WorldWideScience

Sample records for human cellular extracts

  1. Dandelion Extracts Protect Human Skin Fibroblasts from UVB Damage and Cellular Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yafan; Li, Shuangshuang

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes damage in skin by generating excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), leading to skin photoageing. Dandelion extracts have long been used for traditional Chinese medicine and native American medicine to treat cancers, hepatitis, and digestive diseases; however, less is known on the effects of dandelion extracts in skin photoageing. Here we found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts significantly protect UVB irradiation-inhibited cell viability when added before UVB irradiation or promptly after irradiation. Dandelion leaf and flower extracts inhibited UVB irradiation-stimulated MMP activity and ROS generation. Dandelion root extracts showed less action on protecting HDFs from UVB irradiation-induced MMP activity, ROS generation, and cell death. Furthermore, dandelion leaf and flower but not root extracts stimulated glutathione generation and glutathione reductase mRNA expression in the presence or absence of UVB irradiation. We also found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts help absorb UVB irradiation. In addition, dandelion extracts significantly protected HDFs from H2O2-induced cellular senescence. In conclusion, dandelion extracts especially leaf and flower extracts are potent protective agents against UVB damage and H2O2-induced cellular senescence in HDFs by suppressing ROS generation and MMP activities and helping UVB absorption.

  2. Dandelion Extracts Protect Human Skin Fibroblasts from UVB Damage and Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV irradiation causes damage in skin by generating excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS and induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, leading to skin photoageing. Dandelion extracts have long been used for traditional Chinese medicine and native American medicine to treat cancers, hepatitis, and digestive diseases; however, less is known on the effects of dandelion extracts in skin photoageing. Here we found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts significantly protect UVB irradiation-inhibited cell viability when added before UVB irradiation or promptly after irradiation. Dandelion leaf and flower extracts inhibited UVB irradiation-stimulated MMP activity and ROS generation. Dandelion root extracts showed less action on protecting HDFs from UVB irradiation-induced MMP activity, ROS generation, and cell death. Furthermore, dandelion leaf and flower but not root extracts stimulated glutathione generation and glutathione reductase mRNA expression in the presence or absence of UVB irradiation. We also found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts help absorb UVB irradiation. In addition, dandelion extracts significantly protected HDFs from H2O2-induced cellular senescence. In conclusion, dandelion extracts especially leaf and flower extracts are potent protective agents against UVB damage and H2O2-induced cellular senescence in HDFs by suppressing ROS generation and MMP activities and helping UVB absorption.

  3. Dandelion Extracts Protect Human Skin Fibroblasts from UVB Damage and Cellular Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yafan; Li, Shuangshuang

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes damage in skin by generating excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), leading to skin photoageing. Dandelion extracts have long been used for traditional Chinese medicine and native American medicine to treat cancers, hepatitis, and digestive diseases; however, less is known on the effects of dandelion extracts in skin photoageing. Here we found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts significantly protect UVB irradiation-inhibited cell viability when added before UVB irradiation or promptly after irradiation. Dandelion leaf and flower extracts inhibited UVB irradiation-stimulated MMP activity and ROS generation. Dandelion root extracts showed less action on protecting HDFs from UVB irradiation-induced MMP activity, ROS generation, and cell death. Furthermore, dandelion leaf and flower but not root extracts stimulated glutathione generation and glutathione reductase mRNA expression in the presence or absence of UVB irradiation. We also found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts help absorb UVB irradiation. In addition, dandelion extracts significantly protected HDFs from H2O2-induced cellular senescence. In conclusion, dandelion extracts especially leaf and flower extracts are potent protective agents against UVB damage and H2O2-induced cellular senescence in HDFs by suppressing ROS generation and MMP activities and helping UVB absorption. PMID:26576225

  4. Fenugreek extract as an inducer of cellular death via autophagy in human T lymphoma Jurkat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Daghri Nasser M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drugs used both in classical chemotherapy and the more recent targeted therapy do not have cancer cell specificity and, hence, cause severe systemic side effects. Tumors also develop resistance to such drugs due to heterogeneity of cell types and clonal selection. Several traditional dietary ingredients from plants, on the other hand, have been shown to act on multiple targets/pathways, and may overcome drug resistance. The dietary agents are safe and readily available. However, application of plant components for cancer treatment/prevention requires better understanding of anticancer functions and elucidation of their mechanisms of action. The current study focuses on the anticancer properties of fenugreek, a herb with proven anti-diabetic, antitumor and immune-stimulating functions. Method Jurkat cells were incubated with 30 to 1500 μg/mL concentrations of 50% ethanolic extract of dry fenugreek seeds and were followed for changes in viability (trypan blue assay, morphology (microscopic examination and autophagic marker LC3 transcript level (RT-PCR. Results Incubation of Jurkat cells with fenugreek extract at concentrations ranging from 30 to 1500 μg/mL for up to 3 days resulted in cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Jurkat cell death was preceded by the appearance of multiple large vacuoles, which coincided with transcriptional up-regulation of LC3. GC-MS analysis of fenugreek extract indicated the presence of several compounds with anticancer properties, including gingerol (4.82%, cedrene (2.91%, zingerone (16.5%, vanillin (1.52% and eugenol (1.25%. Conclusions Distinct morphological changes involving appearance of large vacuoles, membrane disintegration and increased expression of LC3 transcripts indicated that fenugreek extract induced autophagy and autophagy-associated death of Jurkat cells. In addition to the already known apoptotic activation, induction of autophagy may be an additional mechanism

  5. Dandelion Extracts Protect Human Skin Fibroblasts from UVB Damage and Cellular Senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Yafan Yang; Shuangshuang Li

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes damage in skin by generating excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), leading to skin photoageing. Dandelion extracts have long been used for traditional Chinese medicine and native American medicine to treat cancers, hepatitis, and digestive diseases; however, less is known on the effects of dandelion extracts in skin photoageing. Here we found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts significantly protect U...

  6. Dandelion Extracts Protect Human Skin Fibroblasts from UVB Damage and Cellular Senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Yafan Yang; Shuangshuang Li

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes damage in skin by generating excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), leading to skin photoageing. Dandelion extracts have long been used for traditional Chinese medicine and native American medicine to treat cancers, hepatitis, and digestive diseases; however, less is known on the effects of dandelion extracts in skin photoageing. Here we found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts significantly protect U...

  7. Inhibitory effects of Kaempferia parviflora extract on monocyte adhesion and cellular reactive oxygen species production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigome, Satoru; Yoshida, Izumi; Ito, Shihomi; Inohana, Shuichi; Fushimi, Kei; Nagai, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Satoyama, Toshiya; Katsuda, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Shinobu; Watai, Masatoshi; Hirose, Naoto; Mitsue, Takahiro; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Komai, Michio

    2017-04-01

    The rhizome of Kaempferia parviflora (KP) is used in traditional Thai medicine. In this study, we investigated the effects of an ethanol KP extract and two of its components [5,7-dimethoxyflavone (DMF) and 5-hydroxy-3,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (TMF)] on monocyte adhesion and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), which provide an in vitro model of events relevant to the development and progression of atherosclerosis. RAW264.7 mouse macrophage-like cells were incubated with various concentrations of KP extract or polymethoxyflavonoids and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide prior to measuring nitrite levels in the culture media. Monocyte adhesion was evaluated by measuring the fluorescently labeled human monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells that is attached to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated HUVECs. Cellular ROS production was assessed by measuring cellular antioxidant activity using pyocyanin-stimulated HUVECs. KP extract and DMF reduced nitrite levels (as indicator of nitric oxide production) in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and also inhibited THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVECs. These treatments induced mRNA expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs and downregulated that of various cell adhesion molecules, inflammatory mediators, and endothelial function-related genes. Angiotensin-converting enzyme activity was inhibited by KP extract in vitro. Furthermore, KP extract, DMF, and TMF inhibited the production of cellular ROS in pyocyanin-stimulated HUVECs. KP extract, DMF, and TMF showed potential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects in these in vitro models, properties that would inhibit the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  8. Endocrine Disrupters in Human Blood and Breast Milk: Extraction Methodologies, Cellular Uptake and Effect on Key Nuclear Receptor Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Philip Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    -products from incineration plants, plastic additives, technical industry products, pesticides from the farming industry and detergent degradation products. Many of these substances can interfere with the hormonal system in organisms. The common name for these compounds is endocrine disrupters (EDCs). Some EDCs...... the level of endocrine disrupting activity in the sample. Paper IV. Breast milk was extracted using SPE and these extracts were further processed using polyethylene membranes in a dialytic setup (MDE extraction). The purpose of the dialysis was to reduce the content of lipids in the raw SPE extracts because...

  9. Standardized Kaempferia parviflora Extract Inhibits Intrinsic Aging Process in Human Dermal Fibroblasts and Hairless Mice by Inhibiting Cellular Senescence and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Eun Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic skin aging is a complex biological phenomenon mainly caused by cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of Kaempferia parviflora Wall ex. Baker ethanol extract (KPE on H2O2-stimulated cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction both in vitro and in vivo. KPE significantly increased cell growth and suppressed senescence-associated β-galactosidase activation. KPE inhibited the expression of cell-cycle inhibitors (p53, p21, p16, and pRb and stimulated the expression of cell-cycle activators (E2F1 and E2F2. H2O2-induced hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (AKT signaling pathway was suppressed by KPE through regulated expression of forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. KPE attenuated inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and increased the mRNA expression of PGC-1α, ERRα, NRF1, and Tfam, which modulate mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Consequently, reduced ATP levels and increased ROS level were also reversed by KPE treatment. In hairless mice, KPE inhibited wrinkle formation, skin atrophy, and loss of elasticity by increasing the collagen and elastic fibers. The results indicate that KPE prevents intrinsic aging process in hairless mice by inhibiting cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting its potential as a natural antiaging agent.

  10. Standardized Kaempferia parviflora Extract Inhibits Intrinsic Aging Process in Human Dermal Fibroblasts and Hairless Mice by Inhibiting Cellular Senescence and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Eun; Woo, Seon Wook; Kim, Mi-Bo; Kim, Changhee; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic skin aging is a complex biological phenomenon mainly caused by cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of Kaempferia parviflora Wall ex. Baker ethanol extract (KPE) on H2O2-stimulated cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction both in vitro and in vivo. KPE significantly increased cell growth and suppressed senescence-associated β-galactosidase activation. KPE inhibited the expression of cell-cycle inhibitors (p53, p21, p16, and pRb) and stimulated the expression of cell-cycle activators (E2F1 and E2F2). H2O2-induced hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway was suppressed by KPE through regulated expression of forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). KPE attenuated inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)) and increased the mRNA expression of PGC-1α, ERRα, NRF1, and Tfam, which modulate mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Consequently, reduced ATP levels and increased ROS level were also reversed by KPE treatment. In hairless mice, KPE inhibited wrinkle formation, skin atrophy, and loss of elasticity by increasing the collagen and elastic fibers. The results indicate that KPE prevents intrinsic aging process in hairless mice by inhibiting cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting its potential as a natural antiaging agent.

  11. A high-efficiency cellular extraction system for biological proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry have led to significant improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of biochemical analyses of cellular reactions, protein-protein interactions, and small molecule drug discovery. These approaches depend on cellular proteome extraction that preserves native protein activities. Here, we systematically analyzed mechanical methods of cell lysis and physical protein extraction to identify those that maximize the extraction ...

  12. The yield and quality of cellular and bacterial DNA extracts from human oral rinse samples are variably affected by the cell lysis methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Mohsen; Nair, Raj G; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Zhang, Li; Zulfiker, Abu Hasanat Md; Ahmetagic, Adnan; Good, David; Wei, Ming Q

    2016-03-01

    Recent culture-independent studies have enabled detailed mapping of human microbiome that has not been hitherto achievable by culture-based methods. DNA extraction is a key element of bacterial culture-independent studies that critically impacts on the outcome of the detected microbial profile. Despite the variations in DNA extraction methods described in the literature, no standardized technique is available for the purpose of microbiome profiling. Hence, standardization of DNA extraction methods is urgently needed to yield comparable data from different studies. We examined the effect of eight different cell lysis protocols on the yield and quality of the extracted DNA from oral rinse samples. These samples were exposed to cell lysis techniques based on enzymatic, mechanical, and a combination of enzymatic-mechanical methods. The outcome measures evaluated were total bacterial population, Firmicutes levels and human DNA contamination (in terms of surrogate GAPDH levels). We noted that all three parameters were significantly affected by the method of cell lysis employed. Although the highest yield of gDNA was obtained using lysozyme-achromopeptidase method, the lysozyme-zirconium beads method yielded the peak quantity of total bacterial DNA and Firmicutes with a lower degree of GAPDH contamination compared with the other methods. Taken together our data clearly points to an urgent need for a consensus, standardized DNA extraction technique to evaluate the oral microbiome using oral rinse samples. Further, if Firmicutes levels are the focus of investigation in oral rinse microbiome analyses then the lysozyme-zirconium bead method would be the method of choice in preference to others. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A High-Efficiency Cellular Extraction System for Biological Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabaria, Avantika; Cifani, Paolo; Reed, Casie; Steen, Hanno; Kentsis, Alex

    2015-08-07

    Recent developments in quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry have led to significant improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of the biochemical analyses of cellular reactions, protein-protein interactions, and small-molecule-drug discovery. These approaches depend on cellular proteome extraction that preserves native protein activities. Here, we systematically analyzed mechanical methods of cell lysis and physical protein extraction to identify those that maximize the extraction of cellular proteins while minimizing their denaturation. Cells were mechanically disrupted using Potter-Elvehjem homogenization, probe- or adaptive-focused acoustic sonication, and were in the presence of various detergents, including polyoxyethylene ethers and esters, glycosides, and zwitterions. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, biochemical assays, and mass spectrometry proteomics, we identified the combination of adaptive focused acoustic (AFA) sonication in the presence of a binary poloxamer-based mixture of octyl-β-glucoside and Pluronic F-127 to maximize the depth and yield of the proteome extraction while maintaining native protein activity. This binary poloxamer extraction system allowed for native proteome extraction comparable in coverage to the proteomes extracted using denaturing SDS or guanidine-containing buffers, including the efficient extraction of all major cellular organelles. This high-efficiency cellular extraction system should prove useful for a variety of cell biochemical studies, including structural and functional proteomics.

  14. [Cellular immunity in human periapical granuloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrié, B; Grégoire, G

    1991-03-01

    Numerous authors have produced different types of immunoglobulins in analyses of the human periapical granuloma. The present study examines the cellular immunity of the human periapical granuloma, and in particular the distribution of the lymphocyte sub-populations and the macrophage population. The technique used was that of cell surface marking, using monoclonal antibodies on frozen sections. The results reveal equal proportions of inductor T lymphocytes and suppressor T lymphocytes (whereas healthy tissue shows a ratio of 2/1), which explains the chronic nature of the lesion as far as the immune reaction is concerned. The presence of numerous macrophage cells shows that there are important local immune reactions.

  15. Direct Cellular Lysis/Protein Extraction Protocol for Soil Metaproteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Jansson, Janet [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Chavarria, Krystle L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Tom, Lauren M [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Brodie, Eoin L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel direct protocol for deep proteome characterization of microorganisms in soil. The method employs thermally assisted detergent-based cellular lysis (SDS) of soil samples, followed by TCA precipitation for proteome extraction/cleanup prior to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric characterization. This approach was developed and optimized using different soils inoculated with genome-sequenced bacteria (Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida or Gram-positive Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus). Direct soil protein extraction was compared to protein extraction from cells isolated from the soil matrix prior to lysis (indirect method). Each approach resulted in identification of greater than 500 unique proteins, with a wide range in molecular mass and functional categories. To our knowledge, this SDS-TCA approach enables the deepest proteome characterizations of microbes in soil to date, without significant biases in protein size, localization, or functional category compared to pure cultures. This protocol should provide a powerful tool for ecological studies of soil microbial communities.

  16. Direct cellular lysis/protein extraction protocol for soil metaproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourey, Karuna; Jansson, Janet; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Shah, Manesh; Chavarria, Krystle L; Tom, Lauren M; Brodie, Eoin L; Hettich, Robert L

    2010-12-03

    We present a novel direct protocol for deep proteome characterization of microorganisms in soil. The method employs thermally assisted detergent-based cellular lysis (SDS) of soil samples, followed by TCA precipitation for proteome extraction/cleanup prior to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric characterization. This approach was developed and optimized using different soils inoculated with genome-sequenced bacteria (Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida or Gram-positive Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus). Direct soil protein extraction was compared to protein extraction from cells isolated from the soil matrix prior to lysis (indirect method). Each approach resulted in identification of greater than 500 unique proteins, with a wide range in molecular mass and functional categories. To our knowledge, this SDS-TCA approach enables the deepest proteome characterizations of microbes in soil to date, without significant biases in protein size, localization, or functional category compared to pure cultures. This protocol should provide a powerful tool for ecological studies of soil microbial communities.

  17. Emblica officinalis extract downregulates pro-angiogenic molecules via upregulation of cellular and exosomal miR-375 in human ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Alok; Powers, Benjamin; De, Archana; Zhou, Jianping; Sharma, Siddarth; Van Veldhuizen, Peter; Bansal, Ajay; Sharma, Ramratan; Sharma, Mukut

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is highly resistant to current treatment strategies based on a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We have recently demonstrated the anti-neoplastic effect of Amla extract (Emblica officinalis, AE) on OC cells in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesized that AE attenuates growth of OC through microRNA (miR)-regulated mechanism(s). The inhibitory effect of AE on proliferation, migration and invasiveness (P≤0.001) of SKOV3 cells and >90% attenuation of tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model suggested multiple targets. RT-qPCR analysis of microRNAs associated with OC showed a >2,000-fold increase in the expression of miR-375 in AE-treated SKOV3 cells that was blocked by an exogenous miR-375 inhibitor (P≤0.001). AE also decreased the gene and protein expression of IGF1R, a target of miR-375 (P≤0.001), and SNAIL1 (P≤0.002), an EMT-associated transcription factor that represses E-cadherin expression (P≤0.003). AE increased E-cadherin expression (P≤0.001). Treatment of SKOV3 cells with AE resulted in increased miR-375 in exosomes in the medium (P≤0.01). Finally, AE significantly decreased the expression of IGF1R and SNAIL1 proteins during attenuation of SKOV3-derived xenograft tumor. Together, these results show that AE modulates cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment via activation of miR-375 and by targeting IGF1R and SNAIL1 in OC cells. PMID:27129171

  18. Extra cellular matrix features in human meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnani, S; Castaldo, C; Di Meglio, F; Sciorio, S; Giordano-Lanza, G

    2000-01-01

    We collected human fetal and adult normal meninges to relate the age of the tissue with the presence of collagenous and non-collagenous components of Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM). Immunohistochemistry led us to observe some differences in the amount and in the distribution of these proteins between the two sets of specimens. In particular, laminin and tenascin seem to be expressed more intensely in fetal meninges when compared to adult ones. In order to investigate whether the morphofunctional characteristics of fetal meninges may be represented in pathological conditions we also studied meningeal specimens from human meningiomas. Our attention was particularly focused on the expression of those non-collagenous proteins involved in nervous cell migration and neuronal morphogenesis as laminin and tenascin, which were present in lesser amount in normal adult specimens. Microscopical evidences led us to hipothesize that these proteins which are synthesized in a good amount during the fetal development of meninges can be newly produced in tumors. On the contrary, the role of tenascin and laminin in adult meninges is probably only interesting for their biophysical characteristics.

  19. Text Extraction and Enhancement of Binary Images Using Cellular Automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Sahoo; Tapas Kumar; B.L. Rains; C.M. Bhatia

    2009-01-01

    Text characters embedded in images represent a rich source of information for content-based indexing and retrieval applications. However, these text characters are difficult to be detected and recognized due to their various sizes, grayscale values, and complex backgrounds. Existing methods cannot handle well those texts with different contrast or embedded in a complex image background. In this paper, a set of sequential algorithms for text extraction and enhancement of image using cellular automata are proposed. The image enhancement includes gray level, contrast manipulation, edge detection, and filtering. First, it applies edge detection and uses a threshold to filter out for low-contrast text and simplify complex background of high-contrast text from binary image. The proposed algorithm is simple and easy to use and requires only a sample texture binary image as an input. It generates textures with perceived quality, better than those proposed by earlier published techniques. The performance of our method is demonstrated by presenting experimental results for a set of text based binary images. The quality of thresholding is assessed using the precision and recall analysis of the resultant text in the binary image.

  20. Transcription of human respiratory syncytial virus genome RNA in vitro: requirement of cellular factor(s).

    OpenAIRE

    Barik, S

    1992-01-01

    Extracts made from human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected Hep-2 cells synthesized mRNAs encoded by all known viral genes. In contrast, RSV ribonucleoproteins purified from infected cells failed to transcribe in vitro; transcription was restored by addition of a cytoplasmic extract of uninfected Hep-2 cells, demonstrating that a cellular factor(s) has a role in RSV gene expression. Quantitation of the individual gene mRNAs transcribed in vitro revealed polarity of transcription of th...

  1. A cellular modelsystem of differentiated human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Kristensen, S R; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to select an effective and stable protocol for the differentiation of human satellite cells (Sc) and to identify the optimal time period for the experimental use of differentiated human Sc-cultures. In order to identify the differentiation conditions which give a good su...

  2. Piracy on the molecular level: human herpesviruses manipulate cellular chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Tanner, Anne; Stutz, Eric W; Poole, Brian D; Berges, Bradford K

    2016-03-01

    Cellular chemotaxis is important to tissue homeostasis and proper development. Human herpesvirus species influence cellular chemotaxis by regulating cellular chemokines and chemokine receptors. Herpesviruses also express various viral chemokines and chemokine receptors during infection. These changes to chemokine concentrations and receptor availability assist in the pathogenesis of herpesviruses and contribute to a variety of diseases and malignancies. By interfering with the positioning of host cells during herpesvirus infection, viral spread is assisted, latency can be established and the immune system is prevented from eradicating viral infection.

  3. Analysis of Human Mobility Based on Cellular Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifiansyah, F.; Saptawati, G. A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays not only adult but even teenager and children have then own mobile phones. This phenomena indicates that the mobile phone becomes an important part of everyday’s life. Based on these indication, the amount of cellular data also increased rapidly. Cellular data defined as the data that records communication among mobile phone users. Cellular data is easy to obtain because the telecommunications company had made a record of the data for the billing system of the company. Billing data keeps a log of the users cellular data usage each time. We can obtained information from the data about communication between users. Through data visualization process, an interesting pattern can be seen in the raw cellular data, so that users can obtain prior knowledge to perform data analysis. Cellular data processing can be done using data mining to find out human mobility patterns and on the existing data. In this paper, we use frequent pattern mining and finding association rules to observe the relation between attributes in cellular data and then visualize them. We used weka tools for finding the rules in stage of data mining. Generally, the utilization of cellular data can provide supporting information for the decision making process and become a data support to provide solutions and information needed by the decision makers.

  4. Cellular receptors for human enterovirus species A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorihiro eNishimura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Human enterovirus species A (HEV-A is one of the four species of HEV in the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae. Among HEV-A, coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 and enterovirus 71 (EV71 are the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. Some other types of HEV-A are commonly associated with herpangina. Although HFMD and herpangina due to HEV-A are common febrile diseases among infants and children, EV71 can cause various neurological diseases, such as aseptic meningitis and fatal encephalitis.Recently, two human transmembrane proteins, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 and scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2, were identified as functional receptors for EV71 and CVA16. In in vitro infection experiments using the prototype HEV-A strains, PSGL-1 and SCARB2 could be responsible for the specific receptors for EV71 and CVA16. However, the involvement of both receptors in the in vitro and in vivo infections of clinical isolates of HEV-A has not been clarified yet. To elucidate a diverse array of the clinical outcome of HEV-A-associated diseases, the identification and characterization of HEV-A receptors may provide useful information in understanding the HEV-A pathogenesis at a molecular level.

  5. Extracts from two ubiquitous Mediterranean plants ameliorate cellular and animal models of neurodegenerative proteinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briffa, Michelle; Ghio, Stephanie; Neuner, Johanna; Gauci, Alison J; Cacciottolo, Rebecca; Marchal, Christelle; Caruana, Mario; Cullin, Christophe; Vassallo, Neville; Cauchi, Ruben J

    2017-01-18

    A signature feature of age-related neurodegenerative proteinopathies is the misfolding and aggregation of proteins, typically amyloid-β (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and α-synuclein (α-syn) in Parkinson's disease (PD), into soluble oligomeric structures that are highly neurotoxic. Cellular and animal models that faithfully replicate the hallmark features of these disorders are being increasing exploited to identify disease-modifying compounds. Natural compounds have been identified as a useful source of bioactive molecules with promising neuroprotective capabilities. In the present report, we investigated whether extracts derived from two ubiquitous Mediterranean plants namely, the prickly pear Opuntia ficus-indica (EOFI) and the brown alga Padina pavonica (EPP) alleviate neurodegenerative phenotypes in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fly (Drosophila melanogaster) models of AD and PD. Pre-treatment with EPP or EOFI in the culture medium significantly improved the viability of yeast expressing the Arctic Aβ42 (E22G) mutant. Supplementing food with EOFI or EPP dramatically ameliorated lifespan and behavioural signs of flies with brain-specific expression of wild-type Aβ42 (model of late-onset AD) or the Arctic Aβ42 variant (model of early-onset AD). Additionally, we show that either extract prolonged the survival of a PD fly model based on transgenic expression of the human α-syn A53T mutant. Taken together, our findings suggest that the plant-derived extracts interfere with shared mechanisms of neurodegeneration in AD and PD. This notion is strengthened by evidence demonstrating that EOFI and to a greater extent EPP, while strongly inhibiting the fibrillogenesis of both Aβ42 and α-syn, accumulate remodelled oligomeric aggregates that are less effective at disrupting lipid membrane integrity. Our work therefore opens new avenues for developing therapeutic applications of these natural plant extracts in the treatment of amyloidogenic

  6. Hawthorn extract inhibits human isolated neutrophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalli, Ernesto; Milara, Javier; Cortijo, Julio; Morcillo, Esteban J; Cosín-Sales, Juan; Sotillo, José Francisco

    2008-06-01

    Hawthorn extract is a popular herbal medicine given as adjunctive treatment for chronic heart failure. In contrast to the cardiac properties of hawthorn extract, its anti-inflammatory effect has been scarcely investigated. This study examines the effects of a dry extract of leaves and flowers of Crataegus laevigata on various functional outputs of human neutrophils in vitro. Incubation of human neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood of healthy donors with C. laevigata extract (0.75-250 microg/ml) inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP)-induced superoxide anion generation, elastase release and chemotactic migration with potency values of 43.6, 21.9, and 31.6 microg/ml, respectively. By contrast, serum-opsonized zymosan-induced phagocytosis was unaltered by plant extract. C. laevigata extract (125 microg/ml) reduced FMLP-induced leukotriene B(4) production and lipopolysaccharide-induced generation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-8. Extract inhibited FMLP-induced intracellular calcium signal with potency of 17.4 microg/ml. Extract also markedly inhibited the extracellular calcium entry into calcium-depleted neutrophils, and the thapsigargin-induced intracellular calcium response. In conclusion, C. laevigata extract inhibited various functional outputs of activated human neutrophils which may be relevant to the pathophysiology of cardiac failure.

  7. Nuclear microanalysis of the human amnion: A study of ionic cellular exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafindrabe, L.; Moretto, Ph.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.; Bara, M.; Guiet-Bara, A.

    1995-09-01

    The epithelial cells of the human amniotic membrane have been extensively studied by electrophysiologists with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of transmembrane ionic transfers. In order to provide complementary information about this model, nuclear microanalysis was performed using the CENBG ion microbeam. Quantitative mapping of the human amnion was carried out and the distributions of most mono- and divalent ions involved in cellular pathways (Na +, Mg 2+, Cl -, Ca 2+) were determined. The ionic cellular content was also compared, before and after incubation in a Hanks' physiological fluid and the resultant ions transfers were determined. The aim of this paper is to expose the advances of this experimental model, more particularly after the development of simulation programs which improved the accuracy of PIXE analysis in the measurement of low energy X-rays emitters. Statistically significant results can now be extracted and can be explained taking into account the results of previous electrophysiological experiments.

  8. Cellular reprogramming for understanding and treating human disease.

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    Riya Rajan Kanherkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our understanding of cells so radical that it has rewritten the rules of biology. The study of cellular reprogramming has gone from little more than a hypothesis, to applied bioengineering, with the creation of a variety of important cell types. By way of metaphor, we can compare the discovery of reprogramming with the archaeological discovery of the Rosetta stone. This stone slab made possible the initial decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics because it allowed us to see this language in a way that was previously impossible. We propose that cellular reprogramming will have an equally profound impact on understanding and curing human disease, because it allows us to perceive and study molecular biological processes such as differentiation, epigenetics, and chromatin in ways that were likewise previously impossible. Stem cells could be called cellular Rosetta stones because they allow also us to perceive the connections between development, disease, cancer, aging, and regeneration in novel ways. Here we present a comprehensive historical review of stem cells and cellular reprogramming, and illustrate the developing synergy between many previously unconnected fields. We show how stem cells can be used to create in vitro models of human disease and provide examples of how reprogramming is being used to study and treat such diverse diseases as cancer, aging and accelerated aging syndromes, infectious diseases such as AIDS, and epigenetic diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome. While the technology of reprogramming is being developed and refined there have also been significant ongoing developments in other complementary technologies such as gene editing, progenitor cell production, and tissue engineering. These technologies are the foundations of what is becoming a fully-functional field of regenerative medicine and are converging to a point that will allow us to treat almost any

  9. Aloe vera extract activity on human corneal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Anna; Paduch, Roman

    2012-02-01

    Ocular diseases are currently an important problem in modern societies. Patients suffer from various ophthalmologic ailments namely, conjunctivitis, dry eye, dacryocystitis or degenerative diseases. Therefore, there is a need to introduce new treatment methods, including medicinal plants usage. Aloe vera [Aloe barbadensis Miller (Liliaceae)] possesses wound-healing properties and shows immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory or antioxidant activities. NR uptake, MTT, DPPH• reduction, Griess reaction, ELISA and rhodamine-phalloidin staining were used to test toxicity, antiproliferative activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine level, and distribution of F-actin in cells, respectively. The present study analyzes the effect of Aloe vera extracts obtained with different solvents on in vitro culture of human 10.014 pRSV-T corneal cells. We found no toxicity of ethanol, ethyl acetate and heptane extracts of Aloe vera on human corneal cells. No ROS reducing activity by heptane extract and trace action by ethanol (only at high concentration 125 µg/ml) extract of Aloe vera was observed. Only ethyl acetate extract expressed distinct free radical scavenging effect. Plant extracts decreased NO production by human corneal cells as compared to untreated controls. The cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10) production decreased after the addition of Aloe vera extracts to the culture media. Aloe vera contains multiple pharmacologically active substances which are capable of modulating cellular phenotypes and functions. Aloe vera ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts may be used in eye drops to treat inflammations and other ailments of external parts of the eye such as the cornea.

  10. Vision preservation during retinal inflammation by anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract: cellular and molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Seiji; Takahashi, Noriko; Sasaki, Mariko; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    Anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract, a plant-derived antioxidant, has been utilized as a popular supplement for ocular health worldwide. However, it is unclear whether this extract has any biological effect on visual function, and the mechanism for such an effect is completely unknown. In this study, we generated a mouse model of endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) that shows retinal inflammation, as well as uveitis, by injecting lipopolysaccharide. We pretreated the mice with anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract and analyzed the effect on the retina. Anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract prevented the impairment of photoreceptor cell function, as measured by electroretinogram. At the cellular level, we found that the EIU-associated rhodopsin decreased and the shortening of outer segments in photoreceptor cells were suppressed in the bilberry-extract-treated animals. Moreover, the extract prevented both STAT3 activation, which induces inflammation-related rhodopsin decrease, and the increase in interleukin-6 expression, which activates STAT3. In addition to its anti-inflammatory effect, the anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract ameliorated the intracellular elevation of reactive oxygen species and activated NF-κB, a redox-sensitive transcription factor, in the inflamed retina. Our findings indicate that anthocyanin-rich bilberry extract has a protective effect on visual function during retinal inflammation.

  11. Human more complex than mouse at cellular level.

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    Alexander E Vinogradov

    Full Text Available The family of transcription factors with the C2H2 zinc finger domain is expanding in the evolution of vertebrates, reaching its highest numbers in the mammals. The question arises: whether an increased amount of these transcription factors is related to embryogenesis, nervous system, pathology or more of them are expressed in individual cells? Among mammals, the primates have a more complex anatomical structure than the rodents (e.g., brain. In this work, I show that a greater number of C2H2-ZF genes are expressed in the human cells than in the mouse cells. The effect is especially pronounced for C2H2-ZF genes accompanied with the KRAB domain. The relative difference between the numbers of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes in the human and mouse cellular transcriptomes even exceeds their difference in the genomes (i.e. a greater subset of existing in the genome genes is expressed in the human cellular transcriptomes compared to the mouse transcriptomes. The evolutionary turnover of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes acts in the direction of the revealed phenomenon, i.e. gene duplication and loss enhances the difference in the relative number of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes between human and mouse cellular transcriptomes. A higher amount of these genes is expressed in the brain and embryonic cells (compared with other tissues, whereas a lower amount--in the cancer cells. It is specifically the C2H2-ZF transcription factors whose repertoire is poorer in the cancer and richer in the brain (other transcription factors taken together do not show this trend. These facts suggest that increase of anatomical complexity is accompanied by a more complex intracellular regulation involving these transcription factors. Malignization is associated with simplification of this regulation. These results agree with the known fact that human cells are more resistant to oncogenic transformation than mouse cells. The list of C2H2-ZF genes whose suppression might be involved in malignization is provided.

  12. Dynamics of the cellular metabolome during human cytomegalovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Munger

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral replication requires energy and macromolecular precursors derived from the metabolic network of the host cell. Despite this reliance, the effect of viral infection on host cell metabolic composition remains poorly understood. Here we applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to measure the levels of 63 different intracellular metabolites at multiple times after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection of human fibroblasts. Parallel microarray analysis provided complementary data on transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways. As the infection progressed, the levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis markedly increased. HCMV-induced transcriptional upregulation of specific glycolytic and citric acid cycle enzymes mirrored the increases in metabolite levels. The peak levels of numerous metabolites during infection far exceeded those observed during normal fibroblast growth or quiescence, demonstrating that HCMV markedly disrupts cellular metabolic homeostasis and institutes its own specific metabolic program.

  13. Concise review: Human cell engineering: cellular reprogramming and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Prashant; Cheng, Linzhao

    2012-01-01

    Cell engineering is defined here as the collective ability to both reset and edit the genome of a mammalian cell. Until recently, this had been extremely challenging to achieve as nontransformed human cells are significantly refractory to both these processes. The recent success in reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells that are self-renewable in culture, coupled with our increasing ability to effect precise and predesigned genomic editing, now readily permits cellular changes at both the genetic and epigenetic levels. These dual capabilities also make possible the generation of genetically matched, disease-free stem cells from patients for regenerative medicine. The objective of this review is to summarize the key enabling developments on these two rapidly evolving research fronts in human cell engineering, highlight unresolved issues, and outline potential future research directions.

  14. Defining the cellular precursors to human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Patricia J.; Arendt, Lisa M.; Skibinski, Adam; Logvinenko, Tanya; Klebba, Ina; Dong, Shumin; Smith, Avi E.; Prat, Aleix; Perou, Charles M.; Gilmore, Hannah; Schnitt, Stuart; Naber, Stephen P.; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Human breast cancers are broadly classified based on their gene-expression profiles into luminal- and basal-type tumors. These two major tumor subtypes express markers corresponding to the major differentiation states of epithelial cells in the breast: luminal (EpCAM+) and basal/myoepithelial (CD10+). However, there are also rare types of breast cancers, such as metaplastic carcinomas, where tumor cells exhibit features of alternate cell types that no longer resemble breast epithelium. Until now, it has been difficult to identify the cell type(s) in the human breast that gives rise to these various forms of breast cancer. Here we report that transformation of EpCAM+ epithelial cells results in the formation of common forms of human breast cancer, including estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative tumors with luminal and basal-like characteristics, respectively, whereas transformation of CD10+ cells results in the development of rare metaplastic tumors reminiscent of the claudin-low subtype. We also demonstrate the existence of CD10+ breast cells with metaplastic traits that can give rise to skin and epidermal tissues. Furthermore, we show that the development of metaplastic breast cancer is attributable, in part, to the transformation of these metaplastic breast epithelial cells. These findings identify normal cellular precursors to human breast cancers and reveal the existence of a population of cells with epidermal progenitor activity within adult human breast tissues. PMID:21940501

  15. Cellular Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Coffee Extracts with Different Roasting Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soohan; Kim, Min Hyung; Park, Jae Hee; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Ko, Kwang Suk

    2017-06-01

    During roasting, major changes occur in the composition and physiological effects of coffee beans. In this study, in vitro antioxidant effects and anti-inflammatory effects of Coffea arabica green coffee extracts were investigated at different roasting levels corresponding to Light, Medium, City, and French roast. Total caffeine did not show huge difference according to roasting level, but total chlorogenic acid contents were higher in light roasted coffee extract than other roasted groups. In addition, light roasted coffee extract had the highest antioxidant activity in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. To determine the in vitro antioxidant property, coffee extracts were used to treat AML-12 cells. Intracellular glutathione (GSH) concentration and mRNA expression levels of genes related to GSH synthesis were negatively related to roasting levels. The anti-inflammatory effects of coffee extracts were investigated in lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. The cellular antioxidant activity of coffee extracts exhibited similar patterns as the AML-12 cells. The expression of mRNA for tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 was decreased in cells treated with the coffee extracts and the expression decreased with increasing roasting levels. These data suggest that coffee has physiological antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and these effects are negatively correlated with roasting levels in the cell models.

  16. Immunostimulating effect of aqueous extract of Amphypterygium adstringens on immune cellular response in immunosuppressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-León, Adriana; Barajas-Martinez, Héctor; Flores-Torales, Edgardo; Orozco-Barocio, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Amphypterygium adstringens is a Mexican tree known as cuachalalate whose bark is habitually used for the treatment of fresh wounds, gastric ulcers, gastrointestinal cancer and various inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunostimulant effect of the aqueous extract of A. adstringens on immune cellular response in immunosuppressed mice. An aqueous extract from the bark of cuachalalate was administered into BALB/c mice for 10 days. We assessed their immunostimmulant activity on cellular immune response by Delayed Type Hypersensitivity Response (DHT) to dinitrofluorobencene (DNFB) and by MTT assay. L5178Y lymphoma was used as immunossuppression model. An increase in DHT was observed after treatment with 10 and 100 mg/kg of the aqueous extract from A. adstringens oral treatment in lymphoma bearing mice. Splenocyte proliferation rate was significantly increased (2.5 time) in immunosuppresed mice treated with 10 mg/kg oral treatment compared with group that received vehicle only. The present study showed for the first time the aqueous extract from A. adstringens as a positive immunostimulant agent in lymphoma bearing mice and we demonstrated evidence to support the traditionally use of cuachalalate in conditions in which the immune system is depressed.

  17. Cannabinoids inhibit cellular respiration of human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Donna A; Al-Hammadi, Suleiman; Balhaj, Ghazala; Brown, Oliver M; Penefsky, Harvey S; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2010-01-01

    The primary cannabinoids, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) and Delta(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(8)-THC) are known to disturb the mitochondrial function and possess antitumor activities. These observations prompted us to investigate their effects on the mitochondrial O(2) consumption in human oral cancer cells (Tu183). This epithelial cell line overexpresses bcl-2 and is highly resistant to anticancer drugs. A phosphorescence analyzer that measures the time-dependence of O(2) concentration in cellular or mitochondrial suspensions was used for this purpose. A rapid decline in the rate of respiration was observed when Delta(9)-THC or Delta(8)-THC was added to the cells. The inhibition was concentration-dependent, and Delta(9)-THC was the more potent of the two compounds. Anandamide (an endocannabinoid) was ineffective; suggesting the effects of Delta(9)-THC and Delta(8)-THC were not mediated by the cannabinoidreceptors. Inhibition of O(2) consumption by cyanide confirmed the oxidations occurred in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Delta(9)-THC inhibited the respiration of isolated mitochondria from beef heart. These results show the cannabinoids are potent inhibitors of Tu183 cellular respiration and are toxic to this highly malignant tumor.

  18. Acrylamide inhibits cellular differentiation of human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jong-Hang; Chou, Chin-Cheng

    2015-08-01

    This study explores human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) and human glioblastoma (U-1240 MG) cellular differentiation changes under exposure to acrylamide (ACR). Differentiation of SH-SY5Y and U-1240 MG cells were induced by retinoic acid (RA) and butyric acid (BA), respectively. Morphological observations and MTT assay showed that the induced cellular differentiation and cell proliferation were inhibited by ACR in a time- and dose-dependent manner. ACR co-treatment with RA attenuated SH-SY5Y expressions of neurofilament protein-L (NF-L), microtubule-associated protein 1b (MAP1b; 1.2 to 0.7, p < 0.001), MAP2c (2.2 to 0.8, p < 0.05), and Janus kinase1 (JAK1; 1.9 to 0.6, p < 0.001), while ACR co-treatment with BA attenuated U-1240 MG expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), MAP1b (1.2 to 0.6, p < 0.001), MAP2c (1.5 to 0.7, p < 0.01), and JAK1 (2.1 to 0.5, p < 0.001), respectively. ACR also decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) in U-1240 MG cells, while caffeine reversed this suppression of ERK and JNK phosphorylation caused by ACR treatment. These results showed that RA-induced neurogenesis of SH-SY5Y and BA-induced astrogliogenesis of U-1240 MG cells were attenuated by ACR and were associated with down-regulation of MAPs expression and JAK-STAT signaling.

