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Sample records for human centromere autoantigen

  1. Engineered human dicentric chromosomes show centromere plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Anne W; Gustashaw, Karen M; Willard, Huntington F

    2005-01-01

    The centromere is essential for the faithful distribution of a cell's genetic material to subsequent generations. Despite intense scrutiny, the precise genetic and epigenetic basis for centromere function is still unknown. Here, we have used engineered dicentric human chromosomes to investigate mammalian centromere structure and function. We describe three classes of dicentric chromosomes isolated in different cell lines: functionally monocentric chromosomes, in which one of the two genetically identical centromeres is consistently inactivated; functionally dicentric chromosomes, in which both centromeres are consistently active; and dicentric chromosomes heterogeneous with respect to centromere activity. A study of serial single cell clones from heterogeneous cell lines revealed that while centromere activity is usually clonal, the centromere state (i.e. functionally monocentric or dicentric) in some lines can switch within a growing population of cells. Because pulsed field gel analysis indicated that the DNA at the centromeres of these chromosomes did not change detectably, this switching of the centromere state is most likely due to epigenetic changes. Inactivation of one of the two active centromeres in a functionally dicentric chromosome was observed in a percentage of cells after treatment with Trichostatin A, an inhibitor of histone deacetylation. This study provides evidence that the activity of human centromeres, while largely stable, can be subject to dynamic change, most likely due to epigenetic modification.

  2. CRALBP is a Highly Prevalent Autoantigen for Human Autoimmune Uveitis

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    Cornelia A. Deeg

    2007-01-01

    uveitis patient's sera was first evaluated in two-dimensional (2D Western blot analysis. Subsequent identification of the immunoreactive proteins by mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of CRALBP as a putative autoantigen. Additionally, sera from human uveitis and control patients were by Western blot using purified human recombinant CRALBP. Anti-CRALBP autoantibodies occur more frequently (P<.01 in human uveitis patients than in normal controls. Thirty out of 56 tested uveitis patient's sera contained autoantibodies reactive against CRALBP, compared to only four out of 23 normal control subjects. The presence of CRALBP autoantibodies in 54% of tested uveitis patients supports CRALBP as a possible autoantigen in human autoimmune uveitis.

  3. The Past, Present, and Future of Human Centromere Genomics

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    Megan E. Aldrup-MacDonald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The centromere is the chromosomal locus essential for chromosome inheritance and genome stability. Human centromeres are located at repetitive alpha satellite DNA arrays that compose approximately 5% of the genome. Contiguous alpha satellite DNA sequence is absent from the assembled reference genome, limiting current understanding of centromere organization and function. Here, we review the progress in centromere genomics spanning the discovery of the sequence to its molecular characterization and the work done during the Human Genome Project era to elucidate alpha satellite structure and sequence variation. We discuss exciting recent advances in alpha satellite sequence assembly that have provided important insight into the abundance and complex organization of this sequence on human chromosomes. In light of these new findings, we offer perspectives for future studies of human centromere assembly and function.

  4. Human chromosome pellicle antibody recognizing centromere protein—C (CENP0C),the main component of the kinetochore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEYONG; ZUMEINI; 等

    1997-01-01

    Recently the antichromosome antisera from several sclerogerma patients have been found to recognize the pellicle of metaphase and anaphase chromosomes.In order to identify the pellicle components,we used these antichromosome antisera to screen a human embryonic cDNA library.The sequences of the positive clones are identical to the cDNA gene sequence of CENP-C (centromere protein C),a human centromere autoantigen.This result suggusts that CENP-C is a component of the pellicle of human metaphase and anaphase chromosomes.

  5. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

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    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations.

  6. Expression of pemphigus-autoantigen desmoglein 1 in human thymus.

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    Mouquet, H; Berrih-Aknin, S; Bismuth, J; Joly, P; Gilbert, D; Tron, F

    2008-05-01

    Desmoglein (Dsg) 1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the desmosome allowing cell-cell adhesion between keratinocytes, whose expression is restricted to stratified squamous epithelia-like epidermis. Dsg1 is the target autoantigen of pathogenic autoantibodies produced by pemphigus foliaceus and 50% of pemphigus vulgaris patients in a Dsg1-specific T-cell-dependent pathway. Herewith, we show that mRNA of the DSG1 gene is present in normal human thymus and show by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis that the expression of DSG1 transcript increases with age. Although immunoblot analysis on human thymus extracts using different anti-Dsg1 antibodies did not allow to detect the protein, we show by double-immunofluorescence assay that Dsg1 is expressed at protein level by CD19+ CD63+ cells located in the medulla. These data provide another illustration of the thymic expression of a tissue-specific autoantigen involved in an organ-specific autoimmune disease, which may participate in the tolerance acquisition and/or regulation of Dsg1-specific T cells.

  7. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  8. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  9. Shuttling of the autoantigen La between nucleus and cell surface after uv irradiation of human keratinocytes

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    Bachmann, M.; Chang, S.; Slor, H.; Kukulies, J.; Mueller, W.E. (Universitaet, Mainz (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-12-01

    During the past years we have established that the nuclear autoantigen La shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in tumor cells after inhibition of transcription or virus infection. We reinvestigated this shuttling using primary human keratinocytes from both healthy donors and patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. Ultraviolet irradiation resulted in both an inhibition of transcription and a translocation of La protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. After a prolonged inhibition of transcription La protein relocated into the nucleus and assembled with nuclear storage regions. The uv-induced shuttling included a translocation to the cell surface, where La protein colocalized with epidermal growth factor receptors.

  10. Integrity of the human centromere DNA repeats is protected by CENP-A, CENP-C, and CENP-T.

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    Giunta, Simona; Funabiki, Hironori

    2017-02-21

    Centromeres are highly specialized chromatin domains that enable chromosome segregation and orchestrate faithful cell division. Human centromeres are composed of tandem arrays of α-satellite DNA, which spans up to several megabases. Little is known about the mechanisms that maintain integrity of the long arrays of α-satellite DNA repeats. Here, we monitored centromeric repeat stability in human cells using chromosome-orientation fluorescent in situ hybridization (CO-FISH). This assay detected aberrant centromeric CO-FISH patterns consistent with sister chromatid exchange at the frequency of 5% in primary tissue culture cells, whereas higher levels were seen in several cancer cell lines and during replicative senescence. To understand the mechanism(s) that maintains centromere integrity, we examined the contribution of the centromere-specific histone variant CENP-A and members of the constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN), CENP-C, CENP-T, and CENP-W. Depletion of CENP-A and CCAN proteins led to an increase in centromere aberrations, whereas enhancing chromosome missegregation by alternative methods did not, suggesting that CENP-A and CCAN proteins help maintain centromere integrity independently of their role in chromosome segregation. Furthermore, superresolution imaging of centromeric CO-FISH using structured illumination microscopy implied that CENP-A protects α-satellite repeats from extensive rearrangements. Our study points toward the presence of a centromere-specific mechanism that actively maintains α-satellite repeat integrity during human cell proliferation.

  11. A sensitive method for detecting proliferation of rare autoantigen-specific human T cells.

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    Mannering, Stuart I; Morris, Jessica S; Jensen, Kent P; Purcell, Anthony W; Honeyman, Margo C; van Endert, Peter M; Harrison, Leonard C

    2003-12-01

    The ability to measure proliferation of rare antigen-specific T cells among many bystanders is critical for the evaluation of cellular immune function in health and disease. T-cell proliferation in response to antigen has been measured almost exclusively by 3H-thymidine incorporation. This method does not directly identify the phenotype of the proliferating cells and is frequently not sufficiently sensitive to detect rare autoantigen-specific T cells. To overcome these problems, we developed a novel assay for antigen-specific human T-cell proliferation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were labelled with the fluorescent dye 5,6-carboxylfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) and cells that proliferated in response to antigen, with resultant reduction in CFSE intensity, were measured directly by flow cytometry. This assay was more sensitive than 3H-thymidine incorporation and detected the proliferation of rare antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells at 10-fold lower antigen concentrations. It also allowed the phenotype of the proliferating cells to be directly determined. Using the CFSE assay we were able to measure directly the proliferation of human CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors in response to the type 1 diabetes autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and proinsulin (PI).

  12. Premitotic assembly of human CENPs -T and -W switches centromeric chromatin to a mitotic state.

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    Lisa Prendergast

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are differentiated chromatin domains, present once per chromosome, that direct segregation of the genome in mitosis and meiosis by specifying assembly of the kinetochore. They are distinct genetic loci in that their identity in most organisms is determined not by the DNA sequences they are associated with, but through specific chromatin composition and context. The core nucleosomal protein CENP-A/cenH3 plays a primary role in centromere determination in all species and directs assembly of a large complex of associated proteins in vertebrates. While CENP-A itself is stably transmitted from one generation to the next, the nature of the template for centromere replication and its relationship to kinetochore function are as yet poorly understood. Here, we investigate the assembly and inheritance of a histone fold complex of the centromere, the CENP-T/W complex, which is integrated with centromeric chromatin in association with canonical histone H3 nucleosomes. We have investigated the cell cycle regulation, timing of assembly, generational persistence, and requirement for function of CENPs -T and -W in the cell cycle in human cells. The CENP-T/W complex assembles through a dynamic exchange mechanism in late S-phase and G2, is required for mitosis in each cell cycle and does not persist across cell generations, properties reciprocal to those measured for CENP-A. We propose that the CENP-A and H3-CENP-T/W nucleosome components of the centromere are specialized for centromeric and kinetochore activities, respectively. Segregation of the assembly mechanisms for the two allows the cell to switch between chromatin configurations that reciprocally support the replication of the centromere and its conversion to a mitotic state on postreplicative chromatin.

  13. Physical Characterization of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology

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    Vladimir Larionov, Ph D

    2007-06-05

    A special interest in the organization of human centromeric DNA was stimulated a few years ago when two independent groups succeeded in reconstituting a functional human centromere, using constructs carrying centromere-specific alphoid DNA arrays. This work demonstrated the importance of DNA components in mammalian centromeres and opened a way for studying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation and for construction of human artificial chromosomes (HACs) with therapeutic potential. To elucidate the structural requirements for formation of HACs with a functional kinetochore, we developed a new method for cloning of large DNA fragments for human centromeric regions that can be used as a substrate for HAC formation. This method exploits in vivo recombination in yeast (TAR cloning). In addition, a new strategy for the construction of alphoid DNA arrays was developed in our lab. The strategy involves the construction of uniform or hybrid synthetic alphoid DNA arrays by the RCA-TAR technique. This technique comprises two steps: rolling circle amplification of an alphoid DNA dimer and subsequent assembling of the amplified fragments by in vivo homologous recombination in yeast (Figure 1). Using this system, we constructed a set of different synthetic alphoid DNA arrays with a predetermined sequence varying in size from 30 to 140 kb and demonstrated that some of the arrays are competent in HAC formation. Because any nucleotide can be changed in a dimer before its amplification, this new technique is optimal for identifying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation in HACs. Moreover, the technique makes possible to introduce into alphoid DNA arrays recognition sites for DNA-binding proteins. We have made the following progress on the studying of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology: i) minimal size of alphoid DNA array required for de novo kinetochore formation was estimated; ii

  14. Cultivation and differentiation change nuclear localization of chromosome centromeres in human mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Yana I Voldgorn

    Full Text Available Chromosome arrangement in the interphase nucleus is not accidental. Strong evidences support that nuclear localization is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this research was to identify differences in the localization of centromeres of chromosomes 6, 12, 18 and X in human mesenchymal stem cells depending on differentiation and cultivating time. We analyzed centromere positions in more than 4000 nuclei in 19 mesenchymal stem cell cultures before and after prolonged cultivation and after differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic directions. We found a centromere reposition of HSAX at late passages and after differentiation in osteogenic direction as well as of HSA12 and HSA18 after adipogenic differentiation. The observed changes of the nuclear structure are new nuclear characteristics of the studied cells which may reflect regulatory changes of gene expression during the studied processes.

  15. Cultivation and differentiation change nuclear localization of chromosome centromeres in human mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Voldgorn, Yana I; Adilgereeva, Elmira P; Nekrasov, Evgeny D; Lavrov, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome arrangement in the interphase nucleus is not accidental. Strong evidences support that nuclear localization is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this research was to identify differences in the localization of centromeres of chromosomes 6, 12, 18 and X in human mesenchymal stem cells depending on differentiation and cultivating time. We analyzed centromere positions in more than 4000 nuclei in 19 mesenchymal stem cell cultures before and after prolonged cultivation and after differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic directions. We found a centromere reposition of HSAX at late passages and after differentiation in osteogenic direction as well as of HSA12 and HSA18 after adipogenic differentiation. The observed changes of the nuclear structure are new nuclear characteristics of the studied cells which may reflect regulatory changes of gene expression during the studied processes.

  16. Changes in the expression of human cell division autoantigen-1 influence Toxoplasma gondii growth and development.

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    Jay R Radke

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma is a significant opportunistic pathogen in AIDS, and bradyzoite differentiation is the critical step in the pathogenesis of chronic infection. Bradyzoite development has an apparent tropism for cells and tissues of the central nervous system, suggesting the need for a specific molecular environment in the host cell, but it is unknown whether this environment is parasite directed or the result of molecular features specific to the host cell itself. We have determined that a trisubstituted pyrrole acts directly on human and murine host cells to slow tachyzoite replication and induce bradyzoite-specific gene expression in type II and III strain parasites but not type I strains. New mRNA synthesis in the host cell was required and indicates that novel host transcripts encode signals that were able to induce parasite development. We have applied multivariate microarray analyses to identify and correlate host gene expression with specific parasite phenotypes. Human cell division autoantigen-1 (CDA1 was identified in this analysis, and small interfering RNA knockdown of this gene demonstrated that CDA1 expression causes the inhibition of parasite replication that leads subsequently to the induction of bradyzoite differentiation. Overexpression of CDA1 alone was able to slow parasite growth and induce the expression of bradyzoite-specific proteins, and thus these results demonstrate that changes in host cell transcription can directly influence the molecular environment to enable bradyzoite development. Investigation of host biochemical pathways with respect to variation in strain type response will help provide an understanding of the link(s between the molecular environment in the host cell and parasite development.

  17. Human islets and dendritic cells generate post-translationally modified islet auto-antigens

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    McLaughlin, Rene J; de Haan, Anne; Zaldumbide, Arnaud; de Koning, Eelco J; de Ru, Arnoud H; van Veelen, Peter A; van Lummel, Menno; Roep, Bart O

    2016-01-01

    Initiation of type 1 diabetes (T1D) requires a break in peripheral tolerance. New insights into neo-epitope formation indicate that post-translational modification of islet auto-antigens, for example via deamidation, may be an important component of disease initiation or exacerbation. Indeed, deamid

  18. A Highly Expressed Human Protein, Apolipoprotein B-100, Serves as an Autoantigen in a Subgroup of Patients With Lyme Disease.

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    Crowley, Jameson T; Drouin, Elise E; Pianta, Annalisa; Strle, Klemen; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Steere, Allen C

    2015-12-01

    To discover novel autoantigens associated with Lyme arthritis (LA), we identified T-cell epitopes presented in vivo by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR molecules in patients' inflamed synovial tissue or joint fluid and tested each epitope for autoreactivity. Using this approach, we identified the highly expressed human protein, apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), as a target of T- and B-cell responses in a subgroup of LA patients. Additionally, the joint fluid of these patients had markedly elevated levels of apoB-100 protein, which may contribute to its autoantigenicity. In patients with antibiotic-refractory LA, the magnitude of apoB-100 antibody responses correlated with increased numbers of plasma cells in synovial tissue, greater numbers and activation of endothelial cells, and more synovial fibroblast proliferation. Thus, a subset of LA patients have high levels of apoB-100 in their joints and autoreactive T- and B-cell responses to the protein, which likely contributes to pathogenic autoimmunity in patients with antibiotic-refractory LA.

  19. Stem-loop structures of the repetitive DNA sequences located at human centromeres

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    Gupta, G.; Garcia, A.E.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Catasti, P.; Hong, Lin; Yau, P. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Chemistry; Bradbury, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Chemistry

    1993-09-01

    The presence of the highly conserved repetitive DNA sequences in the human centromeres argues for a special role of these sequences in their biological functions - most likely achieved by the formation of unusual structures. This prompted us to carry out quantitative one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (lD/2D NMR) spectroscopy to determine the structural properties of the human centromeric repeats, d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}. The studies on centromeric DNAs reveal that the complementary sequence, d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}, adopts the usual Watson-Crick B-DNA duplex and the pyrimidine-rich d(CCATT){sub n} strand is essentially a random coil. However, the purine-rich d(AATGG){sub n} strand is shown to adopt unusual stem-loop structures for repeat lengths, n=2,3,4, and 6. In addition to normal Watson-Crick A{center_dot}T pairs, the stem-loop structures are stabilized by mismatch A{center_dot}G and G{center_dot}G pairs in the stem and G-G-A stacking in the loop. Stem-loop structures of d(AATGG)n are independently verified by gel electrophoresis and nuclease digestion studies. Thermal melting studies show that the DNA repeats, d(AATGG){sub n}, are as stable as the corresponding Watson-Crick duplex d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}. Therefore, the sequence d(AATGG){sub n} can, indeed, nucleate a stem-loop structure at little free-energy cost and if, during mitosis, they are located on the chromosome surface they can provide specific recognition sites for kinetochore function.

  20. Centromeres of filamentous fungi

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    Smith, Kristina M.; Galazka, Jonathan M.; Phatale, Pallavi A.; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Freitag, Michael

    2012-01-01

    How centromeres are assembled and maintained remains one of the fundamental questions in cell biology. Over the past 20 years the idea of centromeres as precise genetic loci has been replaced by the realization that it is predominantly the protein complement that defines centromere localization and function. Thus, placement and maintenance of centromeres are excellent examples of epigenetic phenomena in the strict sense. In contrast, the highly derived “point centromeres” of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its close relatives are counterexamples for this general principle of centromere maintenance. While we have learned much in the past decade, it remains unclear if mechanisms for epigenetic centromere placement and maintenance are shared amongst various groups of organisms. For that reason it seems prudent to examine species from many different phylogenetic groups with the aim to extract comparative information that will yield a more complete picture of cell division in all eukaryotes. This review addresses what has been learned by studying the centromeres of filamentous fungi, a large, heterogeneous group of organisms that includes important plant, animal and human pathogens, saprobes and symbionts that fulfill essential roles in the biosphere, as well as a growing number of taxa that have become indispensable for industrial use. PMID:22752455

  1. Construction and expression of a humanized M2 autoantigen trimer and its application in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis

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    Xiao-Hua Jiang; Ren-Qian Zhong; Sheng-Qian Yu; Yin Hu; Weng-Weng Li; Xian-Tao Kong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct and express a humanized M2 autoantigen trimer designated as BPO and to apply it in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). METHODS: cDNA fragments encoding M2-reactive epitopes of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex Ez (PDCE2), branched chain 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complex E2 (BCOADC-E2) and 2-oxo-glutarate dehydrogenase complex E2 (OGDC-E2) were amplified with PCR using total RNA extracted from human peripheral mononuclear blood cells. The fragments were cloned into the plasmid vector pQE-30 and then transferred into E. coliM15 (pREP4) for expression, which was induced by isopropylthio-β-Dgalactoside. The expressed recombinant BPO protein was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE, Western-blotting and Immunoabsorption test, its antigenic reactivity and specificity were identified with seven M2-positive sera confirmed at Euroimmun Research Center (Germany).Using the purified BPO, M2 antibodies in sera from patients with PBC and other liver related diseases were detected with ELISA. RESULTS: The expressed BPO was observed with both antigenic reactivity and specificity of M2 autoantigens. The determination of M2 antibodies by BPO with ELISA was more sensitive than using the Euroimmun's kit with the coefficients of variation less than 10 % in both interassay and intraassay.With the newly established method, M2 antibodies were found in 100 % (20/20) of patients with PBC. Six cases of liver disease with unknown etiology and 1 patient with drug induced liver injury had detectable levels of serum M2antibodies. There were also 2 patients with autoimmune cholangitis and 1 with autoimmune hepatitis showing M2-antibody positive. CONCLUSION: Compared with the routine immunofluorescenoe assay and commercially available assay kit using porcine heart mitochondrial protein as the antigen, the detection system established in the present study shows higher sensitivity and specificity and may be used as a powerful tool for the diagnosis of PBC.

  2. Identification of novel mitosis regulators through data mining with human centromere/kinetochore proteins as group queries

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    Tipton Aaron R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins functioning in the same biological pathway tend to be transcriptionally co-regulated or form protein-protein interactions (PPI. Multiple spatially and temporally regulated events are coordinated during mitosis to achieve faithful chromosome segregation. The molecular players participating in mitosis regulation are still being unravelled experimentally or using in silico methods. Results An extensive literature review has led to a compilation of 196 human centromere/kinetochore proteins, all with experimental evidence supporting the subcellular localization. Sixty-four were designated as “core” centromere/kinetochore components based on peak expression and/or well-characterized functions during mitosis. By interrogating and integrating online resources, we have mined for genes/proteins that display transcriptional co-expression or PPI with the core centromere/kinetochore components. Top-ranked hubs in either co-expression or PPI network are not only enriched with known mitosis regulators, but also contain candidates whose mitotic functions are not yet established. Experimental validation found that KIAA1377 is a novel centrosomal protein that also associates with microtubules and midbody; while TRIP13 is a novel kinetochore protein and directly interacts with mitotic checkpoint silencing protein p31comet. Conclusions Transcriptional co-expression and PPI network analyses with known human centromere/kinetochore proteins as a query group help identify novel potential mitosis regulators.

  3. Characterization of human gene encoding SLA/LP autoantigen and its conserved homologs in mouse,fish,fly,and worm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Xia Wang; Andreas Teufel; Uta Cheruti; Joachim Gr(o)tzinger; Peter R Galle; Ansgar W Lohse; Johannes Herkel

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To approach the elusive function of the SLA/LP molecule, we have characterized genomic organization and conservation of the major antigenic and functional properties of the SLA/LP molecule in various species.METHODS: By means of computational biology, we have characterized the complete SLA/LP gene, mRNA and deduced protein sequences in man, mouse,zebrafish, fly, and worm.RESULTS: The human SLA/LP gene sequence of approximately 39 kb, which maps to chromosome 4p15.2, is organized in 11 exons, of which 10 or 11 are translated, depending on the splice variant. Homologous molecules were identified in several biological model organisms. The various homologous protein sequences showed a high degree of similarity or homology, notably at those residues that are of functional importance. The only domain of the human protein sequence that lacks significant homology with homologous sequences is the major antigenic epitope recognized by autoantibodies from autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) patients.CONCLUSION: The SLA/LP molecule and its functionally relevant residues have been highly conserved throughout the evoluti n, suggesting an indispensable function of the molecule. The finding that the only non-conserved domain is the dominant antigenic epitope of the human SLA/LP sequence, suggests that SLA/LP autoimmunity is autoantigen-driven rather than being driven by molecular mimicry.

  4. Transfection, overexpression and clinical application of human 60 kDa Ro/SSA autoantigens in HEp-2 cells

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    吕良敬; 陈顺乐; 顾越英; 沈南; 鲍春德; 王元; 薛峰; 叶萍; 俞翀曌

    2003-01-01

    Objective To develop an improved substrate for indirect immunofluorescence test (IIF) for detecting anti-Ro60/Sjogren's syndrome A (Ro/SSA) autoantibodies.Methods 60-kDa Ro/SSA autoantigens (Ro60) cDNAs were obtained from human placental cDNA library using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and were cloned into the mammalian expression vector-pEGFP-C1. Then, the recombinant plasmids were transfected into HEp-2 cells. We confirmed the overexpression, localization and antigenicity of fusion proteins in transfected cells by means of immunoblotting, confocal fluorescence microscopy and IIF. HEp-2 and HEp-Ro60 were analyzed by IIF using a panel of 10 precipitin-positive anti-Ro human sera simultaneously.Results Stable expression of Ro60-green fluorescent protein (Ro60-GFP) fusion proteins were maintained ten more generations. Ro60-GFP kept the antigenicity of Ro while demonstrating its own characteristic immunofluorescent pattern in HEp-Ro60 cells. The transfectants dramatically increased the sensitivity of IIF testing (a mean increase of 6.7-fold in endpoint titer). Eight overten (8/10) positive anti-Ro sera showed characteristic immunofluorescent patterns for HEp-Ro60, including two sera that were anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) negative for untransfected HEp-2. IIF-ANA in all healthy sera was negative for HEp-Ro60. Conclusions As a new substrate for IIF, the Ro60 transfectants can be used to detect anti-Ro antibodies. In addition, transfected HEp-2 cells keep the immunofluorescent properties of HEp-2 cells in IIF-ANA tests and can be employed as a substrate for routine IIF-ANA detection.

  5. The IL-8 release from cultured human keratinocytes, mediated by antibodies to bullous pemphigoid autoantigen 180, is inhibited by dapsone

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    Schmidt, E; Reimer, S; Kruse, N; Bröcker, E-B; Zillikens, D

    2001-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a subepidermal blistering disease associated with autoantibodies to the hemidesmosomal 180 kD BP autoantigen (BP180). However, the binding of autoantibodies to BP180 alone is not sufficient for blister formation in this disease and the infiltration of neutrophils into the skin is required. Dapsone and nicotinamide inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis and are used effectively in treating BP. IL-8 is a known chemoattractant for neutrophils and has been implicated in the inflammatory process of both human and experimental murine BP. We have recently shown that antibodies to BP180 mediate a dose and time-dependent release of IL-6 and IL-8 from cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). In the present study, we addressed the question whether dapsone or nicotinamide influence this cytokine release. We demonstrate that dapsone, but not nicotinamide, in its pharmacological range, inhibits the IL-8, but not the IL-6 release from NHEK, induced by anti-BP180 IgG, in a dose-dependent fashion as detected by ELISA. IL-8 mRNA levels, as determined by RT-PCR, were the same in cells treated with BP IgG alone compared to cells treated with BP IgG plus dapsone. This observation suggests that dapsone inhibits the BP IgG-induced IL-8 release from cultured NHEK by mechanisms at the post-transcriptional level. Our findings contribute to the understanding how dapsone leads to a reduced influx of neutrophils into BP lesions and, finally, to the cessation of blister formation in this disease. PMID:11359455

  6. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes: altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex.

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    van de Werken, C; Avo Santos, M; Laven, J S E; Eleveld, C; Fauser, B C J M; Lens, S M A; Baart, E B

    2015-10-01

    Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal phosphorylation dynamics of histone H2A at T120 (H2ApT120) by Bub1 kinase and subsequent recruitment of Shugoshin, but phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 3 (H3pT3) by Haspin failed to show the expected centromeric enrichment on metaphase chromosomes in the zygote. Human cleavage stage embryos show high levels of chromosomal instability. What causes this high error rate is unknown, as mechanisms used to ensure proper chromosome segregation in mammalian embryos are poorly described. In this study, we investigated the pathways regulating CPC targeting to the inner centromere in human embryos. We characterized the distribution of the CPC in relation to activity of its two main centromeric targeting pathways: the Bub1-H2ApT120-Sgo-CPC and Haspin-H3pT3-CPC pathways. The study was conducted between May 2012 and March 2014 on human surplus embryos resulting from in vitro fertilization treatment and donated for research. In zygotes, nuclear envelope breakdown was monitored by time-lapse imaging to allow timed incubations with specific inhibitors to arrest at prometaphase and metaphase, and to interfere with Haspin and Aurora B/C kinase activity. Functionality of the targeting pathways was assessed through characterization of histone phosphorylation dynamics by immunofluorescent analysis, combined with gene expression by RT-qPCR and immunofluorescent localization of key pathway proteins. Immunofluorescent analysis of the CPC subunit Inner Centromere Protein revealed the pool of stably bound CPC proteins was not strictly confined to the inner centromere of prometaphase chromosomes in human zygotes, as observed in later stages of preimplantation development and somatic cells. Investigation of the

  7. Centromere domain organization and histone modifications

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    P. Bjerling

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Centromere function requires the proper coordination of several subfunctions, such as kinetochore assembly, sister chromatid cohesion, binding of kinetochore microtubules, orientation of sister kinetochores to opposite spindle poles, and their movement towards the spindle poles. Centromere structure appears to be organized in different, separable domains in order to accomplish these functions. Despite the conserved nature of centromere functions, the molecular genetic definition of the DNA sequences that form a centromere in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and in humans has revealed little conservation at the level of centromere DNA sequences. Also at the protein level few centromere proteins are conserved in all of these four organisms and many are unique to the different organisms. The recent analysis of the centromere structure in the yeast S. pombe by electron microscopy and detailed immunofluorescence microscopy of Drosophila centromeres have brought to light striking similarities at the overall structural level between these centromeres and the human centromere. The structural organization of the centromere is generally multilayered with a heterochromatin domain and a central core/inner plate region, which harbors the outer plate structures of the kinetochore. It is becoming increasingly clear that the key factors for assembly and function of the centromere structure are the specialized histones and modified histones which are present in the centromeric heterochromatin and in the chromatin of the central core. Thus, despite the differences in the DNA sequences and the proteins that define a centromere, there is an overall structural similarity between centromeres in evolutionarily diverse eukaryotes.

  8. Different patterns of evolution in the centromeric and telomeric regions of group A and B haplotypes of the human killer cell Ig-like receptor locus.

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    Chul-Woo Pyo

    Full Text Available The fast evolving human KIR gene family encodes variable lymphocyte receptors specific for polymorphic HLA class I determinants. Nucleotide sequences for 24 representative human KIR haplotypes were determined. With three previously defined haplotypes, this gave a set of 12 group A and 15 group B haplotypes for assessment of KIR variation. The seven gene-content haplotypes are all combinations of four centromeric and two telomeric motifs. 2DL5, 2DS5 and 2DS3 can be present in centromeric and telomeric locations. With one exception, haplotypes having identical gene content differed in their combinations of KIR alleles. Sequence diversity varied between haplotype groups and between centromeric and telomeric halves of the KIR locus. The most variable A haplotype genes are in the telomeric half, whereas the most variable genes characterizing B haplotypes are in the centromeric half. Of the highly polymorphic genes, only the 3DL3 framework gene exhibits a similar diversity when carried by A and B haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates, point to the centromeric gene-content motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes having emerged ~6 million years ago, contemporaneously with the separation of human and chimpanzee ancestors. In contrast, the telomeric motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes emerged more recently, ~1.7 million years ago, before the emergence of Homo sapiens. Thus the centromeric and telomeric motifs that typify A and B haplotypes have likely been present throughout human evolution. The results suggest the common ancestor of A and B haplotypes combined a B-like centromeric region with an A-like telomeric region.

  9. Design of Chemical Conjugate for Targeted Therapy of Multiple Sclerosis Based of Constant Fragment of Human Antibody Heavy Chain and Peptoid Analog of Autoantigen MOG35-55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakin, Y A; Stepanov, A V; Balabashin, D S; Ponomarenko, N A; Smirnov, I V; Belogurov, A A

    2017-04-01

    Elimination of B cells producing autoantibodies to neuroantigens is considered as beneficial in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a significant autoantigen in multiple sclerosis. It was shown that MOG-like peptoid AMogP3 can bind autoantibodies produced by pathological lymphocytes. We propose a structure of an innovative drug for targeted elimination of the pool of autoreactive B cells responsible for multiple sclerosis pathogenesis; this compound is a complex of peptoid AMogP3 with Fc fragment of human immunoglobulin. The obtained Fc-PEG-AMogP3 conjugate effectively interact with autoreactive antibodies, which attests to their high therapeutic potential.

  10. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding the human Sm-D autoantigen

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    Rokeach, L.A.; Haselby, J.A.; Hoch, S.O. (Agouron Institute, La Jolla, CA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Antibodies to the Sm-D polypeptide antigen are closely associated with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Sm-D exists in the cell as one of the core proteins of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes implicated in RNA processing. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone, D45-2, coding for the Sm-D human nuclear antigen by screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The 1633-base-pair clone contains an open reading frame (ORF) 357 nucleotides long, capable of encoding a 13,282-dalton polypeptide. The Sm-D coding region is initiated at an AUG codon downstream from a sequence with excellent match to the consensus for the eukaryotic ribosome-binding site. The Sm-D ORF is preceded by a 150-nucleotide-long untranslated leader and followed by a 1126-nucleotide-long untranslated region containing four putative poly(A) signals. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals a (Gly-Arg){sub 9} repeated motif at the C terminus, which may constitute one of the Sm-D immunoreactive determinants. Moreover, this C terminus shows interesting features: (i) a good homology to protamines as expected for a nucleic acid binding protein and (ii) a striking similarity to a region in the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen.

  11. Functional analysis of phosphorylation of the mitotic centromere-associated kinesin by Aurora B kinase in human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Andreas; Sanhaji, Mourad; Friemel, Alexandra; Roth, Susanne; Rolle, Udo; Louwen, Frank; Yuan, Juping

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) is the best characterized member of the kinesin-13 family and plays important roles in microtubule dynamics during mitosis. Its activity and subcellular localization is tightly regulated by an orchestra of mitotic kinases, such as Aurora B. It is well known that serine 196 of MCAK is the major phosphorylation site of Aurora B in Xenopus leavis extracts and that this phosphorylation regulates its catalytic activity and subcellular localization. In the current study, we have addressed the conserved phosphorylation site serine 192 in human MCAK to characterize its function in more depth in human cancer cells. Our data confirm that S192 is the major phosphorylation site of Aurora B in human MCAK and that this phosphorylation has crucial roles in regulating its catalytic activity and localization at the kinetochore/centromere region in mitosis. Interfering with this phosphorylation leads to a delayed progression through prometa- and metaphase associated with mitotic defects in chromosome alignment and segregation. We show further that MCAK is involved in directional migration and invasion of tumor cells, and interestingly, interference with the S192 phosphorylation affects this capability of MCAK. These data provide the first molecular explanation for clinical observation, where an overexpression of MCAK was associated with lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis in gastric and colorectal cancer patients.

  12. A CENP-S/X complex assembles at the centromere in S and G2 phases of the human cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornblut, Carsten; Quinn, Nadine; Monajambashi, Shamci; Prendergast, Lisa; van Vuuren, Chelly; Münch, Sandra; Deng, Wen; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina; Hoischen, Christian; Diekmann, Stephan; Sullivan, Kevin F

    2014-02-12

    The functional identity of centromeres arises from a set of specific nucleoprotein particle subunits of the centromeric chromatin fibre. These include CENP-A and histone H3 nucleosomes and a novel nucleosome-like complex of CENPs -T, -W, -S and -X. Fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) revealed that human CENP-S and -X exist principally in complex in soluble form and retain proximity when assembled at centromeres. Conditional labelling experiments show that they both assemble de novo during S phase and G2, increasing approximately three- to fourfold in abundance at centromeres. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) measurements documented steady-state exchange between soluble and assembled pools, with CENP-X exchanging approximately 10 times faster than CENP-S (t1/2 ∼ 10 min versus 120 min). CENP-S binding to sites of DNA damage was quite distinct, with a FRAP half-time of approximately 160 s. Fluorescent two-hybrid analysis identified CENP-T as a uniquely strong CENP-S binding protein and this association was confirmed by FRET, revealing a centromere-bound complex containing CENP-S, CENP-X and CENP-T in proximity to histone H3 but not CENP-A. We propose that deposition of the CENP-T/W/S/X particle reveals a kinetochore-specific chromatin assembly pathway that functions to switch centromeric chromatin to a mitosis-competent state after DNA replication. Centromeres shuttle between CENP-A-rich, replication-competent and H3-CENP-T/W/S/X-rich mitosis-competent compositions in the cell cycle.

  13. Molecular and evolutionary characteristics of the fraction of human alpha satellite DNA associated with CENP-A at the centromeres of chromosomes 1, 5, 19, and 21

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    Roizès Gérard

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mode of evolution of the highly homogeneous Higher-Order-Repeat-containing alpha satellite arrays is still subject to discussion. This is also true of the CENP-A associated repeats where the centromere is formed. Results In this paper, we show that the molecular mechanisms by which these arrays evolve are identical in multiple chromosomes: i accumulation of crossovers that homogenise and expand the arrays into different domains and subdomains that are mostly unshared between homologues and ii sporadic mutations and conversion events that simultaneously differentiate them from one another. Individual arrays are affected by these mechanisms to different extents that presumably increase with time. Repeats associated with CENP-A, where the centromere is formed, are subjected to the same evolutionary mechanisms, but constitute minor subsets that exhibit subtle sequence differences from those of the bulk repeats. While the DNA sequence per se is not essential for centromere localisation along an array, it appears that certain sequences can be selected against. On chromosomes 1 and 19, which are more affected by the above evolutionary mechanisms than are chromosomes 21 and 5, CENP-A associated repeats were also recovered from a second homogeneous array present on each chromosome. This could be a way for chromosomes to sustain mitosis and meiosis when the normal centromere locus is ineluctably undermined by the above mechanisms. Conclusion We discuss, in light of these observations, possible scenarios for the normal evolutionary fates of human centromeric regions.

  14. Autoantigenic targets of B-cell receptors derived from chronic lymphocytic leukemias bind to and induce proliferation of leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Carsten; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Kemele, Maria; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Bühler, Andreas; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-06-06

    Antigenic targets of the B-cell receptor (BCR) derived from malignant cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) might play a role in the pathogenesis of this neoplasm. We screened human tissue-derived protein macroarrays with antigen-binding fragments derived from 47 consecutive cases of CLL. An autoantigenic target was identified for 12/47 (25.5%) of the cases, with 3 autoantigens being the target of the BCRs from 2 patients each. Recombinantly expressed autoantigens bound specifically to the CLL cells from which the BCR used for the identification of the respective autoantigen was derived. Moreover, binding of the autoantigen to the respective leukemic cells induced a specific activation and proliferation of these cells. In conclusion, autoantigens are frequent targets of CLL-BCRs. Their specific binding to and induction of proliferation in the respective leukemic cells provide the most convincing evidence to date for the long-time hypothesized role of autoantigens in the pathogenesis of CLL.

  15. Immunogenicity of autoantigens

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    Keller Andreas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoantibodies against self-antigens have been associated not only with autoimmune diseases, but also with cancer and are even found in healthy individuals. The mechanism causing the autoantibody response remains elusive for the majority of the immunogenic antigens. To deepen the understanding of autoantibody responses, we ask whether natural-occurring, autoimmunity-associated and tumor-associated antigens have structural or biological features related to the immune response. To this end, we have carried out the most comprehensive in-silicio study of different groups of autoantigens including large antigen sets identified by our groups combined with publicly available antigen sets. Results We found evidence for an enrichment of genes with a larger exon length increasing the probability of the occurrence of potential immunogenic features such as mutations, SNPs, immunogenic sequence patterns and structural epitopes, or alternative splicing events. While SNPs seem to play a more central role in autoimmunity, somatic mutations seem to be stronger enriched in tumor-associated antigens. In addition, antigens of autoimmune diseases are different from other antigen sets in that they appear preferentially secreted, have frequently an extracellular location, and they are enriched in pathways associated with the immune system. Furthermore, for autoantibodies in general, we found enrichment of sequence-based properties including coiled-coils motifs, ELR motifs, and Zinc finger DNA-binding motifs. Moreover, we found enrichment of proteins binding to proteins or nucleic acids including RNA and enrichment of proteins that are part of ribosome or spliceosome. Both, homologies to proteins of other species and an enrichment of ancient protein domains indicate that immunogenic proteins are evolutionary conserved and that mimicry might play a central role. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that proteins which i are evolutionary conserved

  16. Switching the centromeres on and off: epigenetic chromatin alterations provide plasticity in centromere activity stabilizing aberrant dicentric chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2013-12-01

    The kinetochore, which forms on a specific chromosomal locus called the centromere, mediates interactions between the chromosome and the spindle during mitosis and meiosis. Abnormal chromosome rearrangements and/or neocentromere formation can cause the presence of multiple centromeres on a single chromosome, which results in chromosome breakage or cell cycle arrest. Analyses of artificial dicentric chromosomes suggested that the activity of the centromere is regulated epigenetically; on some stably maintained dicentric chromosomes, one of the centromeres no longer functions as a platform for kinetochore formation, although the DNA sequence remains intact. Such epigenetic centromere inactivation occurs in cells of various eukaryotes harbouring 'regional centromeres', such as those of maize, fission yeast and humans, suggesting that the position of the active centromere is determined by epigenetic markers on a chromosome rather than the nucleotide sequence. Our recent findings in fission yeast revealed that epigenetic centromere inactivation consists of two steps: disassembly of the kinetochore initiates inactivation and subsequent heterochromatinization prevents revival of the inactivated centromere. Kinetochore disassembly followed by heterochromatinization is also observed in normal senescent human cells. Thus epigenetic centromere inactivation may not only stabilize abnormally generated dicentric chromosomes, but also be part of an intrinsic mechanism regulating cell proliferation.

  17. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups.

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    Stefania Piersanti

    Full Text Available Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2 are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR.

  18. Localization of two human autoantigen genes by PCR screening and in situ hybridization-glycyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 7p15 and Alanyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 16q22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.C.; Pai, S.I.; Liu, P. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Ge, Q.; Targoff, I.N. [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aminoacyl-RS) catalyze the attachment of an amino acid to its cognate tRNA. Five of 20 human aminoacyl-RS (histidyl-RS, threonyl-RS, isoleucyl-RS, glycyl-RS, and alanyl-RS) have been identified as targets of autoantibodies in the autoimmune disease polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM; 9). A sixth autoantigenic amino-acyl-RS, lysyl-RS, was recently reported. The genes for histidyl-RS and threonyl-RS have been assigned to chromosome 5, as have the genes for leucyl-RS and arginyl-RS. Six other aminoacyl-RS (glutamyl-prolyl-RS, valyl-RS, cysteinyl-RS, methionyl-RS, tryptophanyl-RS, and asparaginyl-RS) were assigned to chromosomes 1, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 18, respectively. The reason for a preponderance of aminoacyl-RS genes on chromosome 5 is unknown, but it has been suggested that regulatory relatedness might be a factor. Recently the entire or partial cDNA sequences for two autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS genes, glycyl-RS (gene symbol GARS; 4) and alanyl-RS (gene symbol AARS; 1), were reported. To understand further the genesis of autoimmune responses to aminoacyl-RS and to determine whether genes for autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS colocalize to chromosome 5, we have determined the chromosomal site of the GARS and AARS genes by PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid panels and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Identification of novel Drosophila centromere-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Teresa K; Schade, Georg O M; Schmidt, Andreas; Vetter, Irene; Wirth, Marc; Heun, Patrick; Thomae, Andreas W; Imhof, Axel

    2014-10-01

    Centromeres are chromosomal regions crucial for correct chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. They are epigenetically defined by centromeric proteins such as the centromere-specific histone H3-variant centromere protein A (CENP-A). In humans, 16 additional proteins have been described to be constitutively associated with centromeres throughout the cell cycle, known as the constitutive centromere-associated network (CCAN). In contrast, only one additional constitutive centromeric protein is known in Drosophila melanogaster (D.mel), the conserved CCAN member CENP-C. To gain further insights into D.mel centromere composition and biology, we analyzed affinity-purified chromatin prepared from D.mel cell lines expressing green fluorescent protein tagged histone three variants by MS. In addition to already-known centromeric proteins, we identified novel factors that were repeatedly enriched in affinity purification-MS experiments. We analyzed the cellular localization of selected candidates by immunocytochemistry and confirmed localization to the centromere and other genomic regions for ten factors. Furthermore, RNA interference mediated depletion of CG2051, CG14480, and hyperplastic discs, three of our strongest candidates, leads to elevated mitotic defects. Knockdowns of these candidates neither impair the localization of several known kinetochore proteins nor CENP-A(CID) loading, suggesting their involvement in alternative pathways that contribute to proper centromere function. In summary, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the proteomic composition of Drosophila centromeres. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000758 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000758).

  20. Centromere activity in dicentric small supernumerary marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Elisabeth; Yoda, Kinya; Hamid, Ahmed B; Weise, Anja; Manvelyan, Marina; Liehr, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    mechanisms similar or identical to meiotic imprinting in the centromeric regions of human chromosomes might be present. Furthermore, centromeric activation pattern could be at least in parts meaningful for the clinical outcome of dicentric sSMC, as sSMC stability and mosaicism can make the difference between clinically normal and abnormal phenotypes.

  1. Chromosomes. CENP-C reshapes and stabilizes CENP-A nucleosomes at the centromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Samantha J; Guo, Lucie Y; Sekulic, Nikolina; Smoak, Evan M; Mani, Tomoyasu; Logsdon, Glennis A; Gupta, Kushol; Jansen, Lars E T; Van Duyne, Gregory D; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Lampson, Michael A; Black, Ben E

    2015-05-01

    Inheritance of each chromosome depends upon its centromere. A histone H3 variant, centromere protein A (CENP-A), is essential for epigenetically marking centromere location. We find that CENP-A is quantitatively retained at the centromere upon which it is initially assembled. CENP-C binds to CENP-A nucleosomes and is a prime candidate to stabilize centromeric chromatin. Using purified components, we find that CENP-C reshapes the octameric histone core of CENP-A nucleosomes, rigidifies both surface and internal nucleosome structure, and modulates terminal DNA to match the loose wrap that is found on native CENP-A nucleosomes at functional human centromeres. Thus, CENP-C affects nucleosome shape and dynamics in a manner analogous to allosteric regulation of enzymes. CENP-C depletion leads to rapid removal of CENP-A from centromeres, indicating their collaboration in maintaining centromere identity.

  2. Assignment of two human autoantigen genes-isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 9q21 and lysyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 16q23-q24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.C.; Blinder, J.; Pai, S.I. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-15

    Protein synthesis is initiated by the attachment of amino acids to cognate tRNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). Five of twenty human aaRS (histidyl-RS, threonyl-RS, alanyl-RS, glycyl-RS, and isoleucyl-RS) have been identified as targets of autoantibodies in the autoimmune disease polymyositis/dermatomyositis. Autoantibodies to human lysyl-RS, a sixth autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS, were recently identified. The genes for histidyl-RS and threonyl-RS have been localized to chromosome 5, and we recently reported that the genes for alanyl-RS and glycyl-RS localize to chromosomes 16 and 7, respectively. To understand the genesis of autoimmune responses to aaRS better, we have used PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid panels and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to assign the genes for isoleucyl-RS and lysyl-RS. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Replication, checkpoint suppression and structure of centromeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Francesco; Falbo, Lucia; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    Human centromeres contain large amounts of repetitive DNA sequences known as α satellite DNA, which can be difficult to replicate and whose functional role is unclear. Recently, we have characterized protein composition, structural organization and checkpoint response to stalled replication forks of centromeric chromatin reconstituted in Xenopus laevis egg extract. We showed that centromeric DNA has high affinity for SMC2-4 subunits of condensins and for CENP-A, it is enriched for DNA repair factors and suppresses the ATR checkpoint to ensure its efficient replication. We also showed that centromeric chromatin forms condensins enriched and topologically constrained DNA loops, which likely contribute to the overall structure of the centromere. These findings have important implications on how chromosomes are organized and genome stability is maintained in mammalian cells.

  4. Neocentrics and holokinetics (holocentrics): chromosomes out of the centromeric rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, M; Cabral, G; Cuacos, M; González-García, M; González-Sánchez, M; Vega, J; Puertas, M J

    2010-07-01

    The centromere appears as a single constriction at mitotic metaphase in most eukaryotic chromosomes. Holokinetic chromosomes are the exception to this rule because they do not show any centromeric constrictions. Holokinetic chromosomes are usually forgotten in most reviews about centromeres, despite their presence in a number of animal and plant species. They are generally linked to very intriguing and unusual mechanisms of mitosis and meiosis. Holokinetic chromosomes differ from monocentric chromosomes not only in the extension of the kinetochore plate, but also in many other peculiar karyological features, which could be understood as the 'holokinetic syndrome' that is reviewed in detail. Together with holokinetic chromosomes we review neocentromeric activity, a similarly intriguing case of regions able to pull chromosomes towards the poles without showing the main components reported to be essential to centromeric function. A neocentromere is a chromosomal region different from the true centromere in structure, DNA sequence and location, but is able to lead chromosomes to the cell poles in special circumstances. Neocentromeres have been reported in plants and animals showing different features. Both in humans and Drosophila, neocentric activity appears in somatic cells with defective chromosomes lacking a functional centromere. In most cases in plants, neocentromeres appear in chromosomes which have normal centromeres, but are active only during meiosis. Because of examples such as spontaneous or induced neocentromeres and holokinetic chromosomes, it is becoming less surprising that different structures and DNA sequences of centromeres appear in evolution.

  5. Centromeres and kinetochores of Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermontova, Inna; Sandmann, Michael; Demidov, Dmitri

    2014-06-01

    The centromere-the primary constriction of monocentric chromosomes-is essential for correct segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. Centromeric DNA varies between different organisms in sequence composition and extension. The main components of centromeric and pericentromeric DNA of Brassicaceae species are centromeric satellite repeats. Centromeric DNA initiates assembly of the kinetochore, the large protein complex where the spindle fibers attach during nuclear division to pull sister chromatids apart. Kinetochore assembly is initiated by incorporation of the centromeric histone H3 cenH3 into centromeric nucleosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint acts during mitosis and meiosis at centromeres and maintains genome stability by preventing chromosome segregation before all kinetochores are correctly attached to microtubules. The function of the spindle assembly checkpoint in plants is still poorly understood. Here, we review recent advances of studies on structure and functional importance of centromeric DNA of Brassicaceae, assembly and function of cenH3 in Arabidopsis thaliana and characterization of core SAC proteins of A. thaliana in comparison with non-plant homologues.

  6. Dynamic epigenetic states of maize centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin eLiu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region identified as the major constriction, upon which the kinetochore complex is formed, ensuring accurate chromosome orientation and segregation during cell division. The rapid evolution of centromere DNA sequence and the conserved centromere function are two contradictory aspects of centromere biology. Indeed, the sole presence of genetic sequence is not sufficient for centromere formation. Various dicentric chromosomes with one inactive centromere have been recognized. It has also been found that de novo centromere formation is common on fragments in which centromeric DNA sequences are lost. Epigenetic factors play important roles in centromeric chromatin assembly and maintenance. Nondisjunction of the supernumerary B chromosome early prophase of meiosis I requires an active centromere. This review discusses recent studies in maize about genetic and epigenetic elements regulating formation and maintenance of centromere chromatin, as well as centromere behavior in meiosis.

  7. SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor Fun30 supports point centromere function in S. cerevisiae.

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    Mickaël Durand-Dubief

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Budding yeast centromeres are sequence-defined point centromeres and are, unlike in many other organisms, not embedded in heterochromatin. Here we show that Fun30, a poorly understood SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor conserved in humans, promotes point centromere function through the formation of correct chromatin architecture at centromeres. Our determination of the genome-wide binding and nucleosome positioning properties of Fun30 shows that this enzyme is consistently enriched over centromeres and that a majority of CENs show Fun30-dependent changes in flanking nucleosome position and/or CEN core micrococcal nuclease accessibility. Fun30 deletion leads to defects in histone variant Htz1 occupancy genome-wide, including at and around most centromeres. FUN30 genetically interacts with CSE4, coding for the centromere-specific variant of histone H3, and counteracts the detrimental effect of transcription through centromeres on chromosome segregation and suppresses transcriptional noise over centromere CEN3. Previous work has shown a requirement for fission yeast and mammalian homologs of Fun30 in heterochromatin assembly. As centromeres in budding yeast are not embedded in heterochromatin, our findings indicate a direct role of Fun30 in centromere chromatin by promoting correct chromatin architecture.

  8. Dicentric chromosomes: unique models to study centromere function and inactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaitlin M Stimpson; Matheny, Justyne E.; Sullivan, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are products of genome rearrangement that place two centromeres on the same chromosome. Depending on the organism, dicentric stability varies after formation. In humans, dicentrics occur naturally in a substantial portion of the population and usually segregate successfully in mitosis and meiosis. Their stability has been attributed to inactivation of one of the two centromeres, creating a functionally monocentric chromosome that can segregate normally during cell divisi...

  9. Validation of the micronucleus-centromere assay for biological dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcik A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The micronucleus assay is frequently used for purposes of biological dosimetry. Due to high interindividual variability in the spontaneous frequency of micronuclei, its sensitivity in the low dose region is poor. It has been suggested that this problem can be mitigated by selectively analyzing the frequency of those micronuclei which contain only acentric fragments. Using a pan-centromeric FISH probe we have studied the dose dependence of micronuclei with centromeres in peripheral lymphocytes of human donors. In contrast to previous publications, our approach is based on determining the relative frequency of micronuclei with and without centromeric signals. Our results confirm previous observations that in the low dose range of ionizing radiation, the micronucleus-centromere assay is more sensitive than the conventional micronucleus test.

  10. The mapping of the human 52-kD Ro/SSA autoantigen gene to human chromosome II, and its polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M.B.; Itoh, Kazuko (Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City (United States)); Fujisaku, Atsushi (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)); Pontarotti, P. (Centre de Recherches sur le Polymorphisme Genetique des Populations Humaines, Toulouse (France)); Mattei, M.G. (INSERM U 242, Marseille (France)); Neas, B.R. (Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City (United States) Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the ribonucleoprotein Ro/SSA occur in nearly half of the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and are associated with lymphopenia, photosensitive dermatitis, and pulmonary and renal disease, which suggests that they have an immunopathologic role. The majority of Ro/SSA precipitin-positive patients produce serum antibodies that bind to the 60-kD and 52-kD Ro/SSA proteins. The authors previously isolated and determined the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone that encodes the 52-kD form of the human Ro/SSA protein. In the present study, they have determined the chromosomal location of the gene by in situ hybridization to the end of the short arm of chromosome 11. Hybridization of portions of the cDNA probe to restriction enzyme-digested DNA indicated the gene is composed of at least three exons. The exon encoding the putative zinc fingers of this protein was found to be distinct from that which encodes the leucine zipper. An RFLP of this gene was identified and is associated with the presence of lupus, primarily in black Americans. 60 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. The nuclear lamina promotes telomere aggregation and centromere peripheral localization during senescence of human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raz, Vered; Vermolen, Bart J.; Garini, Yuval; Onderwater, Jos J.M.; Mommaas-Kienhuis, Mieke A.; Koster, Abraham J.; Young, Ian T.; Tanke, Hans; Dirks, Roeland W.

    2008-01-01

    Ex vivo, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) undergo spontaneous cellular senescence after a limited number of cell divisions. Intranuclear structures of the nuclear lamina were formed in senescent hMSCs, which are identified by the presence of Hayflick-senescence-associated factors. Notably, spati

  12. Retinal glycoprotein enrichment by concanavalin a enabled identification of novel membrane autoantigen synaptotagmin-1 in equine recurrent uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadzba, Margarete E; Hauck, Stefanie M; Naim, Hassan Y; Amann, Barbara; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2012-01-01

    Complete knowledge of autoantigen spectra is crucial for understanding pathomechanisms of autoimmune diseases like equine recurrent uveitis (ERU), a spontaneous model for human autoimmune uveitis. While several ERU autoantigens were identified previously, no membrane protein was found so far. As there is a great overlap between glycoproteins and membrane proteins, the aim of this study was to test whether pre-enrichment of retinal glycoproteins by ConA affinity is an effective tool to detect autoantigen candidates among membrane proteins. In 1D Western blots, the glycoprotein preparation allowed detection of IgG reactions to low abundant proteins in sera of ERU patients. Synaptotagmin-1, a Ca2+-sensing protein in synaptic vesicles, was identified as autoantigen candidate from the pre-enriched glycoprotein fraction by mass spectrometry and was validated as a highly prevalent autoantigen by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Analysis of Syt1 expression in retinas of ERU cases showed a downregulation in the majority of ERU affected retinas to 24%. Results pointed to a dysregulation of retinal neurotransmitter release in ERU. Identification of synaptotagmin-1, the first cell membrane associated autoantigen in this spontaneous autoimmune disease, demonstrated that examination of tissue fractions can lead to the discovery of previously undetected novel autoantigens. Further experiments will address its role in ERU pathology.

  13. Centromere architecture breakdown induced by the viral E3 ubiquitin ligase ICP0 protein of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Gross

    Full Text Available The viral E3 ubiquitin ligase ICP0 protein has the unique property to temporarily localize at interphase and mitotic centromeres early after infection of cells by the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1. As a consequence ICP0 induces the proteasomal degradation of several centromeric proteins (CENPs, namely CENP-A, the centromeric histone H3 variant, CENP-B and CENP-C. Following ICP0-induced centromere modification cells trigger a specific response to centromeres called interphase Centromere Damage Response (iCDR. The biological significance of the iCDR is unknown; so is the degree of centromere structural damage induced by ICP0. Interphase centromeres are complex structures made of proximal and distal protein layers closely associated to CENP-A-containing centromeric chromatin. Using several cell lines constitutively expressing GFP-tagged CENPs, we investigated the extent of the centromere destabilization induced by ICP0. We show that ICP0 provokes the disappearance from centromeres, and the proteasomal degradation of several CENPs from the NAC (CENP-A nucleosome associated and CAD (CENP-A Distal complexes. We then investigated the nucleosomal occupancy of the centromeric chromatin in ICP0-expressing cells by micrococcal nuclease (MNase digestion analysis. ICP0 expression either following infection or in cell lines constitutively expressing ICP0 provokes significant modifications of the centromeric chromatin structure resulting in higher MNase accessibility. Finally, using human artificial chromosomes (HACs, we established that ICP0-induced iCDR could also target exogenous centromeres. These results demonstrate that, in addition to the protein complexes, ICP0 also destabilizes the centromeric chromatin resulting in the complete breakdown of the centromere architecture, which consequently induces iCDR.

  14. A human homologue to the yeast omnipotent suppressor 45 maps 100 kb centromeric to HLA-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvel, B.; Dorval, I.; Fergelot, P. [CNRS, Faculte de Medecine, Rennes (France)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Idipathic hemochromatosis is a common autosomal recessive inherited disorder of iron metabolism. The molecular defect is unknown. However, the gene responsible for the disease (HFE) has been localized on the short arm of chromosome 6. It is closely linked to the HLA class I genes and possibly within a 350 kilobase (kb) region around the HLA-A locus. In order to identify candidate genes for hemochromatosis, we applied a cDNA selection technique to isolate transcribed sequences encoded on yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC). At first, we screened a cDNA library derived from normal human duodenal mucosa with the YAC B30 H3. This YAC contains a 320 kb DNA insert including the HLA-A gene and spanning 150 kb of the 350 kb zone where the hemochromatosis gene is in linkage disequilibrium with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. Preparation of the cDNA library of duodenal mucosa in Lambda Zap II phage and library screening with YAC B30 were carried out as previously described. In this way, we isolated seven non-HLA-A cDNAs corresponding to seven new genomic sequences. These potential genes were named hemochromatosis candidate gene (HCG) and numbered I to VII. The survey of all these cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences is in progress. In this work, we are especially interested in one of the seven non-HLA class I cDNA clones, named clone 58. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Rice Centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiming

    2010-02-04

    The centromere is the most characteristic landmark of eukaryotic chromosomes. Centromeres function as the site for kinetochore assembly and spindle attachment, allowing for the faithful pairing and segregation of sister chromatids during cell division. Characterization of centromeric DNA is not only essential to understand the structure and organization of plant genomes, but it is also a critical step in the development of plant artificial chromosomes. The centromeres of most model eukaryotic species, consist predominantly of long arrays of satellite DNA. Determining the precise DNA boundary of a centromere has proven to be a difficult task in multicellular eukaryotes. We have successfully cloned and sequenced the centromere of rice chromosome 8 (Cen8), representing the first fully sequenced centromere from any multicellular eukaryotes. The functional core of Cen8 spans ~800 kb of DNA, which was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody against the rice centromere-specific H3 histone. We discovered 16 actively transcribed genes distributed throughout the Cen8 region. In addition to Cen8, we have characterized eight additional rice centromeres using the next generation sequencing technology. We discovered four subfamilies of the CRR retrotransposon that is highly enriched in rice centromeres. CRR elements are constitutively transcribed and different CRR subfamilies are differentially processed by RNAi. These results suggest that different CRR subfamilies may play different roles in the RNAi-mediated pathway for formation and maintenance of centromeric chromatin.

  16. Organization and evolution of Gorilla centromeric DNA from old strategies to new approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catacchio, C R; Ragone, R; Chiatante, G; Ventura, M

    2015-09-21

    The centromere/kinetochore interaction is responsible for the pairing and segregation of replicated chromosomes in eukaryotes. Centromere DNA is portrayed as scarcely conserved, repetitive in nature, quickly evolving and protein-binding competent. Among primates, the major class of centromeric DNA is the pancentromeric α-satellite, made of arrays of 171 bp monomers, repeated in a head-to-tail pattern. α-satellite sequences can either form tandem heterogeneous monomeric arrays or assemble in higher-order repeats (HORs). Gorilla centromere DNA has barely been characterized, and data are mainly based on hybridizations of human alphoid sequences. We isolated and finely characterized gorilla α-satellite sequences and revealed relevant structure and chromosomal distribution similarities with other great apes as well as gorilla-specific features, such as the uniquely octameric structure of the suprachromosomal family-2 (SF2). We demonstrated for the first time the orthologous localization of alphoid suprachromosomal families-1 and -2 (SF1 and SF2) between human and gorilla in contrast to chimpanzee centromeres. Finally, the discovery of a new 189 bp monomer type in gorilla centromeres unravels clues to the role of the centromere protein B, paving the way to solve the significance of the centromere DNA's essential repetitive nature in association with its function and the peculiar evolution of the α-satellite sequence.

  17. The rapidly evolving centromere-specific histone has stringent functional requirements in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Kwong, Pak N; Menorca, Ron M G; Valencia, Joel T; Ramahi, Joseph S; Stewart, Jodi L; Tran, Robert K; Sundaresan, Venkatesan; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W-L

    2010-10-01

    Centromeres control chromosome inheritance in eukaryotes, yet their DNA structure and primary sequence are hypervariable. Most animals and plants have megabases of tandem repeats at their centromeres, unlike yeast with unique centromere sequences. Centromere function requires the centromere-specific histone CENH3 (CENP-A in human), which replaces histone H3 in centromeric nucleosomes. CENH3 evolves rapidly, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. A portion of the CENH3 histone-fold domain, the CENP-A targeting domain (CATD), has been previously shown to confer kinetochore localization and centromere function when swapped into human H3. Furthermore, CENP-A in human cells can be functionally replaced by CENH3 from distantly related organisms including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used cenh3-1 (a null mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana) to replace endogenous CENH3 with GFP-tagged variants. A H3.3 tail domain-CENH3 histone-fold domain chimera rescued viability of cenh3-1, but CENH3's lacking a tail domain were nonfunctional. In contrast to human results, H3 containing the A. thaliana CATD cannot complement cenh3-1. GFP-CENH3 from the sister species A. arenosa functionally replaces A. thaliana CENH3. GFP-CENH3 from the close relative Brassica rapa was targeted to centromeres, but did not complement cenh3-1, indicating that kinetochore localization and centromere function can be uncoupled. We conclude that CENH3 function in A. thaliana, an organism with large tandem repeat centromeres, has stringent requirements for functional complementation in mitosis.

  18. Dicentric chromosomes: unique models to study centromere function and inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M; Matheny, Justyne E; Sullivan, Beth A

    2012-07-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are products of genome rearrangement that place two centromeres on the same chromosome. Depending on the organism, dicentric stability varies after formation. In humans, dicentrics occur naturally in a substantial portion of the population and usually segregate successfully in mitosis and meiosis. Their stability has been attributed to inactivation of one of the two centromeres, creating a functionally monocentric chromosome that can segregate normally during cell division. The molecular basis for centromere inactivation is not well understood, although studies in model organisms and in humans suggest that genomic and epigenetic mechanisms can be involved. Furthermore, constitutional dicentric chromosomes ascertained in patients presumably represent the most stable chromosomes, so the spectrum of dicentric fates, if it exists, is not entirely clear. Studies of engineered or induced dicentrics in budding yeast and plants have provided significant insight into the fate of dicentric chromosomes. And, more recently, studies have shown that dicentrics in humans can also undergo multiple fates after formation. Here, we discuss current experimental evidence from various organisms that has deepened our understanding of dicentric behavior and the intriguingly complex process of centromere inactivation.

