucoma. Furthermore, we identify key SNPs by quantifying structural network characteristics. Through functional annotation of these key SNPs using Biofilter, a software accessing multiple publicly available human genetic data sources, we find supporting biomedical evidences linking glaucoma to an array of genetic diseases, proving our concept. We conclude by suggesting hypotheses for a better understanding of the disease.

  15. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ling-ling; ZHANG Zhe; ZHENG Jie-sheng; SHENG Ji-fang; LIU Ke-zhou

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed at developing a simple and easy way to generate dendritic cells (DCs) from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) in vitro. Methods: PBMCs were isolated directly from white blood cell rather than whole blood and purified by patching methods (collecting the attached cell and removing the suspension cell). DCs were then generated by culturing PBMCs for six days with 30 ng/ml recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and 20 ng/ml recombinant human interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) in vitro. On the sixth day, TNF-alpha (TNFα) 30 ng/ml was added into some DC cultures, which were then incubated for two additional days. The morphology was monitored by light microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy, and the phenotypes were determined by flow cytometry. Autologous mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR) were used to characterize DC function after TNFα or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulations for 24 h. Results: After six days of culture, the monocytes developed significant dendritic morphology and a portion of cells expressed CD 1 a, CD80 and CD86, features of DCs. TNFα treatment induced DCs maturation and up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD83. Autologous MLR demonstrated that these DCs possess potent T-cell stimulatory capacity. Conclusion: This study developed a simple and easy way to generate DCs from PBMCs exposed to rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4. The DCs produced by this method acquired morphologic and antigenic characteristics of DCs.

  16. Cellular phenotype impacts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral protein R subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrucci Adriano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr is a virion-associated regulatory protein that functions at several points within the viral life cycle and has been shown to accumulate primarily in the nucleus and at the nuclear envelope. However, most studies have investigated Vpr localization employing cell types irrelevant to HIV-1 pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of how cellular phenotype might impact HIV-1 Vpr intracellular localization, Vpr localization was examined in several cell lines representing major cellular targets for HIV-1 infection within the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and central nervous system (CNS. Results Utilizing a green fluorescent protein-tagged Vpr, we detected Vpr mainly in foci inside the nucleus, at the nuclear envelope, and around the nucleoli, with dispersed accumulation in the cytoplasm of human endothelial kidney 293T cells. No differences were observed in Vpr localization pattern with respect to either the location of the tag (N- or C-terminus or the presence of other viral proteins. Subsequently, the Vpr localization pattern was explored in two primary HIV-1 target cells within the peripheral blood: the CD4+ T lymphocyte (represented by the Jurkat CD4+ T-cell line and the monocyte-macrophage (represented by the U-937 cell line. Vpr was found primarily in speckles within the cytoplasm of the Jurkat T cells, whereas it accumulated predominantly intranuclearly in U-937 monocytic cells. These patterns differ from that observed in a bone marrow progenitor cell line (TF-1, wherein Vpr localized mainly at the nuclear envelope with some intranuclear punctuate staining. Within the CNS, we examined two astroglioma cell lines and found that Vpr displayed a perinuclear and cytoplasmic distribution. Conclusions The results suggest that the pattern of Vpr localization depends on cellular phenotype, probably owing to interactions between Vpr and cell type-specific host

  17. Tenascin and aggrecan expression by articular chondrocytes is influenced by interleukin 1ß: a possible explanation for the changes in matrix synthesis during osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pfander, D; HEINZ, N.; Rothe, P; Carl, H.; Swoboda, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the distribution patterns of tenascin and proteoglycans in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage, and to determine the effect of interleukin 1ß (IL1ß) on aggrecan and tenascin expression by human articular chondrocytes in vitro.

  18. Promoting chondrocyte cell clustering through tuning of a poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(peptide) thermosensitive hydrogel with distinctive microarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sydney; Wu, Chih-Wei; Lin, Ji-Yu; Yang, Chin-Yu; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Chu, I-Ming

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogels are considered to be attractive cell-matrix for chondrocytes due to their similarity in properties to the natural cartilage. However, the formation of chondrocyte cell clusters in hydrogels has been mostly limited to naturally-derived or relatively fast degrading materials. In this study, a series of diblock copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(alanine) (mPEG-PA) was synthesized and investigated as injectable biomimic hydrogels for the culturing of chondrocytes. Depending on the poly(alanine) chain length, afforded hydrogels exhibited variable mechanical property and microarchitecture due to difference in secondary structure arrangement. After 21days of culture, cell clusters were observed in all hydrogels with longer PA chains and these hydrogels supported more homogenous and established clustering as well as significantly higher glycosaminoglycan and collagen deposition. Interestingly, scanning electron microscopy revealed a distinct micron range fibrillar-like microarchitecture that may be responsible for maintaining chondrocyte phenotype and matrix production. In addition, micrographs revealed the presence of collagen fibrils and an extensive extracellular matrix network. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that mPEG-PA hydrogels possess the desirable properties for chondrocyte cluster formation and serve as potential candidate in cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxidative Stress Promotes Peroxiredoxin Hyperoxidation and Attenuates Pro-survival Signaling in Aging Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John A; Wood, Scott T; Nelson, Kimberly J; Rowe, Meredith A; Carlson, Cathy S; Chubinskaya, Susan; Poole, Leslie B; Furdui, Cristina M; Loeser, Richard F

    2016-03-25

    Oxidative stress-mediated post-translational modifications of redox-sensitive proteins are postulated as a key mechanism underlying age-related cellular dysfunction and disease progression. Peroxiredoxins (PRX) are critical intracellular antioxidants that also regulate redox signaling events. Age-related osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aging and oxidative stress on chondrocyte intracellular signaling, with a specific focus on oxidation of cytosolic PRX2 and mitochondrial PRX3. Menadione was used as a model to induce cellular oxidative stress. Compared with chondrocytes isolated from young adult humans, chondrocytes from older adults exhibited higher levels of PRX1-3 hyperoxidation basally and under conditions of oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was associated with inhibition of pro-survival Akt signaling and stimulation of pro-death p38 signaling. These changes were prevented in cultured human chondrocytes by adenoviral expression of catalase targeted to the mitochondria (MCAT) and in cartilage explants from MCAT transgenic mice. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was observedin situin human cartilage sections from older adults and in osteoarthritic cartilage. MCAT transgenic mice exhibited less age-related osteoarthritis. These findings demonstrate that age-related oxidative stress can disrupt normal physiological signaling and contribute to osteoarthritis and suggest peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation as a potential mechanism.

  20. Curcumin Inhibits Apoptosis of Chondrocytes through Activation ERK1/2 Signaling Pathways Induced Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is an inflammatory disease of load-bearing synovial joints that is currently treated with drugs that exhibit numerous side effects and are only temporarily effective in treating pain, the main symptom of the disease. Consequently, there is an acute need for novel, safe, and more effective chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of osteoarthritis and related arthritic diseases. Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid and the most active component in turmeric, is a biologically active phytochemical. Evidence from several recent in vitro studies suggests that curcumin may exert a chondroprotective effect through actions such as anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative stress, and anti-catabolic activity that are critical for mitigating OA disease pathogenesis and symptoms. In the present study, we investigated the protective mechanisms of curcumin on interleukin 1β (IL-1β-stimulated primary chondrocytes in vitro. The treatment of interleukin (IL-1β significantly reduces the cell viability of chondrocytes in dose and time dependent manners. Co-treatment of curcumin with IL-1β significantly decreased the growth inhibition. We observed that curcumin inhibited IL-1β-induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation in chondrocytes. Curcumin can increase the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2, autophagy marker light chain 3 (LC3-II, and Beclin-1 in chondrocytes. The expression of autophagy markers could be decreased when the chondrocytes were incubated with ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Our results suggest that curcumin suppresses apoptosis and inflammatory signaling through its actions on the ERK1/2-induced autophagy in chondrocytes. We propose that curcumin should be explored further for the prophylactic treatment of osteoarthritis in humans and companion animals.

  1. DNA Phenotyping: The prediction of human pigmentation traits from genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Walsh (Susan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPhenotyping is the ability to assign characteristics to an organism based on certain measurable parameters. In the case of DNA phenotyping, it is limited to the sole use of DNA to determine a phenotype such as an externally visible characteristic. In a forensic setting, it encompasses

  2. DNA Phenotyping: The prediction of human pigmentation traits from genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Walsh (Susan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPhenotyping is the ability to assign characteristics to an organism based on certain measurable parameters. In the case of DNA phenotyping, it is limited to the sole use of DNA to determine a phenotype such as an externally visible characteristic. In a forensic setting, it encompasses th

  3. Autoimmune regulator, Aire, is a novel regulator of chondrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yuan; Inoue, Kazuki; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kanno, Jun; Imai, Yuuki

    2013-08-09

    Chondrocyte differentiation is controlled by various regulators, such as Sox9 and Runx2, but the process is complex. To further understand the precise underlying molecular mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation, we aimed to identify a novel regulatory factor of chondrocyte differentiation using gene expression profiles of micromass-cultured chondrocytes at different differentiation stages. From the results of microarray analysis, the autoimmune regulator, Aire, was identified as a novel regulator. Aire stable knockdown cells, and primary cultured chondrocytes obtained from Aire(-/-) mice, showed reduced mRNA expression levels of chondrocyte-related genes. Over-expression of Aire induced the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation by facilitating expression of Bmp2. A ChIP assay revealed that Aire was recruited on an Airebinding site (T box) in the Bmp2 promoter region in the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation and histone methylation was modified. These results suggest that Aire can facilitate early chondrocyte differentiation by expression of Bmp2 through altering the histone modification status of the promoter region of Bmp2. Taken together, Aire might play a role as an active regulator of chondrocyte differentiation, which leads to new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prolactin inhibits the apoptosis of chondrocytes induced by serum starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermeño, C; Guzmán-Morales, J; Macotela, Y; Nava, G; López-Barrera, F; Kouri, J B; Lavalle, C; de la Escalera, G Martínez; Clapp, C

    2006-05-01

    The apoptosis of chondrocytes plays an important role in endochondral bone formation and in cartilage degradation during aging and disease. Prolactin (PRL) is produced in chondrocytes and is known to promote the survival of various cell types. Here we show that articular chondrocytes from rat postpubescent and adult cartilage express the long form of the PRL receptor as revealed by immunohistochemistry of cartilage sections and by RT-PCR and Western blot analyses of the isolated chondrocytes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of these same chondrocytes cultured in low-serum. Chondrocyte apoptosis was measured by hypodiploid DNA content determined by flow cytometry and by DNA fragmentation evaluated by the ELISA and the TUNEL methods. The anti-apoptotic effect of PRL was dose-dependent and was prevented by heat inactivation. These data demonstrate that PRL can act as a survival factor for chondrocytes and that it has potential preventive and therapeutic value in arthropathies characterized by cartilage degradation.