  19. Comprehensive cellular-resolution atlas of the adult human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Song-Lin; Royall, Joshua J; Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A C; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H Ronald; Hohmann, John G; Jones, Allan R; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Hof, Patrick R; Fischl, Bruce; Lein, Ed S

    2016-11-01

    Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole-brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high-resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large-format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto- and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127-3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Probing Regenerative Potential of Moringa oleifera Aqueous Extracts Using In vitro Cellular Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Evangeline E.; Pulwale, Anubha V.; Patil, Gauri A.; Moghe, Alpana S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Molecules stimulating regeneration and proliferation of cells are of significance in combating ailments caused due to tissue injury, inflammation, and degenerative disorders. Moringa oleifera is one of the most valued food plants having the profile of important nutrients and impressive range of medicinal uses. Objective: To evaluate the potential of M. oleifera aqueous leaf and flower extracts to promote the proliferation of cells and explore their effect on cancer cell lines for assessment of safety. Materials and Methods: Aqueous leaf and flower extracts of M. oleifera were investigated for effect on rat-derived primary fibroblast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cancer cell lines using cell proliferation assay. They were also tested and compared for wound healing, angiogenesis, and hepatoprotective effect using in vitro assays. Results: Statistically significant increase in the proliferation of primary rat fibroblast, MSCs, and angiogenesis was observed after treatment with aqueous flower extract. The aqueous leaf extract determined a comparatively moderate increment in the proliferation of MSCs and angiogenesis. It however showed prominent cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines and a significant hepatoprotective effect. Conclusion: A very clear difference in response of the two extracts to different types of cells was detected in this study. The aqueous flower extract exhibited a higher potential to stimulate cell proliferation while not exerting the same effect on cancer cell lines. The leaf extract on the other hand, had a prominent antitumor and hepatoptotective effects. SUMMARY Moringa oleifera flower extract showed significant ability to promote proliferation of rat fibroblast and mesenchymal stem cells. The extract also had prominent angiogenic and hepatoprotective effects.The extract did not influence proliferation of cancer cell lines indicating its safety for human consumption and use in pharmaceuticals.The Moringa oleifera leaf extract

  1. Probing Regenerative Potential of Moringa oleifera Aqueous Extracts Using In vitro Cellular Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Evangeline E; Pulwale, Anubha V; Patil, Gauri A; Moghe, Alpana S

    2016-01-01

    Molecules stimulating regeneration and proliferation of cells are of significance in combating ailments caused due to tissue injury, inflammation, and degenerative disorders. Moringa oleifera is one of the most valued food plants having the profile of important nutrients and impressive range of medicinal uses. To evaluate the potential of M. oleifera aqueous leaf and flower extracts to promote the proliferation of cells and explore their effect on cancer cell lines for assessment of safety. Aqueous leaf and flower extracts of M. oleifera were investigated for effect on rat-derived primary fibroblast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cancer cell lines using cell proliferation assay. They were also tested and compared for wound healing, angiogenesis, and hepatoprotective effect using in vitro assays. Statistically significant increase in the proliferation of primary rat fibroblast, MSCs, and angiogenesis was observed after treatment with aqueous flower extract. The aqueous leaf extract determined a comparatively moderate increment in the proliferation of MSCs and angiogenesis. It however showed prominent cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines and a significant hepatoprotective effect. A very clear difference in response of the two extracts to different types of cells was detected in this study. The aqueous flower extract exhibited a higher potential to stimulate cell proliferation while not exerting the same effect on cancer cell lines. The leaf extract on the other hand, had a prominent antitumor and hepatoptotective effects. Moringa oleifera flower extract showed significant ability to promote proliferation of rat fibroblast and mesenchymal stem cells. The extract also had prominent angiogenic and hepatoprotective effects.The extract did not influence proliferation of cancer cell lines indicating its safety for human consumption and use in pharmaceuticals.The Moringa oleifera leaf extract showed relatively less potential to stimulate cells but had prominent cytotoxic

  2. Commonly consumed and specialty dietary mushrooms reduce cellular proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Keith R; Brophy, Sara K

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, over one million women will be newly diagnosed with breast cancer in the next year. Moreover, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the USA. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that consumption of dietary mushrooms can protect against breast cancer. In this study, we tested and compared the ability of five commonly consumed or specialty mushrooms to modulate cell number balance in the cancer process using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Hot water extracts (80°C for 2 h) of maitake (MT, Grifola frondosa), crimini (CRIM, Agaricus bisporus), portabella (PORT, Agaricus bisporus), oyster (OYS, Pleurotus ostreatus) and white button (WB, Agaricus bisporus) mushrooms or water alone (5% v/v) were incubated for 24 h with MCF-7 cells. Cellular proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly (P mushrooms, with MT and OYS being the most effective. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction, an often used mitochondrion-dependent marker of proliferation, was unchanged although decreased (P > 0.05) by 15% with OYS extract. Lactate dehydrogenase release, as a marker of necrosis, was significantly increased after incubation with MT but not with other test mushrooms. Furthermore, MT extract significantly increased apoptosis, or programmed cell death, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl end labeling method, whereas other test mushrooms displayed trends of ∼15%. The total numbers of cells per flask, determined by hemacytometry, were not different from control cultures. Overall, all test mushrooms significantly suppressed cellular proliferation, with MT further significantly inducing apoptosis and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. This suggests that both common and specialty mushrooms may be chemoprotective against breast cancer.

  3. Distribution of cellular HSV-1 receptor expression in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathe, Richard; Haas, Juergen G

    2016-12-15

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus linked to a range of acute and chronic neurological disorders affecting distinct regions of the brain. Unusually, HSV-1 entry into cells requires the interaction of viral proteins glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) with distinct cellular receptor proteins. Several different gD and gB receptors have been identified, including TNFRSF14/HVEM and PVRL1/nectin 1 as gD receptors and PILRA, MAG, and MYH9 as gB receptors. We investigated the expression of these receptor molecules in different areas of the adult and developing human brain using online transcriptome databases. Whereas all HSV-1 receptors showed distinct expression patterns in different brain areas, the Allan Brain Atlas (ABA) reported increased expression of both gD and gB receptors in the hippocampus. Specifically, for PVRL1, TNFRFS14, and MYH9, the differential z scores for hippocampal expression, a measure of relative levels of increased expression, rose to 2.9, 2.9, and 2.5, respectively, comparable to the z score for the archetypical hippocampus-enriched mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2, z = 3.1). These data were confirmed at the Human Brain Transcriptome (HBT) database, but HBT data indicate that MAG expression is also enriched in hippocampus. The HBT database allowed the developmental pattern of expression to be investigated; we report that all HSV1 receptors markedly increase in expression levels between gestation and the postnatal/adult periods. These results suggest that differential receptor expression levels of several HSV-1 gD and gB receptors in the adult hippocampus are likely to underlie the susceptibility of this brain region to HSV-1 infection.

  4. Modification of an acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate disruption method for cellular protein extraction from neuropathogenic Clostridium botulinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) disruption method was used for the extraction of cellular proteins from neurotoxigenic Clostridium botulinum. The amount of protein extracted per gram of dry weight and the protein profile as revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was comparabl...

  5. Modeling and remodeling of human extraction sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombelli, Leonardo; Farina, Roberto; Marzola, Andrea; Bozzi, Leopoldo; Liljenberg, Birgitta; Lindhe, Jan

    2008-07-01

    The available studies on extraction wound repair in humans are affected by significant limitations and have failed to evaluate tissue alterations occurring in all compartments of the hard tissue defect. To monitor during a 6-month period the healing of human extraction sockets and include a semi-quantitative analysis of tissues and cell populations involved in various stages of the processes of modeling/remodeling. Twenty-seven biopsies, representative of the early (2-4 weeks, n=10), intermediate (6-8 weeks, n=6), and late phase (12-24 weeks, n=11) of healing, were collected and analysed. Granulation tissue that was present in comparatively large amounts in the early healing phase of socket healing, was in the interval between the early and intermediate observation phase replaced with provisional matrix and woven bone. The density of vascular structures and macrophages slowly decreased from 2 to 4 weeks over time. The presence of osteoblasts peaked at 6-8 weeks and remained almost stable thereafter; a small number of osteoclasts were present in a few specimens at each observation interval. The present findings demonstrated that great variability exists in man with respect to hard tissue formation within extraction sockets. Thus, whereas a provisional connective tissue consistently forms within the first weeks of healing, the interval during which mineralized bone is laid down is much less predictable.

  6. Dietary administration of scallion extract effectively inhibits colorectal tumor growth: cellular and molecular mechanisms in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanisamy Arulselvan

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Diet is known to play an important role in the etiology of colon cancer and dietary chemoprevention is receiving increasing attention for prevention and/or alternative treatment of colon cancers. Allium fistulosum L., commonly known as scallion, is popularly used as a spice or vegetable worldwide, and as a traditional medicine in Asian cultures for treating a variety of diseases. In this study we evaluated the possible beneficial effects of dietary scallion on chemoprevention of colon cancer using a mouse model of colon carcinoma (CT-26 cells subcutaneously inoculated into BALB/c mice. Tumor lysates were subjected to western blotting for analysis of key inflammatory markers, ELISA for analysis of cytokines, and immunohistochemistry for analysis of inflammatory markers. Metabolite profiles of scallion extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Scallion extracts, particularly hot-water extract, orally fed to mice at 50 mg (dry weight/kg body weight resulted in significant suppression of tumor growth and enhanced the survival rate of test mice. At the molecular level, scallion extracts inhibited the key inflammatory markers COX-2 and iNOS, and suppressed the expression of various cellular markers known to be involved in tumor apoptosis (apoptosis index, proliferation (cyclin D1 and c-Myc, angiogenesis (VEGF and HIF-1α, and tumor invasion (MMP-9 and ICAM-1 when compared with vehicle control-treated mice. Our findings may warrant further investigation of the use of common scallion as a chemopreventive dietary agent to lower the risk of colon cancer.

  7. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Erika; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Takita, Hiroko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Momose, Takehito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Murakami, Shusuke; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold were, respectively, approximately 2.5-fold and 1.4-fold greater than those of the control. Particularly, the infiltration of ED2-positive (M2) macrophages and blood vessels were prominent in the GO scaffold. Dog bone-formation tests showed that 1 µg/mL GO scaffold implantation enhanced bone formation. New bone formation following GO scaffold implantation was enhanced fivefold compared to that in control subjects. These results suggest that GO was biocompatible and had high bone-formation capability for the scaffold

  8. Network signatures of cellular immortalization in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

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    Shim, Sung-Mi; Jung, So-Young; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Mee-Hee; Kim, Jun-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Osong 363-951 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jae-Pil, E-mail: jaepiljeon@hanmail.net [Division of Brain Diseases, Center for Biomedical Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Osong 363-951 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We identified network signatures of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles. •More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCLs. •MicroRNA target genes in LCLs are involved in apoptosis and immune-related functions. •This approach is useful to find functional miRNA targets in specific cell conditions. -- Abstract: Human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) has been used as an in vitro cell model in genetic and pharmacogenomic studies, as well as a good model for studying gene expression regulatory machinery using integrated genomic analyses. In this study, we aimed to identify biological networks of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles of microRNAs and their target genes in LCLs. We first selected differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and microRNAs (DEmiRs) between early passage LCLs (eLCLs) and terminally differentiated late passage LCLs (tLCLs). The in silico and correlation analysis of these DEGs and DEmiRs revealed that 1098 DEG–DEmiR pairs were found to be positively (n = 591 pairs) or negatively (n = 507 pairs) correlated with each other. More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCL immortalizations. The target DEGs of DEmiRs were enriched for cellular functions associated with apoptosis, immune response, cell death, JAK–STAT cascade and lymphocyte activation while non-miRNA target DEGs were over-represented for basic cell metabolisms. The target DEGs correlated negatively with miR-548a-3p and miR-219-5p were significantly associated with protein kinase cascade, and the lymphocyte proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. In addition, the miR-106a and miR-424 clusters located in the X chromosome were enriched in DEmiR–mRNA pairs for LCL immortalization. In this study, the integrated transcriptomic analysis of LCLs could identify functional networks of biologically active microRNAs and their target genes involved in LCL immortalization.

  9. Effect of propolis on mitotic and cellular proliferation indices in human blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M.; Villaescusa, J. [Valencia Hospital Univ. la Fe, Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica (Spain); Barquinero, J. [Barcelona Univ. Autonom, Servicio de Dosimetria Biologica, Unidad de Antropologia, Dept. de Biologia Animal, Vegetal y Ecologia, barcelona (Spain); Barrios, L. [Barcelona Univ. Autonoma, Dept. de Biologia Celular y Fisiologia. Unidad de Biologia Celular (Spain); Verdu, G. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear (Spain); Perez, J. [Hospital la Fe, Seccion de Radiofisica, Servicio de Radioterapia, valencia (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The study of the frequency of chromosomal aberrations per cell is the tool used in Biological dosimetry studies. Using dose-effect calibration curve obtained in our laboratory, we can evaluate the radioprotector effect of the EEP (ethanolic extract of propolis) in cultures in vitro. Propolis is the generic name for resinous substance collected by honeybees. The results showed a reduction in chromosomal aberrations's frequency of up to 50 %. The following study consisted of analyzing human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to 2 Gy {gamma} rays, in presence and absence of EEP, the change in the frequency of chromosome aberrations was analysed with biological dosimetry. The protection against the formation of dicentric and ring was dose-dependent, but there seemed to be a maximum protection, i.e. a further increase in the concentration of EEP does not show additional protection. This work studies the effect of the EEP of the cellular cycle using the mitotic and cellular proliferation index, as an alternative for the screening cytostatic activity. The results indicate that the lymphocytes which were cultures in presence of EEP exhibited a significant and dependent-concentration decrease in mitotic index and proliferation kinetics. The possible mechanisms involved in the radioprotective influence of EEP are discussed. (authors)

  10. Redox regulation of human OGG1 activity in response to cellular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravard, Anne; Vacher, Monique; Gouget, Barbara; Coutant, Alexandre; de Boisferon, Florence Hillairet; Marsin, Stéphanie; Chevillard, Sylvie; Radicella, J Pablo

    2006-10-01

    8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common and mutagenic form of oxidized guanine in DNA, is eliminated mainly through base excision repair. In human cells its repair is initiated by human OGG1 (hOGG1), an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase. We investigated the effects of an acute cadmium exposure of human lymphoblastoid cells on the activity of hOGG1. We show that coinciding with alteration of the redox cellular status, the 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase activity of hOGG1 was nearly completely inhibited. However, the hOGG1 activity returned to normal levels once the redox cellular status was normalized. In vitro, the activity of purified hOGG1 was abolished by cadmium and could not be recovered by EDTA. In cells, however, the reversible inactivation of OGG1 activity by cadmium was strictly associated with reversible oxidation of the protein. Moreover, the 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase activity of purified OGG1 and that from crude extracts were modulated by cysteine-modifying agents. Oxidation of OGG1 by the thiol oxidant diamide led to inhibition of the activity and a protein migration pattern similar to that seen in cadmium-treated cells. These results suggest that cadmium inhibits hOGG1 activity mainly by indirect oxidation of critical cysteine residues and that excretion of the metal from the cells leads to normalization of the redox cell status and restoration of an active hOGG1. The results presented here unveil a novel redox-dependent mechanism for the regulation of OGG1 activity.

  11. The degradation of nucleotide triphosphates extracted under boiling ethanol conditions is prevented by the yeast cellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Andres; Siegel, David; Bonsing-Vedelaar, Silke; Permentier, Hjalmar; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Dekker, Frank; Bischoff, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Boiling ethanol extraction is a frequently used method for metabolomics studies of biological samples. However, the stability of several central carbon metabolites, including nucleotide triphosphates, and the influence of the cellular matrix on their degradation have not been addressed. To study how a complex cellular matrix extracted from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) may affect the degradation profiles of nucleotide triphosphates extracted under boiling ethanol conditions. We present a double-labelling LC-MS approach with a (13)C-labeled yeast cellular extract as complex surrogate matrix, and (13)C(15)N-labeled nucleotides as internal standards, to study the effect of the yeast matrix on the degradation of nucleotide triphosphates. While nucleotide triphosphates were degraded to the corresponding diphosphates in pure solutions, degradation was prevented in the presence of the yeast matrix under typical boiling ethanol extraction conditions. Extraction of biological samples under boiling ethanol extraction conditions that rapidly inactivate enzyme activity are suitable for labile central energy metabolites such as nucleotide triphosphates due to the stabilizing effect of the yeast matrix. The basis of this phenomenon requires further study.

  12. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Musunuru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  13. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musunuru, Kiran

    2013-07-01

    Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  14. Cellular trafficking and anticancer activity of Garcinia mangostana extract-encapsulated polymeric nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-In P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Porntip Pan-In,1,2 Supason Wanichwecharungruang,3,4 Justin Hanes,2,5 Anthony J Kim2,6,7 1Program in Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Nanotec-CU Center of Excellence on Food and Agriculture, Bangkok, Thailand; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Neurosurgery, and Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 6Department of Neurosurgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 7Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Garcinia mangostana Linn extract (GME is a natural product that has received considerable attention in cancer therapy, and has the potential to reduce side effects of chemotherapeutics and improve efficacy. We formulated GME-encapsulated ethyl cellulose (GME-EC and a polymer blend of ethyl cellulose and methyl cellulose (GME-EC/MC nanoparticles. We achieved high drug-loading and encapsulation efficiency using a solvent-displacement method with particle sizes around 250 nm. Cellular uptake and accumulation of GME was higher for GME-encapsulated nanoparticles compared to free GME. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis showed effective anticancer activity of GME-EC and GME-EC/MC nanoparticles in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. GME-EC/MC nanoparticles showed approximately twofold-higher anticancer activity compared to GME-EC nanoparticles, likely due to their enhanced bioavailability. GME-encapsulated nanoparticles primarily entered HeLa cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and trafficked through the endolysosomal pathway. As far as we know, this is the first report on the cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking mechanism of drug-loaded cellulose-based nanoparticles

  15. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida E

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Erika Nishida,1 Hirofumi Miyaji,1 Akihito Kato,1 Hiroko Takita,2 Toshihiko Iwanaga,3 Takehito Momose,1 Kosuke Ogawa,1 Shusuke Murakami,1 Tsutomu Sugaya,1 Masamitsu Kawanami11Department of Periodontology and Endodontology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Sapporo, Japan; 2Support Section for Education and Research, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Sapporo, Japan; 3Laboratory of Histology and Cytology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: Graphene oxide (GO consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1

  16. Effects of blue-green algae extracts on the proliferation of human adult stem cells in vitro: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shytle, Douglas R; Tan, Jun; Ehrhart, Jared; Smith, Adam J; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sanberg, Paul R; Anderson, Jerry; Bickford, Paula C

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells are known to have a reduced restorative capacity as we age and are more vulnerable to oxidative stress resulting in a reduced ability of the body to heal itself. We have previously reported that a proprietary nutraceutical formulation, NT-020, promotes proliferation of human hematopoietic stem cells in vitro and protects stem cells from oxidative stress when given chronically to mice in vivo. Because previous reports suggest that the blue green algae, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) can modulate immune function in animals, we sought to investigate the effects of AFA on human stem cells in cultures. Two AFA products were used for extraction: AFA whole (AFA-W) and AFA cellular concentrate (AFA-C). Water and ethanol extractions were performed to isolate active compounds for cell culture experiments. For cell proliferation analysis, human bone marrow cells or human CD34+ cells were cultured in 96 well plates and treated for 72 hours with various extracts. An MTT assay was used to estimate cell proliferation. We report here that the addition of an ethanol extract of AFA-cellular concentrate further enhances the stem cell proliferative action of NT-020 when incubated with human adult bone marrow cells or human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors in culture. Algae extracts alone had only moderate activity in these stem cell proliferation assays. This preliminary study suggests that NT-020 plus the ethanol extract of AFA cellular concentrate may act to promote proliferation of human stem cell populations.

  17. Rational design of human DNA ligase inhibitors that target cellular DNA replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhong, Shijun; Zhu, Xiao; Dziegielewska, Barbara; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, Gerald M; MacKerell, Alexander D; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2008-05-01

    Based on the crystal structure of human DNA ligase I complexed with nicked DNA, computer-aided drug design was used to identify compounds in a database of 1.5 million commercially available low molecular weight chemicals that were predicted to bind to a DNA-binding pocket within the DNA-binding domain of DNA ligase I, thereby inhibiting DNA joining. Ten of 192 candidates specifically inhibited purified human DNA ligase I. Notably, a subset of these compounds was also active against the other human DNA ligases. Three compounds that differed in their specificity for the three human DNA ligases were analyzed further. L82 inhibited DNA ligase I, L67 inhibited DNA ligases I and III, and L189 inhibited DNA ligases I, III, and IV in DNA joining assays with purified proteins and in cell extract assays of DNA replication, base excision repair, and nonhomologous end-joining. L67 and L189 are simple competitive inhibitors with respect to nicked DNA, whereas L82 is an uncompetitive inhibitor that stabilized complex formation between DNA ligase I and nicked DNA. In cell culture assays, L82 was cytostatic whereas L67 and L189 were cytotoxic. Concordant with their ability to inhibit DNA repair in vitro, subtoxic concentrations of L67 and L189 significantly increased the cytotoxicity of DNA-damaging agents. Interestingly, the ligase inhibitors specifically sensitized cancer cells to DNA damage. Thus, these novel human DNA ligase inhibitors will not only provide insights into the cellular function of these enzymes but also serve as lead compounds for the development of anticancer agents.

  18. AFM studies of environmental effects on nanomechanical properties and cellular structure of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Chen, Nianhuan

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of cellular structure and physical and mechanical properties of hair are essential to develop better cosmetic products and advance biological and cosmetic science. Although the morphology of the cellular structure of human hair has been traditionally investigated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, these techniques provide limited capability to in situ study of the physical and mechanical properties of human hair in various environments. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) overcomes these problems and can be used for characterization in ambient conditions without requiring specific sample preparations and surface treatment. In this study, film thickness, adhesive forces and effective Young's modulus of various hair surfaces were measured at different environments (humidity and temperature) using force calibration plot technique with an AFM. Torsional resonance mode phase contrast images were also taken in order to characterize the morphology and cellular structure changes of human hair at different humidity. The correlation between the nanomechanical properties and the cellular structure of hair is discussed.

  19. Human interstitial cellular model in therapeutics of heart valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Caimei; Tang, Hai; Mei, Zijian; Li, Nichujie; Zeng, Zhi; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Yin, Yulong; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Yang, Xiaoping

    2017-05-23

    Calcific aortic valve disease is a common, severe heart condition that is currently with no proven, effective drug treatment and requires a surgical valve replacement or an entire heart explanation. Thus, developing novel, targeted therapeutic approaches becomes a major goal for cardiovascular disease research. To achieve this goal, isolated heart valve interstitial cells could be an advanced model to explore molecular mechanisms and measure drug efficacy. Based on this progress, molecular mechanisms that harbor components of  inflammation and fibrosis coupled with proteins, for example, BMP-2, TLRs, RANKL, Osteoprotegerin, have been proposed. Small molecules or antibodies targeting these proteins have shown promising efficacy for either reversing or slowing down calcification development in vitro. In this review, we summarize these potential therapeutics with some highlights of interstitial cellular models.

  20. Soybean extracts increase cell surface ZIP4 abundance and cellular zinc levels: a potential novel strategy to enhance zinc absorption by ZIP4 targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Ohkura, Katsuma; Takahashi, Masakazu; Kizu, Kumiko; Narita, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Shuichi; Miyamae, Yusaku; Masuda, Seiji; Nagao, Masaya; Irie, Kazuhiro; Ohigashi, Hajime; Andrews, Glen K; Kambe, Taiho

    2015-12-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency puts human health at risk, so we explored strategies for enhancing zinc absorption. In the small intestine, the zinc transporter ZIP4 functions as an essential component of zinc absorption. Overexpression of ZIP4 protein increases zinc uptake and thereby cellular zinc levels, suggesting that food components with the ability to increase ZIP4 could potentially enhance zinc absorption via the intestine. In the present study, we used mouse Hepa cells, which regulate mouse Zip4 (mZip4) in a manner indistinguishable from that in intestinal enterocytes, to screen for suitable food components that can increase the abundance of ZIP4. Using this ZIP4-targeting strategy, two such soybean extracts were identified that were specifically able to decrease mZip4 endocytosis in response to zinc. These soybean extracts also effectively increased the abundance of apically localized mZip4 in transfected polarized Caco2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and, moreover, two apically localized mZip4 acrodermatitis enteropathica mutants. Soybean components were purified from one extract and soyasaponin Bb was identified as an active component that increased both mZip4 protein abundance and zinc levels in Hepa cells. Finally, we confirmed that soyasaponin Bb is capable of enhancing cell surface endogenous human ZIP4 in human cells. Our results suggest that ZIP4 targeting may represent a new strategy to improve zinc absorption in humans.

  1. Cellular Proteome Dynamics during Differentiation of Human Primary Myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Barrio, Inigo; Mortensen, Tenna Pavia;

    2015-01-01

    and the complex temporal protein dynamics accompanying the differentiation of primary human muscle cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the advantages of applying a MS-based quantitative approach, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), for studying human myogenesis...... dynamic expression profiles during the course of myogenic differentiation and quantified 2240 proteins, 243 of which were regulated. These changes in protein expression occurred in sequential waves and underlined vast reprogramming in key processes governing cell fate decisions, i.e., cell cycle...

  2. Aqueous extract of Crataegus azarolus protects against DNA damage in human lymphoblast Cell K562 and enhances antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Nadia; Bouhlel, Inès; Chaabane, Fadwa; Bzéouich, Imèn Mokdad; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2014-02-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the cellular antioxidant effect of the aqueous extract of Crataegus azarolus and its antigenotoxic potential using human myelogenous cells, K562. The antioxidant capacity of this extract was evaluated by determining its cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) in K562 cells. Also, preceding antigenotoxicity assessment, its eventual genotoxicity property was investigated by evaluating its capacity to induce the DNA degradation of treated cell nuclei. As no genotoxicity was detected at different exposure times, its ability to protect cell DNA against H2O2 oxidative effect was investigated, using the "comet assay." It appears that 800 μg/mL of extract inhibited the genotoxicity induced by H2O2 with a rate of 41.30 %, after 4 h of incubation. In addition, this extract revealed a significant cellular antioxidant capacity against the reactive oxygen species in K562 cells.

  3. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  4. Cellular evidence for selfish spermatogonial selection in aged human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, G J; Goriely, A; Wilkie, A O M

    2014-05-01

    identifying the potential cellular source of PAE mutations.

  5. A cellular model system of differentiated human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Kristensen, S R; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to select an effective and stable protocol for the differentiation of human satellite cells (Sc) and to identify the optimal time period for the experimental use of differentiated human Sc-cultures. In order to identify the differentiation conditions which give a good...... survival of myotubes and a high grade of differentiation, Sc-cultures were induced to differentiate in media supplemented with either 2% fetal calf serum (FCS) 2% horse serum (HS) or 10% HS. Based on higher CK-activities in cultures differentiating in FCS-supplemented media compared to horse sera, fetal......-cultures in the period from day 4 to 8 after induction of differentiation as only minor differentation-related changes will take place in the cells during this period of time....

  6. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, E.S.

    1992-09-01

    Quantitative data of the human bronchial epithelial cells at possible risk for malignant transformation in lung cancer is crucial for accurate radon dosimetry and risk analysis. The locations and other parameters of the nuclei which may be damaged by [alpha] particles must be determined and compared in different airway generations, among smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers, between men and women and in people of different ages. This proposal includes extended morphometric studies on electron micrographs of human epithelium of defined airway generations and in parallel on electron micrographs of the dog bronchial lining. The second part of this proposal describes studies to quantitate the cycling bronchial epithelial population(s) using proliferation markers and immunocytochemistry on frozen and paraffin sections and similar labeling of isolated bronchial epithelial cells sorted flow cytometry.

  7. Influence of low temperature storage on the properties of human placenta extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina D. Rozanova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research represents the results of comparative investigations of the composition and biological activity of aqueous-saline extracts, obtained from fresh and stored at –196ºC human placental tissues. Methods: The studying of quantitative composition of proteins in human placenta extract (HPE was performed with gel-chromatography method. Content of lipid peroxidation products and catalase activity in the extracts were evaluated using spectrophotometric assay. Biological activity of extracts was evaluated by studying the modifications of structural and functional parameters of erythrocytes after exposure with the extracts. Results: Our researches have shown that properties of HPE from the stored at –196ºС tissues slightly differ from those of fresh tissues. In extract of frozen tissues the content of high-molecular proteins is relatively higher. Content of malonyldialdehyde in extracts of the tissues stored at –196ºC does not change. Catalase activity decreases. For evaluation of biological effect of the extract on erythrocytes we have analyzed the following structural and functional parameters of red blood cells: spontaneous hemolysis, osmotic, and low-pH resistances, which characterize mechanical properties and stability of cellular membranes; relative content of main forms of hemoglobin (oxy-, deoxy-, and met-Hb, which elucidate the functioning of biochemical systems; and cytosol microviscosity, which reflects structure-dynamical state, determined, first of all, by interaction of cytosol and components of cytoskeleton with membranes. Conclusion: It was shown that distinctions between the effects of extracts on erythrocytes were mainly manifested at cellular membrane level, not affecting main vital parameters. [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(3.000: 213-217

  8. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, E.S.

    1991-09-01

    One hundred and forty-seven bronchial samples (generations 3--6) from 66 patients (62 usable; 36 female, 26 male; median age 61) have been dissected by generation from fixed surgical lung specimens obtained after the removal of pathological lesions. In addition, one hundred and fifty-six mongol dog bronchi (generations 2--6) dissected from different lobes of 26 dog lungs have also been similarly prepared. One hundred and twenty-seven human samples have been completely processed for electron microscopy and have yielded 994 electron micrographs of which 655 have been entered into the Computerized Stereological Analysis System (COSAS) and been used for the measurement of the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface. Similarly 328 micrographs of dog epithelium from 33 bronchial samples have been used to measure the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface and have been entered into COSAS. Using the COSAS planimetry program, we continue to expand our established data bases which describe the volume density and nuclear numbers per electron micrograph for 5 cell types of the human bronchial epithelial lining of men and women, as well as smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers and similar parameters for the same 5 epithelial cell types of dog bronchi. Our micrographs of human bronchial epithelium have allowed us to analyze the recent suggestion that the DNA of lymphocytes may be subject to significant damage from Rn progeny while within the lung. Since the last progress report three papers have been submitted for publication. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Water soluble nanocurcumin extracted from turmeric challenging the microflora from human oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Judy; Muthu, Manikandan; Chun, Se-Chul

    2016-11-15

    Water soluble nanocurcumin prepared from commercial turmeric powders was compared against ethanol extracted curcumin particles. The oral microflora from five different human volunteers was collected and the efficacy of solvent extracted curcumin versus water extracted nanocurcumin was demonstrated. Nanocurcumin activity against oral microflora confirms its antimicrobial potency. Confocal laser scanning microscopic results revealed the enhanced entry of nanocurcumin particles into microbial cells. The nanosized nature of nanocurcumin appears to have led to increased cellular interaction and thereby efficient destruction of microbial cells in the mouth. In addition, solubility of nanocurcumin is also believed to be a crucial factor behind its successful antimicrobial activity. This study proves that the bioactivity of a compound is greatly influenced by its solubility in water. This work recommends the use of water soluble nanocurcumin (extracted from turmeric) as potent substitute for curcumin in dental formulations.

  10. Thiol oxidation by nitrosative stress: Cellular localization in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrillana, María E; Uribe, Pamela; Villegas, Juana V; Álvarez, Juan; Sánchez, Raúl; Fornés, Miguel W

    2016-10-01

    Peroxynitrite is a highly reactive nitrogen species and when it is generated at high levels it causes nitrosative stress, an important cause of impaired sperm function. High levels of peroxynitrite have been shown to correlate with decreased semen quality in infertile men. Thiol groups in sperm are mainly found in enzymes, antioxidant molecules, and structural proteins in the axoneme. Peroxynitrite primarily reacts with thiol groups of cysteine-containing proteins. Although it is well known that peroxynitrite oxidizes sulfhydryl groups in sperm, the subcellular localization of this oxidation remains unknown. The main objective of this study was to establish the subcellular localization of peroxynitrite-induced nitrosative stress in thiol groups and its relation to sperm motility in human spermatozoa. For this purpose, spermatozoa from healthy donors were exposed in vitro to 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a compound which generates peroxynitrite. In order to detect peroxynitrite and reduced thiol groups, the fluorescent probes, dihydrorhodamine 123 and monobromobimane (mBBr), were used respectively. Sperm viability was analyzed by propidium iodide staining. Peroxynitrite generation and thiol redox state were monitored by confocal microscopy whereas sperm viability was evaluated by flow cytometry. Sperm motility was analyzed by CASA using the ISAS(®) system. The results showed that exposure of human spermatozoa to peroxynitrite results in increased thiol oxidation which is mainly localized in the sperm head and principal piece regions. Thiol oxidation was associated with motility loss. The high susceptibility of thiol groups to peroxynitrite-induced oxidation could explain, at least in part, the negative effect of reactive nitrogen species on sperm motility. DHR: dihydrorhodamine 123; mBBr: monobromobimane ONOO(-): peroxynitrite RNS: reactive nitrogen species RFI: relative fluorescence intensity SIN-1: 3-morpholinosydnonimine CASA: Computer-Aided Sperm Analysis

  11. Grape seed extracts modify the outcome of oxaliplatin in colon cancer cells by interfering with cellular mechanisms of drug cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Letizia; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Quatrale, Anna Elisa; Bergamini, Carlo; Denora, Nunzio; Crupi, Pasquale; Antonacci, Donato; Mangia, Anita; Simone, Giovanni; Silvestris, Nicola; Azzariti, Amalia

    2017-08-01

    Grape seed extracts are commonly utilized as dietary supplements for their antioxidant properties, even from cancer patients. However, whether these natural extracts interfere with chemotherapeutics utilized in colon cancer treatment is still poorly investigated. The cytotoxicity of extracts from Italia and Palieri cultivars either alone or in combination with oxaliplatin was evaluated in colon cancer cells. Grape seed extracts displayed anti-proliferative activity depending on the concentration utilized through apoptosis induction. In combination, they affected the activation of Erk1/2 and counteracted the intrinsic and the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis, the DNA damage and the generation of ROS induced by oxaliplatin. Noteworthy grape seed extracts strongly enhanced the uptake of oxaliplatin into all cells, by affecting the cell transport system of platinum. The addition of these natural extracts to oxaliplatin strongly reduced the cellular response to oxaliplatin and allowed a huge accumulation of platinum into cells. Here, we shed light on the chemical biology underlying the combination of grape seed extracts and oxaliplatin, demonstrating that they might be detrimental to oxaliplatin effectiveness in colon cancer therapy.

  12. The cellular inflammatory response in human spinal cords after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jennifer C; Norenberg, Michael D; Ramsay, David A; Dekaban, Gregory A; Marcillo, Alexander E; Saenz, Alvaro D; Pasquale-Styles, Melissa; Dietrich, W Dalton; Weaver, Lynne C

    2006-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) provokes an inflammatory response that generates substantial secondary damage within the cord but also may contribute to its repair. Anti-inflammatory treatment of human SCI and its timing must be based on knowledge of the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the time after injury when they appear and then decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. Using post-mortem spinal cords, we evaluated the time course and distribution of pathological change, infiltrating neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes, and microglial activation in injured spinal cords from patients who were 'dead at the scene' or who survived for intervals up to 1 year after SCI. SCI caused zones of pathological change, including areas of inflammation and necrosis in the acute cases, and cystic cavities with longer survival (Zone 1), mantles of less severe change, including axonal swellings, inflammation and Wallerian degeneration (Zone 2) and histologically intact areas (Zone 3). Zone 1 areas increased in size with time after injury whereas the overall injury (size of the Zones 1 and 2 combined) remained relatively constant from the time (1-3 days) when damage was first visible. The distribution of inflammatory cells correlated well with the location of Zone 1, and sometimes of Zone 2. Neutrophils, visualized by their expression of human neutrophil alpha-defensins (defensin), entered the spinal cord by haemorrhage or extravasation, were most numerous 1-3 days after SCI, and were detectable for up to 10 days after SCI. Significant numbers of activated CD68-immunoreactive ramified microglia and a few monocytes/macrophages were in injured tissue within 1-3 days of SCI. Activated microglia, a few monocytes/macrophages and numerous phagocytic macrophages were present for weeks to months after SCI. A few CD8(+) lymphocytes were in the injured cords throughout the sampling intervals. Expression by the inflammatory cells of the oxidative

  13. Quantitative model of cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence in primary human fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Schäuble

    Full Text Available Primary human fibroblasts in tissue culture undergo a limited number of cell divisions before entering a non-replicative "senescent" state. At early population doublings (PD, fibroblasts are proliferation-competent displaying exponential growth. During further cell passaging, an increasing number of cells become cell cycle arrested and finally senescent. This transition from proliferating to senescent cells is driven by a number of endogenous and exogenous stress factors. Here, we have developed a new quantitative model for the stepwise transition from proliferating human fibroblasts (P via reversibly cell cycle arrested (C to irreversibly arrested senescent cells (S. In this model, the transition from P to C and to S is driven by a stress function γ and a cellular stress response function F which describes the time-delayed cellular response to experimentally induced irradiation stress. The application of this model based on senescence marker quantification at the single-cell level allowed to discriminate between the cellular states P, C, and S and delivers the transition rates between the P, C and S states for different human fibroblast cell types. Model-derived quantification unexpectedly revealed significant differences in the stress response of different fibroblast cell lines. Evaluating marker specificity, we found that SA-β-Gal is a good quantitative marker for cellular senescence in WI-38 and BJ cells, however much less so in MRC-5 cells. Furthermore we found that WI-38 cells are more sensitive to stress than BJ and MRC-5 cells. Thus, the explicit separation of stress induction from the cellular stress response, and the differentiation between three cellular states P, C and S allows for the first time to quantitatively assess the response of primary human fibroblasts towards endogenous and exogenous stress during cellular ageing.

  14. Evolutionarily conserved and nonconserved cellular localizations and functions of human SIRT proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Eriko; Park, Jean Y; Burneskis, Jenna M; Barrett, J Carl; Horikawa, Izumi

    2005-10-01

    Sir2 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that extends lifespan in yeast and worms. This study examines seven human proteins homologous to Sir2 (SIRT1 through SIRT7) for cellular localization, expression profiles, protein deacetylation activity, and effects on human cell lifespan. We found that: 1) three nuclear SIRT proteins (SIRT1, SIRT6, and SIRT7) show different subnuclear localizations: SIRT6 and SIRT7 are associated with heterochromatic regions and nucleoli, respectively, where yeast Sir2 functions; 2) SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are localized in mitochondria, an organelle that links aging and energy metabolism; 3) cellular p53 is a major in vivo substrate of SIRT1 deacetylase, but not the other six SIRT proteins; 4) SIRT1, but not the other two nuclear SIRT proteins, shows an in vitro deacetylase activity on histone H4 and p53 peptides; and 5) overexpression of any one of the seven SIRT proteins does not extend cellular replicative lifespan in normal human fibroblasts or prostate epithelial cells. This study supports the notion that multiple human SIRT proteins have evolutionarily conserved and nonconserved functions at different cellular locations and reveals that the lifespan of normal human cells, in contrast to that of lower eukaryotes, cannot be manipulated by increased expression of a single SIRT protein.

  15. Antibacterial activity of mangrove leaf extracts against human pathogens

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sahoo, G.; Mulla, N.S.S.; Ansari, Z.A.; Mohandass, C.

    The antibacterial activity of leaf extract of mangroves, namely, Rhizophora mucronata, Sonneratia alba and Exoecaria agallocha from Chorao island, Goa was investigated against human bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp...

  16. Protective Effect of Garlic on Cellular Senescence in UVB-Exposed HaCaT Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Kyung

    2016-07-29

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells, which induces the cellular senescence and photoaging. The present study investigated the protective effects of garlic on photo-damage and cellular senescence in UVB-exposed human keratinocytes, HaCaT cells. An in vitro cell free system was used to examine the scavenging activity of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals and nitric oxide (NO). The effect of garlic extract on ROS formation, MMP-1 protein and mRNA expressions, cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, senescence associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, and silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) activity were determined in UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells. Garlic exhibited strong DPPH radical and NO scavenging activity in cell free system exhibiting IC50 values of 2.50 mg/mL and 4.38 mg/mL, respectively. Garlic pretreatment attenuated the production of UVB-induced intracellular ROS. MMP-1 level, which has been known to be induced by ROS, was dramatically elevated by UVB irradiation, and UVB-induced MMP-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly reduced by garlic treatment (50 µg/mL) comparable to those of UV-unexposed control cells. UV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine productions (IL-6 and IL-1β) were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with garlic in a dose-dependent manner. SA-β-gal activity, a classical biomarker of cellular senescence, and SIRT1 activity, which has attracted attention as an anti-aging factor in recent years, were ameliorated by garlic treatment in UV-irradiated HaCaT cells. The present study provides the first evidence of garlic inhibiting UVB-induced photoaging as a result of augmentation of cellular senescence in HaCaT human keratinocytes.

  17. Dual effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract on human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Lin, Juan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jian-Hong; Sun, Xue-Min; Zeng, Cheng-Ming

    2009-02-01

    Extracts from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba have been used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Today, various standardized preparations from G. biloba leaf extract have been developed. G. biloba leaf extract, which contains flavonoids and terpenoids as the major biologically active components, has become one of the most popular and commonly used herbal remedies due to its wide spectrum of beneficial effects on health. In this study, we investigated the effects of G. biloba leaf extract on the properties of human red blood cells in the presence and absence of amyloid peptide (Abeta25-35), peroxide and hypotonic stress. The results suggest that G. biloba leaf extract has a dual action, both protective and disruptive, on red blood cells, depending on whether an exogenous stress is present. G. biloba leaf extract has a protective role on red blood cells against Abeta- and hypotonic pressure-induced haemolysis, peroxide-induced lipoperoxidation, as well as glutathione consumption and methaemoglobin formation. On the other hand, G. biloba leaf extract also exhibited damage to red blood cells by increasing cell fragility, changing cellular morphology and inducing glutathione consumption and methaemoglobin formation, especially when applied at high doses. These anti- and pro-oxidative activities of polyphenolic substances are thought to be involved in the dual function of G. biloba leaf extract. The results of this study suggest that high doses of herbal remedies and dietary supplements can be toxic to cells.

  18. Differential Response of Two Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines to the Phenolic Extract from Flaxseed Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Sorice

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have evidenced that the phenolic components from flaxseed (FS oil have potential health benefits. The effect of the phenolic extract from FS oil has been evaluated on two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB231, and on the human non-cancerous breast cell line, MCF10A, by SRB assay, cellular death, cell cycle, cell signaling, lipid peroxidation and expression of some key genes. We have evidenced that the extract shows anti-proliferative activity on MCF7 cells by inducing cellular apoptosis, increase of the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase and of lipid peroxidation, activation of the H2AX signaling pathway, and upregulation of a six gene signature. On the other hand, on the MDA-MB2131 cells we verified only an anti-proliferative activity, a weak lipid peroxidation, the activation of the PI3K signaling pathway and an up-regulation of four genes. Overall these data suggest that the extract has both cytotoxic and pro-oxidant effects only on MCF7 cells, and can act as a metabolic probe, inducing differences in the gene expression. For this purpose, we have performed an interactomic analysis, highlighting the existing associations. From this approach, we show that the phenotypic difference between the two cell lines can be explained through their differential response to the phenolic extract.