  19. Synaptonemal complex components persist at centromeres and are required for homologous centromere pairing in mouse spermatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Gaston Bisig

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in simple model organisms have shown that centromere pairing is important for ensuring high-fidelity meiotic chromosome segregation. However, this process and the mechanisms regulating it in higher eukaryotes are unknown. Here we present the first detailed study of meiotic centromere pairing in mouse spermatogenesis and link it with key events of the G2/metaphase I transition. In mouse we observed no evidence of the persistent coupling of centromeres that has been observed in several model organisms. We do however find that telomeres associate in non-homologous pairs or small groups in B type spermatogonia and pre-leptotene spermatocytes, and this association is disrupted by deletion of the synaptonemal complex component SYCP3. Intriguingly, we found that, in mid prophase, chromosome synapsis is not initiated at centromeres, and centromeric regions are the last to pair in the zygotene-pachytene transition. In late prophase, we first identified the proteins that reside at paired centromeres. We found that components of the central and lateral element and transverse filaments of the synaptonemal complex are retained at paired centromeres after disassembly of the synaptonemal complex along diplotene chromosome arms. The absence of SYCP1 prevents centromere pairing in knockout mouse spermatocytes. The localization dynamics of SYCP1 and SYCP3 suggest that they play different roles in promoting homologous centromere pairing. SYCP1 remains only at paired centromeres coincident with the time at which some kinetochore proteins begin loading at centromeres, consistent with a role in assembly of meiosis-specific kinetochores. After removal of SYCP1 from centromeres, SYCP3 then accumulates at paired centromeres where it may promote bi-orientation of homologous centromeres. We propose that, in addition to their roles as synaptonemal complex components, SYCP1 and SYCP3 act at the centromeres to promote the establishment and/or maintenance of

  20. Synaptonemal Complex Components Persist at Centromeres and Are Required for Homologous Centromere Pairing in Mouse Spermatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsova, Anna; Scherthan, Harry; Höög, Christer; Dawson, Dean S.; Pezza, Roberto J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in simple model organisms have shown that centromere pairing is important for ensuring high-fidelity meiotic chromosome segregation. However, this process and the mechanisms regulating it in higher eukaryotes are unknown. Here we present the first detailed study of meiotic centromere pairing in mouse spermatogenesis and link it with key events of the G2/metaphase I transition. In mouse we observed no evidence of the persistent coupling of centromeres that has been observed in several model organisms. We do however find that telomeres associate in non-homologous pairs or small groups in B type spermatogonia and pre-leptotene spermatocytes, and this association is disrupted by deletion of the synaptonemal complex component SYCP3. Intriguingly, we found that, in mid prophase, chromosome synapsis is not initiated at centromeres, and centromeric regions are the last to pair in the zygotene-pachytene transition. In late prophase, we first identified the proteins that reside at paired centromeres. We found that components of the central and lateral element and transverse filaments of the synaptonemal complex are retained at paired centromeres after disassembly of the synaptonemal complex along diplotene chromosome arms. The absence of SYCP1 prevents centromere pairing in knockout mouse spermatocytes. The localization dynamics of SYCP1 and SYCP3 suggest that they play different roles in promoting homologous centromere pairing. SYCP1 remains only at paired centromeres coincident with the time at which some kinetochore proteins begin loading at centromeres, consistent with a role in assembly of meiosis-specific kinetochores. After removal of SYCP1 from centromeres, SYCP3 then accumulates at paired centromeres where it may promote bi-orientation of homologous centromeres. We propose that, in addition to their roles as synaptonemal complex components, SYCP1 and SYCP3 act at the centromeres to promote the establishment and/or maintenance of centromere pairing and

  1. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina

    2010-01-01

    to genetic disabilities, including birth defects. The basis by which centromeric meiotic recombination is repressed has been largely unknown. We report here that, in fission yeast, RNAi functions and Clr4-Rik1 (histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase) are required for repression of centromeric recombination...

  2. Insights into centromeric transcription in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The major role of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is to generate mRNAs. I recently uncovered a novel function of RNAP II in chromosome segregation in mitosis, installing the cohesin protector, Shugoshin, at centromeres. Here I will discuss the current understanding of RNAP II-dependent centromeric transcription in mitosis.

  3. A Positive Twist to the Centromeric Nucleosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Ocampo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Centromeric nucleosomes are critical for chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle. In this issue of Cell Reports, Diaz-Ingelmo et al. (2015 propose that the yeast centromeric nucleosome is stabilized by a positively supercoiled loop formed by the sequence-specific CBF3 complex.

  4. Formation of functional CENP-B boxes at diverse locations in repeat units of centromeric DNA in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugou, Kazuto; Hirai, Hirohisa; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Koga, Akihiko

    2016-06-13

    Centromere protein B, which is involved in centromere formation, binds to centromeric repetitive DNA by recognizing a nucleotide motif called the CENP-B box. Humans have large numbers of CENP-B boxes in the centromeric repetitive DNA of their autosomes and X chromosome. The current understanding is that these CENP-B boxes are located at identical positions in the repeat units of centromeric DNA. Great apes also have CENP-B boxes in locations that are identical to humans. The purpose of the present study was to examine the location of CENP-B box in New World monkeys. We recently identified CENP-B box in one species of New World monkeys (marmosets). In this study, we found functional CENP-B boxes in CENP-A-assembled repeat units of centromeric DNA in 2 additional New World monkeys (squirrel monkeys and tamarins) by immunostaining and ChIP-qPCR analyses. The locations of the 3 CENP-B boxes in the repeat units differed from one another. The repeat unit size of centromeric DNA of New World monkeys (340-350 bp) is approximately twice that of humans and great apes (171 bp). This might be, associated with higher-order repeat structures of centromeric DNA, a factor for the observed variation in the CENP-B box location in New World monkeys.

  5. Chromatin ring formation at plant centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit eSchubert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We observed the formation of chromatin ring structures at centromeres of somatic rye and Arabidopsis chromosomes. To test whether this behavior is present also in other plant species and tissues we analyzed Arabidopsis, rye, wheat, Aegilops and barley centromeres during cell divisions and in interphase nuclei by immunostaining and FISH. Furthermore, structured illumination microscopy (super-resolution was applied to investigate the ultrastructure of centromere chromatin beyond the classical refraction limit of light. It became obvious, that a ring formation at centromeres may appear during mitosis, meiosis and in interphase nuclei in all species analyzed. However, varying centromere structures, as ring formations or globular organized chromatin fibers, were identified in different tissues of one and the same species. In addition, we found that a chromatin ring formation may also be caused by subtelomeric repeats in barley. Thus, we conclude that the formation of chromatin rings may appear in different plant species and tissues, but that it is not specific for centromere function. Based on our findings we established a model describing the ultrastructure of plant centromeres and discuss it in comparison to previous models proposed for animals and plants.

  6. Dicentric Chromosome Formation and Epigenetics of Centromere Formation in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shulan Fu; Zhi Gao; James Birchler; Fangpu Han

    2012-01-01

    Plant centromeres are generally composed of tandem arrays of simple repeats that form a complex chromosome locus where the kinetochore forms and microtubules attach during mitosis and meiosis.Each chromosome has one centromere region,which is essential for accurate division of the genetic material.Recently,chromosomes containing two centromere regions (called dicentric chromosomes)have been found in maize and wheat.Interestingly,some dicentric chromosomes are stable because only one centromere is active and the other one is inactivated.Because such arrays maintain their typical structure for both active and inactive centromeres,the specification of centromere activity has an epigenetic component independent of the DNA sequence.Under some circumstances,the inactive centromeres may recover centromere function,which is called centromere reactivation.Recent studies have highlighted the important changes,such as DNA methylation and histone modification,that occur during centromere inactivation and reactivation.

  7. Dicentric chromosome formation and epigenetics of centromere formation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shulan; Gao, Zhi; Birchler, James; Han, Fangpu

    2012-03-20

    Plant centromeres are generally composed of tandem arrays of simple repeats that form a complex chromosome locus where the kinetochore forms and microtubules attach during mitosis and meiosis. Each chromosome has one centromere region, which is essential for accurate division of the genetic material. Recently, chromosomes containing two centromere regions (called dicentric chromosomes) have been found in maize and wheat. Interestingly, some dicentric chromosomes are stable because only one centromere is active and the other one is inactivated. Because such arrays maintain their typical structure for both active and inactive centromeres, the specification of centromere activity has an epigenetic component independent of the DNA sequence. Under some circumstances, the inactive centromeres may recover centromere function, which is called centromere reactivation. Recent studies have highlighted the important changes, such as DNA methylation and histone modification, that occur during centromere inactivation and reactivation.

  8. Purification of pituitary autoantigen by column liquid chromatography and chromatofocusing

    OpenAIRE

    Gut, Paweł; Fischbach, Jakub; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Bączyk, Maciej; Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pituitary autoantibodies can be determined both in patients with pituitary disease as well as patients with autoimmune endocrine diseases. The purpose of the study was to isolate and purify pituitary autoantigen using sera of patients and the microsomal fraction of the pituitary. Material and methods To isolate a pituitary autoantigen, patient sera were used, which showed a strong immune response to pituitary antigens. Pituitary microsomal fractions were prepared from pituitary t...

  9. Identification of the novel autoantigen candidate Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha in isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyota, Atsushi; Iwama, Shintaro; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Takeuchi, Seiji; Takagi, Hiroshi; Iwata, Naoko; Nakashima, Kohtaro; Suzuki, Haruyuki; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kato, Takuya; Enomoto, Atsushi; Arima, Hiroshi; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency (IAD) is characterized by low or absent adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production. IAD is presumed to be caused in part by an autoimmune mechanism, and several lines of evidence have suggested the presence of anti-pituitary antibodies in IAD. However, the exact autoantigens remain unknown. The present study was designed to identify the autoantigen(s) in IAD using chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Rat anterior pituitary lysate was subjected to SDS-PAGE, and immunoblotting was performed using the sera from two patients with IAD and from a healthy subject. The bands detected by the patient serum samples, but not by the healthy subject sample, were excised, in-gel digested using trypsin, and subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis. On immunoblots, a 51-kDa band in the insoluble pellet was detected by the sera from the IAD patients but not from the healthy subject. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the 51-kDa band contained Rab guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) alpha. Consistent with the mass spectrometric analysis, a recombinant full-length human Rab GDI alpha was recognized by the two IAD patient samples but not by the healthy subject sample using immunoblotting. In total, anti-Rab GDI alpha antibodies were detected in serum samples from three of five patients with IAD (60%) but were absent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, Rab GDI alpha was expressed in the anterior pituitary. In conclusion, it appears that Rab GDI alpha is a candidate autoantigen involved in IAD, and that anti-Rab GDI alpha antibodies are present predominantly in patients with IAD.

  10. Atypical centromeres in plants – what they can tell us

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eCuacos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The centromere, visible as the primary constriction of condensed metaphase chromosomes, is a defined chromosomal locus essential for genome stability. It mediates transient assembly of a multi-protein complex, the kinetochore, which enables interaction with spindle fibers and thus faithful segregation of the genetic information during nuclear divisions. Centromeric DNA varies in extent and sequence composition among organisms, but a common feature of almost all active eukaryotic centromeres is the presence of the centromeric histone H3 variant cenH3 (a.k.a. CENP-A.These typical centromere features apply to most studied species. However, a number of species display atypical centromeres, such as holocentromeres (centromere extension along almost the entire chromatid length or neocentromeres (ectopic centromere activity.In this review, we provide an overview of different atypical centromere types found in plants including holocentromeres, de novo formed centromeres and terminal neocentromeres as well as di-, tri- and metapolycentromeres (more than one centromere per chromosomes. We discuss their specific and common features and compare them to centromere types found in other eukaryotic species. We also highlight new insights into centromere biology gained in plants with atypical centromeres such as distinct mechanisms to define a holocentromere, specific adaptations in species with holocentromeres during meiosis or various scenarios leading to neocentromere formation.

  11. Role of transcription at centromeres in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkuni, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Katsumi

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized chromosomal loci that are essential for proper chromosome segregation. Recent data show that a certain level of active transcription, regulated by transcription factors Cbf1 and Ste12, makes a direct contribution to centromere function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we discuss the requirement and function of transcription at centromeres.

  12. Transgenerational propagation and quantitative maintenance of paternal centromeres depends on Cid/Cenp-A presence in Drosophila sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitika Raychaudhuri

    Full Text Available In Drosophila melanogaster, as in many animal and plant species, centromere identity is specified epigenetically. In proliferating cells, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3, named Cid in Drosophila and Cenp-A in humans, is a crucial component of the epigenetic centromere mark. Hence, maintenance of the amount and chromosomal location of CenH3 during mitotic proliferation is important. Interestingly, CenH3 may have different roles during meiosis and the onset of embryogenesis. In gametes of Caenorhabditis elegans, and possibly in plants, centromere marking is independent of CenH3. Moreover, male gamete differentiation in animals often includes global nucleosome for protamine exchange that potentially could remove CenH3 nucleosomes. Here we demonstrate that the control of Cid loading during male meiosis is distinct from the regulation observed during the mitotic cycles of early embryogenesis. But Cid is present in mature sperm. After strong Cid depletion in sperm, paternal centromeres fail to integrate into the gonomeric spindle of the first mitosis, resulting in gynogenetic haploid embryos. Furthermore, after moderate depletion, paternal centromeres are unable to re-acquire normal Cid levels in the next generation. We conclude that Cid in sperm is an essential component of the epigenetic centromere mark on paternal chromosomes and it exerts quantitative control over centromeric Cid levels throughout development. Hence, the amount of Cid that is loaded during each cell cycle appears to be determined primarily by the preexisting centromeric Cid, with little flexibility for compensation of accidental losses.

  13. Genetic definition and sequence analysis of Arabidopsis centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, G P; Nickel, K; Kuromori, T; Benito, M I; Kaul, S; Lin, X; Bevan, M; Murphy, G; Harris, B; Parnell, L D; McCombie, W R; Martienssen, R A; Marra, M; Preuss, D

    1999-12-24

    High-precision genetic mapping was used to define the regions that contain centromere functions on each natural chromosome in Arabidopsis thaliana. These regions exhibited dramatic recombinational repression and contained complex DNA surrounding large arrays of 180-base pair repeats. Unexpectedly, the DNA within the centromeres was not merely structural but also encoded several expressed genes. The regions flanking the centromeres were densely populated by repetitive elements yet experienced normal levels of recombination. The genetically defined centromeres were well conserved among Arabidopsis ecotypes but displayed limited sequence homology between different chromosomes, excluding repetitive DNA. This investigation provides a platform for dissecting the role of individual sequences in centromeres in higher eukaryotes.

  14. Assembly of Drosophila centromeric nucleosomes requires CID dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiguo; Colmenares, Serafin U; Karpen, Gary H

    2012-01-27

    Centromeres are essential chromosomal regions required for kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation. The composition and organization of centromeric nucleosomes containing the essential histone H3 variant CENP-A (CID in Drosophila) is a fundamental, unresolved issue. Using immunoprecipitation of CID mononucleosomes and cysteine crosslinking, we demonstrate that centromeric nucleosomes contain CID dimers in vivo. Furthermore, CID dimerization and centromeric targeting require a residue implicated in formation of the four-helix bundle, which mediates intranucleosomal H3 dimerization and nucleosome integrity. Taken together, our findings suggest that CID nucleosomes are octameric in vivo and that CID dimerization is essential for correct centromere assembly.

  15. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role.

  16. Stretching the rules: monocentric chromosomes with multiple centromere domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice; Schroeder-Reiter, Elizabeth; Koblížková, Andrea; Steinbauerová, Veronika; Chocholová, Eva; Novák, Petr; Wanner, Gerhard; Macas, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is a functional chromosome domain that is essential for faithful chromosome segregation during cell division and that can be reliably identified by the presence of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CenH3. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is characterized by a single CenH3-containing region within a morphologically distinct primary constriction. This region usually spans up to a few Mbp composed mainly of centromere-specific satellite DNA common to all chromosomes of a given species. In holocentric chromosomes, there is no primary constriction; the centromere is composed of many CenH3 loci distributed along the entire length of a chromosome. Using correlative fluorescence light microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy, we show that pea (Pisum sativum) chromosomes exhibit remarkably long primary constrictions that contain 3-5 explicit CenH3-containing regions, a novelty in centromere organization. In addition, we estimate that the size of the chromosome segment delimited by two outermost domains varies between 69 Mbp and 107 Mbp, several factors larger than any known centromere length. These domains are almost entirely composed of repetitive DNA sequences belonging to 13 distinct families of satellite DNA and one family of centromeric retrotransposons, all of which are unevenly distributed among pea chromosomes. We present the centromeres of Pisum as novel "meta-polycentric" functional domains. Our results demonstrate that the organization and DNA composition of functional centromere domains can be far more complex than previously thought, do not require single repetitive elements, and do not require single centromere domains in order to segregate properly. Based on these findings, we propose Pisum as a useful model for investigation of centromere architecture and the still poorly understood role of repetitive DNA in centromere evolution, determination, and function.

  17. Evolution of Centromeric Retrotransposons in Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anupma; Presting, Gernot G.

    2014-01-01

    Centromeric retrotransposons (CRs) constitute a family of plant retroelements, some of which have the ability to target their insertion almost exclusively to the functional centromeres. Our exhaustive analysis of CR family members in four grass genomes revealed not only horizontal transfer (HT) of CR elements between the oryzoid and panicoid grass lineages but also their subsequent recombination with endogenous elements that in some cases created prolific recombinants in foxtail millet and sorghum. HT events are easily identifiable only in cases where host genome divergence significantly predates HT, thus documented HT events likely represent only a fraction of the total. If the more difficult to detect ancient HT events occurred at frequencies similar to those observable in present day grasses, the extant long terminal repeat retrotransposons represent the mosaic products of HT and recombination that are optimized for retrotransposition in their host genomes. This complicates not only phylogenetic analysis but also the establishment of a meaningful retrotransposon nomenclature, which we have nevertheless attempted to implement here. In contrast to the plant-centric naming convention used currently for CR elements, we classify elements primarily based on their phylogenetic relationships regardless of host plant, using the exhaustively studied maize elements assigned to six different subfamilies as a standard. The CR2 subfamily is the most widely distributed of the six CR subfamilies discovered in grass genomes to date and thus the most likely to play a functional role at grass centromeres. PMID:24814286

  18. Increased polyamines alter chromatin and stabilize autoantigens in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley H. Brooks

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines are small cations with unique combinations of charge and length that give them many putative interactions in cells. Polyamines are essential since they are involved in replication, transcription, translation, and stabilization of macro-molecular complexes. However, polyamine synthesis competes with cellular methylation for S-adenosylmethionine, the methyl donor. Also, polyamine degradation can generate reactive molecules like acrolein. Therefore, polyamine levels are tightly controlled. This control may be compromised in autoimmune diseases since elevated polyamine levels are seen in autoimmune diseases. Here a hypothesis is presented explaining how polyamines can stabilize autoantigens. In addition, the hypothesis explains how polyamines can inappropriately activate enzymes involved in NETosis, a process in which chromatin is modified and extruded from cells as extracellular traps that bind pathogens during an immune response. This polyamine-induced enzymatic activity can lead to an increase in NETosis resulting in release of autoantigenic material and tissue damage.

  19. Strong nucleosomes of A. thaliana concentrate in centromere regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Bilal; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Earlier identified strongest nucleosome DNA sequences of A. thaliana, those with visible 10-11 base sequence periodicity, are mapped along chromosomes. Resulting positional distributions reveal distinct maxima, one per chromosome, located in the centromere regions. Sequence-directed nucleosome mapping demonstrates that the strong nucleosomes (SNs) make tight arrays, several 'parallel' nucleosomes each, suggesting a columnar chromatin structure. The SNs represent a new class of centromeric nucleosomes, presumably, participating in synapsis of chromatids and securing the centromere architecture.

  20. Loss of pRB causes centromere dysfunction and chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Amity L; Longworth, Michelle S; Dyson, Nicholas J

    2010-07-01

    Chromosome instability (CIN) is a common feature of tumor cells. By monitoring chromosome segregation, we show that depletion of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) causes rates of missegregation comparable with those seen in CIN tumor cells. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor is frequently inactivated in human cancers and is best known for its regulation of the G1/S-phase transition. Recent studies have shown that pRB inactivation also slows mitotic progression and promotes aneuploidy, but reasons for these phenotypes are not well understood. Here we describe the underlying mitotic defects of pRB-deficient cells that cause chromosome missegregation. Analysis of mitotic cells reveals that pRB depletion compromises centromeric localization of CAP-D3/condensin II and chromosome cohesion, leading to an increase in intercentromeric distance and deformation of centromeric structure. These defects promote merotelic attachment, resulting in failure of chromosome congression and an increased propensity for lagging chromosomes following mitotic delay. While complete loss of centromere function or chromosome cohesion would have catastrophic consequences, these more moderate defects allow pRB-deficient cells to proliferate but undermine the fidelity of mitosis, leading to whole-chromosome gains and losses. These observations explain an important consequence of RB1 inactivation, and suggest that subtle defects in centromere function are a frequent source of merotely and CIN in cancer.

  1. Tension sensing by Aurora B kinase is independent of survivin-based centromere localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christopher S; Desai, Arshad

    2013-05-01

    Accurate segregation of the replicated genome requires chromosome biorientation on the spindle. Biorientation is ensured by Aurora B kinase (Ipl1), a member of the four-subunit chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). Localization of the CPC to the inner centromere is central to the current model for how tension ensures chromosome biorientation: kinetochore-spindle attachments that are not under tension remain close to the inner centromere and are destabilized by Aurora B phosphorylation, whereas kinetochores under tension are pulled away from the influence of Aurora B, stabilizing their microtubule attachments. Here we show that an engineered truncation of the Sli15 (known as INCENP in humans) subunit of budding yeast CPC that eliminates association with the inner centromere nevertheless supports proper chromosome segregation during both mitosis and meiosis. Truncated Sli15 suppresses the deletion phenotypes of the inner-centromere-targeting proteins survivin (Bir1), borealin (Nbl1), Bub1 and Sgo1 (ref. 6). Unlike wild-type Sli15, truncated Sli15 localizes to pre-anaphase spindle microtubules. Premature targeting of full-length Sli15 to microtubules by preventing Cdk1 (also known as Cdc28) phosphorylation also suppresses the inviability of Bir1 deletion. These results suggest that activation of Aurora B kinase by clustering either on chromatin or on microtubules is sufficient for chromosome biorientation.

  2. Centromere positions in chicken and Japanese quail chromosomes: de novo centromere formation versus pericentric inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlotina, A.; Galkina, S.; Krasikova, A.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.; Gaginskaya, E.; Deryusheva, S.

    2012-01-01

    Chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus, GGA) and Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica, CCO) karyotypes are very similar. They have identical chromosome number (2n = 78) and show a high degree of synteny. Centromere positions on the majority of orthologous chromosomes are different in these two spec

  3. Plant centromeric retrotransposons: a structural and cytogenetic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann Pavel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeric and pericentromeric regions of plant chromosomes are colonized by Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons, which, on the basis of their reverse transcriptase sequences, form the chromovirus CRM clade. Despite their potential importance for centromere evolution and function, they have remained poorly characterized. In this work, we aimed to carry out a comprehensive survey of CRM clade elements with an emphasis on their diversity, structure, chromosomal distribution and transcriptional activity. Results We have surveyed a set of 190 CRM elements belonging to 81 different retrotransposon families, derived from 33 host species and falling into 12 plant families. The sequences at the C-terminus of their integrases were unexpectedly heterogeneous, despite the understanding that they are responsible for targeting to the centromere. This variation allowed the division of the CRM clade into the three groups A, B and C, and the members of each differed considerably with respect to their chromosomal distribution. The differences in chromosomal distribution coincided with variation in the integrase C-terminus sequences possessing a putative targeting domain (PTD. A majority of the group A elements possess the CR motif and are concentrated in the centromeric region, while members of group C have the type II chromodomain and are dispersed throughout the genome. Although representatives of the group B lack a PTD of any type, they appeared to be localized preferentially in the centromeres of tested species. All tested elements were found to be transcriptionally active. Conclusions Comprehensive analysis of the CRM clade elements showed that genuinely centromeric retrotransposons represent only a fraction of the CRM clade (group A. These centromeric retrotransposons represent an active component of centromeres of a wide range of angiosperm species, implying that they play an important role in plant centromere evolution. In addition, their

  4. Centromeric DNA Facilitates Nonconventional Yeast Genetic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Meirong; Lopez-Garcia, Carmen Lorena; Wu, Yutong; Seetharam, Arun Somwarpet; Severin, Andrew Josef; Shao, Zengyi

    2017-08-18

    Many nonconventional yeast species have highly desirable features that are not possessed by model yeasts, despite that significant technology hurdles to effectively manipulate them lay in front. Scheffersomyces stipitis is one of the most important exemplary nonconventional yeasts in biorenewables industry, which has a high native xylose utilization capacity. Recent study suggested its much better potential than Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a well-suited microbial biomanufacturing platform for producing high-value compounds derived from shikimate pathway, many of which are associated with potent nutraceutical or pharmaceutical properties. However, the broad application of S. stipitis is hampered by the lack of stable episomal expression platforms and precise genome-editing tools. Here we report the success in pinpointing the centromeric DNA as the partitioning element to guarantee stable extra-chromosomal DNA segregation. The identified centromeric sequence not only stabilized episomal plasmid, enabled homogeneous gene expression, increased the titer of a commercially relevant compound by 3-fold, and also dramatically increased gene knockout efficiency from <1% to more than 80% with the expression of CRISPR components on the new stable plasmid. This study elucidated that establishment of a stable minichromosome-like expression platform is key to achieving functional modifications of nonconventional yeast species in order to expand the current collection of microbial factories.

  5. Purification of pituitary autoantigen by column liquid chromatography and chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Paweł; Fischbach, Jakub; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Bączyk, Maciej; Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary autoantibodies can be determined both in patients with pituitary disease as well as patients with autoimmune endocrine diseases. The purpose of the study was to isolate and purify pituitary autoantigen using sera of patients and the microsomal fraction of the pituitary. To isolate a pituitary autoantigen, patient sera were used, which showed a strong immune response to pituitary antigens. Pituitary microsomal fractions were prepared from pituitary tissue homogenates. In the study, sera of patients with pituitary disease, Addison and Graves' disease were used. The initial stages were carried out by affinity chromatography on CN -Br sepharose column whereas purification was continued by column liquid chromatography on AcA54 Ultrogel. Chromatofocusing was performed by Polybuffer exchanger PBE 94. (125)I-labeled pituitary antigens after isolation appeared in column chromatography in three peaks. The first peak contained 50-70 kDa proteins, the second peak - 17 to 22 kDa proteins and the third peak contains (125)-iodides. Three fractions obtained from filtration on Ultrogel were separated in a polyacrylamide gel. In the first peak two bands 67 and 55 kDa appeared. The second peak contained low molecular weight substances, and the third peak contained (125)I. The first peak from Ultrogel was isolated by chromatofocusing - the first peak with pH 5.9 and the second one with pH 4.9. Isolation and purification of pituitary autoantigen with the use of column liquid chromatography and chromatofocusing resulted in obtainment of two antigenic proteins of specific gravity of 67 and 55 kDa.

  6. Peroxiredoxin 2 is a novel autoantigen for anti-endothelial cell antibodies in systemic vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, R; Kurokawa, M S; Yudoh, K; Masuko, K; Ozaki, S; Kato, T

    2010-01-01

    Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) have been frequently detected in systemic vasculitis, which affects blood vessels of various sizes. To understand the pathogenic roles of AECA in systemic vasculitis, we attempted to identify target antigens for AECA comprehensively by a proteomic approach. Proteins extracted from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and Western blotting was subsequently conducted using sera from patients with systemic vasculitis. As a result, 53 autoantigenic protein spots for AECA were detected, nine of which were identified by mass spectrometry. One of the identified proteins was peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2), an anti-oxidant enzyme. Frequency of anti-Prx2 autoantibodies, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was significantly higher in systemic vasculitis (60%) compared to those in collagen diseases without clinical vasculitis (7%, P vasculitis and would be involved in the inflammatory processes of systemic vasculitis. PMID:20646000

  7. The structure of (CENP-A-H4)2 reveals physical features that mark centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekulic, Nikolina; Bassett, Emily A; Rogers, Danielle J; Black, Ben E [UPENN-MED

    2010-09-20

    Centromeres are specified epigenetically, and the histone H3 variant CENP-A is assembled into the chromatin of all active centromeres. Divergence from H3 raises the possibility that CENP-A generates unique chromatin features to mark physically centromere location. Here we report the crystal structure of a subnucleosomal heterotetramer, human (CENP-A-H4)2, that reveals three distinguishing properties encoded by the residues that comprise the CENP-A targeting domain (CATD; ref. 2): (1) a CENP-A-CENP-A interface that is substantially rotated relative to the H3-H3 interface; (2) a protruding loop L1 of the opposite charge as that on H3; and (3) strong hydrophobic contacts that rigidify the CENP-A-H4 interface. Residues involved in the CENP-A-CENP-A rotation are required for efficient incorporation into centromeric chromatin, indicating specificity for an unconventional nucleosome shape. DNA topological analysis indicates that CENP-A-containing nucleosomes are octameric with conventional left-handed DNA wrapping, in contrast to other recent proposals. Our results indicate that CENP-A marks centromere location by restructuring the nucleosome from within its folded histone core.

  8. An Innovative Method to Identify Autoantigens Expressed on the Endothelial Cell Surface: Serological Identification System for Autoantigens Using a Retroviral Vector and Flow Cytometry (SARF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Shirai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies against integral membrane proteins are usually pathogenic. Although anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECAs are considered to be critical, especially for vascular lesions in collagen diseases, most molecules identified as autoantigens for AECAs are localized within the cell and not expressed on the cell surface. For identification of autoantigens, proteomics and expression library analyses have been performed for many years with some success. To specifically target cell-surface molecules in identification of autoantigens, we constructed a serological identification system for autoantigens using a retroviral vector and flow cytometry (SARF. Here, we present an overview of recent research in AECAs and their target molecules and discuss the principle and the application of SARF. Using SARF, we successfully identified three different membrane proteins: fibronectin leucine-rich transmembrane protein 2 (FLRT2 from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 from a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, and Pk (Gb3/CD77 from an SLE patient with hemolytic anemia, as targets for AECAs. SARF is useful for specific identification of autoantigens expressed on the cell surface, and identification of such interactions of the cell-surface autoantigens and pathogenic autoantibodies may enable the development of more specific intervention strategies in autoimmune diseases.

  9. Recombination patterns reveal information about centromere location on linkage maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Morten T.; McKinney, Garrett J.; Seeb, Lisa W.

    2016-01-01

    , approximate centromere placement is possible by phasing the same data used to generate linkage maps. Assuming one obligate crossover per chromosome arm, information about centromere location can be revealed by tracking the accumulated recombination frequency along linkage groups, similar to half....... mykiss) characterized by low and unevenly distributed recombination – a general feature of male meiosis in many species. Further, a high frequency of double crossovers along chromosome arms in barley reduced resolution for locating centromeric regions on most linkage groups. Despite these limitations......, our method should work well for high‐density maps in species with strong recombination interference and will enrich many existing and future mapping resources....

  10. Evolutionary Origin of Higher-Order Repeat Structure in Alpha-Satellite DNA of Primate Centromeres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Yuriko; Terada, Shoko; Jahan, Israt; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-satellite DNA (AS) is a main DNA component of primate centromeres, consisting of tandemly repeated units of ∼170 bp. The AS of humans contains sequences organized into higher-order repeat (HOR) structures, in which a block of multiple repeat units forms a larger repeat unit and the larger units are repeated tandemly. The presence of HOR in AS is widely thought to be unique to hominids (family Hominidae; humans and great apes). Recently, we have identified an HOR-containing AS in the siamang, which is a small ape species belonging to the genus Symphalangus in the family Hylobatidae. This result supports the view that HOR in AS is an attribute of hominoids (superfamily Hominoidea) rather than hominids. A single example is, however, not sufficient for discussion of the evolutionary origin of HOR-containing AS. In the present study, we developed an efficient method for detecting signs of large-scale HOR and demonstrated HOR of AS in all the three other genera. Thus, AS organized into HOR occurs widely in hominoids. Our results indicate that (i) HOR-containing AS was present in the last common ancestor of hominoids or (ii) HOR-containing AS emerged independently in most or all basal branches of hominoids. We have also confirmed HOR occurrence in centromeric AS in the Hylobatidae family, which remained unclear in our previous study because of the existence of AS in subtelomeric regions, in addition to centromeres, of siamang chromosomes. PMID:24585002

  11. Ectopic Centromere Nucleation by CENP-A in Fission Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Marlyn; He, Haijin; Dong, Qianhua; Sun, Siyu; Li, Fei

    2014-01-01

    The centromere is a specific chromosomal locus that organizes the assembly of the kinetochore. It plays a fundamental role in accurate chromosome segregation. In most eukaryotic organisms, each chromosome contains a single centromere the position and function of which are epigenetically specified. Occasionally, centromeres form at ectopic loci, which can be detrimental to the cell. However, the mechanisms that protect the cell against ectopic centromeres (neocentromeres) remain poorly understood. Centromere protein-A (CENP-A), a centromere-specific histone 3 (H3) variant, is found in all centromeres and is indispensable for centromere function. Here we report that the overexpression of CENP-ACnp1 in fission yeast results in the assembly of CENP-ACnp1 at noncentromeric chromatin during mitosis and meiosis. The noncentromeric CENP-A preferentially assembles near heterochromatin and is capable of recruiting kinetochore components. Consistent with this, cells overexpressing CENP-ACnp1 exhibit severe chromosome missegregation and spindle microtubule disorganization. In addition, pulse induction of CENP-ACnp1 overexpression reveals that ectopic CENP-A chromatin can persist for multiple generations. Intriguingly, ectopic assembly of CENP-Acnp1 is suppressed by overexpression of histone H3 or H4. Finally, we demonstrate that deletion of the N-terminal domain of CENP-Acnp1 results in an increase in the number of ectopic CENP-A sites and provide evidence that the N-terminal domain of CENP-A prevents CENP-A assembly at ectopic loci via the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. These studies expand our current understanding of how noncentromeric chromatin is protected from mistakenly assembling CENP-A. PMID:25298518

  12. Tetrameric structure of centromeric nucleosomes in interphase Drosophila cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamini Dalal

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres, the specialized chromatin structures that are responsible for equal segregation of chromosomes at mitosis, are epigenetically maintained by a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3. However, the mechanistic basis for centromere maintenance is unknown. We investigated biochemical properties of CenH3 nucleosomes from Drosophila melanogaster cells. Cross-linking of CenH3 nucleosomes identifies heterotypic tetramers containing one copy of CenH3, H2A, H2B, and H4 each. Interphase CenH3 particles display a stable association of approximately 120 DNA base pairs. Purified centromeric nucleosomal arrays have typical "beads-on-a-string" appearance by electron microscopy but appear to resist condensation under physiological conditions. Atomic force microscopy reveals that native CenH3-containing nucleosomes are only half as high as canonical octameric nucleosomes are, confirming that the tetrameric structure detected by cross-linking comprises the entire interphase nucleosome particle. This demonstration of stable half-nucleosomes in vivo provides a possible basis for the instability of centromeric nucleosomes that are deposited in euchromatic regions, which might help maintain centromere identity.

  13. Composition and organization of active centromere sequences in complex genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Karen E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centromeres are sites of chromosomal spindle attachment during mitosis and meiosis. While the sequence basis for centromere identity remains a subject of considerable debate, one approach is to examine the genomic organization at these active sites that are correlated with epigenetic marks of centromere function. Results We have developed an approach to characterize both satellite and non-satellite centromeric sequences that are missing from current assemblies in complex genomes, using the dog genome as an example. Combining this genomic reference with an epigenetic dataset corresponding to sequences associated with the histone H3 variant centromere protein A (CENP-A, we identify active satellite sequence domains that appear to be both functionally and spatially distinct within the overall definition of satellite families. Conclusions These findings establish a genomic and epigenetic foundation for exploring the functional role of centromeric sequences in the previously sequenced dog genome and provide a model for similar studies within the context of less-characterized genomes.

  14. A lupus-like syndrome develops in mice lacking the Ro 60-kDa protein, a major lupus autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dahai; Shi, Hong; Smith, James D; Chen, Xinguo; Noe, Dennis A; Cedervall, Tommy; Yang, Derek D; Eynon, Elizabeth; Brash, Douglas E; Kashgarian, Michael; Flavell, Richard A; Wolin, Sandra L

    2003-06-24

    Antibodies against a conserved RNA-binding protein, the Ro 60-kDa autoantigen, occur in 24-60% of all patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Anti-Ro antibodies are correlated with photosensitivity and cutaneous lesions in these patients and with neonatal lupus, a syndrome in which mothers with anti-Ro antibodies give birth to children with complete congenital heart block and photosensitive skin lesions. In higher eukaryotes, the Ro protein binds small RNAs of unknown function known as Y RNAs. Because the Ro protein also binds misfolded 5S rRNA precursors, it is proposed to function in a quality-control pathway for ribosome biogenesis. Consistent with a role in the recognition or repair of intracellular damage, an orthologue of Ro in the radiation-resistant eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contributes to survival of this bacterium after UV irradiation. Here, we show that mice lacking the Ro protein develop an autoimmune syndrome characterized by anti-ribosome antibodies, anti-chromatin antibodies, and glomerulonephritis. Moreover, in one strain background, Ro-/- mice display increased sensitivity to irradiation with UV light. Thus, one function of this major human autoantigen may be to protect against autoantibody development, possibly by sequestering defective ribonucleoproteins from immune surveillance. Furthermore, the finding that mice lacking the Ro protein are photosensitive suggests that loss of Ro function could contribute to the photosensitivity associated with anti-Ro antibodies in humans.

  15. Centromere binding and a conserved role in chromosome stability for SUMO-dependent ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loes A L van de Pasch

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Slx5/8 complex is the founding member of a recently defined class of SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs. Slx5/8 has been implicated in genome stability and transcription, but the precise contribution is unclear. To characterise Slx5/8 function, we determined genome-wide changes in gene expression upon loss of either subunit. The majority of mRNA changes are part of a general stress response, also exhibited by mutants of other genome integrity pathways and therefore indicative of an indirect effect on transcription. Genome-wide binding analysis reveals a uniquely centromeric location for Slx5. Detailed phenotype analyses of slx5Δ and slx8Δ mutants show severe mitotic defects that include aneuploidy, spindle mispositioning, fish hooks and aberrant spindle kinetics. This is associated with accumulation of the PP2A regulatory subunit Rts1 at centromeres prior to entry into anaphase. Knockdown of the human STUbL orthologue RNF4 also results in chromosome segregation errors due to chromosome bridges. The study shows that STUbLs have a conserved role in maintenance of chromosome stability and links SUMO-dependent ubiquitination to a centromere-specific function during mitosis.

  16. Identification of a centromeric exchange of acrocentric chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.W.; Immken, L.; Curry, C.J.R. [UCSF, Fresno, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Exchanges of the peri-centromeric area of acrocentric chromosomes are difficult to identify using the conventional cytogenetic techniques. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) provides a new way for precisely identifying such rearrangements. Here we report a case of centromeric rearrangement in an amniotic fluid specimen with an extra marker chromosome. M.G., a 41-year-old G1, was referred for advanced maternal age. Chromosome studies revealed a 47,XX +mar karyotype. The marker appeared to be bi-satallited with a single C band. Chromosome studies from the parents were normal. The parents elected to terminate the pregnancy. Anatomical examination of the abortus revealed a very short neck, posteriorly rotated ears, high set cecum, absent hepatic lobation and low abdominal kidneys with short ureters. FISH studies with alpha-satellite probes of 13/21, 14/22, and 15, and the DiGeorge probe, indicated that there is a translocation of 21 alpha-satellite to the 22, and that the marker chromosome probably consists of 14/22 alpha-satellite material. FISH analysis of the parents chromosome revealed that father had the translocation of 21 alpha-satellite to the 22 as well. Exchanges of centromeric material among the acrocentric chromosomes may not be an uncommon event in humans. Although it probably has no clinical significance, it may result in non-disjunction or marker chromosome formation from an uncommon satellite association. With the use of FISH techniques, exchanges involving the centromeric regions of acrocentric chromosomes can be identified.

  17. Posttranslational modification of CENP-A influences the conformation of centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Aaron O; Panchenko, Tanya; Sathyan, Kizhakke M; Petkowski, Janusz J; Pai, Pei-Jing; Bai, Dina L; Russell, David H; Macara, Ian G; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Black, Ben E; Foltz, Daniel R

    2013-07-16

    Centromeres are chromosomal loci required for accurate segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis. The location of the centromere on the chromosome is not dependent on DNA sequence, but rather it is epigenetically specified by the histone H3 variant centromere protein A (CENP-A). The N-terminal tail of CENP-A is highly divergent from other H3 variants. Canonical histone N termini are hotspots of conserved posttranslational modification; however, no broadly conserved modifications of the vertebrate CENP-A tail have been previously observed. Here, we report three posttranslational modifications on human CENP-A N termini using high-resolution MS: trimethylation of Gly1 and phosphorylation of Ser16 and Ser18. Our results demonstrate that CENP-A is subjected to constitutive initiating methionine removal, similar to other H3 variants. The nascent N-terminal residue Gly1 becomes trimethylated on the α-amino group. We demonstrate that the N-terminal RCC1 methyltransferase is capable of modifying the CENP-A N terminus. Methylation occurs in the prenucleosomal form and marks the majority of CENP-A nucleosomes. Serine 16 and 18 become phosphorylated in prenucleosomal CENP-A and are phosphorylated on asynchronous and mitotic nucleosomal CENP-A and are important for chromosome segregation during mitosis. The double phosphorylation motif forms a salt-bridged secondary structure and causes CENP-A N-terminal tails to form intramolecular associations. Analytical ultracentrifugation of phospho-mimetic CENP-A nucleosome arrays demonstrates that phosphorylation results in greater intranucleosome associations and counteracts the hyperoligomerized state exhibited by unmodified CENP-A nucleosome arrays. Our studies have revealed that the major modifications on the N-terminal tail of CENP-A alter the physical properties of the chromatin fiber at the centromere.

  18. Multilocus analysis for gene-centromere mapping using first polar bodies and secondary oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da, Y.; Jarrell, V.L.; Wang, T.; Fernando, R.L.; Wheeler, M.B.; Lewin, H.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Polar body and oocyte typing is a new technique for gene-centromere mapping and for generating female linkage maps. A maximum likelihood approach is presented for ordering multiple markers relative to the centromere and for estimating recombination frequencies between markers and between the centromere and marker loci. Three marker-centromere orders are possible for each pair of markers: two orders when the centromere flanks the two markers and one order when the centromere is flanked by the two markers. For each possible order, the likelihood was expressed as a function of recombination frequencies for two adjacent intervals. LOD score for recombination frequency between markers or between the centromere and a marker locus was derived based on the likelihood for each gene-centromere order. The methods developed herein provide a general solution to the problem of multilocus gene-centromere mapping that involves all theoretical crossover possibilities, including four-strand double crossovers. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis of medullary breast carcinoma autoantigens in different histological types of breast carcinomas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kostianets, Olga; Antoniuk, Stepan; Filonenko, Valeriy; Kiyamova, Ramziya

    2012-01-01

    ... and treatment of this disease. In current study we analyzed six previously identified medullary breast carcinoma autoantigens including LGALS3BP, RAD50, FAM50A, RBPJ, PABPC4, LRRFIP1 with cancer restricted serological profile...

  20. Adaptive evolution of centromere proteins in plants and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henikoff Steven

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centromeres represent the last frontiers of plant and animal genomics. Although they perform a conserved function in chromosome segregation, centromeres are typically composed of repetitive satellite sequences that are rapidly evolving. The nucleosomes of centromeres are characterized by a special H3-like histone (CenH3, which evolves rapidly and adaptively in Drosophila and Arabidopsis. Most plant, animal and fungal centromeres also bind a large protein, centromere protein C (CENP-C, that is characterized by a single 24 amino-acid motif (CENPC motif. Results Whereas we find no evidence that mammalian CenH3 (CENP-A has been evolving adaptively, mammalian CENP-C proteins contain adaptively evolving regions that overlap with regions of DNA-binding activity. In plants we find that CENP-C proteins have complex duplicated regions, with conserved amino and carboxyl termini that are dissimilar in sequence to their counterparts in animals and fungi. Comparisons of Cenpc genes from Arabidopsis species and from grasses revealed multiple regions that are under positive selection, including duplicated exons in some grasses. In contrast to plants and animals, yeast CENP-C (Mif2p is under negative selection. Conclusions CENP-Cs in all plant and animal lineages examined have regions that are rapidly and adaptively evolving. To explain these remarkable evolutionary features for a single-copy gene that is needed at every mitosis, we propose that CENP-Cs, like some CenH3s, suppress meiotic drive of centromeres during female meiosis. This process can account for the rapid evolution and the complexity of centromeric DNA in plants and animals as compared to fungi.

  1. Combinations of siRNAs against La Autoantigen with NS5B or hVAP-A Have Additive Effect on Inhibition of HCV Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Anirban; Ganta, Krishna Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus is major cause of chronic liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Presently available direct-acting antiviral drugs have improved success rate; however, high cost limits their utilization, especially in developing countries like India. In the present study, we evaluated anti-HCV potential of several siRNAs targeted against the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B and cellular factors, La autoantigen, PSMA7, and human VAMP-associated protein to intercept different steps of viral life cycle. The target genes were downregulated individually as well as in combinations and their impact on viral replication was evaluated. Individual downregulation of La autoantigen, PSMA7, hVAP-A, and NS5B resulted in inhibition of HCV replication by about 67.2%, 50.7%, 39%, and 52%, respectively. However, antiviral effect was more pronounced when multiple genes were downregulated simultaneously. Combinations of siRNAs against La autoantigen with NS5B or hVAP-A resulted in greater inhibition in HCV replication. Our findings indicate that siRNA is a potential therapeutic tool for inhibiting HCV replication and simultaneously targeting multiple viral steps with the combination of siRNAs is more effective than silencing a single target. PMID:27446609

  2. No longer a nuisance: long non-coding RNAs join CENP-A in epigenetic centromere regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rošić, Silvana; Erhardt, Sylvia

    2016-04-01

    Centromeres represent the basis for kinetochore formation, and are essential for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Despite these essential roles, centromeres are not defined by specific DNA sequences, but by epigenetic means. The histone variant CENP-A controls centromere identity epigenetically and is essential for recruiting kinetochore components that attach the chromosomes to the mitotic spindle during mitosis. Recently, a new player in centromere regulation has emerged: long non-coding RNAs transcribed from repetitive regions of centromeric DNA function in regulating centromeres epigenetically. This review summarizes recent findings on the essential roles that transcription, pericentromeric transcripts, and centromere-derived RNAs play in centromere biology.

  3. Identification of novel autoantigens by a triangulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Tricia R; Hall, John C; Rosen, Antony; Casciola-Rosen, Livia

    2012-11-30

    High titer autoantibodies, which are often associated with specific clinical phenotypes, are useful diagnostically and prognostically in systemic autoimmune diseases. In several autoimmune rheumatic diseases (e.g. myositis and Sjogren's syndrome), 20-40% of patients are autoantibody negative as assessed by conventional assays. The recent discovery of new specificities (e.g., anti-MDA5) in a subset of these autoantibody-negative subjects demonstrates that additional specificities await identification. In this manuscript, we describe a rapid multidimensional method to identify new autoantigens. A central foundation of this rapid approach is the use of an antigen source in which a pathogenic pathway active in the disease is recapitulated. Additionally, the method involves a modified serological proteome analysis strategy which allows confirmation that the correct gel plug has been removed prior to sending for sequencing. Lastly, the approach uses multiple sources of information to enable rapid triangulation and identification of protein candidates. Possible permutations and underlying principles of this triangulation strategy are elaborated to demonstrate the broad utility of this approach for antigen discovery.

  4. Aberrant accumulation of the diabetes autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi membranes in conditions of ER stress and autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet beta cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in beta cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes GABA......, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary beta cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes....... The palmitoylated form has heightened immunogenicity, exhibiting increased uptake by antigen presenting cells and T cell stimulation compared to the non-palmitoylated form. Similar accumulation of GAD65 in Golgi membranes is observed in human beta cells in pancreatic sections from GAD65 autoantibody positive...

  5. The cotton centromere contains a Ty3-gypsy-like LTR retroelement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Luo

    Full Text Available The centromere is a repeat-rich structure essential for chromosome segregation; with the long-term aim of understanding centromere structure and function, we set out to identify cotton centromere sequences. To isolate centromere-associated sequences from cotton, (Gossypium hirsutum we surveyed tandem and dispersed repetitive DNA in the genus. Centromere-associated elements in other plants include tandem repeats and, in some cases, centromere-specific retroelements. Examination of cotton genomic survey sequences for tandem repeats yielded sequences that did not localize to the centromere. However, among the repetitive sequences we also identified a gypsy-like LTR retrotransposon (Centromere Retroelement Gossypium, CRG that localizes to the centromere region of all chromosomes in domestic upland cotton, Gossypium hirsutum, the major commercially grown cotton. The location of the functional centromere was confirmed by immunostaining with antiserum to the centromere-specific histone CENH3, which co-localizes with CRG hybridization on metaphase mitotic chromosomes. G. hirsutum is an allotetraploid composed of A and D genomes and CRG is also present in the centromere regions of other AD cotton species. Furthermore, FISH and genomic dot blot hybridization revealed that CRG is found in D-genome diploid cotton species, but not in A-genome diploid species, indicating that this retroelement may have invaded the A-genome centromeres during allopolyploid formation and amplified during evolutionary history. CRG is also found in other diploid Gossypium species, including B and E2 genome species, but not in the C, E1, F, and G genome species tested. Isolation of this centromere-specific retrotransposon from Gossypium provides a probe for further understanding of centromere structure, and a tool for future engineering of centromere mini-chromosomes in this important crop species.

  6. Three wise centromere functions: see no error, hear no break, speak no delay.

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Tomoyuki U; Clayton, Lesley; Natsume, Toyoaki

    2013-01-01

    The main function of the centromere is to promote kinetochore assembly for spindle microtubule attachment. Two additional functions of the centromere, however, are becoming increasingly clear: facilitation of robust sister-chromatid cohesion at pericentromeres and advancement of replication of centromeric regions. The combination of these three centromere functions ensures correct chromosome segregation during mitosis. Here, we review the mechanisms of the kinetochore–microtubule interaction,...

  7. Cis-acting determinants affecting centromere function, sister-chromatid cohesion and reciprocal recombination during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, D.D.; Hieter, P. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Shero, J.H. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Hegemann, J.H. [Justus Liebig Universitaet, Giessen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    We have employed a system that utilizes homologous pairs of human DNA-derived yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) as marker chromosomes to assess the specific role(s) of conserved centromere DNA elements (CDEI, CDEII, and CDEIII) in meiotic chromosome disjunction fidelity. Thirteen different centromere (CEN) mutations were tested for their effects on meiotic centromere function. YACs containing a wild-type CEN DNA sequence segregate with high fidelity in meiosis I (99% normal segregation) and in meiosis II (96% normal segregation). YACs containing a 31-bp deletion mutation in centromere DNA element II (CDEII{Delta}31) in either a heterocentric (mutant/wild type), homocentric (mutant/mutant) or monosomic (mutant/-) YAC pair configuration exhibited high levels (16-28%) of precocious sister-chromatid segregation (PSS) and increased levels (1-6%) of nondisjunction meiosis I (NDI). YACs containing this mutation also exhibit high levels (21%) of meiosis II nondisjunction. Interestingly, significant alterations in homolog recombination frequency were observed in the exceptional PSS class of tetrads, suggesting unusual interactions between prematurely separated sister chromatids and their homologous nonsister chromatids. We also have assessed the meiotic segregation effects of rare gene conversion events occurring at sites located immediately adjacent to or distantly from the centromere region. Proximal gene conversion events were associated with extremely high levels (60%) of meiosis I segregation errors (including both PSS and NDI), whereas distal events had no apparent effect. Taken together, our results indicate a critical role for CDEII in meiosis and underscore the importance of maintaining sister-chromatid cohesion for proper recombination in meiotic prophase and for proper disjunction in meiosis I. 49 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. β2-Glycoprotein I/HLA class II complexes are novel autoantigens in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Kenji; Jin, Hui; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Morikami, Satoko; Arase, Noriko; Kishida, Kazuki; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Kohyama, Masako; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Horita, Tetsuya; Takasugi, Kiyoshi; Ohmura, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Ken; Katayama, Ichiro; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Lanier, Lewis L; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Yamada, Hideto; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-04-30

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy complications. β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) complexed with phospholipid is recognized as a major target for autoantibodies in APS; however, less than half the patients with clinical manifestations of APS possess autoantibodies against the complexes. Therefore, the range of autoantigens involved in APS remains unclear. Recently, we found that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules transport misfolded cellular proteins to the cell surface via association with their peptide-binding grooves. Furthermore, immunoglobulin G heavy chain/HLA class II complexes were specific targets for autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we demonstrate that intact β2GPI, not peptide, forms a complex with HLA class II molecules. Strikingly, 100 (83.3%) of the 120 APS patients analyzed, including those whose antiphospholipid antibody titers were within normal range, possessed autoantibodies that recognize β2GPI/HLA class II complexes in the absence of phospholipids. In situ association between β2GPI and HLA class II was observed in placental tissues of APS patients but not in healthy controls. Furthermore, autoantibodies against β2GPI/HLA class II complexes mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity against cells expressing the complexes. These data suggest that β2GPI/HLA class II complexes are a target in APS that might be involved in the pathogenesis.

  9. MHC Class II Auto-antigen Processing and Presentation is Unconventional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheherazade eSadegh-Nasseri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Antigen presentation is highly critical in adoptive immunity. Only by interacting with antigens presented by MHC Class II molecules, can helper T cells be stimulated to fight infections or diseases. The degradation of a full protein into small peptide fragments bound to class II molecules is a dynamic, lengthy process consisting of many steps and chaperons. Deregulation in any step of antigen processing could lead to the development of self-reactive T cells or defective immune response to pathogens. Indeed Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA Class II genes are the predominant contributors to susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Conventional antigen processing calls for internalization of extracellular antigens followed by processing and epitope selection within antigen processing subcellular compartments, enriched with all necessary accessory molecules, processing enzymes, and proper pH and denaturing conditions. However, recent data examining the temporal relationship between antigen uptakes, processing and epitope selection revealed unexpected characteristics for autoantigenic epitopes, which was not shared with antigenic epitopes from pathogens. This review provides a discussion of the relevance of these findings to the mechanisms of autoimmunity.

  10. Recombination patterns reveal information about centromere location on linkage maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Morten T.; McKinney, Garrett J.; Seeb, Lisa W.

    2016-01-01

    . mykiss) characterized by low and unevenly distributed recombination – a general feature of male meiosis in many species. Further, a high frequency of double crossovers along chromosome arms in barley reduced resolution for locating centromeric regions on most linkage groups. Despite these limitations...

  11. SHUGOSHINs and PATRONUS protect meiotic centromere cohesion in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamariola, Linda; De Storme, Nico; Vannerum, Katrijn; Vandepoele, Klaas; Armstrong, Susan J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Geelen, Danny

    2014-03-01

    In meiosis, chromosome cohesion is maintained by the cohesin complex, which is released in a two-step manner. At meiosis I, the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit Rec8 is cleaved by the protease Separase along chromosome arms, allowing homologous chromosome segregation. Next, in meiosis II, cleavage of the remaining centromere cohesin results in separation of the sister chromatids. In eukaryotes, protection of centromeric cohesion in meiosis I is mediated by SHUGOSHINs (SGOs). The Arabidopsis genome contains two SGO homologs. Here we demonstrate that Atsgo1 mutants show a premature loss of cohesion of sister chromatid centromeres at anaphase I and that AtSGO2 partially rescues this loss of cohesion. In addition to SGOs, we characterize PATRONUS which is specifically required for the maintenance of cohesion of sister chromatid centromeres in meiosis II. In contrast to the Atsgo1 Atsgo2 double mutant, patronus T-DNA insertion mutants only display loss of sister chromatid cohesion after meiosis I, and additionally show disorganized spindles, resulting in defects in chromosome segregation in meiosis. This leads to reduced fertility and aneuploid offspring. Furthermore, we detect aneuploidy in sporophytic tissue, indicating a role for PATRONUS in chromosome segregation in somatic cells. Thus, ploidy stability is preserved in Arabidopsis by PATRONUS during both meiosis and mitosis.

  12. High-resolution mapping and transcriptional activity analysis of chicken centromere sequences on giant lampbrush chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikova, Alla; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Zlotina, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Exploration into morphofunctional organisation of centromere DNA sequences is important for understanding the mechanisms of kinetochore specification and assembly. In-depth epigenetic analysis of DNA fragments associated with centromeric nucleosome proteins has demonstrated unique features of centromere organisation in chicken karyotype: there are both mature centromeres, which comprise chromosome-specific homogeneous arrays of tandem repeats, and recently evolved primitive centromeres, which consist of non-tandemly organised DNA sequences. In this work, we describe the arrangement and transcriptional activity of chicken centromere repeats for Cen1, Cen2, Cen3, Cen4, Cen7, Cen8, and Cen11 and non-repetitive centromere sequences of chromosomes 5, 27, and Z using highly elongated lampbrush chromosomes, which are characteristic of the diplotene stage of oogenesis. The degree of chromatin packaging and fine spatial organisations of tandemly repetitive and non-tandemly repetitive centromeric sequences significantly differ at the lampbrush stage. Using DNA/RNA FISH, we have demonstrated that during the lampbrush stage, DNA sequences are transcribed within the centromere regions of chromosomes that lack centromere-specific tandem repeats. In contrast, chromosome-specific centromeric repeats Cen1, Cen2, Cen3, Cen4, Cen7, Cen8, and Cen11 do not demonstrate any transcriptional activity during the lampbrush stage. In addition, we found that CNM repeat cluster localises adjacent to non-repetitive centromeric sequences in chicken microchromosome 27 indicating that centromere region in this chromosome is repeat-rich. Cross-species FISH allowed localisation of the sequences homologous to centromeric DNA of chicken chromosomes 5 and 27 in centromere regions of quail orthologous chromosomes.

  13. Bacterial scaffold directs pole-specific centromere segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacin, Jerod L; Gahlmann, Andreas; Bowman, Grant R; Perez, Adam M; von Diezmann, Alexander R S; Eckart, Michael R; Moerner, W E; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-05-13

    Bacteria use partitioning systems based on the ParA ATPase to actively mobilize and spatially organize molecular cargoes throughout the cytoplasm. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses a ParA-based partitioning system to segregate newly replicated chromosomal centromeres to opposite cell poles. Here we demonstrate that the Caulobacter PopZ scaffold creates an organizing center at the cell pole that actively regulates polar centromere transport by the ParA partition system. As segregation proceeds, the ParB-bound centromere complex is moved by progressively disassembling ParA from a nucleoid-bound structure. Using superresolution microscopy, we show that released ParA is recruited directly to binding sites within a 3D ultrastructure composed of PopZ at the cell pole, whereas the ParB-centromere complex remains at the periphery of the PopZ structure. PopZ recruitment of ParA stimulates ParA to assemble on the nucleoid near the PopZ-proximal cell pole. We identify mutations in PopZ that allow scaffold assembly but specifically abrogate interactions with ParA and demonstrate that PopZ/ParA interactions are required for proper chromosome segregation in vivo. We propose that during segregation PopZ sequesters free ParA and induces target-proximal regeneration of ParA DNA binding activity to enforce processive and pole-directed centromere segregation, preventing segregation reversals. PopZ therefore functions as a polar hub complex at the cell pole to directly regulate the directionality and destination of transfer of the mitotic segregation machine.

  14. Three wise centromere functions: see no error, hear no break, speak no delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tomoyuki U; Clayton, Lesley; Natsume, Toyoaki

    2013-12-01

    The main function of the centromere is to promote kinetochore assembly for spindle microtubule attachment. Two additional functions of the centromere, however, are becoming increasingly clear: facilitation of robust sister-chromatid cohesion at pericentromeres and advancement of replication of centromeric regions. The combination of these three centromere functions ensures correct chromosome segregation during mitosis. Here, we review the mechanisms of the kinetochore-microtubule interaction, focusing on sister-kinetochore bi-orientation (or chromosome bi-orientation). We also discuss the biological importance of robust pericentromeric cohesion and early centromere replication, as well as the mechanisms orchestrating these two functions at the microtubule attachment site.

  15. Autoantigens produced in plants for oral tolerance therapy of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, S; Jevnikar, A M

    1999-01-01

    Oral administration of protein antigens can induce antigen-specific immune hyporesponsiveness and may be useful in treating autoimmune diseases or preventing transplant rejection. However, the therapeutic value of oral tolerance may be limited when candidate autoantigens cannot be produced by conventional system in quantities sufficient for clinical studies. Plants may be ideally suited for this purpose, as they can produce hugh quantities of functional mammalian proteins at extremely competitive cost. Furthermore, transgenic food plants could provide a simple and direct method of autoantigen delivery for oral tolerance. Here we show that the diabetes-associated autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is efficiently expressed in both tobacco and potato plants, and that mice, when fed with fresh transgenic potato tubers, are fully protected from diabetes.

  16. Major retinal autoantigens remain stably expressed during all stages of spontaneous uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeg, Cornelia A; Hauck, Stefanie M; Amann, Barbara; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Stangassinger, Manfred; Ueffing, Marius

    2007-07-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is a valuable model for autoimmune diseases, since it develops frequently and occurs spontaneously. We investigated the overall expression level of three major retinal autoantigens in normal retinas and various ERU stages. Analysis of retinal proteomes of both, healthy and diseased retinas revealed an almost unaffected expression of IRBP, S-antigen and cRALBP in ERU cases. Validation of these findings with western blots and immunohistochemistry confirmed constant to increased expression of these autoantigens, although loss of their physiological expression sites within retina is evident. In contrast to stable expression of autoantigens, rhodopsin, the major component of phototransduction in photoreceptors, disappeared from destructed retinas. These results explain persistent uveitic attacks even in severely damaged eyes and draw the attention to further investigations of biological pathways and regulations in autoimmune target tissues.

  17. A regulatory effect of INMAP on centromere proteins: antisense INMAP induces CENP-B variation and centromeric halo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Tan

    Full Text Available CENP-B is a highly conserved protein that facilitates the assembly of specific centromere structures both in interphase nuclei and on mitotic chromosomes. INMAP is a conserved protein that localizes at nucleus in interphase cells and at mitotic apparatus in mitotic cells. Our previous results showed that INMAP over-expression leads to spindle defects, mitotic arrest and formation of polycentrosomal and multinuclear cells, indicating that INMAP may modulate the function of (a key protein(s in mitotic apparatus. In this study, we demonstrate that INMAP interacts with CENP-B and promotes cleavage of the N-terminal DNA binding domain from CENP-B. The cleaved CENP-B cannot associate with centromeres and thus lose its centromere-related functions. Consistent with these results, CENP-B in INMAP knockdown cells becomes more diffused around kinetochores. Although INMAP knockdown cells do not exhibit gross defects in mitotic spindle formation, these cells go through mitosis, especially prophase and metaphase, with different relative timing, indicating subtle abnormality. These results identify INMAP as a model regulator of CENP-B and support the notion that INMAP regulates mitosis through modulating CENP-B-mediated centromere organization.

  18. A regulatory effect of INMAP on centromere proteins: antisense INMAP induces CENP-B variation and centromeric halo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tan; Chen, Zhe; Lei, Yan; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Qianjin

    2014-01-01

    CENP-B is a highly conserved protein that facilitates the assembly of specific centromere structures both in interphase nuclei and on mitotic chromosomes. INMAP is a conserved protein that localizes at nucleus in interphase cells and at mitotic apparatus in mitotic cells. Our previous results showed that INMAP over-expression leads to spindle defects, mitotic arrest and formation of polycentrosomal and multinuclear cells, indicating that INMAP may modulate the function of (a) key protein(s) in mitotic apparatus. In this study, we demonstrate that INMAP interacts with CENP-B and promotes cleavage of the N-terminal DNA binding domain from CENP-B. The cleaved CENP-B cannot associate with centromeres and thus lose its centromere-related functions. Consistent with these results, CENP-B in INMAP knockdown cells becomes more diffused around kinetochores. Although INMAP knockdown cells do not exhibit gross defects in mitotic spindle formation, these cells go through mitosis, especially prophase and metaphase, with different relative timing, indicating subtle abnormality. These results identify INMAP as a model regulator of CENP-B and support the notion that INMAP regulates mitosis through modulating CENP-B-mediated centromere organization.

  19. Total centromere size and genome size are strongly correlated in ten grass species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Dawe, R Kelly

    2012-05-01

    It has been known for decades that centromere size varies across species, but the factors involved in setting centromere boundaries are unknown. As a means to address this question, we estimated centromere sizes in ten species of the grass family including rice, maize, and wheat, which diverged 60~80 million years ago and vary by 40-fold in genome size. Measurements were made using a broadly reactive antibody to rice centromeric histone H3 (CENH3). In species-wide comparisons, we found a clear linear relationship between total centromere size and genome size. Species with large genomes and few chromosomes tend to have the largest centromeres (e.g., rye) while species with small genomes and many chromosomes have the smallest centromeres (e.g., rice). However, within a species, centromere size is surprisingly uniform. We present evidence from three oat-maize addition lines that support this claim, indicating that each of three maize centromeres propagated in oat are not measurably different from each other. In the context of previously published data, our results suggest that the apparent correlation between chromosome and centromere size is incidental to a larger trend that reflects genome size. Centromere size may be determined by a limiting component mechanism similar to that described for Caenorhabditis elegans centrosomes.

  20. Identification of immunodominant autoantigens in rat autoimmune orchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijak, Monika; Iosub, Radu; Schneider, Eva; Linder, Monika; Respondek, Kathrin; Klug, Jörg; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2005-10-01

    Infection and inflammation of the genital tract are amongst the leading causes of male infertility. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in the rat serves as a model for the investigation of inflammatory testicular impairment. In this study, experiments were conducted to identify the molecules that are responsible for eliciting the autoimmune attack on the testis. EAO was induced in in-bred Wistar rats by active immunization with testis homogenates (EAO group I). Development of disease was observed using histological techniques and a new non-invasive three-dimensional (3D) imaging technology for in vivo monitoring, termed flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpvCT). Examination of control and EAO testes demonstrated the superior image quality of high-resolution fpvCT. A proteomics approach using 2D SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis with EAO sera identified 12 spots. Seven were subsequently identified by mass spectrometry as heat shock proteins 60 (Hsp60) and 70 (Hsp70), disulphide isomerase ER-60, alpha-1-anti-trypsin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (hnRNP H1), sperm outer dense fibre major protein 2 (ODF-2), and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. Hsp70, ODF-2, hnRNP H1, and ER-60 were identified by all EAO sera studied. To test the capacity of the identified proteins to elicit testicular autoimmune disease, recombinant proteins were used either individually or in combination to immunize rats (EAO group II). In all groups, the incidence of EAO was 25%. Inflammatory-type (ED1+) and resident (ED2+) macrophages, lymphocytes (CD45RA+), and dendritic cells (Ox-62+) were strongly increased in EAO group II animals, comparable to the testes of EAO I rats. Pre-immunization with a low dose of recombinant Hsp 70, hnRNP H1 or ODF-2 before induction of EAO with testis homogenate significantly delayed the onset of EAO but could not prevent disease. The identification of testicular autoantigens will allow a better understanding of disease pathogenesis and could

  1. Uncoupling of satellite DNA and centromeric function in the genus Equus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca M Piras

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we showed that centromere repositioning, that is the shift along the chromosome of the centromeric function without DNA sequence rearrangement, has occurred frequently during the evolution of the genus Equus. In this work, the analysis of the chromosomal distribution of satellite tandem repeats in Equus caballus, E. asinus, E. grevyi, and E. burchelli highlighted two atypical features: 1 several centromeres, including the previously described evolutionary new centromeres (ENCs, seem to be devoid of satellite DNA, and 2 satellite repeats are often present at non-centromeric termini, probably corresponding to relics of ancestral now inactive centromeres. Immuno-FISH experiments using satellite DNA and antibodies against the kinetochore protein CENP-A demonstrated that satellite-less primary constrictions are actually endowed with centromeric function. The phylogenetic reconstruction of centromere repositioning events demonstrates that the acquisition of satellite DNA occurs after the formation of the centromere during evolution and that centromeres can function over millions of years and many generations without detectable satellite DNA. The rapidly evolving Equus species gave us the opportunity to identify different intermediate steps along the full maturation of ENCs.