  5. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. EXPERIMENTAL: FINDINGS: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas that express AR. CONCLUSION: This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines

  6. Demonstration of a novel HIV-1 restriction phenotype from a human T cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxing Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although retroviruses may invade host cells, a productive infection can be established only after the virus counteracts inhibition from different types of host restriction factors. Fv1, APOBEC3G/F, TRIM5alpha, ZAP, and CD317 inhibit the replication of different retroviruses by interfering with viral uncoating, reverse transcription, nuclear import, RNA stability, and release. In humans, although APOBEC3G/3F and CD317 block HIV-1 replication, their antiviral activities are neutralized by viral proteins Vif and Vpu. So far, no human gene has been found to effectively block wild type HIV-1 replication under natural condition. Thus, identification of such a gene product would be of great medical importance for the development of HIV therapies. METHOD AND FINDINGS: In this study, we discovered a new type of host restriction against the wild type HIV-1 from a CD4/CXCR4 double-positive human T cell line. We identified a CEM-derived cell line (CEM.NKR that is highly resistant to productive HIV-1 infection. Viral production was reduced by at least 1000-fold when compared to the other permissive human T cell lines such as H9, A3.01, and CEM-T4. Importantly, this resistance was evident at extremely high multiplicity of infection. Further analyses demonstrated that HIV-1 could finish the first round of replication in CEM.NKR cells, but the released virions were poorly infectious. These virions could enter the target cells, but failed to initiate reverse transcription. Notably, this restriction phenotype was also present in CEM.NKR and 293T heterokaryons. CONCLUSIONS: These results clearly indicate that CEM.NKR cells express a HIV inhibitory gene(s. Further characterization of this novel gene product(s will reveal a new antiretroviral mechanism that directly inactivates wild type HIV-1.

  7. Phenotypic and Genomic Analysis of Hypervirulent Human-associated Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahuja Umesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background B. bronchiseptica infections are usually associated with wild or domesticated animals, but infrequently with humans. A recent phylogenetic analysis distinguished two distinct B. bronchiseptica subpopulations, designated complexes I and IV. Complex IV isolates appear to have a bias for infecting humans; however, little is known regarding their epidemiology, virulence properties, or comparative genomics. Results Here we report a characterization of the virulence of human-associated complex IV B. bronchiseptica strains. In in vitro cytotoxicity assays, complex IV strains showed increased cytotoxicity in comparison to a panel of complex I strains. Some complex IV isolates were remarkably cytotoxic, resulting in LDH release levels in A549 cells that were 10- to 20-fold greater than complex I strains. In vivo, a subset of complex IV strains was found to be hypervirulent, with an increased ability to cause lethal pulmonary infections in mice. Hypercytotoxicity in vitro and hypervirulence in vivo were both dependent on the activity of the bsc T3SS and the BteA effector. To clarify differences between lineages, representative complex IV isolates were sequenced and their genomes were compared to complex I isolates. Although our analysis showed there were no genomic sequences that can be considered unique to complex IV strains, there were several loci that were predominantly found in complex IV isolates. Conclusion Our observations reveal a T3SS-dependent hypervirulence phenotype in human-associated complex IV isolates, highlighting the need for further studies on the epidemiology and evolutionary dynamics of this B. bronchiseptica lineage.

  8. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Holly A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Gloss, Bernd; Kirby, Margaret L.; Hutson, Mary R.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Point mutations in the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel have been identified as the cause of autosomal-dominant human motor neuropathies, arthropathies, and skeletal malformations of varying severity. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which TRPV4 channelopathy mutations cause skeletal dysplasia. The human TRPV4V620I channelopathy mutation was transfected into primary porcine chondrocytes and caused significant (2.6-fold) up-regulation of follistatin (FST) expression levels. Pore altering mutations that prevent calcium influx through the channel prevented significant FST up-regulation (1.1-fold). We generated a mouse model of theTRPV4V620I mutation, and found significant skeletal deformities (e.g., shortening of tibiae and digits, similar to the human disease brachyolmia) and increases in Fst/TRPV4 mRNA levels (2.8-fold). FST was significantly up-regulated in primary chondrocytes transfected with 3 different dysplasia-causing TRPV4 mutations (2- to 2.3-fold), but was not affected by an arthropathy mutation (1.1-fold). Furthermore, FST-loaded microbeads decreased bone ossification in developing chick femora (6%) and tibiae (11%). FST gene and protein levels were also increased 4-fold in human chondrocytes from an individual natively expressing the TRPV4T89I mutation. Taken together, these data strongly support that up-regulation of FST in chondrocytes by skeletal dysplasia-inducing TRPV4 mutations contributes to disease pathogenesis.—Leddy, H. A., McNulty, A. L., Lee, S. H., Rothfusz, N. E., Gloss, B., Kirby, M. L., Hutson, M. R., Cohn, D. H., Guilak, F., Liedtke, W. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations. PMID:24577120

  9. Increased chondrocyte adhesion on nanotubular anodized titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kevin; Yao, Chang; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated increased osteoblast (bone-forming cells) functions (including adhesion, synthesis of intracellular collagen, alkaline phosphatase activity, and deposition of calcium-containing minerals) on titanium anodized to possess nanometer features compared with their unanodized counterparts. Such titanium materials were anodized to possess novel nanotubes also capable of drug delivery. Since titanium has not only experienced wide spread commercial use in orthopedic but also in cartilage applications, the objective of the present in vitro study was for the first time to investigate chondrocyte (cartilage synthesizing cells) functions on titanium anodized to possess nanotubes. For this purpose, titanium was anodized in dilute hydrofluoric acid at 20 V for 20 min. Results showed increased chondrocyte adhesion on anodized titanium with nanotube structures compared with unanodized titanium. Importantly, the present study also provided evidence why. Since material characterization studies revealed significantly greater nanometer roughness and similar chemistry as well as crystallinity between nanotubular anodized and unanodized titanium, the results of the present study highlight the importance of the nanometer roughness provided by anodized nanotubes on titanium for enhancing chondrocyte adhesion. In this manner, the results of the present in vitro study indicated that anodization might be a promising quick and inexpensive method to modify the surface of titanium-based implants to induce better chondrocyte adhesion for cartilage applications.

  10. Giant crystals inside mitochondria of equine chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberger, S; Rentenberger, C; Thiel, K; Schädl, B; Grunwald, I; Ponomarev, I; Marlovits, St; Meyer, Ch; Barnewitz, D

    2017-05-01

    The present study reports for the first time the presence of giant crystals in mitochondria of equine chondrocytes. These structures show dark contrast in TEM images as well as a granular substructure of regularly aligned 1-2 nm small units. Different zone axes of the crystalline structure were analysed by means of Fourier transformation of lattice-resolution TEM images proving the crystalline nature of the structure. Elemental analysis reveals a high content of nitrogen referring to protein. The outer shape of the crystals is geometrical with an up to hexagonal profile in cross sections. It is elongated, spanning a length of several micrometres through the whole cell. In some chondrocytes, several crystals were found, sometimes combined in a single mitochondrion. Crystals were preferentially aligned along the long axis of the cells, thus appearing in the same orientation as the chondrocytes in the tissue. Although no similar structures have been found in the cartilage of any other species investigated, they have been found in cartilage repair tissue formed within a mechanically stimulated equine chondrocyte construct. Crystals were mainly located in superficial regions of cartilage, especially in joint regions of well-developed superficial layers, more often in yearlings than in adult horses. These results indicate that intramitochondrial crystals are related to the high mechanical stress in the horse joint and potentially also to the increased metabolic activity of immature individuals.

  11. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Resinger, Christoph [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Vecsei, Vilmos [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation.

  12. Tracing the sources of human salmonellosis: a multi-model comparison of phenotyping and genotyping methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Smid, Joost; Enserink, Remko; Franz, Eelco; Schouls, Leo; Heck, Max; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella source attribution is usually performed using frequency-matched models, such as the (modified) Dutch and Hald models, based on phenotyping data, i.e. serotyping, phage typing, and antimicrobial resistance profiling. However, for practical and economic reasons, genotyping methods such as Multi-locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) are gradually replacing traditional phenotyping of salmonellas beyond the serovar level. As MLVA-based source attribution of human salmonellosis using frequency-matched models is problematic due to the high variability of the genetic targets investigated, other models need to be explored. Using a comprehensive data set from the Netherlands in 2005-2013, this study aimed at attributing sporadic and domestic cases of Salmonella Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and Salmonella Enteritidis to four putative food-producing animal sources (pigs, cattle, broilers, and layers/eggs) using the modified Dutch and Hald models (based on sero/phage typing data) in comparison with a widely applied population genetics model - the asymmetric island model (AIM) - supplied with MLVA data. This allowed us to compare model outcomes and to corroborate whether MLVA-based Salmonella source attribution using the AIM is able to provide sound, comparable results. All three models provided very similar results, confirming once more that most S. Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and S. Enteritidis cases are attributable to pigs and layers/eggs, respectively. We concluded that MLVA-based source attribution using the AIM is a feasible option, at least for S. Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and S. Enteritidis. Enough information seems to be contained in the MLVA profiles to trace the sources of human salmonellosis even in presence of imperfect temporal overlap between human and source isolates. Besides Salmonella, the AIM might also be applicable to other pathogens that do not always comply to clonal models. This would add further value to current surveillance

  13. Lin28a transgenic mice manifest size and puberty phenotypes identified in human genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Shah, Samar; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Shinoda, Gen; Einhorn, William S; Viswanathan, Srinivas R; Takeuchi, Ayumu; Grasemann, Corinna; Rinn, John L; Lopez, Mary F; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Palmert, Mark R; Daley, George Q

    2010-07-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies have implicated the human LIN28B locus in regulating height and the timing of menarche. LIN28B and its homolog LIN28A are functionally redundant RNA-binding proteins that block biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs. lin-28 and let-7 were discovered in Caenorhabditis elegans as heterochronic regulators of larval and vulval development but have recently been implicated in cancer, stem cell aging and pluripotency. The let-7 targets Myc, Kras, Igf2bp1 and Hmga2 are known regulators of mammalian body size and metabolism. To explore the function of the Lin28-Let-7 pathway in vivo, we engineered transgenic mice to express Lin28a and observed in them increased body size, crown-rump length and delayed onset of puberty. Investigation of metabolic and endocrine mechanisms of overgrowth in these transgenic mice revealed increased glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Here we report a mouse that models the human phenotypes associated with genetic variation in the Lin28-Let-7 pathway.