  19. The cellular composition of the human immune system is shaped by age and cohabitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Edward J; Dooley, James; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lee, James C; Wouters, Carine; Meyts, Isabelle; Goris, An; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Linterman, Michelle A; Liston, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Detailed population-level description of the human immune system has recently become achievable. We used a 'systems-level' approach to establish a resource of cellular immune profiles of 670 healthy individuals. We report a high level of interindividual variation, with low longitudinal variation, at the level of cellular subset composition of the immune system. Despite the profound effects of antigen exposure on individual antigen-specific clones, the cellular subset structure proved highly elastic, with transient vaccination-induced changes followed by a return to the individual's unique baseline. Notably, the largest influence on immunological variation identified was cohabitation, with 50% less immunological variation between individuals who share an environment (as parents) than between people in the wider population. These results identify local environmental conditions as a key factor in shaping the human immune system.

  20. White Tea extract induces lipolytic activity and inhibits adipogenesis in human subcutaneous (pre-adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenck Horst

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dramatic increase in obesity-related diseases emphasizes the need to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying fat metabolism. To investigate how natural substances influence lipolysis and adipogenesis, we determined the effects of White Tea extract on cultured human subcutaneous preadipocytes and adipocytes. Methods For our in vitro studies we used a White Tea extract solution that contained polyphenols and methylxanthines. Utilizing cultured human preadipocytes we investigated White Tea extract solution-induced inhibition of triglyceride incorporation during adipogenesis and possible effects on cell viability. In vitro studies on human adipocytes were performed aiming to elucidate the efficacy of White Tea extract solution to stimulate lipolytic activity. To characterize White Tea extract solution-mediated effects on a molecular level, we analyzed gene expression of essential adipogenesis-related transcription factors by qRT-PCR and determined the expression of the transcription factor ADD1/SREBP-1c on the protein level utilizing immunofluorescence analysis. Results Our data show that incubation of preadipocytes with White Tea extract solution significantly decreased triglyceride incorporation during adipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner (n = 10 without affecting cell viability (n = 10. These effects were, at least in part, mediated by EGCG (n = 10, 50 μM. In addition, White Tea extract solution also stimulated lipolytic activity in adipocytes (n = 7. Differentiating preadipocytes cultivated in the presence of 0.5% White Tea extract solution showed a decrease in PPARγ, ADD1/SREBP-1c, C/EBPα and C/EBPδ mRNA levels. Moreover, the expression of the transcription factor ADD1/SREBP-1c was not only decreased on the mRNA but also on the protein level. Conclusion White Tea extract is a natural source that effectively inhibits adipogenesis and stimulates lipolysis-activity. Therefore, it can be utilized to

  1. Cellular development of the human cochlea and the regenerative potential of hair follicle bulge stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Locher, heiko

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic development of the human cochlea (the organ of hearing) has been investigated for over one hundred years. However, little is still known about the development on a cellular and protein level, which is important to better understand etiologies and pathologies of various types of sensori

  2. Cellular development of the human cochlea and the regenerative potential of hair follicle bulge stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Locher, heiko

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic development of the human cochlea (the organ of hearing) has been investigated for over one hundred years. However, little is still known about the development on a cellular and protein level, which is important to better understand etiologies and pathologies of various types of

  3. Cellular development of the human cochlea and the regenerative potential of hair follicle bulge stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic development of the human cochlea (the organ of hearing) has been investigated for over one hundred years. However, little is still known about the development on a cellular and protein level, which is important to better understand etiologies and pathologies of various types of sensorineural hearing loss. Knowledge of the normal gene expression patterns and cell fate specification in the human cochlea has therefore the potential to aid in the development of gene and cell-based t...

  4. Evolutionarily Conserved and Nonconserved Cellular Localizations and Functions of Human SIRT Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Michishita, Eriko; Park, Jean Y.; Burneskis, Jenna M.; Barrett, J. Carl; Horikawa, Izumi

    2005-01-01

    Sir2 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that extends lifespan in yeast and worms. This study examines seven human proteins homologous to Sir2 (SIRT1 through SIRT7) for cellular localization, expression profiles, protein deacetylation activity, and effects on human cell lifespan. We found that: 1) three nuclear SIRT proteins (SIRT1, SIRT6, and SIRT7) show different subnuclear localizations: SIRT6 and SIRT7 are associated with heterochromatic regions and nucleoli, respectively, where yeast...

  5. Is glutathione the major cellular target of cisplatin? A study of the interactions of cisplatin with cancer cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasherman, Yonit; Sturup, Stefan; Gibson, Dan

    2009-07-23

    Cisplatin is an anticancer drug whose efficacy is limited because tumors develop resistance to the drug. Resistant cells often have elevated levels of cellular glutathione (GSH), believed to be the major cellular target of cisplatin that inactivates the drug by binding to it irreversibly, forming [Pt(SG)(2)] adducts. We show by [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC that the half-life of (15)N labeled cisplatin in whole cell extracts is approximately 75 min, but no Pt-GSH adducts were observed. When the low molecular mass fraction (cisplatin, binding to GSH was observed probably due to removal of high molecular mass platinophiles. Two-thirds of the Pt adducts formed in whole cell extracts, had a molecular mass >3 kDa. [Pt(SG)(2)] cannot account for more than 20% of the Pt adducts. The concentration of reduced thiols in the high molecular mass fraction of the extracts is six times higher than in the low molecular mass fraction.

  6. Probing regenerative potential of Moringa oleifera aqueous extracts using In vitro cellular assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangeline E Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecules stimulating regeneration and proliferation of cells are of significance in combating ailments caused due to tissue injury, inflammation, and degenerative disorders. Moringa oleifera is one of the most valued food plants having the profile of important nutrients and impressive range of medicinal uses. Objective: To evaluate the potential of M. oleifera aqueous leaf and flower extracts to promote the proliferation of cells and explore their effect on cancer cell lines for assessment of safety. Materials and Methods: Aqueous leaf and flower extracts of M. oleifera were investigated for effect on rat-derived primary fibroblast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, and cancer cell lines using cell proliferation assay. They were also tested and compared for wound healing, angiogenesis, and hepatoprotective effect using in vitro assays. Results: Statistically significant increase in the proliferation of primary rat fibroblast, MSCs, and angiogenesis was observed after treatment with aqueous flower extract. The aqueous leaf extract determined a comparatively moderate increment in the proliferation of MSCs and angiogenesis. It however showed prominent cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines and a significant hepatoprotective effect. Conclusion: A very clear difference in response of the two extracts to different types of cells was detected in this study. The aqueous flower extract exhibited a higher potential to stimulate cell proliferation while not exerting the same effect on cancer cell lines. The leaf extract on the other hand, had a prominent antitumor and hepatoptotective effects.

  7. Digital Cellular Solid Pressure Vessels: A Novel Approach for Human Habitation in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellucci, Daniel; Jenett, Benjamin; Cheung, Kenneth C.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely assumed that human exploration beyond Earth's orbit will require vehicles capable of providing long duration habitats that simulate an Earth-like environment - consistent artificial gravity, breathable atmosphere, and sufficient living space- while requiring the minimum possible launch mass. This paper examines how the qualities of digital cellular solids - high-performance, repairability, reconfigurability, tunable mechanical response - allow the accomplishment of long-duration habitat objectives at a fraction of the mass required for traditional structural technologies. To illustrate the impact digital cellular solids could make as a replacement to conventional habitat subsystems, we compare recent proposed deep space habitat structural systems with a digital cellular solids pressure vessel design that consists of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) digital cellular solid cylindrical framework that is lined with an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) skin. We use the analytical treatment of a linear specific modulus scaling cellular solid to find the minimum mass pressure vessel for a structure and find that, for equivalent habitable volume and appropriate safety factors, the use of digital cellular solids provides clear methods for producing structures that are not only repairable and reconfigurable, but also higher performance than their conventionally manufactured counterparts.

  8. Human resource management practices in ZAIN cellular communications company operating in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulieman Ibraheem Shelash Mohammad

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the best human resource management (HRM practices at ZAIN; cellular communications company operating in Jordan. study consisted of employees in ZAIN Cellular Communications Company in Jordan. All participants of this study were employees working in the organization - staff, team leaders, supervisors, programmers, project leaders, business analysts, managers, assistant managers. The findings in the paper that there are relatively high levels of practice for the areas of Training and development, Performance Appraisal, along with Communication and information sharing. Recruitment and selection is the one area, on the other hand, where a considerably lower mean level of practice exists .

  9. Preventive effects of tamarind seed coat extract on UVA-induced alterations in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phetdee, Khemjira; Rakchai, Racharat; Rattanamanee, Kwanchai; Teaktong, Thanasak; Viyoch, Jarupa

    2014-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions on skin is from solar radiation, particularly from its ultraviolet (UV) component, through the formation of oxidative species. Thus, an antioxidant strategy that prevents the formation of these oxidants could form the basis of an efficacious cutaneous protectant. Many herbal materials contain antioxidant polyphenols, and this study assessed the possibility that tamarind seed coat extract could fulfill this role. An alcoholic extract of the tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seed coat showed stronger antioxidant activity (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl inhibition, EC(50) = 12.9 μg/ml) than L-ascorbic acid (EC(50) = 22.9 μg/ml) and α-tocopherol (EC(50) = 29.3 μg/ml). In cultured fibroblasts taken from human skin, hydrogen peroxide (100-1000 μM) damaged 62-92% of the cells compared to only 35-47% when the cells were preincubated in extract (200 μg/ml) for 24 h. UVA (40 J/cm2) irradiation of human fibroblasts damaged 25% of the cells but the death rate was reduced to 10% with extract. UV irradiation increased the proportion of cells arrest in G(0)/G(1) phase (from 59% to 78%) but this was largely prevented by the extract (64%), according to flow cytometry. Intracellular total glutathione of UVA-irradiated cells pretreated with the extract increased to 10-25% compared to the non-pretreated group at 24-72 h after irradiation. Fibroblasts typically increased matrix metalloproteinase-1 secretion after photodamage, and this is prevented by the extract. This is the first report showing that tamarind seed coat extract is an antioxidant and can protect human skin fibroblasts from cellular damage produced by UVA and thus may form the foundation for an antiaging cosmetic.

  10. Cytotoxic Effects of Strawberry, Korean Raspberry, and Mulberry Extracts on Human Ovarian Cancer A2780 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dahae; Kang, Ki Sung; Lee, Sanghyun; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Hyun Young

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are tumorigenic by their ability to increase cell proliferation, survival, and cellular migration. The purpose of the present study was to compare the antioxidant activity and cytotoxic effects of 3 berry extracts (strawberry, Korean raspberry, and mulberry) in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells. Except for raspberry, the ethyl acetate or methylene chloride fractions of berries containing phenolic compounds exerted dose dependent free radical scavenging activities. In the raspberry fractions, the hexane fraction also exhibited potent antioxidant activity. The cytotoxic effects of berries extracts in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells were measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Surprisingly, co-treatment with n-butanol (BuOH) fractions of berries showed stronger cytotoxic effects compared to the other fractions. These findings suggest that potent anticancer molecules are found in the BuOH fractions of berries that have stronger cytotoxic activity than antioxidants. PMID:28078263

  11. Cellular transformation by human papillomaviruses: Lessons learned by comparing high- and low-risk viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Roman, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of papillomaviruses (PVs) has been appreciated since the 1930s yet the mechanisms of virally-mediated cellular transformation are still being revealed. Reasons for this include: a) the oncoproteins are multifunctional, b) there is an ever-growing list of cellular interacting proteins, c) more than one cellular protein may bind to a given region of the oncoprotein, and d) there is only limited information on the proteins encoded by the corresponding non-oncogenic PVs. The perspective of this review will be to contrast the activities of the viral E6 and E7 proteins encoded by the oncogenic human PVs (termed high-risk HPVs) to those encoded by their non-oncogenic counterparts (termed low-risk HPVs) in an attempt to sort out viral life cycle-related functions from oncogenic functions. The review will emphasize lessons learned from the cell culture studies of the HPVs causing mucosal/genital tract cancers. PMID:22284986

  12. A matured fruit extract of date palm tree (Phoenix dactylifera L.) stimulates the cellular immune system in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Koji; Uzuhashi, Yuji; Hirota, Mitsuru; Otani, Hajime

    2011-10-26

    The immunomodulatory effects of a hot water extract from matured fruit of the date palm tree (Phoenix dactylifera L.) were investigated in comparison to those of prune and fig fruit in mice. The number of spleen IFN-γ(+)CD4(+), IFN-γ(+)CD49b(+) and IL-12(+)CD11b(+) cells was highest in mice given the date extract-added diet. Polyphenols identified in the date extract, such as chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, pelargonin and ferulic acid, stimulated IFN-γ mRNA expression significantly in mouse Peyer's patch cell cultures. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid also increased the number of IFN-γ(+)CD4(+) cells significantly, while some polyphenols increased the number of IFN-γ(+)CD49b(+) and IL-12(+)CD11b(+) cells significantly. On the other hand, a 70% ethanol-insoluble date extract treated with trypsin increased the number of IFN-γ(+)CD49b(+) and IL-12(+)CD11b(+) cells significantly. These results indicate that some polyphenols and polysaccharides present in date fruit stimulate the cellular immune system in mice.

  13. Pharmacological activity of Kaempferia parviflora extract against human bile duct cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leardkamolkarn, Vijittra; Tiamyuyen, Sunida; Sripanidkulchai, Bung-orn

    2009-01-01

    A crude ethanol extract of Kaemperia parviflora Wall. Ex Baker and a purified compound, 5,7,4-trimethoxyflavone (KP.8.10), were evaluated for pharmacological effects on human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines (HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1). The cells were incubated with various concentrations of extract for various time periods and metabolic activity (MTT assay) was assessed for cell viability. The results showed a dose-dependent effect of both crude ethanol extract and the pure compound. CC50s for the crude extract on HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1 cells were 46.1 microg/ml and 62.0 microg/ml, respectively. Values for the pure compound could not be determined because of solubility problems. Interestingly, K. parviflora ethanol extract and KP.8.10 at low concentrations (10-20 microg/ml and 2.5-5 microg/ml, respectively) markedly reduced rhHGF-induced invasion by HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1 cells across matrix-coated transwell plates. Higher concentrations of K. parviflora ethanol extract (60 and 80 microg/ml) and KP.8.10 (20 microg /ml) dramatically changed the cellular morphology and caused death in both cell types. KP.8.10 further exhibited progressive action via caspase-3 mitochondrial enzyme activation, enhancing cellular toxicity in a time-dose dependent fashion. Therefore, 5,7,4-trimethoxyflavone appeared to be a bioactive component of K. parviflora extract capable of exerting anti-cancer action. The results suggested a benefit of this edible plant in prevention and treatment of cholangiocarcinoma.

  14. Silhouette extraction from human gait images sequence using cosegmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyan; Zhang, Yi

    2012-11-01

    Gait based human identification is very useful for automatic person recognize through visual surveillance and has attracted more and more researchers. A key step in gait based human identification is to extract human silhouette from images sequence. Current silhouette extraction methods are mainly based on simple color subtraction. These methods have a very poor performance when the color of some body parts is similar to the background. In this paper a cosegmentation based human silhouette extraction method is proposed. Cosegmentation is typically defined as the task of jointly segmenting "something similar" in a given set of images. We can divide the human gait images sequence into several step cycles and every step cycle consist of 10-15 frames. The frames in human gait images sequence have following similarity: every frame is similar to the next or previous frame; every frame is similar to the corresponding frame in the next or previous step cycle; every pixel can find similar pixel in other frames. The progress of cosegmentation based human silhouette extraction can be described as follows: Initially only points which have high contrast to background are used as foreground kernel points, the points in the background are used as background kernel points, then points similar to foreground points will be added to foreground points set and the points similar to background points will be added to background points set. The definition of the similarity consider the context of the point. Experimental result shows that our method has a better performance comparing to traditional human silhouette extraction methods. Keywords: Human gait

  15. Xeno-Free Extraction, Culture, and Cryopreservation of Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Carlos Hugo; Chaparro, Orlando

    2016-03-01

    Molecules of animal or bacterial origin, which pose a risk for zoonoses or immune rejection, are commonly used for extraction, culture, and cryopreservation of mesenchymal stem cells. There is no sequential and orderly protocol for producing human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) under xeno-free conditions. After standardizing a human platelet lysate (hPL) production protocol, four human adipose tissue samples were processed through explants with fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented or hPL-supplemented media for extracting the adipose-derived stem cells. The cells were cultivated in cell culture medium + hPL (5%) or FBS (10%). The cellular replication rate, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential were evaluated at fourth passage. Cellular viability was evaluated before and after cryopreservation of the cells, with an hPL-based solution compared with an FBS-based solution. The explants cultured in hPL-supplemented media showed earlier and faster hASC proliferation than did those supplemented with FBS. Likewise, cells grown in hPL-supplemented media showed a greater proliferation rate, without losing the immunophenotype. Osteogenic differentiation of xeno-free hASC was higher than the hASC produced in standard conditions. However, adipogenic differentiation was reduced in xeno-free hASC. Finally, the cells cryopreserved in an hPL-based solution showed a higher cellular viability than the cells cryopreserved in an FBS-based. In conclusion, we have developed a complete xeno-free protocol for extracting, culturing, and cryopreserving hASCs that can be safely implemented in clinical studies.

  16. The anticancer potential of steroidal saponin, dioscin, isolated from wild yam (Dioscorea villosa) root extract in invasive human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously, we observed that wild yam (Dioscorea villosa) root extract (WYRE) was able to activate GATA3 in human breast cancer cells targeting epigenome. This study aimed to 'nd out if dioscin (DS), a bioactive compound of WYRE, can modulate GATA3 functions and cellular invasion in human breast can...

  17. Human Cytosolic Extracts Stabilize the HIV-1 Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Thomas; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Wang, Xiaozhao; Smith, Amos B.

    2013-01-01

    The stability of the HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm is crucial for productive HIV-1 infection. Mutations that stabilize or destabilize the core showed defects on HIV-1 reverse transcription and infection. We developed a novel and simple assay to measure the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. The assay allowed us to demonstrate that cytosolic extracts strongly stabilize the HIV-1 core. Interestingly, stabilization of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes is not due solely to macromolecular crowding, suggesting the presence of specific cellular factors that stabilize the HIV-1 core. By using our novel assay, we measured the abilities of different drugs, such as PF74, CAP-1, IXN-053, cyclosporine, Bi2 (also known as BI-2), and the peptide CAI, to modulate the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Interestingly, we found that PF74 and Bi2 strongly stabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. On the other hand, the peptide CAI destabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. We also found that purified cyclophilin A destabilizes in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes in the presence of cellular extracts in a cyclosporine-sensitive manner. In agreement with previous observations using the fate-of-the-capsid assay, we also demonstrated the ability of recombinant CPSF6 to stabilize HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Overall, our findings suggested that cellular extracts specifically stabilize the HIV-1 core. We believe that our assay can be a powerful tool to assess HIV-1 core stability in vitro. PMID:23885082

  18. Gorilla and orangutan brains conform to the primate cellular scaling rules: implications for human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Kaas, Jon H

    2011-01-01

    Gorillas and orangutans are primates at least as large as humans, but their brains amount to about one third of the size of the human brain. This discrepancy has been used as evidence that the human brain is about 3 times larger than it should be for a primate species of its body size. In contrast to the view that the human brain is special in its size, we have suggested that it is the great apes that might have evolved bodies that are unusually large, on the basis of our recent finding that the cellular composition of the human brain matches that expected for a primate brain of its size, making the human brain a linearly scaled-up primate brain in its number of cells. To investigate whether the brain of great apes also conforms to the primate cellular scaling rules identified previously, we determine the numbers of neuronal and other cells that compose the orangutan and gorilla cerebella, use these numbers to calculate the size of the brain and of the cerebral cortex expected for these species, and show that these match the sizes described in the literature. Our results suggest that the brains of great apes also scale linearly in their numbers of neurons like other primate brains, including humans. The conformity of great apes and humans to the linear cellular scaling rules that apply to other primates that diverged earlier in primate evolution indicates that prehistoric Homo species as well as other hominins must have had brains that conformed to the same scaling rules, irrespective of their body size. We then used those scaling rules and published estimated brain volumes for various hominin species to predict the numbers of neurons that composed their brains. We predict that Homo heidelbergensis and Homo neanderthalensis had brains with approximately 80 billion neurons, within the range of variation found in modern Homo sapiens. We propose that while the cellular scaling rules that apply to the primate brain have remained stable in hominin evolution (since they

  19. Comparative effect of Piper betle, Chlorella vulgaris and tocotrienol-rich fraction on antioxidant enzymes activity in cellular ageing of human diploid fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makpol, Suzana; Yeoh, Thong Wei; Ruslam, Farah Adilah Che; Arifin, Khaizurin Tajul; Yusof, Yasmin Anum Mohd

    2013-08-16

    Human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) undergo a limited number of cellular divisions in culture and progressively reach a state of irreversible growth arrest, a process termed cellular ageing. Even though beneficial effects of Piper betle, Chlorella vulgaris and tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) have been reported, ongoing studies in relation to ageing is of interest to determine possible protective effects that may reverse the effect of ageing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of P. betle, C. vulgaris and TRF in preventing cellular ageing of HDFs by determining the activity of antioxidant enzymes viz.; catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase. Different passages of HDFs were treated with P. betle, C. vulgaris and TRF for 24 h prior to enzymes activity determination. Senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA β-gal) expression was assayed to validate cellular ageing. In cellular ageing of HDFs, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were reduced, but SOD activity was heightened during pre-senescence. P. betle exhibited the strongest antioxidant activity by reducing SA β-gal expression, catalase activities in all age groups, and SOD activity. TRF exhibited a strong antioxidant activity by reducing SA β-gal expression, and SOD activity in senescent HDFs. C. vulgaris extract managed to reduce SOD activity in senescent HDFs. P. betle, C. vulgaris, and TRF have the potential as anti-ageing entities which compensated the role of antioxidant enzymes in cellular ageing of HDFs.

  20. Aqueous extract ofOcimum gratissimum Linn and ascorbic acid ameliorate nicotine-induced cellular damage in murine peritoneal macrophage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santanu Kar Mahapatra; Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty; Somenath Roy

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To test thein vitro protective role of aqueous extract ofOcimum gratissimumLinn. (O. gratissimum) and ascorbic acid against nicotine-induced murine peritoneal macrophage. Methods: Peritoneal macrophages from mice were treated with nicotine (10mM), nicotine (10 mM) with aqueous extract ofO. gratissimum (1 to25 μg/mL), and nicotine (10 mM) with ascorbic acid (0.01 mM) for12h in cell culture media, while the control group was treated with culture media. Levels of free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, oxidized glutathione levels andDNA damage were observed and compared.Results:Phytochemical analysis of aqueous extract has shown high amount of phenolics and flavonoids compound present in it. The significantly increased free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, oxidized glutathione levels andDNA damage were observed in nicotine-treated group as compared to the control group; those were significantly reduced in aqueous extract ofO. gratissimum and ascorbic acid supplemented groups. Moreover, significantly reduced antioxidant status in nicotine exposed murine peritoneal macrophage was effectively ameliorated by these two products. Among the different concentration of aqueous extract ofO. gratissimum, the maximum protective effect was observed at 10 μg/mL which does not produce any significant change in the normal cell.Conclusions:These findings suggest the potential use and beneficial role ofO. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced cellular damage in murine peritoneal macrophage.

  1. Protein extraction and 2-DE of water- and lipid-soluble proteins from bovine pericardium, a low-cellularity tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Leigh G; Choe, Leila; Lee, Kelvin H; Reardon, Kenneth F; Orton, E Christopher

    2008-11-01

    Bovine pericardium (BP) is an important biomaterial used in the production of glutaraldehyde-fixed heart valves and tissue-engineering applications. The ability to perform proteomic analysis on BP is useful for a range of studies, including investigation of immune rejection after implantation. However, proteomic analysis of fibrous tissues such as BP is challenging due to their relative low-cellularity and abundance of extracellular matrix. A variety of methods for tissue treatment, protein extraction, and fractionation were investigated with the aim of producing high-quality 2-DE gels for both water- and lipid-soluble BP proteins. Extraction of water-soluble proteins with 3-(benzyldimethylammonio)-propanesulfonate followed by n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside extraction and ethanol precipitation for lipid-soluble proteins provided the best combination of yield, spot number, and resolution on 2-DE gels (Protocol E2). ESI-quadrupole/ion trap or MALDI-TOF/TOF MS protein identifications were performed to confirm bovine origin and appropriate subcellular prefractionation of resolved proteins. Twenty-five unique, predominantly cytoplasmic bovine proteins were identified from the water-soluble fraction. Thirty-two unique, predominantly membrane bovine proteins were identified from the lipid-soluble fraction. These results demonstrated that the final protocol produced high-quality proteomic data from this important tissue for both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins.

  2. Methanolic Extract of Ganoderma lucidum Induces Autophagy of AGS Human Gastric Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Filipa S; Lima, Raquel T; Morales, Patricia; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2015-09-29

    Ganoderma lucidum is one of the most widely studied mushroom species, particularly in what concerns its medicinal properties. Previous studies (including those from some of us) have shown some evidence that the methanolic extract of G. lucidum affects cellular autophagy. However, it was not known if it induces autophagy or decreases the autophagic flux. The treatment of a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS) with the mushroom extract increased the formation of autophagosomes (vacuoles typical from autophagy). Moreover, the cellular levels of LC3-II were also increased, and the cellular levels of p62 decreased, confirming that the extract affects cellular autophagy. Treating the cells with the extract together with lysossomal protease inhibitors, the cellular levels of LC3-II and p62 increased. The results obtained proved that, in AGS cells, the methanolic extract of G. lucidum causes an induction of autophagy, rather than a reduction in the autophagic flux. To our knowledge, this is the first study proving that statement.

  3. Dimethylarsenic acid damages cellular DNA and inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication between human skin fibroblast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoXB; DengFR

    2002-01-01

    Although arsenic is identified as a human carcinogen,there is currently no accepted mechanism for its action or an established animal model for evaluating the carcinogenic activity of arsenic.To elucidate the mechanism of arsenic arcinogenesis,we investigated the effect of dimethylarsenic acid(DMAA),the main metabolite of inorganic arsenic in humans,on the cellular DNA and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between human skin fibroblast cells.Single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay was used to detect the DNA damage in human skin fibroblast cells exposed to DMAA,and the GJIC between cells was detected by the scrape loading/dye transfer assay.DMAA at concentrations of 0.01-1.0 mmol·L-1 induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner,and GJIC between human skin fibroblast cells was significantly inhibited by DMAA at 1.0 mmol·L-1.Our results suggest that both genotoxic and nongenotoxic mechanism are involved in the mechanism of DMAA-induced cellular toxicity.

  4. Identification of the candidate genes associated with cellular rejection in pig-to-human xenotransplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To identify the genes associated with cellular rejection in pig-to-human xenotransplantation, the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used in screening the up-regulated genes from a co-culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and porcine vascular endothelial cell line PIEC. The up-regulated cDNAs were cloned into pGEM-T Easy vector and then sequenced. Nucleic acid homology searches were performed using the BLAST program. A subtracted cDNA library including about 300 clones with the expected up-regulated genes was obtained. Twenty-four of these clones were analyzed by sequencing and homology comparison was made. These clones represent the genes of human perforin (PRF1), proteasome, lymphocyte specific interferon regulatory factor/interferon regulatory factor 4 (LSIRF/IRF 4), muscleblind-like (MBNL) protein and a porcine expressed sequence tag (EST) which has 81% homology with human oxidative-stress responsive 1 (OSR 1). These genes might be the candidate genes which are associated with cellular rejection in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  5. Rapid Extraction of Human DNA Containing Humic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Sutlović, Davorka; Definis Gojanović, Marija; Anđelinović, Šimun

    2007-01-01

    The identification process of dead bodies or human remains is nowadays conducted in numerous fields of forensic science, archeology and other judicial cases. A particular problem is the isolation and DNA typing of human remains found in mass graves, due to the degradation process, as well as post mortal DNA contamination with bacteria, fungi, humic acids, metals, etc. In this study, the influence of humic acid (HA) on the DNA extraction and typing is investigated. If present in...

  6. An agent-based model of cellular dynamics and circadian variability in human endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung T Nguyen

    Full Text Available As cellular variability and circadian rhythmicity play critical roles in immune and inflammatory responses, we present in this study an agent-based model of human endotoxemia to examine the interplay between circadian controls, cellular variability and stochastic dynamics of inflammatory cytokines. The model is qualitatively validated by its ability to reproduce circadian dynamics of inflammatory mediators and critical inflammatory responses after endotoxin administration in vivo. Novel computational concepts are proposed to characterize the cellular variability and synchronization of inflammatory cytokines in a population of heterogeneous leukocytes. Our results suggest that there is a decrease in cell-to-cell variability of inflammatory cytokines while their synchronization is increased after endotoxin challenge. Model parameters that are responsible for IκB production stimulated by NFκB activation and for the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines have large impacts on system behaviors. Additionally, examining time-dependent systemic responses revealed that the system is least vulnerable to endotoxin in the early morning and most vulnerable around midnight. Although much remains to be explored, proposed computational concepts and the model we have pioneered will provide important insights for future investigations and extensions, especially for single-cell studies to discover how cellular variability contributes to clinical implications.

  7. Cellular Structural Changes in Candida albicans Caused by the Hydroalcoholic Extract from Sapindus saponaria L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane S. Shinobu-Mesquita

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC is a disease caused by the abnormal growth of yeast-like fungi in the mucosa of the female genital tract. Candida albicans is the principal etiological agent involved in VVC, but reports have shown an increase in the prevalence of Candida non-C. albicans (CNCA cases, which complicates VVC treatment because CNCA does not respond well to antifungal therapy. Our group has reported the in vitro antifungal activity of extracts from Sapindus saponaria L. The present study used scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to further evaluate the antifungal activity of hydroalcoholic extract from S. saponaria (HE against yeast obtained from VVC and structural changes induced by HE. We observed the antifungal activity of HE against 125 vaginal yeasts that belonged to four different species of the Candida genus and S. cerevisae. The results suggest that saponins that are present in HE act on the cell wall or membrane of yeast at the first moments after contact, causing damage to these structures and cell lysis.

  8. Evaluation of an Aqueous Extract from Horseradish Root (Armoracia rusticana Radix) against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cellular Inflammation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Corinna; Tran, Hoai Thi Thu; Márton, Melinda-Rita; Maul, Ronald; Schreiner, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a perennial crop and its root is used in condiments. Traditionally, horseradish root is used to treat bacterial infections of the respiratory tract and urinary bladder. The antiphlogistic activity, determined in activated primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), was evaluated for an aqueous extract and its subfractions, separated by HPLC. Compound analysis was done by UHPLC-QToF/MS and GC-MS. The aqueous extract concentration-dependently inhibited the anti-inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in terms of TNF-α release at ≥37 μg/mL. Further, the cyclooxygenase as well as lipoxygenase pathway was blocked by the extract as demonstrated by inhibition of COX-2 protein expression and PGE2 synthesis at ≥4 μg/mL and leukotriene LTB4 release. Mechanistic studies revealed that inhibition of ERK1/2 and c-Jun activation preceded COX-2 suppression upon plant extract treatment in the presence of LPS. Chemical analysis identified target compounds with a medium polarity as relevant for the observed bioactivity. Importantly, allyl isothiocyanate, which is quite well known for its anti-inflammatory capacity and as the principal pungent constituent in horseradish roots, was not relevant for the observations. The results suggest that horseradish root exerts an antiphlogistic activity in human immune cells by regulation of the COX and LOX pathway via MAPK signalling. PMID:28182113

  9. Cellular morphological parameters of the human urinary bladder (malignant and normal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Ahmad; Keshtkar, Asghar; Lawford, Pat

    2007-06-01

    The normal and malignant cellular morphological parameters (intra- and extracellular spaces of the human urinary bladder) were obtained from analysis of digital images of bladder histology sections. Then these cellular morphological parameters were compared with the same parameters obtained from the literature for the bladder tissue. However, the limited quantitative data about these parameters available in the literature for bladder cell sizes and other geometrical parameters such as extra-cellular space does not provide a scientific basis to construct accurate structural models of normal and malignant bladder tissue. Therefore, there is usually no quantitative discussion of cell sizes in literature but the measured data in this work can provide a reasonable estimation of expected morphological parameter changes of bladder tissue with pathology. To produce this quantitative information, and also, to build a suitable models in another study using electrical properties of the tissue, 10 digital images of histological sections of normal, and six sections from malignant areas of the human urinary bladder, were chosen randomly (ex vivo). Finally, the measured data showed that there is a significant difference between the cell dimensions (in basal and intermediate layers) of normal and malignant bladder tissues.

  10. Human cytomegalovirus antigens in malignant gliomas as targets for adoptive cellular therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eLandi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor in adults, with over 12,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year. Over the last decade, investigators have reliably identified human cytomegalovirus (HCMV proteins, nucleic acids, and virions in most high-grade gliomas, including glioblastoma (GBM. This discovery is significant because human cytomegalovirus gene products can be targeted by immune-based therapies.In this review, we describe the current level of understanding regarding the presence and role in pathogenesis of HCMV in GBM. We describe our success detecting and expanding HCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill GBM cells and explain how these cells can be used as a platform for enhanced cellular therapies. We discuss alternative approaches that capitalize on HCMV infection to treat patients with HCMV-positive tumors. Adoptive cellular therapy for HCMV-positive GBM has been tried in a small number of patients with some benefit, but we reason why, to date, these approaches generally fail to generate long-term remission or cure. We conjecture how cellular therapy for GBM can be improved and describe the barriers that must be overcome to cure these patients.

  11. Immunosuppressive effects of the standardized extract of Phyllanthus amarus on cellular immune responses in Wistar-Kyoto rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilangkovan M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Menaga Ilangkovan, Ibrahim Jantan, Mohamed Ahmed Mesaik, Syed Nasir Abbas BukhariDrug and Herbal Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaAbstract: Phyllanthus amarus (family: Euphorbiaceae is of immense interest due to its wide spectrum of biological activities. In the present study, the standardized 80% ethanol extract of P. amarus was investigated for its modulatory activity on various cellular immune parameters, including chemotaxis of neutrophils, engulfment of Escherichia coli by neutrophils, and Mac-1 expression, in leukocytes isolated from treated/nontreated Wistar-Kyoto rats. The detailed cell-mediated activity of P. amarus was also investigated, including analysis of the effects on T- and B-cell proliferation and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in splenic mononuclear cells, and estimation of serum cytokine production by activated T-cells. The main components of the extract, phyllanthin, hypophyllanthin, corilagin, geraniin, ellagic acid, and gallic acid were identified and quantitatively analyzed in the extracts, using validated reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC methods. N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP-induced neutrophils isolated from rats administered with the extract of P. amarus, at doses ranging from 100 to 400 mg/kg for 14 days, revealed a significant dose-dependent reduction in neutrophil migration (P<0.05. Similar patterns of inhibition were also observed in phagocytic activity and in fMLP-induced changes in expression of β2 integrin polymorphonuclear neutrophils. The results in P. amarus-treated rats also demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of both lipopolysaccharide-stimulated B-cell proliferation and concanavalin A–stimulated T-cell proliferation as compared with sensitized control. At a dose of 400 mg/kg (P<0.01, there was a significant decrease in the (% expression of CD4+ and CD8+ in splenocytes and in serum cytokines of T

  12. Testicular disorders induced by plant growth regulators: cellular protection with proanthocyanidins grape seeds extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hanaa A; Isa, Ahmed M; El-Kholy, Wafaa M; Nour, Samar E

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to investigate the adverse effects of plant growth regulators : gibberellic acid (GA3) and indoleacetic acid (IAA) on testicular functions in rats, and extends to investigate the possible protective role of grape seed extract, proanthocyanidin (PAC). Male rats were divided into six groups; control group, PAC, GA3, IAA, GA3 + PAC and IAA + PAC groups. The data showed that GA3 and IAA caused significant increase in total lipids, total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol in the serum, concomitant with a significant decrease in high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, total protein, and testosterone levels. In addition, there was significant decrease in the activity of alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase. A significant decrease was detected also in epididymyal fructose along with a significant reduction in sperm count. Testicular lipid peroxidation product and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were significantly increased. Meanwhile, the total antioxidant capacity, glutathione, sulphahydryl group content, as well as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity were significantly decreased. Moreover, there were a number of histopathological testicular changes including Leydig's cell degeneration, reduction in seminiferous tubule and necrotic symptoms and sperm degeneration in both GA3- and IAA-treated rats. However, an obvious recovery of all the above biochemical and histological testicular disorders was detected when PAC seed extract was supplemented to rats administered with GA3 or IAA indicating its protective effect. Therefore it was concluded that supplementation with PAC had ameliorative effects on those adverse effects of the mentioned plant growth regulators through its natural antioxidant properties.

  13. Immunosuppressive activity of Semen Persicae ethanol extract on specific antibody and cellular response to ovalbumin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Bin; Qin, Feng; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2006-09-01

    The immunosuppressive activity of the ethanol extract of Semen Persicae (EESP) was studied with respect to specific antibody and cellular response to ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. The effects of EESP on mice splenocyte proliferation in vitro were measured. EESP significantly suppressed concanavalin A (ConA)- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated splenocyte proliferation in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the effects of EESP at three dose levels on the humoral and cellular immune responses in the OVA-immunized mice were examined. ICR Mice were immunized subcutaneously with OVA on day 0 and 14. Starting on the day of immunization, the mice were administered intraperitoneally with EESP at a single dose of 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg, and cyclosporin A (CsA, positive drug) at a single dose of 0.1 mg at intervals of 7 days. On day 28, mitogen- and OVA-induced splenocyte proliferation and OVA-specific antibody level in serum were measured. EESP significantly decreased ConA-, LPS-, and OVA-induced splenocyte proliferation in the OVA-immunized mice at the dose of 1.0 mg. Meanwhile, the OVA-specific serum IgG, IgG1, and IgG2b antibody levels in the OVA-immunized mice were markedly reduced by EESP in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest that EESP could suppress the cellular and humoral immune response in mice, and deserve further research to be developed as immunosuppressant.

  14. Cellular characterization of human dermal fibroblasts, focus on mitochondria and maple syrup urine disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Guerra, Paula

    and functions are expressed in HDFs’ culture environment. Studies of molecular disease mechanisms often point to the involvement of mitochondria. Mitochondria are involved in the regulation of cell cycle and programmed cell death as well as cellular stress responses because they are the main producers......Cell phenotyping of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) from patients with inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) provide invaluable information for diagnosis, disease aetiology, predicting prognosis, and monitoring of treatments. HDFs possess the genetic composition of patients and many pathways...... of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Advances in technology help the study of complex situations with large amount of data, like cellular phenotyping in cell culture. Image cytometry is an emerging technique that combines morphological information and fluorescent intensity data from single cells. We defined...

  15. A cellular microRNA mediates antiviral defense in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Dunoyer, Patrice; Arar, Khalil; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Eyquem, Stephanie; Himber, Christophe; Saïb, Ali; Voinnet, Olivier

    2005-04-22

    In eukaryotes, 21- to 24-nucleotide-long RNAs engage in sequence-specific interactions that inhibit gene expression by RNA silencing. This process has regulatory roles involving microRNAs and, in plants and insects, it also forms the basis of a defense mechanism directed by small interfering RNAs that derive from replicative or integrated viral genomes. We show that a cellular microRNA effectively restricts the accumulation of the retrovirus primate foamy virus type 1 (PFV-1) in human cells. PFV-1 also encodes a protein, Tas, that suppresses microRNA-directed functions in mammalian cells and displays cross-kingdom antisilencing activities. Therefore, through fortuitous recognition of foreign nucleic acids, cellular microRNAs have direct antiviral effects in addition to their regulatory functions.

  16. Ebola virion attachment and entry into human macrophages profoundly effects early cellular gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Wahl-Jensen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV infections are associated with high lethality in primates. ZEBOV primarily targets mononuclear phagocytes, which are activated upon infection and secrete mediators believed to trigger initial stages of pathogenesis. The characterization of the responses of target cells to ZEBOV infection may therefore not only further understanding of pathogenesis but also suggest possible points of therapeutic intervention. Gene expression profiles of primary human macrophages exposed to ZEBOV were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative PCR to gain insight into the cellular response immediately after cell entry. Significant changes in mRNA concentrations encoding for 88 cellular proteins were observed. Most of these proteins have not yet been implicated in ZEBOV infection. Some, however, are inflammatory mediators known to be elevated during the acute phase of disease in the blood of ZEBOV-infected humans. Interestingly, the cellular response occurred within the first hour of Ebola virion exposure, i.e. prior to virus gene expression. This observation supports the hypothesis that virion binding or entry mediated by the spike glycoprotein (GP(1,2 is the primary stimulus for an initial response. Indeed, ZEBOV virions, LPS, and virus-like particles consisting of only the ZEBOV matrix protein VP40 and GP(1,2 (VLP(VP40-GP triggered comparable responses in macrophages, including pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signals. In contrast, VLP(VP40 (particles lacking GP(1,2 caused an aberrant response. This suggests that GP(1,2 binding to macrophages plays an important role in the immediate cellular response.

  17. Longevity and composition of cellular immune responses following experimental Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne C Teirlinck

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to Plasmodium falciparum parasites, in particular interferon-gamma (IFNγ production, play an important role in anti-malarial immunity. However, clinical immunity to malaria develops slowly amongst naturally exposed populations, the dynamics of cellular responses in relation to exposure are difficult to study and data about the persistence of such responses are controversial. Here we assess the longevity and composition of cellular immune responses following experimental malaria infection in human volunteers. We conducted a longitudinal study of cellular immunological responses to sporozoites (PfSpz and asexual blood-stage (PfRBC malaria parasites in naïve human volunteers undergoing single (n = 5 or multiple (n = 10 experimental P. falciparum infections under highly controlled conditions. IFNγ and interleukin-2 (IL-2 responses following in vitro re-stimulation were measured by flow-cytometry prior to, during and more than one year post infection. We show that cellular responses to both PfSpz and PfRBC are induced and remain almost undiminished up to 14 months after even a single malaria episode. Remarkably, not only 'adaptive' but also 'innate' lymphocyte subsets contribute to the increased IFNγ response, including αβT cells, γδT cells and NK cells. Furthermore, results from depletion and autologous recombination experiments of lymphocyte subsets suggest that immunological memory for PfRBC is carried within both the αβT cells and γδT compartments. Indeed, the majority of cytokine producing T lymphocytes express an CD45RO(+ CD62L(- effector memory (EM phenotype both early and late post infection. Finally, we demonstrate that malaria infection induces and maintains polyfunctional (IFNγ(+IL-2(+ EM responses against both PfRBC and PfSpz, previously found to be associated with protection. These data demonstrate that cellular responses can be readily induced and are long-lived following infection with P

  18. Sterilisation of extracted human teeth for educational use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty intact, non-carious and unrestored teeth extracted due to periodontal disease were used to determine the most effective method of sterilisation. The teeth were divided into six groups, each containing 10 teeth. Group 1 teeth were immersed in 10% formalin for seven days, group 2 teeth were immersed in 3% hydrogen peroxide for seven days, group 3 teeth were immersed in 2.6% sodium hypochlorite for seven days, group 4 teeth were boiled in water at 100°C for 20 minutes, group 5 teeth were autoclaved at 121°C at 15 lbs psi for 30 minutes, and group 6 teeth were immersed in normal saline for seven days. After the treatment, the teeth were individually inoculated into trypticase soy broth and incubated for 48 hours. A questionnaire survey was also conducted to determine the awareness of dental students regarding infection due to extracted human teeth and the common disinfection/sterilisation methods used. Autoclaving at 121°C, 15 lbs psi for 30 minutes and immersion in 10% formalin for seven days were effective in disinfecting/sterilising extracted human teeth. Chemicals such as 2.6% sodium hypochlorite, 3% hydrogen peroxide and boiling in water were not effective. The results indicate that autoclaving for 30 minutes or immersion in 10% formalin for seven days could be effectively used for disinfection/sterilisation of extracted human teeth.