  2. Epigenetically-inherited centromere and neocentromere DNA replicates earliest in S-phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Koren

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic centromeres are maintained at specific chromosomal sites over many generations. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, centromeres are genetic elements defined by a DNA sequence that is both necessary and sufficient for function; whereas, in most other eukaryotes, centromeres are maintained by poorly characterized epigenetic mechanisms in which DNA has a less definitive role. Here we use the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans as a model organism to study the DNA replication properties of centromeric DNA. By determining the genome-wide replication timing program of the C. albicans genome, we discovered that each centromere is associated with a replication origin that is the first to fire on its respective chromosome. Importantly, epigenetic formation of new ectopic centromeres (neocentromeres was accompanied by shifts in replication timing, such that a neocentromere became the first to replicate and became associated with origin recognition complex (ORC components. Furthermore, changing the level of the centromere-specific histone H3 isoform led to a concomitant change in levels of ORC association with centromere regions, further supporting the idea that centromere proteins determine origin activity. Finally, analysis of centromere-associated DNA revealed a replication-dependent sequence pattern characteristic of constitutively active replication origins. This strand-biased pattern is conserved, together with centromere position, among related strains and species, in a manner independent of primary DNA sequence. Thus, inheritance of centromere position is correlated with a constitutively active origin of replication that fires at a distinct early time. We suggest a model in which the distinct timing of DNA replication serves as an epigenetic mechanism for the inheritance of centromere position.

  3. Abnormal centromere-chromatid apposition (ACCA) and Peters' anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertelecki, W; Dev, V G; Superneau, D W

    1985-08-01

    Abnormal centromere-chromatid apposition (ACCA) was noted in a patient with Peters' anomaly. Previous reports of ACCA emphasized its association with tetraphocomelia and other congenital malformations (Roberts, SC Phocomelia, Pseudothalidomide Syndromes). This report expands the array of congenital malformations associated with ACCA and emphasizes the diagnostic importance of ocular defects for the ascertainment of additional cases of ACCA and its possible relationship with abnormal cell division.

  4. The chromosomal passenger complex activates Polo kinase at centromeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Carmena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The coordinated activities at centromeres of two key cell cycle kinases, Polo and Aurora B, are critical for ensuring that the two sister kinetochores of each chromosome are attached to microtubules from opposite spindle poles prior to chromosome segregation at anaphase. Initial attachments of chromosomes to the spindle involve random interactions between kinetochores and dynamic microtubules, and errors occur frequently during early stages of the process. The balance between microtubule binding and error correction (e.g., release of bound microtubules requires the activities of Polo and Aurora B kinases, with Polo promoting stable attachments and Aurora B promoting detachment. Our study concerns the coordination of the activities of these two kinases in vivo. We show that INCENP, a key scaffolding subunit of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC, which consists of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin, and Borealin/Dasra B, also interacts with Polo kinase in Drosophila cells. It was known that Aurora A/Bora activates Polo at centrosomes during late G2. However, the kinase that activates Polo on chromosomes for its critical functions at kinetochores was not known. We show here that Aurora B kinase phosphorylates Polo on its activation loop at the centromere in early mitosis. This phosphorylation requires both INCENP and Aurora B activity (but not Aurora A activity and is critical for Polo function at kinetochores. Our results demonstrate clearly that Polo kinase is regulated differently at centrosomes and centromeres and suggest that INCENP acts as a platform for kinase crosstalk at the centromere. This crosstalk may enable Polo and Aurora B to achieve a balance wherein microtubule mis-attachments are corrected, but proper attachments are stabilized allowing proper chromosome segregation.

  5. The chromosomal passenger complex activates Polo kinase at centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmena, Mar; Pinson, Xavier; Platani, Melpi; Salloum, Zeina; Xu, Zhenjie; Clark, Anthony; Macisaac, Fiona; Ogawa, Hiromi; Eggert, Ulrike; Glover, David M; Archambault, Vincent; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-01-01

    The coordinated activities at centromeres of two key cell cycle kinases, Polo and Aurora B, are critical for ensuring that the two sister kinetochores of each chromosome are attached to microtubules from opposite spindle poles prior to chromosome segregation at anaphase. Initial attachments of chromosomes to the spindle involve random interactions between kinetochores and dynamic microtubules, and errors occur frequently during early stages of the process. The balance between microtubule binding and error correction (e.g., release of bound microtubules) requires the activities of Polo and Aurora B kinases, with Polo promoting stable attachments and Aurora B promoting detachment. Our study concerns the coordination of the activities of these two kinases in vivo. We show that INCENP, a key scaffolding subunit of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), which consists of Aurora B kinase, INCENP, Survivin, and Borealin/Dasra B, also interacts with Polo kinase in Drosophila cells. It was known that Aurora A/Bora activates Polo at centrosomes during late G2. However, the kinase that activates Polo on chromosomes for its critical functions at kinetochores was not known. We show here that Aurora B kinase phosphorylates Polo on its activation loop at the centromere in early mitosis. This phosphorylation requires both INCENP and Aurora B activity (but not Aurora A activity) and is critical for Polo function at kinetochores. Our results demonstrate clearly that Polo kinase is regulated differently at centrosomes and centromeres and suggest that INCENP acts as a platform for kinase crosstalk at the centromere. This crosstalk may enable Polo and Aurora B to achieve a balance wherein microtubule mis-attachments are corrected, but proper attachments are stabilized allowing proper chromosome segregation.

  6. Organization and evolution of primate centromeric DNA from whole-genome shotgun sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Alkan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The major DNA constituent of primate centromeres is alpha satellite DNA. As much as 2%-5% of sequence generated as part of primate genome sequencing projects consists of this material, which is fragmented or not assembled as part of published genome sequences due to its highly repetitive nature. Here, we develop computational methods to rapidly recover and categorize alpha-satellite sequences from previously uncharacterized whole-genome shotgun sequence data. We present an algorithm to computationally predict potential higher-order array structure based on paired-end sequence data and then experimentally validate its organization and distribution by experimental analyses. Using whole-genome shotgun data from the human, chimpanzee, and macaque genomes, we examine the phylogenetic relationship of these sequences and provide further support for a model for their evolution and mutation over the last 25 million years. Our results confirm fundamental differences in the dispersal and evolution of centromeric satellites in the Old World monkey and ape lineages of evolution.

  7. Epiplakin Is a Paraneoplastic Pemphigus Autoantigen and Related to Bronchiolitis Obliterans in Japanese Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Numata, Sanae; Teye, Kwesi; Natsuaki, Yohei; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Takeda, Yoshito; Wang, Wenqing; Ishikawa, Kazushi; Goto, Mizuki; Koga, Hiroshi; Sogame, Ryosuke; Ishii, Norito; Takamori, Shinzo; Hoshino, Tomoaki; Brandt, Oliver; Pas, Hendri H.; Fujiwara, Sakuhei; Hashimoto, Takashi

    All plakin family proteins are known to be autoantigens in paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP). In this study, we first examined whether PNP sera also react with epiplakin, another plakin protein, by various immunological methods using 48 Japanese PNP sera. Immunofluorescence confirmed that cultured

  8. Molecular characterization of flow-sorted mammalian centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamkalo, B.A.; Henschen, A.; Parseghian, M.H. [Univ. of Calfornia, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry] [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project involved experiments directed towards developing a molecular characterization of the centromere region of mammalian chromosomes. Attempts to purify this essential chromosomal locus by conventional methods have thus far been unsuccessful. However, preliminary data obtained in collaboration with the National Flow Cytometry Resource (NFCR) showed that it is possible to purify a chromosome fragment that is present in certain cultured mouse cell lines and has all the properties expected of an intact centromere region. To begin sorting this minichromosome for the identification of proteins preferentially associated with centromere regions, standard buffers utilized in chromosome sorting were evaluated for potential effects on maintenance of chromosomal proteins during sorting. The data indicate that the presence of several buffer constituents results in the extraction of all but a few chromosomal proteins. The subsequent use of a magnesium sulfate buffer resulted in the sorting of mouse chromosomes that do not suffer a significant loss of proteins. Several DNA stains were also evaluated for causing protein dissociation, but no significant losses were observed. Although flow-sorted chromosomes have been used extensively for DNA analysis and cloning, this is a pioneering effort by the NFCR, and its collaborators, to exploit chromosome sorting capabilities for the analysis of chromosomal proteins.

  9. Molecular characterization of flow-sorted mammalian centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamkalo, B.A.; Henschen, A.; Parseghian, M.H. [Univ. of Calfornia, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry] [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project involved experiments directed towards developing a molecular characterization of the centromere region of mammalian chromosomes. Attempts to purify this essential chromosomal locus by conventional methods have thus far been unsuccessful. However, preliminary data obtained in collaboration with the National Flow Cytometry Resource (NFCR) showed that it is possible to purify a chromosome fragment that is present in certain cultured mouse cell lines and has all the properties expected of an intact centromere region. To begin sorting this minichromosome for the identification of proteins preferentially associated with centromere regions, standard buffers utilized in chromosome sorting were evaluated for potential effects on maintenance of chromosomal proteins during sorting. The data indicate that the presence of several buffer constituents results in the extraction of all but a few chromosomal proteins. The subsequent use of a magnesium sulfate buffer resulted in the sorting of mouse chromosomes that do not suffer a significant loss of proteins. Several DNA stains were also evaluated for causing protein dissociation, but no significant losses were observed. Although flow-sorted chromosomes have been used extensively for DNA analysis and cloning, this is a pioneering effort by the NFCR, and its collaborators, to exploit chromosome sorting capabilities for the analysis of chromosomal proteins.

  10. Restructuring of Holocentric Centromeres During Meiosis in the Plant Rhynchospora pubera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, André; Schubert, Veit; Houben, Andreas; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Centromeres are responsible for the correct segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. Holocentric chromosomes, characterized by multiple centromere units along each chromatid, have particular adaptations to ensure regular disjunction during meiosis. Here we show by detecting CENH3, CENP-C, tubulin, and centromeric repeats that holocentromeres may be organized differently in mitosis and meiosis of Rhynchospora pubera Contrasting to the mitotic linear holocentromere organization, meiotic centromeres show several clusters of centromere units (cluster-holocentromeres) during meiosis I. They accumulate along the poleward surface of bivalents where spindle fibers perpendicularly attach. During meiosis II, the cluster-holocentromeres are mostly present in the midregion of each chromatid. A linear holocentromere organization is restored after meiosis during pollen mitosis. Thus, a not yet described case of a cluster-holocentromere organization, showing a clear centromere restructuration between mitosis and meiosis, was identified in a holocentric organism. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Organization and evolution of Gorilla centromeric DNA from old strategies to new approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Catacchio, C. R.; Ragone, R.; Chiatante, G.; M. Ventura

    2015-01-01

    The centromere/kinetochore interaction is responsible for the pairing and segregation of replicated chromosomes in eukaryotes. Centromere DNA is portrayed as scarcely conserved, repetitive in nature, quickly evolving and protein-binding competent. Among primates, the major class of centromeric DNA is the pancentromeric α-satellite, made of arrays of 171 bp monomers, repeated in a head-to-tail pattern. α-satellite sequences can either form tandem heterogeneous monomeric arrays or assemble in h...

  12. Production of the main celiac disease autoantigen by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Soledad Marin Viegas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Celiac Disease (CD is a gluten sensitive enteropathy that remains widely undiagnosed and implementation of massive screening tests is needed to reduce the long term complications associated to untreated CD. The main CD autoantigen, human tissue transglutaminase (TG2, is a challenge for the different expression systems available since its cross-linking activity affects cellular processes. Plant-based transient expression systems can be an alternative for the production of this protein. In this work, a transient expression system for the production of human TG2 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves was optimized and reactivity of plant-produced TG2 in CD screening test was evaluated. First, a subcellular targeting strategy was tested. Cytosolic, secretory, endoplasmic reticulum (C-terminal SEKDEL fusion and vacuolar (C-terminal KISIA fusion TG2 versions were transiently expressed in leaves and recombinant protein yields were measured. ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 levels were 9 to 16 fold higher than their cytosolic and secretory counterparts. As second strategy, TG2 variants were co-expressed with a hydrophobic elastin-like polymer (ELP construct encoding for 36 repeats of the pentapeptide VPGXG in which the guest residue X were V and F in ratio 8:1. Protein bodies (PB were induced by the ELP, with a consequent 2 fold-increase in accumulation of both ER-TG2 and vac-TG2. Subsequently, ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were produced and purified using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Plant purified ER-TG2 and vac-TG2 were recognized by three anti-TG2 monoclonal antibodies that bind different epitopes proving that plant-produced antigen has immunochemical characteristics similar to those of human TG2. Lastly, an ELISA was performed with sera of CD patients and healthy controls. Both vac-TG2 and ER-TG2 were positively recognized by IgA of CD patients while they were not recognized by serum from non-celiac controls. These results confirmed the usefulness of plant

  13. Mutations in CENPE define a novel kinetochore-centromeric mechanism for microcephalic primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Vitre, Benjamin; Carpenter, Gillian; Abramowicz, Iga; Gleeson, Joseph G; Paciorkowski, Alex R; Cleveland, Don W; Dobyns, William B; O'Driscoll, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Defects in centrosome, centrosomal-associated and spindle-associated proteins are the most frequent cause of primary microcephaly (PM) and microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD) syndromes in humans. Mitotic progression and segregation defects, microtubule spindle abnormalities and impaired DNA damage-induced G2-M cell cycle checkpoint proficiency have been documented in cell lines from these patients. This suggests that impaired mitotic entry, progression and exit strongly contribute to PM and MPD. Considering the vast protein networks involved in coordinating this cell cycle stage, the list of potential target genes that could underlie novel developmental disorders is large. One such complex network, with a direct microtubule-mediated physical connection to the centrosome, is the kinetochore. This centromeric-associated structure nucleates microtubule attachments onto mitotic chromosomes. Here, we described novel compound heterozygous variants in CENPE in two siblings who exhibit a profound MPD associated with developmental delay, simplified gyri and other isolated abnormalities. CENPE encodes centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E), a core kinetochore component functioning to mediate chromosome congression initially of misaligned chromosomes and in subsequent spindle microtubule capture during mitosis. Firstly, we present a comprehensive clinical description of these patients. Then, using patient cells we document abnormalities in spindle microtubule organization, mitotic progression and segregation, before modeling the cellular pathogenicity of these variants in an independent cell system. Our cellular analysis shows that a pathogenic defect in CENP-E, a kinetochore-core protein, largely phenocopies PCNT-mutated microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism-type II patient cells. PCNT encodes a centrosome-associated protein. These results highlight a common underlying pathomechanism. Our findings provide the first evidence for a kinetochore-based route to

  14. Structural Basis for Recognition and Sequestration of UUUOH 3 ' Temini of Nascent RNA Polymerase III Transcripts by La, a Rheumatic Disease Autoantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplova,M.; Yuan, Y.; Phan, A.; Malinina, L.; Ilin, S.; Teplov, A.; Patel, D.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear phosphoprotein La was identified as an autoantigen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjogren's syndrome. La binds to and protects the UUUOH 3' terminii of nascent RNA polymerase III transcripts from exonuclease digestion. We report the 1.85 Angstroms crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human La, consisting of La and RRM1 motifs, bound to r(U1-G2-C3-U4-G5-U6-U7-U8-U9OH). The U7-U8-U9OH 3' end, in a splayed-apart orientation, is sequestered within a basic and aromatic amino acid-lined cleft between the La and RRM1 motifs. The specificity-determining U8 residue bridges both motifs, in part through unprecedented targeting of the {beta} sheet edge, rather than the anticipated face, of the RRM1 motif. Our structural observations, supported by mutation studies of both La and RNA components, illustrate the principles behind RNA sequestration by a rheumatic disease autoantigen, whereby the UUUOH 3' ends of nascent RNA transcripts are protected during downstream processing and maturation events.

  15. Autoantigenic proteins that bind recombinogenic sequences in Epstein-Barr virus and cellular DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    We have identified conserved autoantigenic cellular proteins that bind to G-rich sequence motifs in recombinogenic regions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA. This binding activity, called TRBP, recognizes the EBV terminal repeats, a locus responsible for interconversion of linear and circular EBV DNA. We found that TRBP also binds to EBV DNA sequences involved in deletion of EBNA2, a gene product required for immortalization. We show that TRBP binds sequences present in repetitive cellular DNA,...

  16. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 identified as autoantigens by biochemical and mass spectrometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N H; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Muncrief, T

    2000-01-01

    The antigenic specificity of an unusual antinuclear antibody pattern in three patient sera was identified after separating HeLa-cell nuclear extracts by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and localizing the antigens by immunoblotting with patient serum. Protein spots were excised from the 2......-separation methods and mass-spectrometric peptide mapping in combination with database searches are powerful tools in the identification of novel autoantigen specificities....

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation corrects the immunologic abnormalities associated with immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial dysmorphism syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gennery, A.R.; Slatter, M.A.; Bredius, R.G.; Hagleitner, M.M.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Cant, A.J.; Lankester, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial dysmorphism syndrome, characterized by variable immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, and facial anomalies caused by epigenetic dysregulation resulting in hypomethylation, is caused in many patients by mutations in DNMT3B, a DNA methyltransferase

  18. The size and sequence organization of the centromeric region of arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumekawa, N; Hosouchi, T; Tsuruoka, H; Kotani, H

    2000-12-31

    We have determined the size of the centromeric region of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5, which corresponds to the genetically defined centromere by Copenhaver et al. (Science, 286, 2468-2474, 1999) on the basis of restriction analysis. As a large clone gap was present in the previously constructed contig map of the centromeric region, the restriction map of this region was constructed using Asc I, Not I, Apa I and Pme I and genomic DNA from a hypomethylated strain. The size of the centromeric region finally estimated by combination with the sequence data of cloned regions at both sides was 4.35 megabases (Mb). This value is over 2 Mb longer than those estimated in our previous work and also by Copenhaver et al. Combing this centromeric region with the physical map previously constructed, the entire length of chromosome 5 becomes 31 Mb. Although the internal moiety of the centromeric region has not been sequenced yet because of extremely high repetition, the result of sequence analysis from both sides toward the inside strongly suggests that the centromeric region is composed of the central 2.9-Mb domain consisting of mainly 180-bp repeats and Athila retrotransposons and flanking regions containing various types of transposons. On the basis of these observations, a structural model for the centromeric region is discussed.

  19. High frequency of centromere inactivation resulting in stable dicentric chromosomes of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fangpu; Lamb, Jonathan C; Birchler, James A

    2006-02-28

    Somatic chromosome spreads from maize (Zea mays L.) plants containing B-A translocation chromosomes undergoing the chromosome type breakage-fusion-bridge cycle were examined by FISH. The size and type of extra chromosomes varied among cells of the same individual. A collection of minichromosomes derived from the chromosome type breakage-fusion-bridge cycle was examined for the presence of stable dicentric chromosomes. Six of 23 chromosomes in the collection contained two regions with DNA sequences typical of centromeres. Functional analysis and immunolabeling of CENH3, the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, revealed only one functional centromere per chromosome, despite the duplicate centromere sequences. One plant was found with an inactive B centromere that had been translocated to the short arm of chromosome 9. The translocated centromere region appeared identical to that of a normal B chromosome. The inactivation of the centromeres was stable for at least four generations. By using dicentrics from dispensable chromosomes, centromere inactivation was found to be quite common under these circumstances.

  20. Aberrant Accumulation of the Diabetes Autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi Membranes in Conditions of ER Stress and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P; Pasquier, Miriella; Kanaani, Jamil; Nano, Rita; Lavallard, Vanessa; Billestrup, Nils; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Baekkeskov, Steinunn

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic islet β-cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in β-cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes γ-aminobutyric acid, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary β-cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes. The palmitoylated form has heightened immunogenicity, exhibiting increased uptake by antigen-presenting cells and T-cell stimulation compared with the nonpalmitoylated form. Similar accumulation of GAD65 in Golgi membranes is observed in human β-cells in pancreatic sections from GAD65 autoantibody-positive individuals who have not yet progressed to clinical onset of T1D and from patients with T1D with residual β-cell mass and ongoing T-cell infiltration of islets. We propose that aberrant accumulation of immunogenic GAD65 in Golgi membranes facilitates inappropriate presentation to the immune system after release from stressed and/or damaged β-cells, triggering autoimmunity.

  1. Structure and function of centromeric and pericentromeric heterochromatin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauriane eSimon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The centromere is a specific chromosomal region where the kinetochore assembles to ensure the faithful segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. Centromeres are defined by a local enrichment of the specific histone variant CenH3 mostly at repetitive satellite sequences. A larger pericentromeric region containing repetitive sequences and transposable elements surrounds the centromere that adopts a particular chromatin state characterized by specific histone variants and post-translational modifications and forms a transcriptionally repressive chromosomal environment. In the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana centromeric and pericentromeric domains form conspicuous heterochromatin clusters called chromocenters in interphase. Here we discuss, using Arabidopsis as example, recent insight into mechanisms involved in maintenance and establishment of centromeric and pericentromeric chromatin signatures as well as in chromocenter formation.

  2. Paradoxical effect of pertussis toxin on the delayed hypersensitivity response to autoantigens in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajwahrdhan Yadav

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pertussis toxin (PTX, an exotoxin of Bordetella pertussis, enhances the development of experimental autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in rodent models. The mechanisms of the promotion of experimental autoimmune diseases by PTX may be based upon PTX-induced disruption of the blood eye/brain barriers facilitating the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the modulation of inflammatory cell migration and the enhancement of the activation of inflammatory cells. We hypothesized that the facilitation of experimental autoimmunity by PTX suggests that its influence on the in vivo immune response to auto-antigen may differ from its influence on non-self antigens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have evaluated the effect of PTX on the simultaneous generation of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH responses and autoimmune responses to uveitogenic interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein peptide (IRBP161-180, encephalitogenic myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG35-55 or ovalbumin (OVA. PTX injection of mice immunized to IRBP peptide161-180 led to (i the development of EAU as shown by histopathology of the retina, (ii pro-inflammatory cytokine production by splenocytes in response to IRBP peptide161-180, and (iii symptomatic EAE in mice immunized with encephalitogenic MOG peptide35-55. However, mice that received PTX had a reduced DTH response to IRBP161-180 peptide or MOG peptide35-55 when challenged distal to the site affected by autoreactive T cells. Moreover, footpad challenge with MOG35-55 peptide reduced EAE in mice immunized with MOG peptide. In contrast, the use of PTX when immunizing with OVA protein or an OVA immunogenic peptide did not affect the DTH response to OVA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that that the reduced DTH response in mice receiving PTX may be specific for autoantigens and autoantigen-reactive T cells are

  3. CD8+ T cells specific for the islet autoantigen IGRP are restricted in their T cell receptor chain usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Yannick F.; Eugster, Anne; Dietz, Sevina; Sebelefsky, Christian; Kühn, Denise; Wilhelm, Carmen; Lindner, Annett; Gavrisan, Anita; Knoop, Jan; Dahl, Andreas; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T cells directed against beta cell autoantigens are considered relevant for the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Using single cell T cell receptor sequencing of CD8+ T cells specific for the IGRP265-273 epitope, we examined whether there was expansion of clonotypes and sharing of T cell receptor chains in autoreactive CD8+ T cell repertoires. HLA-A*0201 positive type 1 diabetes patients (n = 19) and controls (n = 18) were analysed. TCR α- and β-chain sequences of 418 patient-derived IGRP265-273-multimer+ CD8+ T cells representing 48 clonotypes were obtained. Expanded populations of IGRP265-273-specific CD8+ T cells with dominant clonotypes that had TCR α-chains shared across patients were observed. The SGGSNYKLTF motif corresponding to TRAJ53 was contained in 384 (91.9%) cells, and in 20 (41.7%) patient-derived clonotypes. TRAJ53 together with TRAV29/DV5 was found in 15 (31.3%) clonotypes. Using next generation TCR α-chain sequencing, we found enrichment of one of these TCR α-chains in the memory CD8+ T cells of patients as compared to healthy controls. CD8+ T cell clones bearing the enriched motifs mediated antigen-specific target cell lysis. We provide the first evidence for restriction of T cell receptor motifs in the alpha chain of human CD8+ T cells with specificity to a beta cell antigen. PMID:28300170

  4. A gene-protein assay for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2: brightfield tricolor visualization of HER2 protein, the HER2 gene, and chromosome 17 centromere (CEN17 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitta Hiroaki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eligibility of breast cancer patients for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-directed therapies is determined by the HER2 gene amplification and/or HER2 protein overexpression status of the breast tumor as determined by in situ hybridization (ISH or immunohistochemistry (IHC, respectively. Our objective was to combine the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved HER2 & chromosome 17 centromere (CEN17 brightfield ISH (BISH and HER2 IHC assays into a single automated HER2 gene-protein assay allowing simultaneous detection of all three targets in a single tissue section. Methods The HER2 gene-protein assay was optimized using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples of the xenograft tumors MCF7 [HER2 negative (non-amplified gene, protein negative] and Calu-3 [HER2 positive (amplified gene, protein positive]. HER2 IHC was performed using a rabbit monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (clone 4B5 and a conventional 3,3'-diaminobenzidine IHC detection. The HER2 & CEN17 BISH signals were visualized using horseradish peroxidase-based silver and alkaline phosphatase-based red detection systems, respectively with a cocktail of 2,4-dinitrophenyl-labeled HER2 and digoxigenin-labeled CEN17 probes. The performance of the gene-protein assay on tissue microarray slides containing 189 randomly selected FFPE clinical breast cancer tissue cores was compared to that of the separate HER2 IHC and HER2 & CEN17 BISH assays. Results HER2 protein detection was optimal when the HER2 IHC protocol was used before (rather than after the BISH protocol. The sequential use of HER2 IHC and HER2 & CEN17 BISH detection steps on FFPE xenograft tumor sections appropriately co-localized the HER2 protein, HER2 gene, and CEN17 signals after mitigating the silver background staining by using a naphthol phosphate-containing hybridization buffer for the hybridization step. The HER2 protein and HER2 gene status obtained using the multiplex HER2 gene

  5. Widespread Positive Selection Drives Differentiation of Centromeric Proteins in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Emily A; Llopart, Ana

    2015-11-25

    Rapid evolution of centromeric satellite repeats is thought to cause compensatory amino acid evolution in interacting centromere-associated kinetochore proteins. Cid, a protein that mediates kinetochore/centromere interactions, displays particularly high amino acid turnover. Rapid evolution of both Cid and centromeric satellite repeats led us to hypothesize that the apparent compensatory evolution may extend to interacting partners in the Condensin I complex (i.e., SMC2, SMC4, Cap-H, Cap-D2, and Cap-G) and HP1s. Missense mutations in these proteins often result in improper centromere formation and aberrant chromosome segregation, thus selection for maintained function and coevolution among proteins of the complex is likely strong. Here, we report evidence of rapid evolution and recurrent positive selection in seven centromere-associated proteins in species of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, and further postulate that positive selection on these proteins could be a result of centromere drive and compensatory changes, with kinetochore proteins competing for optimal spindle attachment.

  6. The centromere geometry essential for keeping mitosis error free is controlled by spindle forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncarek, Jadranka; Kisurina-Evgenieva, Olga; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Hergert, Polla; La Terra, Sabrina; Kapoor, Tarun M; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2007-11-29

    Accurate segregation of chromosomes, essential for the stability of the genome, depends on 'bi-orientation'-simultaneous attachment of each individual chromosome to both poles of the mitotic spindle. On bi-oriented chromosomes, kinetochores (macromolecular complexes that attach the chromosome to the spindle) reside on the opposite sides of the chromosome's centromere. In contrast, sister kinetochores shift towards one side of the centromere on 'syntelic' chromosomes that erroneously attach to one spindle pole with both sister kinetochores. Syntelic attachments often arise during spindle assembly and must be corrected to prevent chromosome loss. It is assumed that restoration of proper centromere architecture occurs automatically owing to elastic properties of the centromere. Here we test this assumption by combining laser microsurgery and chemical biology assays in cultured mammalian cells. We find that kinetochores of syntelic chromosomes remain juxtaposed on detachment from spindle microtubules. These findings reveal that correction of syntelic attachments involves an extra step that has previously been overlooked: external forces must be applied to move sister kinetochores to the opposite sides of the centromere. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the shape of the centromere is important for spindle assembly, because bipolar spindles do not form in cells lacking centrosomes when multiple chromosomes with juxtaposed kinetochores are present. Thus, proper architecture of the centromere makes an important contribution to achieving high fidelity of chromosome segregation.

  7. Centromere inactivation on a neo-Y fusion chromosome in threespine stickleback fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Jennifer N; Peichel, Catherine L

    2016-12-01

    Having one and only one centromere per chromosome is essential for proper chromosome segregation during both mitosis and meiosis. Chromosomes containing two centromeres are known as dicentric and often mis-segregate during cell division, resulting in aneuploidy or chromosome breakage. Dicentric chromosome can be stabilized by centromere inactivation, a process which reestablishes monocentric chromosomes. However, little is known about this process in naturally occurring dicentric chromosomes. Using a combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunofluorescence combined with FISH (IF-FISH) on metaphase chromosome spreads, we demonstrate that centromere inactivation has evolved on a neo-Y chromosome fusion in the Japan Sea threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus nipponicus). We found that the centromere derived from the ancestral Y chromosome has been inactivated. Our data further suggest that there have been genetic changes to this centromere in the two million years since the formation of the neo-Y chromosome, but it remains unclear whether these genetic changes are a cause or consequence of centromere inactivation.

  8. High quality maize centromere 10 sequence reveals evidence of frequent recombination events

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    Thomas Kai Wolfgruber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ancestral centromeres of maize contain long stretches of the tandemly arranged CentC repeat. The abundance of tandem DNA repeats and centromeric retrotransposons (CR have presented a significant challenge to completely assembling centromeres using traditional sequencing methods. Here we report a nearly complete assembly of the 1.85 Mb maize centromere 10 from inbred B73 using PacBio technology and BACs from the reference genome project. The error rates estimated from overlapping BAC sequences are 7 x 10-6 and 5 x 10-5 for mismatches and indels, respectively. The number of gaps in the region covered by the reassembly was reduced from 140 in the reference genome to three. Three expressed genes are located between 92 and 477 kb of the inferred ancestral CentC cluster, which lies within the region of highest centromeric repeat density. The improved assembly increased the count of full-length centromeric retrotransposons from 5 to 55 and revealed a 22.7 kb segmental duplication that occurred approximately 121,000 years ago. Our analysis provides evidence of frequent recombination events in the form of partial retrotransposons, deletions within retrotransposons, chimeric retrotransposons, segmental duplications including higher order CentC repeats, a deleted CentC monomer, centromere-proximal inversions, and insertion of mitochondrial sequences. Double-strand DNA break (DSB repair is the most plausible mechanism for these events and may be the major driver of centromere repeat evolution and diversity. This repair appears to be mediated by microhomology, suggesting that tandem repeats may have evolved to facilitate the repair of frequent DSBs in centromeres.

  9. Rad51-Rad52 mediated maintenance of centromeric chromatin in Candida albicans.

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    Sreyoshi Mitra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Specification of the centromere location in most eukaryotes is not solely dependent on the DNA sequence. However, the non-genetic determinants of centromere identity are not clearly defined. While multiple mechanisms, individually or in concert, may specify centromeres epigenetically, most studies in this area are focused on a universal factor, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, often considered as the epigenetic determinant of centromere identity. In spite of variable timing of its loading at centromeres across species, a replication coupled early S phase deposition of CENP-A is found in most yeast centromeres. Centromeres are the earliest replicating chromosomal regions in a pathogenic budding yeast Candida albicans. Using a 2-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis assay, we identify replication origins (ORI7-LI and ORI7-RI proximal to an early replicating centromere (CEN7 in C. albicans. We show that the replication forks stall at CEN7 in a kinetochore dependent manner and fork stalling is reduced in the absence of the homologous recombination (HR proteins Rad51 and Rad52. Deletion of ORI7-RI causes a significant reduction in the stalled fork signal and an increased loss rate of the altered chromosome 7. The HR proteins, Rad51 and Rad52, have been shown to play a role in fork restart. Confocal microscopy shows declustered kinetochores in rad51 and rad52 mutants, which are evidence of kinetochore disintegrity. CENP-ACaCse4 levels at centromeres, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments, are reduced in absence of Rad51/Rad52 resulting in disruption of the kinetochore structure. Moreover, western blot analysis reveals that delocalized CENP-A molecules in HR mutants degrade in a similar fashion as in other kinetochore mutants described before. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation assays indicate that Rad51 and Rad52 physically interact with CENP-ACaCse4 in vivo. Thus, the HR proteins Rad51 and Rad52

  10. A La autoantigen homologue is required for the internal ribosome entry site mediated translation of giardiavirus.

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    Srinivas Garlapati

    Full Text Available Translation of Giardiavirus (GLV mRNA is initiated at an internal ribosome entry site (IRES in the viral transcript. The IRES localizes to a downstream portion of 5' untranslated region (UTR and a part of the early downstream coding region of the transcript. Recent studies indicated that the IRES does not require a pre-initiation complex to initiate translation but may directly recruit the small ribosome subunit with the help of a number of trans-activating protein factors. A La autoantigen homologue in the viral host Giardia lamblia, GlLa, was proposed as one of the potential trans-activating factors based on its specific binding to GLV-IRES in vitro. In this study, we further elucidated the functional role of GlLa in GLV-IRES mediated translation in Giardia by knocking down GlLa with antisense morpholino oligo, which resulted in a reduction of GLV-IRES activity by 40%. An over-expression of GlLa in Giardia moderately stimulated GLV-IRES activity by 20%. A yeast inhibitory RNA (IRNA, known to bind mammalian and yeast La autoantigen and inhibit Poliovirus and Hepatitis C virus IRES activities in vitro and in vivo, was also found to bind to GlLa protein in vitro and inhibited GLV-IRES function in vivo. The C-terminal domain of La autoantigen interferes with the dimerization of La and inhibits its function. An over-expression of the C-terminal domain (200-348aa of GlLa in Giardia showed a dominant-negative effect on GLV-IRES activity, suggesting a potential inhibition of GlLa dimerization. HA tagged GlLa protein was detected mainly in the cytoplasm of Giardia, thus supporting a primary role of GlLa in translation initiation in Giardiavirus.

  11. Identification of novel autoantigen in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients using an immunoproteomics approach.

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    Sagarika Biswas

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune and inflammatory joint disease with a poorly understood etiology. Despite widespread diagnostic use of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies and rheumatoid factor proteins there is a strong demand for novel serological biomarkers to improve the diagnosis this disease. The present study was aimed to identify novel autoantigens involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis through immune-proteomic strategy. Synovial fluid samples from clinically diagnosed RA patients were separated on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE. Samples from patients with non-RA rheumatisms (osteoarthritis and trauma were used as controls. Immunoreactive proteins were spotted by Western blotting followed by identification through Q-TOF mass spectrometer analysis. Forty Western blots were generated using plasma from ten individual RA patients and 33 reactive spots were identified, 20 from the high molecular weight (HMW gel and 13 from the low molecular weight (LMW gel. Among the 33 common immunogenic spots, 18 distinct autoantigens were identified, out of which 14 are novel proteins in this context. Expression analysis of five important proteins, vimentin, gelsolin, alpha 2 HS glycoprotein (AHSG, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and α1B-glycoprotein (A1BG by Western blot analysis using their specific antibodies revealed their higher expression in RA synovial fluid as compared to non-RA samples. Recombinantly expressed GFAP and A1BG protein were used to develop an in-house ELISA to quantify the amount of autoantibodies in the RA patients. RA patients revealed an increase in the expression of GFAP and A1BG in the plasma as compared to osteoarthritis patients. Therefore, GFAP and A1BG can be proposed as potential new autoantigens of diagnostic importance for RA subjects. Further characterization of these proteins in rheumatoid arthritis will be helpful in understanding the role of these proteins in the disease

  12. Posttranslational modification of HLA-DQ binding islet autoantigens in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lummel, Menno; Duinkerken, Gaby; van Veelen, Peter A; de Ru, Arnoud; Cordfunke, Robert; Zaldumbide, Arnaud; Gomez-Touriño, Iria; Arif, Sefina; Peakman, Mark; Drijfhout, Jan W; Roep, Bart O

    2014-01-01

    Posttranslational modification (PTM) of islet autoantigens can cause lack of central tolerance in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Tissue transglutaminase (tTG), involved in PTM of gluten antigens in celiac disease, creates negatively charged peptides favored by T1D-predisposing HLA-DQ molecules, offering an attractive candidate modifying islet autoantigens in T1D. The highly predisposing HLA-DQ8cis/trans molecules share preferences for negatively charged peptides, as well as distinct peptide-binding characteristics that distinguish their peptide-binding repertoire. We screened islet autoantigens with the tTG substrate motif for candidate-modified epitopes binding to HLA-DQ8cis/trans and identified 31 candidate islet epitopes. Deamidation was confirmed for 28 peptides (90%). Two of these epitopes preferentially bound to HLA-DQ8cis and six to HLA-DQ8trans upon deamidation, whereas all other peptides bound equally to HLA-DQ8cis/trans. HLA-DQ8cis-restricted T cells from a new-onset T1D patient could only be generated against a deamidated proinsulin peptide, but cross-reacted with native proinsulin peptide upon restimulation. The rate of T-cell autoreactivity in recent-onset T1D patients extended from 42% to native insulin to 68% adding responses to modified proinsulin, versus 20% and 37% respectively, in healthy donors. Most patients responded by interferon-γ, whereas most healthy donors produced interleukin-10 only. Thus, T-cell autoreactivity exists to modified islet epitopes that differs in quality and quantity between patients and healthy donors.

  13. Autoantigen microarrays reveal autoantibodies associated with proliferative nephritis and active disease in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddon, D James; Diep, Vivian K; Price, Jordan V; Limb, Cindy; Utz, Paul J; Balboni, Imelda

    2015-06-17

    Pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (pSLE) patients often initially present with more active and severe disease than adults, including a higher frequency of lupus nephritis. Specific autoantibodies, including anti-C1q, anti-DNA and anti-alpha-actinin, have been associated with kidney involvement in SLE, and DNA antibodies are capable of initiating early-stage lupus nephritis in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Over 100 different autoantibodies have been described in SLE patients, highlighting the need for comprehensive autoantibody profiling. Knowledge of the antibodies associated with pSLE and proliferative nephritis will increase the understanding of SLE pathogenesis, and may aid in monitoring patients for renal flare. We used autoantigen microarrays composed of 140 recombinant or purified antigens to compare the serum autoantibody profiles of new-onset pSLE patients (n = 45) to healthy controls (n = 17). We also compared pSLE patients with biopsy-confirmed class III or IV proliferative nephritis (n = 23) and without significant renal involvement (n = 18). We performed ELISA with selected autoantigens to validate the microarray findings. We created a multiple logistic regression model, based on the ELISA and clinical information, to predict whether a patient had proliferative nephritis, and used a validation cohort (n = 23) and longitudinal samples (88 patient visits) to test its accuracy. Fifty autoantibodies were at significantly higher levels in the sera of pSLE patients compared to healthy controls, including anti-B cell-activating factor (BAFF). High levels of anti-BAFF were associated with active disease. Thirteen serum autoantibodies were present at significantly higher levels in pSLE patients with proliferative nephritis than those without, and we confirmed five autoantigens (dsDNA, C1q, collagens IV and X and aggrecan) by ELISA. Our model, based on ELISA measurements and clinical variables, correctly identified patients with proliferative

  14. Induction of tolerance with intranasal administration of human cartilage gp-39 in DBA/1 mice - Amelioration of clinical, histologic, and radiologic signs of type II collagen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, LAB; Coenen-de Roo, CJJ; Helsen, MMA; Lubberts, E; Boots, AMH; van den Berg, WB; Miltenburg, AMM

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Human cartilage glycoprotein 39 (HC gp-39) was recently identified as a candidate autoantigen in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, In the present studies, we investigated the capacity of HC gp-39 to interfere in clinical disease induced by an unrelated autoantigen, type II collage

  15. Identification of Autoantigen Epitopes in Alopecia Areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Eddy H C; Yu, Mei; Breitkopf, Trisia; Akhoundsadegh, Noushin; Wang, Xiaojie; Shi, Feng-Tao; Leung, Gigi; Dutz, Jan P; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J

    2016-08-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is believed to be a cell-mediated autoimmune hair loss disease. Both CD4 and cytotoxic CD8 T cells (CTLs) are important for the onset and progression of AA. Hair follicle (HF) keratinocyte and/or melanocyte antigen epitopes are suspected potential targets of autoreactive CTLs, but the specific epitopes have not yet been identified. We investigated the potential for a panel of known epitopes, expressed by HF keratinocytes and melanocytes, to induce activation of CTL populations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Specific synthetic epitopes derived from HF antigens trichohyalin and tyrosinase-related protein-2 induced significantly higher frequencies of response in AA CTLs compared with healthy controls (IFN-gamma secretion). Apoptosis assays revealed conditioned media from AA peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with trichohyalin peptides elevated the expression of apoptosis markers in primary HF keratinocytes. A cytokine array revealed higher expression of IL-13 and chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5, RANTES) from AA peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with trichohyalin peptides compared with controls. The data indicate that AA affected subjects present with an increased frequency of CTLs responsive to epitopes originating from keratinocytes and melanocytes; the activated CTLs secreted soluble factors that induced apoptosis in HF keratinocytes. Potentially, CTL response to self-antigen epitopes, particularly trichohyalin epitopes, could be a prognostic marker for human AA.

  16. 葡萄膜炎自身抗原表位的研究%Studies on autoantigenic epitopes involving in the development of uveitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵长霖; 杨培增

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed that a few kinds of autoantigens imitate the development of autoimmune uveitis while the immunodominant epitopes of these antigens have not been identified.Researches on retinal S-antigen and interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein as well as tyrosinase-related protein epitopes mapping have shown that each autoantigen contains several immunopathogenic epitopes and immunogenic epitopes and that the immunopathogenic sites ale not coincident with the immunogenic epitopes.The reactivity of peripheral blood mononucleal cells from uveitis patients against each autoantigenic epitopes displays high heterogeneity.Epitopes spreading phenomenon has been disclosed in human uveifis study and reinforced in animal experiments.Study on this epitope spreading may contribute to our understanding of immune tolerance induced by different epitopes in the treatment of autoimmune disease including uveifis.%多种抗原参与自身免疫性葡萄膜炎的发生发展,但是这些抗原的免疫优势表位尚不明确.针对视网膜S抗原等葡萄膜炎自身抗原免疫表位的研究显示,每种抗原蛋白均存在多个可诱导易感动物葡萄膜炎发作的致病位点,每种抗原均存在多个可诱导葡萄膜炎患者产生体外细胞免疫反应的免疫原性表位,同种抗原的致病表位和免疫原性表位不完全一致.葡萄膜炎患者对于各抗原表位肽的反应性显示出高度异质性,表现为不同患者对不同肽发生反应和同一例患者在不同时期对不同肽发生反应.由此,提出了葡萄膜炎表位扩展现象,并利用动物实验得以证实.表位扩展可能是自身免疫反应的防御现象,但是自身免疫反应的多样化同时又对抗原特异性耐受疗法提出了挑战.

  17. The nucleoplasmin homolog NLP mediates centromere clustering and anchoring to the nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padeken, Jan; Mendiburo, María José; Chlamydas, Sarantis; Schwarz, Hans-Jürgen; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Heun, Patrick

    2013-04-25

    Centromere clustering during interphase is a phenomenon known to occur in many different organisms and cell types, yet neither the factors involved nor their physiological relevance is well understood. Using Drosophila tissue culture cells and flies, we identified a network of proteins, including the nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP), the insulator protein CTCF, and the nucleolus protein Modulo, to be essential for the positioning of centromeres. Artificial targeting further demonstrated that NLP and CTCF are sufficient for clustering, while Modulo serves as the anchor to the nucleolus. Centromere clustering was found to depend on centric chromatin rather than specific DNA sequences. Moreover, unclustering of centromeres results in the spatial destabilization of pericentric heterochromatin organization, leading to partial defects in the silencing of repetitive elements, defects during chromosome segregation, and genome instability.

  18. Clinical spectrum of immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial dysmorphism (ICF syndrome).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagleitner, M.M.; Lankester, A.; Maraschio, P.; Hulten, M.; Fryns, J.P.; Schuetz, C.; Gimelli, G.; Davies, E.G.; Gennery, A.; Belohradsky, B.H.; Groot, R. de; Gerritsen, E.J.; Mattina, T.; Howard, P.J.; Fasth, A.; Reisli, I.; Furthner, D.; Slatter, M.A.; Cant, A.J.; Cazzola, G.; Dijken, P.J. van; Deuren, M. van; Greef, J.C. de; Maarel, S.M. van der; Weemaes, C.M.R.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial dysmorphism (ICF syndrome) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterised by facial dysmorphism, immunoglobulin deficiency and branching of chromosomes 1, 9 and 16 after PHA stimulation of lymphocytes. Hypomethylation of DNA of a

  19. Mislocalization of the Drosophila centromere-specific histone CIDpromotes formation of functional ectopic kinetochores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heun, Patrick; Erhardt, Sylvia; Blower, Michael D.; Weiss,Samara; Skora, Andrew D.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2006-01-30

    The centromere-specific histone variant CENP-A (CID in Drosophila) is a structural and functional foundation for kinetochore formation and chromosome segregation. Here, we show that overexpressed CID is mislocalized into normally non-centromeric regions in Drosophila tissue culture cells and animals. Analysis of mitoses in living and fixed cells reveals that mitotic delays, anaphase bridges, chromosome fragmentation, and cell and organismal lethality are all direct consequences of CID mislocalization. In addition, proteins that are normally restricted to endogenous kinetochores assemble at a subset of ectopic CID incorporation regions. The presence of microtubule motors and binding proteins, spindle attachments, and aberrant chromosome morphologies demonstrate that these ectopic kinetochores are functional. We conclude that CID mislocalization promotes formation of ectopic centromeres and multicentric chromosomes, which causes chromosome missegregation, aneuploidy, and growth defects. Thus, CENP-A mislocalization is one possible mechanism for genome instability during cancer progression, as well as centromere plasticity during evolution.

  20. The clinical significance of posttranslational modification of autoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Cerna, Maria G; Martínez-García, Erika A; Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Rubio-Jurado, Benjamín; Riebeling, Carlos; Nava, Arnulfo

    2014-08-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) are defined as covalent modifications occurring in a specific protein amino acid in a time- and signal-dependent manner. Under physiological conditions, proteins are posttranslationally modified to carry out a large number of cellular events from cell signaling to DNA replication. However, an absence, deficiency, or excess in PTMs of a given protein can evolve into a target to trigger autoimmunity, since PTMs arise in the periphery and may not occur in the thymus; hence, proteins with PTMs never tolerize developing thymocytes. Consequently, when PTMs arise during cellular responses, such as inflammation, these modified self-antigens can be taken up and processed by the antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Autoreactive T cells, which recognize peptides presented by APCs, can then infiltrate into host tissue where the modified antigen serves to amplify the autoimmune response, eventually leading to autoimmune pathology. Furthermore, a PTM occurring in an amino acid residue can induce changes in the net charge of the protein, leading to conformational modifications in the tertiary and quaternary structure of the protein, especially interaction with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules. Molecular mimicry (MM) was until now the prevailing hypothesis explaining generation of autoimmunity; nevertheless, experimental animal models need inflammation via infection or other immunogens to ensure autoimmunity; MM alone is not sufficient to develop autoimmunity. PTMs could arise as an additive factor to MM, which is required to start an autoimmune response. PTMs have been found to be present in different pathologic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome, and primary biliary cirrhosis. The aim of the present review is to expose protein posttranslational modifications and the evidence suggesting their role in the generation of autoimmunity.

  1. DNMT3B interacts with constitutive centromere protein CENP-C to modulate DNA methylation and the histone code at centromeric regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Suhasni; Sullivan, Beth A; Trazzi, Stefania; Della Valle, Giuliano; Robertson, Keith D

    2009-09-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetically imposed mark of transcriptional repression that is essential for maintenance of chromatin structure and genomic stability. Genome-wide methylation patterns are mediated by the combined action of three DNA methyltransferases: DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B. Compelling links exist between DNMT3B and chromosome stability as emphasized by the mitotic defects that are a hallmark of ICF syndrome, a disease arising from germline mutations in DNMT3B. Centromeric and pericentromeric regions are essential for chromosome condensation and the fidelity of segregation. Centromere regions contain distinct epigenetic marks, including dense DNA hypermethylation, yet the mechanisms by which DNA methylation is targeted to these regions remains largely unknown. In the present study, we used a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified a novel interaction between DNMT3B and constitutive centromere protein CENP-C. CENP-C is itself essential for mitosis. We confirm this interaction in mammalian cells and map the domains responsible. Using siRNA knock downs, bisulfite genomic sequencing and ChIP, we demonstrate for the first time that CENP-C recruits DNA methylation and DNMT3B to both centromeric and pericentromeric satellite repeats and that CENP-C and DNMT3B regulate the histone code in these regions, including marks characteristic of centromeric chromatin. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of CENP-C or DNMT3B leads to elevated chromosome misalignment and segregation defects during mitosis and increased transcription of centromeric repeats. Taken together, our data reveal a novel mechanism by which DNA methylation is targeted to discrete regions of the genome and contributes to chromosomal stability.

  2. The Role of Dicentric Chromosome Formation and Secondary Centromere Deletion in the Evolution of Myeloid Malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    MacKinnon, Ruth N.; Campbell, Lynda J.

    2011-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes have been identified as instigators of the genome instability associated with cancer, but this instability is often resolved by one of a number of different secondary events. These include centromere inactivation, inversion, and intercentromeric deletion. Deletion or excision of one of the centromeres may be a significant occurrence in myeloid malignancy and other malignancies but has not previously been widely recognized, and our reports are the first describing centrom...

  3. Identification of Drosophila centromere associated proteins by quantitative affinity purification-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Teresa K.; Schade, Georg O.M.; Schmidt, Andreas; Vetter, Irene; Wirth, Marc; Heun, Patrick; Imhof, Axel; Thomae, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically defined by the centromere specific histone H3 variant CENP-ACID. CENP-ACID builds the foundation for the assembly of a large network of proteins. In contrast to mammalian systems, the protein composition of Drosophila centromeres has not been comprehensively investigated. Here we describe the proteome of Drosophila melanogaster centromeres as analyzed by quantitative affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS). The AP-MS input chromatin material was prepared from D. melanogaster cell lines expressing CENP-ACID or H3.3 fused to EGFP as baits. Centromere chromatin enriched proteins were identified based on their relative abundance in CENP-ACID–GFP compared to H3.3-GFP or mock affinity-purifications. The analysis yielded 86 proteins specifically enriched in centromere chromatin preparations. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach (Barth et al., 2015, Proteomics 14:2167-78, DOI: 10.1002/pmic.201400052) has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://www.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000758. PMID:26306323

  4. CenH3 evolution reflects meiotic symmetry as predicted by the centromere drive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedek, František; Bureš, Petr

    2016-09-15

    The centromere drive model explaining rapid evolution of eukaryotic centromeres predicts higher frequency of positive selection acting on centromeric histone H3 (CenH3) in clades with asymmetric meiosis compared to the clades with only symmetric meiosis. However, despite the impression one might get from the literature, this key prediction of the centromere drive model has not only never been confirmed, but it has never been tested, because all the previous studies dealt only with the presence or absence instead of the frequency of positive selection. To provide evidence for or against different frequencies of positively selected CenH3 in asymmetrics and symmetrics, we have inferred the selective pressures acting on CenH3 in seventeen eukaryotic clades, including plants, animals, fungi, ciliates and apicomplexa, using codon-substitution models, and compared the inferred frequencies between asymmetrics and symmetrics in a quantitative manner. We have found that CenH3 has been evolving adaptively much more frequently in clades with asymmetric meiosis compared with clades displaying only symmetric meiosis which confirms the prediction of centromere drive model. Our findings indicate that the evolution of asymmetric meiosis required CenH3 to evolve adaptively more often to counterbalance the negative consequences of centromere drive.

  5. Toxoplasma gondii chromodomain protein 1 binds to heterochromatin and colocalises with centromeres and telomeres at the nuclear periphery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gissot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for some of the most deadly parasitic diseases afflicting humans, including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These obligate intracellular parasites exhibit a complex life cycle and a coordinated cell cycle-dependant expression program. Their cell division is a coordinated multistep process. How this complex mechanism is organised remains poorly understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study, we provide evidence for a link between heterochromatin, cell division and the compartmentalisation of the nucleus in Toxoplasma gondii. We characterised a T. gondii chromodomain containing protein (named TgChromo1 that specifically binds to heterochromatin. Using ChIP-on-chip on a genome-wide scale, we report TgChromo1 enrichment at the peri-centromeric chromatin. In addition, we demonstrate that TgChromo1 is cell-cycle regulated and co-localised with markers of the centrocone. Through the loci-specific FISH technique for T. gondii, we confirmed that TgChromo1 occupies the same nuclear localisation as the peri-centromeric sequences. CONCLUSION: We propose that TgChromo1 may play a role in the sequestration of chromosomes at the nuclear periphery and in the process of T. gondii cell division.

  6. Loss of maternal ATRX results in centromere instability and aneuploidy in the mammalian oocyte and pre-implantation embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Claudia; Viveiros, Maria M; De La Fuente, Rabindranath

    2010-09-23

    The α-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked protein (ATRX) is a chromatin-remodeling factor known to regulate DNA methylation at repetitive sequences of the human genome. We have previously demonstrated that ATRX binds to pericentric heterochromatin domains in mouse oocytes at the metaphase II stage where it is involved in mediating chromosome alignment at the meiotic spindle. However, the role of ATRX in the functional differentiation of chromatin structure during meiosis is not known. To test ATRX function in the germ line, we developed an oocyte-specific transgenic RNAi knockdown mouse model. Our results demonstrate that ATRX is required for heterochromatin formation and maintenance of chromosome stability during meiosis. During prophase I arrest, ATRX is necessary to recruit the transcriptional regulator DAXX (death domain associated protein) to pericentric heterochromatin. At the metaphase II stage, transgenic ATRX-RNAi oocytes exhibit abnormal chromosome morphology associated with reduced phosphorylation of histone 3 at serine 10 as well as chromosome segregation defects leading to aneuploidy and severely reduced fertility. Notably, a large proportion of ATRX-depleted oocytes and 1-cell stage embryos exhibit chromosome fragments and centromeric DNA-containing micronuclei. Our results provide novel evidence indicating that ATRX is required for centromere stability and the epigenetic control of heterochromatin function during meiosis and the transition to the first mitosis.

  7. Loss of maternal ATRX results in centromere instability and aneuploidy in the mammalian oocyte and pre-implantation embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Baumann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The α-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked protein (ATRX is a chromatin-remodeling factor known to regulate DNA methylation at repetitive sequences of the human genome. We have previously demonstrated that ATRX binds to pericentric heterochromatin domains in mouse oocytes at the metaphase II stage where it is involved in mediating chromosome alignment at the meiotic spindle. However, the role of ATRX in the functional differentiation of chromatin structure during meiosis is not known. To test ATRX function in the germ line, we developed an oocyte-specific transgenic RNAi knockdown mouse model. Our results demonstrate that ATRX is required for heterochromatin formation and maintenance of chromosome stability during meiosis. During prophase I arrest, ATRX is necessary to recruit the transcriptional regulator DAXX (death domain associated protein to pericentric heterochromatin. At the metaphase II stage, transgenic ATRX-RNAi oocytes exhibit abnormal chromosome morphology associated with reduced phosphorylation of histone 3 at serine 10 as well as chromosome segregation defects leading to aneuploidy and severely reduced fertility. Notably, a large proportion of ATRX-depleted oocytes and 1-cell stage embryos exhibit chromosome fragments and centromeric DNA-containing micronuclei. Our results provide novel evidence indicating that ATRX is required for centromere stability and the epigenetic control of heterochromatin function during meiosis and the transition to the first mitosis.

  8. Down-regulated centromere protein-Ⅰ arrests cell growth at G2/M phase in human embryo kidney cells%CENP-Ⅰ表达下调对HEK293细胞生长及染色体分离的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁泰先; 蔡燕; 彭乙华; 翁亚光; 施琼; 刘子杰; 刘斌; 李素彦

    2009-01-01

    Objective To construct the RNA interference eukaryotic expression vector targeting human centromere protein-Ⅰ (CENP-Ⅰ) and to observe its effect on the growth of human embryo kidney 293 cells ( HEK 293). Methods The expression vectors of pGenesil-1/CENP-Ⅰ-siRNA-1, pGenesil-1/CENP-Ⅰ-siRNA-2 and pGenesil-1/CENP-Ⅰ-siRNA-3 were constructed by gene recombination and then were transfected into the HEK293 cells by liposome. The expressions of CENP-Ⅰ at the protein and mRNA levels were detected by West-em blotting and fluorescence quality PCR (FQ-PCR). The effective vector and the best transfection time were selected. The growth and the cell cycle of the transfected cells were assessed by MTT assay and flow cytometry. Giemsa was used to stain the transfected cells to calculate the mitotic index. Results Sequence-specific siR-NAs targeting CENP-Ⅰ significantly down-regulated the expression of CENP-Ⅰ in HEK293 cells. The recombinant plasmid of pGenesil-1/CENP-Ⅰ-siRNA-3 was the effective vector. After transfecting for 72 h the best inhibited efficiency was achieved. In CENP-Ⅰ-siRNA transfected cells, the rate of cell growth was decreased markedly. Cells at G2/M phase and the mitotic index were increased conspicuous compared with the cells transfected with the blank vector or untransfected. Conclusion Down-regulation of CENP-Ⅰ in HEK293 cells by sequence spe-cific siRNA delays the cell growth and postpones the cell division.%目的 构建CENP-Ⅰ特异性RNA干扰真核表达载体,体外观察抑制CENP-Ⅰ基因表达对HEK293细胞生长、细胞周期和染色体数目异常率的影响.方法 构建CENP-Ⅰ siRNA真核表达载体,脂质体法将pGenesil-1空载体和pGene-sil-1/CENP-I-siRNA-1、pGenesil-1/CENP-Ⅰ-siRNA-2、pGenesil-1/CENP-Ⅰ-siRNA-3真核表达载体分别导入人胚肾HEK293细胞.转染后24、48、72 h收集细胞用Western blot和FQ-PCR检测HEK293细胞内CENP-Ⅰ蛋白及mRNA水平的表达情况,以确定干扰效果及

  9. Nucleolar activity and CENP-C regulate CENP-A and CAL1 availability for centromere assembly in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwenda, Lucretia; Collins, Caitriona M; Dattoli, Anna A; Dunleavy, Elaine M

    2016-04-15

    The centromere-specific histone CENP-A is the key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity. Whereas most histones are removed from mature sperm, CENP-A is retained to mark paternal centromeres. In Drosophila males we show that the centromere assembly factors CAL1 and CENP-C are required for meiotic chromosome segregation, CENP-A assembly and maintenance on sperm, as well as fertility. In meiosis, CENP-A accumulates with CAL1 in nucleoli. Furthermore, we show that CENP-C normally limits the release of CAL1 and CENP-A from nucleoli for proper centromere assembly in meiotic prophase I. Finally, we show that RNA polymerase I transcription is required for efficient CENP-A assembly in meiosis, as well as centromere tethering to nucleoli.

  10. Transient systemic inflammation does not alter the induction of tolerance to gastric autoantigens by migratory dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Dorothée; Ross, Ellen M; Allen, Stacey; Read, Simon; Houghton, Fiona J; Bedoui, Sammy; Boon, Louis; Gleeson, Paul A; van Driel, Ian R

    2014-06-01

    It has been proposed that activation of dendritic cells (DCs) presenting self-antigens during inflammation may lead to activation of autoreactive T cells and the development of autoimmunity. To test this hypothesis, we examined the presentation of the autoantigen recognized in autoimmune gastritis, gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase, which is naturally expressed in the stomach and is constitutively presented in the stomach-draining lymph nodes. Systemic administration to mice of the TLR9 agonist CpG DNA, agonist anti-CD40 Ab, or TLR4 agonist LPS all failed to abrogate the process of peripheral clonal deletion of H(+)/K(+) ATPase-specific CD4 T cells or promote the development of autoimmune gastritis. We demonstrated that migratory DCs from the stomach-draining lymph nodes are the only DC subset capable of constitutively presenting the endogenous gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase autoantigen in its normal physiological context. Analysis of costimulatory molecules indicated that, relative to resident DCs, migratory DCs displayed a partially activated phenotype in the steady state. Furthermore, migratory DCs were refractory to stimulation by transient exposure to TLR agonists, as they failed to upregulate costimulatory molecules, secrete significant amounts of inflammatory cytokines, or induce differentiation of effector T cells. Together, these data show that transient systemic inflammation failed to break tolerance to the gastric autoantigen, as migratory DCs presenting the gastric autoantigen remain tolerogenic under such conditions, demonstrating the robust nature of peripheral tolerance.

  11. The orthologue of Sjogren's syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 in Trypanosoma brucei is an immunogenic self-assembling molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P Price

    Full Text Available Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (PSS is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease, typically manifesting as lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands leading to chronically impaired lacrimal and salivary secretion. Sjögren's Syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 or NA14 is a major specific target for autoantibodies in PSS but the precise function and clinical relevance of this protein are largely unknown. Orthologues of the gene are absent from many of the commonly used model organisms but are present in Chlamyodomonas reinhardtii (in which it has been termed DIP13 and most protozoa. We report the functional characterisation of the orthologue of SSNA1 in the kinetoplastid parasite, Trypanosoma brucei. Both TbDIP13 and human SSNA1 are small coiled-coil proteins which are predicted to be remote homologues of the actin-binding protein tropomyosin. We use comparative proteomic methods to identify potential interacting partners of TbDIP13. We also show evidence that TbDIP13 is able to self-assemble into fibril-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, a property which may contribute to its immunogenicity. Endogenous TbDIP13 partially co-localises with acetylated α-tubulin in the insect procyclic stage of the parasite. However, deletion of the DIP13 gene in cultured bloodstream and procyclic stages of T. brucei has little effect on parasite growth or morphology, indicating either a degree of functional redundancy or a function in an alternative stage of the parasite life cycle.

  12. Expression and prognostic relevance of centromere protein A in primary osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiao-Min; Fu, Jie; Feng, Xiao-Jun; Huang, Xue; Wang, Shou-Mei; Chen, Xin-Feng; Zhu, Ming-Hua; Zhang, Shu-Hui

    2014-04-01

    Centromere protein A (CENP-A) is one of the fundamental components of the human active kinetochore and plays important roles in cell-cycle regulation, cell survival, and genetic stability. The aim of the present study was to explore the expression and prognostic significance of CENP-A in osteosarcoma. The results of real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting analysis revealed an enhanced expression of CENP-A in osteosarcomas relative to adjacent non-tumorous bone tissues at both mRNA and protein levels. Immunohistochemically, 72 of the 123 osteosarcoma specimens (58.5%) had high expression of CENP-A. CENP-A overexpression was significantly correlated with tumor size (P=0.002), poor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P=0.016), local recurrence/lung metastasis (P=0.001), high Ki-67 index (P=0.004), and P53 positivity (P=0.005). Median overall and recurrence-free survival time was significantly shorter in patients with high-CENP-A osteosarcomas than in those with low-CENP-A osteosarcomas. Multivariate analysis identified CENP-A as an independent poor prognostic factor for osteosarcoma. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that elevated CENP-A expression is significantly associated with osteosarcoma progression and has an independent prognostic value in predicting overall and recurrence-free survival for patients with osteosarcoma.

  13. [The effect of long-term exposure to low doses of endocrine disruptor ddt on serum levels of thyroid protein autoantigenes and antithyroid autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaglova, N V; Yaglov, V V

    2016-01-01

    Changes in secretion of thyroid autoantigenes and production of antithyroid autoantibodies after long-term exposure to low doses of DDT were studied. Changes in serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies and thyroid peroxidase, attributed to disruption of thyroxine production by DDT were found. Long-term exposure of rats to low doses of DDT revealed no specific impact on serum autoantibodies to all thyroid autoantigenes studied. The increase of the ratio of autoantibody/autoantigen for thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin was rather small and thus could not be considered as a significant symptom of thyroid autoimmunity.

  14. Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) as target autoantigen in liver autoimmunity: lost and found.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Smyk, Daniel S; Liaskos, Christos; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Feist, Eugen; Conrad, Karsten; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2012-12-01

    Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) has attracted the attention of liver immunologists for many years. This liver-specific lectin was found to be a major B and T cell autoantigenic target in patients with autoimmune liver diseases, and in particular in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). This review discusses the biological significance of ASGPR and its relevance to the pathogenesis of autoimmune and virus-triggered liver diseases. We also discuss emerging data on the diagnostic and clinical relevance of anti-ASGPR antibodies in light of recent reports based on commercially available anti-ASGPR enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Finally, we critically revisit the data reporting on disease-specific cellular immune responses against ASGPR and their relevance in relation to the pathogenesis of AIH.