  14. BRCA1 controls the cell division axis and governs ploidy and phenotype in human mammary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhengcheng; Kannan, Nagarajan; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Taylor, Brian; Jiang, Jihong; Pilarski, Linda M; Fleisch, Markus C; Niederacher, Dieter; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Eaves, Connie J; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2017-05-16

    BRCA1 deficiency may perturb the differentiation hierarchy present in the normal mammary gland and is associated with the genesis of breast cancers that are genomically unstable and typically display a basal-like transcriptome. Oriented cell division is a mechanism known to regulate cell fates and to restrict tumor formation. We now show that the cell division axis is altered following shRNA-mediated BRCA1 depletion in immortalized but non-tumorigenic, or freshly isolated normal human mammary cells with graded consequences in progeny cells that include aneuploidy, perturbation of cell polarity in spheroid cultures, and a selective loss of cells with luminal features. BRCA1 depletion stabilizes HMMR abundance and disrupts cortical asymmetry of NUMA-dynein complexes in dividing cells such that polarity cues provided by cell-matrix adhesions were not able to orient division. We also show that immortalized mammary cells carrying a mutant BRCA1 allele (BRCA1 185delAG/+) reproduce many of these effects but in this model, oriented divisions were maintained through cues provided by CDH1+ cell-cell junctions. These findings reveal a previously unknown effect of BRCA1 suppression on mechanisms that regulate the cell division axis in proliferating, non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells and consequent downstream effects on the mitotic integrity and phenotype control of their progeny.

  15. Phenotypic effects of genetic variability in human clock genes on circadian and sleep parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malcolm Von Schantz

    2008-12-01

    Circadian rhythms and sleep are two separate but intimately related processes. Circadian rhythms are generated through the precisely controlled, cyclic expression of a number of genes designated clock genes. Genetic variability in these genes has been associated with a number of phenotypic differences in circadian as well as sleep parameters, both in mouse models and in humans. Diurnal preferences as determined by the selfreported Horne–Östberg (HÖ) questionnaire, has been associated with polymorphisms in the human genes CLOCK, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Circadian rhythm-related sleep disorders have also been associated with mutations and polymorphisms in clock genes, with the advanced type cosegrating in an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with mutations in the genes PER2 and CSNK1D, and the delayed type associating without discernible Mendelian inheritance with polymorphisms in CLOCK and PER3. Several mouse models of clock gene null alleles have been demonstrated to have affected sleep homeostasis. Recent findings have shown that the variable number tandem polymorphism in PER3, previously linked to diurnal preference, has profound effects on sleep homeostasis and cognitive performance following sleep loss, confirming the close association between the processes of circadian rhythms and sleep at the genetic level.

  16. A red wine polyphenolic extract reduces the activation phenotype of cultured human liver myofibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Véronique Neaud; Jean Rosenbaum

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To test the effect of a standardized red wine polyphenolic extract (RWPE) on the phenotype of human liver myofibroblasts in culture.METHODS: Human myofibroblasts grown from liver explants were used in this study. Cell proliferation was measured with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Signaling events were analyzed by western blot with phosphospecific antibodies. Matrix-metalloproteinase activity was measured with gel zymography.RESULTS: We found that cell proliferation was dosedependently decreased by up to 90% by RWPE while cell viability was not affected. Exposure to RWPE also greatly decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/ERK2 and Akt in response to stimulation by the mitogenic factor platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB).Finally, RWPE affected extracellular matrix remodeling by decreasing the secretion by myofibroblasts of matrixmetalloproteinase-2 and of tissue inhibitor of matrixmetalloproteinases-1.CONCLUSION: Altogether, RWPE decreases the activation state of liver myofibroblasts. The identification of the active compounds in RWPE could offer new therapeutic strategies against liver fibrosis.

  17. CD161 Defines a Transcriptional and Functional Phenotype across Distinct Human T Cell Lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joannah R. Fergusson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin CD161 is expressed by a large proportion of human T lymphocytes of all lineages, including a population known as mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells. To understand whether different T cell subsets expressing CD161 have similar properties, we examined these populations in parallel using mass cytometry and mRNA microarray approaches. The analysis identified a conserved CD161++/MAIT cell transcriptional signature enriched in CD161+CD8+ T cells, which can be extended to CD161+ CD4+ and CD161+TCRγδ+ T cells. Furthermore, this led to the identification of a shared innate-like, TCR-independent response to interleukin (IL-12 plus IL-18 by different CD161-expressing T cell populations. This response was independent of regulation by CD161, which acted as a costimulatory molecule in the context of T cell receptor stimulation. Expression of CD161 hence identifies a transcriptional and functional phenotype, shared across human T lymphocytes and independent of both T cell receptor (TCR expression and cell lineage.

  18. Human keratin diseases: the increasing spectrum of disease and subtlety of the phenotype-genotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, A D; McLean, W H

    1999-05-01

    Keratins are obligate heterodimer proteins that form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. Keratins are tissue and differentiation specific and are expressed in pairs of types I and II proteins. The spectrum of inherited human keratin diseases has steadily increased since the causative role of mutations in the basal keratinocyte keratins 5 and 14 in epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was first reported in 1991. At the time of writing, mutations in 15 epithelial keratins and two trichocyte keratins have been associated with human diseases which include EBS, bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens, diffuse and focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, pachyonychia congenita and monilethrix. Mutations in extracutaneous keratins have been reported in oral white sponge naevus and Meesmann's corneal dystrophy. New subtleties of phenotype-genotype correlation are emerging within the keratin diseases with widely varying clinical presentations attributable to similar mutations within the same keratin. Mutations in keratin-associated proteins have recently been reported for the first time. This article reviews clinical, ultrastructural and molecular aspects of all the keratin diseases described to date and delineates potential future areas of research in this field.

  19. DNMT3b overexpression contributes to a hypermethylator phenotype in human breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivenbark Ashley G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA hypermethylation events and other epimutations occur in many neoplasms, producing gene expression changes that contribute to neoplastic transformation, tumorigenesis, and tumor behavior. Some human cancers exhibit a hypermethylator phenotype, characterized by concurrent DNA methylation-dependent silencing of multiple genes. To determine if a hypermethylation defect occurs in breast cancer, the expression profile and promoter methylation status of methylation-sensitive genes were evaluated among breast cancer cell lines. Results The relationship between gene expression (assessed by RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR, promoter methylation (assessed by methylation-specific PCR, bisulfite sequencing, and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine treatment, and the DNA methyltransferase machinery (total DNMT activity and expression of DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b proteins were examined in 12 breast cancer cell lines. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the expression of 64 methylation-sensitive genes revealed two groups of cell lines that possess distinct methylation signatures: (i hypermethylator cell lines, and (ii low-frequency methylator cell lines. The hypermethylator cell lines are characterized by high rates of concurrent methylation of six genes (CDH1, CEACAM6, CST6, ESR1, LCN2, SCNN1A, whereas the low-frequency methylator cell lines do not methylate these genes. Hypermethylator cell lines coordinately overexpress total DNMT activity and DNMT3b protein levels compared to normal breast epithelial cells. In contrast, most low-frequency methylator cell lines possess DNMT activity and protein levels that are indistinguishable from normal. Microarray data mining identified a strong cluster of primary breast tumors that express the hypermethylation signature defined by CDH1, CEACAM6, CST6, ESR1, LCN2, and SCNN1A. This subset of breast cancers represents 18/88 (20% tumors in the dataset analyzed, and 100% of these tumors were classified as basal

  20. Genotypic and phenotypic modifications of Neisseria meningitidis after an accidental human passage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Omer

    Full Text Available A scientist in our laboratory was accidentally infected while working with Z5463, a Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A strain. She developed severe symptoms (fever, meningism, purpuric lesions that fortunately evolved with antibiotic treatment to complete recovery. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis confirmed that the isolate obtained from the blood culture (Z5463BC was identical to Z5463, more precisely to a fourth subculture of this strain used the week before the contamination (Z5463PI. In order to get some insights into genomic modifications that can occur in vivo, we sequenced these three isolates. All the strains contained a mutated mutS allele and therefore displayed an hypermutator phenotype, consistent with the high number of mutations (SNP, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism detected in the three strains. By comparing the number of SNP in all three isolates and knowing the number of passages between Z5463 and Z5463PI, we concluded that around 25 bacterial divisions occurred in the human body. As expected, the in vivo passage is responsible for several modifications of phase variable genes. This genomic study has been completed by transcriptomic and phenotypic studies, showing that the blood strain used a different haemoglobin-linked iron receptor (HpuA/B than the parental strains (HmbR. Different pilin variants were found after the in vivo passage, which expressed different properties of adhesion. Furthermore the deletion of one gene involved in LOS biosynthesis (lgtB results in Z5463BC expressing a different LOS than the L9 immunotype of Z2491. The in vivo passage, despite the small numbers of divisions, permits the selection of numerous genomic modifications that may account for the high capacity of the strain to disseminate.