  19. Cellular Anti-Melanogenic Effects of a Euryale ferox Seed Extract Ethyl Acetate Fraction via the Lysosomal Degradation Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hwa Baek

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ethyl acetate fraction of Euryale ferox seed extracts (Efse-EA on melanogenesis in immortalized mouse melanocyte cell line, melan-a. Efse-EA showed strong dose-dependent mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity. Treatment of melan-a cells with 30 μg/mL Efse-EA produced strong inhibition of cellular tyrosinase and melanin synthesis. Efse-EA significantly reduced the levels of melanogenesis-related proteins, such as tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Because Efse-EA treatment reduced tyrosinase protein levels without changing its mRNA expression, we investigated whether this decrease was related to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase. We found that chloroquine, a lysosomal proteolysis inhibitor, almost completely abolished both the down-regulation of tyrosinase and the inhibition of melanin synthesis induced by Efse-EA. These results suggested that Efse-EA may contribute to the inhibition of melanogenesis by altering lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase, and that this extract may provide a new cosmetic skin-whitening agent.

  20. Cellular Anti-Melanogenic Effects of a Euryale ferox Seed Extract Ethyl Acetate Fraction via the Lysosomal Degradation Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Hwa; Nam, In-Jeong; Kwak, Hyeong Seob; Kim, Ki-Chan; Lee, Sang-Han

    2015-04-23

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ethyl acetate fraction of Euryale ferox seed extracts (Efse-EA) on melanogenesis in immortalized mouse melanocyte cell line, melan-a. Efse-EA showed strong dose-dependent mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity. Treatment of melan-a cells with 30 μg/mL Efse-EA produced strong inhibition of cellular tyrosinase and melanin synthesis. Efse-EA significantly reduced the levels of melanogenesis-related proteins, such as tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Because Efse-EA treatment reduced tyrosinase protein levels without changing its mRNA expression, we investigated whether this decrease was related to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase. We found that chloroquine, a lysosomal proteolysis inhibitor, almost completely abolished both the down-regulation of tyrosinase and the inhibition of melanin synthesis induced by Efse-EA. These results suggested that Efse-EA may contribute to the inhibition of melanogenesis by altering lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase, and that this extract may provide a new cosmetic skin-whitening agent.

  1. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Barany, M.; Arus, C.

    1986-03-01

    Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference.

  2. Cellular expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor in the human antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V C; Sagot, M A; Wong, H; Buchan, A M

    2000-03-15

    The localization of the neurokinin 1 receptor in rat and guinea pig gastrointestinal tract has been extensively studied but not in human tissues. The present study used antibodies to characterize the cellular expression of neurokinin 1 receptors in human antrum. Cryostat sections (40-80 microm) were immunostained for the neurokinin 1 receptor double labeled with substance P, von Willebrand's factor, c-kit, fibronectin, S-100, serotonin, gastrin and somatostatin. Neurokinin 1 receptor-immunoreactivity was observed on neurons within the myenteric and submucosal plexuses surrounded by substance P-immunoreactive fibers and on von Willebrand's factor-immunoreactive endothelial cells lining blood vessels throughout the antral wall. c-Kit-immunoreactive interstitial cells of Cajal and gastrin cells were co-stained by the monoclonal neurokinin 1 receptor antibody. Finally, there was no evidence for the presence of the neurokinin 1 receptor on fibroblasts, Schwann, somatostatin, serotonin or smooth muscle cells. This study clearly demonstrates an expanded cellular expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor in the human antrum.

  3. Effects of Rosmarinus officinalis extract on human primary omental preadipocytes and adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanon, Bruno; Pomari, Elena; Colitti, Monica

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing all over the world. Although it has been shown that natural substances influence fat metabolism, little is known about the effect on cellular and molecular mechanisms in human. In this in vitro study, the activity of Rosmarinus officinalis (RO) standardized extract in modulating human primary visceral preadipocytes differentiation, lipolysis, and apoptosis was investigated. Moreover, gene expression of key adipogenesis modulators and microRNAs-seq were evaluated. Preadipocytes treated with RO extract significantly reduced triglyceride incorporation during maturation in a dose-dependent manner without affecting cell viability. In addition, RO extract stimulated lipolytic activity in differentiating preadipocytes and mature adipocytes in treated cells compared to controls. Differentiating preadipocytes incubated in the presence of RO extract showed a decreased expression of cell cycle genes such as cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21, Cip1) and an increased expression of GATA binding protein 3, wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 3A mRNA levels. Recent studies have demonstrated that some phytochemicals alter the expression of specific genes and microRNAs that play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of obesity and related diseases. Interestingly, genes modulated in RO-treated cells were found to be validated miRNAs targets, such as let-7f-1, miR-17, and miR-143. The results indicated that RO extract modulates human adipocyte differentiation and significantly interferes with adipogenesis and lipid metabolism, supporting its interest as dietary supplement.

  4. In situ amplification of DNA fragments specific for human Y chromosome in cellular nuclei by PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锡元; 姜海波; 李立家; 马琦; 杨建琪; 刘汀

    1996-01-01

    Using single primer pairs Y3 and Y4, in siru polymerase chain reaction (in situ PCR) was successfully performed on the specimen slides of peripheral leukocytes. By both of the direct digpxiginin-11-dUTP incorporation into PCR products with in situ PCR (direct in situ PCR) and in situ PCR followed by detection of in situ hybridization (indirect in siru PCR), DNA fragments specific for human Y chromosome were obviously amplified in cellular nuclei of specimens on the slides. The results were verified by Southern analysis. The methodology of in situ PCR and its application were discussed.

  5. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing FENG; Lai-ji MA; Jin-jing YAO; Yun FANG; Yan-ai MEI; Shao-min WEI

    2013-01-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties;no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level.Therefore,the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide(H2O2).Kjeldahl determination,phenol-sulfuric acid method,and high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%,of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1301.01 Da.Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH)radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity.3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide(MTT)colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling(TUNEL)assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H2O2 in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis.Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H2O2,but application oat peptides with H2O2 at same time did not.Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H2O2-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase(SOD)and the inhibition of malondialdehyde(MDA).The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H2O2-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level.Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury.

  6. Role of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans in infection of human adenovirus serotype 3 and 35.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Tuve

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Species B human adenoviruses (Ads are increasingly associated with outbreaks of acute respiratory disease in U.S. military personnel and civil population. The initial interaction of Ads with cellular attachment receptors on host cells is via Ad fiber knob protein. Our previous studies showed that one species B Ad receptor is the complement receptor CD46 that is used by serotypes 11, 16, 21, 35, and 50 but not by serotypes 3, 7, and 14. In this study, we attempted to identify yet-unknown species B cellular receptors. For this purpose we used recombinant Ad3 and Ad35 fiber knobs in high-throughput receptor screening methods including mass spectrometry analysis and glycan arrays. Surprisingly, we found that the main interacting surface molecules of Ad3 fiber knob are cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. We subsequently found that HSPGs acted as low-affinity co-receptors for Ad3 but did not represent the main receptor of this serotype. Our study also revealed a new CD46-independent infection pathway of Ad35. This Ad35 infection mechanism is mediated by cellular HSPGs. The interaction of Ad35 with HSPGs is not via fiber knob, whereas Ad3 interacts with HSPGs via fiber knob. Both Ad3 and Ad35 interacted specifically with the sulfated regions within HSPGs that have also been implicated in binding physiologic ligands. In conclusion, our findings show that Ad3 and Ad35 directly utilize HSPGs as co-receptors for infection. Our data suggest that adenoviruses evolved to simulate the presence of physiologic HSPG ligands in order to increase infection.

  7. Clonal priming of human lymphocytes: Specificity and cross-reactivity of cellular immune reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, W R; Datiner, A M

    1977-04-23

    Clonal priming in response to chemical and microbial antigens which defines the specificity of cellular immune reactions, was demonstrated by culture techniques. Human leucocyte cultures stimulated with specific antigens typically show peak levels of D.N.A. synthesis after 5 to 7 days in culture. Such primary leucocyte cultures were incubated for 10-20 days, then the cells were gently centrifuged and resuspended in fresh RPMI 1640 with 20% plasma. These secondary or primed cultures typically showed less than 1000 c.p.m. after 48 hours. However, if the original antigenic stimulant was added, specific accelerated responses were seen by 48 hours in the secondary cultures. Lymphocyte clones in these sceondary cultures primed with dinitrophenylated (D.N.P.) antigens (from subjects sensitised to dinitrochlorobenzene) showed enhanced D.N.A. sythesis in response to the same dinitrophenylated antigens and showed varible accelerated responses to related chemically modified antigens. However, D.N.P.-activated clones in these secondary cultures did not show enhanced responses to microbial antigens even though the lymphocytes had been highly responsive to tetanus toxoid and other microbial antigens in primary cultures. The specificity of this clonal activation was further demonstrated by the enhanced response of secondary cultures of tetanus-toxoid-activated clones to tetanus toxoid but not to dinitrophenylated antigens. The abiltty to detect specificity and cross-reactivity of cellular immune reaction has broad implications for investigations of cellular immunity as well as many potential applications in the diagnosis and understanding the patogenesis of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases in which cellular immune discrimination may be involved.

  8. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hafis Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bum-Chan [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su-Hyung [Laboratory of Translational Immunology and Vaccinology, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eui-Cheol, E-mail: ecshin@kaist.ac.kr [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  9. Rapid extraction and preservation of genomic DNA from human samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundaram, D; Kim, J-H; Yeo, W-H; Oh, K; Lee, K-H; Kim, M-H; Ryew, S-M; Ahn, S-G; Gao, D; Cangelosi, G A; Chung, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Simple and rapid extraction of human genomic DNA remains a bottleneck for genome analysis and disease diagnosis. Current methods using microfilters require cumbersome, multiple handling steps in part because salt conditions must be controlled for attraction and elution of DNA in porous silica. We report a novel extraction method of human genomic DNA from buccal swab and saliva samples. DNA is attracted onto a gold-coated microchip by an electric field and capillary action while the captured DNA is eluted by thermal heating at 70 °C. A prototype device was designed to handle four microchips, and a compatible protocol was developed. The extracted DNA using microchips was characterized by qPCR for different sample volumes, using different lengths of PCR amplicon, and nuclear and mitochondrial genes. In comparison with a commercial kit, an equivalent yield of DNA extraction was achieved with fewer steps. Room-temperature preservation for 1 month was demonstrated for captured DNA, facilitating straightforward collection, delivery, and handling of genomic DNA in an environment-friendly protocol.

  10. Water extraction on Mars for an expanding human colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralphs, M; Franz, B; Baker, T; Howe, S

    2015-11-01

    In-situ water extraction is necessary for an extended human presence on Mars. This study looks at the water requirements of an expanding human colony on Mars and the general systems needed to supply that water from the martian atmosphere and regolith. The proposed combination of systems in order to supply the necessary water includes a system similar to Honeybee Robotics' Mobile In-Situ Water Extractor (MISWE) that uses convection, a system similar to MISWE but that directs microwave energy down a borehole, a greenhouse or hothouse type system, and a system similar to the Mars Atmospheric Resource Recovery System (MARRS). It is demonstrated that a large water extraction system that can take advantage of large deposits of water ice at site specific locations is necessary to keep up with the demands of a growing colony.

  11. Increase of cellular recruitment, phagocytosis ability and nitric oxide production induced by hydroalcoholic extract from Chenopodium ambrosioides leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Gustavo V B; Pereira, Paulo Vitor S; Patrício, Fernando J; Costa, Graciomar C; Sousa, Sanara M; Frazão, Josias B; Aragão-Filho, Walmir C; Maciel, Márcia C G; Silva, Lucilene A; Amaral, Flávia M M; Barroqueiro, Elizabeth S B; Guerra, Rosane N M; Nascimento, Flávia R F

    2007-04-20

    The leaves and the oil from the seeds of Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Chenopodiaceae), a plant known in Brazil as 'mastruz', have been used by native people to treat parasitic diseases. Experimentally it was shown that Chenopodium ambrosioides inhibits the Ehrlich tumor growth, what could be due to an immunomodulatory effect of this product. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydroalcoholic crude extract (HCE) from leaves of Chenopodium ambrosioides on macrophage activity and on lymphoid organs cellularity. C3H/HePas mice received the HCE (5mg/kg) by intraperitoneal via and were sacrificed 2 days later. HCE treatment did not alter the cell number in bone marrow, but it increased the cell number in peritoneal cavity, spleen and lymph node. The spreading and phagocytosis activity, the PMA-induced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) release and the nitric oxide (NO) production were also increased when compared to control group. Similar results were obtained with concanavalin A (Con A), used as a positive control, with exception of the NO production that was only detected in HCE-derived macrophages. The in vitro treatment with HCE induced a dose-dependent NO production by resident macrophages, but did not enhance the NO production by HCE-derived macrophage, which however, was enhanced by Con A, suggesting that HCE and Con A induce NO production by different routes. In conclusion, HCE-treatment was able to increase the macrophages activity and also the cellular recruitment to secondary lymphoid organs, what could explain the previously related anti-tumor activity of Chenopodium ambrosioides.

  12. Isolation of cellular lipid droplets: two purification techniques starting from yeast cells and human placentas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannik, Jaana; Meyers, Alex; Dalhaimer, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Lipid droplets are dynamic organelles that can be found in most eukaryotic and certain prokaryotic cells. Structurally, the droplets consist of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer. One of the most useful techniques in determining the cellular roles of droplets has been proteomic identification of bound proteins, which can be isolated along with the droplets. Here, two methods are described to isolate lipid droplets and their bound proteins from two wide-ranging eukaryotes: fission yeast and human placental villous cells. Although both techniques have differences, the main method-- density gradient centrifugation--is shared by both preparations. This shows the wide applicability of the presented droplet isolation techniques. In the first protocol, yeast cells are converted into spheroplasts by enzymatic digestion of their cell walls. The resulting spheroplasts are then gently lysed in a loose-fitting homogenizer. Ficoll is added to the lysate to provide a density gradient, and the mixture is centrifuged three times. After the first spin, the lipid droplets are localized to the white-colored floating layer of the centrifuge tubes along with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the plasma membrane, and vacuoles. Two subsequent spins are used to remove these other three organelles. The result is a layer that has only droplets and bound proteins. In the second protocol, placental villous cells are isolated from human term placentas by enzymatic digestion with trypsin and DNase I. The cells are homogenized in a loose-fitting homogenizer. Low-speed and medium-speed centrifugation steps are used to remove unbroken cells, cellular debris, nuclei, and mitochondria. Sucrose is added to the homogenate to provide a density gradient and the mixture is centrifuged to separate the lipid droplets from the other cellular fractions. The purity of the lipid droplets in both protocols is confirmed by Western Blot analysis. The droplet fractions from both preps

  13. Gene markers of cellular aging in human multipotent stromal cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellayr, Ian H; Catalano, Jennifer G; Lababidi, Samir; Yang, Amy X; Lo Surdo, Jessica L; Bauer, Steven R; Puri, Raj K

    2014-04-28

    Human multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow or other tissue sources have great potential to treat a wide range of injuries and disorders in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In particular, MSCs have inherent characteristics to suppress the immune system and are being studied in clinical studies to prevent graft-versus-host disease. MSCs can be expanded in vitro and have potential for differentiation into multiple cell lineages. However, the impact of cell passaging on gene expression and function of the cells has not been determined. Commercially available human MSCs derived from bone marrow from six different donors, grown under identical culture conditions and harvested at cell passages 3, 5, and 7, were analyzed with gene-expression profiling by using microarray technology. The phenotype of these cells did not change as reported previously; however, a statistical analysis revealed a set of 78 significant genes that were distinguishable in expression between passages 3 and 7. None of these significant genes corresponded to the markers established by the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) for MSC identification. When the significant gene lists were analyzed through pathway analysis, these genes were involved in the top-scoring networks of cellular growth and proliferation and cellular development. A meta-analysis of the literature for significant genes revealed that the MSCs seem to be undergoing differentiation into a senescent cell type when cultured extensively. Consistent with the differences in gene expression at passage 3 and 7, MSCs exhibited a significantly greater potential for cell division at passage 3 in comparison to passage 7. Our results identified specific gene markers that distinguish aging MSCs grown in cell culture. Confirmatory studies are needed to correlate these molecular markers with biologic attributes that may facilitate the development of assays to test the quality of MSCs

  14. Anti-Proliferative Effect of Rosmarinus officinalis L. Extract on Human Melanoma A375 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Lucia; Cicconi, Rosella; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Giorgi, Alessandra; Mattei, Maurizio; Graziani, Giulia; Ferracane, Rosalia; Grosso, Alessandro; Aducci, Patrizia; Schininà, M Eugenia; Marra, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) has been used since ancient times in traditional medicine, while nowadays various rosemary formulations are increasingly exploited by alternative medicine to cure or prevent a wide range of health disorders. Rosemary's bioproperties have prompted scientific investigation, which allowed us to ascertain antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytostatic, and cytotoxic activities of crude extracts or of pure components. Although there is a growing body of experimental work, information about rosemary's anticancer properties, such as chemoprotective or anti-proliferative effects on cancer cells, is very poor, especially concerning the mechanism of action. Melanoma is a skin tumor whose diffusion is rapidly increasing in the world and whose malignancy is reinforced by its high resistance to cytotoxic agents; hence the availability of new cytotoxic drugs would be very helpful to improve melanoma prognosis. Here we report on the effect of a rosemary hydroalcoholic extract on the viability of the human melanoma A375 cell line. Main components of rosemary extract were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) and the effect of the crude extract or of pure components on the proliferation of cancer cells was tested by MTT and Trypan blue assays. The effect on cell cycle was investigated by using flow cytometry, and the alteration of the cellular redox state was evaluated by intracellular ROS levels and protein carbonylation analysis. Furthermore, in order to get information about the molecular mechanisms of cytotoxicity, a comparative proteomic investigation was performed.

  15. CD16 is indispensable for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Kok Loon; Shimasaki, Noriko; Teo, Esmeralda Chi Yuan; Quek, Jeffrey Kim Siang; Yong, Hao Xiang; Diong, Colin Phipps; Bertoletti, Antonio; Linn, Yeh Ching; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is exerted by immune cells expressing surface Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) against cells coated with antibody, such as virus-infected or transformed cells. CD16, the FcγRIIIA, is essential for ADCC by NK cells, and is also expressed by a subset of human blood monocytes. We found that human CD16− expressing monocytes have a broad spectrum of ADCC capacities and can kill cancer cell lines, primary leukemic cells and hepatitis B virus-infected cells in the presence of specific antibodies. Engagement of CD16 on monocytes by antibody bound to target cells activated β2-integrins and induced TNFα secretion. In turn, this induced TNFR expression on the target cells, making them susceptible to TNFα-mediated cell death. Treatment with TLR agonists, DAMPs or cytokines, such as IFNγ, further enhanced ADCC. Monocytes lacking CD16 did not exert ADCC but acquired this property after CD16 expression was induced by either cytokine stimulation or transient transfection. Notably, CD16+ monocytes from patients with leukemia also exerted potent ADCC. Hence, CD16+ monocytes are important effectors of ADCC, suggesting further developments of this property in the context of cellular therapies for cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:27670158

  16. A Cellular Star Atlas: Using Astrocytes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eKrencik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available What roles do astrocytes play in human disease? This question remains unanswered for nearly every human neurological disorder. Yet, because of their abundance and complexity astrocytes can impact neurological function in many ways. The differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs into neuronal and glial subtypes, including astrocytes, is becoming routine, thus their use as tools for modeling neurodevelopment and disease will provide one important approach to answer this question. When designing experiments, careful consideration must be given to choosing paradigms for differentiation, maturation, and functional analysis of these temporally asynchronous cellular populations in culture. In the case of astrocytes, they display heterogeneous characteristics depending upon species of origin, brain region, developmental stage, environmental factors, and disease states, all of which may render experimental results highly variable. In this review, challenges and future directions are discussed for using hPSC-derived astroglial progenitors and mature astrocytes for neurodevelopmental studies with a focus on exploring human astrocyte effects upon neuronal function. As new technologies emerge to measure the functions of astrocytes in vitro and in vivo, there is also a need for a standardized source of human astrocytes that are most relevant to the diseases of interest.

  17. Chemical Characterization, Free Radical Scavenging, and Cellular Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of a Stilbenoid-Rich Root Extract of Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Ewald, Philipp; Yasui, Yoshiaki; Yokokawa, Haruka; Wagner, Anika E; Matsugo, Seiichi; Winterhalter, Peter; Rimbach, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dietary stilbenoids are receiving increasing attention due to their potential health benefits. However, most studies concerning the bioactivity of stilbenoids were conducted with pure compounds, for example, resveratrol. The aim of this study was to characterize a complex root extract of Vitis vinifera in terms of its free radical scavenging and cellular antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses of the root extract of Vitis vinifera identified seven stilbenoids including two monomeric (resveratrol and piceatannol), two dimeric (trans-ɛ-viniferin and ampelopsin A), one trimeric (miyabenol C), and two tetrameric (r-2-viniferin = vitisin A and r-viniferin = vitisin B) compounds which may mediate its biological activity. Electron spin resonance and spin trapping experiments indicate that the root extract scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl, galvinoxyl, and superoxide free radicals. On a cellular level it was observed that the root extract of Vitis vinifera protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage and induces Nrf2 and its target genes heme oxygenase-1 and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. Furthermore, the root extract could induce the antiatherogenic hepatic enzyme paraoxonase 1 and downregulate proinflammatory gene expression (interleukin 1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase) in macrophages. Collectively our data suggest that the root extract of Vitis vinifera exhibits free radical scavenging as well as cellular antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  18. Effects of cellular origin on differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shijun; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Shao, Ning-Yi; Lee, Won Hee; Chen, Haodong; Snyder, Michael P; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-06-02

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from various types of somatic cells by transient overexpression of 4 Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4). Patient-specific iPSC derivatives (e.g., neuronal, cardiac, hepatic, muscular, and endothelial cells [ECs]) hold great promise in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the cellular origin can affect the differentiation, in vivo behavior, and single-cell gene expression signatures of human iPSC-derived ECs. We derived human iPSCs from 3 types of somatic cells of the same individuals: fibroblasts (FB-iPSCs), ECs (EC-iPSCs), and cardiac progenitor cells (CPC-iPSCs). We then differentiated them into ECs by sequential administration of Activin, BMP4, bFGF, and VEGF. EC-iPSCs at early passage (10 < P < 20) showed higher EC differentiation propensity and gene expression of EC-specific markers (PECAM1 and NOS3) than FB-iPSCs and CPC-iPSCs. In vivo transplanted EC-iPSC-ECs were recovered with a higher percentage of CD31(+) population and expressed higher EC-specific gene expression markers (PECAM1, KDR, and ICAM) as revealed by microfluidic single-cell quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro EC-iPSC-ECs maintained a higher CD31(+) population than FB-iPSC-ECs and CPC-iPSC-ECs with long-term culturing and passaging. These results indicate that cellular origin may influence lineage differentiation propensity of human iPSCs; hence, the somatic memory carried by early passage iPSCs should be carefully considered before clinical translation.

  19. Effects of cellular origin on differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell–derived endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming-Tao; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Lee, Won Hee; Snyder, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from various types of somatic cells by transient overexpression of 4 Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4). Patient-specific iPSC derivatives (e.g., neuronal, cardiac, hepatic, muscular, and endothelial cells [ECs]) hold great promise in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the cellular origin can affect the differentiation, in vivo behavior, and single-cell gene expression signatures of human iPSC–derived ECs. We derived human iPSCs from 3 types of somatic cells of the same individuals: fibroblasts (FB-iPSCs), ECs (EC-iPSCs), and cardiac progenitor cells (CPC-iPSCs). We then differentiated them into ECs by sequential administration of Activin, BMP4, bFGF, and VEGF. EC-iPSCs at early passage (10 < P < 20) showed higher EC differentiation propensity and gene expression of EC-specific markers (PECAM1 and NOS3) than FB-iPSCs and CPC-iPSCs. In vivo transplanted EC-iPSC–ECs were recovered with a higher percentage of CD31+ population and expressed higher EC-specific gene expression markers (PECAM1, KDR, and ICAM) as revealed by microfluidic single-cell quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro EC-iPSC–ECs maintained a higher CD31+ population than FB-iPSC–ECs and CPC-iPSC–ECs with long-term culturing and passaging. These results indicate that cellular origin may influence lineage differentiation propensity of human iPSCs; hence, the somatic memory carried by early passage iPSCs should be carefully considered before clinical translation. PMID:27398408

  20. Hepatotoxicity and metabolic effects of cellular extract of cyanobacterium Radiocystis fernandoi containing microcystins RR and YR on neotropical fish (Hoplias malabaricus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Marcelo Gustavo; Rossi, Priscila Adriana; Venturini, Francine Perri; Tavares, Driele; Elisabete da Silva Souza, Naiara; Sakuragui, Marise Margareth; Moraes, Gilberto; Terezan, Ana Paula; Fernandes, João Batista; Giani, Alessandra; Fernandes, Marisa Narciso

    2017-05-01

    The toxicological effect of cellular extract of cyanobacterium Radiocystis fernandoi strain R28 containing RR and YR microcystins was analyzed in the fish Hoplias malabaricus with emphasis on the liver structure and energetic metabolism, after short-term exposure. Fish were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with 100 μg of equivalent MC-LR kg(-1) body mass containing in the cellular extract of R. fernandoi strain R28. Twelve and 96 h post-injection, the plasma, liver and white muscle were sampled for biochemical analyses and liver was also sampled for morphological analyses. After i.p. injection, the activity of acid phosphatase (ACP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and direct bilirubin increased in the plasma, while ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) decreased in the liver. Glucose, lactate and pyruvate increased while protein decreased in the plasma; glycogen, pyruvate and lactate decreased in the liver; and glycogen and glucose increased in the muscle. Ammonia increased in the plasma, liver and muscle. The hepatocyte cell shape changed from polyhedral to round after cellular extract injection; there was loss of biliary canaliculus organization, but the biliary duct morphology was conserved in the liver parenchyma. In conclusion, microcystins present in the cellular extract of R. fernandoi strain R28 affect the liver structure of H. malabaricus, but the liver was able to continuously produce energy by adjusting its intermediate metabolism; glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis maintained glucose homeostasis and energy supply.

  1. Trinucleotide repeat expansions catalyzed by human cell-free extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer R Stevens; Elaine E Lahue; Guo-Min Li; Robert S Lahue

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions cause 17 heritable human neurological disorders.In some diseases,somatic expansions occur in non-proliferating tissues such as brain where DNA replication is limited.This finding stimulated significant interest in replication-independent expansion mechanisms.Aberrant DNA repair is a likely source,based in part on mouse studies showing that somatic expansions are provoked by the DNA repair protein MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3complex).Biochemical studies to date used cell-free extracts or purified DNA repair proteins to yield partial reactions at triplet repeats.The findings included expansions on one strand but not the other,or processing of DNA hairpin structures thought to be important intermediates in the expansion process.However,it has been difficult to recapitulate complete expansions in vitro,and the biochemical role of MutSβ remains controversial.Here,we use a novel in vitro assay to show that human cell-free extracts catalyze expansions and contractions of trinucleotide repeats without the requirement for DNA replication.The extract promotes a size range of expansions that is similar to certain diseases,and triplet repeat length and sequence govern expansions in vitro as in vivo.MutSβ stimulates expansions in the extract,consistent with aberrant repair of endogenous DNA damage as a source of expansions.Overall,this biochemical system retains the key characteristics of somatic expansions in humans and mice,suggesting that this important mutagenic process can be restored in the test tube.

  2. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangli Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time cellular neural network that can realize a nonlinear filter is proposed. This structure decreases the memory demand through the removal of data dependency. Thirdly, a hardware-friendly descriptor is introduced in order to overcome the hardware design bottleneck through the polar sample pattern; a simplified method to realize rotation invariance is also presented. Finally, the proposed architecture is designed in TSMC 65 nm CMOS technology. The experimental results show a performance of 127 fps in full HD resolution at 200 MHz frequency. The peak performance reaches 181 GOPS and the throughput is double the speed of other state-of-the-art architectures.

  3. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Zhu, Wenping; Yin, Shouyi; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-09-04

    This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time cellular neural network) that can realize a nonlinear filter is proposed. This structure decreases the memory demand through the removal of data dependency. Thirdly, a hardware-friendly descriptor is introduced in order to overcome the hardware design bottleneck through the polar sample pattern; a simplified method to realize rotation invariance is also presented. Finally, the proposed architecture is designed in TSMC 65 nm CMOS technology. The experimental results show a performance of 127 fps in full HD resolution at 200 MHz frequency. The peak performance reaches 181 GOPS and the throughput is double the speed of other state-of-the-art architectures.

  4. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells by which Total Saponin Extracted from Tribulus Terrestris Protects Against Artherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengquan Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Total saponin extracted from Tribulus terrestris (TSETT has been reported to protect against atherosclerosis. We here investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of TSETT underlying protection against atherosclerosis. Methods: Cell proliferation was measured with Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT; Intracellular H2O2 was measured with DCFH-DA, a fluorescent dye; Intracellular free Ca2+ was measured with a confocal laser scanning microscopy; Genes expression was measured with gene array and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (phospho-ERK1/2 was measured with cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and western blotting. Results: TSETT significantly suppressed the increase in cells proliferation induced by angiotensin II, significantly suppressed the increase in the intracellular production of H2O2 induced by angiotensin II, significantly inhibited the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ induced by H2O2, significantly inhibited the increase in phospho-ERK1/2 induced by angiotensin II; significantly inhibited the increase in mRNA expression of c-fos, c-jun and pkc-α induced by angiotensin II. Conclusion: These findings provide a new insight into the antiatherosclerotic properties of TSETT and provide a pharmacological basis for the clinical application of TSETT in anti-atherosclerosis.

  5. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1.

  6. Cellular and molecular alterations in human epithelial cells transformed by high let radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Sutter, T.; Willey, J. C.; Suzuki, K.

    An understanding of the radiobiological effects of high LET radiation is essential for human risk estimation and radiation protection. In the present study, we show that a single, 30 cGy dose of 150 keV/mum ^4He ions can malignantly transform human papillomavirus immortalized human bronchial epithelial [BEP2D] cells. Transformed cells produce progressively growing tumors in nude mice. The transformation frequency by the single dose of alpha particles is estimated to be approximately 4 x 10^-7. Based on the average cross-sectional area of BEP2D cells, it can be calculated that a mean traversal of 1.4 particles per cell is sufficient to induce tumorigenic conversion of these cells 3 to 4 months post-irradiation. Tumorigenic BEP2D cells overexpress mutated p53 tumor suppressor oncoproteins in addition to the cell cycle control gene cyclin D1 and D2. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular changes at the various stages in radiation carcinogenesis involving human cells.

  7. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-09-02

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown.

  8. Cellular and biomolecular responses of human ovarian cancer cells to cytostatic dinuclear platinum(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Miaoxin; Wang, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Jianhui; Fan, Damin; Zhang, Yangmiao; Zhang, Junfeng; Guo, Zijian

    2011-03-01

    Polynuclear platinum(II) complexes represent a class of potential anticancer agents that have shown promising pharmacological properties in preclinical studies. The nature of cellular responses induced by these complexes, however, is poorly understood. In this research, the cellular responses of human ovarian cancer COC1 cells to dinuclear platinum(II) complexes {[cis-Pt(NH₃)₂Cl]₂L¹}(NO₃)₂ (1) and {[cis-Pt(NH₃)₂Cl]₂L²}(NO₃)₂ (2) (L¹ = α,α'-diamino-p-xylene, L² = 4,4'-methylenedianiline) has been studied using cisplatin as a reference. The effect of platinum complexes on the proliferation, death mode, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell cycle progression has been examined by MTT assay and flow cytometry. The activation of cell cycle checkpoint kinases (CHK1/2), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) of the cells by the complexes has also been analyzed using phospho-specific flow cytometry. Complex 1 is more cytotoxic than complex 2 and cisplatin at most concentrations; complex 2 and cisplatin are comparably cytotoxic. These complexes kill the cells through an apoptotic or apoptosis-like pathway characterized by exposure of phosphatidylserine and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Complex 1 shows the strongest inductive effect on the morphological changes of the cells, followed by cisplatin and complex 2. Complexes 1 and 2 arrest the cell cycle in G2 or M phase, while cisplatin arrests the cell cycle in S phase. The influence of these complexes on CHK1/2, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK varies with the dose of the drugs or reaction time. Activation of phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-p38 MAPK by these complexes is closely related to the cytostatic activity. The results demonstrate that dinuclear platinum(II) complexes can induce some cellular responses different from those caused by cisplatin.

  9. CBFA1 and topoisomerase I mRNA levels decline during cellular aging of human trabecular osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, M; Kveiborg, Marie; Kassem, M

    2000-01-01

    reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). There is a progressive and significant reduction of the CBFA1 steady-state mRNA level down to 50% during cellular aging of human osteoblasts. In comparison to the normal cells, human osteosarcoma cell lines SaOS-2 and KHOS/NP, and the SV40...

  10. Extending breath analysis to the cellular level: current thoughts on the human microbiome and the expression of organic compounds in the human exposome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human biomarkers are comprised of compounds from cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, and the microbiome of bacteria in the gut, genitourinary, and pulmonary tracts. When we examine patterns in human biomarkers to discern human health state or diagnose specific diseases, it is...

  11. Cruising the cellular highways: How human papillomavirus travels from the surface to the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Guion, Lucile G; Sapp, Martin

    2017-03-02

    The non-enveloped human papillomaviruses (HPVs) specifically target epithelial cells of the skin and mucosa. Successful infection requires a lesion in the stratified tissue for access to the basal cells. Herein, we discuss our recent progress in understanding binding, internalization, uncoating, and intracellular trafficking of HPV particles. Our focus will be on HPV type 16, which is the most common HPV type associated with various anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. The study of HPV entry has revealed a number of novel cellular pathways utilized during infection. These include but are not restricted to the following: a previously uncharacterized form of endocytosis, membrane penetration by a capsid protein, the use of retromer complexes for trafficking to the trans-Golgi network, the requirement for nuclear envelope breakdown and microtubule-mediated transport during mitosis for nuclear entry, the existence of membrane-bound intranuclear vesicles harboring HPV genome, and the requirement of PML protein for efficient transcription of incoming viral genome. The continued study of these pathways may reveal new roles in basic biological cellular processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Augmentation of humoral and cellular immunity in response to Tetanus and Diphtheria toxoids by supercritical carbon dioxide extracts of Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayashankar, Bindhya; Singh, Divya; Tanwar, Himanshi; Mishra, K P; Murthy, Swetha; Chanda, Sudipta; Mishra, Jigni; Tulswani, R; Misra, K; Singh, S B; Ganju, Lilly

    2017-03-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides L. commonly known as Seabuckthorn (SBT), a wild shrub of family Elaegnacea, has extensively used for treating various ailments like skin diseases, jaundice, asthma, lung troubles. SBT leaves have been reported to possess several pharmacological properties including immunomodulatory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and tissue regeneration etc. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the adjuvant property of supercritical carbon dioxide extracts (SCEs 300ET and 350ET) of SBT leaves in balb/c mice immunized with Tetanus and Diphtheria toxoids. The dynamic changes in the immune response were measured in terms of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. We have seen the effect of SCEs on immunoglobulin subtypes and secondary immune response generation. In addition, the effect of SCEs on antigen specific cellular immunity was evaluated. Our results show that SCEs 300ET and 350ET significantly enhanced antibody titers in response to both TT and DT antigens. The secondary immune response generated was significantly increased in case of TT immunized animals. SCEs also enhanced cytokine levels (IFN-γ, IL-4, TNF-α and IL-1β) and increased lymphoproliferation. Besides, both SCEs did not show any toxic effects. Therefore, the study suggests that SCEs are safe and have potent immunostimulatory activity and hence, seems to be a promising balanced Th1 and Th2 directing immunological adjuvant for various veterinary as well as human vaccines. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Chestnut extract induces apoptosis in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2011-06-01

    In Korea, chestnut production is increasing each year, but consumption is far below production. We investigated the effect of chestnut extracts on antioxidant activity and anticancer effects. Ethanol extracts of raw chestnut (RCE) or chestnut powder (CPE) had dose-dependent superoxide scavenging activity. Viable numbers of MDA-MD-231 human breast cancer cells, DU145 human prostate cancer cells, and AGS human gastric cancer cells decreased by 18, 31, and 69%, respectively, following treatment with 200 µg/mL CPE for 24 hr. CPE at various concentrations (0-200 µg/mL) markedly decreased AGS cell viability and increased apoptotic cell death dose and time dependently. CPE increased the levels of cleaved caspase-8, -7, -3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner but not cleaved caspase-9. CPE exerted no effects on Bcl-2 and Bax levels. The level of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein decreased within a narrow range following CPE treatment. The levels of Trail, DR4, and Fas-L increased dose-dependently in CPE-treated AGS cells. These results show that CPE decreases growth and induces apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells and that activation of the death receptor pathway contributes to CPE-induced apoptosis in AGS cells. In conclusion, CPE had more of an effect on gastric cancer cells than breast or prostate cancer cells, suggesting that chestnuts would have a positive effect against gastric cancer.

  14. Shock-induced damage to mitochondrial function and some cellular antioxidant mechanisms in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbucci, G G; Gasparetto, A; Candiani, A; Crimi, G; Antonelli, M; Bufi, M; De Blasi, R A; Cooper, M B; Gohil, K

    1985-01-01

    The effects of circulatory shock on skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative activity in various substrates and cytochrome oxidase activity have been investigated using samples of muscle obtained by the needle biopsy technique from human subjects. The effect of shock on superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione content of skeletal muscle was also examined. The results show that there is a large decrease in cytochrome oxidase activity during shock and also in the capacity of the mitochondria to oxidize either succinate, or pyruvate, or palmitoyl carnitine. There is a fall in the tissue content of superoxide dismutase and in the total glutathione present. Furthermore, an increased oxidized glutathione content causes a decrease in the molar ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione present in the muscle. These findings suggest that mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) oxidative damage can play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of circulatory shock and support the hypothesis of oxygen-free radical involvement in the cellular injury.

  15. Effects of Environmental Pollutants on Cellular Iron Homeostasis and Ultimate Links to Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreinemachers, Dina M; Ghio, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic disease has increased in the past several decades, and environmental pollutants have been implicated. The magnitude and variety of diseases may indicate the malfunctioning of some basic mechanisms underlying human health. Environmental pollutants demonstrate a capability to complex iron through electronegative functional groups containing oxygen, nitrogen, or sulfur. Cellular exposure to the chemical or its metabolite may cause a loss of requisite functional iron from intracellular sites. The cell is compelled to acquire further iron critical to its survival by activation of iron-responsive proteins and increasing iron import. Iron homeostasis in the exposed cells is altered due to a new equilibrium being established between iron-requiring cells and the inappropriate chelator (the pollutant or its catabolite). Following exposure to environmental pollutants, the perturbation of functional iron homeostasis may be the mechanism leading to adverse biological effects. Understanding the mechanism may lead to intervention methods for this major public health concern.

  16. Study on Effect of Aloe Glue on Cytogenetics, Cellular Immunity and Cell Proliferation of Human Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jiahua; WEN Shaluo; XIA Yun; ZHANG Lijun

    2002-01-01

    Objective To provide the scientific evidence for the exploiture of aloe resource. Methods Cytological combined determination was used to study the effect of aloe glue(0.01 ~ 0.3ml) on cytogenetics, cellular immunity and cell proliferation of human cells. Results SCE and MNR in varying dose groups had no significant differences as compared with control group( P > 0.05). LTR was significantly higher than that of control group(P < 0.005). MI was significantly higher than that of control group ( P < 0.05). M3 and PRI in highest dose group had significant differences as compared with control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion Aloe gel had no significant effect on cytogenetics. But it had activating effects on immunity and proliferation of cells.

  17. Cellular immune response of humans to the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio M. Rodrigues

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available The cellular immune response to the circumsporozoite (CS protein of plasmodium vivax of individuals from malaria-endemic areas of Brazil was studied. We examined the in vitro proliferative response of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of 22 individuals when stimulated with a CS recombinant protein (rPvCS-2 and two other synthetic peptides based on the sequenceof the P. vivax CS protein. Seven of the individuals from malaria-endemic area displayed an antigen specific in vitro proliferative responseto the recombinant protein PvCS-2 and one out of 6, proliferative response to the peptide 308-320. In contrast, none of the individuals displayed a proliferative reponse when stimulated with the D/A peptide which represent some of the repeated units present in this CS protein. Our study, therefore, provides evidence for the presence, withinthe major surface antigen of P. vivax sporozoites, of epitopes capble to induce proliferation of human PBMC.

  18. A human cellular sequence implicated in trk oncogene activation is DNA damage inducible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Scharf, R.; Sharon, R.; Kapten, I. (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel))

    1990-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the repair of UV light-induced DNA damage, have been used to clone DNA-damage-inducible transcripts in human cells. The cDNA clone designated pC-5 hybridizes on RNA gel blots to a 1-kilobase transcript, which is moderately abundant in nontreated cells and whose synthesis is enhanced in human cells following UV irradiation or treatment with several other DNA-damaging agents. UV-enhanced transcription of C-5 RNA is transient and occurs at lower fluences and to a greater extent in DNA-repair-deficient than in DNA-repair-proficient cells. Southern blot analysis indicates that the C-5 gene belongs to a multigene family. A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of C-5 was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that it is homologous to a human cellular sequence encoding the amino-terminal activating sequence of the trk-2h chimeric oncogene. The presence of DNA-damage-responsive sequences at the 5' end of a chimeric oncogene could result in enhanced expression of the oncogene in response to carcinogens.