  15. Structural and Biochemical Basis for Misfolded RNA Recognition by the Ro Autoantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs,G.; Stein, A.; Fu, C.; Reinisch, K.; Wolin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Ro autoantigen is ring-shaped, binds misfolded noncoding RNAs and is proposed to function in quality control. Here we determine how Ro interacts with misfolded RNAs. Binding of Ro to misfolded precursor (pre)-5S ribosomal RNA requires a single-stranded 3 end and helical elements. As mutating most sequences of the helices and tail results in modest decreases in binding, Ro may be able to associate with a range of RNAs. Ro binds several other RNAs that contain single-stranded tails. A crystal structure of Ro bound to a misfolded pre-5S rRNA fragment reveals that the tail inserts into the cavity, while a helix binds on the surface. Most contacts of Ro with the helix are to the backbone. Mutagenesis reveals that Ro has an extensive RNA-binding surface. We propose that Ro uses this surface to scavenge RNAs that fail to bind their specific RNA-binding proteins.

  16. Multiple sclerosis autoantigen myelin basic protein escapes control by ubiquitination during proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurov, Alexey; Kudriaeva, Anna; Kuzina, Ekaterina; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatyana; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Kravtsova-Ivantsiv, Yelena; Ciechanover, Aaron; Gabibov, Alexander

    2014-06-20

    The vast majority of cellular proteins are degraded by the 26S proteasome after their ubiquitination. Here, we report that the major component of the myelin multilayered membrane sheath, myelin basic protein (MBP), is hydrolyzed by the 26S proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner both in vitro and in mammalian cells. As a proteasomal substrate, MBP reveals a distinct and physiologically relevant concentration range for ubiquitin-independent proteolysis. Enzymatic deimination prevents hydrolysis of MBP by the proteasome, suggesting that an abnormally basic charge contributes to its susceptibility toward proteasome-mediated degradation. To our knowledge, our data reveal the first case of a pathophysiologically important autoantigen as a ubiquitin-independent substrate of the 26S proteasome.

  17. The Role of Dicentric Chromosome Formation and Secondary Centromere Deletion in the Evolution of Myeloid Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth N. MacKinnon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dicentric chromosomes have been identified as instigators of the genome instability associated with cancer, but this instability is often resolved by one of a number of different secondary events. These include centromere inactivation, inversion, and intercentromeric deletion. Deletion or excision of one of the centromeres may be a significant occurrence in myeloid malignancy and other malignancies but has not previously been widely recognized, and our reports are the first describing centromere deletion in cancer cells. We review what is known about dicentric chromosomes and the mechanisms by which they can undergo stabilization in both constitutional and cancer genomes. The failure to identify centromere deletion in cancer cells until recently can be partly explained by the standard approaches to routine diagnostic cancer genome analysis, which do not identify centromeres in the context of chromosome organization. This hitherto hidden group of primary dicentric, secondary monocentric chromosomes, together with other unrecognized dicentric chromosomes, points to a greater role for dicentric chromosomes in cancer initiation and progression than is generally acknowledged. We present a model that predicts and explains a significant role for dicentric chromosomes in the formation of unbalanced translocations in malignancy.

  18. Recognition of the centromere-specific histone Cse4 by the chaperone Scm3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med)

    2011-09-20

    A specialized nucleosome is a component of all eukaryotic kinetochores. The core of this nucleosome contains a centromere-specific histone, CENP-A (the Cse4 gene product in budding yeast), instead of the usual H3. Assembly of a centromeric nucleosome depends on a specific chaperone, called Scm3 in yeast and HJURP in higher eukaryotes. We describe here the structure of a complex formed by an N-terminal fragment of Scm3 with the histone-fold domains of Cse4, and H4, all prepared as recombinant proteins derived from the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The contacts of Scm3 with Cse4 explain its selectivity for the centromere-specific histone; key residues at the interface are conserved in HJURP, indicating a common mechanism for centromeric-histone deposition. We also report the structure of a (Cse4 : H4)2 heterotetramer; comparison with the structure of the Scm3:Cse4:H4 complex shows that tetramer formation and DNA-binding require displacement of Scm3 from the nucleosome core. The two structures together suggest that specific contacts between the chaperone and Cse4, rather than an altered overall structure of the nucleosome core, determine the selective presence of Cse4 at centromeres.

  19. Centromere-independent accumulation of cohesin at ectopic heterochromatin sites induces chromosome stretching during anaphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel A Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pericentric heterochromatin, while often considered as "junk" DNA, plays important functions in chromosome biology. It contributes to sister chromatid cohesion, a process mediated by the cohesin complex that ensures proper genome segregation during nuclear division. Long stretches of heterochromatin are almost exclusively placed at centromere-proximal regions but it remains unclear if there is functional (or mechanistic importance in linking the sites of sister chromatid cohesion to the chromosomal regions that mediate spindle attachment (the centromere. Using engineered chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster, we demonstrate that cohesin enrichment is dictated by the presence of heterochromatin rather than centromere proximity. This preferential accumulation is caused by an enrichment of the cohesin-loading factor (Nipped-B/NIPBL/Scc2 at dense heterochromatic regions. As a result, chromosome translocations containing ectopic pericentric heterochromatin embedded in euchromatin display additional cohesin-dependent constrictions. These ectopic cohesion sites, placed away from the centromere, disjoin abnormally during anaphase and chromosomes exhibit a significant increase in length during anaphase (termed chromatin stretching. These results provide evidence that long stretches of heterochromatin distant from the centromere, as often found in many cancers, are sufficient to induce abnormal accumulation of cohesin at these sites and thereby compromise the fidelity of chromosome segregation.

  20. The role of dicentric chromosome formation and secondary centromere deletion in the evolution of myeloid malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Ruth N; Campbell, Lynda J

    2011-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes have been identified as instigators of the genome instability associated with cancer, but this instability is often resolved by one of a number of different secondary events. These include centromere inactivation, inversion, and intercentromeric deletion. Deletion or excision of one of the centromeres may be a significant occurrence in myeloid malignancy and other malignancies but has not previously been widely recognized, and our reports are the first describing centromere deletion in cancer cells. We review what is known about dicentric chromosomes and the mechanisms by which they can undergo stabilization in both constitutional and cancer genomes. The failure to identify centromere deletion in cancer cells until recently can be partly explained by the standard approaches to routine diagnostic cancer genome analysis, which do not identify centromeres in the context of chromosome organization. This hitherto hidden group of primary dicentric, secondary monocentric chromosomes, together with other unrecognized dicentric chromosomes, points to a greater role for dicentric chromosomes in cancer initiation and progression than is generally acknowledged. We present a model that predicts and explains a significant role for dicentric chromosomes in the formation of unbalanced translocations in malignancy.

  1. Transposons play an important role in the evolution and diversification of centromeres among closely related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eJackson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are important chromosomal regions necessary for eukaryotic cell segregation and replication. Due to high amounts of tandem repeats and transposons, centromeres have been difficult to sequence in most multicellular organisms, thus their sequence structure and evolution are poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed transposons in the centromere 8 (Cen8 from the African cultivated rice (O. glaberrima and two subspecies of the Asian cultivated rice (O. sativa, indica and japonica. We detected much higher transposon contents (>69% in centromere regions than in the whole genomes of O. sativa ssp japonica and O. glaberrima (~35%. We compared the three Cen8s and identified numerous recent insertions of transposons that were frequently organized into multiple-layer nested blocks, similar to nested transposons in maize. Except for the Hopi retrotransposon, all LTR retrotransposons were shared but exhibit different abundances amongst the three Cen8s. Even though a majority of the transposons were located in intergenic regions, some gene-related transposons were found and may be involved in gene diversification. Chromatin immunoprecipitated (ChIP data analysis revealed that 165 families from both Class I and Class II transposons were found in CENH3-associated chromatin sequences. These results indicate essential roles for transposons in centromeres and that the rapid divergence of the Cen8 sequences between the two cultivated rice species was primarily caused by recent transposon insertions.

  2. A cytogenetic study of nuclear power plant workers using the micronucleus-centromere assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierens, H; Vral, A; Barbé, M; Aousalah, B; De Ridder, L

    1999-09-15

    A cytogenetic study was performed in 215 nuclear power plant workers occupationally exposed to radiation using the micronucleus-centromere assay for peripheral blood lymphocytes. As control population served administrative staff with yearly doses below 1 mSv. The increase of the micronucleus frequency with age, observed in the non-smoking control population, is mainly due to an enhanced number of centromere-positive micronuclei, pointing to an increased chromosome loss. No differences in the number of micronuclei, centromere-positive and centromere-negative micronuclei between smokers and non-smokers are observed. An analysis of the micronucleus data vs. the dose accumulated over the 10 years preceding the venepuncture shows no significant clastogenic or aneuploidogenic effects of the exposure in the studied population which is representative for workers in the nuclear industry at present. According to the linear fits to our data an increase of the micronucleus frequency pro rata 0.5 per 1000 binucleated cells per year, related to the centromere-negative micronuclei, may be expected for workers with the maximal tolerable dose of 20 mSv/year.

  3. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Honglin Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.

  4. Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens in pancreatic allograft recipients with preexisting beta cell autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Muhammad Ahmad; Fridell, Jonathan; Book, Benita; Faiz, Sara; Sharfuddin, Asif; Wiebke, Eric; Rigby, Mark; Taber, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens and its relevance in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in pancreatic allograft recipients is not well known. Thirty-three patients requiring a pancreas transplant were enrolled in an IRB approved study. They underwent prospective monitoring for DSA and beta cell autoantibody (BCAA) levels to GAD65, insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA-2), insulin (micro-IAA [mIAA]), and islet-specific zinc transporter isoform-8 (ZnT8). Twenty-five (75.7%) had pre-transplant BCAA. Twenty had a single antibody (mIAA n = 15, GAD65 n = 5); five had two or more BCAA (GAD65 + mIAA n = 2, GAD65 + mIAA+IA-2 n = 2, GA65 + mIAA+IA-2 + ZnT8 = 1). No changes in GAD65 (p > 0.29), IA-2 (>0.16), and ZnT8 (p > 0.07) were observed between pre-transplant and post-transplant at 6 or 12 months. A decrease in mIAA from pre- to post-6 months (p BCAA was observed at one yr. Seven (21.0%) developed de novo DSA. The incidence of DSA was 24% in patients with BCAA vs. 25% in patients without BCAA (p = 0.69). Pancreatic allograft function of patients with vs. without BCAA, and with and without BCAA + DSA was comparable until last follow-up (three yr). Re-exposure to beta cell autoantigens by pancreas transplant may not lead to increased levels or development of new BCAA or pancreatic allograft dysfunction.

  5. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Honglin; Luo, Hui; Yan, Mei; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.

  6. Meiosis-Specific Loading of the Centromere-Specific Histone CENH3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Shibata, Fukashi; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Chen, Changbin; Murata, Minoru; Chan, Simon W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Centromere behavior is specialized in meiosis I, so that sister chromatids of homologous chromosomes are pulled toward the same side of the spindle (through kinetochore mono-orientation) and chromosome number is reduced. Factors required for mono-orientation have been identified in yeast. However, comparatively little is known about how meiotic centromere behavior is specialized in animals and plants that typically have large tandem repeat centromeres. Kinetochores are nucleated by the centromere-specific histone CENH3. Unlike conventional histone H3s, CENH3 is rapidly evolving, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. Here we describe chimeric variants of CENH3 with alterations in the N-terminal tail that are specifically defective in meiosis. Arabidopsis thaliana cenh3 mutants expressing a GFP-tagged chimeric protein containing the H3 N-terminal tail and the CENH3 C-terminus (termed GFP-tailswap) are sterile because of random meiotic chromosome segregation. These defects result from the specific depletion of GFP-tailswap protein from meiotic kinetochores, which contrasts with its normal localization in mitotic cells. Loss of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant in meiosis affects recruitment of the essential kinetochore protein MIS12. Our findings suggest that CENH3 loading dynamics might be regulated differently in mitosis and meiosis. As further support for our hypothesis, we show that GFP-tailswap protein is recruited back to centromeres in a subset of pollen grains in GFP-tailswap once they resume haploid mitosis. Meiotic recruitment of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant is not restored by removal of the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit REC8. Our results reveal the existence of a specialized loading pathway for CENH3 during meiosis that is likely to involve the hypervariable N-terminal tail. Meiosis-specific CENH3 dynamics may play a role in modulating meiotic centromere behavior. PMID:21695238

  7. Recognition of the centromere-specific histone Cse4 by the chaperone Scm3

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    A specialized nucleosome is a component of all eukaryotic kinetochores. The core of this nucleosome contains a centromere-specific histone, CENP-A (the Cse4 gene product in budding yeast), instead of the usual H3. Assembly of a centromeric nucleosome depends on a specific chaperone, called Scm3 in yeast and HJURP in higher eukaryotes. We describe here the structure of a complex formed by an N-terminal fragment of Scm3 with the histone-fold domains of Cse4, and H4, all prepared as recombinant ...

  8. Replication initiator DnaA binds at the Caulobacter centromere and enables chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Paola E; Kalogeraki, Virginia S; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-11-11

    During cell division, multiple processes are highly coordinated to faithfully generate genetically equivalent daughter cells. In bacteria, the mechanisms that underlie the coordination of chromosome replication and segregation are poorly understood. Here, we report that the conserved replication initiator, DnaA, can mediate chromosome segregation independent of replication initiation. It does so by binding directly to the parS centromere region of the chromosome, and mutations that alter this interaction result in cells that display aberrant centromere translocation and cell division. We propose that DnaA serves to coordinate bacterial DNA replication with the onset of chromosome segregation.

  9. Mis17 is a regulatory module of the Mis6-Mal2-Sim4 centromere complex that is required for the recruitment of CenH3/CENP-A in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiharu Shiroiwa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The centromere is the chromosome domain on which the mitotic kinetochore forms for proper segregation. Deposition of the centromeric histone H3 (CenH3, CENP-A is vital for the formation of centromere-specific chromatin. The Mis6-Mal2-Sim4 complex of the fission yeast S. pombe is required for the recruitment of CenH3 (Cnp1, but its function remains obscure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mass spectrometry was performed on the proteins precipitated with Mis6- and Mis17-FLAG. The results together with the previously identified Sim4- and Mal2-TAP precipitated proteins indicated that the complex contains 12 subunits, Mis6, Sim4, Mal2, Mis15, Mis17, Cnl2, Fta1-4, Fta6-7, nine of which have human centromeric protein (CENP counterparts. Domain dissection indicated that the carboxy-half of Mis17 is functional, while its amino-half is regulatory. Overproduction of the amino-half caused strong negative dominance, which led to massive chromosome missegregation and hypersensitivity to the histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA. Mis17 was hyperphosphorylated and overproduction-induced negative dominance was abolished in six kinase-deletion mutants, ssp2 (AMPK, ppk9 (AMPK, ppk15 (Yak1, ppk30 (Ark1, wis4 (Ssk2, and lsk1 (P-TEFb. CONCLUSIONS: Mis17 may be a regulatory module of the Mis6 complex. Negative dominance of the Mis17 fragment is exerted while the complex and CenH3 remain at the centromere, a result that differs from the mislocalization seen in the mis17-362 mutant. The known functions of the kinases suggest an unexpected link between Mis17 and control of the cortex actin, nutrition, and signal/transcription. Possible interpretations are discussed.

  10. Pancreatic beta cells express two autoantigenic forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase, a 65-kDa hydrophilic form and a 64-kDa amphiphilic form which can be both membrane-bound and soluble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, S; Schierbeck, H; Aanstoot, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 64-kDa pancreatic beta-cell autoantigen, which is a target of autoantibodies associated with early as well as progressive stages of beta-cell destruction, resulting in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) in humans, has been identified as the gamma-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme glutamic...... acid decarboxylase. We have identified two autoantigenic forms of this protein in rat pancreatic beta-cells, a Mr 65,000 (GAD65) hydrophilic and soluble form of pI 6.9-7.1 and a Mr 64,000 (GAD64) component of pI 6.7. GAD64 is more abundant than GAD65 and has three distinct forms with regard to cellular...... compartment and hydrophobicity. A major portion of GAD64 is hydrophobic and firmly membrane-anchored and can only be released from membrane fractions by detergent. A second portion is hydrophobic but soluble or of a low membrane avidity, and a third minor portion is soluble and hydrophilic. All the GAD64...

  11. Escape from Mitotic Arrest: An Unexpected Connection Between Microtubule Dynamics and Epigenetic Regulation of Centromeric Chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Anuja A; Walworth, Nancy C

    2015-12-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation is necessary to ensure genomic integrity. Segregation depends on the proper functioning of the centromere, kinetochore, and mitotic spindle microtubules and is monitored by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defects in Dis1, a microtubule-associated protein that influences microtubule dynamics, lead to mitotic arrest as a result of an active SAC and consequent failure to grow at low temperature. In a mutant dis1 background (dis1-288), loss of function of Msc1, a fission yeast homolog of the KDM5 family of proteins, suppresses the growth defect and promotes normal mitosis. Genetic analysis implicates a histone deacetylase (HDAC)-linked pathway in suppression because HDAC mutants clr6-1, clr3∆, and sir2∆, though not hos2∆, also promote normal mitosis in the dis1-288 mutant. Suppression of the dis phenotype through loss of msc1 function requires the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2 and is limited by the presence of the heterochromatin-associated HP1 protein homolog Swi6. We speculate that alterations in histone acetylation promote a centromeric chromatin environment that compensates for compromised dis1 function by allowing for successful kinetochore-microtubule interactions that can satisfy the SAC. In cells arrested in mitosis by mutation of dis1, loss of function of epigenetic determinants such as Msc1 or specific HDACs can promote cell survival. Because the KDM5 family of proteins has been implicated in human cancers, an appreciation of the potential role of this family of proteins in chromosome segregation is warranted.

  12. 1型糖尿病自身抗原研究进展%Autoantigens in type 1 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟双

    2015-01-01

    自身免疫是1型糖尿病发病的重要机制.1型糖尿病自身抗原的发现为疾病的发病机制及临床诊治开拓了视野.胰岛素、谷氨酸脱羧酶65、胰岛细胞瘤相关抗原2等是已发现的1型糖尿病主要的自身抗原.近年来,1型糖尿病自身抗原如嗜铬粒蛋白A、胰岛淀粉样多肽、锌转运体8、胰-十二指肠同源盒因子1备受重视.该文就1型糖尿病自身抗原的研究进展进行综述.%Autoimmunity is the main mechanism of type 1 diabetes.The discovery of autoantigens has broadened our understanding of pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of type 1 diabetes.Insulin,glutamic acid decarboxylase 65,and insulinoma-associated protein 2 have been found to be major autoantigens of type 1 diabetes.In recent years,some autoantigens in type 1 diabetes,such as chromogranin A,islet amyloid polypeptide,zinc transporter 8,and pancreatic duodenal homeobox factor-1,have received some attention in the literature.The purpose of this article is to review the progress of novel autoantigens in type 1 diabetes.

  13. Chromosome 17 centromere duplication and responsiveness to anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibau, Ariadna; López-Vilaró, Laura; Pérez-Olabarria, Maitane; Vázquez, Tania; Pons, Cristina; Gich, Ignasi; Alonso, Carmen; Ojeda, Belén; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Lerma, Enrique; Barnadas, Agustí; Escuin, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) genes have been proposed as predictive biomarkers of sensitivity to anthracycline chemotherapy. Recently, chromosome 17 centromere enumeration probe (CEP17) duplication has also been associated with increased responsiveness to anthracyclines. However, reports are conflicting and none of these tumor markers can yet be considered a clinically reliable predictor of response to anthracyclines. We studied the association of TOP2A gene alterations, HER2 gene amplification, and CEP17 duplication with response to anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 140 patients with operable or locally advanced breast cancer. HER2 was tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization and TOP2A and CEP17 by chromogenic in situ hybridization. Thirteen patients (9.3%) achieved pathologic complete response (pCR). HER2 amplification was present in 24 (17.5%) of the tumors. TOP2A amplification occurred in seven tumors (5.1%). CEP17 duplication was detected in 13 patients (9.5%). CEP17 duplication correlated with a higher rate of pCR [odds ratio (OR) 6.55, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.25-34.29, P = .026], and analysis of TOP2A amplification showed a trend bordering on statistical significance (OR 6.97, 95% CI 0.96-50.12, P = .054). TOP2A amplification and CEP17 duplication combined were strongly associated with pCR (OR 6.71, 95% CI 1.66-27.01, P = .007). HER2 amplification did not correlate with pCR. Our results suggest that CEP17 duplication predicts pCR to primary anthracycline-based chemotherapy. CEP17 duplication, TOP2A amplifications, and HER2 amplifications were not associated with prognosis.

  14. Apoptosis and Redistribution of the Ro Autoantigen in Balb/c Mouse Like in Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Herrera-Esparza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In subacute cutaneous lupus eryhematosus (SCLE the cutaneous antigens constitute the main source of Ro and La autoantigens. The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate if UV light increases the availability of Ro autoantigen in the skin, also the blocking effect of Ac-DEVD-CMK a caspase inhibitor was assessed. For this purpose newborn Balb/c mice were UVB irradiated (5–30 mJ/cm2 equivalent to a moderate to severe sunburn. Animals were injected with monoclonal anti-Ro antibodies from SCLE patients. Apoptosis was also induced by anti-Fas antibody injection. Skin samples were examined by direct immunofluoresence, by TUNEL, and the expression of caspase 3 by RT-PCR. Major findings of present studies were: 1. UVB irradiation and anti-Fas induced apoptosis of keratinocytes. 2. Apoptosis redistribute the Ro antigen on cell surface and is better triggered by Ro antibody. 3. The caspase 3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CMK decreases the availability of Ro autoantigen in epidermis and prevents deposition of anti-Ro. In conclusion, the caspase pathway would be blocked to avoid anti-Ro deposition along skin; this finding would be a prospect in the treatment of SCLE patients.

  15. Centromeres cluster de novo at the beginning of meiosis in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoyu Wen

    Full Text Available In most eukaryotes that have been studied, the telomeres cluster into a bouquet early in meiosis, and in wheat and its relatives and in Arabidopsis the centromeres pair at the same time. In Arabidopsis, the telomeres do not cluster as a typical telomere bouquet on the nuclear membrane but are associated with the nucleolus both somatically and at the onset of meiosis. We therefore assessed whether Brachypodium distachyon, a monocot species related to cereals and whose genome is approximately twice the size of Arabidopsis thaliana, also exhibited an atypical telomere bouquet and centromere pairing. In order to investigate the occurrence of a bouquet and centromere pairing in B distachyon, we first had to establish protocols for studying meiosis in this species. This enabled us to visualize chromosome behaviour in meiocytes derived from young B distachyon spikelets in three-dimensions by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, and accurately to stage meiosis based on chromatin morphology in relation to spikelet size and the timing of sample collection. Surprisingly, this study revealed that the centromeres clustered as a single site at the same time as the telomeres also formed a bouquet or single cluster.

  16. Inter-domain Cooperation in INCENP Promotes Aurora B Relocation from Centromeres to Microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando van der Horst

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosomal passenger complex is essential for error-free chromosome segregation and proper execution of cytokinesis. To coordinate nuclear division with cytoplasmic division, its enzymatic subunit, Aurora B, relocalizes from centromeres in metaphase to the spindle midzone in anaphase. In budding yeast, this requires dephosphorylation of the microtubule-binding (MTB domain of the INCENP analog Sli15. The mechanistic basis for this relocalization in metazoans is incompletely understood. We demonstrate that the putative coiled-coil domain within INCENP drives midzone localization of Aurora B via a direct, electrostatic interaction with microtubules. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the CPC multimerizes via INCENP’s centromere-targeting domain (CEN box, which increases the MTB affinity of INCENP. In (prometaphase, the MTB affinity of INCENP is outcompeted by the affinity of its CEN box for centromeres, while at anaphase onset—when the histone mark H2AT120 is dephosphorylated—INCENP and Aurora B switch from centromere to microtubule localization.

  17. Inter-domain Cooperation in INCENP Promotes Aurora B Relocation from Centromeres to Microtubules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, Armando; Vromans, Martijn J M; Bouwman, Kim; van der Waal, Maike S; Hadders, Michael A; Lens, Susanne M A; Lens, SMA

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex is essential for error-free chromosome segregation and proper execution of cytokinesis. To coordinate nuclear division with cytoplasmic division, its enzymatic subunit, Aurora B, relocalizes from centromeres in metaphase to the spindle midzone in anaphase. In buddin

  18. [Chromosomal organization of centromeric Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons in Allium cepa L. and Allium fistulosum L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, A V; Kirov, I V; Khrustaleva, L I

    2014-06-01

    This is the first report on the presence of Ty3/gypsy-like retrotransposons in the centromeric region of Allium cepa and Allium fistulosum. The paper identifies the putative Ty3/gypsy centromeric retrotransposons (CR) among the DNA sequences of A. cepa present in the NCBI database and evaluates their copy number in the genomes of Allium cepa and Allium fistulosum. The putative copy number of Ty3/gypsy CR constituted about 26000 for A. cepa and about 7000 for A. fistulosum. The chromosomal organization of Ty3/gypsy CR was analyzed with the help of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The 300-bp PCR products synthesized with genomic DNA of Allium cepa and Allium fistulosum and primers designed for the sequence ET645811 of A. cepa (Genome Survey Sequence database), displaying similarity to the reverse transcriptase of the CR Ty3/gypsy family, served as FISH hybridization probes. On the chromosomes of A. cepa, hybridization signals were mainly localized in the centromeric region. On the chromosomes of A. fistulosum the signals were less expressed in the centromeric regions, though they were abundant in other chromosomal regions. The pathways of evolution in these closely related species are discussed.

  19. Survivin mediates targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex to the centromere and midbody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, G; Kauw, JJW; Medema, RH; Lens, SMA

    2006-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) coordinates chromosomal and cytoskeletal events of mitosis. The enzymatic core of this complex (Aurora-B) is guided through the mitotic cell by its companion chromosomal passenger proteins, inner centromere protein (INCENP), Survivin and Borealin/Dasra-B, ther

  20. Correlation between centromere protein-F autoantibodies and cancer analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Morten Frisch, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Centromere protein-F (CENP-F) is a large nuclear protein of 367 kDa, which is involved in multiple mitosis-related events such as proper assembly of the kinetochores, stabilization of heterochromatin, chromosome alignment and mitotic checkpoint signaling. Several studies have shown a correlation...

  1. Chromatin determinants of the inner-centromere rely on replication factors with functions that impart cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takuya; Kawasumi, Ryotaro; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Hori, Tetsuya; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Losada, Ana; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Branzei, Dana

    2016-10-18

    Replication fork-associated factors promote genome integrity and protect against cancer. Mutations in the DDX11 helicase and the ESCO2 acetyltransferase also cause related developmental disorders classified as cohesinopathies. Here we generated vertebrate model cell lines of these disorders and cohesinopathies-related genes. We found that vertebrate DDX11 and Tim-Tipin are individually needed to compensate for ESCO2 loss in chromosome segregation, with DDX11 also playing complementary roles with ESCO2 in centromeric cohesion. Our study reveals that overt centromeric cohesion loss does not necessarily precede chromosome missegregation, while both these problems correlate with, and possibly originate from, inner-centromere defects involving reduced phosphorylation of histone H3T3 (pH3T3) in the region. Interestingly, the mitotic pH3T3 mark was defective in all analyzed replication-related mutants with functions in cohesion. The results pinpoint mitotic pH3T3 as a postreplicative chromatin mark that is sensitive to replication stress and conducts with different kinetics to robust centromeric cohesion and correct chromosome segregation.

  2. Novel Centromeric Loci of the Wine and Beer Yeast Dekkera bruxellensis CEN1 and CEN2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishchuk, Olena P.; Vojvoda Zeljko, Tanja; Schifferdecker, Anna J.

    2016-01-01

    The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis thrives in environments that are harsh and limiting, especially in concentrations with low oxygen and high ethanol. Its different strains' chromosomes greatly vary in number (karyotype). This study isolates two novel centromeric loci (CEN1 and CEN2...

  3. Mutations in ZBTB24 are associated with immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, and facial anomalies syndrome type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J.C. de; Wang, J.; Balog, J.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Frants, R.R.; Straasheijm, K.R.; Aytekin, C.; Burg, M. van der; Duprez, L.; Ferster, A.; Gennery, A.R.; Gimelli, G.; Reisli, I.; Schuetz, C.; Schulz, A.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Sznajer, Y.; Wijmenga, C.; Eggermond, M.C. van; Ostaijen-ten Dam, M.M. van; Lankester, A.C.; Tol, M.J. van; Elsen, P.J. van den; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Maarel, S.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is mainly characterized by recurrent, often fatal, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. About 50% of patients carry mutations in the DNA methyltransferase 3B gene (DNMT3B) (ICF1). The remaining

  4. Aurora B kinase controls the separation of centromeric and telomeric heterochromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Gachet, Yannick; Reyes, Celine; Tournier, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of chromosomes is coordinated at multiple levels to prevent chromosome loss, a phenotype frequently observed in cancers. We recently described an essential role for telomeres in the physical separation of chromosomes and identified Aurora B kinase as a double agent involved in the separation of centromeric and telomeric heterochromatin.

  5. Aurora B kinase controls the separation of centromeric and telomeric heterochromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, Yannick; Reyes, Celine; Tournier, Sylvie

    2016-03-01

    The segregation of chromosomes is coordinated at multiple levels to prevent chromosome loss, a phenotype frequently observed in cancers. We recently described an essential role for telomeres in the physical separation of chromosomes and identified Aurora B kinase as a double agent involved in the separation of centromeric and telomeric heterochromatin.

  6. Repetitive sequence analysis and karyotyping reveals centromere-associated DNA sequences in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qunyan; Cai, Zexi; Hu, Tianhua; Liu, Huijun; Bao, Chonglai; Mao, Weihai; Jin, Weiwei

    2015-04-18

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L., 2n = 2x = 18) is a major root vegetable crop especially in eastern Asia. Radish root contains various nutritions which play an important role in strengthening immunity. Repetitive elements are primary components of the genomic sequence and the most important factors in genome size variations in higher eukaryotes. To date, studies about repetitive elements of radish are still limited. To better understand genome structure of radish, we undertook a study to evaluate the proportion of repetitive elements and their distribution in radish. We conducted genome-wide characterization of repetitive elements in radish with low coverage genome sequencing followed by similarity-based cluster analysis. Results showed that about 31% of the genome was composed of repetitive sequences. Satellite repeats were the most dominating elements of the genome. The distribution pattern of three satellite repeat sequences (CL1, CL25, and CL43) on radish chromosomes was characterized using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). CL1 was predominantly located at the centromeric region of all chromosomes, CL25 located at the subtelomeric region, and CL43 was a telomeric satellite. FISH signals of two satellite repeats, CL1 and CL25, together with 5S rDNA and 45S rDNA, provide useful cytogenetic markers to identify each individual somatic metaphase chromosome. The centromere-specific histone H3 (CENH3) has been used as a marker to identify centromere DNA sequences. One putative CENH3 (RsCENH3) was characterized and cloned from radish. Its deduced amino acid sequence shares high similarities to those of the CENH3s in Brassica species. An antibody against B. rapa CENH3, specifically stained radish centromeres. Immunostaining and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) tests with anti-BrCENH3 antibody demonstrated that both the centromere-specific retrotransposon (CR-Radish) and satellite repeat (CL1) are directly associated with RsCENH3 in radish. Proportions

  7. Sisters unbound is required for meiotic centromeric cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B; McKee, Bruce D

    2014-11-01

    Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires sister centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when sister chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between sister centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called sisters unbound (sunn), which is required for stable sister chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Characterization of centromeric histone H3 (CENH3 variants in cultivated and wild carrots (Daucus sp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Dunemann

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, centromeres are the assembly sites for the kinetochore, a multi-protein complex to which spindle microtubules are attached at mitosis and meiosis, thereby ensuring segregation of chromosomes during cell division. They are specified by incorporation of CENH3, a centromere specific histone H3 variant which replaces canonical histone H3 in the nucleosomes of functional centromeres. To lay a first foundation of a putative alternative haploidization strategy based on centromere-mediated genome elimination in cultivated carrots, in the presented research we aimed at the identification and cloning of functional CENH3 genes in Daucus carota and three distantly related wild species of genus Daucus varying in basic chromosome numbers. Based on mining the carrot transcriptome followed by a subsequent PCR-based cloning, homologous coding sequences for CENH3s of the four Daucus species were identified. The ORFs of the CENH3 variants were very similar, and an amino acid sequence length of 146 aa was found in three out of the four species. Comparison of Daucus CENH3 amino acid sequences with those of other plant CENH3s as well as their phylogenetic arrangement among other dicot CENH3s suggest that the identified genes are authentic CENH3 homologs. To verify the location of the CENH3 protein in the kinetochore regions of the Daucus chromosomes, a polyclonal antibody based on a peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of DcCENH3 was developed and used for anti-CENH3 immunostaining of mitotic root cells. The chromosomal location of CENH3 proteins in the centromere regions of the chromosomes could be confirmed. For genetic localization of the CENH3 gene in the carrot genome, a previously constructed linkage map for carrot was used for mapping a CENH3-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR marker, and the CENH3 locus was mapped on the carrot chromosome 9.

  9. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Honglin Zhu; Hui Luo; Mei Yan; Xiaoxia Zuo; Quan-Zhen Li

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplas-mic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epi-topes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection.

  10. Autoantigen TRIM21/Ro52 as a Possible Target for Treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusuke Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic, systemic, and autoimmune disease, whose etiology is still unknown. Although there has been progress in the treatment of SLE through the use of glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive drugs, these drugs have limited efficacy and pose significant risks of toxicity. Moreover, prognosis of patients with SLE has remained difficult to assess. TRIM21/Ro52/SS-A1, a 52-kDa protein, is an autoantigen recognized by antibodies in sera of patients with SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS, another systemic autoimmune disease, and anti-TRIM21 antibodies have been used as a diagnostic marker for decades. TRIM21 belongs to the tripartite motif-containing (TRIM super family, which has been found to play important roles in innate and acquired immunity. Recently, TRIM21 has been shown to be involved in both physiological immune responses and pathological autoimmune processes. For example, TRIM21 ubiquitylates proteins of the interferon-regulatory factor (IRF family and regulates type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines. In this paper, we summarize molecular features of TRIM21 revealed so far and discuss its potential as an attractive therapeutic target for SLE.

  11. Atomic features of an autoantigen in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zheng; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Greene, Mark I; Cines, Douglas B

    2016-07-01

    Autoantigen development is poorly understood at the atomic level. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an autoimmune thrombotic disorder caused by antibodies to an antigen composed of platelet factor 4 (PF4) and heparin or cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In solution, PF4 exists as an equilibrium among monomers, dimers and tetramers. Structural studies of these interacting components helped delineate a multi-step process involved in the pathogenesis of HIT. First, heparin binds to the 'closed' end of the PF4 tetramer and stabilizes its conformation; exposing the 'open' end. Second, PF4 arrays along heparin/GAG chains, which approximate tetramers, form large antigenic complexes that enhance antibody avidity. Third, pathogenic HIT antibodies bind to the 'open' end of stabilized PF4 tetramers to form an IgG/PF4/heparin ternary immune complex and also to propagate the formation of 'ultralarge immune complexes' (ULCs) that contain multiple IgG antibodies. Fourth, ULCs signal through FcγRIIA receptors, activating platelets and monocytes directly and generating thrombin, which transactivates hematopoietic and endothelial cells. A non-pathogenic anti-PF4 antibody prevents tetramer formation, binding of pathogenic antibody, platelet activation and thrombosis, providing a new approach to manage HIT. An improved understanding of the pathogenesis of HIT may lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutics for this autoimmune disease.

  12. Esperanto for histones: CENP-A, not CenH3, is the centromeric histone H3 variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnshaw, W C; Allshire, R C; Black, B E; Bloom, K; Brinkley, B R; Brown, W; Cheeseman, I M; Choo, K H A; Copenhaver, G P; Deluca, J G; Desai, A; Diekmann, S; Erhardt, S; Fitzgerald-Hayes, M; Foltz, D; Fukagawa, T; Gassmann, R; Gerlich, D W; Glover, D M; Gorbsky, G J; Harrison, S C; Heun, P; Hirota, T; Jansen, L E T; Karpen, G; Kops, G J P L; Lampson, M A; Lens, S M; Losada, A; Luger, K; Maiato, H; Maddox, P S; Margolis, R L; Masumoto, H; McAinsh, A D; Mellone, B G; Meraldi, P; Musacchio, A; Oegema, K; O'Neill, R J; Salmon, E D; Scott, K C; Straight, A F; Stukenberg, P T; Sullivan, B A; Sullivan, K F; Sunkel, C E; Swedlow, J R; Walczak, C E; Warburton, P E; Westermann, S; Willard, H F; Wordeman, L; Yanagida, M; Yen, T J; Yoda, K; Cleveland, D W

    2013-04-01

    The first centromeric protein identified in any species was CENP-A, a divergent member of the histone H3 family that was recognised by autoantibodies from patients with scleroderma-spectrum disease. It has recently been suggested to rename this protein CenH3. Here, we argue that the original name should be maintained both because it is the basis of a long established nomenclature for centromere proteins and because it avoids confusion due to the presence of canonical histone H3 at centromeres.

  13. 系统性红斑狼疮中内皮细胞相关自身抗原的鉴定%Identification of autoantigens associated with systemic lupus erythematosus from endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹毅; 吴乔; 牟芝蓉

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to identify new potential autoantigens associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Serum samples were collected from 27 SLE patients and 24 health donors. And IgG from serum was captured by Protein G Beads. Then the beads were washed and incubated with HUVEC lysate. The proteins which reacted with IgG-Beads were separated by immobilized pH gradient two -dimensional (2 -D) gel electrophoresis, and the unique protein spots in SLE patients group were identified by LC -MS -MS. We identified several proteins including known SLE autoantigen GAPDH, in which calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) was the first find to be involved in SLE. Furthermore, we also found that CASK antibody expression in SLE was significantly higher than that in health donor. From all the results, we presumed that CASK in HUVEC may be a new potential autoantigen in SLE. Systemic lupus erythematosus; Human umbilical vein endothelial cells; Calcium/calmodulin-%目的 在内皮细胞中筛选与系统性红斑狼疮(systemic lupus erythematosus,SLE)疾病相关的自身抗原.方法 用免疫沉淀法以SLE病人血清中自身抗体捕获人脐带内皮细胞(human umbilical vein endothelial cell,HUVEC)相关抗原,并用双向电泳法分离免疫沉淀产物,然后用LC-MS-MS串联质谱鉴定与SLE病人血清反应的蛋白点.最后用Western blot法验证部分鉴定蛋白.结果 相对于正常人血清对照,SLE病人血清捕获了多个内皮细胞相关蛋白,质谱鉴定结果 显示:通过免疫沉淀与双向电泳结合的方法 成功鉴定了包括GAPDH等已知SLE自身抗原在内的一系列蛋白,其中钙/钙调蛋白依赖性丝氨酸蛋白激酶(calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase,CASK)为新发现SLE候选自身抗原.并以重组人CASK蛋白证实SLE病人血清中CASK抗体水平显著高于正常人对照.结论 内皮细胞蛋白CASK可能作为一个新的SLE相关自身抗原.

  14. Cloning and molecular characterization of cDNA encoding a mouse male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2): a putative family of the Golgi autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, M; Sutou, S

    1997-01-01

    The male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2) gene was originally identified with a monoclonal histocompatibility Y (H-Y) antibody (mAb4VII). There is no report of the full length cDNA encode for Mea-2 product until this report. In this study, we isolated the full length mouse Mea-2 cDNA by screening a testis cDNA library with a PCR-amplified Mea-2 product, and direct PCR amplification of its upstream sequences from the cDNA library. The primary structure of the Mea-2 peptide, deduced from this nucleotide sequence, shows that it encode a 150 kDa protein, of 1325 amino acid residues, which contained five putative N-glycosylation sites and four leucine zipper motifs. A data bank search indicated that it has high homology with a human Golgi autoantigen (golgin-160) both in its nucleotides (78%) and amino acids sequence (83%). This suggests that Mea-2 gene product may encode a golgi structural protein. In situ hybridization analysis suggested that the Mea-2 gene is expressed in spermatids during spermatogenesis as already shown by Mea-1, suggesting that Mea-2 gene product as well as Mea-1 have also some role for spermatogenesis.

  15. La Autoantigen Induces Ribosome Binding Protein 1 (RRBP1) Expression through Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES)-Mediated Translation during Cellular Stress Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Zhu, Ruiyu; Jin, Jian

    2016-07-20

    The function of ribosome binding protein 1 (RRBP1) is regulating the transportation and secretion of some intracellular proteins in mammalian cells. Transcription of RRBP1 is induced by various cytokines. However, few studies focused on the process of RRPB1 mRNA translation. The RRBP1 mRNA has a long 5' untranslated region that potentially formed a stable secondary structure. In this study, we show that the 5' UTR of RRBP1 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Moreover, the RRBP1 expression is induced by chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or adriamycin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and accompanied with the increased expression of La autoantigen (La), which binds to RRBP1 IRES element and facilitates translation initiation. Interestingly, we found IRES-mediated RRBP1 translation is also activated during serum-starvation condition which can induce cytoplasmic localization of La. After mapping the entire RRBP1 5' UTR, we determine the core IRES activity is located between nt-237 and -58. Furthermore, two apical GARR loops within the functional RRBP1 IRES elements may be important for La binding. These results strongly suggest an important role for IRES-dependent translation of RRBP1 mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cells during cellular stress conditions.

  16. Genetics and pathophysiology of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and its main autoantigen proteinase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relle, Manfred; Föhr, Bernd; Fasola, Federica; Schwarting, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a severe autoimmune disease and one of the small vessel anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides. Although its etiology and pathophysiology are still widely unknown, it is accepted that infections, environmental factors, epigenetic modifications, and a genetic predisposition provide the basis for this systemic disorder. GPA typically evolves into two phases: an initial phase characterized by ear, nose and throat (ENT) manifestations, such as chronic sinusitis and otitis, ulceration of the oral cavity and pharynx, as well as pulmonary nodules and a severe generalized phase, defined by the occurrence of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, pulmonary hemorrhage, and arthritis. ANCAs, directed against the neutrophilic enzymes proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase, are present in up to 90% of the affected patients in the systemic phase. As the humoral immunity is predominantly directed against neutrophilic antigens, it is apparent that neutrophils play a critical role in GPA both as target and effector cells. Although GPA pathogenesis is not well known, some susceptibility genes and loci have been identified by candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, and meta-analyses, as well as familial association studies. Such genes are CTLA4, PTPN22, COL11A2, SERPINA1, and the MHC class II gene cluster. This review highlights the clinical, pathophysiological, and genetic background of GPA and aims to give an overview of recent efforts to identify GPA susceptibility genes. We point out the genetic basis of the main autoantigen PR3 and why it is so difficult to establish a murine GPA model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of critical residues of linear B cell epitope on Goodpasture autoantigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yu Jia

    Full Text Available The autoantigen of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM disease has been identified as the non-collagenous domain 1 of α3 chain of type IV collagen, α3(IVNC1. Our previous study revealed a peptide on α3(IVNC1 as a major linear epitope for B cells and potentially nephrogenic, designated as P14 (α3129-150. This peptide has also been proven to be the epitope of auto-reactive T cells in anti-GBM patients. This study was aimed to further characterize the critical motif of P14.16 patients with anti-GBM disease and positive anti-P14 antibodies were enrolled. A set of truncated and alanine substituted peptides derived from P14 were synthesized. Circulating antibodies against the peptides were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.We found that all sera with anti-P14 antibodies reacted with the 13-mer sequence in the C-terminus of P14 (P14c exclusively. The level of antibodies against P14 was highly correlated with the level of antibodies against P14c (r=0.970, P<0.001. P14c was the core immunogenic region and the amino acid sequence (ISLWKGFSFIMFT was highly hydrophobic. Each amino acid residue in P14c was sequentially replaced by alanine. Three residues of glycine142, phenylalanine143, and phenylalanine145 were identified crucial for antibody binding based on the remarkable decline (P<0.001 of antibody reaction after each residue replacement.We defined GFxF (α3142, 143,145 as the critical motif of P14. It may provide some clues for understanding the etiology of anti-GBM disease.

  18. Modelling of Thyroid Peroxidase Reveals Insights into Its Enzyme Function and Autoantigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Sarah N; Porebski, Benjamin T; McCoey, Julia; Fodor, James; Riley, Blake; Godlewska, Marlena; Góra, Monika; Czarnocka, Barbara; Banga, J Paul; Hoke, David E; Kass, Itamar; Buckle, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) catalyses the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones and is a major autoantigen in Hashimoto's disease--the most common organ-specific autoimmune disease. Epitope mapping studies have shown that the autoimmune response to TPO is directed mainly at two surface regions on the molecule: immunodominant regions A and B (IDR-A, and IDR-B). TPO has been a major target for structural studies for over 20 years; however, to date, the structure of TPO remains to be determined. We have used a molecular modelling approach to investigate plausible modes of TPO structure and dimer organisation. Sequence features of the C-terminus are consistent with a coiled-coil dimerization motif that most likely anchors the TPO dimer in the apical membrane of thyroid follicular cells. Two contrasting models of TPO were produced, differing in the orientation and exposure of their active sites relative to the membrane. Both models are equally plausible based upon the known enzymatic function of TPO. The "trans" model places IDR-B on the membrane-facing side of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-like domain, potentially hindering access of autoantibodies, necessitating considerable conformational change, and perhaps even dissociation of the dimer into monomers. IDR-A spans MPO- and CCP-like domains and is relatively fragmented compared to IDR-B, therefore most likely requiring domain rearrangements in order to coalesce into one compact epitope. Less epitope fragmentation and higher solvent accessibility of the "cis" model favours it slightly over the "trans" model. Here, IDR-B clusters towards the surface of the MPO-like domain facing the thyroid follicular lumen preventing steric hindrance of autoantibodies. However, conformational rearrangements may still be necessary to allow full engagement with autoantibodies, with IDR-B on both models being close to the dimer interface. Taken together, the modelling highlights the need to consider the oligomeric state of TPO, its conformational

  19. Assaying genome-wide recombination and centromere functions with Arabidopsis tetrads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Browne, William E.; Preuss, Daphne

    1998-01-01

    During meiosis, crossover events generate new allelic combinations, yet the abundance of these genetic exchanges in individual cells has not been measured previously on a genomic level. To perform a genome-wide analysis of recombination, we monitored the assortment of genetic markers in meiotic tetrads from Arabidopsis. By determining the number and distribution of crossovers in individual meiotic cells, we demonstrated (i) surprisingly precise regulation of crossover number in each meiosis, (ii) considerably reduced recombination along chromosomes carrying ribosomal DNA arrays, and (iii) an inversely proportional relationship between recombination frequencies and chromosome size. This use of tetrad analysis also achieved precise mapping of all five Arabidopsis centromeres, localizing centromere functions in the intact chromosomes of a higher eukaryote. PMID:9419361

  20. Genetic and physical mapping of two centromere-proximal regions of chromosome IV in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleksenko, Alexei Y.; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Clutterbuck, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The centromere-proximal portion of the chromosome was mapped physically using overlapping clones of a cosmid genomic library. Two contiguous segments of a physical map, based on restriction mapping of cosmid clones, were generated, together covering more than 0.4 Mb DNA. A reverse genetic mapping...... approach was used to establish a correlation between physical and genetic maps; i,e., marker genes were integrated into physically mapped segments and subsequently mapped by mitotic and meiotic recombination. The resulting data, together with additional classical genetic mapping, lead to a substantial...... revision of the genetic map of the chromosome, including the position of the centromere, Comparison of physical and genetic maps indicates that meiotic recombination is low in subcentromeric DNA, its frequency being reduced from 1 crossover per 0.8 Mb to approximately 1 crossover per 5 Mb per meiosis...

  1. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  2. Promiscuous stimulation of ParF protein polymerization by heterogeneous centromere binding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machón, Cristina; Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2007-11-16

    The segrosome is the nucleoprotein complex that mediates accurate segregation of bacterial plasmids. The segrosome of plasmid TP228 comprises ParF and ParG proteins that assemble on the parH centromere. ParF, which exemplifies one clade of the ubiquitous ParA superfamily of segregation proteins, polymerizes extensively in response to ATP binding. Polymerization is modulated by the ParG centromere binding factor (CBF). The segrosomes of plasmids pTAR, pVT745 and pB171 include ParA homologues of the ParF subgroup, as well as diverse homodimeric CBFs with no primary sequence similarity to ParG, or each other. Centromere binding by these analogues is largely specific. Here, we establish that the ParF homologues of pTAR and pB171 filament modestly with ATP, and that nucleotide hydrolysis is not required for this polymerization, which is more prodigious when the cognate CBF is also present. By contrast, the ParF homologue of plasmid pVT745 did not respond appreciably to ATP alone, but polymerized extensively in the presence of both its cognate CBF and ATP. The co-factors also stimulated nucleotide-independent polymerization of cognate ParF proteins. Moreover, apart from the CBF of pTAR, the disparate ParG analogues promoted polymerization of non-cognate ParF proteins suggesting that filamentation of the ParF proteins is enhanced by a common mechanism. Like ParG, the co-factors may be modular, possessing a centromere-specific interaction domain linked to a flexible region containing determinants that promiscuously stimulate ParF polymerization. The CBFs appear to function as bacterial analogues of formins, microtubule-associated proteins or related ancillary factors that regulate eucaryotic cytoskeletal dynamics.

  3. ParB Partition Proteins: Complex Formation and Spreading at Bacterial and Plasmid Centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Funnell

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, active partition systems contribute to the faithful segregation of both chromosomes and low-copy-number plasmids. Each system depends on a site-specific DNA binding protein to recognize and assemble a partition complex at a centromere-like site, commonly called parS. Many plasmid and all chromosomal centromere-binding proteins are dimeric helix-turn-helix DNA binding proteins, which are commonly named ParB. Although the overall sequence conservation among ParBs is not high, the proteins share similar domain and functional organization, and they assemble into similar higher-order complexes. In vivo, ParBs spread; that is, DNA binding extends away from the parS site into the surrounding nonspecific DNA, a feature that reflects higher-order complex assembly. ParBs bridge and pair DNA at parS and nonspecific DNA sites. ParB dimers interact with each other via flexible conformations of an N-terminal region. This review will focus on the properties of the HTH centromere-binding protein, in light of recent experimental evidence and models that are adding to our understanding of how these proteins assemble into large and dynamic partition complexes at and around their specific DNA sites.

  4. A stable acentric marker chromosome: Possible existence of an intercalary ancient centromere at distal 8p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Wakui, Keiko; Ogawa, Kioyshi [Saitama Children`s Medical Center, Iwatsuki (Japan); Okano, Tetsuroh [Kitazato Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Niikawa, Norio [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    A centromere is considered to be an essential chromosomal component where microtubule-kinetochore interaction occurs to segregate sister chromatids faithfully and acentric chromosomes are unstable and lost through cell divisions. We report a novel marker chromosome that was acentric but stable through cell divisions. The patient was a 2-year-old girl with mental retardation, patent ductus arteriosus, and mild dysmorphic features. G-banded chromosome analysis revealed that an additional small marker chromosome was observed in all 100 cells examined. By the reverse-chromosome-painting method, the marker was found to originate from the distal region of 8p, and a subsequent two-color FISH analysis with cosmid probes around the region revealed that the marker was an inverted duplication interpreted as 8pter {yields} p23.1::p23.1 {yields} 8pter. No centromeric region was involved in the marker. By FISH, no {alpha}-satellite sequence was detected on the marker, while a telomere sequence was detected at each end. Anti-kinetochore immunostaining, using a serum from a patient with CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud syndrome, esophageal dismotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) syndrome, showed a pair of signals on the marker, which indicated that a functional kinetochore was present on the marker. The analysis of this patient might suggest the possibility that an ancient centromere sequence exists at distal 8p (8p23.1-pter) and was activated through the chromosome rearrangement in the patient.

  5. Shearing of the CENP-A dimerization interface mediates plasticity in the octameric centromeric nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winogradoff, David; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini; Papoian, Garegin A

    2015-11-25

    The centromeric nucleosome is a key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity and function. Consequently, deciphering how CENP-A containing nucleosomes contribute structurally to centromere function is a fundamental question in chromosome biology. Here, we performed microsecond timescale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes, and report that the octameric CENP-A core particles and nucleosomes display different dynamics from their canonical H3-containing counterparts. The most significant motion observed is within key interactions at the heart of the CENP-A octameric core, wherein shearing of contacts within the CENP-A:CENP-A' dimerization interface results in a weaker four helix bundle, and an extrusion of 10-30 bp of DNA near the pseudo-dyad. Coupled to other local and global fluctuations, the CENP-A nucleosome occupies a more rugged free energy landscape than the canonical H3 nucleosome. Taken together, our data suggest that CENP-A encodes enhanced distortability to the octameric nucleosome, which may allow for enhanced flexing of the histone core in vivo.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes autophagy and apoptosis leading to cellular redistribution of the autoantigens Ro/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA) and La/SSB in salivary gland epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiougiannis, S; Tenta, R; Skopouli, F N

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in minor salivary glands, to investigate the interplay between ER stress-induced autophagy and apoptosis in human salivary gland (HSG) cells and to test the effect of ER stress-induced apoptosis on the cellular redistribution of the two major Sjögren's syndrome (SS) autoantigens Ro/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SSA) and La/Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen B (SSB). Minor salivary gland biopsies from SS patients and sicca controls were examined by immunohistochemistry for the expression of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein/binding immunoglobulin protein (GRP78/BiP) as an indicator of unfolded protein response (UPR). HSG cells were treated with thapsigargin (TG) and cell viability, autophagy and apoptosis were assessed. Immunoblot was applied to detect the conversion of LC3I to LC3II and the protein levels of GRP78/BiP and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1). Apoptosis was evaluated by a single-stranded DNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ro/SSA and La/SSB localization was visualized using immunofluorescence. GRP78/BiP was expressed by acinar and ductal epithelial cells in salivary glands of patients and sicca controls. TG treatment induced autophagy, as indicated by enhanced protein expression of LC3II. The protein levels of UPR marker XBP-1 were increased after TG treatment, while GRP78/BiP levels were decreased. TG treatment resulted in induction of HSG apoptosis. Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantigens were localized predominantly to the cytoplasm in resting cells, while they were redistributed to cell membrane and blebs in the apoptotic cells. In conclusion, ER stress is activated in minor salivary gland epithelial cells from SS patients and controls. ER stress-induced apoptosis in HSG cells leads to cell surface and apoptotic blebs relocalization of Ro/SSA and La/SSB autoantigens.

  7. Modelling of Thyroid Peroxidase Reveals Insights into Its Enzyme Function and Autoantigenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N Le

    Full Text Available Thyroid peroxidase (TPO catalyses the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones and is a major autoantigen in Hashimoto's disease--the most common organ-specific autoimmune disease. Epitope mapping studies have shown that the autoimmune response to TPO is directed mainly at two surface regions on the molecule: immunodominant regions A and B (IDR-A, and IDR-B. TPO has been a major target for structural studies for over 20 years; however, to date, the structure of TPO remains to be determined. We have used a molecular modelling approach to investigate plausible modes of TPO structure and dimer organisation. Sequence features of the C-terminus are consistent with a coiled-coil dimerization motif that most likely anchors the TPO dimer in the apical membrane of thyroid follicular cells. Two contrasting models of TPO were produced, differing in the orientation and exposure of their active sites relative to the membrane. Both models are equally plausible based upon the known enzymatic function of TPO. The "trans" model places IDR-B on the membrane-facing side of the myeloperoxidase (MPO-like domain, potentially hindering access of autoantibodies, necessitating considerable conformational change, and perhaps even dissociation of the dimer into monomers. IDR-A spans MPO- and CCP-like domains and is relatively fragmented compared to IDR-B, therefore most likely requiring domain rearrangements in order to coalesce into one compact epitope. Less epitope fragmentation and higher solvent accessibility of the "cis" model favours it slightly over the "trans" model. Here, IDR-B clusters towards the surface of the MPO-like domain facing the thyroid follicular lumen preventing steric hindrance of autoantibodies. However, conformational rearrangements may still be necessary to allow full engagement with autoantibodies, with IDR-B on both models being close to the dimer interface. Taken together, the modelling highlights the need to consider the oligomeric state of TPO, its

  8. Molecular architecture of the Goodpasture autoantigen in anti-GBM nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedchenko, Vadim; Bondar, Olga; Fogo, Agnes B; Vanacore, Roberto; Voziyan, Paul; Kitching, A Richard; Wieslander, Jörgen; Kashtan, Clifford; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Neilson, Eric G; Wilson, Curtis B; Hudson, Billy G

    2010-07-22

    In Goodpasture's disease, circulating autoantibodies bind to the noncollagenous-1 (NC1) domain of type IV collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The specificity and molecular architecture of epitopes of tissue-bound autoantibodies are unknown. Alport's post-transplantation nephritis, which is mediated by alloantibodies against the GBM, occurs after kidney transplantation in some patients with Alport's syndrome. We compared the conformations of the antibody epitopes in Goodpasture's disease and Alport's post-transplantation nephritis with the intention of finding clues to the pathogenesis of anti-GBM glomerulonephritis. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine the specificity of circulating autoantibodies and kidney-bound antibodies to NC1 domains. Circulating antibodies were analyzed in 57 patients with Goodpasture's disease, and kidney-bound antibodies were analyzed in 14 patients with Goodpasture's disease and 2 patients with Alport's post-transplantation nephritis. The molecular architecture of key epitope regions was deduced with the use of chimeric molecules and a three-dimensional model of the alpha345NC1 hexamer. In patients with Goodpasture's disease, both autoantibodies to the alpha3NC1 monomer and antibodies to the alpha5NC1 monomer (and fewer to the alpha4NC1 monomer) were bound in the kidneys and lungs, indicating roles for the alpha3NC1 and alpha5NC1 monomers as autoantigens. High antibody titers at diagnosis of anti-GBM disease were associated with ultimate loss of renal function. The antibodies bound to distinct epitopes encompassing region E(A) in the alpha5NC1 monomer and regions E(A) and E(B) in the alpha3NC1 monomer, but they did not bind to the native cross-linked alpha345NC1 hexamer. In contrast, in patients with Alport's post-transplantation nephritis, alloantibodies bound to the E(A) region of the alpha5NC1 subunit in the intact hexamer, and binding decreased on dissociation. The development of Goodpasture

  9. Separase Is Required for Homolog and Sister Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of Sister Centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattner, Ariane C; Chaurasia, Soumya; McKee, Bruce D; Lehner, Christian F

    2016-04-01

    Spatially controlled release of sister chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of sister centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain sister centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of sister centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in sister centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that sister centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase.

  10. Centromeric cohesion is protected twice at meiosis, by SHUGOSHINs at anaphase I and by PATRONUS at interkinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromer, Laurence; Jolivet, Sylvie; Horlow, Christine; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Heyman, Jefri; De Jaeger, Geert; Koncz, Csaba; De Veylder, Lieven; Mercier, Raphael

    2013-11-04

    At meiosis, two successive rounds of chromosome segregation lead to ploidy halving. This is achieved through a stepwise release of sister chromatid cohesion, along chromosome arms to allow homolog segregation at anaphase I and at centromeres to allow sister chromatid segregation at anaphase II. Cohesins, the protein complex that ensures cohesion, must then be protected at centromeres throughout meiosis, until the onset of anaphase II. Members of the Shugoshin protein family have been shown to protect centromeric cohesins at anaphase I, but much less is known about the protection of cohesion during interkinesis, the stage between meiosis I and meiosis II. Here, we (1) show that both Arabidopsis SHUGOSHINs paralogs are required for complete protection of centromeric cohesins during meiosis I, without apparent somatic function, and (2) identified PATRONUS (PANS1), a novel protein required for protection of meiotic centromeric cohesion. Although AtSGO1 and AtSGO2 protect centromeric cohesion during anaphase I, PANS1 is required at a later stage, during interkinesis. Additionally, we identified PANS2, a paralog of PANS1, whose mutation is synthetically lethal with pans1 suggesting that PANS genes are also essential for mitosis. PANS1 interacts directly with the CDC27b and the CDC20.1 subunit of the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC/C), in a manner suggesting that PANS1 could be both a regulator and a target of the APC/C. This study reveals that centromeric cohesion is actively protected at two successive stages of meiosis, by SHUGOSHINs at anaphase I and by PATRONUS at interkinesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Overexpression of SETβ, a protein localizing to centromeres, causes precocious separation of chromatids during the first meiosis of mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shu-Tao; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Hu, Meng-Wen; Huang, Xin; Ge, Zhaojia; Guo, Lei; Wang, Ya-Peng; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    Chromosome segregation in mammalian oocyte meiosis is an error-prone process, and any mistake in this process may result in aneuploidy, which is the main cause of infertility, abortion and many genetic diseases. It is now well known that shugoshin and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) play important roles in the protection of centromeric cohesion during the first meiosis. PP2A can antagonize the phosphorylation of rec8, a member of the cohesin complex, at the centromeres and thus prevent cleavage of rec8 and so maintain the cohesion of chromatids. SETβ is a protein that physically interacts with shugoshin and inhibits PP2A activity. We thus hypothesized that SETβ might regulate cohesion protection and chromosome segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation. Here we report for the first time the expression, subcellular localization and functions of SETβ during mouse oocyte meiosis. Immunoblotting analysis showed that the expression level of SETβ was stable from the germinal vesicle stage to the MII stage of oocyte meiosis. Immunofluorescence analysis showed SETβ accumulation in the nucleus at the germinal vesicle stage, whereas it was targeted mainly to the inner centromere area and faintly localized to the interchromatid axes from germinal vesicle breakdown to MI stages. At the MII stage, SETβ still localized to the inner centromere area, but could relocalize to kinetochores in a process perhaps dependent on the tension on the centromeres. SETβ partly colocalized with PP2A at the inner centromere area. Overexpression of SETβ in mouse oocytes caused precocious separation of sister chromatids, but depletion of SETβ by RNAi showed little effects on the meiotic maturation process. Taken together, our results suggest that SETβ, even though it localizes to centromeres, might not be essential for chromosome separation during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation, although its forced overexpression causes premature chromatid separation.

  12. Identification and Preliminary Analysis of Several Centromere-associated Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones from a Diploid Wheat Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Although the centromeres of some plants have been investigated previously, our knowledge of the wheat centromere is still very limited. To understand the structure and function of the wheat centromere, we used two centromeric repeats (RCS1 and CCS1-5ab) to obtain some centromere-associated bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones in 32 RCS1-related BAC clones that had been screened out from a diploid wheat (Triticum boeoticum Boiss.; 2n=2x=14) BAC library. Southern hybridization results indicated that, of the 32 candidates,there were 28 RCS1-positive clones. Based on gel blot patterns, the frequency of RCS1 was approximately one copy every 69.4 kb in these 28 RCS1-positive BAC clones. More bands were detected when the same filter was probed with CCS1-5ab. Furthermore, the CCS1 bands covered all the bands detected by RCS1, which suggests that some CCS1 repeats were distributed together with RCS1. The frequency of CCS1 families was once every 35.8 kb, nearly twice that of RCS1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that the five BAC clones containing RCS1 and CCS1 sequences all detected signals at the centromeric regions in hexaploid wheat, but the signal intensities on the A-genome chromosomes were stronger than those on the B- and/or D-genome chromosomes. The FISH analysis among nine Triticeae cereals indicated that there were A-genomespecific (or rich) sequences dispersing on chromosome arms in the BAC clone TbBAC5. In addition, at the interphase cells, the centromeres of diploid species usually clustered at one pole and formed a ring-like allocation in the period before metaphase.

  13. Separase Is Required for Homolog and Sister Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of Sister Centromeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane C Blattner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spatially controlled release of sister chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of sister centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain sister centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of sister centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in sister centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that sister centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase.

  14. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M; Song, Ihn Young; Jauch, Anna; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Hayden, Karen E; Bridger, Joanna M; Sullivan, Beth A

    2010-08-12

    Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics) that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  15. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Stimpson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  16. Characterization of the genomic organization of the region bordering the centromere of chromosome V of Podospora anserina by direct sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silar, Philippe; Barreau, Christian; Debuchy, Robert; Kicka, Sébastien; Turcq, Béatrice; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie; Sellem, Carole H; Billault, Alain; Cattolico, Laurence; Duprat, Simone; Weissenbach, Jean

    2003-08-01

    A Podospora anserina BAC library of 4800 clones has been constructed in the vector pBHYG allowing direct selection in fungi. Screening of the BAC collection for centromeric sequences of chromosome V allowed the recovery of clones localized on either sides of the centromere, but no BAC clone was found to contain the centromere. Seven BAC clones containing 322,195 and 156,244bp from either sides of the centromeric region were sequenced and annotated. One 5S rRNA gene, 5 tRNA genes, and 163 putative coding sequences (CDS) were identified. Among these, only six CDS seem specific to P. anserina. The gene density in the centromeric region is approximately one gene every 2.8kb. Extrapolation of this gene density to the whole genome of P. anserina suggests that the genome contains about 11,000 genes. Synteny analyses between P. anserina and Neurospora crassa show that co-linearity extends at the most to a few genes, suggesting rapid genome rearrangements between these two species.