  1. The Results of Fetal Chondrocytes Transplantation in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Krivoruchko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapy has significantly improved the quality of life and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Nevertheless, there are still many patients with progressive rheumatoid inflammation, resulting in the destruction of joints. Cell therapy seems like a promising direction in rheumatology. The aim of our research was to evaluate the efficacy of fetal chondrocyte transplantation in patients with RA.Methods. We examined 60 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (I - III stages between 20 and 63 years of age. They were divided into 2 groups: the first group underwent the fetal chondrocytes transplantation (n = 40, and the second was a control group who got conservative therapy (n = 20. Donor cells were taken from the chondrogenic layer of the humerus or femur heads and hip condyles of human embryos in gestation for 17-20 weeks. A suspension of fetal chondrocytes injected into affected areas of the articular surfaces under X-ray control. Cell viability was determined before the injection. Efficacy of the therapy was assessed by clinical, instrumental, and laboratory tests. This clinical trial was allowed by The Ministry of Public Health and Ethics Committee. All of our patients gave informed consent for the fetal chondrocytes transplantation.Results. Evaluation of the clinical manifestations of RA in the first group of patients showed 3.7 times decrease in pain and 1.6 times relief of synovitis. Complete reduction of contracture was observed in 82% of patients in the first group. Morphometric changes in X-ray demonstrated inhibition of the destruction in articular cartilage and surfaces of bones after transplantation of fetal chondrocytes. The dynamics of morphological changes in synovium showed 2.5 times reduction of the inflammatory reaction. Transplantation of fetal chondrocytes led to a significant reduction in ESR, CRP, fibrinogen , γ-globulin after a period of 12 months (p < 0

  2. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-05-27

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines.

  3. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W. Brownjohn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation.

  4. Rapid Cellular Phenotyping of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes using a Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan S. Leyton-Mange

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity.

  5. [Toxicity of antiseptics on chondrocytes in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumburger, J; Beckmann, J; Springorum, H-R; Handel, M; Anders, S; Kalteis, T; Grifka, J; Rath, B

    2010-01-01

    Local antiseptics are commonly used for perioperative skin and wound disinfection and as solutions for joint lavage. Therefore, we examined if an intra-articular use of these antiseptics is possible by using an IN VITRO chondrocyte model. Articular chondrocytes harvested from 7 patients were cultured. After reaching 80% confluency different concentrations (0%, 1%, 10%, 50%, 100%) of polyhexanide, hydrogen peroxide and povidone-iodine were added for 5 minutes. Afterwards, the solution was removed and the chondrocytes were cultured for 24 hours. Subsequently the vitality and proliferation rate (DNA synthesis) were analysed with the WST-1 and BrdU tests. 1% povidone-iodine and 1% hydrogen peroxide solutions significantly (p=0.001) decreased the chondrocyte vitality as compared to our control group. There was no significant difference (p=0.71) after the application of 1% polyhexanide in the vitality ratios. A significant decrease in vitality was also observed after the application of 10% polyhexanide solution (p=0.001). Application of 1% povidone-iodine solution, 1% hydrogen peroxide solution and 10% polyhexanide revealed a decrease in the metabolic cell activity of 80% compared to our control group, whereas the activity was 65% (p=0.026) compared to the control group after application of 1% polyhexanide solution. Our results demonstrate the chondrotoxic effect of the tested antiseptic solutions in clinical used concentrations within short time points. Polyhexanide in a low concentrated solution (1%) was the antiseptic with the lowest influence on the vitality and the DNA synthesis of chondrocytes. Thus, this antiseptic solution seemed to be the best choice for intra-articular application. But overall, our study showed general limitations for the intra-articular use of local antiseptics. Copyright (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  6. The Zebrafish Model Organism Database: new support for human disease models, mutation details, gene expression phenotypes and searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Douglas G.; Bradford, Yvonne M.; Eagle, Anne; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Kalita, Patrick; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra Taylor; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruzicka, Leyla; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri; Westerfield, Monte

    2017-01-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for zebrafish (Danio rerio) genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN curators provide expert manual curation and integration of comprehensive data involving zebrafish genes, mutants, transgenic constructs and lines, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expressions, morpholinos, TALENs, CRISPRs, antibodies, anatomical structures, models of human disease and publications. We integrate curated, directly submitted, and collaboratively generated data, making these available to zebrafish research community. Among the vertebrate model organisms, zebrafish are superbly suited for rapid generation of sequence-targeted mutant lines, characterization of phenotypes including gene expression patterns, and generation of human disease models. The recent rapid adoption of zebrafish as human disease models is making management of these data particularly important to both the research and clinical communities. Here, we describe recent enhancements to ZFIN including use of the zebrafish experimental conditions ontology, ‘Fish’ records in the ZFIN database, support for gene expression phenotypes, models of human disease, mutation details at the DNA, RNA and protein levels, and updates to the ZFIN single box search. PMID:27899582

  7. A monkey model of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity; phenotypic similarity to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Satoshi; Iguchi, Takuma; Niino, Noriyo; Mikamoto, Kei; Sakurai, Ken; Sayama, Ayako; Shimoda, Hitomi; Takasaki, Wataru; Mori, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Species-specific differences in the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen (APAP) have been shown. To establish a monkey model of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, which has not been previously reported, APAP at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg was administered orally to fasting male and female cynomolgus monkeys (n = 3-5/group) pretreated intravenously with or without 300 mg/kg of the glutathione biosynthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO). In all the animals, APAP at 2,000 mg/kg with BSO but not without BSO induced hepatotoxicity, which was characterized histopathologically by centrilobular necrosis and vacuolation of hepatocytes. Plasma levels of APAP and its reactive metabolite N-acethyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) increased 4 to 7 hr after the APAP treatment. The mean Cmax level of APAP at 2,000 mg/kg with BSO was approximately 200 µg/mL, which was comparable to high-risk cutoff value of the Rumack-Matthew nomogram. Interestingly, plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) did not change until 7 hr and increased 24 hr or later after the APAP treatment, indicating that this phenotypic outcome was similar to that in humans. In addition, circulating liver-specific miR-122 and miR-192 levels also increased 24 hr or later compared with ALT, suggesting that circulating miR-122 and miR-192 may serve as potential biomarkers to detect hepatotoxicity in cynomolgus monkeys. These results suggest that the hepatotoxicity induced by APAP in the monkey model shown here was translatable to humans in terms of toxicokinetics and its toxic nature, and this model would be useful to investigate mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury and also potential translational biomarkers in humans.

  8. Prediction of phenotypes of missense mutations in human proteins from biological assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiong; Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent variation in the human genome. Nonsynonymous SNPs that lead to missense mutations can be neutral or deleterious, and several computational methods have been presented that predict the phenotype of human missense mutations. These methods use sequence-based and structure-based features in various combinations, relying on different statistical distributions of these features for deleterious and neutral mutations. One structure-based feature that has not been studied significantly is the accessible surface area within biologically relevant oligomeric assemblies. These assemblies are different from the crystallographic asymmetric unit for more than half of X-ray crystal structures. We find that mutations in the core of proteins or in the interfaces in biological assemblies are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than those on the surface of the biological assemblies. For structures with more than one protein in the biological assembly (whether the same sequence or different), we find the accessible surface area from biological assemblies provides a statistically significant improvement in prediction over the accessible surface area of monomers from protein crystal structures (P = 6e-5). When adding this information to sequence-based features such as the difference between wildtype and mutant position-specific profile scores, the improvement from biological assemblies is statistically significant but much smaller (P = 0.018). Combining this information with sequence-based features in a support vector machine leads to 82% accuracy on a balanced dataset of 50% disease-associated mutations from SwissVar and 50% neutral mutations from human/primate sequence differences in orthologous proteins.

  9. A matter of identity — Phenotype and differentiation potential of human somatic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E.P. New

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human somatic stem cells with neural differentiation potential can be valuable for developing cell-based therapies, including treatment of birth-related defects, while avoiding issues associated with cell reprogramming. Precisely defining the “identity” and differentiation potential of somatic stem cells from different sources, has proven difficult, given differences in sets of specific markers, protocols used and lack of side-by-side characterization of these cells in different studies. Therefore, we set to compare expression of mesenchymal and neural markers in human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs, pediatric adipose-derived stem cells (p-ADSCs in parallel with human neural stem cells (NSCs. We show that UC-MSCs at a basal level express mesenchymal and so-called “neural” markers, similar to that we previously reported for the p-ADSCs. All somatic stem cell populations studied, independently from tissue and patient of origin, displayed a remarkably similar expression of surface markers, with the main difference being the restricted expression of CD133 and CD34 to NSCs. Expression of certain surface and neural markers was affected by the expansion medium used. As predicted, UC-MSCs and p-ADSCs demonstrated tri-mesenchymal lineage differentiation potential, though p-ADSCs display superior chondrogenic differentiation capability. UC-MSCs and p-ADSCs responded also to neurogenic induction by up-regulating neuronal markers, but crucially they appeared morphologically immature when compared with differentiated NSCs. This highlights the need for further investigation into the use of these cells for neural therapies. Crucially, this study demonstrates the lack of simple means to distinguish between different cell types and the effect of culture conditions on their phenotype, and indicates that a more extensive set of markers should be used for somatic stem cell characterization, especially when developing therapeutic

  10. In-depth evaluation of commercially available human vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype: Implications for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timraz, Sara B H; Farhat, Ilyas A H; Alhussein, Ghada; Christoforou, Nicolas; Teo, Jeremy C M

    2016-05-01

    In vitro research on vascular tissue engineering has extensively used isolated primary human or animal smooth muscle cells (SMC). Research programs that lack such facilities tend towards commercially available primary cells sources. Here, we aim to evaluate the capacity of commercially available human SMC to maintain their contractile phenotype, and determine if dedifferentiation towards the synthetic phenotype occurs in response to conventional cell culture and passaging without any external biochemical or mechanical stimuli. Lower passage SMC adopted a contractile phenotype marked by a relatively slower proliferation rate, higher expression of proteins of the contractile apparatus and smoothelin, elongated morphology, and reduced deposition of collagen types I and III. As the passage number increased, migratory capacity was enhanced, average cell speed, total distance and net distance travelled increased up to passage 8. Through the various assays, corroborative evidence pinpoints SMC at passage 7 as the transition point between the contractile and synthetic phenotypes, while passage 8 distinctly and consistently exhibited characteristics of synthetic phenotype. This knowledge is particularly useful in selecting SMC of appropriate passage number for the target vascular tissue engineering application, for example, a homeostatic vascular graft for blood vessel replacement versus recreating atherosclerotic blood vessel model in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genomic and cranial phenotype data support multiple modern human dispersals from Africa and a southern route into Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Ghirotto, Silvia; Détroit, Florent; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique; Barbujani, Guido; Harvati, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    Current consensus indicates that modern humans originated from an ancestral African population between ∼100–200 ka. The ensuing dispersal pattern is controversial, yet has important implications for the demographic history and genetic/phenotypic structure of extant human populations. We test for the first time to our knowledge the spatiotemporal dimensions of competing out-of-Africa dispersal models, analyzing in parallel genomic and craniometric data. Our results support an initial dispersal...