  19. Realistic numerical modelling of human head tissue exposure to electromagnetic waves from cellular phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarella, Gilles; Clatz, Olivier; Lanteri, Stéphane; Beaume, Grégory; Oudot, Steve; Pons, Jean-Philippe; Piperno, Sergo; Joly, Patrick; Wiart, Joe

    2006-06-01

    The ever-rising diffusion of cellular phones has brought about an increased concern for the possible consequences of electromagnetic radiation on human health. Possible thermal effects have been investigated, via experimentation or simulation, by several research projects in the last decade. Concerning numerical modeling, the power absorption in a user's head is generally computed using discretized models built from clinical MRI data. The vast majority of such numerical studies have been conducted using Finite Differences Time Domain methods, although strong limitations of their accuracy are due to heterogeneity, poor definition of the detailed structures of head tissues (staircasing effects), etc. In order to propose numerical modeling using Finite Element or Discontinuous Galerkin Time Domain methods, reliable automated tools for the unstructured discretization of human heads are also needed. Results presented in this article aim at filling the gap between human head MRI images and the accurate numerical modeling of wave propagation in biological tissues and its thermal effects. To cite this article: G. Scarella et al., C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  20. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, Michael J. [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Medicine, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Molecular Sciences, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Longhurst, Celia M.; Baker, Benjamin [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Homayouni, Ramin [Department of Biology, Bioinformatics Program, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Speich, Henry E.; Kotha, Jayaprakash [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Jennings, Lisa K., E-mail: ljennings@uthsc.edu [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Medicine, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Molecular Sciences, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Biology, Bioinformatics Program, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD9 is differentially expressed in human Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. • We found that CD9 expression promotes these cells proliferation. • CD9 expression also increases HDAC activity. • HDAC inhibition decreased both cell proliferation and importantly CD9 expression. • CD9 may dictate HDAC efficacy and play a role in HDAC regulation. - Abstract: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9–Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity.

  1. Chromatin remodeling of human subtelomeres and TERRA promoters upon cellular senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Peter E.; Tobi, Elmar W.; Balog, Judit; Schouten, Suzanne G.; Kremer, Dennis; El Bouazzaoui, Fatiha; Henneman, Peter; Putter, Hein; Eline Slagboom, P.; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2013-01-01

    Subtelomeres are patchworks of evolutionary conserved sequence blocks and harbor the transcriptional start sites for telomere repeat containing RNAs (TERRA). Recent studies suggest that the interplay between telomeres and subtelomeric chromatin is required for maintaining telomere function. To further characterize chromatin remodeling of subtelomeres in relation to telomere shortening and cellular senescence, we systematically quantified histone modifications and DNA methylation at the subtelomeres of chromosomes 7q and 11q in primary human WI-38 fibroblasts. Upon senescence, both subtelomeres were characterized by a decrease in markers of constitutive heterochromatin, suggesting relative chromatin relaxation. However, we did not find increased levels of markers of euchromatin or derepression of the 7q VIPR2 gene. The repressed state of the subtelomeres was maintained upon senescence, which could be attributed to a rise in levels of facultative heterochromatin markers at both subtelomeres. While senescence-induced subtelomeric chromatin remodeling was similar for both chromosomes, chromatin remodeling at TERRA promoters displayed chromosome-specific patterns. At the 7q TERRA promoter, chromatin structure was co-regulated with the more proximal subtelomere. In contrast, the 11q TERRA promoter, which was previously shown to be bound by CCCTC-binding factor CTCF, displayed lower levels of markers of constitutive heterochromatin that did not change upon senescence, whereas levels of markers of facultative heterochromatin decreased upon senescence. In line with the chromatin state data, transcription of 11q TERRA but not 7q TERRA was detected. Our study provides a detailed description of human subtelomeric chromatin dynamics and shows distinct regulation of the TERRA promoters of 7q and 11q upon cellular senescence. PMID:23644601

  2. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Human and Porcine Neurons and Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Jeremy J.; Hansen, Brian; Portnoy, Sharon; Lee, Choong-Heon; King, Michael A.; Fey, Michael; Vincent, Franck; Stanisz, Greg J; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Blackband, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    With its unparalleled ability to safely generate high-contrast images of soft tissues, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has remained at the forefront of diagnostic clinical medicine. Unfortunately due to resolution limitations, clinical scans are most useful for detecting macroscopic structural changes associated with a small number of pathologies. Moreover, due to a longstanding inability to directly observe magnetic resonance (MR) signal behavior at the cellular level, such information is poorly characterized and generally must be inferred. With the advent of the MR microscope in 1986 came the ability to measure MR signal properties of theretofore unobservable tissue structures. Recently, further improvements in hardware technology have made possible the ability to visualize mammalian cellular structure. In the current study, we expand upon previous work by imaging the neuronal cell bodies and processes of human and porcine α-motor neurons. Complimentary imaging studies are conducted in pig tissue in order to demonstrate qualitative similarities to human samples. Also, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were generated inside porcine α-motor neuron cell bodies and portions of their largest processes (mean = 1.7±0.5 μm2/ms based on 53 pixels) as well as in areas containing a mixture of extracellular space, microvasculature, and neuropil (0.59±0.37 μm2/ms based on 33 pixels). Three-dimensional reconstruction of MR images containing α-motor neurons shows the spatial arrangement of neuronal projections between adjacent cells. Such advancements in imaging portend the ability to construct accurate models of MR signal behavior based on direct observation and measurement of the components which comprise functional tissues. These tools would not only be useful for improving our interpretation of macroscopic MRI performed in the clinic, but they could potentially be used to develop new methods of differential diagnosis to aid in the early detection of a

  3. Metabolic fate of extracted glucose in normal human myocardium.

    OpenAIRE

    Wisneski, J A; Gertz, E W; Neese, R A; Gruenke, L D; D. L. Morris; Craig, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Glucose is an important substrate for myocardial metabolism. This study was designed to determine the effect of circulating metabolic substrates on myocardial glucose extraction and to determine the metabolic fate of glucose in normal human myocardium. Coronary sinus and arterial catheters were placed in 23 healthy male volunteers. [6-14C]Glucose was infused as a tracer in 10 subjects. [6-14C]Glucose and [U-13C]lactate were simultaneously infused in the other 13 subjects. Simultaneous blood s...

  4. Cellular phenotype impacts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral protein R subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrucci Adriano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr is a virion-associated regulatory protein that functions at several points within the viral life cycle and has been shown to accumulate primarily in the nucleus and at the nuclear envelope. However, most studies have investigated Vpr localization employing cell types irrelevant to HIV-1 pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of how cellular phenotype might impact HIV-1 Vpr intracellular localization, Vpr localization was examined in several cell lines representing major cellular targets for HIV-1 infection within the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and central nervous system (CNS. Results Utilizing a green fluorescent protein-tagged Vpr, we detected Vpr mainly in foci inside the nucleus, at the nuclear envelope, and around the nucleoli, with dispersed accumulation in the cytoplasm of human endothelial kidney 293T cells. No differences were observed in Vpr localization pattern with respect to either the location of the tag (N- or C-terminus or the presence of other viral proteins. Subsequently, the Vpr localization pattern was explored in two primary HIV-1 target cells within the peripheral blood: the CD4+ T lymphocyte (represented by the Jurkat CD4+ T-cell line and the monocyte-macrophage (represented by the U-937 cell line. Vpr was found primarily in speckles within the cytoplasm of the Jurkat T cells, whereas it accumulated predominantly intranuclearly in U-937 monocytic cells. These patterns differ from that observed in a bone marrow progenitor cell line (TF-1, wherein Vpr localized mainly at the nuclear envelope with some intranuclear punctuate staining. Within the CNS, we examined two astroglioma cell lines and found that Vpr displayed a perinuclear and cytoplasmic distribution. Conclusions The results suggest that the pattern of Vpr localization depends on cellular phenotype, probably owing to interactions between Vpr and cell type-specific host

  5. The inhibitory mechanism of Cordyceps sinensis on cigarette smoke extract-induced senescence in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ailing; Wu, Jinxiang; Li, Aijun; Bi, Wenxiang; Liu, Tian; Cao, Liuzhao; Liu, Yahui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a state of irreversible growth arrest induced either by telomere shortening (replicative senescence) or stress. The bronchial epithelial cell is often injured by inhaled toxic substances, such as cigarette smoke. In the present study, we investigated whether exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) induces senescence of bronchial epithelial cells; and Cordyceps sinensis mechanism of inhibition of CSE-induced cellular senescence. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE cells) cultured in vitro were treated with CSE and/or C. sinensis. p16, p21, and senescence-associated-galactosidase activity were used to detect cellular senescence with immunofluorescence, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), PI3K/AKT/mTOR and their phosphorylated proteins were examined to testify the activation of signaling pathway by ROS fluorescent staining and Western blotting. Then, inhibitors of ROS and PI3K were used to further confirm the function of this pathway. Cellular senescence was upregulated by CSE treatment, and C. sinensis can decrease CSE-induced cellular senescence. Activation of ROS/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway was enhanced by CSE treatment, and decreased when C. sinensis was added. Blocking ROS/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway can attenuate CSE-induced cellular senescence. CSE can induce cellular senescence in human bronchial epithelial cells, and ROS/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway may play an important role in this process. C. sinensis can inhibit the CSE-induced senescence.

  6. Longevity and composition of cellular immune responses following experimental Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teirlinck, A.C.; McCall, M.B.B.; Roestenberg, M.; Scholzen, A.; Woestenenk, R.M.; Mast, Q. de; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Hermsen, C.C.; Luty, A.J.F.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular responses to Plasmodium falciparum parasites, in particular interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) production, play an important role in anti-malarial immunity. However, clinical immunity to malaria develops slowly amongst naturally exposed populations, the dynamics of cellular responses in relation

  7. Fisetin inhibits cellular proliferation and induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarwal, Akash; Agarwal, Rajesh; Singh, Rana P

    2017-02-01

    The anticancer effects of fisetin, a dietary agent, are largely unknown against human gastric cancer. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms of fisetin-induced inhibition of growth and survival of human gastric carcinoma AGS and SNU-1 cells. Fisetin (25-100 μM) caused significant decrease in the levels of G1 phase cyclins and CDKs, and increased the levels of p53 and its S15 phosphorylation in gastric cancer cells. We also observed that growth suppression and death of non-neoplastic human intestinal FHs74int cells were minimally affected by fisetin. Fisetin strongly increased apoptotic cells and showed mitochondrial membrane depolarization in gastric cancer cells. DNA damage was observed as early as 3 h after fisetin treatment which was accompanied with gamma-H2A.X(S139) phosphorylation and cleavage of PARP. Fisetin-induced apoptosis was observed to be independent of p53. DCFDA and MitoSOX analyses showed an increase in mitochondrial ROS generation in time- and dose-dependent fashion. It also increased cellular nitrite and superoxide generation. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) inhibited ROS generation and also caused protection from fisetin-induced DNA damage. The formation of comets were observed in only fisetin treated cells which was blocked by NAC pre-treatment. Further investigation of the source of ROS, using mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complex inhibitors, suggested that fisetin caused ROS generation specifically through complex I. Collectively, these results for the first time demonstrated that fisetin possesses anticancer potential through ROS production most likely via MRC complex I leading to apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Mishra, Anurag [Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Krynetskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: ekrynets@temple.edu [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  9. Facilitated uptake of a bioactive metabolite of maritime pine bark extract (pycnogenol into human erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Kurlbaum

    Full Text Available Many plant secondary metabolites exhibit some degree of biological activity in humans. It is a common observation that individual plant-derived compounds in vivo are present in the nanomolar concentration range at which they usually fail to display measurable activity in vitro. While it is debatable that compounds detected in plasma are not the key effectors of bioactivity, an alternative hypothesis may take into consideration that measurable concentrations also reside in compartments other than plasma. We analysed the binding of constituents and the metabolite δ-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl-γ-valerolactone (M1, that had been previously detected in plasma samples of human consumers of pine bark extract Pycnogenol, to human erythrocytes. We found that caffeic acid, taxifolin, and ferulic acid passively bind to red blood cells, but only the bioactive metabolite M1 revealed pronounced accumulation. The partitioning of M1 into erythrocytes was significantly diminished at higher concentrations of M1 and in the presence of glucose, suggesting a facilitated transport of M1 via GLUT-1 transporter. This concept was further supported by structural similarities between the natural substrate α-D-glucose and the S-isomer of M1. After cellular uptake, M1 underwent further metabolism by conjugation with glutathione. We present strong indication for a transporter-mediated accumulation of a flavonoid metabolite in human erythrocytes and subsequent formation of a novel glutathione adduct. The physiologic role of the adduct remains to be elucidated.

  10. Cell-type specific DNA methylation patterns define human breast cellular identity.

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    Petr Novak

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a role in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and stem cell differentiation. Tissue specific differential methylation has also been well characterized. We sought to extend these studies to create a map of differential DNA methylation between different cell types derived from a single tissue. Using three pairs of isogenic human mammary epithelial and fibroblast cells, promoter region DNA methylation was characterized using MeDIP coupled to microarray analysis. Comparison of DNA methylation between these cell types revealed nearly three thousand cell-type specific differentially methylated regions (ctDMRs. MassARRAY was performed upon 87 ctDMRs to confirm and quantify differential DNA methylation. Each of the examined regions exhibited statistically significant differences ranging from 10-70%. Gene ontology analysis revealed the overrepresentation of many transcription factors involved in developmental processes. Additionally, we have shown that ctDMRs are associated with histone related epigenetic marks and are often aberrantly methylated in breast cancer. Overall, our data suggest that there are thousands of ctDMRs which consistently exhibit differential DNA methylation and may underlie cell type specificity in human breast tissue. In addition, we describe the pathways affected by these differences and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms and physiological overlap between normal cellular differentiation and breast carcinogenesis.

  11. Cellular and synaptic localization of EAAT2a in human cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello eMelone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical techniques to analyze the distribution, cellular and synaptic localization of EAAT2, the main glutamate transporter, in normal human neocortex. EAAT2a immunoreactivity was in all layers and consisted of small neuropilar puncta and rare cells. In white matter EAAT2a+ cells were numerous. Electron microscopic studies showed that in gray matter ∼77% of immunoreactive elements were astrocytic processes, ∼14% axon terminals, ∼2.8% dendrites, whereas ∼5% were unidentifiable. In white matter, ∼81% were astrocytic processes, ∼17% were myelinated axons and ∼2.0% were unidentified. EAAT2a immunoreactivity was never in microglial cells and oligodendrocytes. Pre-embedding electron microscopy showed that ∼67% of EAAT2a expressed at (or in the vicinity of asymmetric synapses was in astrocytes, ∼17% in axon terminals, while ∼13% was both in astrocytes and in axons. Post-embeddeding electron microscopy studies showed that in astrocytic processes contacting asymmetric synapses and in axon terminals, gold particle density was ∼25.1 and ∼2.8 particles/µm2, respectively, and was concentrated in a membrane region extending for ∼300 nm from the active zone edge. Besides representing the first detailed description of EAAT2a in human cerebral cortex, these findings may contribute to understanding its role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases.

  12. The human-induced pluripotent stem cell initiative—data resources for cellular genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Ian; Harrison, Peter W.; Faulconbridge, Adam; Flicek, Paul; Parkinson, Helen; Clarke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Initiative (HipSci) isf establishing a large catalogue of human iPSC lines, arguably the most well characterized collection to date. The HipSci portal enables researchers to choose the right cell line for their experiment, and makes HipSci's rich catalogue of assay data easy to discover and reuse. Each cell line has genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and cellular phenotyping data. Data are deposited in the appropriate EMBL-EBI archives, including the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA), ArrayExpress and PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) databases. The project will make 500 cell lines from healthy individuals, and from 150 patients with rare genetic diseases; these will be available through the European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC). As of August 2016, 238 cell lines are available for purchase. Project data is presented through the HipSci data portal (http://www.hipsci.org/lines) and is downloadable from the associated FTP site (ftp://ftp.hipsci.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp). The data portal presents a summary matrix of the HipSci cell lines, showing available data types. Each line has its own page containing descriptive metadata, quality information, and links to archived assay data. Analysis results are also available in a Track Hub, allowing visualization in the context of public genomic annotations (http://www.hipsci.org/data/trackhubs). PMID:27733501

  13. The human-induced pluripotent stem cell initiative-data resources for cellular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Ian; Harrison, Peter W; Faulconbridge, Adam; Flicek, Paul; Parkinson, Helen; Clarke, Laura

    2017-01-04

    The Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Initiative (HipSci) isf establishing a large catalogue of human iPSC lines, arguably the most well characterized collection to date. The HipSci portal enables researchers to choose the right cell line for their experiment, and makes HipSci's rich catalogue of assay data easy to discover and reuse. Each cell line has genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and cellular phenotyping data. Data are deposited in the appropriate EMBL-EBI archives, including the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA), ArrayExpress and PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) databases. The project will make 500 cell lines from healthy individuals, and from 150 patients with rare genetic diseases; these will be available through the European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC). As of August 2016, 238 cell lines are available for purchase. Project data is presented through the HipSci data portal (http://www.hipsci.org/lines) and is downloadable from the associated FTP site (ftp://ftp.hipsci.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp). The data portal presents a summary matrix of the HipSci cell lines, showing available data types. Each line has its own page containing descriptive metadata, quality information, and links to archived assay data. Analysis results are also available in a Track Hub, allowing visualization in the context of public genomic annotations (http://www.hipsci.org/data/trackhubs). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Determination of cellular lipids bound to human CD1d molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl Cox

    Full Text Available CD1 molecules are glycoproteins that present lipid antigens at the cell surface for immunological recognition by specialized populations of T lymphocytes. Prior experimental data suggest a wide variety of lipid species can bind to CD1 molecules, but little is known about the characteristics of cellular ligands that are selected for presentation. Here we have molecularly characterized lipids bound to the human CD1d isoform. Ligands were eluted from secreted CD1d molecules and separated by normal phase HPLC, then characterized by mass spectroscopy. A total of 177 lipid species were molecularly identified, comprising glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. The glycerophospholipids included common diacylglycerol species, reduced forms known as plasmalogens, lyso-phospholipids (monoacyl species, and cardiolipins (tetraacyl species. The sphingolipids included sphingomyelins and glycosylated forms, such as the ganglioside GM3. These results demonstrate that human CD1d molecules bind a surprising diversity of lipid structures within the secretory pathway, including compounds that have been reported to play roles in cancer, autoimmune diseases, lipid signaling, and cell death.

  15. Long-Term Calorie Restriction Enhances Cellular Quality-Control Processes in Human Skeletal Muscle

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    Ling Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR retards aging, acts as a hormetic intervention, and increases serum corticosterone and HSP70 expression in rodents. However, less is known regarding the effects of CR on these factors in humans. Serum cortisol and molecular chaperones and autophagic proteins were measured in the skeletal muscle of subjects on CR diets for 3–15 years and in control volunteers. Serum cortisol was higher in the CR group than in age-matched sedentary and endurance athlete groups (15.6 ± 4.6 ng/dl versus 12.3 ± 3.9 ng/dl and 11.2 ± 2.7 ng/dl, respectively; p ≤ 0.001. HSP70, Grp78, beclin-1, and LC3 mRNA and/or protein levels were higher in the skeletal muscle of the CR group compared to controls. Our data indicate that CR in humans is associated with sustained rises in serum cortisol, reduced inflammation, and increases in key molecular chaperones and autophagic mediators involved in cellular protein quality control and removal of dysfunctional proteins and organelles.

  16. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in human macrophages: uptake, intracellular distribution and cellular responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A; Tentschert, J; Jungnickel, H; Goetz, M E; Luch, A [BfR - Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Product Safety, Thielallee 88-92, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Graf, P [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Mantion, A; Thuenemann, A F [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Draude, F; Galla, S; Arlinghaus, H F [University of Muenster, Institute of Physics, Wilhelm Klemm Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Plendl, J [Free University of Berlin, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, Koserstrasse 20, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Masic, A; Taubert, A, E-mail: andrea.haase@bfr.bund.de, E-mail: alexandre.mantion@bam.de [University of Potsdam, Institute of Chemistry, Karl- Liebknecht- Strasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2011-07-06

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are among the most commercialized nanoparticles worldwide. They can be found in many diverse products, mostly because of their antibacterial properties. Despite its widespread use only little data on possible adverse health effects exist. It is difficult to compare biological data from different studies due to the great variety in sizes, coatings or shapes of the particles. Here, we applied a novel synthesis approach to obtain SNP, which are covalently stabilized by a small peptide. This enables a tight control of both size and shape. We applied these SNP in two different sizes of 20 or 40 nm (Ag20Pep and Ag40Pep) and analyzed responses of THP-1-derived human macrophages. Similar gold nanoparticles with the same coating (Au20Pep) were used for comparison and found to be non-toxic. We assessed the cytotoxicity of particles and confirmed their cellular uptake via transmission electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Importantly a majority of the SNP could be detected as individual particles spread throughout the cells. Furthermore we studied several types of oxidative stress related responses such as induction of heme oxygenase I or formation of protein carbonyls. In summary, our data demonstrate that even low doses of SNP exerted adverse effects in human macrophages.

  17. Mitochondrial proteomics on human fibroblasts for identification of metabolic imbalance and cellular stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bross Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial proteins are central to various metabolic activities and are key regulators of apoptosis. Disturbance of mitochondrial proteins is therefore often associated with disease. Large scale protein data are required to capture the mitochondrial protein levels and mass spectrometry based proteomics is suitable for generating such data. To study the relative quantities of mitochondrial proteins in cells from cultivated human skin fibroblasts we applied a proteomic method based on nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of iTRAQ-labeled peptides. Results When fibroblast cultures were exposed to mild metabolic stress – by cultivation in galactose medium- the amount of mitochondria appeared to be maintained whereas the levels of individual proteins were altered. Proteins of respiratory chain complex I and IV were increased together with NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of the citric acid cycle illustrating cellular strategies to cope with altered energy metabolism. Furthermore, quantitative protein data, with a median standard error below 6%, were obtained for the following mitochondrial pathways: fatty acid oxidation, citric acid cycle, respiratory chain, antioxidant systems, amino acid metabolism, mitochondrial translation, protein quality control, mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis. Conclusion The robust analytical platform in combination with a well-defined compendium of mitochondrial proteins allowed quantification of single proteins as well as mapping of entire pathways. This enabled characterization of the interplay between metabolism and stress response in human cells exposed to mild stress.

  18. Raising the standard: changes to the Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) for human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Craig; Velickovic, Zlatibor; Brown, Ross; Larsen, Stephen; Macpherson, Janet L; Gibson, John; Rasko, John E J

    2014-04-01

    In Australia, manufacture of blood, tissues and biologicals must comply with the federal laws and meet the requirements of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) Manufacturing Principles as outlined in the current Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). The Therapeutic Goods Order (TGO) No. 88 was announced concurrently with the new cGMP, as a new standard for therapeutic goods. This order constitutes a minimum standard for human blood, tissues and cellular therapeutic goods aimed at minimising the risk of infectious disease transmission. The order sets out specific requirements relating to donor selection, donor testing and minimisation of infectious disease transmission from collection and manufacture of these products. The Therapeutic Goods Manufacturing Principles Determination No. 1 of 2013 references the human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products 2013 (2013 cGMP). The name change for the 2013 cGMP has allowed a broadening of the scope of products to include human cellular therapy products. It is difficult to directly compare versions of the code as deletion of some clauses has not changed the requirements to be met, as they are found elsewhere amongst the various guidelines provided. Many sections that were specific for blood and blood components are now less prescriptive and apply to a wider range of cellular therapies, but the general overall intent remains the same. Use of 'should' throughout the document instead of 'must' allows flexibility for alternative processes, but these systems will still require justification by relevant logical argument and validation data to be acceptable to TGA. The cGMP has seemingly evolved so that specific issues identified at audit over the last decade have now been formalised in the new version. There is a notable risk management approach applied to most areas that refer to process justification and decision making. These requirements commenced on 31 May 2013 and a 12 month

  19. Human papillomavirus (HPV upregulates the cellular deubiquitinase UCHL1 to suppress the keratinocyte's innate immune response.

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    Rezaul Karim

    Full Text Available Persistent infection of basal keratinocytes with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV may cause cancer. Keratinocytes are equipped with different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs but hrHPV has developed ways to dampen their signals resulting in minimal inflammation and evasion of host immunity for sustained periods of time. To understand the mechanisms underlying hrHPV's capacity to evade immunity, we studied PRR signaling in non, newly, and persistently hrHPV-infected keratinocytes. We found that active infection with hrHPV hampered the relay of signals downstream of the PRRs to the nucleus, thereby affecting the production of type-I interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This suppression was shown to depend on hrHPV-induced expression of the cellular protein ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1 in keratinocytes. UCHL1 accomplished this by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3 K63 poly-ubiquitination which lead to lower levels of TRAF3 bound to TANK-binding kinase 1 and a reduced phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3. Furthermore, UCHL1 mediated the degradation of the NF-kappa-B essential modulator with as result the suppression of p65 phosphorylation and canonical NF-κB signaling. We conclude that hrHPV exploits the cellular protein UCHL1 to evade host innate immunity by suppressing PRR-induced keratinocyte-mediated production of interferons, cytokines and chemokines, which normally results in the attraction and activation of an adaptive immune response. This identifies UCHL1 as a negative regulator of PRR-induced immune responses and consequently its virus-increased expression as a strategy for hrHPV to persist.

  20. Effect of Cellular Location of Human Carboxylesterase 2 on CPT-11 Hydrolysis and Anticancer Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ting Hsieh

    Full Text Available CPT-11 is an anticancer prodrug that is clinically used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Hydrolysis of CPT-11 by human carboxylesterase 2 (CE2 generates SN-38, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that is the active anti-tumor agent. Expression of CE2 in cancer cells is under investigation for the tumor-localized activation of CPT-11. CE2 is normally expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells but can be engineered to direct expression of active enzyme on the plasma membrane or as a secreted form. Although previous studies have investigated different locations of CE2 expression in cancer cells, it remains unclear if CE2 cellular location affects CPT-11 anticancer activity. In the present study, we directly compared the influence of CE2 cellular location on substrate hydrolysis and CPT-11 cytotoxicity. We linked expression of CE2 and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP via a foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A (F2A peptide to facilitate fluorescence-activated cell sorting to achieve similar expression levels of ER-located, secreted or membrane-anchored CE2. Soluble CE2 was detected in the medium of cells that expressed secreted and membrane-anchored CE2, but not in cells that expressed ER-retained CE2. Cancer cells that expressed all three forms of CE2 were more sensitive to CPT-11 as compared to unmodified cancer cells, but the membrane-anchored and ER-retained forms of CE2 were consistently more effective than secreted CE2. We conclude that expression of CE2 in the ER or on the membrane of cancer cells is suitable for enhancing CPT-11 anticancer activity.

  1. Three dimensional cellular microarray platform for human neural stem cell differentiation and toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Meli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We developed a three-dimensional (3D cellular microarray platform for the high-throughput (HT analysis of human neural stem cell (hNSC growth and differentiation. The growth of an immortalized hNSC line, ReNcell VM, was evaluated on a miniaturized cell culture chip consisting of 60 nl spots of cells encapsulated in alginate, and compared to standard 2D well plate culture conditions. Using a live/dead cell viability assay, we demonstrated that the hNSCs are able to expand on-chip, albeit with lower proliferation rates and viabilities than in conventional 2D culture platforms. Using an in-cell, on-chip immunofluorescence assay, which provides quantitative information on cellular levels of proteins involved in neural fate, we demonstrated that ReNcell VM can preserve its multipotent state during on-chip expansion. Moreover, differentiation of the hNSCs into glial progeny was achieved both off- and on-chip six days after growth factor removal, accompanied by a decrease in the neural progenitor markers. The versatility of the platform was further demonstrated by complementing the cell culture chip with a chamber system that allowed us to screen for differential toxicity of small molecules to hNSCs. Using this approach, we showed differential toxicity when evaluating three neurotoxic compounds and one antiproliferative compound, and the null effect of a non-toxic compound at relevant concentrations. Thus, our 3D high-throughput microarray platform may help predict, in vitro, which compounds pose an increased threat to neural development and should therefore be prioritized for further screening and evaluation.

  2. Effective Cellular Uptake and Efflux of Thyroid Hormone by Human Monocarboxylate Transporter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesema, Edith C. H.; Jansen, Jurgen; Jachtenberg, Jan-willem; Visser, W. Edward; Kester, Monique H. A.; Visser, Theo J.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular entry of thyroid hormone is mediated by plasma membrane transporters, among others a T-type (aromatic) amino acid transporter. Monocarboxylate transporter 10 (MCT10) has been reported to transport aromatic amino acids but not iodothyronines. Within the MCT family, MCT10 is most homologous to MCT8, which is a very important iodothyronine transporter but does not transport amino acids. In view of this paradox, we decided to reinvestigate the possible transport of thyroid hormone by human (h) MCT10 in comparison with hMCT8. Transfection of COS1 cells with hMCT10 cDNA resulted in 1) the production of an approximately 55 kDa protein located to the plasma membrane as shown by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy, 2) a strong increase in the affinity labeling of intracellular type I deiodinase by N-bromoacetyl-[125I]T3, 3) a marked stimulation of cellular T4 and, particularly, T3 uptake, 4) a significant inhibition of T3 uptake by phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan of 12.5%, 22.2%, and 51.4%, respectively, and 5) a marked increase in the intracellular deiodination of T4 and T3 by different deiodinases. Cotransfection studies using the cytosolic thyroid hormone-binding protein μ-crystallin (CRYM) indicated that hMCT10 facilitates both cellular uptake and efflux of T4 and T3. In the absence of CRYM, hMCT10 and hMCT8 increased T3 uptake after 5 min incubation up to 4.0- and 1.9-fold, and in the presence of CRYM up to 6.9- and 5.8-fold, respectively. hMCT10 was less active toward T4 than hMCT8. These findings establish that hMCT10 is at least as active a thyroid hormone transporter as hMCT8, and that both transporters facilitate iodothyronine uptake as well as efflux. PMID:18337592

  3. Evaluation of an Aqueous-Ethanolic Extract from Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) for its Activity on the Hormonal and Cellular Function of Testes in Adult Male Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Ebrahimi Hariry, Reza; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Ghaffari Novin, Marefat; Heidari, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis has been used in traditional medicine extensively. This study evaluated the hormonal and cellular effects of Rosmarinus officinalis extract on testes of adult rats. Thirty male Wistar rats (in three groups) received 50 or 100 mg/Kg b.w of Rosmarinus officinalis extract (made from the plant’s leaves, flower and stem) (treatment groups) and 10 mL/Kg b.w normal saline (control group) respectively, on a daily bases by gavage route for 60 days. Then, spermatological properti...

  4. Effect of wavelength and fluence on morphology, cellular and genetic integrity of diabetic wounded human skin fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamse, H.; Hawkins, D.; Houreld, N.

    2006-02-01

    An alternative treatment modality for diabetic wound healing includes low level laser therapy (LLLT). Biostimulation of such wounds may be of benefit to patients by reducing healing time. Structural, cellular and genetic events in diabetic wounded human skin fibroblasts (WS1) were evaluated after exposing cells in culture to a Helium-Neon (632.8nm), a Diode laser (830nm) and a Nd:YAG (Neodynium:Yttrium-Allumina-Gallium) laser (1064nm) at either 5J/cm2 or 16J/cm2. Cells were exposed twice a week and left 24 hours post-irradiation prior to measuring effects. Structural changes were evaluated by assessing colony formation, haptotaxis and chemotaxis. Cellular changes were evaluated using cell viability, (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP production), and proliferation, (alkaline phosphatase, ALP and basic fibroblast growth factor, bFGF expression), while the Comet assay evaluated DNA damage and cytotoxicity was determined assessing membrane permeability for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Caspase 3/7 activity was used as an estimate of apoptosis as a result of irradiation. The irradiated diabetic wounded cells showed structural, cellular as well as molecular resilience comparable to that of unwounded normal skin fibroblast cells. With regards to fluence, 5J/cm2 elicit positive cellular and structural responses while 16J/cm2 increases cellular and genetic damage and cellular morphology is altered. Different wavelengths of LLLT influences the beneficial outcomes of diabetic wounded cells and although all three wavelengths elicit cellular effects, the penetration depth of 830nm plays a significant role in the healing of diabetic wounded human fibroblast cells. Results from this study validate the contribution of LLLT to wound healing and elucidate the biochemical effects at a cellular level while highlighting the role of different dosages and wavelengths in LLLT.

  5. Facilitated cellular uptake and suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase by a metabolite of maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenhut, Klaus; Högger, Petra

    2012-07-15

    Many natural products exhibit anti-inflammatory activity by suppressing excessive nitric oxide (NO) production by inducible NO synthase (iNOS). The maritime pine bark extract Pycnogenol has been formerly shown to decrease nitrite generation, taken as an index for NO, but so far it was not clear which constituent of the complex flavonoid mixture mediated this effect. The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether the in vivo generated Pycnogenol metabolite M1 (δ-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone) displayed any activity in the context of induction of iNOS expression and excessive NO production. For the first time we show that M1 inhibited nitrite production (IC(50) 1.3 μg/ml, 95% CI 0.96-1.70) and iNOS expression (IC(50) 3.8 μg/ml, 95% CI 0.99-14.35) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This exemplifies bioactivation by metabolism because the M1 precursor molecule catechin is only weakly active. However, these effects required application of M1 in the low-micromolar range, which was not consistent with concentrations previously detected in human plasma samples after ingestion of maritime pine bark extract. Thus, we investigated a possible accumulation of M1 in cells and indeed observed high-capacity binding of this flavonoid metabolite to macrophages, monocytes, and endothelial cells. This binding was distinctly decreased in the presence of the influx inhibitor phloretin, suggesting the contribution of a facilitated M1 transport into cells. In fact, intracellular accumulation of M1 could explain why in vivo bioactivity can be observed with nanomolar plasma concentrations that typically fail to exhibit measurable activity in vitro.

  6. Extraction of Natural Antioxidants from the Thelephora ganbajun Mushroom by an Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Technique and Evaluation of Antiproliferative Activity of the Extract against Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-Ping; Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-10-01

    The Thelephora ganbajun mushroom has been found to be a potential rich source of natural antioxidants. In this study, an ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) technique together with GRAS (generally recognized as safe) solvents (ethanol and water) was used to maximize the extraction of antioxidants from Thelephora ganbajun. Five extraction parameters (ethanol concentration, solvent to solid ratio, extraction time, temperature and ultrasound power) were investigated by single-factor experiments, and then a central composite rotatable design was employed to study interaction of three key extraction parameters. The optimum conditions were as follows: 57.38% ethanol, 70.15 mL/g solvent to solid ratio, 10.58 min extraction time, 40 °C extraction temperature and 500 W ultrasound power. Under the optimum conditions, the antioxidant activity obtained was 346.98 ± 12.19 µmol Trolox/g DW, in accordance with the predicted value of 344.67 µmol Trolox/g DW. Comparison of UAE with conventional maceration and Soxhlet extraction, the UAE method showed stronger extract efficiency in a shorter extraction time. These results showed that UAE was an effective technique to extract antioxidants from Thelephora ganbajun. Furthermore, the extracts obtained under the optimized conditions exhibited antiproliferative activities toward human lung (A549), breast (MCF-7), liver (HepG2) and colon (HT-29) cancer cells, especially for liver and lung cancer cells. In addition, rutin, 2-hydrocinnamic acid and epicatechin were identified in the extract, which might contribute to antioxidant and antiproliferative activities.

  7. Protective effect of Melissa officinalis extract against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human vascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Safaeian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Melissa officinalis L. is a medicinal plant with a large variety of pharmacological effects and traditional applications. This study aimed to evaluate the protective and antioxidant activities of the extract of M. officinalis aerial parts on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs under oxidative stress induced by H 2 O 2 . Cells were incubated with H 2 O 2 (0.5 mM, 2 h after pretreatment with M. officinalis extract (25-500 µg/mL. Cell viability was evaluated by 3-(4, 5- Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The concentration of hydroperoxides and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP were measured in intra- and extra-cellular fluids. Pretreatment of HUVECs with M. officinalis extract at the concentrations of 100-500 µg/mL improved the cell viability after exposure to H 2 O 2 significantly. It also decreased hydroperoxides concentration and increased FRAP value in both intra- and extra-cellular fluids. The results revealed antioxidant and cytoprotective effects of M. officinalis against H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative stress in HUVECs. Due to the valuable antioxidant activity , this plant extract may have potential benefits for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  8. Protective effect of Melissa officinalis extract against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeian, Leila; Sajjadi, Seyyed Ebrahim; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Montazeri, Hossein; Samani, Fariba

    2016-10-01

    Melissa officinalis L. is a medicinal plant with a large variety of pharmacological effects and traditional applications. This study aimed to evaluate the protective and antioxidant activities of the extract of M. officinalis aerial parts on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) under oxidative stress induced by H2O2. Cells were incubated with H2O2 (0.5 mM, 2 h) after pretreatment with M. officinalis extract (25-500 μg/mL). Cell viability was evaluated by 3-(4, 5- Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The concentration of hydroperoxides and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) were measured in intra- and extra-cellular fluids. Pretreatment of HUVECs with M. officinalis extract at the concentrations of 100-500 μg/mL improved the cell viability after exposure to H2O2 significantly. It also decreased hydroperoxides concentration and increased FRAP value in both intra- and extra-cellular fluids. The results revealed antioxidant and cytoprotective effects of M. officinalis against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in HUVECs. Due to the valuable antioxidant activity, this plant extract may have potential benefits for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  9. The molecular and cellular response of normal and progressed human bronchial epithelial cells to HZE particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Larsen, Jill

    We have used a model of non-oncogenically immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cells to determine the response of such cells to particles found outside the protection of the earth’s electromagnetic field. We have identified an enhanced frequency of cellular transformation, as measured by growth in soft agar, for both 56Fe and 28Si (1 GeV/n) that is maximal (4-6 fold) at 0.25 Gy and 0.40 Gy, respectively. At 4 months post-irradiation 38 individual soft agar clones were isolated. These clones were characterized extensively for cellular and molecular changes. Gene expression analysis suggested that these clones had down-regulated several genes associated with anti-oxidant pathways including GLS2, GPX1 and 4, SOD2, PIG3, and NQO1 amongst others. As a result, many of these transformed clones were exposed to high levels of intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS), although there appeared not to be any enhanced mitochondrial ROS. DNA repair pathways associated with ATM/ATR signaling were also upregulated. However, these transformants do not develop into tumors when injected into immune-compromised mice, suggesting that they have not progressed sufficiently to become oncogenic. Therefore we chose 6 soft agar clones for continuous culture for an additional 14 months. Amongst the 6 clones, only one clone showed any significant change in phenotype. Clone 3kt-ff.2a, propagated for 18 months, were 2-fold more radioresistant, had a shortened doubling time and the background rate of transformation more than doubled. Furthermore, the morphology of transformed clones changed. Clones from this culture are being compared to the original clone as well as the parental HBEC3KT and will be injected into immune-compromised mice for oncogenic potential. Oncogenically progressed HBECs, HBEC3KT cells that overexpress a mutant RAS gene and where p53 has been knocked down, designated HBEC3KTR53, responded quite differently to HZE particle exposure. First, these cells are more

  10. Methanolic Extract of Ganoderma lucidum Induces Autophagy of AGS Human Gastric Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa S. Reis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum is one of the most widely studied mushroom species, particularly in what concerns its medicinal properties. Previous studies (including those from some of us have shown some evidence that the methanolic extract of G. lucidum affects cellular autophagy. However, it was not known if it induces autophagy or decreases the autophagic flux. The treatment of a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS with the mushroom extract increased the formation of autophagosomes (vacuoles typical from autophagy. Moreover, the cellular levels of LC3-II were also increased, and the cellular levels of p62 decreased, confirming that the extract affects cellular autophagy. Treating the cells with the extract together with lysossomal protease inhibitors, the cellular levels of LC3-II and p62 increased. The results obtained proved that, in AGS cells, the methanolic extract of G. lucidum causes an induction of autophagy, rather than a reduction in the autophagic flux. To our knowledge, this is the first study proving that statement.

  11. Large-scale cellular-resolution gene profiling in human neocortex reveals species-specific molecular signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hongkui; Shen, Elaine H.; Hohmann, John G.; Oh, Wook Seung; Bernard, Amy; Royall, Joshua J.; Glattfelder, Katie J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Morris, John A.; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L.; Smith, Kimberly A.; Ebbert, Amanda J.; Swanson, Beryl; Kuan, Leonard; Page, Damon T.; Overly, Caroline C.; Lein, Ed S.; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Hyde, Thomas M.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Jones, Allan R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Although there have been major advances in elucidating the functional biology of the human brain, relatively little is known of its cellular and molecular organization. Here we report a large-scale characterization of the expression of ~1,000 genes important for neural functions, by in situ hybridization with cellular resolution in visual and temporal cortices of adult human brains. These data reveal diverse gene expression patterns and remarkable conservation of each individual gene’s expression among individuals (95%), cortical areas (84%), and between human and mouse (79%). A small but substantial number of genes (21%) exhibited species-differential expression. Distinct molecular signatures, comprised of genes both common between species and unique to each, were identified for each major cortical cell type. The data suggest that gene expression profile changes may contribute to differential cortical function across species, in particular, a shift from corticosubcortical to more predominant corticocortical communications in the human brain. PMID:22500809

  12. Expression kinetics of hepatic progenitor markers in cellular models of human liver development recapitulating hepatocyte and biliary cell fate commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Pooja; Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-09-01

    Due to the limitations of research using human embryos and the lack of a biological model of human liver development, the roles of the various markers associated with liver stem or progenitor cell potential in humans are largely speculative, and based on studies utilizing animal models and certain patient tissues. Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro multistage hepatic differentiation systems may serve as good surrogate models for mimicking normal human liver development, pathogenesis and injury/regeneration studies. Here, we describe the implications of various liver stem or progenitor cell markers and their bipotency (i.e. hepatocytic- and biliary-epithelial cell differentiation), based on the pluripotent stem cell-derived model of human liver development. Future studies using the human cellular model(s) of liver and biliary development will provide more human relevant biological and/or pathological roles of distinct markers expressed in heterogeneous liver stem/progenitor cell populations.