  17. Kif18A and chromokinesins confine centromere movements via microtubule growth suppression and spatial control of kinetochore tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpff, Jason; Wagenbach, Michael; Franck, Andrew; Asbury, Charles L; Wordeman, Linda

    2012-05-15

    Alignment of chromosomes at the metaphase plate is a signature of cell division in metazoan cells, yet the mechanisms controlling this process remain ambiguous. Here we use a combination of quantitative live-cell imaging and reconstituted dynamic microtubule assays to investigate the molecular control of mitotic centromere movements. We establish that Kif18A (kinesin-8) attenuates centromere movement by directly promoting microtubule pausing in a concentration-dependent manner. This activity provides the dominant mechanism for restricting centromere movement to the spindle midzone. Furthermore, polar ejection forces spatially confine chromosomes via position-dependent regulation of kinetochore tension and centromere switch rates. We demonstrate that polar ejection forces are antagonistically modulated by chromokinesins. These pushing forces depend on Kid (kinesin-10) activity and are antagonized by Kif4A (kinesin-4), which functions to directly suppress microtubule growth. These data support a model in which Kif18A and polar ejection forces synergistically promote centromere alignment via spatial control of kinetochore-microtubule dynamics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation of centromere localization of the Drosophila Shugoshin MEI-S332 and sister-chromatid cohesion in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Cristina; Kashevsky, Helena; Pinto, Belinda; Clarke, Astrid; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2014-07-31

    The Shugoshin (Sgo) protein family helps to ensure proper chromosome segregation by protecting cohesion at the centromere by preventing cleavage of the cohesin complex. Some Sgo proteins also influence other aspects of kinetochore-microtubule attachments. Although many Sgo members require Aurora B kinase to localize to the centromere, factors controlling delocalization are poorly understood and diverse. Moreover, it is not clear how Sgo function is inactivated and whether this is distinct from delocalization. We investigated these questions in Drosophila melanogaster, an organism with superb chromosome cytology to monitor Sgo localization and quantitative assays to test its function in sister-chromatid segregation in meiosis. Previous research showed that in mitosis in cell culture, phosphorylation of the Drosophila Sgo, MEI-S332, by Aurora B promotes centromere localization, whereas Polo phosphorylation promotes delocalization. These studies also suggested that MEI-S332 can be inactivated independently of delocalization, a conclusion supported here by localization and function studies in meiosis. Phosphoresistant and phosphomimetic mutants for the Aurora B and Polo phosphorylation sites were examined for effects on MEI-S332 localization and chromosome segregation in meiosis. Strikingly, MEI-S332 with a phosphomimetic mutation in the Aurora B phosphorylation site prematurely dissociates from the centromeres in meiosis I. Despite the absence of MEI-S332 on meiosis II centromeres in male meiosis, sister chromatids segregate normally, demonstrating that detectable levels of this Sgo are not essential for chromosome congression, kinetochore biorientation, or spindle assembly. Copyright © 2014 Nogueira et al.

  19. Differing requirements for RAD51 and DMC1 in meiotic pairing of centromeres and chromosome arms in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Da Ines

    Full Text Available During meiosis homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and synapse, thus ensuring accurate chromosome segregation and the halving of ploidy necessary for gametogenesis. The processes permitting a chromosome to pair only with its homologue are not fully understood, but successful pairing of homologous chromosomes is tightly linked to recombination. In Arabidopsis thaliana, meiotic prophase of rad51, xrcc3, and rad51C mutants appears normal up to the zygotene/pachytene stage, after which the genome fragments, leading to sterility. To better understand the relationship between recombination and chromosome pairing, we have analysed meiotic chromosome pairing in these and in dmc1 mutant lines. Our data show a differing requirement for these proteins in pairing of centromeric regions and chromosome arms. No homologous pairing of mid-arm or distal regions was observed in rad51, xrcc3, and rad51C mutants. However, homologous centromeres do pair in these mutants and we show that this does depend upon recombination, principally on DMC1. This centromere pairing extends well beyond the heterochromatic centromere region and, surprisingly, does not require XRCC3 and RAD51C. In addition to clarifying and bringing the roles of centromeres in meiotic synapsis to the fore, this analysis thus separates the roles in meiotic synapsis of DMC1 and RAD51 and the meiotic RAD51 paralogs, XRCC3 and RAD51C, with respect to different chromosome domains.

  20. [Sop proteins can cause transcriptional silencing of genes located close to the centromere sites of linear plasmid N15].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanov, A V; Lane, D; Ravin, N V

    2010-01-01

    Stable inheritance of bacterial chromosomes and low copy number plasmids is ensured by accurate partitioning of replicated molecules between the daughter cells at division. Partitioning of the prophage of the temperate bacteriophage N15, which exists as a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends, depends on the sop locus, comprising genes sopA and sopB, as well as four centromere sites located in different regions of the N15 genome essential for replication and the control of lysogeny. We found that binding of SopB to the centromere can silence centromere-proximal promoters, presumably due to subsequent polymerizing of SopB along the DNA. Close to the IR4 centromere site we identified a promoter, P59, able to drive expression of phage late genes encoding the structural proteins of virion. We found that following binding to IR4 the N15 Sop proteins can cause repression of this promoter. The repression depends on SopB and became stronger in the presence of SopA. Sop-dependent silencing of centromere-proximal promoters control gene expression in phage N15, particularly preventing undesired expression of late genes in the N15 prophage. Thus, the phage N15 sop system not only ensures plasmid partitioning but is also involved in the genetic network controlling prophage replication and the maintenance of lysogeny.

  1. RNA Pol II promotes transcription of centromeric satellite DNA in beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeljka Pezer

    Full Text Available Transcripts of centromeric satellite DNAs are known to play a role in heterochromatin formation as well as in establishment of the kinetochore. However, little is known about basic mechanisms of satellite DNA expression within constitutive heterochromatin and its regulation. Here we present comprehensive analysis of transcription of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, PRAT from beetle Palorus ratzeburgii (Coleoptera. This satellite is characterized by preservation and extreme sequence conservation among evolutionarily distant insect species. PRAT is expressed in all three developmental stages: larvae, pupae and adults at similar level. Transcripts are abundant comprising 0.033% of total RNA and are heterogeneous in size ranging from 0.5 kb up to more than 5 kb. Transcription proceeds from both strands but with 10 fold different expression intensity and transcripts are not processed into siRNAs. Most of the transcripts (80% are not polyadenylated and remain in the nucleus while a small portion is exported to the cytoplasm. Multiple, irregularly distributed transcription initiation sites as well as termination sites have been mapped within the PRAT sequence using primer extension and RLM-RACE. The presence of cap structure as well as poly(A tails in a portion of the transcripts indicate RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and a putative polymerase II promoter site overlaps the most conserved part of the PRAT sequence. The treatment of larvae with alpha-amanitin decreases the level of PRAT transcripts at concentrations that selectively inhibit pol II activity. In conclusion, stable, RNA polymerase II dependant transcripts of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, not regulated by RNAi, have been identified and characterized. This study offers a basic understanding of expression of highly abundant heterochromatic DNA which in beetle species constitutes up to 50% of the genome.

  2. Novel Centromeric Loci of the Wine and Beer Yeast Dekkera bruxellensis CEN1 and CEN2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchuk, Olena P.; Vojvoda Zeljko, Tanja; Schifferdecker, Anna J.; Mebrahtu Wisén, Sofia; Hagström, Åsa K.; Rozpędowska, Elżbieta; Rørdam Andersen, Mikael; Hellborg, Linda; Ling, Zhihao; Sibirny, Andrei A.

    2016-01-01

    The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis thrives in environments that are harsh and limiting, especially in concentrations with low oxygen and high ethanol. Its different strains’ chromosomes greatly vary in number (karyotype). This study isolates two novel centromeric loci (CEN1 and CEN2), which support both the yeast’s autonomous replication and the stable maintenance of plasmids. In the sequenced genome of the D. bruxellensis strain CBS 2499, CEN1 and CEN2 are each present in one copy. They differ from the known “point” CEN elements, and their biological activity is retained within ~900–1300 bp DNA segments. CEN1 and CEN2 have features of both “point” and “regional” centromeres: They contain conserved DNA elements, ARSs, short repeats, one tRNA gene, and transposon-like elements within less than 1 kb. Our discovery of a miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) next to CEN2 is the first report of such transposons in yeast. The transformants carrying circular plasmids with cloned CEN1 and CEN2 undergo a phenotypic switch: They form fluffy colonies and produce three times more biofilm. The introduction of extra copies of CEN1 and CEN2 promotes both genome rearrangements and ploidy shifts, with these effects mediated by homologous recombination (between circular plasmid and genome centromere copy) or by chromosome breakage when integrated. Also, the proximity of the MITE-like transposon to CEN2 could translocate CEN2 within the genome or cause chromosomal breaks, so promoting genome dynamics. With extra copies of CEN1 and CEN2, the yeast’s enhanced capacities to rearrange its genome and to change its gene expression could increase its abilities for exploiting new and demanding niches. PMID:27560164

  3. Cytological identification of an isotetrasomic in rice and its application to centromere mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENGZHUKUAN; HENGXIUYU; 等

    1997-01-01

    The aneuploid with isochromosome or telochromosome is ideal material for exploring the position of centromere in lingkage map.For obtaining these aneuploids in rice,the primary trisomics from triplo-1 to triplo-12 and the aneuploids derived from a triploid of indica rice variety Zhongxiao 3037 were carefully investigated.From the offsprings of triplo-10,a primary trisomic of chromosome 10 of the variety,an isotetrasomic “triplo-10-1” was obtained.Cytological investigation revealed that a pair of extra isochromosomes of triplo-10-1 were come from the short arm of chromosome 10.In the offsprings of the isotetrasomic,a secondary trisomic “triplo-10-2”,in which the extra-chromosome was an isochromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 10,was identified.With the isotetrasomic,secondary trisomic,primary trisomic and diploid of variety Zhongxiao 3037,different molecular markers were used for exploring the position of the centromere of chromosome 10.Based on the DNA dosage effect,it was verified that the molecular markers G1125,G333 and L169 were Located on the short arm,G1084 and other 16 available molecular markers were on the long arm of chromosome 10.So the centromere of chromosome 10 was located somewhere between G1125 and G1084 according to the RFLP linkage map given by Kurata et al[1].The distance from G1125 to G1084 was about 3.2cM.

  4. Novel Centromeric Loci of the Wine and Beer Yeast Dekkera bruxellensis CEN1 and CEN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchuk, Olena P; Vojvoda Zeljko, Tanja; Schifferdecker, Anna J; Mebrahtu Wisén, Sofia; Hagström, Åsa K; Rozpędowska, Elżbieta; Rørdam Andersen, Mikael; Hellborg, Linda; Ling, Zhihao; Sibirny, Andrei A; Piškur, Jure

    2016-01-01

    The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis thrives in environments that are harsh and limiting, especially in concentrations with low oxygen and high ethanol. Its different strains' chromosomes greatly vary in number (karyotype). This study isolates two novel centromeric loci (CEN1 and CEN2), which support both the yeast's autonomous replication and the stable maintenance of plasmids. In the sequenced genome of the D. bruxellensis strain CBS 2499, CEN1 and CEN2 are each present in one copy. They differ from the known "point" CEN elements, and their biological activity is retained within ~900-1300 bp DNA segments. CEN1 and CEN2 have features of both "point" and "regional" centromeres: They contain conserved DNA elements, ARSs, short repeats, one tRNA gene, and transposon-like elements within less than 1 kb. Our discovery of a miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) next to CEN2 is the first report of such transposons in yeast. The transformants carrying circular plasmids with cloned CEN1 and CEN2 undergo a phenotypic switch: They form fluffy colonies and produce three times more biofilm. The introduction of extra copies of CEN1 and CEN2 promotes both genome rearrangements and ploidy shifts, with these effects mediated by homologous recombination (between circular plasmid and genome centromere copy) or by chromosome breakage when integrated. Also, the proximity of the MITE-like transposon to CEN2 could translocate CEN2 within the genome or cause chromosomal breaks, so promoting genome dynamics. With extra copies of CEN1 and CEN2, the yeast's enhanced capacities to rearrange its genome and to change its gene expression could increase its abilities for exploiting new and demanding niches.

  5. Dicentric chromosome aberration analysis using giemsa and centromere specific fluorescence in-situ hybridization for biological dosimetry: An inter- and intra-laboratory comparison in Indian laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavani, M; Tamizh Selvan, G; Kaur, Harpreet; Adhikari, J S; Vijayalakshmi, J; Venkatachalam, P; Chaudhury, N K

    2014-09-01

    To facilitate efficient handling of large samples, an attempt towards networking of laboratories in India for biological dosimetry was carried out. Human peripheral blood samples were exposed to (60)Co γ-radiation for ten different doses (0-5Gy) at a dose rate of 0.7 and 2Gy/min. The chromosomal aberrations (CA) were scored in Giemsa-stained and fluorescence in-situ hybridization with centromere-specific probes. No significant difference (p>0.05) was observed in the CA yield for given doses except 4 and 5Gy, between the laboratories, among the scorers and also staining methods adapted suggest the reliability and validates the inter-lab comparisons exercise for triage applications.

  6. Domain architectures of the Scm3p protein provide insights into centromere function and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Aravind, L.; Lakshminarayan, M. Iyer; Wu, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Recently, Scm3p has been shown to be a nonhistone component of centromeric chromatin that binds stoichiometrically to CenH3–H4 histones, and to be required for the assembly of kinetochores in S. cerevisiae. Scm3p is conserved across fungi, and displays a remarkable variation in protein size, ranging from ~200 amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ~1300 amino acids in Neurospora crassa. This is primarily due a variable C-terminal segment that is linked to a conserved N-terminal, CenH3-int...

  7. Centromere binding specificity in assembly of the F plasmid partition complex

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The segregation of plasmid F of Escherichia coli is highly reliable. The Sop partition locus, responsible for this stable maintenance, is composed of two genes, sopA and sopB and a centromere, sopC, consisting of 12 direct repeats of 43 bp. Each repeat carries a 16-bp inverted repeat motif to which SopB binds to form a nucleoprotein assembly called the partition complex. A database search for sequences closely related to sopC revealed unexpected features that appeared highly conserved. We hav...

  8. A new model of sperm nuclear architecture following assessment of the organization of centromeres and telomeres in three-dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Dimitrios; Millan, Nicole M.; Jordan, Elizabeth; Tempest, Helen G.

    2017-01-01

    The organization of chromosomes in sperm nuclei has been proposed to possess a unique “hairpin-loop” arrangement, which is hypothesized to aid in the ordered exodus of the paternal genome following fertilization. This study simultaneously assessed the 3D and 2D radial and longitudinal organization of telomeres, centromeres, and investigated whether chromosomes formed the same centromere clusters in sperm cells. Reproducible radial and longitudinal non-random organization was observed for all investigated loci using both 3D and 2D approaches in multiple subjects. We report novel findings, with telomeres and centromeres being localized throughout the nucleus but demonstrating roughly a 1:1 distribution in the nuclear periphery and the intermediate regions with exodus of paternal chromosomes following fertilization. PMID:28139771

  9. Renal cell apoptosis in human lupus nephritis: a histological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, M; Penkowa, Milena; Andersen, C B

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear autoantigens from apoptotic cells are believed to drive the immunological response in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Conflicting data exist as to the possible renal origin of apoptotic cells in SLE patients with nephritis. We assessed the level of renal cell apoptosis in kidney...... biopsies from 35 patients with lupus nephritis by means of terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL). Five samples of normal kidney tissue served as control specimens. We did not observe apoptotic glomerular cells in any...... cells constitute a quantitatively important source of auto-antibody-inducing nuclear auto-antigens in human lupus nephritis....

  10. Cohesin, condensin, and the intramolecular centromere loop together generate the mitotic chromatin spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Andrew D; Haase, Julian; Vicci, Leandra; Taylor, Russell M; Bloom, Kerry

    2011-06-27

    Sister chromatid cohesion provides the mechanistic basis, together with spindle microtubules, for generating tension between bioriented chromosomes in metaphase. Pericentric chromatin forms an intramolecular loop that protrudes bidirectionally from the sister chromatid axis. The centromere lies on the surface of the chromosome at the apex of each loop. The cohesin and condensin structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes are concentrated within the pericentric chromatin, but whether they contribute to tension-generating mechanisms is not known. To understand how pericentric chromatin is packaged and resists tension, we map the position of cohesin (SMC3), condensin (SMC4), and pericentric LacO arrays within the spindle. Condensin lies proximal to the spindle axis and is responsible for axial compaction of pericentric chromatin. Cohesin is radially displaced from the spindle axis and confines pericentric chromatin. Pericentric cohesin and condensin contribute to spindle length regulation and dynamics in metaphase. Together with the intramolecular centromere loop, these SMC complexes constitute a molecular spring that balances spindle microtubule force in metaphase.

  11. Centromere-associated protein E: a motor that puts the brakes on the mitotic checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kenneth W; Chua, Penelope; Sutton, David; Jackson, Jeffrey R

    2008-12-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints have long been recognized as important nodes for regulating cell proliferation and maintaining genomic integrity. These checkpoints are often altered in cancer and represent promising points for therapeutic intervention. Until recently, direct targeting of the mitotic checkpoint has been an untapped area for cancer drug discovery. Regulation of the mitotic checkpoint is complex, but many of the critical players have been identified and functionally characterized. A substantial number of these proteins can be localized to the kinetochore, a structure located at the centromeric region of each mitotic chromosome. The kinetochore mediates chromosome attachment to spindle microtubules and subsequent chromosome movement. The mitotic checkpoint monitors microtubule attachment and chromosome position on the mitotic spindle, inhibiting progression into anaphase until proper attachment and metaphase positioning is achieved. Centromere-associated protein E is a kinesin microtubule motor protein that plays an essential role in integrating the mechanics of microtubule-chromosome interactions with mitotic checkpoint signaling, and has emerged as a novel target for cancer therapy.

  12. Identification of a high frequency of chromosomal rearrangements in the centromeric regions of prostate cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the major chromosomal aberrations (CA) like deletion, translocation,inversion and mosaic in prostate cancer patients of Tamilnadu, Southern India. Totally 45 blood samples were collected from various hospitals in Tamilnadu, Southern India. Equal numbers of normal healthy subjects were chosen after signing a consent form. Volunteers provided blood samples (5 ml) to establish leukocyte cultures. Cytogenetic studies were performed by using Giemsa-banding technique and finally the results were ensured by spectral karyotyping (SKY) technique. In the present investigation, major CA like deletion, translocation, inversion and mosaic were identified in experimental subjects. Results showed frequent CA in chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 13, 16, 18 and X. In comparison with experimental subjects, the control subjects exhibited very low levels of major CA (P<0.05). In the present study, the high frequency of centromeric rearrangements indicates a potential role for mitotic irregularities associated with the centromere in prostate cancer tumorigenesis. Identification of chromosome alterations may be helpful in understanding the molecular basis of the disease in better manner.

  13. Characterization of the oncogenic function of centromere protein F in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Yongdong; Liu, Lulu; Zeng, Tingting; Zhu, Ying-Hui [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jiangchao [Vascular Biology Research Institute, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Leilei [Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Li, Yan; Yuan, Yun-Fei [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Ma, Stephanie, E-mail: stefma@hku.hk [Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory for Liver Research, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Guan, Xin-Yuan, E-mail: xyguan@hkucc.hku.hk [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory for Liver Research, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Overexpression of CENPF is frequently detected in HCC. •Upregulation of CENPF serves as an independent prognosis factor in HCC patients. •CENPF functions as an oncogene in HCC by promoting cell G2/M transition. -- Abstract: Centromere protein F (CENPF) is an essential nuclear protein associated with the centromere-kinetochore complex and plays a critical role in chromosome segregation during mitosis. Up-regulation of CENPF expression has previously been detected in several solid tumors. In this study, we aim to study the expression and functional role of CENPF in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We found CENPF was frequently overexpressed in HCC as compared with non-tumor tissue. Up-regulated CENPF expression in HCC was positively correlated with serum AFP, venous invasion, advanced differentiation stage and a shorter overall survival. Cox regression analysis found that overexpression of CENPF was an independent prognosis factor in HCC. Functional studies found that silencing CENPF could decrease the ability of the cells to proliferate, form colonies and induce tumor formation in nude mice. Silencing CENPF also resulted in the cell cycle arrest at G2/M checkpoint by down-regulating cell cycle proteins cdc2 and cyclin B1. Our data suggest that CENPF is frequently overexpressed in HCC and plays a critical role in driving HCC tumorigenesis.

  14. Point Mutations in Centromeric Histone Induce Post-zygotic Incompatibility and Uniparental Inheritance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaram Kuppu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The centromeric histone 3 variant (CENH3, aka CENP-A is essential for the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. To better define CENH3 functional constraints, we complemented a null allele in Arabidopsis with a variety of mutant alleles, each inducing a single amino acid change in conserved residues of the histone fold domain. Many of these transgenic missense lines displayed wild-type growth and fertility on self-pollination, but exhibited frequent post-zygotic death and uniparental inheritance when crossed with wild-type plants. The failure of centromeres marked by these missense mutation in the histone fold domain of CENH3 reproduces the genome elimination syndromes described with chimeric CENH3 and CENH3 from diverged species. Additionally, evidence that a single point mutation is sufficient to generate a haploid inducer provide a simple one-step method for the identification of non-transgenic haploid inducers in existing mutagenized collections of crop species. As proof of the extreme simplicity of this approach to create haploid-inducing lines, we performed an in silico search for previously identified point mutations in CENH3 and identified an Arabidopsis line carrying the A86V substitution within the histone fold domain. This A87V non-transgenic line, while fully fertile on self-pollination, produced postzygotic death and uniparental haploids when crossed to wild type.

  15. Point Mutations in Centromeric Histone Induce Post-zygotic Incompatibility and Uniparental Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppu, Sundaram; Tan, Ek Han; Nguyen, Hanh; Rodgers, Andrea; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W L; Britt, Anne B

    2015-09-01

    The centromeric histone 3 variant (CENH3, aka CENP-A) is essential for the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. To better define CENH3 functional constraints, we complemented a null allele in Arabidopsis with a variety of mutant alleles, each inducing a single amino acid change in conserved residues of the histone fold domain. Many of these transgenic missense lines displayed wild-type growth and fertility on self-pollination, but exhibited frequent post-zygotic death and uniparental inheritance when crossed with wild-type plants. The failure of centromeres marked by these missense mutation in the histone fold domain of CENH3 reproduces the genome elimination syndromes described with chimeric CENH3 and CENH3 from diverged species. Additionally, evidence that a single point mutation is sufficient to generate a haploid inducer provide a simple one-step method for the identification of non-transgenic haploid inducers in existing mutagenized collections of crop species. As proof of the extreme simplicity of this approach to create haploid-inducing lines, we performed an in silico search for previously identified point mutations in CENH3 and identified an Arabidopsis line carrying the A86V substitution within the histone fold domain. This A87V non-transgenic line, while fully fertile on self-pollination, produced postzygotic death and uniparental haploids when crossed to wild type.

  16. Cohesin interaction with centromeric minichromosomes shows a multi-complex rod-shaped structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Surcel

    Full Text Available Cohesin is the protein complex responsible for maintaining sister chromatid cohesion. Cohesin interacts with centromeres and specific loci along chromosome arms known as Chromosome Attachment Regions (CARs. The cohesin holocomplex contains four subunits. Two of them, Smc1p (Structural maintenance of chromosome 1 protein and Smc3p, are long coiled-coil proteins, which heterodimerize with each other at one end. They are joined together at the other end by a third subunit, Scc1p, which also binds to the fourth subunit, Scc3p. How cohesin interacts with chromosomes is not known, although several models have been proposed, in part on the basis of in vitro assembly of purified cohesin proteins. To be able to observe in vivo cohesin-chromatin interactions, we have modified a Minichromosome Affinity Purification (MAP method to isolate a CAR-containing centromeric minichromosome attached to in vivo assembled cohesin. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM analysis of these minichromosomes suggests that cohesin assumes a rod shape and interacts with replicated minichromosome at one end of that rod. Additionally, our data implies that more than one cohesin molecule interacts with each pair of replicated minichromsomes. These molecules seem to be packed into a single thick rod, suggesting that the Smc1p and Smc3p subunits may interact extensively.

  17. High-affinity binding of Chp1 chromodomain to K9 methylated histone H3 is required to establish centromeric heterochromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalch, Thomas; Job, Godwin; Noffsinger, Victoria J; Shanker, Sreenath; Kuscu, Canan; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Partridge, Janet F

    2009-04-10

    In fission yeast, assembly of centromeric heterochromatin requires the RITS complex, which consists of Ago1, Tas3, Chp1, and siRNAs derived from centromeric repeats. Recruitment of RITS to centromeres has been proposed to depend on siRNA-dependent targeting of Ago1 to centromeric sequences. Previously, we demonstrated that methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me) acts upstream of siRNAs during heterochromatin establishment. Our crystal structure of Chp1's chromodomain in complex with a trimethylated lysine 9 H3 peptide reveals extensive sites of contact that contribute to Chp1's high-affinity binding. We found that this high-affinity binding is critical for the efficient establishment of centromeric heterochromatin, but preassembled heterochromatin can be maintained when Chp1's affinity for H3K9me is greatly reduced.

  18. Physical map-based sizes of the centromeric regions of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 1, 2, and 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosouchi, Tsutomu; Kumekawa, Norikazu; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Kotani, Hirokazu

    2002-08-31

    The sizes of the centromeric regions of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 were determined by construction of their physical maps on the basis of restriction analysis. As the reported centromeric regions contain large gaps in the middle due to highly repetitive sequences, appropriate probes for Southern hybridization were prepared from the sequences reported for the flanking regions and from the sequences of BAC and YAC clones newly isolated in this work, and restriction analysis was performed using DNA of a hypomethylated strain (ddm1). The sizes of the genetically defined centromeric regions were deduced to be 9 megabases (Mb), 4.2 Mb and 4.1 Mb, respectively (chromosome 1, from markers T22C23-t7 to T3P8-sp6; chromosome 2, from F5J15-sp6 to T15D9; chromosome 3, from T9G9-sp6 to T15M14; G. P. Copenhaver et al. Science, 286, 2468-2479, 1999). By combining the sizes of the centromeric regions previously estimated for chromosomes 4 and 5 and the sequence data reported for the A. thaliana genome, the total genome size of A. thaliana was estimated to be approximately 146.0 Mb.

  19. A DNA polymerase alpha accessory protein, Mcl1, is required for propagation of centromere structures in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoaki Natsume

    Full Text Available Specialized chromatin exists at centromeres and must be precisely transmitted during DNA replication. The mechanisms involved in the propagation of these structures remain elusive. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of two chromatin domains: the central CENP-A(Cnp1 kinetochore domain and flanking heterochromatin domains. Here we show that fission yeast Mcl1, a DNA polymerase alpha (Pol alpha accessory protein, is critical for maintenance of centromeric chromatin. In a screen for mutants that alleviate both central domain and outer repeat silencing, we isolated several cos mutants, of which cos1 is allelic to mcl1. The mcl1-101 mutation causes reduced CENP-A(Cnp1 in the central domain and an aberrant increase in histone acetylation in both domains. These phenotypes are also observed in a mutant of swi7(+, which encodes a catalytic subunit of Pol alpha. Mcl1 forms S-phase-specific nuclear foci, which colocalize with those of PCNA and Pol alpha. These results suggest that Mcl1 and Pol alpha are required for propagation of centromere chromatin structures during DNA replication.

  20. Is the time dimension of the cell cycle re-entry in AD regulated by centromere cohesion dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajić, Vladan P; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana; Zivković, Lada; Djelić, Ninoslav; Smith, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    Chromosomal involvement is a legitimate, yet not well understood, feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Firstly, AD affects more women than men. Secondly, the amyloid-β protein precursor genetic mutations, responsible for a cohort of familial AD cases, reside on chromosome 21, the same chromosome responsible for the developmental disorder Down's syndrome. Thirdly, lymphocytes from AD patients display a novel chromosomal phenotype, namely premature centromere separation (PCS). Other documented morphological phenomena associated with AD include the occurrence of micronuclei, aneuploidy, binucleation, telomere instability, and cell cycle re-entry protein expression. Based on these events, here we present a novel hypothesis that the time dimension of cell cycle re-entry in AD is highly regulated by centromere cohesion dynamics. In view of the fact that neurons can re-enter the cell division cycle, our hypothesis predicts that alterations in the signaling pathway leading to premature cell death in neurons is a consequence of altered regulation of the separation of centromeres as a function of time. It is well known that centromeres in the metaphase-anaphase transition separate in a non-random, sequential order. This sequence has been shown to be deregulated in aging cells, various tumors, syndromes of chromosome instability, following certain chemical inductions, as well as in AD. Over time, premature chromosome separation is both a result of, and a driving force behind, further cohesion impairment, activation of cyclin dependent kinases, and mitotic catastrophe, a vicious circle resulting in cellular degeneration and death.

  1. Effects of sense and antisense centromere/kinetochore complex protein-B (CENP-B) in cell cycle regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Song; LIN Haiyan; QI Jianguo; WANG Yongchao

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of sense and antisense centromere/kinetochore complex protein-B (CENP-B) in cell cycle regulation. Full-length cenpb cDNA was subcloned into pBI-EGFP eukaryotic expression vector in both sense and antisense orientation. HeLa-Tet-Off cells were transfected with sense or antisense cenpb vectors. Sense transfection of HeLa-Tet-Off cells resulted in the formation of a large centromere/kinetochore complex, and apoptosis of cells following several times of cell division. A stable antisense cenpb transfected cell line, named HACPB, was obtained. The centromere/kinetochore complex of HACPB cells became smaller than control HeLa-Tet-Off cells and scattered, and the expression of CENP-B was down-regulated. In addition, delayed cell cycle progression, inhibited malignant phenotype, restrained ability of tumor formation in nude mice, and delayed entry from G2/M phase into next G1 phase were observed in HACPB cells. Furthermore, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), cyclins, and CDK inhibitors (CKIs) were modulated during different phases of the cell cycle. CENP-B is an essential protein for the maintenance of the structure and function of centromere/kinetochore complex, and plays important roles in cell cycle regulation.

  2. A cytogenetic study of hospital workers occupationally exposed to radionuclides in Serbia. Premature centromere division as novel biomarker of exposure?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajic, Jelena; Rakic, Boban [Serbian Institute of Occupational Health ' ' Dr Dragomir Karajovic' ' , Belgrade (Serbia). Biodosimetry Dept.; Jovicic, Dubravka [Univ. ' ' Singidunum' ' , Belgrade (Serbia). Genotoxicology Dept.; Milovanovic, Aleksandar [Serbian Institute of Occupational Health ' ' Dr Dragomir Karajovic' ' , Belgrade (Serbia). Biodosimetry Dept.; Belgrade Univ. (Serbia). Occupational Health Dept.

    2016-04-15

    The health risk of chronic exposure to radionuclides includes changes in the genome (e.g., chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei) that increase chromosomal instability. There are also other phenomena, which seem to appear more frequently in metaphases of exposed persons (such as premature centromere division). The aim of this study was to discover whether or not there is correlation between incidence of named cytogenetic changes in persons occupationally exposed to radionuclides in comparison with unexposed control group, and if significant correlation is determined, can premature centromere division be consider as a biomarker of radiation exposure? The exposed group comprised 50 individuals occupationally exposed to radionuclides. The reference control group consisted of 40 unexposed individuals. Chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and premature centromere division were analyzed according to a standard International Atomic Energy Agency protocol. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 statistics.The means for analyzed cytogenetic changes were significantly higher in the exposed group. Positive correlation between them was found in exposed group. Premature centromere division parameter PCD5-10 was selected as particularly suitable for separating groups (exposed/unexposed). Identification of other phenomena related to radionuclide exposure, beside well known, may clarify recent problems in radiobiology concerning the biological response to low doses of ionizing radiation and its consequences.

  3. Variation in Copy Number of Ty3/Gypsy Centromeric Retrotransposons in the Genomes of Thinopyrum intermedium and Its Diploid Progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail G Divashuk

    Full Text Available Speciation and allopolyploidization in cereals may be accompanied by dramatic changes in abundance of centromeric repeated transposable elements. Here we demonstrate that the reverse transcriptase part of Ty3/gypsy centromeric retrotransposon (RT-CR is highly conservative in the segmental hexaploid Thinopyrum intermedium (JrJvsSt and its possible diploid progenitors Th. bessarabicum (Jb, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St and Dasypyrum villosum (V but the abundance of the repeats varied to a large extent. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH showed hybridization signals in centromeric region of all chromosomes in the studied species, although the intensity of the signals drastically differed. In Th. intermedium, the strongest signal of RT-CR probe was detected on the chromosomes of Jv, intermediate on Jr and faint on Js and St subgenome suggesting different abundance of RT-CR on the individual chromosomes rather than the sequence specificity of RT-CRs of the subgenomes. RT-CR quantification using real-time PCR revealed that its content per genome in Th. bessarabicum is ~ 2 times and P. spicata is ~ 1,5 times higher than in genome of D. villosum. The possible burst of Ty3/gypsy centromeric retrotransposon in Th. intermedium during allopolyploidization and its role in proper mitotic and meiotic chromosome behavior in a nascent allopolyploid is discussed.

  4. Microsatellite-centromere mapping in Japanese scallop ( Patinopecten yessoensis) through half-tetrad analysis in gynogenetic diploid families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Qi, Mingjun; Nie, Hongtao; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Gene-centromere mapping is an essential prerequisite for understanding the composition and structure of genomes. Half-tetrad analysis is a powerful tool for mapping genes and understanding chromosomal behavior during meiosis. The Japanese scallop ( Patinopecten yessoensis), a cold-tolerant species inhabiting the northwestern Pacific coast, is a commercially important marine bivalve in Asian countries. In this study, inheritance of 32 informative microsatellite loci was examined in 70-h D-shaped larvae of three induced meiogynogenetic diploid families of P. yessoensis for centromere mapping using half-tetrad analysis. The ratio of gynogenetic diploids was proven to be 100%, 100% and 96% in the three families, respectively. Inheritance analysis in the control crosses showed that 51 of the 53 genotypic ratios observed were in accordance with Mendelian expectations at the 5% level after Bonferroni correction. Seven of the 32 microsatellite loci showed the existence of null alleles in control crosses. The second division segregation frequency ( y) of the microsatellite loci ranged from 0.07 to 0.85 with a mean of 0.38, suggesting the existence of positive interference after a single chiasma formation in some chromosomes in the scallop. Microsatellite-centromere distances ranged from 4 cM to 42 cM under the assumption of complete interference. Information on the positions of centromeres in relation to the microsatellite loci will represent a contribution towards the assembly of genetic maps in the commercially important scallop species.

  5. Mutations in Z8T824 Are Associated with Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, and Facial Anomalies Syndrome Type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Greef, Jessica C.; Wang, Jun; Balog, Judit; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Frants, Rune R.; Straasheijm, Kirsten R.; Aytekin, Caner; van der Burg, Mirjam; Duprez, Laurence; Ferster, Alina; Gennery, Andrew R.; Gimelli, Giorgio; Reisli, Ismail; Schuetz, Catharina; Schulz, Ansgar; Smeets, Dominique F. C. M.; Sznajer, Yves; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Eggermond, Maria C.; van Ostaijen-ten Dam, Monique M.; Lankester, Arjan C.; van Tol, Maarten J. D.; van den Elsen, Peter J.; Weemaes, Corry M.; van der Maarel, Silvere M.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, and facial anomalies (ICE) syndrome is mainly characterized by recurrent, often fatal, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. About 50% of patients carry mutations in the DNA methyltransferase 3B gene (DNMT3B) (ICF1). The remaining

  6. Differential expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase in rat and human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J S; Russel, S; Marshall, M O;

    1993-01-01

    The GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD is a prominent islet cell autoantigen in type I diabetes. The two forms of GAD (GAD64 and GAD67) are encoded by different genes in both rats and humans. By in situ hybridization analysis of rat and human pancreases, expression of both genes was detected in rat isl...

  7. T-cell epitopes in type 1 diabetes autoantigen tyrosine phosphatase IA-2: potential for mimicry with rotavirus and other environmental agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Honeyman, M C; Stone, N. L.; Harrison, L. C.

    1998-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase IA-2 is a molecular target of pancreatic islet autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. T-cell epitope peptides in autoantigens have potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and they may hold clues to environmental agents with similar sequences that could trigger or exacerbate autoimmune disease. We identified 13 epitope peptides in IA-2 by measuring peripheral blood T-cell proliferation to 68 overlapping, synthetic peptides encompassing the intracytoplasmic domain ...

  8. Centromere pairing by a plasmid-encoded type I ParB protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringgaard, Simon; Löwe, Jan; Gerdes, Kenn

    2007-01-01

    over the nucleoid. ParB ribbon-helix-helix dimers bind cooperatively to direct repeats in parC1 and parC2. Using four different assays we obtain solid evidence that ParB can pair parC1- and parC2-encoding DNA fragments in vitro. Convincingly, electron microscopy revealed that ParB mediates binary...... pairing of parC fragments. In addition to binary complexes, ParB mediated the formation of higher order complexes consisting of several DNA fragments joined by ParB at centromere site parC. N-terminal truncated versions of ParB still possessing specific DNA binding activity were incompetent in pairing...

  9. A hemicentric inversion in the maize line knobless Tama flint created two sites of centromeric elements and moved the kinetochore-forming region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Jonathan C; Meyer, Julie M; Birchler, James A

    2007-06-01

    A maize line, knobless Tama flint (KTF), was found to contain a version of chromosome 8 with two spatially distinct regions of centromeric elements, one at the original genetic position and the other at a novel location on the long arm. The new site of centromeric elements functions as the kinetochore-forming region resulting in a change of arm length ratio. Examination of fluorescence in situ hybridization markers on chromosome 8 revealed an inversion between the two centromere sites relative to standard maize lines, indicating that this chromosome 8 resulted from a hemicentric inversion with one breakpoint approximately 20 centi-McClintocks (cMc) on the long arm (20% of the total arm length from the centromere) and the other in the original cluster of centromere repeats. This inversion moved the kinetochore-forming region but left the remainder of the centromere repeats. In a hybrid between a standard line (Mo17) and KTF, both chromosome 8 homologues were completely synapsed at pachytene despite the inversion. Although the homologous centromeres were not paired, they were always correctly oriented at anaphase and migrated to opposite poles. Additionally, recombination on 8L was severely repressed in the hybrid.

  10. Identification of the alpha 3 chain of type IV collagen as the common autoantigen in antibasement membrane disease and Goodpasture syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, R; Wilson, C B; Weber, M; Gunwar, S; Chonko, A M; Neilson, E G; Hudson, B G

    1995-10-01

    Antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies can cause glomerulonephritis or pulmonary hemorrhage by themselves or Goodpasture syndrome when they occur together. It is unknown if variations in antibody reactivity contribute to the different patterns of organ involvement seen in this disease. This study examines the reactivity of the alpha 1-alpha 6 NC1 domains of Type IV collagen, the putative autoantigen, in sera from patients with anti-GBM antibodies after various clinical presentations of lung hemorrhage and renal injury. Serum or plasma containing anti-GBM antibodies from 35 patients with combined glomerulonephritis and pulmonary hemorrhage, 19 with glomerulonephritis alone, and 4 with pulmonary hemorrhage alone were compared with samples from 19 normal controls and 32 patients with other kidney diseases. Four different immunologic assays were performed with bovine alpha 1-alpha 6(IV) and recombinant human type alpha 1-alpha 5(IV) collagen NC1 domains. The study found that the anti-GBM antibodies from all patients reacted with the alpha 3(IV) NC1 (85% exclusively). Additional limited reactivity with the alpha 1(IV) NC1 and alpha 4(IV) NC1 was found in 15 and 3%, respectively. This non-alpha 3(IV) NC1 reactivity was most frequent in the patients with anti-GBM antibodies and glomerulonephritis alone. None of the patients had reactivity to other basement membrane components like laminin, fibronectin, heparan sulfate proteoglycan, entactin, or the 7S and triple helical fragments of Type IV collagen. The observed alpha-chain NC1 reactivity was confined to patients with anti-GBM antibodies with no additional reactivities detected among a large number of other kidney diseases controls. The correlation of alpha 1-alpha 6(IV) NC1 reactivity in a large number of patients with anti-GBM antibodies defined by classic assays definitively establishes that reactivity to alpha 3(IV) NC1 domains is both sufficient and necessary for the expression of autoimmune disease

  11. Misregulation of Scm3p/HJURP Causes Chromosome Instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Human Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant K. Mishra; Wei-Chun Au; John S. Choy; P Henning Kuich; Baker, Richard E.; Foltz, Daniel R.; Basrai, Munira A.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetochore (centromeric DNA and associated proteins) is a key determinant for high fidelity chromosome transmission. Evolutionarily conserved Scm3p is an essential component of centromeric chromatin and is required for assembly and function of kinetochores in humans, fission yeast, and budding yeast. Overexpression of HJURP, the mammalian homolog of budding yeast Scm3p, has been observed in lung and breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis; however, the physiological relevanc...

  12. Multiple Pairwise Analysis of Non-homologous Centromere Coupling Reveals Preferential Chromosome Size-Dependent Interactions and a Role for Bouquet Formation in Establishing the Interaction Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrançois, Philippe; Rockmill, Beth; Xie, Pingxing; Roeder, G Shirleen; Snyder, Michael

    2016-10-01

    During meiosis, chromosomes undergo a homology search in order to locate their homolog to form stable pairs and exchange genetic material. Early in prophase, chromosomes associate in mostly non-homologous pairs, tethered only at their centromeres. This phenomenon, conserved through higher eukaryotes, is termed centromere coupling in budding yeast. Both initiation of recombination and the presence of homologs are dispensable for centromere coupling (occurring in spo11 mutants and haploids induced to undergo meiosis) but the presence of the synaptonemal complex (SC) protein Zip1 is required. The nature and mechanism of coupling have yet to be elucidated. Here we present the first pairwise analysis of centromere coupling in an effort to uncover underlying rules that may exist within these non-homologous interactions. We designed a novel chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based assay to detect all possible interactions between non-homologous yeast centromeres during early meiosis. Using this variant of 3C-qPCR, we found a size-dependent interaction pattern, in which chromosomes assort preferentially with chromosomes of similar sizes, in haploid and diploid spo11 cells, but not in a coupling-defective mutant (spo11 zip1 haploid and diploid yeast). This pattern is also observed in wild-type diploids early in meiosis but disappears as meiosis progresses and homologous chromosomes pair. We found no evidence to support the notion that ancestral centromere homology plays a role in pattern establishment in S. cerevisiae post-genome duplication. Moreover, we found a role for the meiotic bouquet in establishing the size dependence of centromere coupling, as abolishing bouquet (using the bouquet-defective spo11 ndj1 mutant) reduces it. Coupling in spo11 ndj1 rather follows telomere clustering preferences. We propose that a chromosome size preference for centromere coupling helps establish efficient homolog recognition.

  13. DNA Topoisomerase II Is a Determinant of the Tensile Properties of Yeast Centromeric Chromatin and the Tension Checkpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Warsi, Tariq H.; Navarro, Michelle S.; Bachant, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Centromeric (CEN) chromatin is placed under mechanical tension and stretches as kinetochores biorient on the mitotic spindle. This deformation could conceivably provide a readout of biorientation to error correction mechanisms that monitor kinetochore–spindle interactions, but whether CEN chromatin acts in a tensiometer capacity is unresolved. Here, we report observations linking yeast Topoisomerase II (Top2) to both CEN mechanics and assessment of interkinetochore tension. First, in top2-4 a...

  14. Maximum-likelihood method identifies meiotic restitution mechanism from heterozygosity transmission of centromeric loci: application in citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Juárez, José; García-Lor, Andrés; Froelicher, Yann; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidisation is a key source of diversification and speciation in plants. Most researchers consider sexual polyploidisation leading to unreduced gamete as its main origin. Unreduced gametes are useful in several crop breeding schemes. Their formation mechanism, i.e., First-Division Restitution (FDR) or Second-Division Restitution (SDR), greatly impacts the gametic and population structures and, therefore, the breeding efficiency. Previous methods to identify the underlying mechanism required the analysis of a large set of markers over large progeny. This work develops a new maximum-likelihood method to identify the unreduced gamete formation mechanism both at the population and individual levels using independent centromeric markers. Knowledge of marker-centromere distances greatly improves the statistical power of the comparison between the SDR and FDR hypotheses. Simulating data demonstrated the importance of selecting markers very close to the centromere to obtain significant conclusions at individual level. This new method was used to identify the meiotic restitution mechanism in nineteen mandarin genotypes used as female parents in triploid citrus breeding. SDR was identified for 85.3% of 543 triploid hybrids and FDR for 0.6%. No significant conclusions were obtained for 14.1% of the hybrids. At population level SDR was the predominant mechanisms for the 19 parental mandarins. PMID:25894579

  15. Maximum-likelihood method identifies meiotic restitution mechanism from heterozygosity transmission of centromeric loci: application in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Juárez, José; García-Lor, Andrés; Froelicher, Yann; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2015-04-20

    Polyploidisation is a key source of diversification and speciation in plants. Most researchers consider sexual polyploidisation leading to unreduced gamete as its main origin. Unreduced gametes are useful in several crop breeding schemes. Their formation mechanism, i.e., First-Division Restitution (FDR) or Second-Division Restitution (SDR), greatly impacts the gametic and population structures and, therefore, the breeding efficiency. Previous methods to identify the underlying mechanism required the analysis of a large set of markers over large progeny. This work develops a new maximum-likelihood method to identify the unreduced gamete formation mechanism both at the population and individual levels using independent centromeric markers. Knowledge of marker-centromere distances greatly improves the statistical power of the comparison between the SDR and FDR hypotheses. Simulating data demonstrated the importance of selecting markers very close to the centromere to obtain significant conclusions at individual level. This new method was used to identify the meiotic restitution mechanism in nineteen mandarin genotypes used as female parents in triploid citrus breeding. SDR was identified for 85.3% of 543 triploid hybrids and FDR for 0.6%. No significant conclusions were obtained for 14.1% of the hybrids. At population level SDR was the predominant mechanisms for the 19 parental mandarins.

  16. High diversity in the TCR repertoire of GAD65 autoantigen-specific human CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Anne; Lindner, Annett; Catani, Mara; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Dahl, Andreas; Klemroth, Sylvia; Kühn, Denise; Dietz, Sevina; Bickle, Marc; Ziegler, Anette-Gabrielle; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2015-03-15

    Autoreactive CD4(+) T cells are an essential feature of type 1 diabetes mellitus. We applied single-cell TCR α- and β-chain sequencing to peripheral blood GAD65-specific CD4(+) T cells, and TCR α-chain next-generation sequencing to bulk memory CD4(+) T cells to provide insight into TCR diversity in autoimmune diabetes mellitus. TCRs obtained for 1650 GAD65-specific CD4(+) T cells isolated from GAD65 proliferation assays and/or GAD65 557I tetramer staining in 6 patients and 10 islet autoantibody-positive children showed large diversity with 1003 different TCRs identified. TRAV and TRBV gene usage was broad, and the TRBV5.1 gene was most prominent within the GAD65 557I tetramer(+) cells. Limited overlap (<5%) was observed between TCRs of GAD65-proliferating and GAD65 557I tetramer(+) CD4(+) T cells. Few TCRs were repeatedly found in GAD65-specific cells at different time points from individual patients, and none was seen in more than one subject. However, single chains were often shared between patients and used in combination with different second chains. Next-generation sequencing revealed a wide frequency range (<0.00001-1.62%) of TCR α-chains corresponding to GAD65-specific T cells. The findings support minor selection of genes and TCRs for GAD65-specific T cells, but fail to provide strong support for TCR-targeted therapies. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. The activity regulation of the mitotic centromere-associated kinesin by Polo-like kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Andreas; Sanhaji, Mourad; Steinhäuser, Kerstin; Roth, Susanne; Louwen, Frank; Yuan, Juping

    2015-03-30

    The mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK), a potent microtubule depolymerase, is involved in regulating microtubule dynamics. The activity and subcellular localization of MCAK are tightly regulated by key mitotic kinases, such as Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) by phosphorylating multiple residues in MCAK. Since Plk1 phosphorylates very often different residues of substrates at different stages, we have dissected individual phosphorylation of MCAK by Plk1 and characterized its function in more depth. We have recently shown that S621 in MCAK is the major phosphorylation site of Plk1, which is responsible for regulating MCAK's degradation by promoting the association of MCAK with APC/CCdc20. In the present study, we have addressed another two residues phosphorylated by Plk1, namely S632/S633 in the C-terminus of MCAK. Our data suggest that Plk1 phosphorylates S632/S633 and regulates its catalytic activity in mitosis. This phosphorylation is required for proper spindle assembly during early phases of mitosis. The subsequent dephosphorylation of S632/S633 might be necessary to timely align the chromosomes onto the metaphase plate. Therefore, our studies suggest new mechanisms by which Plk1 regulates MCAK: the degradation of MCAK is controlled by Plk1 phosphorylation on S621, whereas its activity is modulated by Plk1 phosphorylation on S632/S633 in mitosis.

  18. Overexpression of centromere protein H is significantly associated with breast cancer progression and overall patient survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ting Liao; Yan Feng; Men-Lin Li; Guang-Lin Liu; Man-Zhi Li; Mu-Sheng Zeng; Li-Bing Song

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide.This study aimed to analyze the expression of centromere protein H (CENP-H) in breast cancer and to correlate it with clinicopathologic data,including patient survival.Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Westem blotting to detect the expression of CENP-H in normal mammary epithelial cells,immortalized mammary epithelial cell lines,and breast cancer cell lines,we observed that the mRNA and protein levels of CENP-H were higher in breast cancer cell lines and in immortalized mammary epithelial cells than in normal mammary epithelial cells.We next examined CENP-H expression in 307 paraffin-embedded archived samples of clinicopathologically characterized breast cancer using immunohistochemistry,and detected high CENP-H expression in 134 (43.6%) samples.Statistical analysis showed that CENP-H expression was related with clinical stage (P = 0.001),T classification (P = 0.032),N classification (P =0.018),and Ki-67 (P<0.001).Patients with high CENP-H expression had short overall survival.Multivariate analysis showed that CENP-H expression was an independent prognostic indicator for patient survival.Our results suggest that CENP-H protein is a valuable marker of breast cancer progression and prognosis.

  19. Centromeric Non-coding Transcription: Opening the Black Box of Chromosomal Instability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Gutiérrez, Rodrigo; Herrera, Luis A

    2017-06-01

    In eukaryotes, mitosis is tightly regulated to avoid the generation of numerical chromosome aberrations, or aneuploidies. The aneuploid phenotype is a consequence of chromosomal instability (CIN), i.e., an enhanced rate of chromosome segregation errors, which is frequently found in cancer cells and is associated with tumor aggressiveness and increased tumor cell survival potential. To avoid the generation of aneuploidies, cells rely on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a widely conserved mechanism that protects the genome against this type of error. This signaling pathway stops mitotic pro-gression before anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to spindle microtubules. Howev-er, impairment of the SAC cannot account for the establishment of CIN because cells bearing this phe-notype have a functional SAC. Hence, in cells with CIN, anaphase is not triggered until all chromo-somes are correctly attached to spindle microtubules and congressed at the metaphase plate. Thus, an in-teresting question arises: What mechanisms actually mediate CIN in cancer cells? Recent research has shown that some pathways involved in chromosome segregation are closely associated to centromere-encoded non-coding RNA (cencRNA) and that these RNAs are deregulated in abnormal conditions, such as cancer. These mechanisms may provide new explanations for chromosome segregation errors. The present review discusses some of these findings and proposes novel mechanisms for the establish-ment of CIN based on regulation by cencRNA.

  20. Pregnancy-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with anti-centromere antibody-positive Raynaud's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryu; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Tajima, Yumi; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Onishi, Yasushi; Fujii, Hiroshi; Takasawa, Naruhiko; Ishii, Tomonori; Harigae, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), and hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme levels, and a low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome display common symptoms that include microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Therefore, it is important to distinguish between them because their treatments vary: however, the differential diagnosis is sometimes difficult. We report a 32-year-old woman who was referred to our department for further examination of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and a slightly elevated serum creatinine level with anti-centromere antibody-positive Raynaud's syndrome in the early puerperal period. TTP, SRC, and HELLP syndrome were considered in the differential diagnosis, but the measurement of a disintegrin-like metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS 13) activity and its inhibitor level led to the diagnosis of TTP. She was successfully treated by plasma exchange and high-dose prednisolone and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. If microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia are observed in perinatal women or patients with signs of systemic sclerosis, the measurement of ADAMTS13 activity and its inhibitor level are essential for diagnosis and therapeutic choice.

  1. The coordination of centromere replication, spindle formation, and kinetochore-microtubule interaction in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The kinetochore is a protein complex that assembles on centromeric DNA to mediate chromosome-microtubule interaction. Most eukaryotic cells form the spindle and establish kinetochore-microtubule interaction during mitosis, but budding yeast cells finish these processes in S-phase. It has long been noticed that the S-phase spindle in budding yeast is shorter than that in metaphase, but the biological significance of this short S-phase spindle structure remains unclear. We addressed this issue by using ask1-3, a temperature-sensitive kinetochore mutant that exhibits partially elongated spindles at permissive temperature in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU, a DNA synthesis inhibitor. After exposure to and removal of HU, ask1-3 cells show a delayed anaphase entry. This delay depends on the spindle checkpoint, which monitors kinetochore-microtubule interaction defects. Overproduction of microtubule-associated protein Ase1 or Cin8 also induces spindle elongation in HU-arrested cells. The spindle checkpoint-dependent anaphase entry delay is also observed after ASE1 or CIN8 overexpression in HU-arrested cells. Therefore, the shorter spindle in S-phase cells is likely to facilitate proper chromosome-microtubule interaction.

  2. A BAC library of Beta vulgaris L. for the targeted isolation of centromeric DNA and molecular cytogenetics of Beta species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gunnar; Dechyeva, Daryna; Wenke, Torsten; Weber, Beatrice; Schmidt, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    We constructed a sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of the monosomic addition line PAT2. This chromosomal mutant carries a single additional chromosome fragment (minichromosome) derived from the wild beet Beta patellaris. Restriction analysis of the mutant line by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to determine HindIII as a suitable enzyme for partial digestion of genomic DNA to generate large-insert fragments which were cloned into the vector pCC1. The library consists of 36,096 clones with an average insert size of 120 kb, and 2.2% of the clones contain mitochondrial or chloroplast DNA. Based on a haploid genome size of 758 Mbp, the library represents 5.7 genome equivalents providing the probability of 99.67% that any sequence of the PAT2 genome can be found in the library. Hybridization to high-density filters was used to isolate 89 BACs containing arrays of the centromere-associated satellite repeats pTS5 and pTS4.1. Using the identified BAC clones in fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments with PAT2 and Beta patellaris chromosome spreads their wild beet origin and centromeric localization was demonstrated. Multi-colour FISH with differently labelled satellite repeats pTS5 and pTS4.1 was used to investigate the large-scale organization of the centromere of the PAT2 minichromosome in detail. FISH studies showed that the centromeric satellite pTS5 is flanked on both sides by pTS4.1 arrays and the arms of the minichromosome are terminated by the Arabidopsis-type telomeric sequences. FISH with a BAC, selected from high-density filters after hybridization with an RFLP marker of the genetic linkage group I, demonstrated that it is feasible to correlate genetic linkage groups with chromosomes. Therefore, the PAT2 BAC library provides a useful tool for the characterization of Beta centromeres and a valuable resource for sugar beet genome analysis.

  3. New tool for biological dosimetry: Reevaluation and automation of the gold standard method following telomere and centromere staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M’kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Maalouf, Elie E.L. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire MIPS – Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems GmbH, Robert-Bosch-Str. 6, 68804 Altlussheim (Germany); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, 61 Rue Erlanger, 75016 Paris (France); Cuceu, Corina; Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire MIPS – Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie (LRO), Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), Route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have applied telomere and centromere (TC) staining to the scoring of dicentrics. • TC staining renders the scoring of dicentrics more rapid and robust. • TC staining allows the scoring of not only dicentrics but all chromosomal anomalies. • TC staining has led to a reevaluation of the radiation dose–response curve. • TC staining allows automation of the scoring of chromosomal aberations. • Automated scoring of dicentrics after TC staining was as efficient as manual scoring. - Abstract: Purpose: The dicentric chromosome (dicentric) assay is the international gold-standard method for biological dosimetry and classification of genotoxic agents. The introduction of telomere and centromere (TC) staining offers the potential to render dicentric scoring more efficient and robust. In this study, we improved the detection of dicentrics and all unstable chromosomal aberrations (CA) leading to a significant reevaluation of the dose–effect curve and developed an automated approach following TC staining. Material and methods: Blood samples from 16 healthy donors were exposed to {sup 137}Cs at 8 doses from 0.1 to 6 Gy. CA were manually and automatically scored following uniform (Giemsa) or TC staining. The detection of centromeric regions and telomeric sequences using PNA probes allowed the detection of all unstable CA: dicentrics, centric and acentric rings, and all acentric fragments (with 2, 4 or no telomeres) leading to the precise quantification of estimated double strand breaks (DSB). Results: Manual scoring following TC staining revealed a significantly higher frequency of dicentrics (p < 10{sup −3}) (up to 30%) and estimated DSB (p < 10{sup −4}) compared to uniform staining due to improved detection of dicentrics with centromeres juxtaposed with other centromeres or telomeres. This improvement permitted the development of the software, TCScore, that detected 95% of manually scored dicentrics compared to 50% for

  4. HSV-1 genome subnuclear positioning and associations with host-cell PML-NBs and centromeres regulate LAT locus transcription during latency in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Catez

    Full Text Available Major human pathologies are caused by nuclear replicative viruses establishing life-long latent infection in their host. During latency the genomes of these viruses are intimately interacting with the cell nucleus environment. A hallmark of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 latency establishment is the shutdown of lytic genes expression and the concomitant induction of the latency associated (LAT transcripts. Although the setting up and the maintenance of the latent genetic program is most likely dependent on a subtle interplay between viral and nuclear factors, this remains uninvestigated. Combining the use of in situ fluorescent-based approaches and high-resolution microscopic analysis, we show that HSV-1 genomes adopt specific nuclear patterns in sensory neurons of latently infected mice (28 days post-inoculation, d.p.i.. Latent HSV-1 genomes display two major patterns, called "Single" and "Multiple", which associate with centromeres, and with promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs as viral DNA-containing PML-NBs (DCP-NBs. 3D-image reconstruction of DCP-NBs shows that PML forms a shell around viral genomes and associated Daxx and ATRX, two PML partners within PML-NBs. During latency establishment (6 d.p.i., infected mouse TGs display, at the level of the whole TG and in individual cells, a substantial increase of PML amount consistent with the interferon-mediated antiviral role of PML. "Single" and "Multiple" patterns are reminiscent of low and high-viral genome copy-containing neurons. We show that LAT expression is significantly favored within the "Multiple" pattern, which underlines a heterogeneity of LAT expression dependent on the viral genome copy number, pattern acquisition, and association with nuclear domains. Infection of PML-knockout mice demonstrates that PML/PML-NBs are involved in virus nuclear pattern acquisition, and negatively regulate the expression of the LAT. This study demonstrates that nuclear domains including

  5. Serological proteome analysis of dogs with breast cancer unveils common serum biomarkers with human counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Canine mammary tumor is being touted as a model for investigating the human breast cancer. Breast cancer of the both species has similar biological behavior, histopathologic characteristics, and metastatic pattern. In this study, we used the serological proteome analysis to detect autoantigens that elicit a humoral response in dogs with mammary tumor in order to identify serum biomarkers with potential usefulness as diagnostic markers and to better understand molecular mechanisms underlying canine breast cancer development. Protein extract from a cell line was subject to 2DE followed by Western blotting using sera from 15 dogs with mammary tumor and sera from 15 healthy control dogs. Immunoreactive autoantigens were subsequently identified by the MALDI-TOF MS. Four autoantigens, including manganese-superoxide dismutase, triose phosphate isomerase, alpha-enolase, and phosphoglycerate mutase1, with significantly higher immunoreactivity in the tumor samples than in the normal samples were identified as biomarker candidates. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting revealed higher expression of these biomarkers in the malignant tumors than in the normal or benign tumors. The autoantigens found in this study have been reported to elicit autoantibody response in the human breast cancer, indicating the similarity of breast cancer proteome profile in dogs with that in human beings.

  6. Historical perspectives on the discovery and elucidation of autoantibodies to centromere proteins (CENP) and the emerging importance of antibodies to CENP-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzler, Marvin J; Rattner, Jerome B; Luft, LeeAnne M; Edworthy, Steven M; Casiano, Carlos A; Peebles, Carol; Mahler, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Autoantibodies to the centromere proteins (CENP), which are major constituents of the primary constriction of metaphase chromosomes, were first described in 1980. In those seminal publications and 30 years of research that have followed, a number of CENP have been identified as autoantibody targets in human diseases. Historically, autoantibodies directed to CENP-A, -B and -C have been considered relatively specific biomarkers for limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) or the calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia (CREST) syndrome. These autoantibodies, found in up to 40% of SSc sera, can be identified by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on a variety of tissue culture cell lines as a discrete speckled staining pattern of both interphase nuclei and metaphase chromatin. Early in the investigation of anti-CENP, it became apparent that some autoantibodies had a similar IIF pattern wherein as cells entered into the cell cycle, speckled staining of the metaphase chromatin could be observed but, unlike conventional CENP staining, interphase nuclei were not stained. Subsequent studies identified one of the targets of these autoantibodies to be CENP-F, a kinesin binding protein essential for completion of the cell cycle. Early clinical studies found that, unlike antibodies to the earlier described CENP, lcSSc rarely expressed anti-CENP-F and approximately 50% of these patients had a malignancy. This review provides a historical perspective of CENP autoantibodies and focuses on an update of the information on CENP-F and their clinical associations.

  7. Homing of GAD65 specific autoimmunity and development of insulitis requires expression of both DQ8 and human GAD65 in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elagin, Raya B.; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Diacovo, Maria J.; Baekkeskov, Steinunn; Jaume, Juan C.

    2009-01-01

    MHC-class II genes determine susceptibility in human type-1 diabetes. In their context, presentation of target antigen(s) results in autoimmunity and β-cell destruction. An animal model, in which human β-cell autoantigen(s) are presented to effector-cells in the context of human MHC-class II diabetes susceptibility genes, would be desirable for studying molecular mechanisms of disease and developing antigen-specific immune-interventions. We report the development of antigen-specific insulitis in double-transgenic mice carrying the HLA-DQ8 diabetes susceptibility haplotype and expressing the human autoantigen GAD65 in pancreatic β-cells. Immunization with human GAD65 cDNA resulted in severe insulitis and low antibody levels in double-transgenic mice while control mice were mostly insulitis free. CFA/protein immunization resulted in high antibody levels and modest insulitis. Pancreatic lymphocytic infiltration progressed through stages (exocrine pancreas followed by peri and intra-insulitis). Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from DNA-immunized mice resulted in development of insulitis in recipient transgenics. Our results show that immunization with a clinically relevant, type-1 diabetes human autoantigen, in a humanized genetic setting, results in the development of an immune response that homes to islets of Langerhans. This animal model will facilitate studies of autoimmunity to GAD65 in the context of HLA-DQ8, and development of methods to induce tolerance and prevent insulitis. PMID:19289270

  8. Expression and identification of type 1 diabetes associated autoantigen IA-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾秀娟; 李果; 陈战; 许光武; 谢超; 张迪; 周文中; 郑升; 谢晓雁; 杨键; 李纪平; 罗敏

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To obtain prokaryotic expressed IA-2 recombinant protein and to identify its immunological activity.Methods The complimentary DNA (cDNA) coding for the intracytoplasmic part of IA-2 (IA-2ic) was amplified from human fetal brain RNA, and was subcloned into the PinPoint Xa-1 T vector to construct recombinant expression plasmid, and was then expressed in E.coli JM109 cells as a fusion protein with a biotinylated peptide sequence at the aminoterminus. The biotinylated fusion protein was then purified by affinity chromatography and was subsequently dialyzed. Finally, its immunogenicity was evaluated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Results The purified IA-2ic fusion protein resolved on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as a single Coomassie brilliant blue stained band with a molecular weight of 59 kDa and its immunogenicity was confirmed by ELISA. Conclusions E.coli expressed IA-2ic fusion protein has immunological activity. It can be used for detection of IA-2 autoantibodies (IA-2A) and for further studies on type 1 diabetes in future.

  9. Specific autoantigens identified by sera obtained from mice that are immunized with testicular germ cells alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terayama, Hayato; Hirai, Shuichi; Naito, Munekazu; Qu, Ning; Katagiri, Chiaki; Nagahori, Kenta; Hayashi, Shogo; Sasaki, Hiraku; Moriya, Shota; Hiramoto, Masaki; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Li, Zhong-Lian; Sakabe, Kou; Matsushita, Masayuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    There are various autoimmunogenic antigens (AIs) in testicular germ cells (TGCs) recognized as foreign by the body’s immune system. However, there is little information of TGC-specific AIs being available. The aim of this study is to identify TGC-specific AIs. We have previously established that immunization using viable syngeneic TGC can also induce murine experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) without using any adjuvant. This study is to identify TGC-specific AIs by TGC liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis, followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis that reacted with serum IgG from EAO mice. In this study, we identified 11 TGC-specific AIs that reacted with serum from EAO mice. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the mRNA expressions of seven TGC-specific AIs were significantly higher in only mature testis compared to other organs. Moreover, the recombinant proteins of identified 10 (except unnamed protein) TGC-specific AIs were created by using human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and these antigencities were reconfirmed by Western blot using EAO serum reaction. These results indicated Atp6v1a, Hsc70t, Fbp1 and Dazap1 were candidates for TGC-specific AIs. Identification of these AIs will facilitate new approaches for understanding infertility and cancer pathogenesis and may provide a basis for the development of novel therapies. PMID:27752123

  10. Epigenetic histone marks of extended meta-polycentric centromeres of Lathyrus and Pisum chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel eNeumann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Species of the legume genera Lathyrus and Pisum possess chromosomes that exhibit a unique structure of their centromeric regions, which is clearly apparent during metaphase by the formation of extended primary constrictions which span up to a third of the length of the chromosome. In addition, these species express two different variants of the CenH3 protein which are co-localized in multiple domains along the poleward surface of the primary constrictions. Here we show that the constrictions represent a distinct type of chromatin differing from the chromosome arms. In metaphase, histone phosphorylation patterns including H3S10ph, H3S28ph and H3T3ph were observed along the entire constriction, in a way similar to holocentric chromosomes. On the other hand, distribution of phosphorylated H2AT120 was different from that previously reported from either, holocentric and monocentric chromosomes, occurring at chromatin surrounding but not overlapping CenH3 domains. Since some of these phosphorylations play a role in chromatid cohesion, it can be assumed that they facilitate correct chromosome segregation by ensuring that multiple separate CenH3 domains present on the same chromatid are oriented towards the same pole. The constrictions also displayed distinct patterns of histone methylation marks, being enriched in H3K9me2 and depleted in H3K4me3 and H3K27me2 compared to the chromosome arms. High resolution fluorescence microscopy revealed that although both CenH3 protein variants are present in all CenH3 domains detected on metaphase chromosomes, they are only partially co-localized while there are chromatin subdomains which are mostly made of only one CenH3 variant. Taken together, these data revealed specific features of extended primary constrictions of Lathyrus and Pisum and support the idea that they may represent an intermediate stage between monocentric and holocentric chromosomes.