  12. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 regulates the actin organization of chondrocytes and chondrocyte hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Murata

    Full Text Available Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12/PBSF plays important roles in the biological and physiological functions of haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells. This chemokine regulates the formation of multiple organ systems during embryogenesis. However, its roles in skeletal development remain unclear. Here we investigated the roles of SDF-1 in chondrocyte differentiation. We demonstrated that SDF-1 protein was expressed at pre-hypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the newly formed endochondral callus of rib fracture as well as in the growth plate of normal mouse tibia by immunohistochemical analysis. Using SDF-1(-/- mouse embryo, we histologically showed that the total length of the whole humeri of SDF-1(-/- mice was significantly shorter than that of wild-type mice, which was contributed mainly by shorter hypertrophic and calcified zones in SDF-1(-/- mice. Actin cytoskeleton of hypertrophic chondrocytes in SDF-1(-/- mouse humeri showed less F-actin and rounder shape than that of wild-type mice. Primary chondrocytes from SDF-1(-/- mice showed the enhanced formation of philopodia and loss of F-actin. The administration of SDF-1 to primary chondrocytes of wild-type mice and SDF-1(-/- mice promoted the formation of actin stress fibers. Organ culture of embryonic metatarsals from SDF-1(-/- mice showed the growth delay, which was recovered by an exogenous administration of SDF-1. mRNA expression of type X collagen in metatarsals and in primary chondrocytes of SDF-1(-/- mouse embryo was down-regulated while the administration of SDF-1 to metatarsals recovered. These data suggests that SDF-1 regulates the actin organization and stimulates bone growth by mediating chondrocyte hypertrophy.

  13. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengzhen Wang

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1 and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic

  14. [Phenotypic characterization and distribution of Yersinia in human and environmental samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier Castillo, F; Larraz, V; Asunción Lafarga, M; Navarro, M; Gómez-Lus, R

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of species and phenotypes of Yersinia isolated from environmental samples over an eight year period are compared to that of stool cultures obtained from patients of the same geographical location (Zaragoza, Spain). The number of samples and the percentage contamination were as follows: wastewater 362, 67.4%, freshwater 523, 13.4%, raw food 607, 24.5% and cooked food 1134, 7.9%. Yersinia enterocolitica was isolated significantly more frequently than other species in wastewater, while Yersinia intermedia was the most significant species found in freshwater. Significant differences between the percentage isolates of identified species in raw and cooked foods were not found. Fifteen different serogroups were identified from faeces, thirteen of which were also isolated from environmental samples. Three serogroups of Y. enterocolitica associated with human disease were isolated from the patients faeces as follows: O:3, 145 cases; O:8, 3 cases and O:5,27, 1 case. A low proportion were isolated from food: O:3, 3 strains; O:8, 2 strains and O:5,27, 5 strains. Only one isolate from serogroup O:3 was obtained from freshwater.

  15. Characterization of Genes Associated with Different Phenotypes of Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Cong YANG; Xu LI; Wei CHEN

    2006-01-01

    To identify genes associated with morphological phenotypes of human bladder transitional cell carcinoma, we used suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to create a subtractive cDNA library of two established cell lines, BLZ-211 and BLS-211, derived from a patient with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, then to screen for differentially expressed genes. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to further confirm the selected differentially expressed genes. Forward and reverse subtractive cDNA libraries yielded 168 and 305 putative clones, and among them more than 90% contained the inserts.After differential screening, 36 different transcripts were obtained from 64 cDNA clones of a forward and reverse subtraction library. Among them, 17 were identified as known genes by homology, for example,Vimentin, Keratin7, DDH and UCH-L1. The remaining 19 were unknown expressed genes, and were collected as new expressed sequence tags by the GenBank dbEST database with the accession numbers DR008207,DR010178, DR159652-DR159660, DY230447-DY230448, and DY505708-DY505713. Their function will be studied further. Thus, SSH appears to be a useful technique for identifying differentially expressed genes between cell lines or clones. Our results, as revealed by SSH, also suggest that differences in gene expression of cytoskeletal proteins might contribute to the different morphologies in BLZ-211 and BLS-211 cells.

  16. Antidepressant imipramine induces human astrocytes to differentiate into cells with neuronal phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabras, Stefano; Saba, Francesca; Reali, Camilla; Scorciapino, Maria Laura; Sirigu, Annarita; Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Giovanni; Sogos, Valeria

    2010-06-01

    Several recent studies have expanded our conception of the role of astrocytes in neurogenesis, proposing that these cells may contribute to this phenomenon not only as a source of trophic substances, but also as stem cells themselves. We recently observed in vitro that human mature astrocytes can be induced to differentiate into cells with a neuronal phenotype. Antidepressant drugs have been shown to increase neurogenesis in the adult rodent hippocampus. In order to better understand the role of astroglia in antidepressant-induced neurogenesis, primary astrocyte cultures were treated with the antidepressant imipramine. Cell morphology was rapidly modified by treatment. In fact, whereas untreated astrocytes showed large, flat morphology, after a few hours of treatment cells exhibited a round-shaped cell body with long, thin processes. The expression of neuronal markers was analysed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot and RT-PCR at different treatment times. Results showed an increase in neuronal markers such as neurofilament and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), whereas glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and nestin expression were not significantly modified by treatment. Similar results were obtained with fluoxetine and venlafaxine. Hes1 mRNA significantly increased after 2 h of treatment, suggesting involvement of this transcription factor in this process. These results confirm the role of astrocytes in neurogenesis and suggest that these cells may represent one of the targets of antidepressants.

  17. Aberrant Phenotype in Human Endothelial Cells of Diabetic Origin: Implications for Saphenous Vein Graft Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2DM confers increased risk of endothelial dysfunction, coronary heart disease, and vulnerability to vein graft failure after bypass grafting, despite glycaemic control. This study explored the concept that endothelial cells (EC cultured from T2DM and nondiabetic (ND patients are phenotypically and functionally distinct. Cultured human saphenous vein- (SV- EC were compared between T2DM and ND patients in parallel. Proliferation, migration, and in vitro angiogenesis assays were performed; western blotting was used to quantify phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, and eNOS. The ability of diabetic stimuli (hyperglycaemia, TNF-α, and palmitate to modulate angiogenic potential of ND-EC was also explored. T2DM-EC displayed reduced migration (~30% and angiogenesis (~40% compared with ND-EC and a modest, nonsignificant trend to reduced proliferation. Significant inhibition of Akt and eNOS, but not ERK phosphorylation, was observed in T2DM cells. Hyperglycaemia did not modify ND-EC function, but TNF-α and palmitate significantly reduced angiogenic capacity (by 27% and 43%, resp., effects mimicked by Akt inhibition. Aberrancies of EC function may help to explain the increased risk of SV graft failure in T2DM patients. This study highlights the importance of other potentially contributing factors in addition to hyperglycaemia that may inflict injury and long-term dysfunction to the homeostatic capacity of the endothelium.

  18. Aberrant phenotype in human endothelial cells of diabetic origin: implications for saphenous vein graft failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Anna C; Gohil, Jai; Hudson, Laura; Connolly, Kyle; Warburton, Philip; Suman, Rakesh; O'Toole, Peter; O'Regan, David J; Turner, Neil A; Riches, Kirsten; Porter, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) confers increased risk of endothelial dysfunction, coronary heart disease, and vulnerability to vein graft failure after bypass grafting, despite glycaemic control. This study explored the concept that endothelial cells (EC) cultured from T2DM and nondiabetic (ND) patients are phenotypically and functionally distinct. Cultured human saphenous vein- (SV-) EC were compared between T2DM and ND patients in parallel. Proliferation, migration, and in vitro angiogenesis assays were performed; western blotting was used to quantify phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, and eNOS. The ability of diabetic stimuli (hyperglycaemia, TNF-α, and palmitate) to modulate angiogenic potential of ND-EC was also explored. T2DM-EC displayed reduced migration (~30%) and angiogenesis (~40%) compared with ND-EC and a modest, nonsignificant trend to reduced proliferation. Significant inhibition of Akt and eNOS, but not ERK phosphorylation, was observed in T2DM cells. Hyperglycaemia did not modify ND-EC function, but TNF-α and palmitate significantly reduced angiogenic capacity (by 27% and 43%, resp.), effects mimicked by Akt inhibition. Aberrancies of EC function may help to explain the increased risk of SV graft failure in T2DM patients. This study highlights the importance of other potentially contributing factors in addition to hyperglycaemia that may inflict injury and long-term dysfunction to the homeostatic capacity of the endothelium.

  19. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington's Disease T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James R C; Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington's disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington's disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington's disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington's disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington's disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system.

  20. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington's Disease T Lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R C Miller

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington's disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington's disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington's disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington's disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington's disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system.