  13. Cortisol extraction through human skin by reverse iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Stephanie A; Heikenfeld, Jason; Brooks, Tiffany; Esfandiari, Leyla; Boyce, Steven; Park, Yoonjee; Kasting, Gerald B

    2017-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of cortisol at the surface of the skin would advance the diagnosis and treatment of cortisol-related diseases, or of elevated cortisol levels related to stress in otherwise healthy populations. Reliable and accurate detection of cortisol at the skin surface remains a limiting factor in real-time monitoring of cortisol. To address this limitation, cortisol extraction through excised human skin by reverse iontophoresis was studied in vitro in side-by-side diffusion cells using a radiolabeled probe. The skin was subjected to four direct current regimens (0, 28, 56, 113μAcm(-2)) with the anode in the donor chamber and the cumulative cortisol concentrations recorded in the receiver chamber. The 56 and 113μAcm(-2) regimens significantly increased transport of (3)H-cortisol through the skin, and current density correlated directly with transcutaneous transport of (3)H-cortisol. The threshold of detection of electroosmotic versus passive diffusion of cortisol through the skin was between 28 and 56μAcm(-2). The results of this study are significant in examining how lipophilic analytes found in the bloodstream respond to reverse iontophoresis across the skin. In addition, a device integration technique is presented which illustrates how continuous cortisol extraction and sensing could potentially be achieved in a conventional wearable format.

  14. An Improved AAM Method for Extracting Human Facial Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Active appearance model is a statistically parametrical model, which is widely used to extract human facial features and recognition. However, intensity values used in original AAM cannot provide enough information for image texture, which will lead to a larger error or a failure fitting of AAM. In order to overcome these defects and improve the fitting performance of AAM model, an improved texture representation is proposed in this paper. Firstly, translation invariant wavelet transform is performed on face images and then image structure is represented using the measure which is obtained by fusing the low-frequency coefficients with edge intensity. Experimental results show that the improved algorithm can increase the accuracy of the AAM fitting and express more information for structures of edge and texture.

  15. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Soy Isoflavone Extracts in Human Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morató, Jose; Farré, Magí; Pérez-Mañá, Clara; Papaseit, Esther; Martínez-Riera, Roser; de la Torre, Rafael; Pizarro, Nieves

    2015-08-12

    The soy isoflavones daidzein and genistein produce several biological activities related to health benefits. A number of isoflavone extracts are commercially available, but there is little information concerning the specific isoflavone content of these products or differences in their bioavailability and pharmacokinetics. This study describes the development and validation of an analytical method to detect and quantify daidzein, genistein, and equol in human plasma using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The method was applied in a crossover, randomized, bioavailability study. Twelve healthy volunteers were administered the same total isoflavones dose from two isoflavone supplement preparations (Super-Absorbable Soy Isoflavones (Life Extension, USA) and Fitoladius (Merck, Spain)). The pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC0-24/dose and Cmax/dose) of the isoflavones from the two preparations differed significantly. Such differences in bioavailability and kinetics may have relevant effects on the health benefits derived from their intake.

  16. Cellular respiration: replicating in vivo systems biology for in vitro exploration of human exposome, microbiome, and disease pathogenesis biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial develops a philosophy for expanding the scope of Journal of Breath Research (JBR) into the realm of cellular level study, and links certain topics back to more traditional systemic research for understanding human health based on exhaled breath constituents. The ex...

  17. Cellular respiration: replicating in vivo systems biology for in vitro exploration of human exposome, microbiome, and disease pathogenesis biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial develops a philosophy for expanding the scope of Journal of Breath Research (JBR) into the realm of cellular level study, and links certain topics back to more traditional systemic research for understanding human health based on exhaled breath constituents. The ex...

  18. A traditional Chinese medicine formula extracts stimulate proliferation and inhibit mineralization of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Muwan; Feng, Wenzhou; Cao, Hui

    2009-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: To investigate the effects of a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula extract, named as ZD-I, on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in vitro. MATERIALS AND METHODS: When hMSCs cultivated in the basal medium with ZD-I, cell...... viability was assessed by MTT assay and cellular proliferation was assessed by SYBR green I assay. The effects of ZD-I on osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs were assessed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization assay and real-time RT-PCR. RESULTS: ZD-I (0.78-100 microg/ml) was non...

  19. Degradation of Human PDZ-Proteins by Human Alphapapillomaviruses Represents an Evolutionary Adaptation to a Novel Cellular Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; DeSalle, Rob; Einstein, Mark H.; Burk, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to complete their life cycle, papillomaviruses have evolved to manipulate a plethora of cellular pathways. The products of the human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins specifically interact with and target PDZ containing proteins for degradation. This viral phenotype has been suggested to play a role in viral oncogenesis. To analyze the association of HPV E6 mediated PDZ-protein degradation with cervical oncogenesis, a high-throughput cell culture assay was developed. Degradation of an epitope tagged human MAGI1 isoform was visualized by immunoblot. The correlation between HPV E6-induced degradation of hMAGI1 and epidemiologically determined HPV oncogenicity was evaluated using a Bayesian approach within a phylogenetic context. All tested oncogenic types degraded the PDZ-containing protein hMAGI1d; however, E6 proteins isolated from several related albeit non-oncogenic viral types were equally efficient at degrading hMAGI1. The relationship between both traits (oncogenicity and PDZ degradation potential) is best explained by a model in which the potential to degrade PDZ proteins was acquired prior to the oncogenic phenotype. This analysis provides evidence that the ancestor of both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPVs acquired the potential to degrade human PDZ-containing proteins. This suggests that HPV E6 directed degradation of PDZ-proteins represents an ancient ecological niche adaptation. Phylogenetic modeling indicates that this phenotype is not specifically correlated with oncogenic risk, but may act as an enabling phenotype. The role of PDZ protein degradation in HPV fitness and oncogenesis needs to be interpreted in the context of Alphapapillomavirus evolution. PMID:26086730

  20. Degradation of Human PDZ-Proteins by Human Alphapapillomaviruses Represents an Evolutionary Adaptation to a Novel Cellular Niche.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koenraad Van Doorslaer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to complete their life cycle, papillomaviruses have evolved to manipulate a plethora of cellular pathways. The products of the human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins specifically interact with and target PDZ containing proteins for degradation. This viral phenotype has been suggested to play a role in viral oncogenesis. To analyze the association of HPV E6 mediated PDZ-protein degradation with cervical oncogenesis, a high-throughput cell culture assay was developed. Degradation of an epitope tagged human MAGI1 isoform was visualized by immunoblot. The correlation between HPV E6-induced degradation of hMAGI1 and epidemiologically determined HPV oncogenicity was evaluated using a Bayesian approach within a phylogenetic context. All tested oncogenic types degraded the PDZ-containing protein hMAGI1d; however, E6 proteins isolated from several related albeit non-oncogenic viral types were equally efficient at degrading hMAGI1. The relationship between both traits (oncogenicity and PDZ degradation potential is best explained by a model in which the potential to degrade PDZ proteins was acquired prior to the oncogenic phenotype. This analysis provides evidence that the ancestor of both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPVs acquired the potential to degrade human PDZ-containing proteins. This suggests that HPV E6 directed degradation of PDZ-proteins represents an ancient ecological niche adaptation. Phylogenetic modeling indicates that this phenotype is not specifically correlated with oncogenic risk, but may act as an enabling phenotype. The role of PDZ protein degradation in HPV fitness and oncogenesis needs to be interpreted in the context of Alphapapillomavirus evolution.

  1. Degradation of Human PDZ-Proteins by Human Alphapapillomaviruses Represents an Evolutionary Adaptation to a Novel Cellular Niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; DeSalle, Rob; Einstein, Mark H; Burk, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    In order to complete their life cycle, papillomaviruses have evolved to manipulate a plethora of cellular pathways. The products of the human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins specifically interact with and target PDZ containing proteins for degradation. This viral phenotype has been suggested to play a role in viral oncogenesis. To analyze the association of HPV E6 mediated PDZ-protein degradation with cervical oncogenesis, a high-throughput cell culture assay was developed. Degradation of an epitope tagged human MAGI1 isoform was visualized by immunoblot. The correlation between HPV E6-induced degradation of hMAGI1 and epidemiologically determined HPV oncogenicity was evaluated using a Bayesian approach within a phylogenetic context. All tested oncogenic types degraded the PDZ-containing protein hMAGI1d; however, E6 proteins isolated from several related albeit non-oncogenic viral types were equally efficient at degrading hMAGI1. The relationship between both traits (oncogenicity and PDZ degradation potential) is best explained by a model in which the potential to degrade PDZ proteins was acquired prior to the oncogenic phenotype. This analysis provides evidence that the ancestor of both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPVs acquired the potential to degrade human PDZ-containing proteins. This suggests that HPV E6 directed degradation of PDZ-proteins represents an ancient ecological niche adaptation. Phylogenetic modeling indicates that this phenotype is not specifically correlated with oncogenic risk, but may act as an enabling phenotype. The role of PDZ protein degradation in HPV fitness and oncogenesis needs to be interpreted in the context of Alphapapillomavirus evolution.

  2. Remnant Cholesterol Elicits Arterial Wall Inflammation and a Multilevel Cellular Immune Response in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernelot Moens, Sophie J; Verweij, Simone L; Schnitzler, Johan G; Stiekema, Lotte C A; Bos, Merijn; Langsted, Anne; Kuijk, Carlijn; Bekkering, Siroon; Voermans, Carlijn; Verberne, Hein J; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Stroes, Erik S G; Kroon, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Mendelian randomization studies revealed a causal role for remnant cholesterol in cardiovascular disease. Remnant particles accumulate in the arterial wall, potentially propagating local and systemic inflammation. We evaluated the impact of remnant cholesterol on arterial wall inflammation, circulating monocytes, and bone marrow in patients with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (FD). Arterial wall inflammation and bone marrow activity were measured using (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Monocyte phenotype was assessed with flow cytometry. The correlation between remnant levels and hematopoietic activity was validated in the CGPS (Copenhagen General Population Study). We found a 1.2-fold increase of (18)F-FDG uptake in the arterial wall in patients with FD (n=17, age 60±8 years, remnant cholesterol: 3.26 [2.07-5.71]) compared with controls (n=17, age 61±8 years, remnant cholesterol 0.29 [0.27-0.40]; Pcholesterol accumulates in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells coinciding with myeloid skewing. Patients with FD have increased arterial wall and cellular inflammation. These findings imply an important inflammatory component to the atherogenicity of remnant cholesterol, contributing to the increased cardiovascular disease risk in patients with FD. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Cellular and molecular portrait of eleven human glioblastoma cell lines under photon and carbon ion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandon, S; Magné, N; Battiston-Montagne, P; Hau-Desbat, N-H; Diaz, O; Beuve, M; Constanzo, J; Chargari, C; Poncet, D; Chautard, E; Ardail, D; Alphonse, G; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C

    2015-04-28

    This study aimed to examine the cellular and molecular long-term responses of glioblastomas to radiotherapy and hadrontherapy in order to better understand the biological effects of carbon beams in cancer treatment. Eleven human glioblastoma cell lines, displaying gradual radiosensitivity, were irradiated with photons or carbon ions. Independently of p53 or O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase(1) status, all cell lines responded to irradiation by a G2/M phase arrest followed by the appearance of mitotic catastrophe, which was concluded by a ceramide-dependent-apoptotic cell death. Statistical analysis demonstrated that: (i) the SF2(2) and the D10(3) values for photon are correlated with that obtained in response to carbon ions; (ii) regardless of the p53, MGMT status, and radiosensitivity, the release of ceramide is associated with the induction of late apoptosis; and (iii) the appearance of polyploid cells after photon irradiation could predict the Relative Biological Efficiency(4) to carbon ions. This large collection of data should increase our knowledge in glioblastoma radiobiology in order to better understand, and to later individualize, appropriate radiotherapy treatment for patients who are good candidates.

  4. Cellular Behavior of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Wettable Gradient Polyethylene Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Hee Ahn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate surface wettability and roughness of biomaterials is an important factor in cell attachment and proliferation. In this study, we investigated the correlation between surface wettability and roughness, and biological response in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs. We prepared wettable and rough gradient polyethylene (PE surfaces by increasing the power of a radio frequency corona discharge apparatus with knife-type electrodes over a moving sample bed. The PE changed gradually from hydrophobic and smooth surfaces to hydrophilic (water contact angle, 90° to ~50° and rough (80 to ~120 nm surfaces as the power increased. We found that hADSCs adhered better to highly hydrophilic and rough surfaces and showed broadly stretched morphology compared with that on hydrophobic and smooth surfaces. The proliferation of hADSCs on hydrophilic and rough surfaces was also higher than that on hydrophobic and smooth surfaces. Furthermore, integrin beta 1 gene expression, an indicator of attachment, and heat shock protein 70 gene expression were high on hydrophobic and smooth surfaces. These results indicate that the cellular behavior of hADSCs on gradient surface depends on surface properties, wettability and roughness.

  5. Biopolymer stochastic moments. I. Modeling human rhinovirus cellular recognition with protein surface electrostatic moments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Uriarte, Eugenio

    2005-04-05

    Stochastic moments may be applied as molecular descriptors in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies for small molecules (H. González-Dìaz et al., Journal of Molecular Modeling, 2002, Vol. 8, pp. 237-245; 2003, Vol. 9, pp. 395-407). However, applications in the field of biopolymers are less known. Recently, the MARCH-INSIDE approach has been generalized to encode structural features of proteins and other biopolymers (H. González-Dáaz et al., Bioinformatics, 2003, Vol. 19, pp. 2079-2087; Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 2004, Vol. 14, pp. 4691-4695; Polymers, 2004, Vol. 45, pp. 3845-3853; Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, 2005, Vol. 13, pp. 323-331). The present article attempts to extend this research by introducing for the first time stochastic moments for a surface road map of viral proteins. These moments are afterward used to seek a model that predicts the cellular receptor for human rhinoviruses. The model correctly classified 100% of 10 viruses binding to low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and 88.9% of 9 viruses binding to the intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) receptors in training. The same results have been obtained in four cross-validation experiments using a resubstitution technique. The present model favorably compares, in terms of complexity, with other previously reported based on entropy considerations, and offers a quantitative basis for the visual rule previously reported by Vlasak et al.

  6. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambavi Kugananthan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human milk (HM contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p < 0.0001, n = 287. No association was found between whole HM leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287, supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89. These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding.

  7. Leptin Dysfunction and Alzheimer's Disease: Evidence from Cellular, Animal, and Human Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Matthew J; Ishii, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies that changes in body weight are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from mid-life obesity increasing the risk of developing AD to weight loss occurring at the earliest stages of AD. Therefore, factors that regulate body weight are likely to influence the development and progression of AD. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin has emerged as a major regulator of body weight mainly by activating hypothalamic neural circuits. Leptin also has several pleotropic effects including regulating cognitive function and having neuroprotective effects, suggesting a potential link between leptin and AD. Here, we will examine the relationship between leptin and AD by reviewing the recent evidence from cellular and animal models to human studies. We present a model where leptin has a bidirectional role in AD. Not only can alterations in leptin levels and function worsen cognitive decline and progression of AD pathology, but AD pathology, in of itself, can disrupt leptin signaling, which together would lead to a downward spiral of progressive neurodegeneration and worsening body weight and systemic metabolic deficits. Collectively, these studies serve as a framework to highlight the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the body weight and systemic metabolic deficits in AD, which has the potential to open new avenues that may ultimately lead to novel therapeutic targets and diagnostic tools.

  8. Leptin dysfunction and Alzheimer’s disease: evidence from cellular, animal, and human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Matthew J.; Ishii, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies that changes in body weight are associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) from mid-life obesity increasing the risk of developing AD to weight loss occurring at the earliest stages of AD. Therefore, factors that regulate body weight are likely to influence the development and progression of AD. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin has emerged as a major regulator of body weight mainly by activating hypothalamic neural circuits. Leptin also has several pleotropic effects including regulating cognitive function and having neuroprotective effects, suggesting a potential link between leptin and AD. Here, we will examine the relationship between leptin and AD by reviewing the recent evidence from cellular and animal models to human studies. We present a model where leptin has a bidirectional role in AD. Not only can alterations in leptin levels and function worsen cognitive decline and progression of AD pathology, but AD pathology, in of itself, can disrupt leptin signaling, which together would lead to a downward spiral of progressive neurodegeneration and worsening body weight and systemic metabolic deficits. Collectively, these studies serve as a framework to highlight the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the body weight and systemic metabolic deficits in AD, which has the potential to open new avenues that may ultimately lead to novel therapeutic targets and diagnostic tools. PMID:26993509

  9. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugananthan, Sambavi; Lai, Ching Tat; Gridneva, Zoya; Mark, Peter J; Geddes, Donna T; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-11-08

    Human milk (HM) contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287), supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89). These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding.

  10. Cellular localization of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) following traumatic brain injury in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Landeghem, Frank K H; Weiss, Thorsten; Oehmichen, Manfred; von Deimling, Andreas

    2007-06-01

    The pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is involved in many processes of the developing and mature central nervous system, such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, neurotransmission, inflammation and neuroprotection. Alternative posttranslational processing of PACAP results in two biologically active, amidated 27- and 38-amino acid peptides termed PACAP27 and PACAP38. In the present study, we examined whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects cellular immunopositivity for PACAP27 and PACAP38. Patients (n = 55) were classified into three groups dependent on their survival time (under 24 h, between 24 h and 7 days and between 7 days and 99 days postinjury). PACAP27 and PACAP38 were expressed by neurons and glial cells in normal human neocortex (n = 10). Following TBI, the total number of PACAP27- and PACAP38-positive cells was significantly decreased for a prolonged survival period within the traumatized neocortex. In the pericontusional cortex, the number of cells expressing PACAP27 and PACAP38 was significantly increased at all survival times examined. Triple immunofluorescence examinations revealed a significant increase in the absolute numbers of GFAP-positive reactive astrocytes as well as a decrease in the CNP-positive oligodendrocytes, each coexpressing PACAP27 or PACAP38 in the contusional and pericontusional cortex. We hypothesize that the increase of glial PACAP immunoreactivity may be interpreted as part of a complex endogenous neuroprotective response in the pericontusional regions, but the precise role of PACAP following TBI is yet to be determined.

  11. Inhibitory Effects of Adlay Extract on Melanin Production and Cellular Oxygen Stress in B16F10 Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Chun Huang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of adlay extract on melanin production and the antioxidant characteristics of the extract. The seeds were extracted by the supercritical fluid CO2 extraction (SFE method. The effect of adlay extract on melanin production was evaluated using mushroom tyrosinase activity assay, intracellular tyrosinase activity, antioxidant properties and melanin content. Those assays were performed spectrophotometrically. In addition, the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins was determined by western blotting. The results revealed that the adlay extract suppressed intracellular tyrosinase activity and decreased the amount of melanin in B16F10 cells. The adlay extract decreased the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF, tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein-1 (TRP-1 and tyrosinase related protein-2 (TRP-2. The extract also exhibited antioxidant characteristics such as free radical scavenging capacity and reducing power. It effectively decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in B16F10 cells. We concluded that the adlay extract inhibits melanin production by down-regulation of MITF, tyrosinase, TRP-1 and TRP-2. The antioxidant properties of the extract may also contribute to the inhibition of melanogenesis. The adlay extract can therefore be applied as an inhibitor of melanogenesis and could also act as a natural antioxidant in skin care products.

  12. Morphine Produces Immunosuppressive Effects in Non-human Primates at the Proteomic and Cellular Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Joseph N.; Ortiz, Gabriel M.; Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Chan, Eric Y.; Purdy, David E.; Murnane, Robert D.; Larsen, Kay; Palermo, Robert E.; Shukla, Anil K.; Clauss, Therese RW; Katze, Michael G.; McCune, Joseph M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-11

    Morphine has long been known to have immunosuppressive properties in vivo, but the molecular and immunologic changes induced by it are incompletely understood. As a prelude to understanding how these changes might interact with lentiviral infection in vivo, animals from two non-human primate (NHP) species [African green monkey (AGMs) and pigtailed macaque (PTs)] were provided morphine and studied using a systems biology approach. Biological specimens were obtained from multiple sources (e.g., lymph node, colon, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and peripheral blood) before and after the administration of morphine (titrated up to a maximum dose of 5 mg/kg over a period of 20 days). Cellular immune, plasma cytokine, and proteome changes were measured and morphine-induced changes in these parameters were assessed on an inter-organ, inter-individual, and inter-species basis. In both species, morphine was associated with decreased levels of (Ki-67+) T cell activation but with only minimal changes in overall T cell counts, neutrophil counts, and NK cells counts. While changes in T cell maturation were observed, these varied across the various tissue/fluid compartments studied. Proteomic analysis revealed a morphine-induced suppressive effect in the lymph node, with decreased abundance of protein mediators involved in the functional categories of energy metabolism, signaling, and maintenance of cell structure. These findings have relevance for understanding the impact of heroin addiction and the opioids used to treat addiction as well as on the interplay between opioid abuse and the response to infection with agents such as the human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV).

  13. SAR Simulation with Magneto Chiral Effects for Human Head Radiated from Cellular Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Silva, H.

    2008-09-01

    A numerical method for a microwave signal emitted by a cellular phone, propagating in a magneto-chiral media, characterized by an extended Born-Fedorov formalism, is presented. It is shown that the use of a cell model, combined with a real model of the human head, derived from the magnetic resonance of images allows a good determination of the near fields induced in the head when the brain chirality and the battery magnetic field are considered together. The results on a 2-Dim human head model show the evolution of the specific absorption rate, (SAR coefficient) and the spatial peak specific absorption rate which are sensitives to the magneto-chiral factor, which is important in the brain layer. For GSM/PCN phones, extremely low frequency real pulsed magnetic fields (in the order of 10 to 60 milligauss) are added to the model through the whole of the user's head. The more important conclusion of our work is that the head absorption is bigger than the results for a classical model without the magneto chiral effect. Hot spots are produced due to the combination of microwave and the magnetic field produced by the phone's operation. The FDTD method was used to compute the SARs inside the MRI based head models consisting of various tissues for 1.8 GHz. As a result, we found that in the head model having more than four kinds of tissue, the localized peak SAR reaches maximum inside the head for over five tissues including skin, bone, blood and brain cells.

  14. Gracilaria bursa-pastoris (Gmelin) Silva extract attenuates ultraviolet B radiation-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, M J; Kim, K C; Zheng, J; Yao, C W; Cha, J W; Kang, H K; Yoo, E S; Koh, Y S; Ko, M H; Lee, N H; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the protective effects of an ethanol extract derived from the red alga Gracilaria bursa-pastoris (Gmelin) Silva (GBE) on ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated human HaCaT keratinocytes. GBE exhibited scavenging activity against intracellular reactive oxygen species that were induced by either hydrogen peroxide or UVB radiation. In addition, both the superoxide anion and the hydroxyl radical were scavenged by GBE in cell-free systems. GBE absorbed light in the UVB range (280-320 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum and lessened the extent of UVB-induced oxidative damage to cellular lipids, proteins, and DNA. Finally, GBE-treated keratinocytes showed a reduction in UVB-induced apoptosis, as exemplified by fewer apoptotic bodies. These results suggest that GBE exerts cytoprotective actions against UVB-stimulated oxidative stress by scavenging ROS and absorbing UVB rays, thereby attenuating injury to cellular constituents and preventing cell death.

  15. Magnolol Affects Cellular Proliferation, Polyamine Biosynthesis and Catabolism-Linked Protein Expression and Associated Cellular Signaling Pathways in Human Prostate Cancer Cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan T. McKeown

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men in Canada and the United States. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development and progression of many cancers, including prostate cancer. Context and purpose of this study: This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on cellular proliferation and proliferation-linked activities of PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Results: PC3 cells exposed to magnolol at a concentration of 80 μM for 6 hours exhibited decreased protein expression of ornithine decarboxylase, a key regulator in polyamine biosynthesis, as well as affecting the expression of other proteins involved in polyamine biosynthesis and catabolism. Furthermore, protein expression of the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, a key regulatory protein associated with DNA synthesis, was significantly decreased. Finally, the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, NFκB (nuclear factor of kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and AP-1 (activator protein 1 cellular signaling pathways were assayed to determine which, if any, of these pathways magnolol exposure would alter. Protein expressions of p-JNK-1 and c-jun were significantly increased while p-p38, JNK-1/2, PI3Kp85, p-PI3Kp85, p-Akt, NFκBp65, p-IκBα and IκBα protein expressions were significantly decreased. Conclusions: These alterations further support the anti-proliferative effects of magnolol on PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggest that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  16. Surgical extraction of human dorsal root ganglia from organ donors and preparation of primary sensory neuron cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtcheva, Manouela V; Copits, Bryan A; Davidson, Steve; Sheahan, Tayler D; Pullen, Melanie Y; McCall, Jordan G; Dikranian, Krikor; Gereau, Robert W

    2016-10-01

    Primary cultures of rodent sensory neurons are widely used to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pain, itch, nerve injury and regeneration. However, translation of these preclinical findings may be greatly improved by direct validation in human tissues. We have developed an approach to extract and culture human sensory neurons in collaboration with a local organ procurement organization (OPO). Here we describe the surgical procedure for extraction of human dorsal root ganglia (hDRG) and the necessary modifications to existing culture techniques to prepare viable adult human sensory neurons for functional studies. Dissociated sensory neurons can be maintained in culture for >10 d, and they are amenable to electrophysiological recording, calcium imaging and viral gene transfer. The entire process of extraction and culturing can be completed in <7 h, and it can be performed by trained graduate students. This approach can be applied at any institution with access to organ donors consenting to tissue donation for research, and is an invaluable resource for improving translational research.

  17. Huaier aqueous extract induces apoptosis of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells through the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yang; Meng, Hongmei; Liu, Weidong; Wang, Huan; Liu, Qingpeng

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, aqueous extract of Trametes robiniophila Murr. (Huaier), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been frequently used in China for complementary cancer therapy. However, the mechanisms underlying its anticancer effects have yet to be elucidated. The present study aimed to evaluate the ability of Huaier extract to inhibit proliferation, promote apoptosis and suppress mobility in the fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line in vitro. The cells were treated with gradient doses of Huaier extract at concentrations of 0, 4, 8 or 16 mg/ml for 24, 48 or 72 h. The cell viability and motility were measured in vitro using MTT, invasive, migration and scratch assays. The distribution of the cell cycle and the extent of cellular apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The apoptotic pathways were detected using a mitochondrial membrane potential transition assay and western blotting. The results revealed that the cellular viability decreased significantly with increasing concentrations of Huaier extract. In addition, cell invasiveness and migration were also suppressed significantly. It was demonstrated that Huaier extract induced G2 cell-cycle arrest and cellular apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, the downregulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 and pro-caspase-3, and upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 suggested that Huaier extract induced the apoptosis of HT1080 cells through the mitochondrial pathway. The results of the present study indicate that Huaier extract is a potential complementary agent for the treatment of fibrosarcoma.

  18. Receptor research on xenohormone effects of human serum extracts containing the actual mixture of perfluorinated alkyl acids: a short review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard-Olesen, Christian; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    risk of breast cancer and other adverse health effects such as lower birth weight and longer time to pregnancy which might be related to disruptions of various hormonal systems. For instance, direct cell exposure studies in vitro suggest that some PFAAs can transactivate the estrogen receptor (ER......), antagonize the androgen receptor (AR) and has the potential to interfere with Thyroid Hormone and Aryl-hydrocarbon Receptor functions. Moreover, the PFAAs also showed cellular oxidative stress potential. Humans are exposed to an array of PFAAs, and the quantity and combination of these PFAAs in human serum...... of the actual serum PFAA mixture on both steroid hormone actions as well as other hormonal systems e.g. thyroid hormone function. In the current review we will discuss how our recently developed PFAA extraction method might be used in future research to assess the endocrine impact of PFAAs on human health....

  19. Detection of cellular senescence within human invasive breast carcinomas distinguishes different breast tumor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotarelo, Cristina L; Schad, Arno; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Sleeman, Jonathan P; Springer, Erik; Schmidt, Marcus; Thaler, Sonja

    2016-11-15

    Oncogene-induced senescence is thought to act as a barrier to tumorigenesis by arresting cells at risk of malignant transformation. Nevertheless, numerous findings suggest that senescent cells may conversely promote tumor progression through the development of the senescence-associated secretome they produce. It is likely that the composition and the physiological consequences mediated by the senescence secretome are dependent on the oncogenes that trigger the senescence program. Breast cancer represents a heterogenous disease that can be divided into breast cancer subtypes due to different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. As tumor initiation and progression of these breast cancer subtypes is triggered by diverse oncogenic stimuli, differences in the senescence secretomes within breast tumors might be responsible for tumor initiation, progression, metastasis and therapeutic response. Many studies have addressed the role of senescence as a barrier to tumor progression using murine xenograft models. However, few investigations have been performed to elucidate the degree to which senescent tumor cells are present within untreated human tumors, and if present, whether these senescent tumor cells may play a role in disease progression. In the present study we analysed the appearance of senescent cells within invasive breast cancers. Detection of cellular senescence by the use of SAβ-galactosidase (SAβ-gal) staining within invasive breast carcinoms from 129 untreated patients revealed differences in the amount of SAβ-gal+ tumor cells between breast cancer subtypes. The highest percentages of SAβ-gal+ tumor cells were found in HER2-positive and luminal A breast carcinomas whereas triple negative tumors showed either little or no positivity.

  20. A retrospective analysis of a human cellular repair matrix for the treatment of chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulski, Matthew; Jacobstein, Douglas A; Petranto, Russell D; Migliori, Vincent J; Nair, Girish; Pfeiffer, Darelle

    2013-12-01

    Despite the introduction of advanced wound care modalities over the last 15 years, chronic wounds are an increasing problem. Few single options are available for clinicians to treat recalcitrant wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and venous leg ulcers (VLUs). A retrospective, single-center study was conducted at an outpatient wound care center to evaluate the clinical effect of a human cellular repair matrix (h-CRM) on chronic wounds that had failed to heal. Data from all patients who had received this treatment modality during a period of 2 years were abstracted. Standard care included weekly visits, regular debridement, offloading DFUs, compression for VLUs, and h-CRM for wounds >4 weeks duration. A total of 66 patients (30 male, 36 female, mean age 71.1 [± 8.8] years) received h-CRM treatment for 67 wounds (34 VLUs, 27 DFUs, and six other chronic wounds). The average wound size at baseline was 6.65 (± 9.68) cm2, and the average wound duration before h-CRM treatment was 38 (±70.8) weeks. Fifty (50) patients (74.6%) had failed to heal using other advanced therapies. After 12 weeks of care, 51 of the 67 wounds (76.1%) were healed: 23 of 34 (67.6%) VLUs and 23 of 27 (85.2%) DFUs. Average time to closure in these wounds was 5.8 (±2.5) weeks. No significant differences were found between proportions of VLUs and DFUs healed. No adverse events or recurrences occurred during an average follow-up time of 20.4 months (range 11 to 32 months). Overall, patients received an average of 3.8 applications of h-CRM, and 3.2 applications were used among patients that healed. The study results suggest h-CRM may benefit patients with chronic wounds. Prospective, randomized clinical studies are warranted.

  1. Contamination by oil crude extraction - Refinement and their effects on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Maria Isabel; Arevalo, Ana Paulina; Sotomayor, Santiago; Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia

    2017-08-18

    The harmful effects of oil on various species of flora and fauna have been studied extensively; however, few studies have studied the effects of oil exposure on human health. The objective of this research was to collect information on the acute health effects and serious psychological symptoms of the possible consequences of such exposure to crude oil. Some studies focused on the composition of different chemicals used in the extraction process, and wastes generated proved to be highly harmful to human health. Thus, studies have shown that individuals who live near oil fields or wells - or who take part in activities of cleaning oil spills - have presented health conditions, such as irritation to the skin, eyes, mucous membranes, kidney damage, liver, reproductive, among others. In Ecuador, this reality is not different from other countries, and some studies have shown increased diseases related with oil crude and oil spills, like skin irritation, throat, liver, lung, infertility, and abortions, and it has been linked to childhood leukemia. Other studies suggest a direct relationship between DNA damage because of oil resulting in a genetic instability of the main enzymes of cellular metabolism as well as a relationship with some cancers, such as leukemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cellular uptake but low permeation of human calcitonin-derived cell penetrating peptides and Tat(47-57) through well-differentiated epithelial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tréhin, Rachel; Krauss, Ulrike; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G;

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether cell penetrating peptides (CPP) derived from human calcitonin (hCT) possess, in addition to cellular uptake, the capacity to deliver their cargo through epithelial barriers.......To investigate whether cell penetrating peptides (CPP) derived from human calcitonin (hCT) possess, in addition to cellular uptake, the capacity to deliver their cargo through epithelial barriers....

  3. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of extracts of mussels originating from Moroccan Atlantic coast, in human colonic epithelial cells Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Boubker; Moustaid, Khadija; Moukha, Serge; Mobio, Théophile A; Essamadi, Abdelkhalid; Creppy, Edmond E

    2008-08-01

    Industrial processing of phosphates generates chemical wastes which are, without any treatment, discharged directly into the Atlantic Ocean at Jorf Lasfar (JL), located 120 km south of Casablanca (Morocco) were shellfish are also collected by people without any control. Marine bivalves concentrate these pollutants by filtration and serve as vectors in human's exposure. The objective of this study was to test and compare in vitro on human intestinal cells (Caco-2) the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) extracts (either hydrophilic or lipophilic) collected at two coastal sites; JL (neighboring a phosphate processing plat-form) and Oualidia (OL) (a vegetable growing area) located 160 km south of Casablanca (i.e. 40 km south of JL). Using Caco-2 cells, the following end-points have been evaluated, cytotoxicity as measured by MTS test, inhibition of cellular macromolecules syntheses (DNA and protein) and genotoxicity evaluated by DNA fragmentation in agarose gel electrophoresis. The results indicated, that hydrophilic and lipophilic OL mussels extracts are cytotoxic and inhibit cellular macromolecules syntheses. Moreover these extracts damage the DNA in Caco-2 cells. The lipophilic JL mussels extract is cytotoxic, inhibits cellular macromolecules syntheses, and damages the DNA in Caco-2 cells whereas the hydrophilic extract of JL mussels fails to inhibit protein synthesis and does not damage the DNA. This extract rather enhances protein synthesis, suggesting possible metallothioneins induction by metal ions. Altogether these in vitro data indicate that mussels collected from OL could be more harmful than those from JL even though the later is closer to the pollution site than OL. Nevertheless consumption of mussels from all these areas may present a risk for humans. Epidemiological studies will be needed for global risk assessment in humans living in these areas especially those consuming see food regularly.

  4. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeomi Mizutani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1 locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]. To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article “Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85” [1].

  5. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2016-03-01

    This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]). To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article "Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85" [1].

  6. Effect of extraction protocols and epidermal growth factor on the cellular repopulation of decellularized anterior cruciate ligament allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert D; Gratzer, Paul F

    2005-12-15

    We are developing a decellularized bone-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-bone allograft for treatment of ACL disruption in young or active patients. This study demonstrates the feasibility of seeding decellularized ACL tissue with primary ligament fibroblasts. Porcine ACLs were decellularized by one of three protocols, each differing only by the detergent/solvent used during the second wash (SDS, Triton-X, or TnBP). Porcine ACL fibroblasts were obtained by explant and seeded onto tissue samples of decellularized ACL. Culture conditions were varied to compare the relative effect of three different decellularization protocols on cellular repopulation. Culture condition variables included (1) the number of cells used for seeding, (2) the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF), and (3) culture duration. Cellular ingrowth was assessed by metabolic activity (MTT assay), DNA quantification (Hoescht dye), and histology (H&E staining). Cell counting on histological sections demonstrated that Triton-X-and TnBP-treated ligaments were more receptive to cellular ingrowth than SDS-treated samples. The addition of EGF to culture medium did not significantly increase cellular ingrowth. Both the Triton-X and TnBP decellularization treatments provide suitable, naturally derived scaffolds for the ingrowth of primary ACL fibroblasts, and should be further investigated in the development of an allograft-derived bone-ACL-bone graft.

  7. In vitro ZnCl2 cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human leukocytes: Zero-order kinetic cellular zinc influx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pereira de Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is an essential trace element for cellular viability, but concentrations above physiologic level may lead to cellular damage. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro ZnCl2 genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in human leukocyte cells. This was assessed in an unprecedented way that correlated the level of intracellular Zn after cell exposition with the cellular damage. The exposure to increased Zn concentrations (2.5-20 µg mL-1, showed significantly reduced cellular leukocyte viability. However, significant DNA damages were observed only when the Zn exposure concentrations were from 10-20 µg mL-1. The Zn intracellular levels found in leukocytes was from 72.25-268.9 ρg cell-1, starting to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity at concentrations of 95.68 and 126.2 ρg cell-1, respectively. The relationship between the exposure concentration and intracellular levels of Zn suggests that the influx of Zn, in the form of ZnCl2, occurs in human leukocytes under zero-order kinetics.

  8. Calendula extract: effects on mechanical parameters of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Naveed; Zaman, Shahiq Uz; Khan, Barkat Ali; Amir, Muhammad Naeem; Ebrahimzadeh, Muhammad Ali

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of newly formulated topical cream of Calendula officinalis extract on the mechanical parameters of the skin by using the cutometer. The Cutometer 580 MPA is a device that is designed to measure the mechanical properties of the skin in response to the application of negative pressure. This non-invasive method can be useful for objective and quantitative investigation of age related changes in skin, skin elasticity, skin fatigue, skin hydration, and evaluation of the effects of cosmetic and antiaging topical products. Two creams (base and formulation) were prepared for the study. Both the creams were applied to the cheeks of 21 healthy human volunteers for a period of eight weeks. Every individual was asked to come on week 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 and measurements were taken by using Cutometer MPA 580 every week. Different mechanical parameters of the skin measured by the cutometer were; R0, R1, R2, R5, R6, R7, and R8. These were then evaluated statistically to measure the effects produced by these creams. Using ANOVA, and t-test it was found that R0, and R6 were significant (p 0.05). The instrumental measurements produced by formulation reflected significant improvements in hydration and firmness of skin.

  9. Extraction of Natural Antioxidants from the Thelephora ganbajun Mushroom by an Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Technique and Evaluation of Antiproliferative Activity of the Extract against Human Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-Ping; Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The Thelephora ganbajun mushroom has been found to be a potential rich source of natural antioxidants. In this study, an ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) technique together with GRAS (generally recognized as safe) solvents (ethanol and water) was used to maximize the extraction of antioxidants from Thelephora ganbajun. Five extraction parameters (ethanol concentration, solvent to solid ratio, extraction time, temperature and ultrasound power) were investigated by single-factor experiments, and then a central composite rotatable design was employed to study interaction of three key extraction parameters. The optimum conditions were as follows: 57.38% ethanol, 70.15 mL/g solvent to solid ratio, 10.58 min extraction time, 40 °C extraction temperature and 500 W ultrasound power. Under the optimum conditions, the antioxidant activity obtained was 346.98 ± 12.19 µmol Trolox/g DW, in accordance with the predicted value of 344.67 µmol Trolox/g DW. Comparison of UAE with conventional maceration and Soxhlet extraction, the UAE method showed stronger extract efficiency in a shorter extraction time. These results showed that UAE was an effective technique to extract antioxidants from Thelephora ganbajun. Furthermore, the extracts obtained under the optimized conditions exhibited antiproliferative activities toward human lung (A549), breast (MCF-7), liver (HepG2) and colon (HT-29) cancer cells, especially for liver and lung cancer cells. In addition, rutin, 2-hydrocinnamic acid and epicatechin were identified in the extract, which might contribute to antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. PMID:27706082

  10. Extraction of Natural Antioxidants from the Thelephora ganbajun Mushroom by an Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Technique and Evaluation of Antiproliferative Activity of the Extract against Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ping Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Thelephora ganbajun mushroom has been found to be a potential rich source of natural antioxidants. In this study, an ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE technique together with GRAS (generally recognized as safe solvents (ethanol and water was used to maximize the extraction of antioxidants from Thelephora ganbajun. Five extraction parameters (ethanol concentration, solvent to solid ratio, extraction time, temperature and ultrasound power were investigated by single-factor experiments, and then a central composite rotatable design was employed to study interaction of three key extraction parameters. The optimum conditions were as follows: 57.38% ethanol, 70.15 mL/g solvent to solid ratio, 10.58 min extraction time, 40 °C extraction temperature and 500 W ultrasound power. Under the optimum conditions, the antioxidant activity obtained was 346.98 ± 12.19 µmol Trolox/g DW, in accordance with the predicted value of 344.67 µmol Trolox/g DW. Comparison of UAE with conventional maceration and Soxhlet extraction, the UAE method showed stronger extract efficiency in a shorter extraction time. These results showed that UAE was an effective technique to extract antioxidants from Thelephora ganbajun. Furthermore, the extracts obtained under the optimized conditions exhibited antiproliferative activities toward human lung (A549, breast (MCF-7, liver (HepG2 and colon (HT-29 cancer cells, especially for liver and lung cancer cells. In addition, rutin, 2-hydrocinnamic acid and epicatechin were identified in the extract, which might contribute to antioxidant and antiproliferative activities.

  11. Study the Effect of Echinacea Purpurea Extract on Cellular Delayed Type Hypersensitivity and Splenocyte Proliferation in BALB/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.M. Hassan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Purple cone flower plant (Echinacea purpurea is one of the mostimportant Herbal products in many countries. Up to now a lot of experimentsdemonstrated the controversial effects of this herb on immune system . In thisresearch we study the in vivo and in vitro effect of Iranian E.purpurea extract oncellular immunity.Materials and Methods: At first we determined the lethal dose of E.purpurea extract after intraperitoneal injection in BALB/c mice. Then we made five groups of mice and treat them by four times intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml extract at different doses (0, 0.4, 2, 10 and 50 mg/ml during two weeks. Splenocyte proliferation response to extract was assessed by MTT method. Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTHresponse was evaluated by priming mice with 1×108 Sheep Red Blood Cell (SRBC injected subcutaneously in the back on day 7after treatment.Results: As a result no significant variation in weight and spleen index of test groups to control was observed. Splenocyte proliferation and DTH response of test groups to control increased significantly (p<0.05.Conclusion: However these data confirmed the results of previous studies, inaddition presented the first results about significant increase in DTH response that could not be seen before. Scince the main reason of this difference refers to active compounds of herb extract, comparing effective component of this extract with that of E.purpurea cultivated in other geographical condition will consider as the next studies.

  12. Revisions to Exceptions Applicable to Certain Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    : The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency or we) is issuing this final rule to amend certain regulations regarding donor eligibility, including the screening and testing of donors of particular human cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based products (HCT/Ps), and related labeling. This final rule is in response to our enhanced understanding in this area and in response to comments from stakeholders regarding the importance of embryos to individuals and couples seeking access to donated embryos.