  11. Prognostic significance of centromere 17 copy number gain in breast cancer depends on breast cancer subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyuongyul; Jang, Min Hye; Chung, Yul Ri; Lee, Yangkyu; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, In Ah; Park, So Yeon

    2017-03-01

    Increased copy number of chromosome enumeration probe (CEP) targeting centromere 17 is frequently encountered during HER2 in situ hybridization (ISH) in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinicopathologic significance of CEP17 copy number gain in a relatively large series of breast cancer patients. We analyzed 945 cases of invasive breast cancers whose HER2 fluorescence ISH reports were available from 2004 to 2011 at a single institution and evaluated the association of CEP17 copy number gain with clinicopathologic features of tumors and patient survival. We detected 186 (19.7%) cases of CEP17 copy number gain (CEP17≥3.0) among 945 invasive breast cancers. In survival analysis, CEP17 copy number gain was not associated with disease-free survival of the patients in the whole group. Nonetheless, it was found to be an independent adverse prognostic factor in the HER2-negative group but not in the HER2-positive group. In further subgroup analyses, CEP17 copy number gain was revealed as an independent poor prognostic factor in HER2-negative and hormone receptor-positive breast cancers, and it was associated with aggressive histologic variables including high T stage, high histologic grade, lymphovascular invasion, p53 overexpression, and high Ki-67 proliferative index. In conclusion, we found that elevated CEP17 count can serve as a prognostic marker in luminal/HER2-negative subtype of invasive breast cancer. We advocate the use of the dual-colored fluorescence ISH using CEP17 rather than the single-colored one because it gives additional valuable information on CEP17 copy number alterations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Heterochromatic Genes Undergo Epigenetic Changes and Escape Silencing in Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, Facial Anomalies (ICF) Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Marie-Elisabeth; Lana, Erica; Rivals, Isabelle; Lefranc, Gérard; Sarda, Pierre; Claustres, Mireille; Mégarbané, André; De Sario, Albertina

    2011-01-01

    Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, Facial Anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by a marked immunodeficiency, severe hypomethylation of the classical satellites 2 and 3 associated with disruption of constitutive heterochromatin, and facial anomalies. Sixty percent of ICF patients have mutations in the DNMT3B (DNA methyltransferase 3B) gene, encoding a de novo DNA methyltransferase. In the present study, we have shown that, in ICF lymphoblasts and peripheral blood, juxtacentromeric heterochromatic genes undergo dramatic changes in DNA methylation, indicating that they are bona fide targets of the DNMT3B protein. DNA methylation in heterochromatic genes dropped from about 80% in normal cells to approximately 30% in ICF cells. Hypomethylation was observed in five ICF patients and was associated with activation of these silent genes. Although DNA hypomethylation occurred in all the analyzed heterochromatic genes and in all the ICF patients, gene expression was restricted to some genes, every patient having his own group of activated genes. Histone modifications were preserved in ICF patients. Heterochromatic genes were associated with histone modifications that are typical of inactive chromatin: they had low acetylation on H3 and H4 histones and were slightly enriched in H3K9Me3, both in ICF and controls. This was also the case for those heterochromatic genes that escaped silencing. This finding suggests that gene activation was not generalized to all the cells, but rather was restricted to a clonal cell population that may contribute to the phenotypic variability observed in ICF syndrome. A slight increase in H3K27 monomethylation was observed both in heterochromatin and active euchromatin in ICF patients; however, no correlation between this modification and activation of heterochromatic genes was found. PMID:21559330

  13. Heterochromatic genes undergo epigenetic changes and escape silencing in immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, facial anomalies (ICF syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Elisabeth Brun

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, Facial Anomalies (ICF syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by a marked immunodeficiency, severe hypomethylation of the classical satellites 2 and 3 associated with disruption of constitutive heterochromatin, and facial anomalies. Sixty percent of ICF patients have mutations in the DNMT3B (DNA methyltransferase 3B gene, encoding a de novo DNA methyltransferase. In the present study, we have shown that, in ICF lymphoblasts and peripheral blood, juxtacentromeric heterochromatic genes undergo dramatic changes in DNA methylation, indicating that they are bona fide targets of the DNMT3B protein. DNA methylation in heterochromatic genes dropped from about 80% in normal cells to approximately 30% in ICF cells. Hypomethylation was observed in five ICF patients and was associated with activation of these silent genes. Although DNA hypomethylation occurred in all the analyzed heterochromatic genes and in all the ICF patients, gene expression was restricted to some genes, every patient having his own group of activated genes. Histone modifications were preserved in ICF patients. Heterochromatic genes were associated with histone modifications that are typical of inactive chromatin: they had low acetylation on H3 and H4 histones and were slightly enriched in H3K9Me(3, both in ICF and controls. This was also the case for those heterochromatic genes that escaped silencing. This finding suggests that gene activation was not generalized to all the cells, but rather was restricted to a clonal cell population that may contribute to the phenotypic variability observed in ICF syndrome. A slight increase in H3K27 monomethylation was observed both in heterochromatin and active euchromatin in ICF patients; however, no correlation between this modification and activation of heterochromatic genes was found.

  14. YKL-40, a mammalian member of the chitinase family, is a matrix protein of specific granules in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Price, P A; Johansen, J S;

    1998-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39 (HC gp-39), is a member of family 18 glycosyl hydrolases. YKL-40 is secreted by chondrocytes, synovial cells, and macrophages, and recently it has been reported that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The function ...

  15. Melanoma inhibitor of apoptosis protein (ML-IAP) specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes cross-react with an epitope from the auto-antigen SS56

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek Sørensen, Rikke; Faurschou, Mikkel; Troelsen, Lone;

    2009-01-01

    A large proportion of melanoma patients host a spontaneous T-cell response specifically against ML-IAP-derived peptides. In this study, we describe that some ML-IAP-specific cytotoxic T cells isolated from melanoma patients cross react with an epitope from the auto-antigen SS56. SS56 is a recently...... described target of autoantibody responses in Sjögren's syndrome (SS) as well as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we describe that SS56 is also an auto-antigen for T cells in SS and SLE. Hence, SS56-specific T cells could readily be detected in circulation and among the infiltrating cells of SLE...... skin lesions. SS56-specific T cells were able to lyse target cells presenting the peptide epitope on the surface. Notably, SS56-specific CD8 T cells isolated from an SS patient cross reacted with the ML-IAP epitope. This early evidence of a target for auto-reactive CTL in SS and SLE patients...

  16. Pathogen and autoantigen homologous regions within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein suggest an autoimmune treatable component of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris J

    2011-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel provides the glutathione and hypochlorous acid necessary for bactericidal/viricidal actions. CFTR mutations block these effects, diminishing pathogen defence and allowing extracellular pathogen accumulation, where antibody encounter is likely. KEGG pathway analysis of the CFTR interactome shows that CFTR is involved in pathogen entry pathways and immune defence as well as in pathways relevant to comorbid conditions (diabetes, cardiomyopathies and sexual organ development). Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus infections decrease the lifespan of cystic fibrosis patients and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia colonization is increased. Autoantibodies, targeting myeloperoxidase, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and calgranulin may further compromise pathogen defence. Short consensus sequences, within immunogenic extracellular regions of the CFTR protein, are homologous to proteins expressed by P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and S. maltophilia, and to several autoantigens, with a universal overlap between autoantigen/pathogen/CFTR consensi. Antibodies to pathogens are thus likely responsible for the creation of these autoantibodies, which, with pathogen antibodies, may target the CFTR protein acting as antagonists, further compromising its function. This creates a feedforward cycle, diminishing the function of the CFTR protein and increasing the probability of pathogen accumulation and antibody production at every turn. Interruption of this cycle by antibody adsorption or immunosuppressant therapy may be beneficial in cystic fibrosis.

  17. In type 1 diabetes a subset of anti-coxsackievirus B4 antibodies recognize autoantigens and induce apoptosis of pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Bason

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes is characterized by autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells. The role played by autoantibodies directed against beta cells antigens in the pathogenesis of the disease is still unclear. Coxsackievirus B infection has been linked to the onset of type 1 diabetes; however its precise role has not been elucidated yet. To clarify these issues, we screened a random peptide library with sera obtained from 58 patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes, before insulin therapy. We identified an immunodominant peptide recognized by the majority of individual patients'sera, that shares homology with Coxsackievirus B4 VP1 protein and with beta-cell specific autoantigens such as phogrin, phosphofructokinase and voltage-gated L-type calcium channels known to regulate beta cell apoptosis. Antibodies against the peptide affinity-purified from patients' sera, recognized the viral protein and autoantigens; moreover, such antibodies induced apoptosis of the beta cells upon binding the L-type calcium channels expressed on the beta cell surface, suggesting a calcium dependent mechanism. Our results provide evidence that in autoimmune diabetes a subset of anti-Coxsackievirus antibodies are able to induce apoptosis of pancreatic beta cells which is considered the most critical and final step in the development of autoimmune diabetes without which clinical manifestations do not occur.

  18. 植物着丝粒结构及进化的研究进展%Research Progress on Structure and Evolution of Plant Centromeres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青

    2015-01-01

    植物着丝粒是染色体重要结构域,介导动粒装配。不同物种间着丝粒重复序列快速趋异进化,着丝粒功能保守,确保有丝分裂和减数分裂过程中染色体正确分离和准确传递。伴随染色质免疫共沉淀技术(Chromatin immunoprecipitation, ChIP)、ChIP与高密度芯片相结合技术(ChIP-chip)、ChIP与高通量测序相结合技术(ChIP-seq)的应用,植物着丝粒研究获得里程碑式进展:某些模式植物着丝粒DNA序列、蛋白质结构、功能获得大量新认识;着丝粒基本蛋白质组蛋白H3被用来界定着丝粒大小和边界;某些非着丝粒区域被激活为新着丝粒,在世代传递中保持稳定性。本文对植物着丝粒结构、功能、进化研究进行了综述,并探讨了植物着丝粒研究存在的问题。%The plant centromere is the most important chromosome domain mediating the assembly of kinetochore. The rapid divergent evolution of centromeric repeat sequences and function conservation of centromeres among different species ensure correct segregation and faithful transmission of chromosome in mitosis and meiosis. Along with the development of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), ChIP-chip, and ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-seq) technologies, three milestone discoveries have achieved in plant centromere research since the last 20 years, such as a lot of new knowledge on the structure, function, and evolution of centromeres from model plants, the fundamental kinetochore protein CENH3 used to delimiting the size and boundaries of centromere, the neocentromeres activated from non-centromeric regions stably transmitted to subsequent generations. The research progress on structure, function, and evolution of plant centromeres are reviewed and the remaining questions of plant centromere studies are discussed.

  19. Diversity of a complex centromeric satellite and molecular characterization of dispersed sequence families in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Gerhard; Dechyeva, Daryna; Wenke, Torsten; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this work was the identification and molecular characterization of novel sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) repetitive sequences to unravel the impact of repetitive DNA on size and evolution of Beta genomes via amplification and diversification. Genomic DNA and a pool of B. vulgaris repetitive sequences were separately used as probes for a screening of high-density filters from a B. vulgaris plasmid library. Novel repetitive motifs were identified by sequencing and further used as probes for Southern analyses in the genus Beta. Chromosomal localization of the repeats was analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridization on chromosomes of B. vulgaris and two other species of the section Beta. Two dispersed repetitive families pDvul1 and pDvul2 and the tandemly arranged repeat family pRv1 were isolated from a sugar beet plasmid library. The dispersed repetitive families pDvul1 and pDvul2 were identified in all four sections of the genus Beta. The members of the pDvul1 and pDvul2 family are scattered over all B. vulgaris chromosomes, although amplified to a different extent. The pRv1 satellite repeat is exclusively present in species of the section Beta. The centromeric satellite pBV1 by structural variations of the monomer and interspersion of pRv1 units forms complex satellite structures, which are amplified in different degrees on the centromeres of 12 chromosomes of the three species of the Beta section. The complexity of the pBV1 satellite family observed in the section Beta of the genus Beta and, in particular, the strong amplification of the pBV1/pRv1 satellite in the domesticated B. vulgaris indicates the dynamics of centromeric satellite evolution during species radiation within the genus. The dispersed repeat families pDvul1 and pDvul2 might represent derivatives of transposable elements.

  20. Differential repetitive DNA composition in the centromeric region of chromosomes of Amazonian lizard species in the family Teiidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Natalia D M; Carmo, Edson; Neves, Rogerio O; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Differences in heterochromatin distribution patterns and its composition were observed in Amazonian teiid species. Studies have shown repetitive DNA harbors heterochromatic blocks which are located in centromeric and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868), and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758). In Cnemidophorus sp.1, repetitive DNA has multiple signals along all chromosomes. The aim of this study was to characterize moderately and highly repetitive DNA sequences by C ot1-DNA from Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 genomes through cloning and DNA sequencing, as well as mapping them chromosomally to better understand its organization and genome dynamics. The results of sequencing of DNA libraries obtained by C ot1-DNA showed that different microsatellites, transposons, retrotransposons, and some gene families also comprise the fraction of repetitive DNA in the teiid species. FISH using C ot1-DNA probes isolated from both Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 showed these sequences mainly located in heterochromatic centromeric, and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin chromosomes, indicating they play structural and functional roles in the genome of these species. In Cnemidophorus sp.1, C ot1-DNA probe isolated from Ameiva ameiva had multiple interstitial signals on chromosomes, whereas mapping of C ot1-DNA isolated from the Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 highlighted centromeric regions of some chromosomes. Thus, the data obtained showed that many repetitive DNA classes are part of the genome of Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentroyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin, and these sequences are shared among the analyzed teiid species, but they were not always allocated at the same chromosome position.

  1. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fox, Catherine A

    2016-04-07

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  2. Genetics and epigenetics of repeat derepression in human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, P.E.

    2016-01-01

    A large part of the human genome consists of repetitive DNA. In this thesis two human diseases have been studied in which deregulation of repetitive DNA is a central feature: facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and immunodeficiency, centromere instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrom

  3. Overexpression of LSD1 contributes to human carcinogenesis through chromatin regulation in various cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, Shinya; Kelly, John D; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Yoshimatsu, Masanori; Unoki, Motoko; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Field, Helen I; Neal, David E; Yamaue, Hiroki; Ponder, Bruce A J; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2011-02-01

    A number of histone demethylases have been identified and biochemically characterized, but the pathological roles of their dysfunction in human disease like cancer have not been well understood. Here, we demonstrate important roles of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) in human carcinogenesis. Expression levels of LSD1 are significantly elevated in human bladder carcinomas compared with nonneoplastic bladder tissues (p human embryonic kidney fibroblast cells. Expression profile analysis showed that LSD1 could affect the expression of genes involved in various chromatin-modifying pathways such as chromatin remodeling at centromere, centromeric heterochromatin formation and chromatin assembly, indicating its essential roles in carcinogenesis through chromatin modification.

  4. Analysis of premature centromere division (PCD) of the X chromosome in Alzheimer patients through the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spremo-Potparevic, Biljana; Zivkovic, Lada; Djelic, Ninoslav; Bajic, Vladan

    2004-05-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of the X chromosome in phytohaemagglutinin stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated in 12 sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) patients and in 11 healthy subjects. For chromosome analysis two methods were used: (1) standard analysis of G-banded metaphase chromosomes and; (2) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for the detection of the X chromosome centromeric region in interphase nuclei. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that the X chromosome expresses premature centromere division (PCD) in AD females in 10.53% of metaphase cells and in 15.22% of interphase nuclei. In AD men the percentages were 3.98 and 6.06%, respectively. X chromosome PCD in the female control group showed a percentage of 7.46% in metaphase cells and 9.35% in interphase nuclei and in male controls the percentages were 2.84% in metaphases and 5.54% in interphase nuclei. The results of FISH analysis showed that PCD could occur much earlier than metaphase of mitosis, i.e. in interphase of the cell cycle, immediately after replication. The FISH method can be used for PCD verification in all phases of the cell cycle in various disorders including AD.

  5. MHF1–2/CENP-S-X performs distinct roles in centromere metabolism and genetic recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Osman, Fekret; Feeney, Laura; Lorenz, Alexander; Bryer, Claire; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    The histone-fold proteins Mhf1/CENP-S and Mhf2/CENP-X perform two important functions in vertebrate cells. First, they are components of the constitutive centromere-associated network, aiding kinetochore assembly and function. Second, they work with the FANCM DNA translocase to promote DNA repair. However, it has been unclear whether there is crosstalk between these roles. We show that Mhf1 and Mhf2 in fission yeast, as in vertebrates, serve a dual function, aiding DNA repair/recombination and localizing to centromeres to promote chromosome segregation. Importantly, these functions are distinct, with the former being dependent on their interaction with the FANCM orthologue Fml1 and the latter not. Together with Fml1, they play a second role in aiding chromosome segregation by processing sister chromatid junctions. However, a failure of this activity does not manifest dramatically increased levels of chromosome missegregation due to the Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease, which acts as a failsafe to resolve DNA junctions before the end of mitosis. PMID:24026537

  6. Endogenous HLA-DR-restricted presentation of the cartilage antigens human cartilage gp-39 and melanoma inhibitory activity in the inflamed rheumatoid joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lierop, M. J. C.; den Hoed, L.; Houbiers, J.; Vencovsky, J.; Ruzickova, S.; Krystufkova, O.; van Schaardenburg, M.; van den Hoogen, F.; Vandooren, B.; Baeten, D.; De Keyser, F.; Sonderstrup, G.; Bos, E.; Boots, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. The cartilage proteins melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) and human cartilage gp-39 (HC gp-39) are candidate autoantigens in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study was undertaken to investigate the endogenous HLA-DR4-restricted presentation of these self proteins, in order to seek i

  7. Virus and autoantigen-specific CD4+ T cells are key effectors in a SCID mouse model of EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W; Mautner, Josef

    2014-05-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies.

  8. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  9. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and Relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Iwata-Otsubo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species.

  10. Quantification, by solid-phase minisequencing, of the telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene in families with spinal muscular atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, M; Sørensen, N; Hansen, F J

    1997-01-01

    In an analysis of 30 families affected by spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) we have used the solid-phase minisequencing method to determine the ratio between the number of telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN and cBCD541 respectively) on normal and SMA chromosomes...

  11. Schizosaccharomyces pombe centromere protein Mis19 links Mis16 and Mis18 to recruit CENP-A through interacting with NMD factors and the SWI/SNF complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Ebe, Masahiro; Nagao, Koji; Kokubu, Aya; Sajiki, Kenichi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2014-07-01

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific variant of histone H3 that is required for accurate chromosome segregation. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammalian Mis16 and Mis18 form a complex essential for CENP-A recruitment to centromeres. It is unclear, however, how the Mis16-Mis18 complex achieves this function. Here, we identified, by mass spectrometry, novel fission yeast centromere proteins Mis19 and Mis20 that directly interact with Mis16 and Mis18. Like Mis18, Mis19 and Mis20 are localized at the centromeres during interphase, but not in mitosis. Inactivation of Mis19 in a newly isolated temperature-sensitive mutant resulted in CENP-A delocalization and massive chromosome missegregation, whereas Mis20 was dispensable for proper chromosome segregation. Mis19 might be a bridge component for Mis16 and Mis18. We isolated extragenic suppressor mutants for temperature-sensitive mis18 and mis19 mutants and used whole-genome sequencing to determine the mutated sites. We identified two groups of loss-of-function suppressor mutations in non-sense-mediated mRNA decay factors (upf2 and ebs1), and in SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling components (snf5, snf22 and sol1). Our results suggest that the Mis16-Mis18-Mis19-Mis20 CENP-A-recruiting complex, which is functional in the G1-S phase, may be counteracted by the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex and non-sense-mediated mRNA decay, which may prevent CENP-A deposition at the centromere.

  12. Meiotic cohesin SMC1β provides prophase I centromeric cohesion and is required for multiple synapsis-associated functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddipta Biswas

    Full Text Available Cohesin subunit SMC1β is specific and essential for meiosis. Previous studies showed functions of SMC1β in determining the axis-loop structure of synaptonemal complexes (SCs, in providing sister chromatid cohesion (SCC in metaphase I and thereafter, in protecting telomere structure, and in synapsis. However, several central questions remained unanswered and concern roles of SMC1β in SCC and synapsis and processes related to these two processes. Here we show that SMC1β substantially supports prophase I SCC at centromeres but not along chromosome arms. Arm cohesion and some of centromeric cohesion in prophase I are provided by non-phosphorylated SMC1α. Besides supporting synapsis of autosomes, SMC1β is also required for synapsis and silencing of sex chromosomes. In absence of SMC1β, the silencing factor γH2AX remains associated with asynapsed autosomes and fails to localize to sex chromosomes. Microarray expression studies revealed up-regulated sex chromosome genes and many down-regulated autosomal genes. SMC1β is further required for non-homologous chromosome associations observed in absence of SPO11 and thus of programmed double-strand breaks. These breaks are properly generated in Smc1β⁻/⁻ spermatocytes, but their repair is delayed on asynapsed chromosomes. SMC1α alone cannot support non-homologous associations. Together with previous knowledge, three main functions of SMC1β have emerged, which have multiple consequences for spermatocyte biology: generation of the loop-axis architecture of SCs, homologous and non-homologous synapsis, and SCC starting in early prophase I.

  13. Expressed Centromere Specific Histone 3 (CENH3 Variants in Cultivated Triploid and Wild Diploid Bananas (Musa spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariuki S. Muiruri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are specified by a centromere specific histone 3 (CENH3 protein, which exists in a complex environment, interacting with conserved proteins and rapidly evolving satellite DNA sequences. The interactions may become more challenging if multiple CENH3 versions are introduced into the zygote as this can affect post-zygotic mitosis and ultimately sexual reproduction. Here, we characterize CENH3 variant transcripts expressed in cultivated triploid and wild diploid progenitor bananas. We describe both splice- and allelic-[Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP] variants and their effects on the predicted secondary structures of protein. Expressed CENH3 transcripts from six banana genotypes were characterized and clustered into three groups (MusaCENH-1A, MusaCENH-1B, and MusaCENH-2 based on similarity. The CENH3 groups differed with SNPs as well as presence of indels resulting from retained and/or skipped exons. The CENH3 transcripts from different banana genotypes were spliced in either 7/6, 5/4 or 6/5 exons/introns. The 7/6 and the 5/4 exon/intron structures were found in both diploids and triploids, however, 7/6 was most predominant. The 6/5 exon/introns structure was a result of failure of the 7/6 to splice correctly. The various transcripts obtained were predicted to encode highly variable N-terminal tails and a relatively conserved C-terminal histone fold domain (HFD. The SNPs were predicted in some cases to affect the secondary structure of protein by lengthening or shorting the affected domains. Sequencing of banana CENH3 transcripts predicts SNP variations that affect amino acid sequences and alternatively spliced transcripts. Most of these changes affect the N-terminal tail of CENH3.

  14. Statistical analysis of 3D images detects regular spatial distributions of centromeres and chromocenters in animal and plant nuclei.

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    Philippe Andrey

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, the interphase nucleus is organized in morphologically and/or functionally distinct nuclear "compartments". Numerous studies highlight functional relationships between the spatial organization of the nucleus and gene regulation. This raises the question of whether nuclear organization principles exist and, if so, whether they are identical in the animal and plant kingdoms. We addressed this issue through the investigation of the three-dimensional distribution of the centromeres and chromocenters. We investigated five very diverse populations of interphase nuclei at different differentiation stages in their physiological environment, belonging to rabbit embryos at the 8-cell and blastocyst stages, differentiated rabbit mammary epithelial cells during lactation, and differentiated cells of Arabidopsis thaliana plantlets. We developed new tools based on the processing of confocal images and a new statistical approach based on G- and F- distance functions used in spatial statistics. Our original computational scheme takes into account both size and shape variability by comparing, for each nucleus, the observed distribution against a reference distribution estimated by Monte-Carlo sampling over the same nucleus. This implicit normalization allowed similar data processing and extraction of rules in the five differentiated nuclei populations of the three studied biological systems, despite differences in chromosome number, genome organization and heterochromatin content. We showed that centromeres/chromocenters form significantly more regularly spaced patterns than expected under a completely random situation, suggesting that repulsive constraints or spatial inhomogeneities underlay the spatial organization of heterochromatic compartments. The proposed technique should be useful for identifying further spatial features in a wide range of cell types.

  15. SGO1 maintains bovine meiotic and mitotic centromeric cohesions of sister chromatids and directly affects embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Xia Yin

    Full Text Available Shugoshin (SGO is a critical factor that enforces cohesion from segregation of paired sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. It has been studied mainly in invertebrates. Knowledge of SGO(s in a mammalian system has only been reported in the mouse and Hela cells. In this study, the functions of SGO1 in bovine oocytes during meiotic maturation, early embryonic development and somatic cell mitosis were investigated. The results showed that SGO1 was expressed from germinal vesicle (GV to the metaphase II stage. SGO1 accumulated on condensed and scattered chromosomes from pre-metaphase I to metaphase II. The over-expression of SGO1 did not interfere with the process of homologous chromosome separation, although once separated they were unable to move to the opposing spindle poles. This often resulted in the formation of oocytes with 60 replicated chromosomes. Depletion of SGO1 in GV oocytes affected chromosomal separation resulting in abnormal chromosome alignment at a significantly higher proportion than in control oocytes. Knockdown of SGO1 expression significantly decreased the embryonic developmental rate and quality. To further confirm the function(s of SGO1 during mitosis, bovine embryonic fibroblast cells were transfected with SGO1 siRNAs. SGO1 depletion induced the premature dissociation of chromosomal cohesion at the centromere and along the chromosome arm giving rise to abnormal appearing mitotic patterns. The results of this study infer that SGO1 is involved in the centromeric cohesion of sister chromatids and chromosomal movement towards the spindle poles. Depletion of SGO1 causes arrestment of cell division in meiosis and mitosis.

  16. A highly conserved pericentromeric domain in human and gorilla chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, M; Gosálvez, J; Gosálvez, A; Nieddu, M; López-Fernández, C; Mezzanotte, R

    2009-01-01

    Significant similarity between human and gorilla genomes has been found in all chromosome arms, but not in centromeres, using whole-comparative genomic hybridization (W-CGH). In human chromosomes, centromeric regions, generally containing highly repetitive DNAs, are characterized by the presence of specific human DNA sequences and an absence of homology with gorilla DNA sequences. The only exception is the pericentromeric area of human chromosome 9, which, in addition to a large block of human DNA, also contains a region of homology with gorilla DNA sequences; the localization of these sequences coincides with that of human satellite III. Since highly repetitive DNAs are known for their high mutation frequency, we hypothesized that the chromosome 9 pericentromeric DNA conserved in human chromosomes and deriving from the gorilla genome may thus play some important functional role.

  17. Modified C-band technique for the analysis of chromosome abnormalities in irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Akifumi; Akiyama, Miho; Yamada, Yuji [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A., E-mail: myoshida@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Biodosimetry Section, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    A modified C-band technique was developed in order to analyze more accurately dicentric, tricentric, and ring chromosomes in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes. Instead of the original method relying on treatment with barium hydroxide Ba(OH){sub 2}, C-bands were obtained using a modified form of heat treatment in formamide followed with DAPI staining. This method was tentatively applied to the analysis of dicentric chromosomes in irradiated human lymphocytes to examine its availability. The frequency of dicentric chromosome was almost the same with conventional Giemsa staining and the modified C-band technique. In the analysis using Giemsa staining, it is relatively difficult to identify the centromere on the elongated chromosomes, over-condensed chromosomes, fragment, and acentric ring. However, the modified C-band method used in this study makes it easier to identify the centromere on such chromosomes than with the use of Giemsa staining alone. Thus, the modified C-band method may give more information about the location of the centromere. Therefore, this method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation due to the analysis of the dicentric chromosome in human lymphocytes exposed to the radiation. Furthermore, this method is simpler and faster than the original C-band protocol and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method with the centromeric DNA probe. - Highlights: > The dicentric (dic) assay is the most effective for the radiation biodosimetry. > It is important to recognize the centromere of the dic. > We improved a C-band technique based on heat denaturation. > This technique enables the accurate detection of a centromere. > This method may be available and more useful for biological dose estimation.

  18. Lack of independent prognostic and predictive value of centromere 17 copy number changes in breast cancer patients with known HER2 and TOP2A status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Vang; Ejlertsen, Bent; Møller, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The clinical benefit of anthracyclines has been connected to HER2 status, TOP2A status and centromere 17 copy numbers (CEN-17). Data from a clinical trial randomizing patients to anthracyclines was used to assess whether the number of CEN-17 in breast cancers may predict incremental responsiveness...... to anthracyclines besides what is obtained when used relatively to TOP2A and HER2. As cut sections of paraffin-embedded tissue are prone to truncation of nuclei, strict definition of ploidy levels is lacking. We therefore used normal breast tissue to assist define ploidy levels in cut sections. Fluorescence in situ...... hybridization (FISH) with centromere 17 (CEN-17) and TOP2A was performed on 120 normal breast specimens. The diploid CEN-17 copy number was reduced from the expected two signals in whole nuclei to an average of 1.68 signals per nucleus in cut sections of normal breast. Ploidy levels determined in normal breast...

  19. Relationships between values of antibodies to several connective tissue disease autoantigens and pulmonary function in a Japanese general population: the Takahata study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Nakano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism in the pathogenesis of respiratory dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between pulmonary function and serum antibodies to several connective tissue disease autoantigens (ACTDA levels, which has not been investigated in a general population. METHODS: Blood sampling and spirometry were performed for subjects (n = 3,257 aged ≥40 years who participated in a community-based annual health check in Takahata, Japan, from 2004 to 2006. ACTDA was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and subjects with ACTDA values ≥20 were defined as positive. RESULTS: In males, there were significant inverse relationships between logarithmically transformed ACTDA values and spirometric parameters, including % predicted values for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 and maximal midexpiratory flow (MMF as well as FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that except for the relationship between ACTDA and FEV1/FVC, these relationships were still significant after adjustment for Brinkman index (a measure of inhaled cigarette consumption. The prevalence of positive ACTDA was greater in male never-smokers with mixed ventilation disorders and relatively severe airflow obstruction (% predicted FEV1 below the median value. CONCLUSIONS: Autoimmunity may be involved in the mechanism of impaired pulmonary function in the general population.

  20. Aire-dependent thymic expression of desmoglein 3, the autoantigen in pemphigus vulgaris, and its role in T-cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Naoko; Nishifuji, Koji; Yamada, Taketo; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Peltonen, Leena; Nagafuchi, Seiho; Amagai, Masayuki

    2011-02-01

    In the mechanism of thymus-induced central tolerance, the transcription factor Aire has been demonstrated to promote the expression of a wide range of peripheral organ-specific antigens (Ags) in the medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), which serve as self-Ags in negative selection. We examined the expression of desmoglein 3 (Dsg3), the autoantigen in pemphigus vulgaris (PV), in mouse thymus and the involvement of Aire in tolerance to Dsg3. Immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization revealed Dsg3 in single cells or in clusters in ∼3% of mTECs near the cortico-medullary junction of the thymus in C57BL/6 mice. Dsg3-expressing mTECs also expressed some Ags of skin-unrelated peripheral organs simultaneously. In contrast, Dsg3-positive mTECs were not detected in the Aire(-/-) thymus. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from Aire(-/-) mice immunized with Dsg3 did not induce anti-Dsg3 IgG production or PV phenotype in Rag2(-/-) recipient mice. However, Aire(-/-) CD4(+) T cells, but not Aire(+/+) CD4(+) T cells, induced low levels of anti-Dsg3 IgG production when transferred with Dsg3(-/-) B cells. These findings indicate that Aire has an important role in Dsg3 expression as well as in selection of T cells that help B cells to produce anti-Dsg3 IgG in thymus.

  1. Novel Centromeric Loci of the Wine and Beer Yeast Dekkera bruxellensis CEN1 and CEN2

    OpenAIRE

    Ishchuk, Olena P.; Vojvoda Zeljko, Tanja; Schifferdecker, Anna J.; Mebrahtu Wisén, Sofia; Hagström, Åsa K.; Rozpędowska, Elżbieta; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Hellborg, Linda; Ling, Zhihao; Sibirny, Andrei A.; Piškur, Jure

    2016-01-01

    The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis thrives in environments that are harsh and limiting, especially in concentrations with low oxygen and high ethanol. Its different strains' chromosomes greatly vary in number (karyotype). This study isolates two novel centromeric loci (CEN1 and CEN2), which support both the yeast's autonomous replication and the stable maintenance of plasmids. In the sequenced genome of the D. bruxellensis strain CBS 2499, CEN1 and CEN2 are each present in one copy....

  2. Preferential recruitment of the maternal centromere-specific histone H3 (CENH3) in oat (Avena sativa L.) × pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) hybrid embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takayoshi; Sunamura, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Ayaka; Eltayeb, Amin Elsadig; Tsujimoto, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Chromosome elimination occurs frequently in interspecific hybrids between distantly related species in Poaceae. However, chromosomes from both parents behave stably in a hybrid of female oat (Avena sativa L.) pollinated by pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.). To analyze the chromosome behavior in this hybrid, we cloned the centromere-specific histone H3 (CENH3) genes of oat and pearl millet and produced a pearl millet-specific anti-CENH3 antibody. Application of this antibody together with a grass species common anti-CENH3 antibody revealed the dynamic CENH3 composition of the hybrid cells before and after fertilization. Despite co-expression of CENH3 genes encoded by oat and pearl millet, only an oat-type CENH3 was incorporated into the centromeres of both species in the hybrid embryo. Oat CENH3 enables a functional centromere in pearl millet chromosomes in an oat genetic background. Comparison of CENH3 genes among Poaceae species that show chromosome elimination in interspecific hybrids revealed that the loop 1 regions of oat and pearl millet CENH3 exhibit exceptionally high similarity.

  3. A stable acentric marker chromosome derived from distal 8p: Reactivation of a latent ancient centromere at 8p23.1?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, H.; Wakui, K.; Ogawa, K. [Saitama Children`s Medical Ctr., Iwatsuki (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Centromere is considered to be an essential chromosomal component for faithful segregation, and acentric chromosomes are unstable and lost through cell divisions. We report a novel marker chromosome that was acentric but stable through cell divisions. The patient was a 2-year-old girl with mental retardation, patent ductus arteriosus and mild dysmorphic features. G-banded chromosome analysis revealed an additional small marker chromosome in all 100 cells examined. Using the targeted chromosome-band painting method, the marker was found to originate from the distal region of 8p, and subsequent two color FISH analysis with cosmid probes around the region revealed the marker was a rearranged chromosome interpreted as 8pter{r_arrow}p23.1{r_arrow}8pter. No centromeric region was involved in the marker. By FISH, no {alpha}-satellite sequence was detected on the marker, while telomere sequence was detected at each end. Antikinetochore immunostaining using a serum from a patient with CREST syndrome showed a pair of signals on the marker, which indicated that a functional kinetochore was present on the marker, presumably at 8p23.1-corresponding region. The patient may provide evidence that an ancient centromere sequence exists at 8p23.1 and was reactivated through the chromosome rearrangement in the patient.

  4. MYEOV : A candidate gene for DNA amplification events occurring centromeric to CCNDI in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, JWG; Cuny, M; Orsetti, B; Rodriguez, C; Valles, H; Bartram, CR; Schuuring, E; Theillet, C

    2002-01-01

    Rearrangements of chromosome 11q13 are frequently observed in human cancer. The 11q13 region harbors several chromosomal breakpoint clusters found in hematologic malignancies and exhibits frequent DNA amplification in carcinomas. DNA amplification patterns in breast tumors are consistent with the ex

  5. High resolution mapping of Dense spike-ar (dsp.ar) to the genetic centromere of barley chromosome 7H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Druka, Arnis; Franckowiak, Jerome; Morgante, Michele; Waugh, Robbie; Stein, Nils

    2012-02-01

    Spike density in barley is under the control of several major genes, as documented previously by genetic analysis of a number of morphological mutants. One such class of mutants affects the rachis internode length leading to dense or compact spikes and the underlying genes were designated dense spike (dsp). We previously delimited two introgressed genomic segments on chromosome 3H (21 SNP loci, 35.5 cM) and 7H (17 SNP loci, 20.34 cM) in BW265, a BC(7)F(3) nearly isogenic line (NIL) of cv. Bowman as potentially containing the dense spike mutant locus dsp.ar, by genotyping 1,536 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in both BW265 and its recurrent parent. Here, the gene was allocated by high-resolution bi-parental mapping to a 0.37 cM interval between markers SC57808 (Hv_SPL14)-CAPSK06413 residing on the short and long arm at the genetic centromere of chromosome 7H, respectively. This region putatively contains more than 800 genes as deduced by comparison with the collinear regions of barley, rice, sorghum and Brachypodium, Classical map-based isolation of the gene dsp.ar thus will be complicated due to the infavorable relationship of genetic to physical distances at the target locus.

  6. DNA topoisomerase II is a determinant of the tensile properties of yeast centromeric chromatin and the tension checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsi, Tariq H; Navarro, Michelle S; Bachant, Jeff

    2008-10-01

    Centromeric (CEN) chromatin is placed under mechanical tension and stretches as kinetochores biorient on the mitotic spindle. This deformation could conceivably provide a readout of biorientation to error correction mechanisms that monitor kinetochore-spindle interactions, but whether CEN chromatin acts in a tensiometer capacity is unresolved. Here, we report observations linking yeast Topoisomerase II (Top2) to both CEN mechanics and assessment of interkinetochore tension. First, in top2-4 and sumoylation-resistant top2-SNM mutants CEN chromatin stretches extensively during biorientation, resulting in increased sister kinetochore separation and preanaphase spindle extension. Our data indicate increased CEN stretching corresponds with alterations to CEN topology induced in response to tension. Second, Top2 potentiates aspects of the tension checkpoint. Mutations affecting the Mtw1 kinetochore protein activate Ipl1 kinase to detach kinetochores and induce spindle checkpoint arrest. In mtw1top2-4 and mtw1top2-SNM mutants, however, kinetochores are resistant to detachment and checkpoint arrest is attenuated. For top2-SNM cells, CEN stretching and checkpoint attenuation occur even in the absence of catenation linking sister chromatids. In sum, Top2 seems to play a novel role in CEN compaction that is distinct from decatenation. Perturbations to this function may allow weakened kinetochores to stretch CENs in a manner that mimics tension or evades Ipl1 surveillance.

  7. A KIR B centromeric region present in Africans but not Europeans protects pregnant women from pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakimuli, Annettee; Chazara, Olympe; Hiby, Susan E; Farrell, Lydia; Tukwasibwe, Stephen; Jayaraman, Jyothi; Traherne, James A; Trowsdale, John; Colucci, Francesco; Lougee, Emma; Vaughan, Robert W; Elliott, Alison M; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Mirembe, Florence; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J; Moffett, Ashley

    2015-01-20

    In sub-Saharan Africans, maternal mortality is unacceptably high, with >400 deaths per 100,000 births compared with pre-eclampsia, a syndrome arising from defective placentation. Controlling placentation are maternal natural killer (NK) cells that use killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) to recognize the fetal HLA-C molecules on invading trophoblast. We analyzed genetic polymorphisms of maternal KIR and fetal HLA-C in 484 normal and 254 pre-eclamptic pregnancies at Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. The combination of maternal KIR AA genotypes and fetal HLA-C alleles encoding the C2 epitope associates with pre-eclampsia [P = 0.0318, odds ratio (OR) = 1.49]. The KIR genes associated with protection are located in centromeric KIR B regions that are unique to sub-Saharan African populations and contain the KIR2DS5 and KIR2DL1 genes (P = 0.0095, OR = 0.59). By contrast, telomeric KIR B genes protect Europeans against pre-eclampsia. Thus, different KIR B regions protect sub-Saharan Africans and Europeans from pre-eclampsia, whereas in both populations, the KIR AA genotype is a risk factor for the syndrome. These results emphasize the importance of undertaking genetic studies of pregnancy disorders in African populations with the potential to provide biological insights not available from studies restricted to European populations.

  8. Condensin HEAT subunits required for DNA repair, kinetochore/centromere function and ploidy maintenance in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingya Xu

    Full Text Available Condensin, a central player in eukaryotic chromosomal dynamics, contains five evolutionarily-conserved subunits. Two SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes subunits contain ATPase, hinge, and coiled-coil domains. One non-SMC subunit is similar to bacterial kleisin, and two other non-SMC subunits contain HEAT (similar to armadillo repeats. Here we report isolation and characterization of 21 fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants for three non-SMC subunits, created using error-prone mutagenesis that resulted in single-amino acid substitutions. Beside condensation, segregation, and DNA repair defects, similar to those observed in previously isolated SMC and cnd2 mutants, novel phenotypes were observed for mutants of HEAT-repeats containing Cnd1 and Cnd3 subunits. cnd3-L269P is hypersensitive to the microtubule poison, thiabendazole, revealing defects in kinetochore/centromere and spindle assembly checkpoints. Three cnd1 and three cnd3 mutants increased cell size and doubled DNA content, thereby eliminating the haploid state. Five of these mutations reside in helix B of HEAT repeats. Two non-SMC condensin subunits, Cnd1 and Cnd3, are thus implicated in ploidy maintenance.

  9. The Finnish lapphund retinal atrophy locus maps to the centromeric region of CFA9

    OpenAIRE

    Sargan David R; Wickström Kaisa; Aguirre-Hernández Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Dogs have the second largest number of genetic diseases, after humans. Among the diseases present in dogs, progressive retinal atrophy has been reported in more than a hundred breeds. In some of them, the mutation has been identified and genetic tests have allowed the identification of carriers, thus enabling a drastic reduction in the incidence of the disease. The Finnish lapphund is a dog breed presenting late-onset progressive retinal atrophy for which the disease locus...

  10. Synthetic Studies on Centromere-Associated Protein-E (CENP-E) Inhibitors: 2. Application of Electrostatic Potential Map (EPM) and Structure-Based Modeling to Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine Derivatives as Anti-Tumor Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Takaharu; Okaniwa, Masanori; Banno, Hiroshi; Kakei, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Akihiro; Iwai, Kenichi; Ohori, Momoko; Mori, Kouji; Gotou, Mika; Kawamoto, Tomohiro; Yokota, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu

    2015-10-22

    To develop centromere-associated protein-E (CENP-E) inhibitors for use as anticancer therapeutics, we designed novel imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines, utilizing previously discovered 5-bromo derivative 1a. By site-directed mutagenesis analysis, we confirmed the ligand binding site. A docking model revealed the structurally important molecular features for effective interaction with CENP-E and could explain the superiority of the inhibitor (S)-isomer in CENP-E inhibition vs the (R)-isomer based on the ligand conformation in the L5 loop region. Additionally, electrostatic potential map (EPM) analysis was employed as a ligand-based approach to optimize functional groups on the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine scaffold. These efforts led to the identification of the 5-methoxy imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivative (+)-(S)-12, which showed potent CENP-E inhibition (IC50: 3.6 nM), cellular phosphorylated histone H3 (p-HH3) elevation (EC50: 180 nM), and growth inhibition (GI50: 130 nM) in HeLa cells. Furthermore, (+)-(S)-12 demonstrated antitumor activity (T/C: 40%, at 75 mg/kg) in a human colorectal cancer Colo205 xenograft model in mice.

  11. Increased expression of Siglec-1 on peripheral blood monocytes and its role in mononuclear cell reactivity to autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi-Song; Cheng, Yue; Lin, Qiu-Shui; Wu, Ai-Lin; Yu, Juan; Li, Chang; Sun, Yi; Zhong, Ren-Qian; Wu, Li-Juan

    2014-02-01

    Elevated expression of Siglec-1 on circulating monocytes has been reported in some inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, but its expression and role in RA has not been elucidated. The aims of this study were to determine the expression of Siglec-1 in peripheral blood and to explore its role in mononuclear cell reactivity to autoantigen in RA. Siglec-1 protein and mRNA levels in 42 RA patients, 39 OA patients, 28 SLE patients and 42 normal controls were determined by flow cytometry and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. In addition, 10 patients with active RA received DMARDs for 12 weeks and the frequencies of Siglec-1-positive cells and the 28-joint DAS (DAS28) were assessed before and after therapy. Furthermore, TNF-α, IFN-γ and type II collagen were used to up-regulate Siglec-1. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from different groups were stimulated with mitogens or antigens and cell proliferation and cytokine production were determined. The protein and mRNA levels of Siglec-1 on PBMCs and monocytes in RA patients were significantly higher than those in OA patients and healthy controls. Moreover, the expression of Siglec-1 protein on PBMCs was positively correlated with DAS28, ESR, high-sensitivity CRP and IgM-RF, but not with anti-CCP antibody. Interestingly, Siglec-1 expression was decreased in parallel with the decrease in the DAS28 after 12 weeks of anti-rheumatic treatment. Furthermore, TNF-α, IFN-γ and type II collagen can up-regulate Siglec-1 in PBMCs. Elevated PBMC proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine production to collagen stimulation in RA patients decreased when Siglec-1 was inhibited by anti-Siglec-1 antibodies. Elevated Siglec-1 expression in PBMCs and monocytes can potentially serve as a biomarker for monitoring disease activity in RA. Siglec-1 may also play a proinflammatory role in stimulating lymphocyte proliferation and activation in RA.

  12. Anti-centromere antibody-seropositive Sjögren's syndrome differs from conventional subgroup in clinical and pathological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Hiroaki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To clarify the clinicopathological characteristics of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS with anti-centromere antibody (ACA. Methods Characteristics of 14 patients of pSS with ACA were evaluated. All patients were anti-SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La antibodies negative (ACA+ group without sclerodactyly. The prevalence of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP, titer of IgG and focus score (FS in the minor salivary glands (MSGs were determined. Quantification analysis of Azan Mallory staining was performed to detect collagenous fiber. Forty eight patients in whom ACA was absent were chosen as the conventional (ACA- pSS group. Results Prevalence of ACA+ SS patients was 14 out of 129 (10.85% pSS patients. RP was observed in 61.5% of the patients with ACA. The level of IgG in the ACA+ group was significantly lower than that of the ACA- group (p = 0.018. Statistical difference was also found in the FS of MSGs from the ACA+ group (1.4 ± 1.0 as compared with the ACA- group (2.3 ± 1.6 (p = 0.035. In contrast, the amount of fibrous tissue was much higher in the ACA+ group (65052.2 ± 14520.6 μm2 versus 26251.3 ± 14249.8 μm2 (p = 1.3 × 10-12. Conclusions Low cellular infiltration but with an increase in fibrous tissues may explain the clinical feature of a high prevalence of RP and normal IgG concentration in ACA+ pSS.

  13. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); El Maalouf, Elie [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Terzoudi, Georgia [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems, Altlussheim (Germany); Karachristou, Ionna [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, Paris (France); Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Pantelias, Gabriel [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to {sup 60}Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw.

  14. The Finnish lapphund retinal atrophy locus maps to the centromeric region of CFA9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargan David R

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dogs have the second largest number of genetic diseases, after humans. Among the diseases present in dogs, progressive retinal atrophy has been reported in more than a hundred breeds. In some of them, the mutation has been identified and genetic tests have allowed the identification of carriers, thus enabling a drastic reduction in the incidence of the disease. The Finnish lapphund is a dog breed presenting late-onset progressive retinal atrophy for which the disease locus remains unknown. Results In this study we mapped the progressive retinal atrophy locus in the Finnish lapphund using a DNA pooling approach, assuming that all affected dogs within the breed share the same identical-by descent-mutation as the cause of the disease (genetic homogeneity. Autosomal recessive inheritance was also assumed, after ruling out, from pedigree analysis, dominant and X-linked inheritance. DNA from 12 Finnish lapphund cases was mixed in one pool, and DNA from 12 first-degree relatives of these cases was mixed to serve as the control pool. The 2 pools were tested with 133 microsatellite markers, 3 of which showed a shift towards homozygosity in the cases. Individual genotyping with these 3 markers confirmed homozygosity for the GALK1 microsatellite only (chromosome 9. Further individual genotyping with additional samples (4 cases and 59 controls confirmed the association between this marker and the disease locus (p Conclusion The locus for progressive rod-cone degeneration is known to be close to the GALK1 locus, on the telomeric region of chromosome 9, where the retinal atrophy locus of the Finnish lapphund has been mapped. This suggests that the disease in this breed, as well as in the Swedish lapphund, may correspond to progressive rod-cone degeneration. This would increase the number of known dog breeds having this particular form of progressive retinal atrophy.

  15. The cell cycle timing of centromeric chromatin assembly in Drosophila meiosis is distinct from mitosis yet requires CAL1 and CENP-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Elaine M; Beier, Nicole L; Gorgescu, Walter; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V; Karpen, Gary H

    2012-01-01

    CENP-A (CID in flies) is the histone H3 variant essential for centromere specification, kinetochore formation, and chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent studies have elucidated major cell cycle mechanisms and factors critical for CENP-A incorporation in mitosis, predominantly in cultured cells. However, we do not understand the roles, regulation, and cell cycle timing of CENP-A assembly in somatic tissues in multicellular organisms and in meiosis, the specialized cell division cycle that gives rise to haploid gametes. Here we investigate the timing and requirements for CID assembly in mitotic tissues and male and female meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster, using fixed and live imaging combined with genetic approaches. We find that CID assembly initiates at late telophase and continues during G1 phase in somatic tissues in the organism, later than the metaphase assembly observed in cultured cells. Furthermore, CID assembly occurs at two distinct cell cycle phases during male meiosis: prophase of meiosis I and after exit from meiosis II, in spermatids. CID assembly in prophase I is also conserved in female meiosis. Interestingly, we observe a novel decrease in CID levels after the end of meiosis I and before meiosis II, which correlates temporally with changes in kinetochore organization and orientation. We also demonstrate that CID is retained on mature sperm despite the gross chromatin remodeling that occurs during protamine exchange. Finally, we show that the centromere proteins CAL1 and CENP-C are both required for CID assembly in meiosis and normal progression through spermatogenesis. We conclude that the cell cycle timing of CID assembly in meiosis is different from mitosis and that the efficient propagation of CID through meiotic divisions and on sperm is likely to be important for centromere specification in the developing zygote.

  16. The cell cycle timing of centromeric chromatin assembly in Drosophila meiosis is distinct from mitosis yet requires CAL1 and CENP-C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M Dunleavy

    Full Text Available CENP-A (CID in flies is the histone H3 variant essential for centromere specification, kinetochore formation, and chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent studies have elucidated major cell cycle mechanisms and factors critical for CENP-A incorporation in mitosis, predominantly in cultured cells. However, we do not understand the roles, regulation, and cell cycle timing of CENP-A assembly in somatic tissues in multicellular organisms and in meiosis, the specialized cell division cycle that gives rise to haploid gametes. Here we investigate the timing and requirements for CID assembly in mitotic tissues and male and female meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster, using fixed and live imaging combined with genetic approaches. We find that CID assembly initiates at late telophase and continues during G1 phase in somatic tissues in the organism, later than the metaphase assembly observed in cultured cells. Furthermore, CID assembly occurs at two distinct cell cycle phases during male meiosis: prophase of meiosis I and after exit from meiosis II, in spermatids. CID assembly in prophase I is also conserved in female meiosis. Interestingly, we observe a novel decrease in CID levels after the end of meiosis I and before meiosis II, which correlates temporally with changes in kinetochore organization and orientation. We also demonstrate that CID is retained on mature sperm despite the gross chromatin remodeling that occurs during protamine exchange. Finally, we show that the centromere proteins CAL1 and CENP-C are both required for CID assembly in meiosis and normal progression through spermatogenesis. We conclude that the cell cycle timing of CID assembly in meiosis is different from mitosis and that the efficient propagation of CID through meiotic divisions and on sperm is likely to be important for centromere specification in the developing zygote.

  17. Molecular characterization and chromosomal distribution of a species-specific transcribed centromeric satellite repeat from the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina T Tsoumani

    Full Text Available Satellite repetitive sequences that accumulate in the heterochromatin consist a large fraction of a genome and due to their properties are suggested to be implicated in centromere function. Current knowledge of heterochromatic regions of Bactrocera oleae genome, the major pest of the olive tree, is practically nonexistent. In our effort to explore the repetitive DNA portion of B. oleae genome, a novel satellite sequence designated BoR300 was isolated and cloned. The present study describes the genomic organization, abundance and chromosomal distribution of BoR300 which is organized in tandem, forming arrays of 298 bp-long monomers. Sequence analysis showed an AT content of 60.4%, a CENP-B like-motif and a high curvature value based on predictive models. Comparative analysis among randomly selected monomers demonstrated a high degree of sequence homogeneity (88%-97% of BoR300 repeats, which are present at approximately 3,000 copies per haploid genome accounting for about 0.28% of the total genomic DNA, based on two independent qPCR approaches. In addition, expression of the repeat was also confirmed through RT-PCR, by which BoR300 transcripts were detected in both sexes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of BoR300 on mitotic metaphases and polytene chromosomes revealed signals to the centromeres of two out of the six chromosomes which indicated a chromosome-specific centromeric localization. Moreover, BoR300 is not conserved in the closely related Bactrocera species tested and it is also absent in other dipterans, but it's rather restricted to the B. oleae genome. This feature of species-specificity attributed to BoR300 satellite makes it a good candidate as an identification probe of the insect among its relatives at early development stages.

  18. The Cell Cycle Timing of Centromeric Chromatin Assembly in Drosophila Meiosis Is Distinct from Mitosis Yet Requires CAL1 and CENP-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgescu, Walter; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2012-01-01

    CENP-A (CID in flies) is the histone H3 variant essential for centromere specification, kinetochore formation, and chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent studies have elucidated major cell cycle mechanisms and factors critical for CENP-A incorporation in mitosis, predominantly in cultured cells. However, we do not understand the roles, regulation, and cell cycle timing of CENP-A assembly in somatic tissues in multicellular organisms and in meiosis, the specialized cell division cycle that gives rise to haploid gametes. Here we investigate the timing and requirements for CID assembly in mitotic tissues and male and female meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster, using fixed and live imaging combined with genetic approaches. We find that CID assembly initiates at late telophase and continues during G1 phase in somatic tissues in the organism, later than the metaphase assembly observed in cultured cells. Furthermore, CID assembly occurs at two distinct cell cycle phases during male meiosis: prophase of meiosis I and after exit from meiosis II, in spermatids. CID assembly in prophase I is also conserved in female meiosis. Interestingly, we observe a novel decrease in CID levels after the end of meiosis I and before meiosis II, which correlates temporally with changes in kinetochore organization and orientation. We also demonstrate that CID is retained on mature sperm despite the gross chromatin remodeling that occurs during protamine exchange. Finally, we show that the centromere proteins CAL1 and CENP-C are both required for CID assembly in meiosis and normal progression through spermatogenesis. We conclude that the cell cycle timing of CID assembly in meiosis is different from mitosis and that the efficient propagation of CID through meiotic divisions and on sperm is likely to be important for centromere specification in the developing zygote. PMID:23300382

  19. Advance in Research of Centromeres in the Meiotic Process%着丝粒及其在减数分裂中的作用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张峰; 林娟; 赵军

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are the important functional elements of chromosomes in eukaryotes, their roles played in mitosis and meiosis processes have been paid more and more attentions. Though the chromosomes vary greatly in DNA sequences, their roles are conserved in all eukaryotic organisms, which make sure the faithful segregation of chromosomes and correct cell division. With the continuous development of molecular biology techniques, we have a deep understanding of the functions of centromeres. Here we review the function of centromeres during the meiotic progress.%着丝粒作为真核生物染色体的重要结构之一,是有丝分裂和减数分裂过程中重要的功能元件,其所起到的重要作用越来越受到人们的重视。在整个真核生物类群中,尽管不同物种之间着丝粒的DNA序列相差极大,但是其功能却是相当保守,这确保了着丝粒在调控细胞分裂和染色单体分离过程中能够正常行使其功能,除此之外,人们还发现着丝粒蛋白不仅在细胞的有丝分裂中起作用,还在减数分裂中起着重要的作用。

  20. Autoantibody profiling on human proteome microarray for biomarker discovery in cerebrospinal fluid and sera of neuropsychiatric lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaojun Hu

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE may be potential biomarkers for prediction, diagnosis, or prognosis of NPSLE. We used a human proteome microarray with~17,000 unique full-length human proteins to investigate autoantibodies associated with NPSLE. Twenty-nine CSF specimens from 12 NPSLE, 7 non-NPSLE, and 10 control (non-systemic lupus erythematosuspatients were screened for NPSLE-associated autoantibodies with proteome microarrays. A focused autoantigen microarray of candidate NPSLE autoantigens was applied to profile a larger cohort of CSF with patient-matched sera. We identified 137 autoantigens associated with NPSLE. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that these autoantigens were enriched for functions involved in neurological diseases (score = 43.Anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA was found in the CSF of NPSLE and non-NPSLE patients. The positive rates of 4 autoantibodies in CSF specimens were significantly different between the SLE (i.e., NPSLE and non-NPSLE and control groups: anti-ribosomal protein RPLP0, anti-RPLP1, anti-RPLP2, and anti-TROVE2 (also known as anti-Ro/SS-A. The positive rate for anti-SS-A associated with NPSLE was higher than that for non-NPSLE (31.11% cf. 10.71%; P = 0.045.Further analysis showed that anti-SS-A in CSF specimens was related to neuropsychiatric syndromes of the central nervous system in SLE (P = 0.009. Analysis with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient indicated that the titers of anti-RPLP2 and anti-SS-A in paired CSF and serum specimens significantly correlated. Human proteome microarrays offer a powerful platform to discover novel autoantibodies in CSF samples. Anti-SS-A autoantibodies may be potential CSF markers for NPSLE.

  1. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus; Prinz, Jörg C

    2015-12-14

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8(+) T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02-restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8(+) T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02-positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02-positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02-presented melanocytic autoantigen of the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 TCR. Consistent with the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8(+) T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8(+) T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway.

  2. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  3. Actin-binding protein (ABP-280) filamin gene (FLN) maps telomeric to the color vision locus (R/GCP) and centromeric to G6PD in Xq28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorlin, J.B. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States) Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)); Henske, E.; Hartwig, J.H.; Kwiatkowski, D.J. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Warren, S.T.; Kunst, C.B. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)); D' Urso, M.; Palmieri, G. (International Institute of Genetics and Biophysics, Naples, (Italy)); Bruns, G. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Actin-binding protein-280 (ABP-280) is a dimeric actin filament-crosslinking protein that promotes orthogonal branching of actin filaments and links actin filaments to membrane glycoproteins. The authors have mapped the ABP-280 filamin gene (FLN) to Xq28 by Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrid lines, by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and through identification of portions of the FLN gene within cosmids and YACs mapped to Xq28. The FLN gene is found within a 200-kb region centromeric to the G6PD locus and telomeric to DSX52 and the color vision locus. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  4. The Goodpasture autoantigen. Structural delineation of two immunologically privileged epitopes on alpha3(IV) chain of type IV collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, R; Sun, M J; Hudson, B G; Neilson, E G

    1996-04-12

    The family of type IV collagen comprises six chains numbered alpha1 through alpha6. The alpha3(IV) NC1 domain is the primary target antigen for autoantibodies from patients with anti-basement membrane disease and Goodpasture syndrome. Earlier peptide studies suggested that the last 36 amino acids of the alpha3 NC1 domain probably contains one recognition site for Goodpasture autoantibodies, and an algorithm analysis of secondary structure from a later study predicted a second possible upstream epitope near the triple helix junction. We have used several analytic approaches to evaluate the likelihood of two immunologic epitopes for the Goodpasture antigen. In our first set of studies, peptide antibodies directed against these two putative regions co-inhibited Goodpasture autoantibodies binding to denatured human alpha3(IV) NC1 monomer by nearly 80%, with the helix-junction region of the alpha3 NC1 domain contributing 26% of the binding sites and the C-terminal region contributing the remaining 50%. Second, both of these candidate regions are normally sequestered within the associated alpha3(IV) NC1 hexamer but become more visible for binding by anti-peptide antibodies upon their dissociation, a property that is shared by the Goodpasture autoantibodies. Third, segment deletions of recombinant alpha3 NC1 domain further confirmed the presence of two serologic binding sites. Finally, we looked more closely at the C-terminal binding region of the alpha3(IV) NC1 domain. Since the lysines in that region have been previously advanced as possible contact sites, we created several substitutions within the C-terminal epitope of the alpha3 NC1 domain. Substitution of lysines to alanines revealed lysines 219 and 229 as essential for antibody binding to this distal site; no lysines were present in the NC1 part of the helix-NC1 junction region. Substitutions involving arginine and cysteines to alanines in the same C-terminal region did not produce significant reductions in

  5. Evolutionarily different alphoid repeat DNA on homologous chromosomes in human and chimpanzee.

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, A L; Laursen, H B; Jones, C; Bak, A L

    1992-01-01

    Centromeric alphoid DNA in primates represents a class of evolving repeat DNA. In humans, chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid DNA while chromosomes 14 and 22 share another subfamily. We show that similar pairwise homogenizations occur in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), where chromosomes 14 and 22, homologous to human chromosomes 13 and 21, share one partially homogenized alphoid DNA subfamily and chromosomes 15 and 23, homologous to human chromosomes 14 and 22, share anothe...

  6. 抗细胞核自身抗原精子蛋白的抗体具有抗生育效果%The antibody against a nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein can result in reproductive failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Jian-Li Shi; Guo-Yan Cheng; Yan-Qing Hu; Chen Xu

    2009-01-01

    为了研究抗睾丸型细胞核自身抗原精子蛋白(tNASP)的抗体是否会影响生育,我们成功克隆表达了一段339 bp小鼠睾丸型细胞核自身抗原精子蛋白(mtNASP)的cDNA.本实验以小鼠为动物模型,着重研究重组mtNASP蛋白和合成肽htNASP393-408(人睾丸型细胞核自身抗原精子蛋白第393-408氨基酸序列)的抗生育效果.用mtNASP和htNASP393-408分别主动免疫小鼠,二者都能在小鼠体内产生高效价的抗体.然后用8-10周龄的小鼠进行精卵结合和精卵融合实验.结果显示在不同浓度的抗mtNASP抗体存在下,小鼠卵子与获能精子的精卵结合能力以及去透明带小鼠卵子和获能精子的精卵融合能力都有明显下降.分别免疫重组mtNASP蛋白和htNASP393-408合成肽的小鼠也都能产生明显的抗生育效果,而且用合成肽免疫的小鼠其抗生育效果是可逆的.我们的实验数据表明,用重组的mtNASP蛋白进行免疫可以产生很强的抗体反应并且抑制小鼠生育.%To study whether the antibody against the testis form of the nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (tNASP) could result in reproductive failure, we successfully cloned and expressed a 339-bp cDNA fragment of mouse tNASP (mtNASP). Using mouse as a model, recombinant mtNASP (rmtNASP) and a synthetic peptide, human tNASP393-408 (htNASP393-408), were investigated for their antifertility effect. Active immunization with rmtNASP or the synthesized peptide raised high antibody titers in the immunized mice. Sperm-egg binding and fusion assay were carried out in 8-10-week-old BALB/c mice. Sperm-egg binding and in vitro fertilization of mouse oocytes were inhibited by co-incubation of zona-free mouse oocytes with capacitated mouse spermatozoa in the presence of varying concentrations of the antisera against rmtNASP. There was a significant antifertility effect in animals immunized with rmtNASP or the synthesized peptide. The effect on fertility in the mice immunized

  7. Cloning and Sequencing of cDNA Encoding Islet Cell Autoantigen 69kD Protein from Chinese%国人 ICA69 基因 cDNA 的克隆及序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: It is reported that cDNA encoding human islet cell autoantigen 69kD protein (hiICA69) has been cloned, so to confirm the nucleotide sequences from the insulinoma cells of Chinese. Methods: cDNA encoding hiICA69 has been amplificated by PCR, from the cDNA library of Chinese insulinoma cells. The PCR product was inserted into the pSPORT 1 vector, and was subcloned into the pUC18 plasmid. After the positive colony was screened by the blue/white colony and the restriction analysis, the nucleotide sequences of the full - length cDNA were analysed by means of the dideoxy chain termination method. Resalts: The results showed that the amplified fragment contained 1449bp, encoded 483 - amino acids. For the sequencing analysis of ICA69 gene from the insulinoma in Mongolian race, the nucleotide sequence of the recombinant was coincident with that reported by Miyazaki and that from EMBL data's bank in addition to one difference of only base on the codon. The change located in the 416th base (A→T), which led to the change of one amino acid (Gln→Leu) . Conclusion: The gene obtained by the method of gene engineering and identified by means of sequence analysis would be able to lay a foundation for follow - up research.%目的:克隆国人胰岛细胞自身抗原 69kD 蛋白基因 ( hiICA69 ) 并经序列分析予以确证。方法:采用聚合酶链式反应技术,从中国人胰岛细胞瘤 cDNA 文库中扩增出 hiICA69 编码序列cDNA,将基因片段插入 pSPORT 1 质粒,进一步亚克隆到 pUCl8 载体中,经蓝白斑和限制性酶谱分析得以初步筛选后,双脱氧末端终止法对其全部核苷酸序列予以确定。结果:证实了 hiICA69 基因全长为 1449bp、编码 483 个氨基酸。与 pietropaolo 等报道的序列比较,仅在编码第 139 位氨基酸的密码子由 CAA→CTA,即由谷氨酰胺→亮氨酸,其余均与文献报道和 EMBL 核酸数据库提供的序列相同。结论:这一基因的获得和

  8. Autoimmunity against INS-IGF2 protein expressed in human pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatsuna, Norio; Taneera, Jalal; Vaziri-Sani, Fariba; Wierup, Nils; Larsson, Helena Elding; Delli, Ahmed; Skärstrand, Hanna; Balhuizen, Alexander; Bennet, Hedvig; Steiner, Donald F; Törn, Carina; Fex, Malin; Lernmark, Åke

    2013-10-04

    Insulin is a major autoantigen in islet autoimmunity and progression to type 1 diabetes. It has been suggested that the insulin B-chain may be critical to insulin autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. INS-IGF2 consists of the preproinsulin signal peptide, the insulin B-chain, and eight amino acids of the C-peptide in addition to 138 amino acids from the IGF2 gene. We aimed to determine the expression of INS-IGF2 in human pancreatic islets and autoantibodies in newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and controls. INS-IGF2, expressed primarily in beta cells, showed higher levels of expression in islets from normal compared with donors with either type 2 diabetes (p = 0.006) or high HbA1c levels (p INS-IGF2 autoantibody levels were increased in newly diagnosed patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 304) compared with healthy controls (n = 355; p INS-IGF2 revealed that more patients than controls had doubly reactive insulin-INS-IGF2 autoantibodies. These data suggest that INS-IGF2, which contains the preproinsulin signal peptide, the B-chain, and eight amino acids of the C-peptide may be an autoantigen in type 1 diabetes. INS-IGF2 and insulin may share autoantibody-binding sites, thus complicating the notion that insulin is the primary autoantigen in type 1 diabetes.