  1. Human MAMLD1 Gene Variations Seem Not Sufficient to Explain a 46,XY DSD Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Camats

    Full Text Available MAMLD1 is thought to cause disordered sex development in 46,XY patients. But its role is controversial because some MAMLD1 variants are also detected in normal individuals, several MAMLD1 mutations have wild-type activity in functional tests, and the male Mamld1-knockout mouse has normal genitalia and reproduction. Our aim was to search for MAMLD1 variations in 108 46,XY patients with disordered sex development, and to test them functionally. We detected MAMDL1 variations and compared SNP frequencies in controls and patients. We tested MAMLD1 transcriptional activity on promoters involved in sex development and assessed the effect of MAMLD1 on androgen production. MAMLD1 expression in normal steroid-producing tissues and mutant MAMLD1 protein expression were also assessed. Nine MAMLD1 mutations (7 novel were characterized. In vitro, most MAMLD1 variants acted similarly to wild type. Only the L210X mutation showed loss of function in all tests. We detected no effect of wild-type or MAMLD1 variants on CYP17A1 enzyme activity in our cell experiments, and Western blots revealed no significant differences for MAMLD1 protein expression. MAMLD1 was expressed in human adult testes and adrenals. In conclusion, our data support the notion that MAMLD1 sequence variations may not suffice to explain the phenotype in carriers and that MAMLD1 may also have a role in adult life.

  2. Effect of human epididymis protein 4 gene silencing on the malignant phenotype in ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Shu-li; CUI Heng; CHANG Xiao-hong; YE Xue; CHENG Hong-yan; CHENG Ye-xia; TANG Zhi-jian; ZHANG Zu-juan; GAO Li; CHEN Xin-hua

    2011-01-01

    Background Human epididymis secretory protein 4 (HE4) has been proved to be a promising novel biomarker for the detection of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Compared with CA125, HE4 assay demonstrated an improved ability to discriminate between pelvic mass with malignant and benign disease. Though it is well known that HE4 is overexpressed in ovarian cancer, however, the role of HE4 in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancer remains unkown.Methods In this study, we explored the role of HE4 in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancer. We screened nine ovarian cancer cell lines for HE4 expression, and using RNA interference (RNAi), we silenced HE4 gene expression in CaoV3 and SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cell lines. We assessed the effect of HE4 gene silencing on the transformed phenotype by examining the cell cycle, apoptosis, proliferation and transwell migration/invasion in vitro.Results HE4 gene silencing induces G0/G1 arrest and blocks the progression from the G1 to S phase in CaoV3 and SKOV3.ip1 cells. HE4 knockdown also inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in SKOV3.ip1 cells in vitro.Conclusion HE4 may be involved in the regulation of the cell cycle and promote ovarian cancer migration and invasion.

  3. Human MAMLD1 Gene Variations Seem Not Sufficient to Explain a 46,XY DSD Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audí, Laura; Mullis, Primus E.; Moreno, Francisca; González Casado, Isabel; López-Siguero, Juan Pedro; Corripio, Raquel; Bermúdez de la Vega, José Antonio; Blanco, José Antonio; Flück, Christa E.

    2015-01-01

    MAMLD1 is thought to cause disordered sex development in 46,XY patients. But its role is controversial because some MAMLD1 variants are also detected in normal individuals, several MAMLD1 mutations have wild-type activity in functional tests, and the male Mamld1-knockout mouse has normal genitalia and reproduction. Our aim was to search for MAMLD1 variations in 108 46,XY patients with disordered sex development, and to test them functionally. We detected MAMDL1 variations and compared SNP frequencies in controls and patients. We tested MAMLD1 transcriptional activity on promoters involved in sex development and assessed the effect of MAMLD1 on androgen production. MAMLD1 expression in normal steroid-producing tissues and mutant MAMLD1 protein expression were also assessed. Nine MAMLD1 mutations (7 novel) were characterized. In vitro, most MAMLD1 variants acted similarly to wild type. Only the L210X mutation showed loss of function in all tests. We detected no effect of wild-type or MAMLD1 variants on CYP17A1 enzyme activity in our cell experiments, and Western blots revealed no significant differences for MAMLD1 protein expression. MAMLD1 was expressed in human adult testes and adrenals. In conclusion, our data support the notion that MAMLD1 sequence variations may not suffice to explain the phenotype in carriers and that MAMLD1 may also have a role in adult life. PMID:26580071

  4. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human memory T cell responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharaporn Tippayawat

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important cause of community-acquired lethal sepsis in endemic regions in southeast Asia and northern Australia and is increasingly reported in other tropical areas. In animal models, production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma is critical for resistance, but in humans the characteristics of IFN-gamma production and the bacterial antigens that are recognized by the cell-mediated immune response have not been defined.Peripheral blood from 133 healthy individuals who lived in the endemic area and had no history of melioidosis, 60 patients who had recovered from melioidosis, and 31 other patient control subjects were stimulated by whole bacteria or purified bacterial proteins in vitro, and IFN-gamma responses were analyzed by ELISPOT and flow cytometry.B. pseudomallei was a potent activator of human peripheral blood NK cells for innate production of IFN-gamma. In addition, healthy individuals with serological evidence of exposure to B. pseudomallei and patients recovered from active melioidosis developed CD4(+ (and CD8(+ T cells that recognized whole bacteria and purified proteins LolC, OppA, and PotF, members of the B. pseudomallei ABC transporter family. This response was primarily mediated by terminally differentiated T cells of the effector-memory (T(EMRA phenotype and correlated with the titer of anti-B. pseudomallei antibodies in the serum.Individuals living in a melioidosis-endemic region show clear evidence of T cell priming for the ability to make IFN-gamma that correlates with their serological status. The ability to detect T cell responses to defined B. pseudomallei proteins in large numbers of individuals now provides the opportunity to screen candidate antigens for inclusion in protein or polysaccharide-conjugate subunit vaccines against this important but neglected disease.

  5. Beta2-adrenergic signaling affects the phenotype of human cardiac progenitor cells through EMT modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Francesca; Angelini, Francesco; Siciliano, Camilla; Tasciotti, Julia; Mangino, Giorgio; De Falco, Elena; Carnevale, Roberto; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Frati, Giacomo; Chimenti, Isotta

    2017-01-15

    Human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) offer great promises to cardiac cell therapy for heart failure. Many in vivo studies have shown their therapeutic benefits, paving the way for clinical translation. The 3D model of cardiospheres (CSs) represents a unique niche-like in vitro microenvironment, which includes CPCs and supporting cells. CSs have been shown to form through a process mediated by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). β2-Adrenergic signaling significantly affects stem/progenitor cells activation and mobilization in multiple tissues, and crosstalk between β2-adrenergic signaling and EMT processes has been reported. In the present study, we aimed at investigating the biological response of CSs to β2-adrenergic stimuli, focusing on EMT modulation in the 3D culture system of CSs. We treated human CSs and CS-derived cells (CDCs) with the β2-blocker butoxamine (BUT), using either untreated or β2 agonist (clenbuterol) treated CDCs as control. BUT-treated CS-forming cells displayed increased migration capacity and a significant increase in their CS-forming ability, consistently associated with increased expression of EMT-related genes, such as Snai1. Moreover, long-term BUT-treated CDCs contained a lower percentage of CD90+ cells, and this feature has been previously correlated with higher cardiogenic and therapeutic potential of the CDCs population. In addition, long-term BUT-treated CDCs had an increased ratio of collagen-III/collagen-I gene expression levels, and showed decreased release of inflammatory cytokines, overall supporting a less fibrosis-prone phenotype. In conclusion, β2 adrenergic receptor block positively affected the stemness vs commitment balance within CSs through the modulation of type1-EMT (so called "developmental"). These results further highlight type-1 EMT to be a key process affecting the features of resident cardiac progenitor cells, and mediating their response to the microenvironment.

  6. Role of lubricin and boundary lubrication in the prevention of chondrocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Kimberly A; Zhang, Ling X; Elsaid, Khaled A; Fleming, Braden C; Warman, Matthew L; Jay, Gregory D

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis is a complex disease involving the mechanical breakdown of articular cartilage in the presence of altered joint mechanics and chondrocyte death, but the connection between these factors is not well established. Lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein encoded by the PRG4 gene, provides boundary lubrication in articular joints. Joint friction is elevated and accompanied by accelerated cartilage damage in humans and mice that have genetic deficiency of lubricin. Here, we investigated the relationship between coefficient of friction and chondrocyte death using ex vivo and in vitro measurements of friction and apoptosis. We observed increases in whole-joint friction and cellular apoptosis in lubricin knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. When we used an in vitro bovine explant cartilage-on-cartilage bearing system, we observed a direct correlation between coefficient of friction and chondrocyte apoptosis in the superficial layers of cartilage. In the bovine explant system, the addition of lubricin as a test lubricant significantly lowered the static coefficient of friction and number of apoptotic chondrocytes. These results demonstrate a direct connection between lubricin, boundary lubrication, and cell survival and suggest that supplementation of synovial fluid with lubricin may be an effective treatment to prevent cartilage deterioration in patients with genetic or acquired deficiency of lubricin.

  7. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Musumeci

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol (PEG based hydrogels (PEG-DA encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  8. Bioavailable constituents/metabolites of pomegranate (Punica granatum L preferentially inhibit COX2 activity ex vivo and IL-1beta-induced PGE2 production in human chondrocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Khursheed A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several recent studies have documented that supplementation with pomegranate fruit extract inhibits inflammatory symptoms in vivo. However, the molecular basis of the observed effects has not been fully revealed. Although previous studies have documented the inhibition of nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase (COX activity in vitro by plant and fruit extracts added directly into the culture medium but whether concentrations of bioactive compounds sufficient enough to exert such inhibitory effects in vivo can be achieved through oral consumption has not been reported. In the present study we determined the effect of rabbit plasma obtained after ingestion of a polyphenol rich extract of pomegranate fruit (PFE on COX enzyme activity ex vivo and the IL-1β-induced production of NO and PGE2 in chondrocytes in vitro. Plasma samples collected before and 2 hr after supplementation with PFE were tested. Plasma samples collected after oral ingestion of PFE were found to inhibit the IL-1β-induced PGE2 and NO production in chondrocytes. These same plasma samples also inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activity ex vivo but the effect was more pronounced on the enzyme activity of COX-2 enzyme. Taken together these results provide additional evidence of the bioavailability and bioactivity of compounds present in pomegranate fruit after oral ingestion. Furthermore, these studies suggest that PFE-derived bioavailable compounds may exert an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the inflammatory cytokine-induced production of PGE2 and NO in vivo.