  13. [Comparing and evaluating six methods of extracting human genomic DNA from whole blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Su-Hua; Li, Li

    2009-04-01

    Comparing the differences in purity and yield among six methods of extracting human genomic DNA from whole blood, which included Classic Phenol-chloroform extraction, modified combined technique composed of improved Phenol-chloroform extraction and Chelex-100 extraction, Chelex-100 extraction, IQ, Qiagen and SP. Ten samples of intravenous whole blood (5 mL/sample) were collected and human genomic DNA was extracted with these six methods. The purity and concentration of the DNA products were detected by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and fluorescent quantitation technique, the yield was calculated and tested with statistical software. The Chelex-100 extraction was inferior in DNA purity to other methods while the other five methods showed no statistical difference. Modified combined technique was the poorest and IQ was the best in yield among the six methods of extraction. Statistical result showed that the extraction with high quality kits was better than that with classic Phenol-chloroform extraction, Chelex-100 extraction and modified combined technique composed of improved Phenol-chloroform. There was statistical difference between them. Comparing to Phenol-chloroform extraction and Chelex-100 extraction, high quality kits are more useful in DNA extraction from forensic materials.

  14. Cellular expression, trafficking, and function of two isoforms of human ULBP5/RAET1G.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Eagle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D is expressed on Natural Killer (NK cells and subsets of T cells. NKG2D contributes to anti-tumour and anti-viral immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The ligands for NKG2D in humans are diverse proteins of the MIC and ULBP/RAET families that are upregulated on the surface of virally infected cells and tumours. Two splicing variants of ULBP5/RAET1G have been cloned previously, but not extensively characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We pursue a number of approaches to characterise the expression, trafficking, and function of the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G. We show that both transcripts are frequently expressed in cell lines derived from epithelial cancers, and in primary breast cancers. The full-length transcript, RAET1G1, is predicted to encode a molecule with transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are unique amongst NKG2D ligands. Using specific anti-RAET1G1 antiserum to stain tissue microarrays we show that RAET1G1 expression is highly restricted in normal tissues. RAET1G1 was expressed at a low level in normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells in a similar pattern to MICA. Both RAET1G1 and MICA showed increased expression in the gut of patients with celiac disease. In contrast to healthy tissues the RAET1G1 antiserum stained a wide variety or different primary tumour sections. Both endogenously expressed and transfected RAET1G1 was mainly found inside the cell, with a minority of the protein reaching the cell surface. Conversely the truncated splicing variant of RAET1G2 was shown to encode a soluble molecule that could be secreted from cells. Secreted RAET1G2 was shown to downregulate NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells and hence may represent a novel tumour immune evasion strategy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that the expression patterns of ULBP5RAET1G are very similar to the well-characterised NKG2D ligand, MICA. However the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G have

  15. A Novel Cellular Handset Design for an Enhanced Antenna Performance and a Reduced SAR in the Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah I. Al-Mously

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel cellular handset design with a bottom-mounted short loaded-whip antenna. This new handset design is modeled and simulated using a finite difference time-domain (FDTD-based platform SEMCAD. The proposed handset is based on a current commercially available bar-phone type with a curvature shape, keypad positioned above the screen, and top-mounted antenna. The specific absorption rates (SARs are determined computationally in the specific anthropomorphic mannequin (SAM and anatomically correct model of a human head when exposed to the EM-field radiation of the proposed cellular handset and the handset with top-mounted antenna. The two cellular handsets are simulated to operate at both GSM standards, 900 MHz as well as 1800 MHz, having different antenna dimensions and intput power of 0.6 W and 0.125 W, respectively. The proposed human hand holding the two handset models is a semirealistic hand model consists of three tissues: skin, muscle, and bone. The simulations are conducted with handset positions based on the IEEE standard 1528-2003. The results show that the proposed handset has a significant improvement of antenna efficiency when it is hand-held close to head, as compared with the handset of top-mounted antenna. Also, the results show that a significant reduction of the induced SAR in the human head-tissues can be achieved with the proposed handset.

  16. Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin is a novel structural component of human erythrocytes and a biomarker of cellular stress and senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna H Antonelou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Secretory Apolipoprotein J/Clusterin (sCLU is a ubiquitously expressed chaperone that has been functionally implicated in several pathological conditions of increased oxidative injury, including aging. Nevertheless, the biological role of sCLU in red blood cells (RBCs remained largely unknown. In the current study we identified sCLU as a component of human RBCs and we undertook a detailed analysis of its cellular topology. Moreover, we studied the erythrocytic membrane sCLU content during organismal aging, in conditions of increased organismal stress and accelerated RBCs senescence, as well as during physiological in vivo cellular senescence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a combination of molecular, biochemical and high resolution microscopical methods we found that sCLU is a novel structural component of RBCs extra- and intracellular plasma membrane and cytosol. We observed that the RBCs membrane-associated sCLU decreases during organismal aging or exposure to acute stress (e.g. smoking, in patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, as well as during RBCs in vivo senescence. In all cases, sCLU reduction paralleled the expression of typical cellular senescence, redox imbalance and erythrophagocytosis markers which are also indicative of the senescence- and oxidative stress-mediated RBCs membrane vesiculation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that sCLU at the mature RBCs is not a silent remnant of the erythroid precursors, but an active component being functionally implicated in the signalling mechanisms of cellular senescence and oxidative stress-responses in both healthy and diseased organism. The reduced sCLU protein levels in the RBCs membrane following cell exposure to various endogenous or exogenous stressors closely correlates to the levels of cellular senescence and redox imbalance markers, suggesting the usefulness of sCLU as a sensitive biomarker of senescence and cellular stress.

  17. Cellular reactivity to respiratory syncytial virus in human colostrum and breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R; Scott, M; Toms, G L

    1985-09-01

    Colostrum and breast-milk samples were taken from 23 mothers between 2 days and 7 weeks postpartum and were examined for the presence of cellular reactivity to respiratory syncytial (RS) virus using a lymphocyte transformation assay. Positive responses were detected in nine of the 23 (39%) samples taken at 2-5 days postpartum, but this reactivity was undetectable at 3 weeks. Positive responses developed in a further three mothers during the 3-7-week period of lactation, suggesting a response to virus infection. Colostral whey was found to suppress the cellular response to RS virus and inhibition was related to the level of specific IgA antibody to RS virus present in the whey. The role of colostral cellular reactivity in protection of breast-fed infants from RS virus bronchiolitis is discussed.

  18. Cellular Adhesion Tripeptide RGD Inhibits Growth of Human Ileocecal Adenocarcinoma Cells HCT-8 and Induces Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; ZENG Hong-bin; YANG Shao-juan; GAO Shen; HUANG Yi-bing; HOU Rui-zhen; ZHAO Mi-feng; XU Li; ZHANG Xue-zhong

    2007-01-01

    The tripeptide, Arg-Gly-Asp(RGD) motif is an integrin-recognition site found in adhesive proteins present in extracellular matrices(ECM) and in the blood. HCT-8 cells were treated with cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD at various concentrations. MTT assay was performed to examine the growth and proliferation of HCT-8 cells after treatment with RGD for 48 h. Haematoxylin and Eosin(HE) staining and electromicroscope were used to observe the morphology of apoptotic cells. Survivin and flow cytometry were also used to analyze the HCT-8 apoptosis. Cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD significantly inhibits the growth and proliferation of HCT-8 cells in a dose-dependent manner and induces apoptosis of HCT-8. These results indicate that cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD inhibits the growth and proliferation of tumor HCT-8 cell, probably by the aid of inducing apoptosis of HCT-8 cell.

  19. Aberrant localization of lamin B receptor (LBR) in cellular senescence in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Rumi; En, Atsuki; Ukekawa, Ryo [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Miki, Kensuke [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Ichiban Life Corporation, 1-1-7 Horai-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama 231-0048 (Japan); Fujii, Michihiko, E-mail: mifuji@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Ayusawa, Dai [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Ichiban Life Corporation, 1-1-7 Horai-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama 231-0048 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    5-Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analogue, induces cellular senescence in mammalian cells. BrdU induces cellular senescence probably through the regulation of chromatin because BrdU destabilizes or disrupts nucleosome positioning and decondenses heterochromatin. Since heterochromatin is tethered to the nuclear periphery through the interaction with the nuclear envelope proteins, we examined the localization of the several nuclear envelope proteins such as lamins, lamin-interacting proteins, nuclear pore complex proteins, and nuclear transport proteins in senescent cells. We have shown here that lamin B receptor (LBR) showed a change in localization in both BrdU-induced and replicative senescent cells.

  20. The inhibitory mechanism of Cordyceps sinensis on cigarette smoke extract-induced senescence in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu AL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ailing Liu,1,2,* Jinxiang Wu,1,* Aijun Li,2 Wenxiang Bi,3 Tian Liu,1 Liuzhao Cao,1 Yahui Liu,1 Liang Dong1 1Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Weihai Municipal Hospital, Weihai, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 3Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: Cellular senescence is a state of irreversible growth arrest induced either by telomere shortening (replicative senescence or stress. The bronchial epithelial cell is often injured by inhaled toxic substances, such as cigarette smoke. In the present study, we investigated whether exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE induces senescence of bronchial epithelial cells; and Cordyceps sinensis mechanism of inhibition of CSE-induced cellular senescence.Methods: Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE cells cultured in vitro were treated with CSE and/or C. sinensis. p16, p21, and senescence-associated-galactosidase activity were used to detect cellular senescence with immunofluorescence, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, PI3K/AKT/mTOR and their phosphorylated proteins were examined to testify the activation of signaling pathway by ROS fluorescent staining and Western blotting. Then, inhibitors of ROS and PI3K were used to further confirm the function of this pathway.Results: Cellular senescence was upregulated by CSE treatment, and C. sinensis can decrease CSE-induced cellular senescence. Activation of ROS/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway was enhanced by CSE treatment, and decreased when C. sinensis was added. Blocking ROS/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway can attenuate CSE-induced cellular senescence.Conclusion: CSE can induce cellular senescence in human bronchial

  1. Cellular uptake and cytotoxic potential of respirable bentonite particles with different quartz contents and chemical modifications in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geh, Stefan; Rettenmeier, Albert W.; Dopp, Elke [University Hospital, Institute of Hygiene and Occupational Medicine, Essen (Germany); Yuecel, Raif [University Hospital, Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research), Essen (Germany); Duffin, Rodger [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); University of Edinburgh, ELEGI COLT Lab, Scotland (United Kingdom); Albrecht, Catrin; Borm, Paul J.A. [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); Armbruster, Lorenz [Verein fuer Technische Sicherheit und Umweltschutz e.V., Gotha (Germany); Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Bruening, Thomas [Research Institute for Occupational Medicine of the Institutions for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Hoffmann, Eik [University of Rostock, Institute of Biology, Department of Cell Biology and Biosystems Technology, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Considering the biological reactivity of pure quartz in lung cells, there is a strong interest to clarify the cellular effects of respirable siliceous dusts, like bentonites. In the present study, we investigated the cellular uptake and the cytotoxic potential of bentonite particles (Oe< 10 {mu}m) with an {alpha}-quartz content of up to 6% and different chemical modifications (activation: alkaline, acidic, organic) in human lung fibroblasts (IMR90). Additionally, the ability of the particles to induce apoptosis in IMR90-cells and the hemolytic activity was tested. All bentonite samples were tested for endotoxins with the in vitro-Pyrogen test and were found to be negative. Cellular uptake of particles by IMR90-cells was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity was analyzed in IMR90-cells by determination of viable cells using flow cytometry and by measuring of the cell respiratory activity. Induced apoptotic cells were detected by AnnexinV/Propidiumiodide-staining and gel electrophoresis. Our results demonstrate that activated bentonite particles are better taken up by IMR90-cells than untreated (native) bentonite particles. Also, activated bentonite particles with a quartz content of 5-6% were more cytotoxic than untreated bentonites or bentonites with a quartz content lower than 4%. The bentonite samples induced necrotic as well as apoptotic cell death. In general, bentonites showed a high membrane-damaging potential shown as hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes. We conclude that cellular effects of bentonite particles in human lung cells are enhanced after chemical treatment of the particles. The cytotoxic potential of the different bentonites is primarily characterized by a strong lysis of the cell membrane. (orig.)

  2. The Cellular Proteins Grb2 and DDX3 Are Increased upon Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Act in a Proviral Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavignac, Yolaine; Lieber, Diana; Laib Sampaio, Kerstin; Madlung, Johannes; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Jahn, Gerhard; Nordheim, Alfred; Sinzger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    While it is well established that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) upregulates many cellular proteins and incorporates several of them into its virion, little is known about the functional relevance of such virus-host interactions. Two cellular proteins, Grb2 and DDX3, gained our interest as they appeared enriched in virion particles and this incorporation depended on the viral tegument protein pp65, suggesting a functional relevance. We therefore tested whether the level of these proteins is altered upon HCMV infection and whether they support viral replication. Immunoblotting analyses of cellular fractions showed increased levels of both proteins in infected cells with a maximum at 2 d p.i. and a reduction of the soluble Grb2 fraction. Knockdown of either gene by transfection of siRNAs reduced viral spread not only of the cell culture adapted HCMV strain TB40/E but also of recent clinical isolates. Apparently, Grb2 and DDX3 are proviral cellular factors that are upregulated in infected cells.

  3. The Cellular Proteins Grb2 and DDX3 Are Increased upon Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Act in a Proviral Fashion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolaine Cavignac

    Full Text Available While it is well established that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV upregulates many cellular proteins and incorporates several of them into its virion, little is known about the functional relevance of such virus-host interactions. Two cellular proteins, Grb2 and DDX3, gained our interest as they appeared enriched in virion particles and this incorporation depended on the viral tegument protein pp65, suggesting a functional relevance. We therefore tested whether the level of these proteins is altered upon HCMV infection and whether they support viral replication. Immunoblotting analyses of cellular fractions showed increased levels of both proteins in infected cells with a maximum at 2 d p.i. and a reduction of the soluble Grb2 fraction. Knockdown of either gene by transfection of siRNAs reduced viral spread not only of the cell culture adapted HCMV strain TB40/E but also of recent clinical isolates. Apparently, Grb2 and DDX3 are proviral cellular factors that are upregulated in infected cells.

  4. Identification of cellular targets for the human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes by RNA interference and transcriptome analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuner, Ruprecht; Vogt, Markus; Sultmann, Holger; Buness, Andreas; Dymalla, Susanne; Bulkescher, Julia; Fellmann, Mark; Butz, Karin; Poustka, Annemarie; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2007-11-01

    Specific types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause cervical cancer, the second most common tumor in women worldwide. Both cellular transformation and the maintenance of the oncogenic phenotype of HPV-positive tumor cells are linked to the expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes. To identify downstream cellular target genes for the viral oncogenes, we silenced endogenous E6 and E7 expression in HPV-positive HeLa cells by RNA interference (RNAi). Subsequently, we assessed changes of the cellular transcriptome by genome-wide microarray analysis. We identified 648 genes, which were either downregulated (360 genes) or upregulated (288 genes), upon inhibition of E6/E7 expression. A large fraction of these genes is involved in tumor-relevant processes, such as apoptosis control, cell cycle regulation, or spindle formation. Others may represent novel cellular targets for the HPV oncogenes, such as a large group of C-MYC-associated genes involved in RNA processing and splicing. Comparison with published microarray data revealed a substantial concordance between the genes repressed by RNAi-mediated E6/E7 silencing in HeLa cells and genes reported to be upregulated in HPV-positive cervical cancer biopsies.

  5. In Vitro Effect of Ananas Comosus Extract on Human Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélany Uribe-Clavijo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Spermicides has been used for birth control, but its chemical components are harmful for the vaginal epithelium, thus other studies have been done, given the possibility to use different extracts from plants as spermicidal agents that avoid vaginal tissue damages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Ananas comosus extract as spermicidal. Semen samples were incubated with pineapple extract, and motility and viability was evaluated after contact. In addition the cytotoxic effect was evaluated using MTS assay on HeLa cells. Motility (p<0.001 and viability (p<0.001 decreased after treatment with 50% dilution. However, extract had a cytotoxic effect on epithelial cell line. In conclusion, despite the cytotoxic effect in the same concentrations that spermicidal activity was observed, further studies determining the fractions of the extract have spermicidal properties are necessary.

  6. Embryonic stem cells as an ectodermal cellular model of human p63-related dysplasia syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rostagno, P.; Wolchinsky, Z.; Vigano, A.M.; Shivtiel, S.; Zhou, H.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Ferone, G.; Missero, C.; Mantovani, R.; Aberdam, D.; Virolle, T.

    2010-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the TP63 transcription factor underlie the molecular basis of several similar autosomal dominant ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndromes. Here we provide a novel cellular model derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells that recapitulates in vitro the main steps of embryonic skin d

  7. Chromatin structure and cellular radiosensitivity : A comparison of two human tumour cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, EC; Roesink, JM; Rosemann, M; Brunsting, JF; Driessen, C; Orta, T; Konings, AWT; Peacock, JH; Kampinga, HH

    1996-01-01

    The role of variation in susceptibility to DNA damage induction was studied as a determinant for cellular radiosensitivity. Comparison of the radiosensitive HX142 and radioresistant RT112 cell lines previously revealed higher susceptibility to X-ray-induced DNA damage in the sensitive cell line usin

  8. Chromatin structure and cellular radiosensitivity : A comparison of two human tumour cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, EC; Roesink, JM; Rosemann, M; Brunsting, JF; Driessen, C; Orta, T; Konings, AWT; Peacock, JH; Kampinga, HH

    1996-01-01

    The role of variation in susceptibility to DNA damage induction was studied as a determinant for cellular radiosensitivity. Comparison of the radiosensitive HX142 and radioresistant RT112 cell lines previously revealed higher susceptibility to X-ray-induced DNA damage in the sensitive cell line

  9. In vitro bioavailability and cellular bioactivity studies of flavonoids and flavonoid-rich plant extracts: questions, considerations and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gerard Bryan

    2017-08-01

    In vitro techniques are essential in elucidating biochemical mechanisms and for screening a wide range of possible bioactive candidates. The number of papers published reporting in vitro bioavailability and bioactivity of flavonoids and flavonoid-rich plant extracts is numerous and still increasing. However, even with the present knowledge on the bioavailability and metabolism of flavonoids after oral ingestion, certain inaccuracies still persist in the literature, such as the use of plant extracts to study bioactivity towards vascular cells. There is therefore a need to revisit, even question, these approaches in terms of their biological relevance. In this review, the bioavailability of flavonoid glycosides, the use of cell models for intestinal absorption and the use of flavonoid aglycones and flavonoid-rich plant extracts in in vitro bioactivity studies will be discussed. Here, we focus on the limitations of current in vitro systems and revisit the validity of some in vitro approaches, and not on the detailed mechanism of flavonoid absorption and bioactivity. Based on the results in the review, there is an apparent need for stricter guidelines on publishing data on in vitro data relating to the bioavailability and bioactivity of flavonoids and flavonoid-rich plant extracts.

  10. Inhibition of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro by ginger extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunathilake, K D Prasanna P; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is thought to play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Currently, there is a renewed interest in ginger because of its antioxidants and cardioprotective properties. The effects of ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, and hexane solvent extracts of ginger and pure major ginger constituents on Cu(2+)-induced oxidation of human LDL in vitro were examined. The LDL oxidation inhibition by ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, and hexane extracts of ginger was 71%, 76%, 67%, and 67%, respectively, at their optimum extraction conditions. Inhibition of LDL oxidation by water extracts of ginger, which was prepared by ultrasonic-assisted extraction conditions of 52°C for 15 min, was about 43%. Phenolic bioactives of ginger-6-gingerols, 8-gingerols, 10-gingerols, and 6-shogaol-seem to be strong inhibitors of Cu(+2)-induced LDL oxidation. Overall, ginger extracts, including the water extract possess the antioxidant activities to inhibit human LDL oxidation in vitro.

  11. Role of oxidative stress in cytotoxicity of grape seed extract in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Komal; Tyagi, Alpna; Kumar, Dileep; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2013-11-01

    In present study, we evaluated grape seed extract (GSE) efficacy against bladder cancer and associated mechanism in two different bladder cancer cell lines T24 and HTB9. A significant inhibitory effect of GSE on cancer cell viability was observed, which was due to apoptotic cell death. Cell death events were preceded by vacuolar appearance in cytoplasm, which under electron microscopy was confirmed as swollen mitochondrial organelle and autophagosomes. Through detailed in vitro studies, we established that GSE generated oxidative stress that initiated an apoptotic response as indicated by the reversal of GSE-mediated apoptosis when the cells were pre-treated with antioxidants prior to GSE. However, parallel to a strong apoptotic cell death event, GSE also caused a pro-survival autophagic event as evidenced by tracking the dynamics of LC3-II within the cells. Since the pro-death apoptotic response was stronger than the pro-survival autophagy induction within the cells, cell eventually succumbed to cellular death after GSE exposure. Together, the findings in the present study are both novel and highly significant in establishing, for the first time, that GSE-mediated oxidative stress causes a strong programmed cell death in human bladder cancer cells, suggesting and advocating the effectiveness of this non-toxic agent against this deadly malignancy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A mint purified extract protects human keratinocytes from short-term, chemically induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berselli, Patrizia Valeria Rita; Zava, Stefania; Montorfano, Gigliola; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Krzyzanowska, Justyna; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Berra, Bruno; Rizzo, Angela Maria

    2010-11-10

    Oxidative stress is strictly correlated to the pathogenesis of many diseases, and a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, or adequately integrated, is currently considered to be a protective and preventive factor. This study aimed to analyze the efficacy of a 1 h preincubation with the highest nontoxic dose of a characterized Mentha longifolia extract (80 μg/mL) in protecting human keratinocytes (NCTC2544) from chemically induced oxidative stress (500 μM H2O2 for 2, 16, and 24 h). As reference synthetic pure compounds rosmarinic acid (360.31 μg/mL), a major mint phenolic constituent, and resveratrol (31.95 mg/mL), a well-known antioxidant, were used. Cellular viability was significantly protected by mint, which limited protein and DNA damage, decreased lipid peroxidation, and preserved glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity in the shorter phases of oxidative stress induction, in extents comparable to or better than those of pure compounds. These data suggest that mint use as only a flavoring has to be revised, taking into consideration its enrichment in foodstuff and cosmetics.

  13. Molecular basis for catalysis and substrate-mediated cellular stabilization of human tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Forouhar, Farhad; Kim, Sung-Mi; Lew, Scott; Wang, YongQiang; Karkashon, Shay; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Hussain, Munif; Correia, Maria Almira; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) play a central role in tryptophan metabolism and are involved in many cellular and disease processes. Here we report the crystal structure of human TDO (hTDO) in a ternary complex with the substrates L-Trp and O2 and in a binary complex with the product N-formylkynurenine (NFK), defining for the first time the binding modes of both substrates and the product of this enzyme. The structure indicates that the dioxygenation reaction is initiated by a direct attack of O2 on the C2 atom of the L-Trp indole ring. The structure also reveals an exo binding site for L-Trp, located ~42 Å from the active site and formed by residues conserved among tryptophan-auxotrophic TDOs. Biochemical and cellular studies indicate that Trp binding at this exo site does not affect enzyme catalysis but instead it retards the degradation of hTDO through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal pathway. This exo site may therefore provide a novel L-Trp-mediated regulation mechanism for cellular degradation of hTDO, which may have important implications in human diseases. PMID:27762317

  14. Analysis of PAHs in human serum using cloud point extraction and LC/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirimanne, S.R.; Ma, Li; McClure, C. [National Center for Health, Environmental Health and Lab. Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In these laboratories, the authors assess human exposure to environmental toxicants by quantifying the levels of target toxicants in serum of exposed individuals. The levels of target analytes are often in trace levels and hence preconcentration and cleanup are prerequisites to the analysis of these trace toxicants. The authors have identified cloud point extraction as an impressive alternative to conventional solvent extraction due its beneficial properties and the greater extraction efficiencies. The authors report for the first time, extraction of PAHs from human serum using cloud point technology and analysis by HPLC.

  15. Lipid-lowering and antioxidant functions of bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) extract in human dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katare, Charu; Saxena, Sonali; Agrawal, Supriya; Joseph, Anish Zacharia; Subramani, Senthil Kumar; Yadav, Dhananjay; Singh, Nita; Bisen, Prakash Singh; Prasad, G B K S

    2014-04-01

    The study validated the antidyslipidemic, antioxidant, and antihyperglycemic effects of Lagenaria siceraria fruit extract in human subjects with dyslipidemia along with subjects of normal health. A total of 200 mL of freshly prepared Lagenaria siceraria fruit extract was administered daily on empty stomach for 90 days. Significant reductions (P Lagenaria siceraria fruit extract exhibited significant antioxidant activity in dyslipidemic subjects as evident from elevations in SOD (P Lagenaria siceraria fruit extract serves as dietary adjunct in treatment of human dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease.

  16. Effect of X irradiation on a heterotransplanted human colonic carcinoma before and after a change in the cellular DNA content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Vindeløv, L L; Nielsen, A

    1983-01-01

    A spontaneous change of cellular DNA content occurred in a hyperdiploid human colonic carcinoma grown in nude mice. After the change to hyperpentaploidy the tumor was exposed to single-dose X irradiation, and the effects on growth curves and on the cell cycle, determined by flow cytometric DNA...... analysis (FCM), were compared to results obtained with the tumor prior to the evolutionary event. The results showed that the radiation effects on growth rate and on cell kinetics had changed after the change in cellular DNA content. In the hyperpentaploid tumor the irradiation had no effect...... a partial synchronization of accumulated cells, whereas no synchronization effect was found in the hyperdiploid tumor. The redistribution time was 8-10 days for both tumors. The results indicate that clonal evolution may affect radiosensitivity, and that FCM analysis may prove to be a valuable method...

  17. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR.

  18. Cellular Metabolomics Revealed the Cytoprotection of Amentoflavone, a Natural Compound, in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Injury of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Yao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Amentoflavone is one of the important bioactive flavonoids in the ethylacetate extract of “Cebaiye”, which is a blood cooling and hematostatic herb in traditional Chinese medicine. The previous work in our group has demonstrated that the ethylacetate extract of Cebaiye has a notable antagonistic effect on the injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. The present investigation was designed to assess the effects and possible mechanism of cytoprotection of amentoflavone via metabolomics. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC/QTOF-MS coupled with multivariate data analysis was used to characterize the variations in the metabolites of HUVECs in response to exposure to LPS and amentoflavone treatment. Seven putative metabolites (glycine, argininosuccinic acid, putrescine, ornithine, spermidine, 5-oxoproline and dihydrouracil were discovered in cells incubated with LPS and/or amentoflavone. Functional pathway analysis uncovered that the changes of these metabolites related to various significant metabolic pathways (glutathione metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, β-alanine metabolism and glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, which may explain the potential cytoprotection function of amentoflavone. These findings also demonstrate that cellular metabolomics through UPLC/QTOF-MS is a powerful tool for detecting variations in a range of intracellular compounds upon toxin and/or drug exposure.

  19. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Guangli Jiang; Leibo Liu; Wenping Zhu; Shouyi Yin; Shaojun Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time...

  20. Immune responses in human infections with Brugia malayi: specific cellular unresponsiveness to filarial antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piessens, W F; McGreevy, P B; Piessens, P W; McGreevy, M; Koiman, I; Saroso, J S; Dennis, D T

    1980-01-01

    We evaluated the cellular immune competence of 101 subjects living in an area of South Kalimantan (Borneo) where Malayan filariasis is endemic. All patients with elephantiasis but none with other clinical stages of filariasis reacted with adult worm antigens. The majority of subjects without clinical or parasitological evidence of filariasis and approximately one-half of those with amicrofilaremic filariasis reacted with microfilarial antigens. In contrast, most patients with patent microfilaremia did not respond to microfilarial antigens. The in vitro reactivity of all patient categories to nonparasite antigens was similar to that of the distant control group. These results indicate that patent microfilaremia is associated with a state of specific cellular immune unresponsiveness and are consistent with the current hypothesis that the various clinical manifestations of filariasis result from different types of immune responses to distinct antigens associated with different developmental stages of filarial worms. PMID:7350196

  1. Cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of positively charged chitosan gold nanoparticles in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seon Young; Jang, Soo Hwa [Seoul National University, Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Institute for Veterinary Science (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin; Jeong, Saeromi; Park, Jin Ho; Ock, Kwang Su [Soongsil University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kangtaek [Yonsei University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Sung Ik [Kyung Hee University, College of Environment and Applied Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sang-Woo, E-mail: sjoo@ssu.ac.kr [Soongsil University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong, E-mail: leeso@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Institute for Veterinary Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and mechanisms of cytotoxicity of the positively charged Au nanoparticles (NPs) were examined in A549 cells, which are one of the most characterized pulmonary cellular systems. Positively charged Au NPs were prepared by chemical reduction using chitosan. The dimension and surface charge of Au NPs were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. The uptake of Au NPs into A549 cells was also monitored using TEM and dark-field microscopy (DFM) and z-stack confocal microRaman spectroscopy. DFM live cell imaging was also performed to monitor the entry of chitosan Au NPs in real time. The cytotoxic assay, using both methylthiazol tetrazolium and lactate dehydrogenase assays revealed that positively charged Au NPs decreased cell viability. Flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, real-time PCR, and western blot analysis suggest that positively charged chitosan Au NPs provoke cell damage through both apoptotic and necrotic pathways.

  2. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Adams, Matthew [BioScreening Technology Group, Biomedical Health Research Center, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); High, Alec S. [Department of Histopathology, Bexley Wing, St. James' s University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Johnson, Colin A., E-mail: c.johnson@leeds.ac.uk [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Robinson, Philip A. [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ► We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ► HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ► We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ► Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  3. Calf Spleen Extractive Injection (CSEI, a small peptides enriched extraction, induces human hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis via ROS/MAPKs dependent mitochondrial pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxu Jia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Calf Spleen Extractive Injection (CSEI, a small peptides enriched extraction, performs immunomodulatory activity on cancer patients suffering from radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The present study aims to investigate the anti-hepatocellular carcinoma effects of CSEI in cells and tumor-xenografted mouse models. In HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells, CSEI reduced cell viability, enhanced apoptosis rate, caused reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, inhibited migration ability, and induced caspases cascade and mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation. CSEI significantly inhibited HepG2-xenografted tumor growth in nude mice. In cell and animal experiments, CSEI increased the activations of pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase 8, caspase 9 and caspase 3; meanwhile, it suppressed the expressions of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 and anti-oxidation proteins, such as nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2 and catalase (CAT. The enhanced phosphorylation of P38 and c-JunN-terminalkinase (JNK, and decreased phosphorylation of extra cellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERKs were observed in CSEI-treated cells and tumor tissues. CSEI-induced cell viability reduction was significantly attenuated by N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (a ROS inhibitor pretreatment. All data demonstrated that the upregulated oxidative stress status and the altered mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs phosphorylation contributed to CSEI-driven mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, CSEI exactly induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells via ROS/MAPKs dependent mitochondrial pathway.

  4. Identification of Aminopeptidase N as a Cellular Receptor for Human Coronavirus-229E

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-12

    feline enteric coronav irus feline infectious peritonitis virus hUman adult intestine hUman aminopeptidase N human aminopeptidase with 39 amino...coronavirus (TCV), rat coronavirus (RCV), cat feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), and the hUman coronaviruses. These include the slow, patchy...While the cat, dog and pig serve as natural hosts for the other coronavirus group 1 viruses, feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), canine

  5. Studies of biological properties of Uncaria tomentosa extracts on human blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bors, Milena; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Pilarski, Radosław; Sicińska, Paulina; Gulewicz, Krzysztof; Bukowska, Bożena

    2012-08-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC is a lignified climbing plant from South and Central America, which (under the name of "vilcacora" or "cat's claw") has become highly popular in many countries due to its proven immunostimmulatory and anti-inflammatory activities and also with respect to its anticancer and antioxidative effects. There are insufficient data on the mechanism of U. tomentosa action on normal blood mononuclear cells. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of ethanol and aqueous extracts from bark and leaves of Uncaria tomentosa on the structure and function of human mononuclear cells and to find out whether the kind of extractant used modulates biological activity of the extracts studied. Plant material consisted of four different extracts: (1) ethanol extract from leaves, (2) aqueous extract from leaves, (3) ethanol extract from bark and (4) aqueous extract from bark. The effect of these extracts on protein damage as well as on free-radical formation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed. Moreover, changes in viability, size, and granularity as well as apoptotic alterations in human blood mononuclear cells exposed to U. tomentosa extracts were investigated. The oxidative changes were observed in mononuclear blood cells exposed to both ethanol and aqueous extracts obtained from bark and leaves. Moreover, in the cells studied the extracts from U. tomentosa induced apoptosis and a decrease in viability of mononuclear blood cells, with the exception of aqueous extract from leaves. Additionally, no statistically significant changes in the cell size were observed both for aqueous extracts from leaves and bark. Changes in the blood mononuclear cell granularity were observed at 250 μg/mL for all extracts examined. The strongest changes were observed for the ethanol extract of the bark, which increased cell granularity at 50 μg/mL and changed cell size at 100 μg/mL. The conducted research showed differences in biological activity

  6. Stem bark and flower extracts of Vismia cauliflora are highly effective antioxidants to human blood cells by preventing oxidative burst in neutrophils and oxidative damage in erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Alessandra Braga; Berto, Alessandra; Ribeiro, Daniela; Freitas, Marisa; Chisté, Renan Campos; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2015-01-01

    Vismia cauliflora A.C.Sm. [Hypericaceae (Clusiaceae)] is an Amazonian plant traditionally used by indigenous population to treat dermatosis and inflammatory processes of the skin. Previous research on V. cauliflora extracts suggests its potential to neutralize cellular oxidative damages related to the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. To determine the activity of stem bark and flower extracts of V. cauliflora on the modulation of oxidative burst in human neutrophils, as well as its potential to inhibit oxidative damage in human erythrocytes. The modulation of neutrophil's oxidative burst by the ethanolic extracts (0.3-1000 µg/mL) was determined by the oxidation of specific probes by reactive species. Additionally, the potential of these extracts to inhibit oxidative damage in human erythrocytes was evaluated by monitoring its biomarkers of oxidative stress. Vismia cauliflora extracts presented remarkable capacity to prevent the oxidative burst in activated human neutrophils (IC50 < 15 µg/mL). However, the maximum percentage of inhibition achieved against hydrogen peroxide was 45%. Concerning the oxidative damage in human erythrocytes, the extracts were able to minimize the tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced hemoglobin oxidation and lipid peroxidation in a very low concentration range (2.7-18 μg/mL). Furthermore, only stem bark extract (100 µg/mL) was able to inhibit the depletion of glutathione (13%). These results reinforce the therapeutic potential of stem bark and flower extracts of V. cauliflora to heal topical skin disease, namely in the treatment of neutrophil-related dermatosis and skin conditions related to oxidative stress, including skin aging.

  7. Calvatia lilacina protein-extract induces apoptosis through glutathione depletion in human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Jwu-Guh; Chung, King-Thom; Yeh, Chung-Hung; Chen, Wan-Ling; Chen, Chi-Hung; Lin, Martin Hsiu-Chu; Lu, Fung-Jou; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Chen, Ching-Hsein

    2009-02-25

    This paper reports that a novel protein extract isolated from Calvatia lilacina (CL) can induce cell death against four types of human colorectal cancer cells. Importantly, CL was shown to be free of apoptotic effects against normal rat liver cells. We have also identified that CL-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion is the major contributor responsible for the apoptotic cell death induction of SW 480 cells, as evidenced by the observation that exogenously added N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or GSH, but not vitamin C, could offer a near complete protection of CL-treated cells against apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, the participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) evoked a drop in the transmembrane potential (Delta Psi(m)) in the CL-induced apoptotic cell death. This observation can only be deemed as a minor pathway due to the fact that cyclosporine A (CyA) could only partially rescue the CL-treated cells from apoptotic cell death. Likewise, despite the fact that CL could induce the upregulation of Bax, its knockdown via siRNA (48 h) failed to completely mitigate apoptotic cell death, indicating that its role in this apoptotic process was insignificant. To further explore the possible underlying mechanism associated with CL-induced GSH depletion, we proceeded to determine the effect of CL on the cellular gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS), a rate-limiting enzyme responsible for GSH biosynthesis, and demonstrated that indeed gamma-GCS could be repressed by CL. Taken together, we report here for the first time that the anticancer effect of CL on human colorectal cancer cells is mediated through GSH depletion mechanism rather than a ROS-mediated killing process. This functional attribute of CL can thus provide the basis for the strategic design of a treatment of colorectal cancer.

  8. Grape seed and red wine polyphenol extracts inhibit cellular cholesterol uptake, cell proliferation, and 5-lipoxygenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifert, Wayne R; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y

    2008-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that grape seed and wine polyphenol extracts possess a diverse array of actions and may be beneficial in the prevention of inflammatory-mediated disease such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. This study aimed to determine whether the reported pleiotropic effects of several polyphenolic extracts from grape seed products or red wine would also include inhibition of cholesterol uptake and cell proliferation, and inhibit a known specific target of the inflammatory process, that is, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX). Incubation of HT29, Caco2, HepG2, or HuTu80 cells in a medium containing [(3)H]cholesterol in the presence of a grape seed extract (GSE) or red wine polyphenolic compounds (RWPCs) inhibited [(3)H]cholesterol uptake by up to 66% (which appeared maximal). The estimated IC(50) values were 60 and 83 microg/mL for RWPC and GSE, respectively. Similar cholesterol uptake inhibitory effects were observed using the fluorescent cholesterol analogue NBD cholesterol. The inhibition of cholesterol uptake was independent of the sample's (GSE and RWPC) potent antioxidative capacity. Red wine polyphenolic compound and GSE dose dependently inhibited HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cell proliferation, which was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis. In addition, RWPC and GSE inhibited 5-LOX activity with the IC(50) values being 35 and 13 microg/mL, respectively. Two of 3 other GSEs tested also significantly inhibited 5-LOX activity. Inhibition of cholesterol uptake and proinflammatory 5-LOX activity may be beneficial in preventing the development of chronic degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  9. Fusarium ramigenum, a novel human opportunist in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency and cellular immune defects: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroti, Ruxandra V; Gheorghita, Valeriu; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meis, Jacques F; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-02-15

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous environmental fungi that occasionally provoke serious invasive infections in immunocompromised hosts. Among Fusarium species, Fusarium ramigenum, belonging to the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex, has thus far never been found to cause human infections. Here we describe the first case of invasive fusariosis caused by Fusarium ramigenum in a human and also identify immunological deficiencies that most likely contributed to invasiveness. A 32-year-old Caucasian male with a seemingly insignificant medical history of mild respiratory illness during the preceding two years, developed invasive pulmonary fusariosis. Detailed immunological assessment revealed the presence of common variable immunodeficiency, complicated by a severe impairment of the capacity of T-cells to produce both gamma-interferon and interleukin-17. In-depth microbiological assessment identified the novel human opportunistic pathogen Fusarium ramigenum as cause of the infection. This report demonstrated that an opportunistic invasive fungal infection may indicate an underlying cellular immune impairment of the host. The unexpected invasive infection with Fusarium ramigenum in this case unmasked a complex combined humoral and cellular immunological deficiency.

  10. SIRT1 overexpression antagonizes cellular senescence with activated ERK/S6k1 signaling in human diploid fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    Full Text Available Sir2, a NAD-dependent deacetylase, modulates lifespan in yeasts, worms and flies. The SIRT1, mammalian homologue of Sir2, regulates signaling for favoring survival in stress. But whether SIRT1 has the function to influence cell viability and senescence under non-stressed conditions in human diploid fibroblasts is far from unknown. Our data showed that enforced SIRT1 expression promoted cell proliferation and antagonized cellular senescence with the characteristic features of delayed Senescence-Associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal staining, reduced Senescence-Associated Heterochromatic Foci (SAHF formation and G1 phase arrest, increased cell growth rate and extended cellular lifespan in human fibroblasts, while dominant-negative SIRT1 allele (H363Y did not significantly affect cell growth and senescence but displayed a bit decreased lifespan. Western blot results showed that SIRT1 reduced the expression of p16(INK4A and promoted phosphorylation of Rb. Our data also exposed that overexpression of SIRT1 was accompanied by enhanced activation of ERK and S6K1 signaling. These effects were mimicked in both WI38 cells and 2BS cells by concentration-dependent resveratrol, a SIRT1 activator. It was noted that treatment of SIRT1-.transfected cells with Rapamycin, a mTOR inhibitor, reduced the phosphorylation of S6K1 and the expression of Id1, implying that SIRT1-induced phosphorylation of S6K1 may be partly for the decreased expression of p16(INK4A and promoted phosphorylation of Rb in 2BS. It was also observed that the expression of SIRT1 and phosphorylation of ERK and S6K1 was declined in senescent 2BS. These findings suggested that SIRT1-promoted cell proliferation and antagonized cellular senescence in human diploid fibroblasts may be, in part, via the activation of ERK/ S6K1 signaling.

  11. Vif proteins of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses require cellular CBFβ to degrade APOBEC3 restriction factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultquist, Judd F; Binka, Mawuena; LaRue, Rebecca S; Simon, Viviana; Harris, Reuben S

    2012-03-01

    HIV-1 requires the cellular transcription factor CBFβ to stabilize its accessory protein Vif and promote APOBEC3G degradation. Here, we demonstrate that both isoforms of CBFβ allow for increased steady-state levels of Vif, enhanced APOBEC3G degradation, and increased viral infectivity. This conserved functional interaction enhances the steady-state levels of Vif proteins from multiple HIV-1 subtypes and is required for the degradation of all human and rhesus Vif-sensitive APOBEC3 proteins by their respective lentiviral Vif proteins.

  12. Human papillomavirus 16E6 and NFX1-123 potentiate notch signaling and differentiation without activating cellular arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vliet-Gregg, Portia A.; Hamilton, Jennifer R. [Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children' s Research Institute, 1900 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A., E-mail: rkatzen@uw.edu [Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children' s Research Institute, 1900 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle WA (United States)

    2015-04-15

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) oncoproteins bind host cell proteins to dysregulate and uncouple apoptosis, senescence, differentiation, and growth. These pathways are important for both the viral life cycle and cancer development. HR HPV16 E6 (16E6) interacts with the cellular protein NFX1-123, and they collaboratively increase the growth and differentiation master regulator, Notch1. In 16E6 expressing keratinocytes (16E6 HFKs), the Notch canonical pathway genes Hes1 and Hes5 were increased with overexpression of NFX1-123, and their expression was directly linked to the activation or blockade of the Notch1 receptor. Keratinocyte differentiation genes Keratin 1 and Keratin 10 were also increased, but in contrast their upregulation was only indirectly associated with Notch1 receptor stimulation and was fully unlinked to growth arrest, increased p21{sup Waf1/CIP1}, or decreased proliferative factor Ki67. This leads to a model of 16E6, NFX1-123, and Notch1 differently regulating canonical and differentiation pathways and entirely uncoupling cellular arrest from increased differentiation. - Highlights: • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the Notch canonical pathway through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the differentiation pathway indirectly through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased differentiation gene expression without growth arrest. • Increased NFX1-123 with 16E6 may create an ideal cellular phenotype for HPV.