  9. 植物着丝粒区串联重复序列的研究进展%Research Progress of Tandem Repetitive Sequence in the Centromere of Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝薇薇; 周岩

    2013-01-01

      着丝粒是细胞染色体的重要结构组成,控制姊妹染色单体的结合、动粒的组装和纺锤丝的附着,确保真核生物细胞在有丝分裂和减数分裂过程中染色体的正常分离及遗传信息的稳定传递。植物着丝粒DNA序列主要由反转录转座子和串联重复序列构成。串联重复序列在着丝粒功能实现和基因组进化过程中起重要作用。随着测序技术的成熟,近年来对串联重复序列的研究取得了很大的进展。综述了植物串联重复序列结构、分析方法及在进化中的作用,以期为相关研究提供参考。%Centromeres are the important domains of chromosomes that are responsible for sister chromatid cohesion, kinetochore assembly and spindle attachment, and are essential for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Satellite DNA and retrotransposons are the most abundant DNA elements found in plant centromere regions. Centromeric tandem repeat play an important role in the centromere function and genome evolution. The study of centromeric tandem repeats got great progress for the development of sequencing technology. This paper introduces the development of centromeric tandem repeat of plants.

  10. Role of Ctf3 and COMA subcomplexes in meiosis: Implication in maintaining Cse4 at the centromere and numeric spindle poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Meenakshi; Mehta, Gunjan; Ghosh, Santanu K

    2015-03-01

    During mitosis and meiosis, kinetochore, a conserved multi-protein complex, connects microtubule with the centromere and promotes segregation of the chromosomes. In budding yeast, central kinetochore complex named Ctf19 has been implicated in various functions and is believed to be made up of three biochemically distinct subcomplexes: COMA, Ctf3 and Iml3-Chl4. In this study, we aimed to identify whether Ctf3 and COMA subcomplexes have any unshared function at the kinetochore. Our data suggests that both these subcomplexes may work as a single functional unit without any unique functions, which we tested. Analysis of severity of the defects in the mutants suggests that COMA is epistatic to Ctf3 subcomplex. Interestingly, we noticed that these subcomplexes affect the organization of mitotic and meiotic kinetochores with subtle differences and they promote maintenance of Cse4 at the centromeres specifically during meiosis which is similar to the role of Mis6 (Ctf3 homolog) in fission yeast during mitosis. Interestingly, analysis of ctf3Δ and ctf19Δ mutants revealed a novel role of Ctf19 complex in regulation of SPB cohesion and duplication in meiosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. SwissProt search result: AK070248 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available igen 2) (Autoantigen PM/Scl 2) (Polymyositis/scleroderma autoantigen 100 kDa) (PM/Scl-100) (P100 polymyositis-scleroderma overlap syndrome associated autoantigen) EXOSX_HUMAN 5e-28 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK066936 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available igen 2) (Autoantigen PM/Scl 2) (Polymyositis/scleroderma autoantigen 100 kDa) (PM/Scl-100) (P100 polymyositis-scleroderma overlap syndrome associated autoantigen) EXOSX_HUMAN 7e-46 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK067375 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available igen 2) (Autoantigen PM/Scl 2) (Polymyositis/scleroderma autoantigen 100 kDa) (PM/Scl-100) (P100 polymyositis-scleroderma overlap syndrome associated autoantigen) EXOSX_HUMAN 4e-69 ...

  14. 风湿性心脏病自身抗原RHDAG1的获得与鉴定%Screening and identification of auto-antigen RHDAG1 of rheumatic heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟锦绣; 李运雄; 朱平; 李玲; 卢聪; 郑少忆; 李广华; 余细勇

    2011-01-01

    目的 探索用风湿性心脏病患者噬菌体表达文库构建和免疫筛选方法来研究风湿性心脏病的自身抗原候选分子.方法 提取风湿性瓣膜性心脏病患者心肌组织总RNA,分离纯化mRNA并逆转录合成长链cDNA,用噬菌体载体构建表达文库,用风湿热患者血清免疫筛选该库,对筛选获得的自身抗原基因进行鉴定、生物信息学分析、体外表达、Western blotting鉴定和免疫反应结合性分析.结果 成功构建了风湿性心脏病患者心脏组织噬菌体表达文库,原始文库滴度为3.3×106pfu/ml,重组率为99%,81%外源片段大于1 kb.通过免疫筛选方法获得了自身抗原RHDAG1,该自身抗原与人类角蛋白18同源,能与活动性风湿热患者血清和风湿性心脏病患者血清结合,而与体检健康人血清无结合.结论 构建噬菌体展示文库方法可以有效地用于筛选和获得风湿性心脏病患者自身抗原;本研究提示自身抗原RHDAG1可成为风湿热和威风心病的候选分子标志物.%Objective To identify the candidate auto-antigen of rheumatic heart disease as a molecular marker for this disease. Methods The total RNA of the heart tissue of patients with rheumatic heart disease was extracted and reverse-transcribed into long cDNA to construct the phage expression library. The library was screened using the serum from patients with active rheumatic fever, and the positive clone was identified and analyzed by bioinformatics and expressed in vitro. The expressed products were evaluated with Western blotting and its cross-reactivity was assessed. Results The phage expression library of the heart tissue of patients with rheumatic heart disease was constructed, with the titer of the primary library of 3.3x106 pfu/ml, recombinant rate of 99%, and 81% of the inserted segments were larger than 1 kb. An auto-antigen RHDAG1 was identified by screening, which was homologous to keratin 18. RHDAG1 was detected in the serum of

  15. Homologies between human and marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) chromosomes revealed by comparative chromosome painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherlock, J.K.; Griffin, D.K.; Delhanty, J.D.A.; Parrington, J.M. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-15

    Regions of DNA homology between human and marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) chromosomes have been demonstrated using fluorescence in situ hybridization. All 24 chromosome paints and two centromere repeat sequences from Homo sapiens (HSA) have been annealed to previously G-banded metaphase spreads of Callithrix jacchus. All human paint probes, except Y, successfully hybridized to marmoset chromosomes. Fifteen of them hybridized to one region only, seven to two regions, and paint 1 to three regions. Homologies proposed from previous banding comparisons have been confirmed for HSA 2, 4-6, 10-12, 18, 19, 21, and X and partially confirmed for HSA 1 and 3, but were not in agreement for HSA 14 and 17. Human centromere repeat sequences for X and 18 did not hybridize to marmoset chromosomes. Because, at present, there is the confusing situation of several different numbering systems for marmoset chromosomes, we propose a new simpler nomenclature based on descending order of chromosome size. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aiuto, L; Antonacci, R; Marzella, R; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M

    1993-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed.

  17. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  18. [Rapid dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repin, M V; Repina, L A

    2011-01-01

    The probability of losses of different chromosome aberrations during the dicentric chromosome assay of metaphase cells with incomplete sets of chromosome centromeres was estimated using a mathematical model for low doses of ionizing radiation. A dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes without determination of the total amount of chromosome centromeres in cells without chromosome aberrations (rapid dicentric assay) has been proposed. The rapid dicentric analysis allows to register chromosome aberrations in full compliance with the conventional classification. The experimental data have shown no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes detected by rapid and classical dicentric chromosome assays of human lymphocytes exposed to 0.5 Gy of 60Co gamma-rays. The rate of the rapid dicentric assay was almost twice as high as that of the classical dicentric assay.

  19. JAR细胞染色体着丝粒点变异的研究%Study on centromeric dots variation of JAR cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹波

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨染色体着丝粒点(Cd)的变异与JAR细胞染色体非整倍性畸变的关系。方法肿瘤细胞株传代后用常规方法制备染色体,用直接法制备胚胎绒毛组织染色体标本,采用Cd-核仁组织区(NOR)同步银染分析技术研究JAR细胞染色体Cd的变异。结果 JAR细胞染色体Cd缺失率为1.33%、Cd迟滞复制率为1.23%、小Cd率为1.73%、Cd-NOR融合率为0.62%,与健康人胚胎绒毛细胞染色体Cd相比较,JAR细胞染色体Cd缺失、Cd迟滞复制显著升高(P<0.0125),而小Cd、Cd-NOR融合其差异无统计学意义。结论 JAR细胞染色体非整倍性畸变可能主要源于Cd缺失、Cd迟滞复制。%Objective To study the relation between the centromeric dots (Cd)variation of JAR cells and the chromosome aneuploidy aberration .Methods Chromosome of tumor cells were prepared with general method ,and chromosome of normal embryonic villi were prepared straightly .A Cd-NOR in-phase argentum dye analysis tech-nique modified by this laboratory was used to study centromeric dots (Cd) variation of JAR cells .Results Fre-quency of Cd loss in JAR cells was 1.33% .Frequency of Cd duplication laggard was 1.23% .Frequency of little Cd was 1.73% .Frequency of Cd-NOR amalgamation was 0.62% .Frequency of Cd loss and Cd duplication lag-gard in JAR cells were significantly higher than those of normal embryonic villi cells (P<0.0125) .Frequency of little Cd and Cd-NOR amalgamation showed no difference between JAR cells and normal embryonic villi .Conclu-sion Cd loss and Cd duplication laggard might be related with aneuploidy aberration of JAR cells .

  20. Quantification, by solid-phase minisequencing, of the telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene in families with spinal muscular atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, M; Sørensen, N; Hansen, F J

    1997-01-01

    In an analysis of 30 families affected by spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) we have used the solid-phase minisequencing method to determine the ratio between the number of telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN and cBCD541 respectively) on normal and SMA chromosomes....... This has enabled us to establish haplotypes with regard to SMN and cBCD541, and estimate their frequencies, on both types of chromosomes. Six predominant haplotypes were identified, three for normal chromosomes and three for SMA chromosomes, characterized by having 0, 1, or 2 copies, respectively, of c......BCD541. We found evidence for the presence of patients homozygous for a deletion of SMN and with only one copy of cBCD541, but found none deleted for all copies of this gene. Several asymptomatic carriers of SMA with only a single copy of SMN and no copy of cBCD541 were identified. We could not confirm...

  1. Mitosis Phase Enrichment with Identification of Mitotic Centromere-Associated Kinesin As a Therapeutic Target in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Kanishka; Huang, Heng; Hu, Limei; Liu, Yuexin; Dhillon, Jasreman; Cogdell, David; Aprikian, Armen; Efstathiou, Eleni; Navone, Nora; Troncoso, Patricia; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The recently described transcriptomic switch to a mitosis program in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) suggests that mitotic proteins may be rationally targeted at this lethal stage of the disease. In this study, we showed upregulation of the mitosis-phase at the protein level in our cohort of 51 clinical CRPC cases and found centrosomal aberrations to also occur preferentially in CRPC compared with untreated, high Gleason–grade hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (P<0.0001). Expression profiling of chemotherapy-resistant CRPC samples (n = 25) was performed, and the results were compared with data from primary chemotherapy-naïve CRPC (n = 10) and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases (n = 108). Our results showed enrichment of mitosis-phase genes and pathways, with progression to both castration-resistant and chemotherapy-resistant disease. The mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) was identified as a novel mitosis-phase target in prostate cancer that was overexpressed in multiple CRPC gene-expression datasets. We found concordant gene expression of MCAK between our parent and murine CRPC xenograft pairs and increased MCAK protein expression with clinical progression of prostate cancer to a castration-resistant disease stage. Knockdown of MCAK arrested the growth of prostate cancer cells suggesting its utility as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22363599

  2. Mitosis phase enrichment with identification of mitotic centromere-associated kinesin as a therapeutic target in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanishka Sircar

    Full Text Available The recently described transcriptomic switch to a mitosis program in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC suggests that mitotic proteins may be rationally targeted at this lethal stage of the disease. In this study, we showed upregulation of the mitosis-phase at the protein level in our cohort of 51 clinical CRPC cases and found centrosomal aberrations to also occur preferentially in CRPC compared with untreated, high Gleason-grade hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (P<0.0001. Expression profiling of chemotherapy-resistant CRPC samples (n = 25 was performed, and the results were compared with data from primary chemotherapy-naïve CRPC (n = 10 and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cases (n = 108. Our results showed enrichment of mitosis-phase genes and pathways, with progression to both castration-resistant and chemotherapy-resistant disease. The mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK was identified as a novel mitosis-phase target in prostate cancer that was overexpressed in multiple CRPC gene-expression datasets. We found concordant gene expression of MCAK between our parent and murine CRPC xenograft pairs and increased MCAK protein expression with clinical progression of prostate cancer to a castration-resistant disease stage. Knockdown of MCAK arrested the growth of prostate cancer cells suggesting its utility as a potential therapeutic target.

  3. Multilocus half-tetrad analysis and centromere mapping in citrus: evidence of SDR mechanism for 2n megagametophyte production and partial chiasma interference in mandarin cv 'Fortune'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, J; Froelicher, Y; Aleza, P; Juárez, J; Navarro, L; Ollitrault, P

    2011-10-01

    The genetic structure of 2n gametes and, particularly, the parental heterozygosity restitution at each locus depends on the meiotic process by which they originated, with first-division restitution and second-division restitution (SDR) being the two major mechanisms. The origin of 2n gametes in citrus is still controversial, although sexual polyploidisation is widely used for triploid seedless cultivar development. In this study, we report the analysis of 2n gametes of mandarin cv 'Fortune' by genotyping 171 triploid hybrids with 35 simple sequence repeat markers. The microsatellite DNA allele counting-peak ratios method for allele-dosage evaluation proved highly efficient in segregating triploid progenies and allowed half-tetrad analysis (HTA) by inferring the 2n gamete allelic configuration. All 2n gametes arose from the female genitor. The observed maternal heterozygosity restitution varied between 10 and 82%, depending on the locus, thus SDR appears to be the mechanism underlying 2n gamete production in mandarin cv 'Fortune'. A new method to locate the centromere, based on the best fit between observed heterozygosity restitution within a linkage group and theoretical functions under either partial or no chiasmata interference hypotheses was successfully applied to linkage group II. The maximum value of heterozygosity restitution and the pattern of restitution along this linkage group would suggest there is partial chiasma interference. The implications of such a restitution mechanism for citrus breeding are discussed.

  4. Human artificial chromosome assembly by transposon-based retrofitting of genomic BACs with synthetic alpha-satellite arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Joydeep; Willard, Huntington F; Stromberg, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    The development of methodologies for the rapid assembly of synthetic alpha-satellite arrays recapitulating the higher-order periodic organization of native human centromeres permits the systematic investigation of the significance of primary sequence and sequence organization in centromere function. Synthetic arrays with defined mutations affecting sequence and/or organization may be evaluated in a de novo human artificial chromosome assay. This unit describes strategies for the assembly of custom built alpha-satellite arrays containing any desired mutation as well as strategies for the construction and manipulation of alpha satellite-based transposons. Transposons permit the rapid and reliable retrofitting of any genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) with synthetic alpha-satellite arrays and other functional components, thereby facilitating conversion into BAC-based human artificial chromosome vectors. These techniques permit identification and optimization of the critical parameters underlying the unique ability of alpha-satellite DNA to facilitate de novo centromere assembly, and they will establish the foundation for the next generation of human artificial chromosome vectors.

  5. YKL-40, a mammalian member of the chitinase family, is a matrix protein of specific granules in human neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volck, B; Price, P A; Johansen, J S;

    1998-01-01

    YKL-40, also called human cartilage glycoprotein-39 (HC gp-39), is a member of family 18 glycosyl hydrolases. YKL-40 is secreted by chondrocytes, synovial cells, and macrophages, and recently it has been reported that YKL-40 has a role as an autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The function...... of YKL-40 is unknown, but the pattern of its expression in normal and disease states suggests that it could function in remodeling or degradation of the extracellular matrix. High levels of YKL-40 are found in synovial fluid from patients with active RA. Neutrophils are abundant in synovial fluid...

  6. Mapping of epitopes for autoantibodies to the Type 1 diabetes autoantigen IA-2 by peptide phage display and molecular modelling: Overlap of antibody and T-cell determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Dromey, James; Weenink, Sarah M.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2004-01-01

    phage display and homology modeling to characterize the epitope of a monoclonal IA-2 Ab (96/3) from a human type 1 diabetic patient. This Ab competes for IA-2 binding with Abs from the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes and therefore binds a region close to common autoantibody epitopes. Alignment...

  7. High resolution linkage disequilibrium and haplotype maps for the genes in the centromeric region of chromo- some 15 in Tibetans and comparisons with Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Genetic variations and their functional implications have been one of the focuses in recent genome research. With the release of the HapMap by the International Consortium, and the availability of the ultra-high-volume genotyping platform, it will soon be possible to use genome-wide association approach to identify genetic variations responsible for complex traits/diseases. While the power of this approach is generally agreed, it is a debated issue as to how much population difference should be exploited, and how best it should be applied. To address this issue we have sequenced 7 genes in the centromeric region of chromosome 15, investigated their SNPs, SNP frequencies, tagSNPs, LD structures, and haplotypes in 50 Tibetan subjects, and compared them with those from the Han population. Genetic diversities between the two populations were also quantified. Our results show that the overall genetic variation between the two populations is very little, but there are differences, primarily in allele frequencies, which is a dominating factor for haplotypes and tagSNPs. In general Tibetans have longer LD and less diversity in the region studied. These data provide genetic evidence for the close relationship between the two populations, and support the idea that all populations are fundamentally the same, but also indicate population variations, particularly in allele frequency, should be taken into account in complex traits/ diseases analysis. Data obtained in this investigation not only help us understand the genome region, but also provide road maps for variation study in the genes/ region in Tibetan population.

  8. A Novel Mutation in a Critical Region for the Methyl Donor Binding in DNMT3B Causes Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, and Facial Anomalies Syndrome (ICF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechavi, Erez; Lev, Atar; Eyal, Eran; Barel, Ortal; Kol, Nitzan; Barhom, Sarit Farage; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Anikster, Yair; Somech, Raz; Simon, Amos J

    2016-11-01

    Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disease. The immune phenotype is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia in the presence of B cells. T cell lymphopenia also develops in some patients. We sought to further investigate the immune defect in an ICF patient with a novel missense mutation in DNMT3B and a severe phenotype. Patient lymphocytes were examined for subset counts, immunoglobulin levels, T and B cell de novo production (via excision circles) and receptor repertoire diversity. Mutated DNMT3B protein structure was modeled to assess the effect of a mutation located outside of the catalytic region on protein function. A novel homozygous missense mutation, Ala585Thr, was found in DNMT3B. The patient had decreased B cell counts with hypogammaglobulinemia, and normal T cell counts. CD4(+) T cells decreased over time, leading to an inversion of the CD4(+) to CD8(+) ratio. Excision circle copy numbers were normal, signifying normal de novo lymphocyte production, but the ratio between naïve and total B cells was low, indicating decreased in vivo B cell replication. T and B cell receptor repertoires displayed normal diversity. Computerized modeling of the mutated Ala585 residue suggested reduced thermostability, possibly affecting the enzyme kinetics. Our results highlight the existence of a T cell defect that develops over time in ICF patient, in addition to the known B cell dysfunction. With intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment ameliorating the B cell defect, the extent of CD4(+) lymphopenia may determine the severity of ICF immunodeficiency.

  9. The Inner Centromere Protein (INCENP) Coil Is a Single α-Helix (SAH) Domain That Binds Directly to Microtubules and Is Important for Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC) Localization and Function in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samejima, Kumiko; Platani, Melpomeni; Wolny, Marcin; Ogawa, Hiromi; Vargiu, Giulia; Knight, Peter J; Peckham, Michelle; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-08-28

    The chromosome passenger complex (CPC) is a master regulator of mitosis. Inner centromere protein (INCENP) acts as a scaffold regulating CPC localization and activity. During early mitosis, the N-terminal region of INCENP forms a three-helix bundle with Survivin and Borealin, directing the CPC to the inner centromere where it plays essential roles in chromosome alignment and the spindle assembly checkpoint. The C-terminal IN box region of INCENP is responsible for binding and activating Aurora B kinase. The central region of INCENP has been proposed to comprise a coiled coil domain acting as a spacer between the N- and C-terminal domains that is involved in microtubule binding and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Here we show that the central region (213 residues) of chicken INCENP is not a coiled coil but a ∼ 32-nm-long single α-helix (SAH) domain. The N-terminal half of this domain directly binds to microtubules in vitro. By analogy with previous studies of myosin 10, our data suggest that the INCENP SAH might stretch up to ∼ 80 nm under physiological forces. Thus, the INCENP SAH could act as a flexible "dog leash," allowing Aurora B to phosphorylate dynamic substrates localized in the outer kinetochore while at the same time being stably anchored to the heterochromatin of the inner centromere. Furthermore, by achieving this flexibility via an SAH domain, the CPC avoids a need for dimerization (required for coiled coil formation), which would greatly complicate regulation of the proximity-induced trans-phosphorylation that is critical for Aurora B activation.

  10. A comprehensive two-dimensional gel protein database of noncultured unfractionated normal human epidermal keratinocytes: towards an integrated approach to the study of cell proliferation, differentiation and skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H

    1991-01-01

    proteins in alphabetical order), "basal cell markers", "differentiation markers", "proteins highly up-regulated in psoriatic skin", "microsequenced proteins" and "human autoantigens". For reference, we have also included 2-D gel (isoelectric focusing) patterns of cultured normal and psoriatic keratinocytes......A two-dimensional (2-D) gel database of cellular proteins from noncultured, unfractionated normal human epidermal keratinocytes has been established. A total of 2651 [35S]methionine-labeled cellular proteins (1868 isoelectric focusing, 783 nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) were resolved...

  11. Characterization and expression of multiple alternatively spliced transcripts of the Goodpasture antigen gene region. Goodpasture antibodies recognize recombinant proteins representing the autoantigen and one of its alternative forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penadés, J R; Bernal, D; Revert, F; Johansson, C; Fresquet, V J; Cervera, J; Wieslander, J; Quinones, S; Saus, J

    1995-05-01

    Collagen IV, the major component of basement membranes, is composed of six distinct alpha chains (alpha 1-alpha 6). Atypically among the collagen IV genes, the exons encoding the carboxyl-terminal region of the human alpha 3(IV) chain undergo alternative splicing. This region has been designated as the Goodpasture antigen because of its reactivity in the kidney and lung with the pathogenic autoantibodies causing Goodpasture syndrome. The data presented in this report demonstrate that, in human kidney, the gene region encompassing the Goodpasture antigen generates at least six alternatively spliced transcripts predicting five distinct proteins that differ in their carboxyl-terminus and retain, except in one case, the exon that harbors the characteristic amino-terminus of the antigen. Goodpasture antibodies specifically recognize recombinant proteins representing the antigen and the alternative form that retains the amino-half of the antigen, suggesting that this moiety could be involved in the in vivo binding of the pathogenic antibodies. Furthermore, the sera of control individuals contain autoantibodies against the antigen that can be differentiated from those causing the syndrome based on their specific reactivities, suggesting that the binding of the pathogenic autoantibodies to a specific determinant likely trigger a distinct and unique cascade of events causing the disease.

  12. SLA/LP/tRNP((Ser)Sec) antigen in autoimmune hepatitis: identification of the native protein in human hepatic cell extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Martin; Luithle, Daniel; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schnölzer, Martina; Fiedler, Sabine; Heid, Hans; Schulze-Bergkamen, Andrea; Strassburg, Christian P; Gehrke, Sven G; Manns, Michael P

    2010-02-01

    A diagnostic subgroup of AIH type 1 is characterized by specific serum antibodies against soluble liver protein. The respective autoantigen was named SLA/LP/tRNP((Ser)Sec), after three homologous recombinant polypeptides were isolated from expression gene libraries. We analyzed human cultured liver cells for the human homologue of recombinant SLA/LP/tRNP((Ser)Sec) by antigen purification. In addition, a monoclonal antibody was generated against recombinant SLA-p35, a truncated recombinant SLA-reactive polypeptide. With a positive patient serum, immune affinity chromatography was performed on the 52 kD-SLA main antigenic determinant pre-enriched by ion exchange chromatography. By mass spectrometry, the 52 kD-SLA/LP/tRNP ((Ser)Sec) autoantigen was unambiguously identified in the purification product. The identity of the recombinant SLA-p35 and its human homologue was further confirmed by a specific signal of the anti SLA-p35 monoclonal antibody with purified human SLA/LP/tRNP((Ser)Sec). The 48 kD-SLA species frequently comigrating in SLA-immunoblotting however was not identified by either approach. We conclude that the native counterpart of recombinant tRNP((Ser)(Sec)) indeed is detectable with a molecular weight of 52 kD in soluble liver extract of human cells as the major antigenic component of SLA/LP/tRNP((Ser)Sec). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Meiosis-specific cohesin component, Stag3 is essential for maintaining centromere chromatid cohesion, and required for DNA repair and synapsis between homologous chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hopkins

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cohesins are important for chromosome structure and chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesins are composed of two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC1-SMC3 proteins that form a V-shaped heterodimer structure, which is bridged by a α-kleisin protein and a stromal antigen (STAG protein. Previous studies in mouse have shown that there is one SMC1 protein (SMC1β, two α-kleisins (RAD21L and REC8 and one STAG protein (STAG3 that are meiosis-specific. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes must recombine with one another in the context of a tripartite structure known as the synaptonemal complex (SC. From interaction studies, it has been shown that there are at least four meiosis-specific forms of cohesin, which together with the mitotic cohesin complex, are lateral components of the SC. STAG3 is the only meiosis-specific subunit that is represented within all four meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. In Stag3 mutant germ cells, the protein level of other meiosis-specific cohesin subunits (SMC1β, RAD21L and REC8 is reduced, and their localization to chromosome axes is disrupted. In contrast, the mitotic cohesin complex remains intact and localizes robustly to the meiotic chromosome axes. The instability of meiosis-specific cohesins observed in Stag3 mutants results in aberrant DNA repair processes, and disruption of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. Furthermore, mutation of Stag3 results in perturbation of pericentromeric heterochromatin clustering, and disruption of centromere cohesion between sister chromatids during meiotic prophase. These defects result in early prophase I arrest and apoptosis in both male and female germ cells. The meiotic defects observed in Stag3 mutants are more severe when compared to single mutants for Smc1β, Rec8 and Rad21l, however they are not as severe as the Rec8, Rad21l double mutants. Taken together, our study demonstrates that STAG3 is required for the stability of all meiosis

  14. Meiosis-specific cohesin component, Stag3 is essential for maintaining centromere chromatid cohesion, and required for DNA repair and synapsis between homologous chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jessica; Hwang, Grace; Jacob, Justin; Sapp, Nicklas; Bedigian, Rick; Oka, Kazuhiro; Overbeek, Paul; Murray, Steve; Jordan, Philip W

    2014-07-01

    Cohesins are important for chromosome structure and chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesins are composed of two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC1-SMC3) proteins that form a V-shaped heterodimer structure, which is bridged by a α-kleisin protein and a stromal antigen (STAG) protein. Previous studies in mouse have shown that there is one SMC1 protein (SMC1β), two α-kleisins (RAD21L and REC8) and one STAG protein (STAG3) that are meiosis-specific. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes must recombine with one another in the context of a tripartite structure known as the synaptonemal complex (SC). From interaction studies, it has been shown that there are at least four meiosis-specific forms of cohesin, which together with the mitotic cohesin complex, are lateral components of the SC. STAG3 is the only meiosis-specific subunit that is represented within all four meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. In Stag3 mutant germ cells, the protein level of other meiosis-specific cohesin subunits (SMC1β, RAD21L and REC8) is reduced, and their localization to chromosome axes is disrupted. In contrast, the mitotic cohesin complex remains intact and localizes robustly to the meiotic chromosome axes. The instability of meiosis-specific cohesins observed in Stag3 mutants results in aberrant DNA repair processes, and disruption of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. Furthermore, mutation of Stag3 results in perturbation of pericentromeric heterochromatin clustering, and disruption of centromere cohesion between sister chromatids during meiotic prophase. These defects result in early prophase I arrest and apoptosis in both male and female germ cells. The meiotic defects observed in Stag3 mutants are more severe when compared to single mutants for Smc1β, Rec8 and Rad21l, however they are not as severe as the Rec8, Rad21l double mutants. Taken together, our study demonstrates that STAG3 is required for the stability of all meiosis-specific cohesin

  15. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe JmjC-protein, Msc1, prevents H2A.Z localization in centromeric and subtelomeric chromatin domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Buchanan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes are repetitively packaged into chromatin by nucleosomes, however they are regulated by the differences between nucleosomes, which establish various chromatin states. Local chromatin cues direct the inheritance and propagation of chromatin status via self-reinforcing epigenetic mechanisms. Replication-independent histone exchange could potentially perturb chromatin status if histone exchange chaperones, such as Swr1C, loaded histone variants into wrong sites. Here we show that in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, like Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Swr1C is required for loading H2A.Z into specific sites, including the promoters of lowly expressed genes. However S. pombe Swr1C has an extra subunit, Msc1, which is a JumonjiC-domain protein of the Lid/Jarid1 family. Deletion of Msc1 did not disrupt the S. pombe Swr1C or its ability to bind and load H2A.Z into euchromatin, however H2A.Z was ectopically found in the inner centromere and in subtelomeric chromatin. Normally this subtelomeric region not only lacks H2A.Z but also shows uniformly lower levels of H3K4me2, H4K5, and K12 acetylation than euchromatin and disproportionately contains the most lowly expressed genes during vegetative growth, including many meiotic-specific genes. Genes within and adjacent to subtelomeric chromatin become overexpressed in the absence of either Msc1, Swr1, or paradoxically H2A.Z itself. We also show that H2A.Z is N-terminally acetylated before, and lysine acetylated after, loading into chromatin and that it physically associates with the Nap1 histone chaperone. However, we find a negative correlation between the genomic distributions of H2A.Z and Nap1/Hrp1/Hrp3, suggesting that the Nap1 chaperones remove H2A.Z from chromatin. These data describe H2A.Z action in S. pombe and identify a new mode of chromatin surveillance and maintenance based on negative regulation of histone variant misincorporation.

  16. Meiosis-specific cohesin component, Stag3 is essential for maintaining centromere chromatid cohesion, and required for DNA repair and synapsis between homologous chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hopkins

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cohesins are important for chromosome structure and chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesins are composed of two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC1-SMC3 proteins that form a V-shaped heterodimer structure, which is bridged by a α-kleisin protein and a stromal antigen (STAG protein. Previous studies in mouse have shown that there is one SMC1 protein (SMC1β, two α-kleisins (RAD21L and REC8 and one STAG protein (STAG3 that are meiosis-specific. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes must recombine with one another in the context of a tripartite structure known as the synaptonemal complex (SC. From interaction studies, it has been shown that there are at least four meiosis-specific forms of cohesin, which together with the mitotic cohesin complex, are lateral components of the SC. STAG3 is the only meiosis-specific subunit that is represented within all four meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. In Stag3 mutant germ cells, the protein level of other meiosis-specific cohesin subunits (SMC1β, RAD21L and REC8 is reduced, and their localization to chromosome axes is disrupted. In contrast, the mitotic cohesin complex remains intact and localizes robustly to the meiotic chromosome axes. The instability of meiosis-specific cohesins observed in Stag3 mutants results in aberrant DNA repair processes, and disruption of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. Furthermore, mutation of Stag3 results in perturbation of pericentromeric heterochromatin clustering, and disruption of centromere cohesion between sister chromatids during meiotic prophase. These defects result in early prophase I arrest and apoptosis in both male and female germ cells. The meiotic defects observed in Stag3 mutants are more severe when compared to single mutants for Smc1β, Rec8 and Rad21l, however they are not as severe as the Rec8, Rad21l double mutants. Taken together, our study demonstrates that STAG3 is required for the stability of all meiosis

  17. Highly species-specific centromeric repetitive DNA sequences in lizards: molecular cytogenetic characterization of a novel family of satellite DNA sequences isolated from the water monitor lizard (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Platynota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiprasertsri, Nampech; Uno, Yoshinobu; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Prakhongcheep, Ornjira; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Charernsuk, Saranon; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi; Koga, Akihiko; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2013-01-01

    Two novel repetitive DNA sequences, VSAREP1 and VSAREP2, were isolated from the water monitor lizard (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Platynota) and characterized using molecular cytogenetics. The respective lengths and guanine-cytosine (GC) contents of the sequences were 190 bp and 57.5% for VSAREP1 and 185 bp and 59.7% for VSAREP2, and both elements were tandemly arrayed as satellite DNA in the genome. VSAREP1 and VSAREP2 were each located at the C-positive heterochromatin in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2q, the centromeric region of chromosome 5, and 3 pairs of microchromosomes. This suggests that genomic compartmentalization between macro- and microchromosomes might not have occurred in the centromeric repetitive sequences of V. salvator macromaculatus. These 2 sequences did only hybridize to genomic DNA of V. salvator macromaculatus, but no signal was observed even for other squamate reptiles, including Varanus exanthematicus, which is a closely related species of V. salvator macromaculatus. These results suggest that these sequences were differentiated rapidly or were specifically amplified in the V. salvator macromaculatus genome.

  18. Centromere cohesion: regulating the guardian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Fang; Guowei Fang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Mitosis, a process in which duplicated chromosomes are segregated into two daughter cells, is the most spectacular event in cell cycle. In mitosis, cells undergo drastic rearrangement of cytoskeleton, lipid and chromosomes under amazingly strict temporal and spatial control so that genetic information is faithfully transmitted to daughter cells.

  19. Increased frequency of dicentric chromosomes in therapy-related MDS and AML compared to de novo disease is significantly related to previous treatment with alkylating agents and suggests a specific susceptibility to chromosome breakage at the centromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, M K; Pedersen-Bjergaard, J

    2000-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are observed in many malignant diseases including myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and have often been observed in a subset of these diseases, namely therapy-related MDS (t-MDS) and AML (t-AML). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with centromere-specific probes, we investigated the frequency and type of dicentric chromosomes in 180 consecutive patients with t-MDS and t-AML and in 231 consecutive patients with de novo MDS and AML, whose karyotypes had been studied previously by conventional G-banding. Twenty-seven out of 180 patients with t-MDS or t-AML presented dicentric chromosomes compared to only seven out of 231 patients with de novo disease (P = 0.00003). A dic(1q;7p) was observed in 10 cases, a dic(5p;17q) was observed in six cases, whereas various isodicentric chromosomes were observed in six cases. Excluding these six cases with isodicentrics, all 25 patients with dicentric chromosomes had involvement of at least one of the chromosome arms 1q, 5p, or 7p resulting in monosomy for 5q or 7q, and/or trisomy for 1q. Patients with dicentric chromosomes presented significantly more often as t-MDS compared to patients without dicentrics (P = 0.046), and the presence of a dicentric chromosome was significantly related to previous therapy with alkylating agents (P = 0.026). Thus, only one out of 27 patients with a dicentric chromosome had not previously received an alkylating agent. A specific susceptibility to breakage at the centromere after exposure to alkylating agents is suggested and may explain the frequent loss of whole chromosomes, in particular chromosomes 5 and 7 in t-MDS and t-AML, if the breaks are not followed by rejoining. Leukemia (2000) 14, 105-111.

  20. Localizing recent adaptive evolution in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, Scott H; Hubisz, Melissa J; Clark, Andrew G;

    2007-01-01

    Identifying genomic locations that have experienced selective sweeps is an important first step toward understanding the molecular basis of adaptive evolution. Using statistical methods that account for the confounding effects of population demography, recombination rate variation, and single......-nucleotide polymorphism ascertainment, while also providing fine-scale estimates of the position of the selected site, we analyzed a genomic dataset of 1.2 million human single-nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped in African-American, European-American, and Chinese samples. We identify 101 regions of the human genome......, clusters of olfactory receptors, genes involved in nervous system development and function, immune system genes, and heat shock genes. We also observe consistent evidence of selective sweeps in centromeric regions. In general, we find that recent adaptation is strikingly pervasive in the human genome...

  1. The nuclear position of pericentromeric DNA of chromosome 11 appears to be random in G0 and non-random in G1 human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulspas, R; Houtsmuller, A B; Krijtenburg, P J; Bauman, J G; Nanninga, N

    1994-07-01

    The nuclear topography of pericentromeric DNA of chromosome 11 was analyzed in G0 (nonstimulated) and G1 [phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated] human lymphocytes by confocal microscopy. In addition to the nuclear center, the centrosome was used as a second point of reference in the three-dimensional (3D) analysis. Pericentromeric DNA of chromosome 11 and the centrosome were labeled using a combination of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunofluorescence. To preserve the 3D morphology of the cells, these techniques were performed on whole cells in suspension. Three-dimensional images of the cells were analyzed with a recently developed 3D software program (Interactive Measurement of Axes and Positioning in 3 Dimensions). The distribution of the chromosome 11 centromeres appeared to be random during the G0 stage but clearly non-random during the G1 stage, when the nuclear center was used as a reference point. Further statistical analysis of the G1 cells revealed that the centromeres were randomly distributed in a shell underlying the nuclear membrane. A topographical relationship between the centrosome and the centromeres appeared to be absent during the G0 and G1 stages of the cell cycle.

  2. Hierarchical radial and polar organisation of chromosomes in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, N M; Lau, P; Hann, M; Ioannou, D; Hoffman, D; Barrionuevo, M; Maxson, W; Ory, S; Tempest, H G

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that chromosomes occupy distinct positions within the interphase nuclei, conferring a potential functional implication to the genome. In addition, alterations in the nuclear organisation patterns have been associated with disease phenotypes (e.g. cancer or laminopathies). The human sperm is the smallest cell in the body with specific DNA packaging and the mission of delivering the paternal genome to the oocyte during fertilisation. Studies of nuclear organisation in the sperm have postulated nonrandom chromosome position and have proposed a chromocentre model with the centromeres facing toward the interior and the telomeres toward the periphery of the nucleus. Most studies have assessed the nuclear address in the sperm longitudinally predominantly using centromeric or telomeric probes and to a lesser extent with whole chromosome paints. To date, studies investigating the radial organisation of human sperm have been limited. The purpose of this study was to utilise whole chromosome paints for six clinically important chromosomes (18, 19, 21, 22, X, and Y) to investigate nuclear address by assessing their radial and longitudinal nuclear organisation. A total of 10,800 sperm were analysed in nine normozoospermic individuals. The results have shown nonrandom chromosome position for all chromosomes using both methods of analysis. We present novel radial and polar analysis of chromosome territory localization within the human sperm nucleus. Specifically, a hierarchical organisation was observed radially with chromosomes organised from the interior to the periphery (chromosomes 22, 21, Y, X, 19, and 18 respectively) and polar organisation from the sperm head to tail (chromosomes X, 19, Y, 22, 21, and 18, respectively). We provide evidence of defined nuclear organisation in the human sperm and discuss the function of organisation and potential possible clinical ramifications of these results in regards to male infertility and early human development.

  3. Comparative mapping of a gorilla-derived alpha satellite DNA clone on great ape and human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, A; Miller, D A; Shridhar, V; Rocchi, M; Miller, O J; Ward, D C

    1991-11-01

    We have isolated an alpha satellite DNA clone, pG3.9, from gorilla DNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on banded chromosomes under high stringency conditions revealed that pG3.9 identifies homologous sequences at the centromeric region of ten gorilla chromosomes, and, with few exceptions, also recognizes the homologous chromosomes in human. A pG3.9-like alphoid DNA is present on a larger number of orangutan chromosomes, but, in contrast, is present on only two chromosomes in the chimpanzee. These results show that the chromosomal subsets of related alpha satellite DNA sequences may undergo different patterns of evolution.

  4. Multilocus half-tetrad analysis and centromere mapping in citrus: evidence of SDR mechanism for 2n megagametophyte production and partial chiasma interference in mandarin cv ‘Fortune'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, J; Froelicher, Y; Aleza, P; Juárez, J; Navarro, L; Ollitrault, P

    2011-01-01

    The genetic structure of 2n gametes and, particularly, the parental heterozygosity restitution at each locus depends on the meiotic process by which they originated, with first-division restitution and second-division restitution (SDR) being the two major mechanisms. The origin of 2n gametes in citrus is still controversial, although sexual polyploidisation is widely used for triploid seedless cultivar development. In this study, we report the analysis of 2n gametes of mandarin cv ‘Fortune' by genotyping 171 triploid hybrids with 35 simple sequence repeat markers. The microsatellite DNA allele counting-peak ratios method for allele-dosage evaluation proved highly efficient in segregating triploid progenies and allowed half-tetrad analysis (HTA) by inferring the 2n gamete allelic configuration. All 2n gametes arose from the female genitor. The observed maternal heterozygosity restitution varied between 10 and 82%, depending on the locus, thus SDR appears to be the mechanism underlying 2n gamete production in mandarin cv ‘Fortune'. A new method to locate the centromere, based on the best fit between observed heterozygosity restitution within a linkage group and theoretical functions under either partial or no chiasmata interference hypotheses was successfully applied to linkage group II. The maximum value of heterozygosity restitution and the pattern of restitution along this linkage group would suggest there is partial chiasma interference. The implications of such a restitution mechanism for citrus breeding are discussed. PMID:21587302

  5. Genomic imbalance in the centromeric 11p15 imprinting center in three families: Further evidence of a role for IC2 as a cause of Russell-Silver syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Chong, Karen; Hannig, Vickie; Choufani, Sanaa; Shuman, Cheryl; Steele, Leslie; Morgan, Thomas; Scherer, Stephen W; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Basran, Raveen K; Weksberg, Rosanna

    2016-10-01

    Russell-Silver syndrome is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, postnatal growth deficiency, characteristic facial appearance, and other variable features. Genetic and epigenetic alterations are identified in about 60% of individuals with Russell-Silver syndrome. Most frequently, Russell-Silver syndrome is caused by altered gene expression on chromosome 11p15 due to loss of methylation at the telomeric imprinting center. To date there have been a handful of isolated clinical reports implicating the centromeric imprinting center 2 in the etiology of Russell-Silver syndrome. Here we report three new families with genomic imbalances, involving imprinting center 2 resulting in gain of methylation at this center and a Russell-Silver syndrome phenotype, including two families with a maternally inherited microduplication and the first pediatric patient with a paternally derived microdeletion. The findings in our families provide additional evidence of a role for imprinting center 2 in the etiology of Russell-Silver syndrome and suggest that imprinting center 2 imprinting abnormalities may be a more common cause of Russell-Silver syndrome than previously recognized. Furthermore, our findings together with previous clinical reports of genomic imbalances involving imprinting center 2 serve to underscore the complexity of the epigenetic regulation of the 11p15 region making it challenging to predict phenotype on the basis of genotype alone. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Physical mapping of the retinoid X receptor B gene in mouse and human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, T.; Kitagawa, K.; Taketo, M. [Banyu Tsukuba Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan); Weiss, E.H. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Munich (Germany); Abe, K. [Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine, Kumamoto (Japan); Ando, A.; Yara-Kikuti, Y.; Inoko, H. [Tokai Univ. School of Medicine, Isehara (Japan); Seldin, M.F. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Ozato, K. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-01-11

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are zinc finger-containing nuclear transcription factors. They belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily that contains retinoid receptors, vitamin D receptors, thyroid hormone receptors, and steroid hormone receptors as well as the so-called orphan receptors. We previously mapped all three RXR genes on mouse chromosomes, using a panel of Mus spretus-Mus musculus interspecific backcross mice: namely, the RXRA-gene (Rxra) on Chr 2 near the centromere, the RXRB gene (Rxrb) on Chr 17 in the H2 region, and the RXRG gene (Rxrg) on distal Chr 1. Using cosmid clones that cover the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, we determined the precise physical map positions of the gene encoding mouse and human RXRB, respectively. The mouse gene (Rxrb) maps between H2-Ke4 and H2-Ke5: namely, immediately telomeric to H2-Ke4 which encodes a histidine-rich transmembrane protein, and 12 kilobases centromeric to H2-Ke5 which is expressed in lymphoid tissues, Rxrb and H2-Ke4 are transcribed into opposite directions from a CpG-rich promoter of about 250 base pairs. This gene organization is well conserved also in the human genome at the HLA-DP subregion of Chr 6p, underscoring the strong conservation of the gene organization in the MHC region between the two mammals. 54 refs., 4 figs.

  7. A new stable human dicentric chromosome, tdic(4;21)(p16;q22), in a woman with first trimester abortion.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, F.; Li, Y.

    1993-01-01

    A woman with first trimester abortion and a dicentric chromosome formed from a 4 and a 21 is described. The dicentric chromosome was stable and in the majority of cells the 21 centromere was active, while in a minority the chromosome 4 centromere was active. This shows that both centromeres were functional, but that only one functioned in any given cell. Suppression of the activity of one centromere might be the mechanism by which this dicentric chromosome achieved its stability. A dicentric ...

  8. HindIII identifies a two allele DNA polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caenazzo, L.; Hoehe, M.R.; Hsieh, W.T.; Berrettini, W.H.; Bonner, T.I.; Gershon, E.S. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-09-11

    HCNR p5, a 0.9 kb BamHI/EcoRI fragment from the human cannabinoid receptor gene inserted into pUC19, was used as probe. The fragment is located in an intron approximately 14 kb 5{prime} of the initiation codon. This fragment is a clean single copy sequence by genomic blotting. Hybridization of human genomic DNA digested with HindIII identified a two allele RFLP with bands at 5.5 (A1) and 3.3 kb (A2). The human cannabinoid receptor gene has been genetically mapped in CEPH reference pedigrees to the centromeric/q region of chromosome 6. In situ hybridization localizes it to 6q14-q15. Codominant segregation has been observed in 26 informative two- and three-generation CEPH pedigrees and in 14 medium-sized disease families.

  9. 水稻双着丝粒染色体有性繁殖过程中的遗传稳定性%Centromere inactivation in a dicentric rice chromosome during sexual reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚志云; 刘秀秀; 张明亮; 薛超; 于恒秀; 裔传灯; 顾铭洪

    2013-01-01

    T0135是2009年从中籼3037第11染色体短臂端三体(2n+11S)自交后代中发现的形态变异株.选用第11号染色体着丝粒区域的特异分子细胞学标记5S rDNA进行染色体荧光原位杂交(fluorescent in situ hybridization,FISH)分析,发现T0135是第11染色体短臂双着丝粒染色体.为了研究该双着丝粒染色体有性繁殖过程中的遗传稳定性,对T0135有性繁殖后代进行FISH分析,观察后代中染色体类型并进行统计,发现后代染色体类型与亲本类型相同的占94%,即双着丝粒染色体能进行正常的减数分裂,通过着丝粒特异组蛋白(centromere specific histone H3,CENH3)免疫检测确定在双着丝粒染色体中只有一个有CENH3信号,说明该双着丝粒材料中只有一个行使正常功能的着丝粒,另外一个着丝粒处于失活状态.

  10. A Comparison of Epitope Repertoires Associated with Myasthenia Gravis in Humans and Nonhuman Hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerrie Vaughan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we analyzed the molecular targets associated with myasthenia gravis (MG immune responses, enabled by an immune epitope database (IEDB inventory of approximately 600 MG-related epitopes derived from 175 references. The vast majority of epitopes were derived from the α-subunit of human AChR suggesting that other MG-associated autoantigens should be investigated further. Human α-AChR was mostly characterized in humans, whereas reactivity primarily to T. californica AChR was examined in animal models. While the fine specificity of T-cell response was similar in the two systems, substantial antibody reactivity to the C-terminus was detected in the nonhuman system, but not in humans. Further analysis showed that the reactivity of nonhuman hosts to the C-terminus was eliminated when data were restricted to hosts tested in the context of autoimmune disease (spontaneous or induced, demonstrating that the epitopes recognized in humans and animals were shared when disease was present. Finally, we provided data subsets relevant to particular applications, including those associated with HLA typing or restriction, sets of epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies, and epitopes associated with modulation of immunity or disease. In conclusion, this analysis highlights gaps, differences, and similarities in the epitope repertoires of humans and animal models.

  11. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Recognition of lyso-phospholipids by human natural killer T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Fox

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a subset of T lymphocytes with potent immunoregulatory properties. Recognition of self-antigens presented by CD1d molecules is an important route of NKT cell activation; however, the molecular identity of specific autoantigens that stimulate human NKT cells remains unclear. Here, we have analyzed human NKT cell recognition of CD1d cellular ligands. The most clearly antigenic species was lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC. Diacylated phosphatidylcholine and lyso-phosphoglycerols differing in the chemistry of the head group stimulated only weak responses from human NKT cells. However, lyso-sphingomyelin, which shares the phosphocholine head group of LPC, also activated NKT cells. Antigen-presenting cells pulsed with LPC were capable of stimulating increased cytokine responses by NKT cell clones and by freshly isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results demonstrate that human NKT cells recognize cholinated lyso-phospholipids as antigens presented by CD1d. Since these lyso-phospholipids serve as lipid messengers in normal physiological processes and are present at elevated levels during inflammatory responses, these findings point to a novel link between NKT cells and cellular signaling pathways that are associated with human disease pathophysiology.

  13. Generation of an ICF Syndrome Model by Efficient Genome Editing of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using the CRISPR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izuho Hatada

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome manipulation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells is essential to achieve their full potential as tools for regenerative medicine. To date, however, gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently, an efficient genome manipulation technology using the RNA-guided DNase Cas9, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR system, has been developed. Here we report the efficient generation of an iPS cell model for immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF syndrome using the CRISPR system. We obtained iPS cells with mutations in both alleles of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B in 63% of transfected clones. Our data suggest that the CRISPR system is highly efficient and useful for genome engineering of human iPS cells.

  14. Generation of an ICF syndrome model by efficient genome editing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using the CRISPR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Takuro; Tamura, Daiki; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Hatada, Izuho

    2013-09-30

    Genome manipulation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is essential to achieve their full potential as tools for regenerative medicine. To date, however, gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently, an efficient genome manipulation technology using the RNA-guided DNase Cas9, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, has been developed. Here we report the efficient generation of an iPS cell model for immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) syndrome using the CRISPR system. We obtained iPS cells with mutations in both alleles of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) in 63% of transfected clones. Our data suggest that the CRISPR system is highly efficient and useful for genome engineering of human iPS cells.

  15. Breaking tolerance in transgenic mice expressing the human TSH receptor A-subunit: thyroiditis, epitope spreading and adjuvant as a 'double edged sword'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Sandra M; Aliesky, Holly A; Chen, Chun-Rong; Chong, Gao; Rapoport, Basil

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic mice with the human thyrotropin-receptor (TSHR) A-subunit targeted to the thyroid are tolerant of the transgene. In transgenics that express low A-subunit levels (Lo-expressors), regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion using anti-CD25 before immunization with adenovirus encoding the A-subunit (A-sub-Ad) breaks tolerance, inducing extensive thyroid lymphocytic infiltration, thyroid damage and antibody spreading to other thyroid proteins. In contrast, no thyroiditis develops in Hi-expressor transgenics or wild-type mice. Our present goal was to determine if thyroiditis could be induced in Hi-expressor transgenics using a more potent immunization protocol: Treg depletion, priming with Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) + A-subunit protein and further Treg depletions before two boosts with A-sub-Ad. As controls, anti-CD25 treated Hi- and Lo-expressors and wild-type mice were primed with CFA+ mouse thyroglobulin (Tg) or CFA alone before A-sub-Ad boosting. Thyroiditis developed after CFA+A-subunit protein or Tg and A-sub-Ad boosting in Lo-expressor transgenics but Hi- expressors (and wild-type mice) were resistant to thyroiditis induction. Importantly, in Lo-expressors, thyroiditis was associated with the development of antibodies to the mouse TSHR downstream of the A-subunit. Unexpectedly, we observed that the effect of bacterial products on the immune system is a "double-edged sword". On the one hand, priming with CFA (mycobacteria emulsified in oil) plus A-subunit protein broke tolerance to the A-subunit in Hi-expressor transgenics leading to high TSHR antibody levels. On the other hand, prior treatment with CFA in the absence of A-subunit protein inhibited responses to subsequent immunization with A-sub-Ad. Consequently, adjuvant activity arising in vivo after bacterial infections combined with a protein autoantigen can break self-tolerance but in the absence of the autoantigen, adjuvant activity can inhibit the induction of immunity to autoantigens (like the

  16. Breaking tolerance in transgenic mice expressing the human TSH receptor A-subunit: thyroiditis, epitope spreading and adjuvant as a 'double edged sword'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M McLachlan

    Full Text Available Transgenic mice with the human thyrotropin-receptor (TSHR A-subunit targeted to the thyroid are tolerant of the transgene. In transgenics that express low A-subunit levels (Lo-expressors, regulatory T cell (Treg depletion using anti-CD25 before immunization with adenovirus encoding the A-subunit (A-sub-Ad breaks tolerance, inducing extensive thyroid lymphocytic infiltration, thyroid damage and antibody spreading to other thyroid proteins. In contrast, no thyroiditis develops in Hi-expressor transgenics or wild-type mice. Our present goal was to determine if thyroiditis could be induced in Hi-expressor transgenics using a more potent immunization protocol: Treg depletion, priming with Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA + A-subunit protein and further Treg depletions before two boosts with A-sub-Ad. As controls, anti-CD25 treated Hi- and Lo-expressors and wild-type mice were primed with CFA+ mouse thyroglobulin (Tg or CFA alone before A-sub-Ad boosting. Thyroiditis developed after CFA+A-subunit protein or Tg and A-sub-Ad boosting in Lo-expressor transgenics but Hi- expressors (and wild-type mice were resistant to thyroiditis induction. Importantly, in Lo-expressors, thyroiditis was associated with the development of antibodies to the mouse TSHR downstream of the A-subunit. Unexpectedly, we observed that the effect of bacterial products on the immune system is a "double-edged sword". On the one hand, priming with CFA (mycobacteria emulsified in oil plus A-subunit protein broke tolerance to the A-subunit in Hi-expressor transgenics leading to high TSHR antibody levels. On the other hand, prior treatment with CFA in the absence of A-subunit protein inhibited responses to subsequent immunization with A-sub-Ad. Consequently, adjuvant activity arising in vivo after bacterial infections combined with a protein autoantigen can break self-tolerance but in the absence of the autoantigen, adjuvant activity can inhibit the induction of immunity to autoantigens

  17. Epitopes of microbial and human heat shock protein 60 and their recognition in myalgic encephalomyelitis.

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    Amal Elfaitouri

    Full Text Available Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME, also called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, a common disease with chronic fatigability, cognitive dysfunction and myalgia of unknown etiology, often starts with an infection. The chaperonin human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 occurs in mitochondria and in bacteria, is highly conserved, antigenic and a major autoantigen. The anti-HSP60 humoral (IgG and IgM immune response was studied in 69 ME patients and 76 blood donors (BD (the Training set with recombinant human and E coli HSP60, and 136 30-mer overlapping and targeted peptides from HSP60 of humans, Chlamydia, Mycoplasma and 26 other species in a multiplex suspension array. Peptides from HSP60 helix I had a chaperonin-like activity, but these and other HSP60 peptides also bound IgG and IgM with an ME preference, theoretically indicating a competition between HSP60 function and antibody binding. A HSP60-based panel of 25 antigens was selected. When evaluated with 61 other ME and 399 non-ME samples (331 BD, 20 Multiple Sclerosis and 48 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients, a peptide from Chlamydia pneumoniae HSP60 detected IgM in 15 of 61 (24% of ME, and in 1 of 399 non-ME at a high cutoff (p<0.0001. IgM to specific cross-reactive epitopes of human and microbial HSP60 occurs in a subset of ME, compatible with infection-induced autoimmunity.

  18. Split hand/foot malformation genetics supports the chromosome 7 copy segregation mechanism for human limb development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, Amar J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic aberrations of several unlinked loci cause human congenital split hand/foot malformation (SHFM) development. Mutations of the DLX5 (distal-less) transcription factor-encoding gene in chromosome 7 cause SHFM through haploinsufficiency, but the vast majority of cases result from heterozygous chromosomal aberrations of the region without mutating the DLX5 gene. To resolve this paradox, we invoke a chromosomal epigenetic mechanism for limb development. It is composed of a monochromatid gene expression phenomenon that we discovered in two fission yeasts with the selective chromosome copy segregation phenomenon that we discovered in mouse cells. Accordingly, one daughter cell inherits both expressed DLX5 copies while the other daughter inherits both epigenetically silenced ones from a single deterministic cell of the developing limb. Thus, differentiated daughter cells after further proliferation will correspondingly produce proximal/distal-limb tissues. Published results of a Chr. 7 translocation with a centromere-proximal breakpoint situated over 41 million bases away from the DLX locus, centromeric and DLX5-region inversions have satisfied key genetic and developmental biology predictions of the mechanism. Further genetic tests of the mechanism are proposed. We propose that the DNA double helical structure itself causes the development of sister cells' gene regulation asymmetry. We also argue against the conventionally invoked morphogen model of development. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Provocative questions in left–right asymmetry’. PMID:27821526

  19. Radiogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Tavakoli, A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer induction by space radiations is a major concern for manned space exploration. Accurate assessment of radiation risk at low doses requires basic understanding of mechanism(s) of radiation carcinogenesis. For determining the oncogenic effects of ionizing radiation in human epithelial cells, we transformed a mammary epithelial cell line (185B5), which was immortalized by benzo(a)pyrene, with energetic heavy ions and obtained several transformed clones. These transformed cells showed growth properties on Matrigel similar to human mammary tumor cells. To better understand the mechanisms of radiogenic transformation of human cells, we systematically examined the alterations in chromosomes and cancer genes. Among 16 autosomes examined for translocations, by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18 appeared to be normal in transformed cells. Chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, and 17 in transformed cells, however, showed patterns different from those in nontransformed cells. Southern blot analyses indicated no detectable alterations in myc, ras, Rb, or p53 genes. Further studies of chromosome 17 by using in situ hybridization with unique sequence p53 gene probe and a centromere probe showed no loss of p53 gene in transformed cells. Experimental results from cell fusion studies indicated that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. The role of genomic instability and tumor suppressor gene(s) in radiogenic transformation of human breast cells remains to be identified.

  20. Localization of the homolog of a mouse craniofacial mutant to human chromosome 18q11 and evaluation of linkage to human CLP and CPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D.C.; Yu, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-15

    The transgene-induced mutation 9257 and the spontaneous mutation twirler cause craniofacial and inner ear malformations and are located on mouse chromosome 18 near the ataxia locus ax. To map the human homolog of 9257, a probe from the transgene insertion site was used to screen a human genomic library. Analysis of a cross-hybridizing human clone identified a 3-kb conserved sequence block that does not appear to contain protein coding sequence. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels assigned the human locus to 18q11. The polymorphic microsatellite markers D18S1001 and D18S1002 were isolated from the human locus and mapped by linkage analysis using the CEPH pedigrees. The 9257 locus maps close to the centromeres of human chromosome 18q and mouse chromosome 18 at the proximal end of a conserved linkage group. To evaluate the role of this locus in human craniofacial disorders, linkage to D18S1002 was tested in 11 families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 3 families with autosomal dominant cleft palate only. Obligatory recombinants were observed in 8 of the families, and negative lod scores from the other families indicated that these disorders are not linked to the chromosome 18 loci. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. 乳腺癌组织中着丝粒蛋白CENP-B的表达及意义%Expression and significance of centromere protein B (CENP-B) in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖雯婷; 翁桂香; 冶亚平; 丁彦青; 王曦

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the expression level and clinicopathologic significance of centromere protein B ( CENP-B ) in breast cancer. Methods CENP-B mRNA and protein expressions in 4 pairs of breast cancer biopsies and their matched adjacent tissues were detected by RT-PCR, Q-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Immunohistochemincal analysis was used to examine the expression of CENP-B protein expressions in 53 cases of paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues. The correlation between CENP-B expression with clinicopathologic features was analyzed by SPSS 10. 0. Results CENP-B was positively detected in 90. 6% ( 48/53 ) paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues, and it was strongly expressed in 52. 8( 28/53 ) samples. The CENP-B protein level was higher in cancer cells than that in adjacent non-cancerous areas. Statistical analysis displayed that strong expression of CENP-B was significantly associated with clinical stage and T classification, while not with age, lymph node involvement and distant metastasis. Conclusion CENP-B may serve as a valuable molecular marker for prediction of breast cancer development and progression.%目的 检测乳腺癌组织中着丝粒蛋白CENP-B的表达,探讨CENP-B的表达与乳腺癌患者临床病理特征的关系及意义.方法 分别用RT-PCR、Q-PCR和Western blot法检测4例乳腺癌活检组织及相应癌旁组织中CENP-B mRNA和蛋白表达水平的差异;采用免疫组化SP法检测CENP-B在53例乳腺癌石蜡组织切片中的表达,并采用SPSS 10.0软件分析其与乳腺癌的临床病理特征的关系.结果 CENP-B mRNA和蛋白在4例乳腺癌组织中的表达高于癌旁组织;53例乳腺癌组织中CENP-B阳性率为90.6%(48/53),强阳性率为52.8%(28/53),CENP-B在乳腺肿瘤组织中的表达水平高于癌旁组织.统计分析结果发现CENP-B强阳性与临床分期、T分期密切相关.结论 CENP-B可能成为评价乳腺癌发生、发展的重要生物学指标.

  2. Bias of selection on human copy-number variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Although large-scale copy-number variation is an important contributor to conspecific genomic diversity, whether these variants frequently contribute to human phenotype differences remains unknown. If they have few functional consequences, then copy-number variants (CNVs might be expected both to be distributed uniformly throughout the human genome and to encode genes that are characteristic of the genome as a whole. We find that human CNVs are significantly overrepresented close to telomeres and centromeres and in simple tandem repeat sequences. Additionally, human CNVs were observed to be unusually enriched in those protein-coding genes that have experienced significantly elevated synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates, estimated between single human and mouse orthologues. CNV genes encode disproportionately large numbers of secreted, olfactory, and immunity proteins, although they contain fewer than expected genes associated with Mendelian disease. Despite mouse CNVs also exhibiting a significant elevation in synonymous substitution rates, in most other respects they do not differ significantly from the genomic background. Nevertheless, they encode proteins that are depleted in olfactory function, and they exhibit significantly decreased amino acid sequence divergence. Natural selection appears to have acted discriminately among human CNV genes. The significant overabundance, within human CNVs, of genes associated with olfaction, immunity, protein secretion, and elevated coding sequence divergence, indicates that a subset may have been retained in the human population due to the adaptive benefit of increased gene dosage. By contrast, the functional characteristics of mouse CNVs either suggest that advantageous gene copies have been depleted during recent selective breeding of laboratory mouse strains or suggest that they were preferentially fixed as a consequence of the larger effective population size of wild mice. It

  3. A high-resolution whole-genome cattle-human comparative map reveals details of mammalian chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts-van der Wind, Annelie; Larkin, Denis M; Green, Cheryl A; Elliott, Janice S; Olmstead, Colleen A; Chiu, Readman; Schein, Jacqueline E; Marra, Marco A; Womack, James E; Lewin, Harris A

    2005-12-20

    Approximately 3,000 cattle bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences were added to the Illinois-Texas 5,000-rad RH (RH, radiation hybrid) map. The BAC-end sequences selected for mapping are approximately 1 Mbp apart on the human chromosomes as determined by blastn analysis. The map has 3,484 ordered markers, of which 3,204 are anchored in the human genome. Two hundred-and-one homologous synteny blocks (HSBs) were identified, of which 27 are previously undiscovered, 79 are extended, 26 were formed by previously unrecognized breakpoints in 18 previously defined HSBs, and 23 are the result of fusions. The comparative coverage relative to the human genome is approximately 91%, or 97% of the theoretical maximum. The positions of 64% of all cattle centromeres and telomeres were reassigned relative to their positions on the previous map, thus facilitating a more detailed comparative analysis of centromere and telomere evolution. As an example of the utility of the high-resolution map, 22 cattle BAC fingerprint contigs were directly anchored to cattle chromosome 19 [Bos taurus, (BTA) 19]. The order of markers on the cattle RH and fingerprint maps of BTA19 and the sequence-based map of human chromosome 17 [Homo sapiens, (HSA) 17] were found to be highly consistent, with only two minor ordering discrepancies between the RH map and fingerprint contigs. The high-resolution Illinois-Texas 5,000-rad RH and comparative maps will facilitate identification of candidate genes for economically important traits, the phylogenomic analysis of mammalian chromosomes, proofing of the BAC fingerprint map and, ultimately, aid the assembly of cattle whole-genome sequence.