  9. High frequency of Fredrickson's phenotypes IV and IIb in Brazilians infected by human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Helena CF

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is very prevalent in Brazil. HIV therapy has been recently associated with coronary heart disease (CHD. Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for CHD that is frequently described in HIV positive patients, but very few studies have been conducted in Brazilian patients evaluating their lipid profiles. Methods In the present work, we evaluated the frequency and severity of dyslipidemia in 257 Brazilian HIV positive patients. Two hundred and thirty-eight (93% were submitted to antiretroviral therapy (224 treated with protease inhibitors plus nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 14 treated only with the latter, 12 naive and 7 had no records of treatment. The average time on drug treatment with antiretroviral therapy was 20 months. None of the patients was under lipid lowering drugs. Cholesterol, triglyceride, phospholipid and free fatty acids were determined by enzymatic colorimetric methods. Lipoprotein profile was estimated by the Friedewald formula and Fredrickson's phenotyping was obtained by serum electrophoresis on agarose. Apolipoprotein B and AI and lipoprotein "a" were measured by nephelometry. Results The Fredrickson phenotypes were: type IIb (51%, IV (41%, IIa (7%. In addition one patient was type III and another type V. Thirty-three percent of all HIV+ patients presented serum cholesterol levels ≥ 200 mg/dL, 61% LDL-cholesterol ≥ 100 mg/dL, 65% HDL-cholesterol below 40 mg/dL, 46% triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dL and 10% have all these parameters above the limits. Eighty-six percent of patients had cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio ≥ 3.5, 22% increased lipoprotein "a", 79% increased free fatty acids and 9% increased phospholipids. The treatment with protease inhibitors plus nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors increased the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides in these patients when compared with naïve patients. The HDL-cholesterol (p = 0.01 and

  10. Chondrocyte hypertrophy in skeletal development, growth, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Margaret Man-Ger; Beier, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Most of our bones form through the process of endochondral ossification, which is tightly regulated by the activity of the cartilage growth plate. Chondrocyte maturation through the various stages of growth plate physiology ultimately results in hypertrophy. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is an essential contributor to longitudinal bone growth, but recent data suggest that these cells also play fundamental roles in signaling to other skeletal cells, thus coordinating endochondral ossification. On the other hand, ectopic hypertrophy of articular chondrocytes has been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Thus, a better understanding of the processes that control chondrocyte hypertrophy in the growth plate as well as in articular cartilage is required for improved management of both skeletal growth disorders and osteoarthritis. This review summarizes recent findings on the regulation of hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation, the cellular mechanisms involved in hypertrophy, and the role of chondrocyte hypertrophy in skeletal physiology and pathophysiology.

  11. Evaluation of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Labeled Chondrocytes Cultivated on a Type II Collagen–Chitosan/Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid Biphasic Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juin-Yih Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondral or osteochondral defects are still controversial problems in orthopedics. Here, chondrocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles were cultivated on a biphasic, type II collagen–chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid scaffold in an attempt to develop cultures with trackable cells exhibiting growth, differentiation, and regeneration. Rabbit chondrocytes were labeled with magnetic nanoparticles and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron (TEM microscopy, and gene and protein expression analyses. The experimental results showed that the magnetic nanoparticles did not affect the phenotype of chondrocytes after cell labeling, nor were protein and gene expression affected. The biphasic type II collagen–chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid scaffold was characterized by SEM, and labeled chondrocytes showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the scaffold after cultivation onto the polymer. Cellular phenotype remained unaltered but with increased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan, as indicated by cell staining, indicating chondrogenesis. Decreased SRY-related high mobility group-box gene (Sox-9 levels of cultured chondrocytes indicated that differentiation was associated with osteogenesis. These results are encouraging for the development of techniques for trackable cartilage regeneration and osteochondral defect repair which may be applied in vivo and, eventually, in clinical trials.

  12. Evaluation of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Labeled Chondrocytes Cultivated on a Type II Collagen-Chitosan/Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid Biphasic Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Juin-Yih; Chen, Shi-Hui; Chen, Yu-Pin; Chen, Wei-Chuan

    2017-01-04

    Chondral or osteochondral defects are still controversial problems in orthopedics. Here, chondrocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles were cultivated on a biphasic, type II collagen-chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold in an attempt to develop cultures with trackable cells exhibiting growth, differentiation, and regeneration. Rabbit chondrocytes were labeled with magnetic nanoparticles and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron (TEM) microscopy, and gene and protein expression analyses. The experimental results showed that the magnetic nanoparticles did not affect the phenotype of chondrocytes after cell labeling, nor were protein and gene expression affected. The biphasic type II collagen-chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid scaffold was characterized by SEM, and labeled chondrocytes showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the scaffold after cultivation onto the polymer. Cellular phenotype remained unaltered but with increased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan, as indicated by cell staining, indicating chondrogenesis. Decreased SRY-related high mobility group-box gene (Sox-9) levels of cultured chondrocytes indicated that differentiation was associated with osteogenesis. These results are encouraging for the development of techniques for trackable cartilage regeneration and osteochondral defect repair which may be applied in vivo and, eventually, in clinical trials.

  13. Contraction-induced Mmp13 and-14 expression by goat articular chondrocytes in collagen type I but not type II gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Agnes D.; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A.

    2012-01-01

    Collagen gels are promising scaffolds to prepare an implant for cartilage repair but several parameters, such as collagen concentration and composition as well as cell density, should be carefully considered, as they are reported to affect phenotypic aspects of chondrocytes. In this study we

  14. Contraction-induced Mmp13 and-14 expression by goat articular chondrocytes in collagen type I but not type II gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Agnes D.; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A.

    2012-01-01

    Collagen gels are promising scaffolds to prepare an implant for cartilage repair but several parameters, such as collagen concentration and composition as well as cell density, should be carefully considered, as they are reported to affect phenotypic aspects of chondrocytes. In this study we investi

  15. Chondrocytic Atf4 regulates osteoblast differentiation and function via Ihh

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Weiguang; Lian, Na; Ma, Yun; Li, Lingzhen; Gallant, Richard C.; Elefteriou, Florent; Yang, Xiangli

    2012-01-01

    Atf4 is a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor that activates osteocalcin (Ocn) in osteoblasts and indian hedgehog (Ihh) in chondrocytes. The relative contribution of Atf4 in chondrocytes and osteoblasts to the regulation of skeletal development and bone formation is poorly understood. Investigations of the Atf4–/–;Col2a1-Atf4 mouse model, in which Atf4 is selectively overexpressed in chondrocytes in an Atf4-null background, demonstrate that chondrocyte-derived Atf4 regulates osteog...

  16. Regulated Production of Mineralization-competent Matrix Vesicles in Hypertrophic Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Thorsten; Nah, Hyun-Duck; Shapiro, Irving M.; Pacifici, Maurizio

    1997-01-01

    Matrix vesicles have a critical role in the initiation of mineral deposition in skeletal tissues, but the ways in which they exert this key function remain poorly understood. This issue is made even more intriguing by the fact that matrix vesicles are also present in nonmineralizing tissues. Thus, we tested the novel hypothesis that matrix vesicles produced and released by mineralizing cells are structurally and functionally different from those released by nonmineralizing cells. To test this hypothesis, we made use of cultures of chick embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes in which mineralization was triggered by treatment with vitamin C and phosphate. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that both control nonmineralizing and vitamin C/phosphatetreated mineralizing chondrocytes produced and released matrix vesicles that exhibited similar round shape, smooth contour, and average size. However, unlike control vesicles, those produced by mineralizing chondrocytes had very strong alkaline phosphatase activity and contained annexin V, a membrane-associated protein known to mediate Ca2+ influx into matrix vesicles. Strikingly, these vesicles also formed numerous apatite-like crystals upon incubation with synthetic cartilage lymph, while control vesicles failed to do so. Northern blot and immunohistochemical analyses showed that the production and release of annexin V-rich matrix vesicles by mineralizing chondrocytes were accompanied by a marked increase in annexin V expression and, interestingly, were followed by increased expression of type I collagen. Studies on embryonic cartilages demonstrated a similar sequence of phenotypic changes during the mineralization process in vivo. Thus, chondrocytes located in the hypertrophic zone of chick embryo tibial growth plate were characterized by strong annexin V expression, and those located at the chondro–osseous mineralizing border exhibited expression of both annexin V and type I collagen. These findings reveal that

  17. Changes in gene expression, protein content and morphology of chondrocytes cultured on a 3D Random Positioning Machine and 2D rotating clinostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela; Sahana, Jayashree

    Chondrocytes are the only cell type found in human cartilage consisting of proteoglycans and type II collagen. Several studies on chondrocytes cultured either in Space or on a ground-based facility for simulation of microgravity revealed that these cells are very resistant to adverse effects and stress induced by altered gravity. Tissue engineering of chondrocytes is a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. Using a three-dimensional Random Positioning Machine and a 2D rotating clinostat, devices designed to simulate microgravity on Earth, we investigated the early effects of microgravity exposure on human chondrocytes of six different donors after 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h and compared the results with the corresponding static controls cultured under normal gravity conditions. As little as 30 min of exposure resulted in increased expression of several genes responsible for cell motility, structure and integrity (beta-actin); control of cell growth, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and cytoskeletal components such as microtubules (beta-tubulin) and intermediate filaments (vimentin). After 4 hours disruptions in the vimentin network were detected. These changes were less dramatic after 16 hours, when human chondrocytes appeared to reorganize their cytoskeleton. However, the gene expression and protein content of TGF-β1 was enhanced for 24 h. Based on the results achieved, we suggest that chondrocytes exposed to simulated microgravity seem to change their extracellular matrix production behavior while they rearrange their cytoskeletal proteins prior to forming three-dimensional aggregates.