  4. Are humans prone to autoimmunity? Implications from evolutionary changes in hominin sialic acid biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varki, Ajit

    2017-09-01

    Given varied intrinsic and extrinsic challenges to the immune system, it is unsurprising that each evolutionary lineage evolves distinctive features of immunoreactivity, and that tolerance mechanisms fail, allowing autoimmunity. Humans appear prone to many autoimmune diseases, with mechanisms both genetic and environmental. Another rapidly evolving biological system involves sialic acids, a family of monosaccharides that are terminal caps on cell surface and secreted molecules of vertebrates, and play multifarious roles in immunity. We have explored multiple genomic changes in sialic acid biology that occurred in human ancestors (hominins), some with implications for enhanced immunoreactivity, and hence for autoimmunity. Human ancestors lost the enzyme synthesizing the common mammalian sialic acid Neu5Gc, with an accumulation of the precursor sialic acid Neu5Ac. Resulting changes include an enhanced reactivity by some immune cells and increased ability of macrophages to kill bacteria, at the cost of increased endotoxin sensitivity. There are also multiple human-specific evolutionary changes in inhibitory and activating Siglecs, immune cell receptors that recognize sialic acids as "self-associated molecular patterns" (SAMPs) to modulate immunity, but can also be hijacked by pathogen molecular mimicry of SAMPs. Altered expression patterns and fixed or polymorphic SIGLEC pseudogenization in humans has modulated both innate and adaptive immunity, sometimes favoring over-reactivity. Meanwhile, dietary intake of Neu5Gc (derived primarily from red meats) allows metabolic incorporation of this non-human molecule into human cells--apparently the first example of "xeno-autoimmunity" involving "xeno-autoantigen" interactions with circulating "xeno-autoantibodies". Taken together, some of these factors may contribute to the apparent human propensity for autoimmunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunology of membranous nephropathy: from animal models to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinico, R A; Mezzina, N; Trezzi, B; Ghiggeri, G M; Radice, A

    2016-02-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN), the leading cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults, is characterized by the deposition of subepithelial immune deposits that consist mainly of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and complement. Most of the cases are primary or idiopathic (iMN), while only approximately 25% of the cases are secondary to some known disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus, hepatitis B, drugs and malignancies. Most of our knowledge on the pathogenesis of iMN has relied upon old experimental models (i.e. Heymann nephritis) that have shown that immune deposits are formed in situ by the reaction of autoantibodies against the respective podocyte antigen. Recent findings indicate that podocyte proteins also act as an autoantigen in human iMN. The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) has been identified as the main target antigen, as it can be found in approximately 70% of iMN patients but only rarely in other glomerulonephritides. Podocytes damage in the experimental model of Heymann nephritis is complement-mediated. In humans, the presence of complement within the subepithelial deposits is well established, but IgG4, which does not activate complement by classical or alternative pathways, represents the predominant subclass of IgG anti-PLA2R. Some evidence suggests that IgG4 anti-PLA2R autoantibodies can bind mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and activate the lectin complement pathway. A genetic background for iMN has been demonstrated by genome-wide association studies that have shown highly significant associations of the PLA2R1 and the human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQA1 loci with iMN. In addition to their diagnostic value, anti-PLA2R antibodies may be useful to monitor disease activity and predict response to treatment.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation dynamics during early human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okae, Hiroaki; Chiba, Hatsune; Hiura, Hitoshi; Hamada, Hirotaka; Sato, Akiko; Utsunomiya, Takafumi; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Atsushi; Suyama, Mikita; Arima, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    DNA methylation is globally reprogrammed during mammalian preimplantation development, which is critical for normal development. Recent reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) studies suggest that the methylome dynamics are essentially conserved between human and mouse early embryos. RRBS is known to cover 5-10% of all genomic CpGs, favoring those contained within CpG-rich regions. To obtain an unbiased and more complete representation of the methylome during early human development, we performed whole genome bisulfite sequencing of human gametes and blastocysts that covered>70% of all genomic CpGs. We found that the maternal genome was demethylated to a much lesser extent in human blastocysts than in mouse blastocysts, which could contribute to an increased number of imprinted differentially methylated regions in the human genome. Global demethylation of the paternal genome was confirmed, but SINE-VNTR-Alu elements and some other tandem repeat-containing regions were found to be specifically protected from this global demethylation. Furthermore, centromeric satellite repeats were hypermethylated in human oocytes but not in mouse oocytes, which might be explained by differential expression of de novo DNA methyltransferases. These data highlight both conserved and species-specific regulation of DNA methylation during early mammalian development. Our work provides further information critical for understanding the epigenetic processes underlying differentiation and pluripotency during early human development.

  7. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Marieke; Vosters, Sanne; Merkx, Gerard; D'Hauwers, Kathleen; Wansink, Derick G; Ramos, Liliana; de Boer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  8. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke de Vries

    Full Text Available In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI, which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  9. Location of chromosomes in the nucleus of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, A V; Voldgorn, Y I

    2011-08-01

    For evaluation of the spatial structure of chromatin in nuclei of mesenchymal SC we determined the position of centromeres and individual chromosomes in interphase nucleus of mesenchymal SC. More than 300 nuclei in 7 cultures of mesenchymal SC were analyzed. Centromeres of chromosomes 6, 8, and 11 lie at a longer (0.68, 0.67, 0.7), while centromere of chromosome 18 at a shorter radial distance (0.49). Homologues of each chromosome had different radial distances. No differences in radial distances of centromeres were detected between mesenchymal SC from the adipose tissue and BM. After passage 8, distal displacement of chromosome 6 centromere (from 0.66 to 0.72) was observed, which probably indicates aging or spontaneous differentiation of cells.

  10. Redirection of Human Cancer Cells upon the Interaction with the Regenerating Mouse Mammary Gland Microenvironment

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    Sonia M. Rosenfield

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is often described as a result of accumulated mutations that lead to growth advantage and clonal expansion of mutated cells. There is evidence in the literature that cancer cells are influenced by the microenvironment. Our previous studies demonstrated that the mouse mammary gland is capable of redirecting mouse cells of non-mammary origins as well as Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-neu transformed cells toward normal mammary epithelial cell fate during gland regeneration. Interestingly, the malignant phenotype of MMTV-neu transformed cells was suppressed during serial transplantation experiments. Here, we discuss our studies that demonstrated the potential of the regenerating mouse mammary gland to redirect cancer cells of different species into a functional tumor-free mammary epithelial cell progeny. Immunochemistry for human specific CD133, mitochondria, cytokeratins as well as milk proteins and FISH for human specific probe identified human epithelial cell progeny in ducts, lobules, and secretory acini. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH for human centromeric DNA and FACS analysis of propidium iodine staining excluded the possibility of mouse-human cell fusion. To our knowledge this is the first evidence that human cancer cells of embryonic or somatic origins respond to developmental signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in vivo.

  11. Targeting inflammation with autoantigen-specific T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune diseases are driven by cells that respond to tissue components of the body. Inflammation in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can be suppressed by drug therapy. However, the broad range of immunosuppressive action of these drugs often does not res

  12. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and NALP5, parathyroid autoantigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Bjorklund, Peyman; Hallgren, Asa; Pontynen, Nora; Szinnai, Gabor; Shikama, Noriko; Keller, Marcel P.; Ekwall, Olov; Kinkel, Sarah A.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Peltonen, Leena; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Akerstrom, Goran; Westin, Gunnar; Scott, Hamish S.; Hollaender, Georg A.; Kampe, Olle

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a multiorgan autoimmune disorder caused by mutations in AIRE, the autoimmune regulator gene. Though recent studies concerning AIRE deficiency have begun to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of organ-specific autoimmunity in patients

  13. Targeting inflammation with autoantigen-specific T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, T.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic autoimmune diseases are driven by cells that respond to tissue components of the body. Inflammation in diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes or multiple sclerosis, can be suppressed by drug therapy. However, the broad range of immunosuppressive action of these drugs often does not

  14. Changing nuclear landscape and unique PML structures during early epigenetic transitions of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John T; Hall, Lisa L; Smith, Kelly P; Lawrence, Jeanne B

    2009-07-01

    The complex nuclear structure of somatic cells is important to epigenomic regulation, yet little is known about nuclear organization of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). Here we surveyed several nuclear structures in pluripotent and transitioning hESC. Observations of centromeres, telomeres, SC35 speckles, Cajal Bodies, lamin A/C and emerin, nuclear shape and size demonstrate a very different "nuclear landscape" in hESC. This landscape is remodeled during a brief transitional window, concomitant with or just prior to differentiation onset. Notably, hESC initially contain abundant signal for spliceosome assembly factor, SC35, but lack discrete SC35 domains; these form as cells begin to specialize, likely reflecting cell-type specific genomic organization. Concomitantly, nuclear size increases and shape changes as lamin A/C and emerin incorporate into the lamina. During this brief window, hESC exhibit dramatically different PML-defined structures, which in somatic cells are linked to gene regulation and cancer. Unlike the numerous, spherical somatic PML bodies, hES cells often display approximately 1-3 large PML structures of two morphological types: long linear "rods" or elaborate "rosettes", which lack substantial SUMO-1, Daxx, and Sp100. These occur primarily between Day 0-2 of differentiation and become rare thereafter. PML rods may be "taut" between other structures, such as centromeres, but clearly show some relationship with the lamina, where PML often abuts or fills a "gap" in early lamin A/C staining. Findings demonstrate that pluripotent hES cells have a markedly different overall nuclear architecture, remodeling of which is linked to early epigenomic programming and involves formation of unique PML-defined structures.

  15. Zebrafish to humans: evolution of the alpha3-chain of type IV collagen and emergence of the autoimmune epitopes associated with Goodpasture syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Brian A; Sund, Malin; Grant, Marianne A; Pfaff, Kathleen L; Holthaus, Kathryn; Zon, Leonard I; Kalluri, Raghu

    2006-03-01

    Goodpasture syndrome is an autoimmune vascular disease associated with kidney and lung failure, with pathogenic circulating autoantibodies targeted to a set of discontinuous epitope sequences within the noncollagenous domain-1 (NC1) of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen (alpha3(IV)NC1), the Goodpasture autoantigen. We demonstrate that basement membrane extracted NC1 domain preparations from Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Danio rerio do not bind Goodpasture autoantibodies, while Xenopus laevis, chicken, mouse and human alpha3(IV)NC1 domains bind autoantibodies. The alpha3(IV) chain is not present in C elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, but is first detected in the Danio rerio. Interestingly, native Danio rerio alpha3(IV)NC1 does not bind Goodpasture autoantibodies. Next, we cloned, sequenced, and generated recombinant Danio rerio alpha3(IV)NC1 domain. In contrast to recombinant human alpha3(IV)NC1 domain, there was complete absence of autoantibody binding to recombinant Danio rerio alpha3(IV)NC1. Three-dimensional molecular modeling from existing x-ray coordinates of human NC1 domain suggest that evolutionary alteration of electrostatic charge and polarity due to the emergence of critical serine, aspartic acid, and lysine residues, accompanied by the loss of asparagine and glutamine, contributes to the emergence of the 2 major Goodpasture epitopes on the human alpha3(IV)NC1 domain, as it evolved from the Danio rerio over 450 million years.

  16. Zebrafish to humans: evolution of the α3-chain of type IV collagen and emergence of the autoimmune epitopes associated with Goodpasture syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Brian A.; Sund, Malin; Grant, Marianne A.; Pfaff, Kathleen L.; Holthaus, Kathryn; Zon, Leonard I.; Kalluri, Raghu

    2006-01-01

    Goodpasture syndrome is an autoimmune vascular disease associated with kidney and lung failure, with pathogenic circulating autoantibodies targeted to a set of discontinuous epitope sequences within the noncollagenous domain-1 (NC1) of the α3 chain of type IV collagen (α3(IV)NC1), the Goodpasture autoantigen. We demonstrate that basement membrane extracted NC1 domain preparations from Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Danio rerio do not bind Goodpasture autoantibodies, while Xenopus laevis, chicken, mouse and human α3(IV)NC1 domains bind autoantibodies. The α3(IV) chain is not present in C elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, but is first detected in the Danio rerio. Interestingly, native Danio rerio α3(IV)NC1 does not bind Goodpasture autoantibodies. Next, we cloned, sequenced, and generated recombinant Danio rerio α3(IV)NC1 domain. In contrast to recombinant human α3(IV)NC1 domain, there was complete absence of autoantibody binding to recombinant Danio rerio α3(IV)NC1. Three-dimensional molecular modeling from existing x-ray coordinates of human NC1 domain suggest that evolutionary alteration of electrostatic charge and polarity due to the emergence of critical serine, aspartic acid, and lysine residues, accompanied by the loss of asparagine and glutamine, contributes to the emergence of the 2 major Goodpasture epitopes on the human α3(IV)NC1 domain, as it evolved from the Danio rerio over 450 million years. PMID:16254142

  17. The SMC5/6 complex is involved in crucial processes during human spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verver, Dideke E; Langedijk, Nathalia S M; Jordan, Philip W; Repping, Sjoerd; Hamer, Geert

    2014-07-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for safe reproduction. Therefore, chromatin structure and dynamics should be tightly regulated during germ cell development. Chromatin structure and function are in large part determined by the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes, of which SMC5/6 recently has been shown to be involved in both spermatogonial differentiation and meiosis during mouse spermatogenesis. We therefore investigated the role of this complex in human spermatogenesis. We found SMC6 to be expressed in the human testis and present in a subset of type Adark and type Apale spermatogonia, all spermatocytes, and round spermatids. During human meiosis, SMC5/6 is located at the synaptonemal complex (SC), the XY body, and at the centromeres during meiotic metaphases. However, in contrast to mouse spermatogenesis, SMC6 is not located at pericentromeric heterochromatin in human spermatogenic cells, indicating subtle but perhaps important differences in not only SMC5/6 function but maybe also in maintenance of genomic integrity at the repetitive pericentromeric regions. Nonetheless, our data clearly indicate that the SMC5/6 complex, as shown in mice, is involved in numerous crucial processes during human spermatogenesis, such as in spermatogonial development, on the SC between synapsed chromosomes, and in DNA double-strand break repair on unsynapsed chromosomes during pachynema.

  18. The human and mouse receptors of hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAMM, genes (HMMR) map to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter and mouse chromosome 11

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    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Roller, M.L.; Camper, S.A. [Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The gene for the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAAM (designated hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, HMMR (human) and Hmmr (mouse), for mapping purposes), was localized to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter by somatic cell and radiation hybrid analyses. Investigation of two interspecific back-crosses localized the mouse RHAMM (Hmmr) locus 18 cM from the centromere of mouse chromosome 11 within a region of synteny homology with human chromosome 5q23-q35 genes. The map position of the human RHAMM gene places it in a region comparatively rich in disease-associated genes, including those for low-frequency hearing loss, dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, and myeloid disorders associated with the 5q-syndrome. The RHAMM gene location and its ability to transform cells when overexpressed implicate RHAMM as a possible candidate gene in the pathogenesis of the recently described t(5;14)(q33-q34;q11) acute lymphoblastic leukemias. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  19. The human histone chaperone sNASP interacts with linker and core histones through distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanyu; Ge, Zhongqi; Walsh, Scott T R; Parthun, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Somatic nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (sNASP) is a human homolog of the N1/N2 family of histone chaperones. sNASP contains the domain structure characteristic of this family, which includes a large acidic patch flanked by several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs. sNASP possesses a unique binding specificity in that it forms specific complexes with both histone H1 and histones H3/H4. Based on the binding affinities of sNASP variants to histones H1, H3.3, H4 and H3.3/H4 complexes, sNASP uses distinct structural domains to interact with linker and core histones. For example, one of the acidic patches of sNASP was essential for linker histone binding but not for core histone interactions. The fourth TPR of sNASP played a critical role in interactions with histone H3/H4 complexes, but did not influence histone H1 binding. Finally, analysis of cellular proteins demonstrated that sNASP existed in distinct complexes that contained either linker or core histones.

  20. Possible Role of Human Herpesvirus 6 as a Trigger of Autoimmune Disease

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    Francesco Broccolo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 infection is common and has a worldwide distribution. Recently, HHV-6A and HHV-6B have been reclassified into two distinct species based on different biological features (genetic, antigenic, and cell tropism and disease associations. A role for HHV-6A/B has been proposed in several autoimmune disorders (AD, including multiple sclerosis (MS, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The focus of this review is to discuss the above-mentioned AD associated with HHV-6 and the mechanisms proposed for HHV-6A/B-induced autoimmunity. HHV-6A/B could trigger autoimmunity by exposing high amounts of normally sequestered cell antigens, through lysis of infected cells. Another potential trigger is represented by molecular mimicry, with the synthesis of viral proteins that resemble cellular molecules, as a mechanism of immune escape. The virus could also induce aberrant expression of histocompatibility molecules thereby promoting the presentation of autoantigens. CD46-HHV-6A/B interaction is a new attractive mechanism proposed: HHV-6A/B (especially HHV-6A could participate in neuroinflammation in the context of MS by promoting inflammatory processes through CD46 binding. Although HHV-6A/B has the ability to trigger all the above-mentioned mechanisms, more studies are required to fully elucidate the possible role of HHV-6A/B as a trigger of AD.

  1. Human See, Human Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  2. Asynchronous replication and autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devkanya Dutta

    Full Text Available A number of mammalian genes exhibit the unusual properties of random monoallelic expression and random asynchronous replication. Such exceptional genes include genes subject to X inactivation and autosomal genes including odorant receptors, immunoglobulins, interleukins, pheromone receptors, and p120 catenin. In differentiated cells, random asynchronous replication of interspersed autosomal genes is coordinated at the whole chromosome level, indicative of chromosome-pair non-equivalence. Here we have investigated the replication pattern of the random asynchronously replicating genes in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells, using fluorescence in situ hybridization based assay. We show that allele-specific replication of X-linked genes and random monoallelic autosomal genes occur in human embryonic stem cells. The direction of replication is coordinated at the whole chromosome level and can cross the centromere, indicating the existence of autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells. These results suggest that epigenetic mechanism(s that randomly distinguish between two parental alleles are emerging in the cells of the inner cell mass, the source of human embryonic stem cells.

  3. Glycosylation of recombinant human thyroid peroxidase ectodomain of insect cell origin has little effect on recognition by serum thyroid peroxidase antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming-ming; LI Qing; ZHAO Lan-lan; GAO Ying; HUANG You-yuan; LU Gui-zhi; GAO Yan-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is an important autoantigen in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT),and almost all epitopes are located in TPO ectodomain.The glycosylation of TPO might contribute to breaking self-tolerance,therefore,purified glycosylated recombinant TPO ectodomain is prerequisite of elucidating its role in the pathogenesis of HT.The aim of our study was to investigate whether the glycosylation has influence on the antigenic determinants of recombinant TPO.Methods Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system was used to generate recombinant human TPO ectodomain.The antigenicity was analyzed by antigen specific enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISAs).The glycosylation of recombinant human TPO ectodomain of High Five insect cell origin was detected by lectin-ELISAs.Results TPO ectodomain was recovered from the culture media as a soluble protein,and it was fused with a hexahistidine tag which allowed purification by nickel-affinity chromatography.The recombinant TPO ectodomain could be recognized by all the 54 HT patients and three TPO monoclonal antibodies.Fucose,sialic acid and galactose were all detected on the recombinant TPO ectodomain.Sera TPOAb binding decreased slightly after non-specific deglycosylation of TPO by periodic acid.Conclusions High Five insect cells derived recombinant human TPO ectodomain had N-glycosylation sites,which might have little effect on recognition by serum TPOAb.

  4. More Human than Human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David

    2017-07-01

    Within the literature surrounding nonhuman animals on the one hand and cognitively disabled humans on the other, there is much discussion of where beings that do not satisfy the criteria for personhood fit in our moral deliberations. In the future, we may face a different but related problem: that we might create (or cause the creation of) beings that not only satisfy but exceed these criteria. The question becomes whether these are minimal criteria, or hierarchical, such that those who fulfill them to greater degree should be afforded greater consideration. This article questions the validity and necessity of drawing divisions among beings that satisfy the minimum requirements for personhood; considering how future beings-intelligent androids, synthezoids, even alternate-substrate sentiences-might fit alongside the "baseline" human. I ask whether these alternate beings ought to be considered different to us, and why this may or may not matter in terms of a notion of "human community." The film Blade Runner, concerned in large part with humanity and its key synthezoid antagonist Roy Batty, forms a framing touchstone for my discussion. Batty is stronger, faster, more resilient, and more intelligent than Homo sapiens. His exploits, far beyond the capability of normal humans, are contrasted with his frailty and transient lifespan, his aesthetic appreciation of the sights he has seen, and his burgeoning empathy. Not for nothing does his creator within the mythos term him "more human than human."

  5. A linkage map of mouse chromosome 8: further definition of homologous linkage relationships between mouse chromosome 8 and human chromosomes 8, 16, and 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, T A; Rochelle, J M; Saunders, A M; Seldin, M F

    1991-05-01

    Using an interspecific cross, a mouse chromosome 8 linkage map spanning 72 cM has been defined by the segregation of restriction fragment length variants. Linkage and genetic distance were established for 10 loci by analysis of 114 meiotic events and indicated the following gene order: (centromere)-Insr-3.5 cM-Plat-26.3 cM-Crryps/Mel/Jund-3.5 cM-Junb/Ucp-10.5 cM-Mt-1-27.2 cM-Acta2-0.9 cM-Aprt. These data provide further definition of mouse chromosome 8 linkage relationships and the relationship between segments of this chromosome and human chromosomes 8, 16, and 19.

  6. Human tNASP promotes in vitro nucleosome assembly with histone H3.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daiki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-02-10

    Nuclear autoantigenic sperm proteins (NASPs) are members of the acidic histone chaperones, which promote nucleosome assembly. In humans, two splicing variants proposed for the somatic and testicular isoforms, sNASP and tNASP, respectively, have been found, and the shorter form, sNASP, reportedly promotes nucleosome assembly with the histone H3 isoforms, H3.1, H3.2, and H3.3. However, the biochemical properties of the longer form, tNASP, have not been reported. tNASP is considered to exist specifically in the testis. Our present results revealed that the tNASP protein is ubiquitously produced in various human tissues, in addition to testis. Unexpectedly, we found that the nucleosome assembly activity of purified tNASP was extremely low with the canonical histone H3.1 or H3.2, but was substantially detected with the replacement histone H3.3 variant. A mutational analysis revealed that the H3.3 Ile89 residue, corresponding to the H3.1 Val89 residue, is responsible for the tNASP-mediated nucleosome assembly with H3.3. A histone deposition assay showed that the H3.3-H4 complex is more efficiently deposited onto DNA by tNASP than the H3.1-H4 complex. These results provide evidence that tNASP is ubiquitously produced in various types of human tissues and promotes in vitro nucleosome assembly with H3 variant specificity.

  7. Human-specific duplication and mosaic transcripts: the recent paralogous structure of chromosome 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jeffrey A; Yavor, Amy M; Viggiano, Luigi; Misceo, Doriana; Horvath, Juliann E; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Schwartz, Stuart; Rocchi, Mariano; Eichler, Evan E

    2002-01-01

    In recent decades, comparative chromosomal banding, chromosome painting, and gene-order studies have shown strong conservation of gross chromosome structure and gene order in mammals. However, findings from the human genome sequence suggest an unprecedented degree of recent (homologous duplications (> or = 1 kb and > or = 90%) on chromosome 22. Overall, 10.8% (3.7/33.8 Mb) of chromosome 22 is duplicated, with an average sequence identity of 95.4%. To organize the duplications into tractable units, intron-exon structure and well-defined duplication boundaries were used to define 78 duplicated modules (minimally shared evolutionary segments) with 157 copies on chromosome 22. Analysis of these modules provides evidence for the creation or modification of 11 novel transcripts. Comparative FISH analyses of human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaque reveal qualitative and quantitative differences in the distribution of these duplications--consistent with their recent origin. Several duplications appear to be human specific, including a approximately 400-kb duplication (99.4%-99.8% sequence identity) that transposed from chromosome 14 to the most proximal pericentromeric region of chromosome 22. Experimental and in silico data further support a pericentromeric gradient of duplications where the most recent duplications transpose adjacent to the centromere. Taken together, these data suggest that segmental duplications have been an ongoing process of primate genome evolution, contributing to recent gene innovation and the dynamic transformation of genome architecture within and among closely related species.

  8. Induction of a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease in mice by a common human anti-DNA idiotype

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    Mendlovic, S.; Brocke, S.; Meshorer, A.; Mozes, E. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)); Shoenfeld, Y.; Bakimer, R. (Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel)); Ben-Bassat, M. (Beilinson Medical Center, Petah-Tiqva (Israel))

    1988-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered to be the quintessential autoimmune disease. It has not been possible to induce SLE in animal models by DNA immunization or by challenge with anti-DNA antibodies. The authors report a murine model of SLE-like disease induced by immunization of C3H.SW female mice with a common human monoclonal anti-DNA idiotype (16/6 idiotype). Following a booster injection with the 16/6 idiotype, high levels of murine anti-16/6 and anti-anti-16/6 antibodies (associated with anti-DNA activity) were detected in the sera of the immunized mice. Elevated titers of autoantibodies reacting with DNA, poly(I), poly(dT), ribonucleoprotein, autoantigens (Sm, SS-A (Ro), and SS-B (La)), and cardiolipin were noted. The serological findings were associated with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, leukopenia, proteinuria, immune complex deposition in the glomerular mesangium, and sclerosis of the glomeruli. The immune complexes in the kidneys were shown to contain the 16/6 idiotype. This experimental SLE-like model may be used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying SLE.

  9. Screening and identification of human ZnT8-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) from type 1 diabetes phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Wang, Xiaodong; Gu, Yong; Zhang, Xiao; Qin, Yao; Chen, Heng; Xu, Xinyu; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8) is a major autoantigen and a predictive marker in type 1 diabetes (T1D). To investigate ZnT8-specific antibodies, a phage display library from T1D was constructed and single-chain antibodies against ZnT8 were screened and identified. Human T1D single-chain variable fragment (scFv) phage display library consists of approximately 1×10(8) clones. After four rounds of bio-panning, seven unique clones were positive by phage ELISA. Among them, C27 and C22, which demonstrated the highest affinity to ZnT8, were expressed in Escherichia coli Top10F' and then purified by affinity chromatography. C27 and C22 specifically bound ZnT8 N/C fusion protein and ZnT8 C terminal dimer with one Arg325Trp mutation. The specificity to human islet cells of these scFvs were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, we have successfully constructed a T1D phage display antibody library and identified two ZnT8-specific scFv clones, C27 and C22. These ZnT8-specific scFvs are potential agents in immunodiagnostic and immunotherapy of T1D.

  10. Human LINE1 endonuclease domain as a putative target of SARS-associated autoantibodies involved in the pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wei-ping; SHU Cui-li; LI Bo-an; ZHAO Jun; CHENG Yun

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome(SARS)is a disease with a mortality of 9.56%.Although SARS is etiologically linked to a new coronavirus(SARS-CoV)and functional cell receptor has been identified,the pathogenesis of the virus infection is largely unclear.Methods The clinical specimens were processed and analyzed using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in-house.Further investigations of target antigen included reviews of phage display technique,rapid amplification of cDNA ends(RACE)technique,protein expression and purification,Western blotting validation,serological and immunohistochemical staining in postmortem tissue.Results A type of medium or low titer anti-lung tissue antibodies were found in the sera of SARS patients at the early stage of the disease.Human long interspersed nuclear element 1(LINE1)gene endonuclease(EN)domain protein was one of the target autoantigens and it was aberrantly expressed in the lung tissue of SARS patients.Anti-EN antibody was positive in the sera of 40.9% of SARS patients.Conclusions Human LINE1 endonuclease domain was identified as a putative target of SARS-associated autoantibodies,which were presented in the serum of SARS patients and may be involved in the pathogenesis of SARS.

  11. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a…

  12. Structure, organization, and sequence of alpha satellite DNA from human chromosome 17: evidence for evolution by unequal crossing-over and an ancestral pentamer repeat shared with the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1986-09-01

    The centromeric regions of all human chromosomes are characterized by distinct subsets of a diverse tandemly repeated DNA family, alpha satellite. On human chromosome 17, the predominant form of alpha satellite is a 2.7-kilobase-pair higher-order repeat unit consisting of 16 alphoid monomers. We present the complete nucleotide sequence of the 16-monomer repeat, which is present in 500 to 1,000 copies per chromosome 17, as well as that of a less abundant 15-monomer repeat, also from chromosome 17. These repeat units were approximately 98% identical in sequence, differing by the exclusion of precisely 1 monomer from the 15-monomer repeat. Homologous unequal crossing-over is suggested as a probable mechanism by which the different repeat lengths on chromosome 17 were generated, and the putative site of such a recombination event is identified. The monomer organization of the chromosome 17 higher-order repeat unit is based, in part, on tandemly repeated pentamers. A similar pentameric suborganization has been previously demonstrated for alpha satellite of the human X chromosome. Despite the organizational similarities, substantial sequence divergence distinguishes these subsets. Hybridization experiments indicate that the chromosome 17 and X subsets are more similar to each other than to the subsets found on several other human chromosomes. We suggest that the chromosome 17 and X alpha satellite subsets may be related components of a larger alphoid subfamily which have evolved from a common ancestral repeat into the contemporary chromosome-specific subsets.

  13. Unique geometry of sister kinetochores in human oocytes during meiosis I may explain maternal age-associated increases in chromosomal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jessica; Tan, Seang Lin; Hartshorne, Geraldine M; McAinsh, Andrew D

    2015-12-30

    The first meiotic division in human oocytes is highly error-prone and contributes to the uniquely high incidence of aneuploidy observed in human pregnancies. A successful meiosis I (MI) division entails separation of homologous chromosome pairs and co-segregation of sister chromatids. For this to happen, sister kinetochores must form attachments to spindle kinetochore-fibres emanating from the same pole. In mouse and budding yeast, sister kinetochores remain closely associated with each other during MI, enabling them to act as a single unified structure. However, whether this arrangement also applies in human meiosis I oocytes was unclear. In this study, we perform high-resolution imaging of over 1900 kinetochores in human oocytes, to examine the geometry and architecture of the human meiotic kinetochore. We reveal that sister kinetochores in MI are not physically fused, and instead individual kinetochores within a pair are capable of forming independent attachments to spindle k-fibres. Notably, with increasing female age, the separation between kinetochores increases, suggesting a degradation of centromeric cohesion and/or changes in kinetochore architecture. Our data suggest that the differential arrangement of sister kinetochores and dual k-fibre attachments may explain the high proportion of unstable attachments that form in MI and thus indicate why human oocytes are prone to aneuploidy, particularly with increasing maternal age.

  14. Unique geometry of sister kinetochores in human oocytes during meiosis I may explain maternal age-associated increases in chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Patel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The first meiotic division in human oocytes is highly error-prone and contributes to the uniquely high incidence of aneuploidy observed in human pregnancies. A successful meiosis I (MI division entails separation of homologous chromosome pairs and co-segregation of sister chromatids. For this to happen, sister kinetochores must form attachments to spindle kinetochore-fibres emanating from the same pole. In mouse and budding yeast, sister kinetochores remain closely associated with each other during MI, enabling them to act as a single unified structure. However, whether this arrangement also applies in human meiosis I oocytes was unclear. In this study, we perform high-resolution imaging of over 1900 kinetochores in human oocytes, to examine the geometry and architecture of the human meiotic kinetochore. We reveal that sister kinetochores in MI are not physically fused, and instead individual kinetochores within a pair are capable of forming independent attachments to spindle k-fibres. Notably, with increasing female age, the separation between kinetochores increases, suggesting a degradation of centromeric cohesion and/or changes in kinetochore architecture. Our data suggest that the differential arrangement of sister kinetochores and dual k-fibre attachments may explain the high proportion of unstable attachments that form in MI and thus indicate why human oocytes are prone to aneuploidy, particularly with increasing maternal age.

  15. The human anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibody repertoire in Graves' and Hashimoto's autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardès, Thierry; Chapal, Nicolas; Bresson, Damien; Bès, Cédric; Giudicelli, Véronique; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Péraldi-Roux, Sylvie

    2002-06-01

    Human anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) autoantibodies (aAb) are generated during autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Within recent years, increasing knowledge of the TPO-specific aAb repertoire, gained mainly by the use of combinatorial library methodology, has led to the cloning and sequencing of around 180 human anti-TPO aAb. Analysis of the immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) genes encoding the TPO aAb in the ImMunoGeneTics database (IMGT) (http://imgt.cines.fr) reveals major features of the TPO-directed aAb repertoire during AITD. Heavy chain VH domains of TPO-specific aAb from Graves' disease patients preferentially use D proximal IGHV1 genes, whereas those from Hashimoto's thyroiditis are characterized more frequently by IGHV3 genes, mainly located in the middle of the IGH locus. A large proportion of the anti-TPO heavy chain VH domains is obtained following a VDJ recombination process that uses inverted D genes. J distal IGKV1 and IGLV1 genes are predominantly used in TPO aAb. In contrast to the numerous somatic hypermutations in the TPO-specific heavy chains, there is only limited amino acid replacement in most of the TPO-specific light chains, particularly in those encoded by J proximal IGLV or IGKV genes, suggesting that a defect in receptor editing can occur during aAb generation in AITD. Among the predominant IGHV1 or IGKV1 TPO aAb, conserved somatic mutations are the hallmark of the TPO aAb repertoire. The aim of this review is to provide new insights into aAb generation against TPO, a major autoantigen involved in AITD.

  16. Serum anti-BPAG1 auto-antibody is a novel marker for human melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Shimbo

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive types of tumor. Because malignant melanoma is difficult to treat once it has metastasized, early detection and treatment are essential. The search for reliable biomarkers of early-stage melanoma, therefore, has received much attention. By using a novel method of screening tumor antigens and their auto-antibodies, we identified bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (BPAG1 as a melanoma antigen recognized by its auto-antibody. BPAG1 is an auto-antigen in the skin disease bullous pemphigoid (BP and anti-BPAG1 auto-antibodies are detectable in sera from BP patients and are used for BP diagnosis. However, BPAG1 has been viewed as predominantly a keratinocyte-associated protein and a relationship between BPAG1 expression and melanoma has not been previously reported. In the present study, we show that bpag1 is expressed in the mouse F10 melanoma cell line in vitro and F10 melanoma tumors in vivo and that BPAG1 is expressed in human melanoma cell lines (A375 and G361 and normal human melanocytes. Moreover, the levels of anti-BPAG1 auto-antibodies in the sera of melanoma patients were significantly higher than in the sera of healthy volunteers (p<0.01. Furthermore, anti-BPAG1 auto-antibodies were detected in melanoma patients at both early and advanced stages of disease. Here, we report anti-BPAG1 auto-antibodies as a promising marker for the diagnosis of melanoma, and we discuss the significance of the detection of such auto-antibodies in cancer biology and patients.

  17. Donor Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Profile Bx1 Imparts a Negative Effect and Centromeric B-Specific Gene Motifs Render a Positive Effect on Standard-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patient Survival after Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaojing; Wang, Miao; Zhou, Huifen; Zhang, Huanhuan; Wu, Xiaojin; Yuan, Xiaoni; Li, Yang; Wu, Depei; He, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Donor killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) group B profiles (Bx) and homozygous of centromeric motif B (Cen-B/B) are the most preferable KIR gene content motifs for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of transplant from Bx1 donors and the benefit of the presence of Cen-B (regardless of number) were observed for standard-risk acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS) patients in this 4-year retrospective study. A total of 210 Chinese patients who underwent unrelated donor HSCT were investigated. Donor KIR profile Bx was associated with significantly improved overall survival (OS; P = .026) and relapse-free survival (RFS; P = .021) and reduced nonrelapse mortality (NRM; P = .017) in AML/MDS patients. A significantly lower survival rate was observed for transplants from Bx1 donors compared with Bx2, Bx3, and Bx4 donors for patients in first complete remission (n = 82; OS: P = .024; RFS: P = .021). Transplant from donors with Cen-B resulted in improved OS (HR = .256; 95% CI, .084 to .774; P = .016) and RFS (HR = .252; 95% CI, .084 to .758; P = .014) in AML/MDS patients at standard risk. However, this particular effect did not increase with a higher number of Cen-B motifs (cB/B versus cA/B; OS: P = .755; RFS: P = .768). No effect was observed on high-risk AML/MDS, acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Avoiding the selection of HSCT donors of KIR profile Bx1 is strongly advisable for standard-risk AML/MDS patients. The presence of the Cen-B motif rather than its number was more important in donor selection for the Chinese population.

  18. Phosphorylation of human Sgo1 by NEK2A is essential for chromosome congression in mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guosheng Fu; Xia Ding; Kai Yuan; Felix Aikhionbare; Jianhui Yao; Xin Cai; Kai Jiang; Xuebiao Yao

    2007-01-01

    Chromosome segregation in mitosis is orchestrated by the interaction of the kinetochore with spindle microtubules. Our recent study shows that NEK2A interacts with MAD1 at the kinetochore and possibly functions as a novel integrator of spindle checkpoint signaling. However, it is unclear how NEK2 A regulates kinetochore-microtubule attachment in mitosis. Here we show that NEK2A phosphorylates human Sgol and such phosphorylation is essential for faithful chromosome congression in mitosis. NEK2A binds directly to HsSgol in vitro and co-distributes with HsSgol to the kinetochore of mitotic cells. Our in vitro phosphorylation experiment demonstrated that HsSgol is a substrate of NEK2A and the phosphorylation sites were mapped to Ser14 and Ser507 as judged by the incorporation of 32P. Although such phosphorylation is not required for assembly of HsSgol to the kinetochore, expression of non-phosphorylatable mutant HsSgol perturbed chromosome congression and resulted in a dramatic increase in microtubule attachment errors, including syntelic and monotelic attachments. These findings reveal a key role for the NEK2A-mediated phosphorylation of HsSgol in orchestrating dynamic kinetochore-microtubule interaction. We propose that NEK2A-mediated phosphorylation of human Sgol provides a link between centromeric cohesion and spindle microtubule attachment at the kinetochores.

  19. Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1) Proteins Do Not Drive Pericentromeric Cohesin Enrichment in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Ángel; Rodríguez-Corsino, Miriam; Losada, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion mediated by cohesin is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Classical studies suggest that heterochromatin promotes cohesion, but whether this happens through regulation of cohesin remains to be determined. Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is a major component of heterochromatin. In fission yeast, the HP1 homologue Swi6 interacts with cohesin and is required for proper targeting and/or stabilization of cohesin at the centromeric region. To test whether this pathway is conserved in human cells, we have examined the behavior of cohesin in cells in which the levels of HP1 alpha, beta or gamma (the three HP1 proteins present in mammalian organisms) have been reduced by siRNA. We have also studied the consequences of treating human cells with drugs that change the histone modification profile of heterochromatin and thereby affect HP1 localization. Our results show no evidence for a requirement of HP1 proteins for either loading of bulk cohesin onto chromatin in interphase or retention of cohesin at pericentric heterochromatin in mitosis. However, depletion of HP1gamma leads to defects in mitotic progression. PMID:19352502

  20. Role of ATRX in chromatin structure and function: implications for chromosome instability and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente, Rabindranath; Baumann, Claudia; Viveiros, Maria M

    2011-08-01

    Functional differentiation of chromatin structure is essential for the control of gene expression, nuclear architecture, and chromosome stability. Compelling evidence indicates that alterations in chromatin remodeling proteins play an important role in the pathogenesis of human disease. Among these, α-thalassemia mental retardation X-linked protein (ATRX) has recently emerged as a critical factor involved in heterochromatin formation at mammalian centromeres and telomeres as well as facultative heterochromatin on the murine inactive X chromosome. Mutations in human ATRX result in an X-linked neurodevelopmental condition with various degrees of gonadal dysgenesis (ATRX syndrome). Patients with ATRX syndrome may exhibit skewed X chromosome inactivation (XCI) patterns, and ATRX-deficient mice exhibit abnormal imprinted XCI in the trophoblast cell line. Non-random or skewed XCI can potentially affect both the onset and severity of X-linked disease. Notably, failure to establish epigenetic modifications associated with the inactive X chromosome (Xi) results in several conditions that exhibit genomic and chromosome instability such as fragile X syndrome as well as cancer development. Insight into the molecular mechanisms of ATRX function and its interacting partners in different tissues will no doubt contribute to our understanding of the pathogenesis of ATRX syndrome as well as the epigenetic origins of aneuploidy. In turn, this knowledge will be essential for the identification of novel drug targets and diagnostic tools for cancer progression as well as the therapeutic management of global epigenetic changes commonly associated with malignant neoplastic transformation.

  1. Human-chromatin-related protein interactions identify a demethylase complex required for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Edyta; Ni, Zuyao; Pu, Shuye; Turinsky, Andrei L; Trimble, Sandra Smiley; Olsen, Jonathan B; Silverman-Gavrila, Rosalind; Silverman-Gavrila, Lorelei; Phanse, Sadhna; Guo, Hongbo; Zhong, Guoqing; Guo, Xinghua; Young, Peter; Bailey, Swneke; Roudeva, Denitza; Zhao, Dorothy; Hewel, Johannes; Li, Joyce; Gräslund, Susanne; Paduch, Marcin; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Lupien, Mathieu; Emili, Andrew; Wodak, Shoshana J; Greenblatt, Jack

    2014-07-10

    Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision) network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  2. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  3. Cryptic Translocation Identification in Human and Mouse using Several Telomeric Multiplex FISH (TM-FISH) Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henegariu, O; Artan, S; Greally, J M; Chen, X-N; Korenberg, J R; Vance, G H; Stubbs, L; Bray-Ward, P; Ward, D C

    2003-08-19

    Experimental data published in recent years showed that up to 10% of all cases with mild to severe idiopathic mental retardation may result from small rearrangements of the subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes. To detect such cryptic translocations, we developed a ''telomeric'' multiplex FISH assay, using a set of previously published and commercially available subtelomeric probes. This set of probes includes 41 cosmid/PAC/P1 clones located from less than 100kb to about 1 Mb from the end of the chromosomes. Similarly, a published mouse probe set, comprised of BACs hybridizing to the closest known marker toward the centromere and telomere of each mouse chromosome, was used to develop a mouse-specific ''telomeric'' M-FISH. Three different combinatorial labeling strategies were used to simultaneously detect all human sub-telomeric regions on one slide. The simplest approach uses only three fluors, and can be performed in laboratories lacking sophisticated imaging equipment or personnel highly trained in cytogenetics. A standard fluorescence microscope equipped with only three filters is sufficient. Fluor-dUTPs and labeled probes can be custom-made, thus dramatically reducing costs. Images can be prepared using generic imaging software (Adobe Photoshop), and analysis performed by simple visual inspection.

  4. Human rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaay Fortman, B. de

    2006-01-01

    Human rights reflect a determined effort to protect the dignity of each and every human being against abuse of power. This endeavour is as old as human history. What is relatively new is the international venture for the protection of human dignity through internationally accepted legal standards an

  5. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security

    OpenAIRE

    Gasper, Des

    2009-01-01

    Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and politics; each has emerged within the United Nations world; each relies implicitly on a conceptualisation of human need; each has specific strengths. Yet mutual communication, understanding and co-operation are deficient, espec...

  6. Human Technology and Human Affects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Human Technology and Human Affects  This year Samsung introduced a mobile phone with "Soul". It was made with a human touch and included itself a magical touch. Which function does technology and affects get in everyday aesthetics like this, its images and interactions included this presentation ...... often mentioned post-human condition....

  7. Identification of a Common Epitope between Enterovirus 71 and Human MED25 Proteins Which May Explain Virus-Associated Neurological Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihu Fan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a major causative pathogen of hand, foot and mouth disease with especially severe neurologic complications, which mainly account for fatalities from this disease. To date, the pathogenesis of EV71 in the central neurons system has remained unclear. Cytokine-mediated immunopathogenesis and nervous tissue damage by virus proliferation are two widely speculated causes of the neurological disease. To further study the pathogenesis, we identified a common epitope (co-epitope between EV71 VP1 and human mediator complex subunit 25 (MED25 highly expressed in brain stem. A monoclonal antibody (2H2 against the co-epitope was prepared, and its interaction with MED25 was examined by ELISA, immunofluorescence assay and Western blot in vitro and by live small animal imaging in vivo. Additionally, 2H2 could bind to both VP1 and MED25 with the affinity constant (Kd of 10−7 M as determined by the ForteBio Octet System. Intravenously injected 2H2 was distributed in brain stem of mice after seven days of EV71 infection. Interestingly, 2H2-like antibodies were detected in the serum of EV71-infected patients. These findings suggest that EV71 infection induces the production of antibodies that can bind to autoantigens expressed in nervous tissue and maybe further trigger autoimmune reactions resulting in neurological disease.

  8. Comparison of BAC FISH with specific telomeres and centromere probes and chromosome painting on detection of chromosome translocation induced by irradiation%BAC FISH与PAINT法检测辐射诱发染色体易位的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青杰; 陆雪; 封江彬; 王晓维; 陈德清

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficiency of BAC FISH established in our lab and conventional chromosome painting(PAINT)on detection of radiation-induced chromosome translocation.Methods Healthy human peripheral blood samples were irradiated with 0~5.0 Gy 60Co γ-rays.Then chromosome translocations in these samples were detected with BAC FISH and PAINT using chromosomes 1.2 and 4.The genome translocation rates were calculated with observed chromosome translocation rates,and the dose-response curve of two methods were established.Results The genome translocation rates induced by 0~5.0 Gy 60Co γ-rays detected by BAC FISH and PAINT were increased with absorbed doses.The observed translocation rates with BAC FISH were higher than that with PAINT at each dose level.The dose-response curve were Y=0.043 D2+0.0008D+0.0048 for BAC FISH and Y=0.043D2+0.006D+0.0027 for PAINT.Conclusions The translocation rate detected by BAC FISH was higher than that by PAINT,and the parameters β in dose-response curve equation were same by two methods.%目的 比较自行建立的BAC FISH方法和常规染色体涂染(PAINT)方法分析辐射诱发染色体易位有效性的不同.方法 对正常人外周血照射不同剂量(0~5.0 Gy)的60Co γ射线,用1、2和4号染色体特异性端粒和着丝粒探针BAC FISH及PAINT分析染色体易位,将观察到的染色体易位率换算为全基因组易位率,并建立两种方法分析辐射诱发的染色体易位率剂量-效应曲线.结果 用两种方法分析0~5.0 Gy 60Coγ射线诱发的全基因组易位率均随着吸收剂量的增加而增高;在相同的剂量点,BAC FISH染色体易位检出率高于PAINT方法.两种方法分析吸收剂量和全基因组易位率之间的剂量-效应曲线均为二次方程模式,分别为Y=0.043D2+0.0008D+0.0048(BAC FISH)和Y=0.043D2+0.006D+0.0027(PAINT).结论 自行建立的BAC FISH方法分析辐射诱发染色体易位检出率高于常规染色体涂染方法,两种方法建立的

  9. Human microbiomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendhran, J.; P. Gunasekaran

    2010-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has driven the study of human biology in a significant way and enabled the genome-wide study to elucidate the molecular basis of complex human diseases. Recently, the role of microbiota on human physiology and health has received much attention. The influence of gut microbiome (the collective genomes of the gut microbiota) in obesity has been demonstrated, which may pave the way for new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies such as bacteriotherapy. The sig...

  10. The role of human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate in neuronal plasticity and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morise, Jyoji; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2017-10-01

    The human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate, a unique trisaccharide possessing sulfated glucuronic acid in a non-reducing terminus (HSO3-3GlcAß1-3Galß1-4GlcNAc-), is highly expressed in the nervous system and its spatiotemporal expression is strictly regulated. Mice deficient in the gene encoding a key enzyme, GlcAT-P, of the HNK-1 biosynthetic pathway exhibit almost complete disappearance of the HNK-1 epitope in the brain, significant reduction of long-term potentiation, and aberration of spatial learning and memory formation. In addition to its physiological roles in higher brain function, the HNK-1 carbohydrate has attracted considerable attention as an autoantigen associated with peripheral demyelinative neuropathy, which relates to IgM paraproteinemia, because of high immunogenicity. It has been suggested, however, that serum autoantibodies in IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) antibody-associated neuropathy patients show heterogeneous reactivity to the HNK-1 epitope. We have found that structurally distinct HNK-1 epitopes are expressed in specific proteins in the nervous system. Here, we overview the current knowledge of the involvement of these HNK-1 epitopes in the regulation of neural plasticity and discuss the impact of different HNK-1 antigens of anti-MAG neuropathy patients. We identified the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA2 and aggrecan as HNK-1 carrier proteins. The HNK-1 epitope on GluA2 and aggrecan regulates neural plasticity in different ways. Furthermore, we found the clinical relationship between reactivity of autoantibodies to the different HNK-1 epitopes and progression of anti-MAG neuropathy. The HNK-1 epitope is indispensable for the acquisition of normal neuronal function and can be a good target for the establishment of diagnostic criteria for anti-MAG neuropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Human Smuggling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel - Rozenblit, Dina; Zaitch, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Human smuggling is based on a consensus between smuggler, smuggled, and his/her family (which usually guarantees or effectuates payment). However, unauthorized immigrants are violating immigration laws and human smugglers are profiting from enabling illegal immigration. Both human smuggling and its

  12. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  13. Induction of complete and incomplete chromosome aberrations by bleomycin in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkhaled, L.; Xuncla, M.; Caballin, M.R. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Unitat d' Antropologia Biologica, Departament de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal i Ecologia, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Barrios, L. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Unitat de Biologia Cel.lular, Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia (Spain); Barquinero, J.F. [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Unitat d' Antropologia Biologica, Departament de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal i Ecologia, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)], E-mail: Francesc.Barquinero@uab.es

    2008-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a clastogenic compound, which due to the overdispersion in the cell distribution of induced dicentrics has been compared to the effect of high-LET radiation. Recently, it has been described that in fibroblast derived cell lines BLM induces incomplete chromosome elements more efficiently than any type of ionizing radiation. The objective of the present study was to evaluate in human lymphocytes the induction of dicentrics and incomplete chromosome elements by BLM. Peripheral blood samples have been treated with different concentrations of BLM. Two cytogenetic techniques were applied, fluorescence plus Giemsa (FPG) and FISH using pan-centromeric and pan-telomeric probes. The observed frequency of dicentric equivalents increases linearly with the BLM concentration, and for all BLM concentrations the distribution of dicentric equivalents was overdispersed. In the FISH study the ratio between total incomplete elements and multicentrics was 0.27. The overdispersion in the dicentric cell distribution, and the linear BLM-concentration dependence of dicentrics can be compared to the effect of high-LET radiation, on the contrary the ratio of incomplete elements and multicentrics is similar to the one induced by low-LET radiation ({approx}0.40). The elevated proportion of interstitial deletions in relation to total acentric fragments, higher than any type of ionizing radiation could be a characteristic signature of the clastogenic effect of BLM.

  14. Mapping and characterization of non-HLA multigene assemblages in the human MHC class I region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venditti, C.P.; Harris, J.M.; Geraghty, D.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ. College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-15

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I region has been shown to be associated with a variety of immune and nonimmune disorders. In an effort to initiate steps designed to identify the idiopathic hemochromatosis disease gene (HFE), the authors have cloned and mapped two expressed messages using probes from the HLA-H subregion that lie immediately distal to the HLA-A9 breakpoint. Although the cDNA clones identify distinct multifragment families that are dispersed throughout the MHC, the gene sequences from which the two cDNA clones derive map centromeric to the HLA-B locus and are absent from the genomes of higher nonhuman primates. This suggests that a syntenic coding segment arose within a highly polymorphic region (TNF to HLA-B interval) as the result of an insertion event following the emergence of Homo sapiens. An additional syntenic cluster exists within a peak of linkage disequilibrium with the HFE gene and may define coding sequences that underlie the defect in genetic iron overload. These data generally support the concept that the class I region is potentially gene-rich and further highlight the possibility that these new coding sequences may play a role in the development of a variety of HLA-linked diseases. The observations presented suggest that interlocus exchanges have played a structural role in the genesis of the human class I region. 46 refs., 6 refs.

  15. Biological effects of in vitro THz radiation exposure in human foetal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Amicis, Andrea; Sanctis, Stefania De; Cristofaro, Sara Di; Franchini, Valeria; Lista, Florigio; Regalbuto, Elisa; Giovenale, Emilio; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Nenzi, Paolo; Bei, Roberto; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Coluzzi, Elisa; Cicia, Cristina; Sgura, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, terahertz (THz) radiation has been widely used in a variety of applications: medical, security, telecommunications and military areas. However, few data are available on the biological effects of this type of electromagnetic radiation and the reported results, using different genetic or cellular assays, are quite discordant. This multidisciplinary study focuses on potential genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, evaluated by several end-points, associated with THz radiation. For this purpose, in vitro exposure of human foetal fibroblasts to low frequency THz radiation (0.1-0.15THz) was performed using a Compact Free Electron Laser. We did not observe an induction of DNA damage evaluated by Comet assay, phosphorylation of H2AX histone or telomere length modulation. In addiction, no induction of apoptosis or changes in pro-survival signalling proteins were detected. Moreover, our results indicated an increase in the total number of micronuclei and centromere positive micronuclei induction evaluated by CREST analysis, indicating that THz radiation could induce aneugenic rather than clastogenic effects, probably leading to chromosome loss. Furthermore, an increase of actin polymerization observed by ultrastructural analysis after THz irradiation, supports the hypothesis that an abnormal assembly of spindle proteins could lead to the observed chromosomal malsegregation.

  16. Localization of the human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) gene to the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkin, D.J.; Jones, C. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Denver, CO (United States)); Kimbro, K.S.; Taylor, M.W. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)); Barr, B.L.; Gupta, S.L. (Hipple Cancer Research Center, Dayton, OH (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the first enzyme in the catabolic pathway for tryptophan. This extrahepatic enzyme differs from the hepatic enzyme, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), in molecular as well as enzymatic characteristics, although both enzymes catalyze the same reaction: cleavage of tryptophan into N-formylkynurenine. The induction of IDO by IFN-[gamma] plays a role in the antigrowth effect of IFN-[gamma] in cell cultures and in the inhibition of intracellular pathogens, e.g., Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci. Tryptophan is also the precursor for the synthesis of serotonin, and reduced levels of tryptophan and serotonin found in AIDS patients have been correlated with the presence of IFN-[gamma] and consequent elevation of IDO activity. The IDO enzyme has been purified and characterized, and its cDNA and genomic DNA clones have been isolated and analyzed. DNA from hybrid cells containing fragments of human chromosome 8 was used to determine the regional localization of the IDO gene on chromosome 8. The hybrids R30-5B and R30-2A contain 8p11 [yields] qter and 8q13 [yields] qter, respectively. Hybrid 229-3A contains the 8pter [yields] q11. The hybrid R30-2A was negative for the IDO gene, whereas R30-5B and 229-3A were positive as analyzed by PCR and verified by Southern blotting. Only the region close to the centromere is shared by R30-5B and 229-3A hybrids. The results indicate that the IDO gene is located on chromosome 8p11 [yields] q11.

  17. Multicolor FISHs for simultaneous detection of genes and DNA segments on human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Maekawa, Masahiko; Asai, Satoko; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a convenient multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) (five-, four-, three-, and two-color FISHs) for detecting specific genes/DNA segments on the human chromosomes. As a foundation of multicolor FISH, we first isolated 80 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes that specifically detect the peri-centromeres (peri-CEN) and subtelomeres (subTEL) of 24 different human chromosomes (nos. 1~22, X, and Y) by screening our homemade BAC library (Keio BAC library) consisting of 200,000 clones. Five-color FISH was performed using human DNA segments specific for peri-CEN or subTEL, which were labeled with five different fluorescent dyes [7-diethylaminocoumarin (DEAC): blue, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC): green, rhodamine 6G (R6G): yellow, TexRed: red, and cyanine5 (Cy5): purple]. To observe FISH signals under a fluorescence microscope, five optic filters were carefully chosen to avoid overlapping fluorescence emission. Five-color FISH and four-color FISH enabled us to accurately examine the numerical anomaly of human chromosomes. Three-color FISH using two specific BAC clones, that distinguish 5' half of oncogene epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) from its 3' half, revealed the amplification and truncation of EGFR in EGFR-overproducing cancer cells. Moreover, two-color FISH readily detected a fusion gene in leukemia cells such as breakpoint cluster region (BCR)/Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue (ABL) on the Philadelphia (Ph') chromosome with interchromosomal translocation. Some other successful cases such as trisomy 21 of Down syndrome are presented. Potential applications of multicolor FISH will be discussed.

  18. Developing de novo human artificial chromosomes in embryonic stem cells using HSV-1 amplicon technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralli, Daniela; Monaco, Zoia L

    2015-02-01

    De novo artificial chromosomes expressing genes have been generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) and are maintained following differentiation into other cell types. Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are small, functional, extrachromosomal elements, which behave as normal chromosomes in human cells. De novo HAC are generated following delivery of alpha satellite DNA into target cells. HAC are characterized by high levels of mitotic stability and are used as models to study centromere formation and chromosome organisation. They are successful and effective as gene expression vectors since they remain autonomous and can accommodate larger genes and regulatory regions for long-term expression studies in cells unlike other viral gene delivery vectors currently used. Transferring the essential DNA sequences for HAC formation intact across the cell membrane has been challenging for a number of years. A highly efficient delivery system based on HSV-1 amplicons has been used to target DNA directly to the ES cell nucleus and HAC stably generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) at high frequency. HAC were detected using an improved protocol for hESc chromosome harvesting, which consistently produced high-quality metaphase spreads that could routinely detect HAC in hESc. In tumour cells, the input DNA often integrated in the host chromosomes, but in the host ES genome, it remained intact. The hESc containing the HAC formed embryoid bodies, generated teratoma in mice, and differentiated into neuronal cells where the HAC were maintained. The HAC structure and chromatin composition was similar to the endogenous hESc chromosomes. This review will discuss the technological advances in HAC vector delivery using HSV-1 amplicons and the improvements in the identification of de novo HAC in hESc.

  19. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Cendes, I. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada); Mulley, J.C. [Alelaide Children`s Hospital (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  20. Chromosomal imbalances in successive moments of human bladder urothelial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento e Pontes, Merielen Garcia; da Silveira, Sara Martorelli; Trindade Filho, José Carlos de Souza

    2013-01-01

    patients, urinary bladder washes citologically negative for neoplastic cells were submitted to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect copy number alterations in centromeres 7, 17, and 9p21 region. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: HR-CGH indicated high frequencies (80%) of gains in 11p12 and losses...

  1. Digital Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brügger, Niels

    2016-01-01

    the humanities for decades, starting with research fields such as humanities computing or computational linguistics in the 1950s, and later new media studies and internet studies. The historical development of digital humanities has been characterized by a focus on three successive, but co-existing types......Digital humanities is an umbrella term for theories, methodologies, and practices related to humanities scholarship that use the digital computer as an integrated and essential part of its research and teaching activities. The computer can be used for establishing, finding, collecting......, and preserving material to study, as an object of study in its own right, as an analytical tool, or for collaborating, and for disseminating results. The term "digital humanities" was coined around 2001, and gained currency within academia in the following years. However, computers had been used within...

  2. Human Rights, Human Needs, Human Development, Human Security - Relationships between four international human discourses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract: Human rights, human development and human security form increasingly important, partly interconnected, partly competitive and misunderstood ethical and policy discourses. Each tries to humanize a pre-existing and unavoidable major discourse of everyday life, policy and

  3. Human Rights and Human Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Possenti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There seems to be two different versions of human rights in Western tradition: say Rationalistic and Christian; the former adopted in revolutionary France, the latter highly developed in Renaissance Spain. Current relativistic criticisms attempt to deny the universality of human rights alleging that this theory has been created in Western countries or it has no strong justification, and therefore cannot have universal approach; but this objection can be dismissed with an alternative justification of human rights.

  4. Human kapital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Anders; Nielsen, Peder Harbjerg

    2007-01-01

    finansiel og human kapital. Den traditionelle rådgivnings snævre synsvinkel kan føre til forkerte investeringsråd. Der skal derfor opfordres til, at de finansielle virksomheder i tilrettelæggelsen af deres rådgivning af private kunder systematisk inddrager den humane kapitals størrelse og karakteristika i...

  5. Human trichuriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human trichuriasis is a neglected tropical disease which affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is particularly prevalent among children living in areas where sanitation is poor. This review examines the current knowledge on the taxonomy, genetics and phylogeography of human Trichuris...

  6. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  7. Human evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llamas, Bastien; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    , and true population genomic studies of Bronze Age populations. Among the emerging areas of aDNA research, the analysis of past epigenomes is set to provide more new insights into human adaptation and disease susceptibility through time. Starting as a mere curiosity, ancient human genetics has become...

  8. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  9. Teaching humanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David T; Cohen, Jordan J; Bruder, Ann; Packer, Barbara; Sole, Allison

    2008-01-01

    As the "passion that animates authentic professionalism," humanism must be infused into medical education and clinical care as a central feature of medicine's professionalism movement. In this article, we discuss a current definition of humanism in medicine. We will also provide detailed descriptions of educational programs intended to promote humanism at a number of medical schools in the United States (and beyond) and identify the key factors that make these programs effective. Common elements of programs that effectively teach humanism include: (1) opportunities for students to gain perspective in the lives of patients; (2) structured time for reflection on those experiences; and (3) focused mentoring to ensure that these events convert to positive, formative learning experiences. By describing educational experiences that both promote and sustain humanism in doctors, we hope to stimulate the thinking of other medical educators and to disseminate the impact of these innovative educational programs to help the profession meet its obligation to provide the public with humanistic physicians.

  10. Genomic structure and evolution of the ancestral chromosome fusion site in 2q13-2q14.1 and paralogous regions on other human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-11-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13-2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%-99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ~100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans.

  11. The homologous putative GTPases Grn1p from fission yeast and the human GNL3L are required for growth and play a role in processing of nucleolar pre-rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xianming; Rao, Malireddi R K Subba; Chen, Xue Qin; Wu, Wei; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy; Balasundaram, David

    2006-01-01

    Grn1p from fission yeast and GNL3L from human cells, two putative GTPases from the novel HSR1_MMR1 GTP-binding protein subfamily with circularly permuted G-motifs play a critical role in maintaining normal cell growth. Deletion of Grn1 resulted in a severe growth defect, a marked reduction in mature rRNA species with a concomitant accumulation of the 35S pre-rRNA transcript, and failure to export the ribosomal protein Rpl25a from the nucleolus. Deleting any of the Grn1p G-domain motifs resulted in a null phenotype and nuclear/nucleolar localization consistent with the lack of nucleolar export of preribosomes accompanied by a distortion of nucleolar structure. Heterologous expression of GNL3L in a Deltagrn1 mutant restored processing of 35S pre-rRNA, nuclear export of Rpl25a and cell growth to wild-type levels. Genetic complementation in yeast and siRNA knockdown in HeLa cells confirmed the homologous proteins Grn1p and GNL3L are required for growth. Failure of two similar HSR1_MMR1 putative nucleolar GTPases, Nucleostemin (NS), or the dose-dependent response of breast tumor autoantigen NGP-1, to rescue deltagrn1 implied the highly specific roles of Grn1p or GNL3L in nucleolar events. Our analysis uncovers an important role for Grn1p/GNL3L within this unique group of nucleolar GTPases.

  12. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. I. experiments with human lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a composite probe for human chromosome 4 and a probe that stained all centromeres was used to study gamma-ray induced breakage, rejoining and misrejoining in prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Dose-response curves for the induction of all types of aberrations in prematurely condensed human chromosomes 4 were determined immediately after irradiation and after 8 h postirradiation incubation. In addition, aberrations were measured after various incubation times from 0 to 18 h after a dose of 7 Gy. Unrejoined chromosome breaks were the most frequent type of aberration observed immediately after irradiation. Approximately 15% of total aberrations observed were chromosome exchanges. After 8 h postirradiation incubation, the frequency of breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes declined to about 20% of the initial value, and chromosomal exchanges became the most frequent aberration. Results of metaphase analysis were similar to those for prematurely condensed chromosomes after 8 h incubation with the exception that a significantly lower frequency of fragments was observed. Symmetrical and asymmetrical interchanges were found at similar frequencies at all doses. No complex exchanges were observed in lymphocyte chromosomes immediately after exposure. They accounted for about 1% of total exchanges in metaphase chromosomes at doses <3 Gy and about 14% at 7 Gy. Incomplete exchanges amounted to approximately 15% of total exchanges at all doses. The kinetics of break rejoining was exponential, and the frequency of exchanges increased with kinetics similar to that observed for the rejoining of the breaks. This increase in the total exchanges as a function of the time between irradiation and fusion was due to a rapid increase in reciprocal interchanges, and a slower increase in complex exchanges; the frequency of incomplete exchanges increased initially, then decreased with prolonged incubation to the level observed

  13. Human Computation

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...

  14. Practicing Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2016-01-01

    In contemporary societies, the humanities are under constant pressure and have to justify their existence. In the ongoing debates, Humboldt’s ideals of ‘Bildung’ and ‘pure science’ are often used to justify the unique function of the humanities of ensuring free research and contributing to a vital...... philosophy. Contrary to Humboldt’s idea that the non-practical is the most practical in the long run, philosophical pragmatism recommends to the humanities to situate knowledge in practices and apply knowledge to practices....