  18. Andrographolide enhances proliferation and prevents dedifferentiation of rabbit articular chondrocytes: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li-Ke; Wei, Qing-Jun; Liu, Lei; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jin-Min

    2015-01-01

    As the main active constituent of Andrographis paniculata that was applied in treatment of many diseases including inflammation in ancient China, andrographolide (ANDRO) was found to facilitate reduction of edema and analgesia in arthritis. This suggested that ANDRO may be promising anti-inflammatory agent to relieve destruction and degeneration of cartilage after inflammation. In this study, the effect of ANDRO on rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro was investigated. Results showed that not more than 8 μM ANDRO did no harm to chondrocytes (P ANDRO groups comparing to the control (P ANDRO could promote expression of aggrecan, collagen II, and Sox9 genes while downregulating expression of collagen I gene (P 0.05). The viability assay, hematoxylin-eosin, safranin O, and immunohistochemical staining also showed better performances in ANDRO groups. As to the doses, 3 μM ANDRO showed the best performance. The results indicate that ANDRO can accelerate proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and meanwhile maintain the phenotype, which may provide valuable references for further exploration on arthritis.

  19. Human Stromal (Mesenchymal) Stem Cells from Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue and Skin Exhibit Differences in Molecular Phenotype and Differentiation Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nbaheen, May; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Ali, Dalia;

    2013-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent stem cells with ability to differentiate into mesoderm-type cells e.g. osteoblasts and adipocytes and thus they are being introduced into clinical trials for tissue regeneration. Traditionally, hMSCs have been isolated from bone marrow......, but the number of cells obtained is limited. Here, we compared the MSC-like cell populations, obtained from alternative sources for MSC: adipose tissue and skin, with the standard phenotype of human bone marrow MSC (BM-MSCs). MSC from human adipose tissue (human adipose stromal cells (hATSCs)) and human skin...... (human adult skin stromal cells, (hASSCs) and human new-born skin stromal cells (hNSSCs)) grew readily in culture and the growth rate was highest in hNSSCs and lowest in hATSCs. Compared with phenotype of hBM-MSC, all cell populations were CD34(-), CD45(-), CD14(-), CD31(-), HLA-DR(-), CD13(+), CD29...

  20. Highly efficient transduction of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells without phenotypic and functional maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plumas Joel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene modified dendritic cells (DC are able to modulate DC functions and induce therapeutic immunity or tolerance in an antigen-specific manner. Among the different DC subsets, plasmacytoid DC (pDC are well known for their ability to recognize and respond to a variety of viruses by secreting high levels of type I interferon. Methods We analyzed here, the transduction efficiency of a pDC cell line, GEN2.2, and of pDC derived from CD34+ progenitors, using lentiviral vectors (LV pseudotyped with different envelope glycoproteins such as the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope (VSVG, the gibbon ape leukaemia virus envelope (GaLV or the feline endogenous virus envelope (RD114. At the same time, we evaluated transgene expression (E-GFP reporter gene under the control of different promoters. Results We found that efficient gene transfer into pDC can be achieved with VSVG-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV under the control of phoshoglycerate kinase (PGK and elongation factor-1 (EF1α promoters (28% to 90% of E-GFP+ cells, respectively in the absence of phenotypic and functional maturation. Surprisingly, promoters (desmin or synthetic C5–12 described as muscle-specific and which drive gene expression in single strand AAV vectors in gene therapy protocols were very highly active in pDC using VSVG-LV. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that LV vectors can serve to design pDC-based vaccines in humans, and they are also useful in vitro to evaluate the immunogenicity of the vector preparations, and the specificity and safety of given promoters used in gene therapy protocols.

  1. Effect of hydrostatic pressure of various magnitudes on osteoarthritic chondrocytes exposed to IL-1beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Collodel, Giulia; Petraglia, Angela; Nerucci, Fabiola; Moretti, Elena; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2010-08-01

    Several in vitro studies have shown the importance of mechanical compression or hydrostatic pressure (HP) as a modulator of cartilage metabolism. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro effects of cyclical low HP (1-5 MPa) and continuous high HP (24 MPa) applied in the presence or absence of interleukin (IL)-1beta on human osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes. Chondrocytes obtained from OA cartilage were cultivated for 48 h and then exposed to pressurization in the presence or absence of IL-1beta. After pressurization, the culture medium was collected to detect the amount of proteoglycans (PG) and nitric oxide (NO) and the chondrocytes were immediately fixed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and processed for immunocytochemistry to localize the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). A significant increase in the level of PG and a small, non-significant, decrease in NO production were observed upon exposure to cyclical low HP. On the other hand, exposure to continuous high HP resulted in a significant decrease in the PG levels and a significant increase in NO production. The presence of IL-1beta led to a significant decrease in PG levels as well as a significant increase in NO production. The cyclical low HP did not increase the PG levels significantly but caused a statistically significant decrease in NO production in cultures damaged with IL-1beta. The continuous high HP in chondrocyte cultures stimulated with IL-1beta did not significantly decrease PG production, but significantly increased NO production. The results concerning metabolic production were further confirmed by morphological findings obtained by TEM and immunocytochemical studies. The findings of this study confirmed that the response of chondrocytes varies with magnitude and frequency of HP. These findings are important to understand aetiopathogenetic mechanisms of OA and to find out which type of physical activity may be best suited for the prevention and therapy of OA.

  2. Hypoxic conditions induce a cancer-like phenotype in human breast epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Vaapil

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Solid tumors are less oxygenated than their tissue of origin. Low intra-tumor oxygen levels are associated with worse outcome, increased metastatic potential and immature phenotype in breast cancer. We have reported that tumor hypoxia correlates to low differentiation status in breast cancer. Less is known about effects of hypoxia on non-malignant cells. Here we address whether hypoxia influences the differentiation stage of non-malignant breast epithelial cells and potentially have bearing on early stages of tumorigenesis. METHODS: Normal human primary breast epithelial cells and immortalized non-malignant mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells were grown in a three-dimensional overlay culture on laminin-rich extracellular matrix for up to 21 days at normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Acinar morphogenesis and expression of markers of epithelial differentiation and cell polarization were analyzed by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, qPCR and immunoblot. RESULTS: In large ductal carcinoma in situ patient-specimens, we find that epithelial cells with high HIF-1α levels and multiple cell layers away from the vasculature are immature compared to well-oxygenated cells. We show that hypoxic conditions impaired acinar morphogenesis of primary and immortalized breast epithelial cells grown ex vivo on laminin-rich matrix. Normoxic cultures formed polarized acini-like spheres with the anticipated distribution of marker proteins associated with mammary epithelial polarization e.g. α6-integrin, laminin 5 and Human Milk Fat Globule/MUC1. At hypoxia, cells were not polarized and the sub-cellular distribution pattern of the marker proteins rather resembled that reported in vivo in breast cancer. The hypoxic cells remained in a mitotic state, whereas proliferation ceased with acinar morphogenesis at normoxia. We found induced expression of the differentiation repressor ID1 in the undifferentiated hypoxic MCF-10A cell structures. Acinar

  3. Human Upcyte Hepatocytes: Characterization of the Hepatic Phenotype and Evaluation for Acute and Long-Term Hepatotoxicity Routine Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, M José; López, Silvia; Guzmán, Carla; Castell, José V; Donato, M Teresa; Jover, Ramiro

    2016-07-01

    The capacity of human hepatic cell-based models to predict hepatotoxicity depends on the functional performance of cells. The major limitations of human hepatocytes include the scarce availability and rapid loss of the hepatic phenotype. Hepatoma cells are readily available and easy to handle, but are metabolically poor compared with hepatocytes. Recently developed human upcyte hepatocytes offer the advantage of combining many features of primary hepatocytes with the unlimited availability of hepatoma cells. We analyzed the phenotype of upcyte hepatocytes comparatively with HepG2 cells and adult primary human hepatocytes to characterize their functional features as a differentiated hepatic cell model. The transcriptomic analysis of liver characteristic genes confirmed that the upcyte hepatocytes expression profile comes closer to human hepatocytes than HepG2 cells. CYP activities were measurable and showed a similar response to prototypical CYP inducers than primary human hepatocytes. Upcyte hepatocytes also retained conjugating activities and key hepatic functions, e.g. albumin, urea, lipid and glycogen synthesis, at levels close to hepatocytes. We also investigated the suitability of this cell model for preclinical hepatotoxicity risk assessments using multiparametric high-content screening, as well as transcriptomics and targeted metabolomic analysis. Compounds with well-documented in vivo hepatotoxicity were screened after acute and repeated doses up to 1 week. The evaluation of complex mechanisms of cell toxicity, drug-induced steatosis and oxidative stress biomarkers demonstrated that, by combining the phenotype of primary human hepatocytes and the ease of handling of HepG2 cells, upcyte hepatocytes offer suitable properties to be potentially used for toxicological assessments during drug development.

  4. An evaluation of chondrocyte morphology and gene expression on superhydrophilic vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonioli, Eliane, E-mail: eliane.antonioli@einstein.br [Research and Education Institute, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lobo, Anderson O., E-mail: aolobo@univap.br [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ferretti, Mario, E-mail: ferretti@einstein.br [Research and Education Institute, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ortophedic Division, Federal University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cohen, Moises, E-mail: m.cohen@uol.com.br [Research and Education Institute, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ortophedic Division, Federal University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marciano, Fernanda R., E-mail: femarciano@uol.com.br [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Universidade do Vale do Paraiba, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Corat, Evaldo J., E-mail: corat@las.inpe.br [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir J., E-mail: vladimir@las.inpe.br [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-03-01

    Cartilage serves as a low-friction and wear-resistant articulating surface in diarthrodial joints and is also important during early stages of bone remodeling. Recently, regenerative cartilage research has focused on combinations of cells paired with scaffolds. Superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are of particular interest in regenerative medicine. The aim of this study is to evaluate cell expansion of human articular chondrocytes on superhydrophilic VACNTs, as well as their morphology and gene expression. VACNT films were produced using a microwave plasma chamber on Ti substrates and submitted to an O{sub 2} plasma treatment to make them superhydrophilic.