  13. Inhibition of cellular activation of retroviral replication by CD8+ T cells derived from non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J D; Bednarik, D P; Folks, T M; Jehuda-Cohen, T; Villinger, F; Sell, K W; Ansari, A A

    1993-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells inhibit viral replication at the level of cellular activation, an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cell line (FEc1) from a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-seropositive sooty mangabey monkey was transfected with a human CD4 gene and shown to be replication-competent for HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV. Utilizing a dual-chamber culture system, it was found that inhibition of viral replication can be mediated by a soluble factor. The FEc1 cell line was transiently transfected with an LTR-driven CAT reporter gene. It was found that autologous CD8+ T cells markedly inhibited CAT activity. Furthermore, co-transfection of the FEc1 cell line with an LTR-driven tat plasmid and LTR-CAT was able to quantitatively mitigate the suppressive effect. Thus, this inhibition appears to be directed at cellular mechanisms of viral transcription. Control transfections with an LTR-driven CAT plasmid with a mutation at the NFkB binding site yielded no CAT activity, suggesting that most viral replication as measured by CAT activity is dependent, to a large extent, upon cellularly derived NFkB binding proteins.

  14. Reversibility of cellular aging by reprogramming through an embryonic-like state : a new paradigm for human cell rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Lemaitre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provides a unique opportunity to derive patient-specific stem cells with potential application in autologous tissue replacement therapies and without the ethical concerns of Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC. However, this strategy still suffers from several hurdles that need to be overcome before clinical applications. Among them, cellular senescence, which contributes to aging and restricted longevity, has been described as a barrier to the derivation of iPSCs. This suggests that aging might be an important limitation for therapeutic purposes for elderly individuals. Senescence is characterized by an irreversible cell cycle arrest in response to various forms of stress, including activation of oncogenes, shortened telomeres, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction. To overcome this barrier, we developed an optimized 6-factor-based reprogramming protocol that is able to cause efficient reversing of cellular senescence and reprogramming into iPSCs. We demonstrated that iPSCs derived from senescent and centenarian fibroblasts have reset telomere size, gene expression profiles, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial metabolism, and are indistinguishable from hESC. Finally, we demonstrate that re-differentiation led to rejuvenated cells with a reset cellular physiology, defining a new paradigm for human cell rejuvenation. We discuss the molecular mechanisms involved in cell reprogramming of senescent cells. 

  15. Esterification of Ginsenoside Rh2 Enhanced Its Cellular Uptake and Antitumor Activity in Human HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Zhang, Bing; Xiong, Zeng-Xing; Zheng, Shi-Lian; Tan, Chao-Li; Hu, Jiang-Ning

    2016-01-13

    Our previous research had indicated that the octyl ester derivative of ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2-O) might have a higher bioavailability than Rh2 in the Caco-2 cell line. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular uptake and antitumor effects of Rh2-O in human HepG2 cells as well as its underlying mechanism compared with Rh2. Results showed that Rh2-O exhibited a higher cellular uptake (63.24%) than Rh2 (36.76%) when incubated with HepG2 cells for 24 h. Rh2-O possessed a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect against the proliferation of HepG2 cells. The IC50 value of Rh2-O for inhibition of HepG2 cell proliferation was 20.15 μM, which was roughly half the value of Rh2. Rh2-O induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells through a mitochondrial-mediated intrinsic pathway. In addition, the accumulation of ROS was detected in Rh2-O-treated HepG2 cells, which participated in the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Conclusively, the findings above all suggested that Rh2-O as well as Rh2 inducing HepG2 cells apoptosis might involve similar mechanisms; however, Rh2-O had better antitumor activities than Rh2, probably due to its higher cellular uptake.

  16. Efficient discrimination and removal of phospholipids during electromembrane extraction from human plasma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vårdal, Linda; Gjelstad, Astrid; Huang, Chuixiu

    2017-01-01

    AIM: For the first time, extracts obtained from human plasma samples by electromembrane extraction (EME) were investigated comprehensively with particular respect to phospholipids using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Thhe purpose was to invest...

  17. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction of acidic drugs from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan-Pijuan, Mercedes; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    The new sample preparation concept “Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction (PALME)” was evaluated for extraction of the acidic drugs ketoprofen, fenoprofen, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, and gemfibrozil from human plasma samples. Plasma samples (250 μL) were loaded into individual...

  18. Cytotoxicity screening of Melastoma malabathricum extracts on human breast cancer cell lines in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurfariza Ahmad Roslen

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: The extracts from leaves and flowers of M. malabathricum showed promising anticancer activity toward human breast cancer cell lines with the lowest IC50 at 7.14 μg/mL while the extracts from stems showed less growth inhibition activity.

  19. Strategies for Prospecting and Extracting Water on Mars for Long-Term Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolley, R. J.; Saikia, S. J.

    2017-02-01

    We aim to develop a specific set of criteria to classify water reserves on Mars, and to design water prospecting and extraction systems for various human landing sites using a requirements-driven framework.

  20. Extraction of human genomic DNA from whole blood using a magnetic microsphere method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Rui; Li, Shengying

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of molecular biology and the life sciences, magnetic extraction is a simple, automatic, and highly efficient method for separating biological molecules, performing immunoassays, and other applications. Human blood is an ideal source of human genomic DNA. Extracting genomic DNA by traditional methods is time-consuming, and phenol and chloroform are toxic reagents that endanger health. Therefore, it is necessary to find a more convenient and efficient method for obtaining human genomic DNA. In this study, we developed urea-formaldehyde resin magnetic microspheres and magnetic silica microspheres for extraction of human genomic DNA. First, a magnetic microsphere suspension was prepared and used to extract genomic DNA from fresh whole blood, frozen blood, dried blood, and trace blood. Second, DNA content and purity were measured by agarose electrophoresis and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The human genomic DNA extracted from whole blood was then subjected to polymerase chain reaction analysis to further confirm its quality. The results of this study lay a good foundation for future research and development of a high-throughput and rapid extraction method for extracting genomic DNA from various types of blood samples.

  1. Human Cortical Neural Stem Cells Expressing Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Lisa M; Sims, Erika; Lunn, J Simon; Kashlan, Osama N; Chen, Kevin S; Bruno, Elizabeth S; Pacut, Crystal M; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. Current treatment fails to modify underlying disease pathologies and very little progress has been made to develop effective drug treatments. Cellular therapies impact disease by multiple mechanisms, providing increased efficacy compared with traditional single-target approaches. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we have shown that transplanted spinal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate into the spinal cord, form synapses with the host, improve inflammation, and reduce disease-associated pathologies. Our current goal is to develop a similar "best in class" cellular therapy for AD. Here, we characterize a novel human cortex-derived NSC line modified to express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), HK532-IGF-I. Because IGF-I promotes neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in vivo, this enhanced NSC line offers additional environmental enrichment, enhanced neuroprotection, and a multifaceted approach to treating complex AD pathologies. We show that autocrine IGF-I production does not impact the cell secretome or normal cellular functions, including proliferation, migration, or maintenance of progenitor status. However, HK532-IGF-I cells preferentially differentiate into gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons, a subtype dysregulated in AD; produce increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels; and display an increased neuroprotective capacity in vitro. We also demonstrate that HK532-IGF-I cells survive peri-hippocampal transplantation in a murine AD model and exhibit long-term persistence in targeted brain areas. In conclusion, we believe that harnessing the benefits of cellular and IGF-I therapies together will provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to patients, and our findings support further preclinical development of HK532-IGF-I cells into a disease-modifying intervention for AD. ©AlphaMed Press.

  2. Biconnectivity of the cellular metabolism: A cross-species study and its implication for human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P.; Lee, D.-S.; Kahng, B.

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of stability during perturbations is essential for living organisms, and cellular networks organize multiple pathways to enable elements to remain connected and communicate, even when some pathways are broken. Here, we evaluated the biconnectivity of the metabolic networks of 506 species in terms of the clustering coefficients and the largest biconnected components (LBCs), wherein a biconnected component (BC) indicates a set of nodes in which every pair is connected by more than one path. Via comparison with the rewired networks, we illustrated how biconnectivity in cellular metabolism is achieved on small and large scales. Defining the biconnectivity of individual metabolic compounds by counting the number of species in which the compound belonged to the LBC, we demonstrated that biconnectivity is significantly correlated with the evolutionary age and functional importance of a compound. The prevalence of diseases associated with each metabolic compound quantifies the compounds vulnerability, i.e., the likelihood that it will cause a metabolic disorder. Moreover, the vulnerability depends on both the biconnectivity and the lethality of the compound. This fact can be used in drug discovery and medical treatments. PMID:26490723

  3. Trichothiodystrophy, a human DNA repair disorder with heterogeneity in the cellular response to ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, A.R.; Arlett, C.F.; Broughton, B.C.; Harcourt, S.A.; Steingrimsdottir, H.; Stefanini, M.; Malcolm, A.; Taylor, R.; Natarajan, A.T.; Green, S.

    1988-11-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brittle hair with reduced sulfur content, ichthyosis, peculiar face, and mental and physical retardation. Some patients are photosensitive. A previous study by Stefanini et al. showed that cells from four photosensitive patients with TTD had a molecular defect in DNA repair, which was not complemented by cells from xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D. In a detailed molecular and cellular study of the effects of UV light on cells cultured from three further TTD patients who did not exhibit photosensitivity we have found an array of different responses. In cells from the first patient, survival, excision repair, and DNA and RNA synthesis following UV irradiation were all normal, whereas in cells from the second patient all these responses were similar to those of excision-defective xeroderma pigmentosum (group D) cells. With the third patient, cell survival measured by colony-forming ability was normal following UV irradiation, even though repair synthesis was only 50% of normal and RNA synthesis was severely reduced. The excision-repair defect in these cells was not complemented by other TTD cell strains. These cellular characteristics of patient 3 have not been described previously for any other cell line. The normal survival may be attributed to the finding that the deficiency in excision-repair is confined to early times after irradiation. Our results pose a number of questions about the relationship between the molecular defect in DNA repair and the clinical symptoms of xeroderma pigmentosum and TTD.

  4. Humoral and Cellular Immunity Changed after Traumatic Brain Injury in Human Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Wei; Li, Jin-Ping; Song, Ying-Lun; Zhao, Qi-Huang

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that there is a disproportionally higher risk of infection following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This predisposition to infection may be driven by a poorly understood, brain-specific response in the immune system after TBI. However, there is a lack of studies that have fully characterized TBI patients to understand the relationship between TBI and peripheral immune function. In the present study, markers for humoral immunity and cellular immunity were measured for up to 2 weeks in the peripheral blood of 37 patients with TBI in order to elucidate the time course and the type of the peripheral immune response following TBI. 12 relatively healthy individuals without TBI and other neurological diseases were enrolled into the control group. Our data indicated that TBI could induce significant changes in humoral immunity characterized by a decrease in IgG and IgM levels and an increase in the complements C3 and C4 levels in comparison with the control group. Moreover, compared with the control group, a significant reduction in peripheral blood CD3(+) and CD3(+)CD4(+) lymphocyte counts occurred early (days 1-3) following the onset of trauma. These results provide evidence that TBI is associated with substantial changes in humoral immunity and cellular immunity, which may explain the high incidence of infection encountered in these patients. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  5. Effects of GSM cellular phones on human hearing: the European project "GUARD".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzini, Marta; Brazzale, Alessandra R; Paglialonga, Alessia; Tognola, Gabriella; Collet, Lionel; Moulin, Annie; Lutman, Mark E; Bell, Steven L; Thomas, Nathan A; Uloziene, Ingrida; Uloza, Virgijlius; Thuroczy, Gyorgy; Tavartkiladze, George; Tsalighopoulos, Miltos; Kyriafinis, Giorgio; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2007-11-01

    The European multicenter project named GUARD involved nine centers and aimed to assess potential changes in auditory function as a consequence of exposure to low-intensity electromagnetic fields (EMFs) produced by GSM cellular phones. Participants were healthy young adults without any evidence of hearing or ear disorders. Auditory function was assessed immediately before and after exposure to EMFs, and only the exposed ear was tested. The procedure was conducted twice in a double blinded design, once with a genuine EMF exposure and once with a sham exposure (at least 24 h apart). Tests for assessment of auditory function were hearing threshold level (HTL), transient otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE), and auditory brainstem response (ABR). The exposure consisted of speech at a typical conversational level delivered via an earphone to one ear, plus genuine or sham EMF exposure. The EMF exposure used the output of a software-controlled consumer cellular phone at full power for 10 min. A system of phone positioning that allowed participants to freely move their heads without affecting exposure was used. Analysis of the data showed there were no effects of exposure to GSM mobile phone signals on the main measures of the status of the auditory system.

  6. ETAS, an enzyme-treated asparagus extract, attenuates amyloid beta-induced cellular disorder in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Junetsu; Ito, Tomohiro; Wakame, Koji; Kitadate, Kentaro; Sakurai, Takuya; Sato, Shogo; Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Izawa, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Kazuto; Ishida, Hitoshi; Takabatake, Ichiro; Kizaki, Takako; Ohno, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    One of the pathological characterizations of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) in cerebral cortical cells. The deposition of Abeta in neuronal cells leads to an increase in the production of free radicals that are typified by reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby inducing cell death. A growing body of evidence now suggests that several plant-derived food ingredients are capable of scavenging ROS in mammalian cells. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS), which is rich in antioxidants, is one of these ingredients. The pre-incubation of differentiated PC 12 cells with ETAS significantly recovered Abeta-induced reduction of cell viability, which was accompanied by reduced levels of ROS. These results suggest that ETAS may be one of the functional food ingredients with anti-oxidative capacity to help prevent AD.

  7. Evaluation of an Aqueous-Ethanolic Extract from Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) for its Activity on the Hormonal and Cellular Function of Testes in Adult Male Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Ebrahimi Hariry, Reza; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Ghaffari Novin, Marefat; Heidari, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis has been used in traditional medicine extensively. This study evaluated the hormonal and cellular effects of Rosmarinus officinalis extract on testes of adult rats. Thirty male Wistar rats (in three groups) received 50 or 100 mg/Kg b.w of Rosmarinus officinalis extract (made from the plant's leaves, flower and stem) (treatment groups) and 10 mL/Kg b.w normal saline (control group) respectively, on a daily bases by gavage route for 60 days. Then, spermatological properties, histometric parameters and sperm dynamics, testis and body weight, testicular cell population and serum testosterone level were analyzed by an acceptable method. Results showed that the mean serum testosterone level was decreased significantly in both treatment groups (50 and 100 mg/Kg b.w) during the experiment time, compared with control group (p Rosmarinus officinalis did not change the total count, motility and viability of sperm. In addition, Rosmarinus officinalis at both doses did not change body and testes weight and their ratio. Furthermore, Rosmarinus officinalis increased the number of Spermatogonia at both doses, Spermatocyte at doses of 50 mg/Kg b.w, Leydig cell and Spermatid at dose of 100 mg/Kg b.w significantly (p Rosmarinus officinalis did not significantly affect the number of Spermatozoid and Sertoli cells. In conclusion, it seems that Rosmarinus officinalis may have some hormonal and cellular effects on the testes which can contribute the spermatogenesis process in rat. Rosmarinus officinalis may have antiandrogenic effect potentially indicating the possibility of developing herbal male contraceptive.

  8. Algal Production of Extra- and Intra-Cellular Polysaccharides as an Adaptive Response to the Toxin Crude Extract of Microcystis Aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mohamed El-Sheekh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is an investigation concerned with studying the possible adaptive response of four different unicellular algae, Anabaena PCC 7120, Oscillatoria angustissima, Scendesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris, to the toxin of Microcystis aeruginosa (Kützing. Theeffects of four different concentrations, 25, 50, 100 and 200 μg mL-1 of microcystins crude extract of M. aeruginosa, on both intra and extra-cellular polysaccharide levels, in log phase,of the four tested algae were studied. The obtained results showed differential increase in the production levels for both intra and extra-cellular polysaccharides by the tested algae,compared with the control. S. obliquus and C. vulgaris showed a resistance to crude toxinhigher than Anabaena PCC 7120 and O. angustissima. The highly production of polysaccharides by green algal species under this toxic stress indicated the involvement of these polysaccharides in protecting the algal cells against toxic species and, reflect thebiological behavior of particular algal species to the environmental stresses.

  9. Algal production of extra and intra-cellular polysaccharides as an adaptive response to the toxin crude extract of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sheekh Mostafa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is an investigation concerned with studying the possible adaptive response of four different unicellular algae, Anabaena PCC 7120, Oscillatoria angustissima, Scendesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris, to the toxin of Microcystis aeruginosa (Kützing. The effects of four different concentrations, 25, 50, 100 and 200 μg mL-1 of microcystins crude extract of M. aeruginosa, on both intra and extra-cellular polysaccharide levels, in log phase, of the four tested algae were studied. The obtained results showed differential increase in the production levels for both intra and extra-cellular polysaccharides by the tested algae, compared with the control. S. obliquus and C. vulgaris showed a resistance to crude toxin higher than Anabaena PCC 7120 and O. angustissima. The highly production of polysaccharides by green algal species under this toxic stress indicated the involvement of these polysaccharides in protecting the algal cells against toxic species and, reflect the biological behavior of particular algal species to the environmental stresses.

  10. Cytotoxic activities of Coriolus versicolor (Yunzhi) extracts on human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    four human liver cancer (7703, HepG2, 7721, PLC) and four human breast cancer (Bcap37, ZR75-30, MCF-7, T-47D) cell lines using a MTT cytotoxicity assay. The results showed that the CVP ... Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics ...

  11. ASTHMATIC HUMAN SERUM IGE-REACTIVITY WITH MOLD EXTRACTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although molds have demonstrated the ability to induce allergic asthma-like responses in mouse models, their role in human disease is unclear. This study was undertaken to provide insight into the prevalence of human IgE-reactivity and identify the target mold protein(s). The st...

  12. Rapid Cellular Phenotyping of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes using a Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan S. Leyton-Mange

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity.

  13. Inhibition of DNA virus: Herpes-1 (HSV-1 in cellular culture replication, through an antioxidant treatment extracted from rosemary spice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva Assunção Portari Mancini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate antiviral properties in antioxidants from spices. Phenolic compounds extracted from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinallis, L by hot water, had their antioxidant activity determined by spectrophotometry using β carotene/linoleic acid system. The rosemary extract was evaluated by antiviral assay of Herpes Virus type-1 (HSV-1 replication in VERO cells, in the presence or absence of the spice. 10,000 TCID50/mL of the HSV-1 was kept for 3 h at 4º C, with 300 ppm of rosemary extract, and 100 ppm of butyl hydroxyl toluene (BHT. Then, these viruses were inoculated in VERO cells incubated at 37º C in CO2-5 %, for seven days. Daily, they were examined and the end point was based on 100% of CPE in virus control (without antioxidants. The HSV-1 replication inhibition percentage (IP measured the antiviral action from antioxidants, showing viral reductions of the 82.0, 82.5%, in the presence of rosemary and rosemary + BHT, respectively. As an extension, cell test corresponded to the similar viral decrease (IP = 85.0 and 86.3% in both aforementioned situations. Results lead to conclude that phenolic compounds from rosemary revealed an antiviral action on herpesvirus-1.Neste estudo foi avaliada a ação antiviral de antioxidantes de especiaria. Extrato aquoso de alecrim (Rosmarinus officinalis, L, que apresentou atividade antioxidante através de espectrofotometria usando o sistema β caroteno/ácido linoléico, foi avaliado em ensaios com vírus herpes-1 na replicação em células VERO. Nestes ensaios foram utilizados 10.000 TCID50%/mL do vírus HSV-1, mantidos em contato com 300 ppm do extrato de alecrim e com 100 ppm de butil hidroxi tolueno (BHT, durante 3h a 4°C. Esses vírus, em seguida, foram inoculados em células VERO incubadas a 37 °C/5% de CO2 por sete dias. Pelo efeito citopático (ECP e o "end point" de ECP do controle de vírus (sem antioxidante, foi possível observar que houve reduções na replicação viral de 82

  14. Expression of cellular genes in HPV16-immortalized and cigarette smoke condensate-transformed human endocervical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Nakao, Y; Pater, M M; Tang, S C; Pater, A

    1997-09-01

    We studied the molecular mechanism of successive multistep cervical carcinogenic progression with our previously established in vitro model system. This system was composed of primary human endocervical cells (HEN), two lines of HEN immortalized by HPV16 and their counterparts subsequently malignantly transformed by cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). The expression was examined of diverse cellular genes associated with oncogenesis and senescence, especially for cervical cancer. Consistent results were seen for the pairs of immortalized and malignantly transformed lines. Immortalization of HEN by HPV16 resulted in enhanced expression of H-ras, c-myc, B-myb, p53, p16INK4 and PCNA mRNA; enhanced expression of p16 and PCNA proteins; decreased expression of WAF1/p21/Cip1/Sid1 and fibronectin mRNA; and decreased p53 protein. On the other hand, the CSC-transformed counterparts of HPV16-immortalized cells had up-regulated levels of B-myb, p53 and WAF1 mRNA and p53 protein. Our results indicate that the differential activation or inactivation of multiple cellular genes is important for the immortalization, as well as the transformation, of human cervical cells. Further, we suggest that our in vitro model system is useful for investigating the molecular mechanism of multistep cervical carcinogenesis.

  15. Effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic waves (RF-EMW) from cellular phones on human ejaculated semen: an in vitro pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Desai, Nisarg R; Makker, Kartikeya; Varghese, Alex; Mouradi, Rand; Sabanegh, Edmund; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate effects of cellular phone radiofrequency electromagnetic waves (RF-EMW) during talk mode on unprocessed (neat) ejaculated human semen. Prospective pilot study. Center for reproductive medicine laboratory in tertiary hospital setting. Neat semen samples from normal healthy donors (n = 23) and infertile patients (n = 9). After liquefaction, neat semen samples were divided into two aliquots. One aliquot (experimental) from each patient was exposed to cellular phone radiation (in talk mode) for 1 h, and the second aliquot (unexposed) served as the control sample under identical conditions. Evaluation of sperm parameters (motility, viability), reactive oxygen species (ROS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of semen, ROS-TAC score, and sperm DNA damage. Samples exposed to RF-EMW showed a significant decrease in sperm motility and viability, increase in ROS level, and decrease in ROS-TAC score. Levels of TAC and DNA damage showed no significant differences from the unexposed group. Radiofrequency electromagnetic waves emitted from cell phones may lead to oxidative stress in human semen. We speculate that keeping the cell phone in a trouser pocket in talk mode may negatively affect spermatozoa and impair male fertility.

  16. Cellular mechanisms of adaptive myelination: bridging the gap between animal studies and human cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalka, Helena; Emery, Ben

    2017-04-01

    Voelker and colleagues propose that we may illuminate learning-associated phenomena such as generalization by considering white matter plasticity. Consistent with this idea, human neuroimaging studies reveal learning-induced changes in adult white matter. Animal studies reveal that some forms of learning induce, and are dependent on, generation of new oligodendrocytes. Nevertheless, it remains unclear which alterations to myelin structure are most relevant to learning, and humans and rodents may profoundly differ in their capacity for oligodendrogenesis in adulthood. A full understanding of these issues will be critical to appreciating the role of adaptive myelination in human neuroplasticity.

  17. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-03-31

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis.

  18. From stem cells to human development: a distinctly human perspective on early embryology, cellular differentiation and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, April M; Johnson, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Over 100 scientists with common interests in human development, disease and regeneration gathered in late September 2016 for The Company of Biologists' second 'From Stem Cells to Human Development' meeting held in historic Southbridge. In this Meeting Review, we highlight some of the exciting new findings that were presented, and discuss emerging themes and convergences in human development and disease that arose during these discussions. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Effects of environmental pollutants on cellular iron homeostasis and ultimate links to human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic disease has increased in the last several decades, and environmental pollutants have been implicated. The magnitude and variety of diseases indicate the malfunctioning of some basic mechanism underlying human health. Environmental pollutants demonstrate a capability to co...

  20. [Pap test used for detection of cellular changes associated with human papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino; Carrillo-Pacheco, Adia; Hernández-Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma virus can infect any mucous of the body and can cause cancer of the uterine cervix. This suggests recommending the Papanicolaou smear combined with a test for detection of human papillomavirus with a frequency interval of 3 years, since it grants greater information and fidelity to the result. The detection studies should begin at the age of 21 years and should stop at 65 years age. Until recently specific treatments did not exist to treat human papilloma virus, but recently some drugs that have demonstrated good effectiveness in curing the infection of human papilloma virus. One example is glycirrhicinic acid, which has demonstrated fewer adverse effects, as well as the possibility that its systemic employment allows treatment of lesions that are difficult to approach. The medical recommendations should be in constant revision, since a clinical trial can modify the interpretation of what is necessary to individualize each patient's treatment.

  1. Cellular and transcriptional responses of SH-SY5Y human neurocytes following in vitro exposure to Gelsemium sempervirens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Pierpaola Dal PrÃÂ

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gelsemium sempervirens (Gelsemium s. is a highly toxic plant but is employed at low doses and/or high dilutions as an anxiolytic and antidepressant. Previous investigations in our laboratory [1,2] have shown a significant anxiolytic-like activity of Gelsemium s., using emotional response models in laboratory mice. Although there is some biochemical evidence of a possible role of neurosteroid metabolism [3], the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of Gelsemium s. at the level of nervous system are largely unknown. To help determine these pathways, we used human neurocytes (SH-SY5Y cell line treated in vitro with different dilutions of Gelsemium s. and evaluated their vitality and gene expression changes. Methods: The drugs were produced by Boiron Laboratoires, Lyon (F, starting from a whole-plant-hydroalcoholic extract of Gelsemium s. Solutions 1C, 2C, 3C, 4C, 8C and 29C (C= centesimal dilution/dynamization prepared in 30% ethanol/distilled water were provided in 30-ml glass bottles, wrapped in aluminium foil and were stored in the dark at room temperature in a metal cupboard. Control solutions (“placebo” were serially diluted/dynamized 30% ethanol/distilled water. Before each experiment, 0.05 ml samples of Gelsemium s. and placebo were added to 5 ml of distilled sterile and apyrogenic water in a 15 ml Falcon polystyrene plastic tube, closed and shaken in mechanical shaker DinaA for 7.5 sec (150 strokes to obtain the final 2C, 3C, 4C, 5C, 9C and 30C succussed dilutions, with ethanol concentration of 0.3% (v/v (final 0.03% in the assay system. Human neuroblastoma cell line SHSY5Y was grown in DMEM-F12 medium (Lonza, with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS, penicillin (100 units/ml and streptomycin (100 mg/ml. To assess cell viability and metabolism, 20,000 cells per well were seeded in 96 microplate wells in 200 μl of medium. After overnight incubation, 22 μl of drug or

  2. Regional and cellular gene expression changes in human Huntington's disease brain

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) pathology is well understood at a histological level but a comprehensive molecular analysis of the effect of the disease in the human brain has not previously been available. To elucidate the molecular phenotype of HD on a genome-wide scale, we compared mRNA profiles from 44 human HD brains with those from 36 unaffected controls using microarray analysis. Four brain regions were analyzed: caudate nucleus, cerebellum, prefrontal association cortex [Brodmann's area 9 (...

  3. Development and validation of an extraction method for the analysis of perfluoroalkyl substances in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Da-Hye; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2017-02-16

    Human hair has many advantages as a non-invasive sample; however, analytical methods for detecting perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in human hair are still in the development stage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate a method for monitoring 11 PFASs in human hair. Solid-phase extraction (SPE), ion-pairing extraction (IPE), a combined method (SPE+IPE) and solvent extraction with ENVI-carb clean-up were compared to develop an optimal extraction method using two types of hair sample (powder and piece forms). Analysis of PFASs was performed using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Among the four different extraction procedures, the SPE method using powdered hair showed the best extraction efficiency and recoveries ranged from 85.8 to 102%. The method detection limits for the SPE method were 0.114-0.796 ng/g and good precision (below 10%) and accuracy (66.4-110%) were obtained. In light of these results, SPE is considered the optimal method for PFAS extraction from hair. It was also successfully used to detect PFASs in human hair samples.

  4. Photoprotective potential of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) extract against UV-A irradiation damage on human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, Francesca; Alvarez-Suarez, Josè M; Tulipani, Sara; Gonzàles-Paramàs, Ana M; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Bompadre, Stefano; Quiles, José L; Mezzetti, Bruno; Battino, Maurizio

    2012-03-07

    Exposure to UV-A radiation is known to induce discrete lesions in DNA and the generation of free radicals that lead to a wide array of skin diseases. Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) contains several polyphenols with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Because the major representative components of strawberry are anthocyanins, these may significantly contribute to its properties. To test this hypothesis, methanolic extracts from the Sveva cultivar were analyzed for anthocyanin content and for their ability to protect human dermal fibroblasts against UV-A radiation, as assayed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenytetrazolium bromide and Comet assays. Five anthocyanin pigments were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. Moreover, the strawberry extract showed a photoprotective activity in fibroblasts exposed to UV-A radiation, increasing cellular viability, and diminishing DNA damage, as compared to control cells. Overall, our data show that strawberry contains compounds that confer photoprotective activity in human cell lines and may protect skin against the adverse effects of UV-A radiation.

  5. FTIR spectroscopic evaluation of changes in the cellular biochemical composition of the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata induced by extracts of some Greek medicinal and aromatic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotti, Efstathia; Kountouri, Sophia; Bouchagier, Pavlos; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I.; Polissiou, Moschos; Tarantilis, Petros A.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the biological activity of aquatic extracts of selected Greek medicinal and aromatic plants to the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata was investigated. Lamiaceae species (Hyssopus officinalis L., Melissa officinalis L., Origanum dictamnus L., Origanum vulgare L. and Salvia officinalis L.) were found to enhance significantly the mycelium growth whereas Crocus sativus appears to inhibit it slightly. M. officinalis and S. officinalis caused the highest stimulation in mycelium growth (+97%) and conidia production (+65%) respectively. In order to further investigate the bioactivity of plant extracts to A. alternata, we employed Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Differences of original spectra were assigned mainly to amides of proteins. The second derivative transformation of spectra revealed changes in spectral regions corresponding to absorptions of the major cellular constituents such as cell membrane and proteins. Principal component analysis of the second derivative transformed spectra confirmed that fatty acids of the cell membranes, amides of proteins and polysaccharides of the cell wall had the major contribution to data variation. FTIR band area ratios were found to correlate with fungal mycelium growth.

  6. Effects of Methanol Extract of Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) on Atherogenic Indices and Redox Status of Cellular System of Hypercholesterolemic Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Akanni, Olubukola Oyebimpe

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of methanol extract of Artocarpus altilis (AA) on atherogenic indices and redox status of cellular system of rats fed with dietary cholesterol while Questran (QUE) served as standard. Biochemical indices such as total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low- and high-density lipoproteins-cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C), aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST and ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), reduced glutathione, glutathione-s-transferase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were assessed. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) rats had significantly increased relative weight of liver and heart. Dietary cholesterol caused a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the levels of serum, hepatic, and cardiac TC by 110%, 70%, and 85%, LDL-C by 79%, 82%, and 176%, and TG by 68%, 96%, and 62%, respectively. Treatment with AA significantly reduced the relative weight of the organs and lipid parameters. There were beneficial increases in serum and cardiac HDL-C levels in HC rats treated with AA. In HC rats, serum LDH, ALT, and AST activities and levels of LPO were increased, whereas hepatic and cardiac SOD, CAT, and GPx were reduced. All biochemical and histological alterations were ameliorated upon treatment with AA. Extract of AA had protective effects against dietary cholesterol-induced hypercholesterolemia.

  7. Effects of Methanol Extract of Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis on Atherogenic Indices and Redox Status of Cellular System of Hypercholesterolemic Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatosin Adekunle Adaramoye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of methanol extract of Artocarpus altilis (AA on atherogenic indices and redox status of cellular system of rats fed with dietary cholesterol while Questran (QUE served as standard. Biochemical indices such as total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, low- and high-density lipoproteins-cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C, aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST and ALT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, reduced glutathione, glutathione-s-transferase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and lipid peroxidation (LPO were assessed. Hypercholesterolemic (HC rats had significantly increased relative weight of liver and heart. Dietary cholesterol caused a significant increase (P<0.05 in the levels of serum, hepatic, and cardiac TC by 110%, 70%, and 85%, LDL-C by 79%, 82%, and 176%, and TG by 68%, 96%, and 62%, respectively. Treatment with AA significantly reduced the relative weight of the organs and lipid parameters. There were beneficial increases in serum and cardiac HDL-C levels in HC rats treated with AA. In HC rats, serum LDH, ALT, and AST activities and levels of LPO were increased, whereas hepatic and cardiac SOD, CAT, and GPx were reduced. All biochemical and histological alterations were ameliorated upon treatment with AA. Extract of AA had protective effects against dietary cholesterol-induced hypercholesterolemia.

  8. Activation of Cellular Immunity in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1-Infected Mice by the Oral Administration of Aqueous Extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Masahiko; Wadhwani, Ashish; Kai, Hisahiro; Hidaka, Muneaki; Yoshida, Hiroki; Sugita, Chihiro; Watanabe, Wataru; Matsuno, Koji; Hagiwara, Akinori

    2016-05-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. is used as a nutritive vegetable and spice. Its ethanol extract has been previously shown to be significantly effective in alleviating herpetic skin lesions in mice. In this study, we evaluated the alleviation by the aqueous extract (AqMOL) and assessed the mode of its anti-herpetic action in a murine cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection model. AqMOL (300 mg/kg) was administered orally to HSV-1-infected mice three times daily on days 0 to 5 after infection. AqMOL significantly limited the development of herpetic skin lesions and reduced virus titers in the brain on day 4 without toxicity. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction to inactivated HSV-1 antigen was significantly stronger in infected mice administered AqMOL and AqMOL augmented interferon (IFN)-γ production by HSV-1 antigen from splenocytes of HSV-1-infected mice at 4 days post-infection. AqMOL administration was effective in elevating the ratio of CD11b(+) and CD49b(+) subpopulations of splenocytes in infected mice. As DTH is a major host defense mechanism for intradermal HSV infection, augmentation of the DTH response by AqMOL may contribute to their efficacies against HSV-1 infection. These results provided an important insights into the mechanism by which AqMOL activates cellular immunity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Inhibitory effects of pomegranate extracts on recombinant human maltase-glucoamylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kayoko; Li, Peng; Uraji, Misugi; Hatanaka, Tadashi; Ito, Hideyuki

    2014-09-01

    α-Glucosidase inhibitors are currently used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory activities of aril and pericarp extracts from pomegranates obtained various regions against recombinant human maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM). The inhibitory activities of the aril extracts tended to be stronger than those of the pericarp extracts. The Iranian aril extract was the most effective inhibitor. We investigated the polyphenol content of the pomegranate extracts using the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Among the aril extracts, the Iranian aril extract showed the highest polyphenol content. We further evaluated inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase from the rat small intestine. Pomegranate extract used in this study showed slightly different inhibitory activities according to α-glucosidase origin. Iranian aril extract was the most effective inhibitor of α-glucosidases, especially recombinant human MGAM. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the pomegranate arils led to identification of punicalagin and oenothein B as potent inhibitors of α-glucosidase. Oenothein B showed inhibitory activity with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of 174 μM. Its potency was comparable to that of the α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose with an IC(50) value of 170 μM. Dixon plot kinetic analysis of oenothein B showed a noncompetitive inhibition with a K(i) value of 102 μM. These results suggest that pomegranate arils would be useful for suppressing postprandial hyperglycemia.

  10. Anticancer activity of Nelumbo nucifera stamen extract in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Feng, Xia; Wang, Cun; Peng, Deguang; Zhu, Kai; Song, Jia-Le

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anticancer activities of Nelumbo nucifera (Ba lotus) stamen ethanol crude extract (BLSEE) in human colon carcinoma HCT-116 cells. MTT assay, flow cytometry analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay were employed to investigate the anticancer mechanisms of BLSEE (100, 200 and 400 µg/ml) in HCT-116 cells. BLSEE reduced HCT-116 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. BLSEE treatment also significantly increased the sub-G1 population in HCT-116 cells (P=0.0020 at 400 µg/ml), as shown by flow cytometry assay. Following treatment with BLSEE, the mRNA levels of the apoptosis-associated factors Fas, Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, death receptor 4 (DR4), death receptor 5 (DR5), caspases 3, 8 and 9, and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) associated X protein were increased, and the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-extra large was decreased in HCT-116 cells. The mRNA levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 1 and TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 2 were also regulated by BLSEE treatment. In addition, BLSEE was able to modulate the expression of inflammation-associated nuclear factor-κB, inhibitory κBα, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 in HCT-116 cells. The present study clearly indicated the cytotoxicity of BLSEE in HCT-116 cells through induced cellular apoptosis. These results also suggested the BLSEE may be a powerful agent against colon cancer cells. PMID:28454279

  11. Apoptosis induction of Persicae Semen extract in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hee-Young; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Hahn, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jeong Hee

    2003-02-01

    The major ingredient of Persicae Semen is a cynogenic compound, amygdalin (D-mandelonitrile-beta-gentiobioside). Controversial results on the anticancer activity of amygdalin were reported due to its conversion to its inactive isomer, neoamygdalin. In order to inhibit the epimerization of amygdalin, we used newly developed simple acid boiling method in preparation of Persicae Semen extract. HPLC analysis revealed most of amygdalin in Persicae Semen extract was active D-form. Persicae Semen extract was used to analyze its effect on cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. Persicae Semen extract was cytotoxic to HL-60 cells with IC50 of 6.4 mg/mL in the presence of 250 nM of beta-glucosidase. The antiproliferative effects of Persicae Semen extract appear to be attributable to its induction of apoptotic cell death, as Persicae Semen extract induced nuclear morphology changes and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation.

  12. Adipose circadian rhythms: translating cellular and animal studies to human physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jonathan D

    2012-02-05

    Emerging links between circadian rhythms and metabolism promise much for the understanding of metabolic physiology and pathophysiology, in which white adipose tissue (WAT) plays a prominent role. Many WAT endocrine molecules, termed adipokines, display rhythmic plasma concentration. Moreover, similar to most other tissues, WAT exhibits widespread 24-h variation in gene expression, with approximately 20% of the murine adipose transcriptome estimated to undergo daily variation. A major limitation to human chronobiology research is the availability of physiologically defined peripheral tissues. To date most analyses of in vivo human peripheral clocks has been limited to blood leucocytes. However, subcutaneous adipose tissue represents a novel opportunity to study peripheral molecular rhythms that are of clearly defined metabolic relevance. This review summarises basic concepts of circadian and metabolic physiology before then comparing alternative protocols used to analyse the rhythmic properties of human adipose tissue.

  13. Specific Human and Candida Cellular Interactions Lead to Controlled or Persistent Infection Outcomes during Granuloma-Like Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misme-Aucouturier, Barbara; Albassier, Marjorie; Alvarez-Rueda, Nidia; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    A delayed type of multicellular process could be crucial during chronic candidiasis in determining the course of infection. This reaction, consisting of organized immune cells surrounding the pathogen, initiates an inflammatory response to avoid fungal dissemination. The goal of the present study was to examine, at an in vitro cellular scale, Candida and human immune cell interaction dynamics during a long-term period. By challenging human peripheral blood immune cells from 10 healthy donors with 32 Candida albicans and non-albicans (C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. lusitaniae, C. krusei, and C. kefyr) clinical isolates, we showed that Candida spp. induced the formation of granuloma-like structures within 6 days after challenge, but their sizes and the respective fungal burdens differed according to the Candida species. These two parameters are positively correlated. Phenotypic characteristics, such as hypha formation and higher axenic growth rate, seem to contribute to yeast persistence within granuloma-like structures. We showed an interindividual variability of the human response against Candida spp. Higher proportions of neutrophils and elevated CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell ratios during the first days after challenge were correlated with early production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and associated with controlled infection. In contrast, the persistence of Candida could result from upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and a poor anti-inflammatory negative feedback (IL-10). Importantly, regulatory subsets of NK cells and CD4(lo) CD8(hi) doubly positive (DP) lymphocytes at late stage infiltrate granuloma-like structures and could correlate with the IL-10 and TNF-α production. These data offer a base frame to explain cellular events that guide infection control or fungal persistence. Copyright © 2016 Misme-Aucouturier et al.

  14. Cellular image classification

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiang; Lin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces new techniques for cellular image feature extraction, pattern recognition and classification. The authors use the antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in patient serum as the subjects and the Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) technique as the imaging protocol to illustrate the applications of the described methods. Throughout the book, the authors provide evaluations for the proposed methods on two publicly available human epithelial (HEp-2) cell datasets: ICPR2012 dataset from the ICPR'12 HEp-2 cell classification contest and ICIP2013 training dataset from the ICIP'13 Competition on cells classification by fluorescent image analysis. First, the reading of imaging results is significantly influenced by one’s qualification and reading systems, causing high intra- and inter-laboratory variance. The authors present a low-order LP21 fiber mode for optical single cell manipulation and imaging staining patterns of HEp-2 cells. A focused four-lobed mode distribution is stable and effective in optical...

  15. Cellular ontogeny of RBMY during human spermatogenesis and its role in sperm motility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shadaan Abid; Vrushali Sagare-Patil; Jyotsna Gokral; Deepak Modi

    2013-03-01

    The Y-chromosome-encoded gene RBMY (RNA-binding motif on Y) is a male germline RNA-binding protein and is postulated to be a RNA-splicing regulator. In order to understand the roles of RBMY in different stages of male gamete maturation, the present study aimed at determining its cellular expression during spermatogenesis, spermeogenesis and in mature spermatozoa. In the spermatogonia (cKIT-positive cells), RBMY immunolocalized as two distinct foci, one in the nucleolus and the other in the subnuclear region; in the spermatocytes (cKIT-negative cells), the nucleus had punctuate staining with a subnuclear foci; in the pachytene cells, the protein was localized as a punctuate pattern in the nucleus spread along the elongating chromosomes. In the round and the elongating spermatids, the protein expression was polarized and restricted to the cytoplasm and in the developing mid-piece. In testicular and ejaculated sperm, RBMY was localized to the mid-piece region and weakly in the tail. Incubation of spermatozoa with the RBMY antibody reduced its motility. The spatial differences in expression of RBMY in the germ cells and the presences of this protein in post-meiotic cells and in transcriptionally inert spermatozoa suggest its involvement in multiple functions beyond RNA splicing. One such possible function of RBMY could be its involvement in sperm motility.

  16. Human Neuroblastoma: From Basic Science to Clinical Debut of Cellular Oncogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Manfred

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood embryonic tumor of migrating neuroectodermal cells derived from the neural crest and destined for the adrenal medulla and the sympathetic nervous system. It very often has a rapidly progressive clinical course, and although many advances have been made in understanding the development of this tumor, improving the survival rates particularly in patients with metastatic tumor has been a frustrating experience. The mechanisms leading to neuroblastoma are largely unclear, but nonrandom chromosomal changes discovered early suggested the involvement of genetic alterations. Most prominent among these is the amplification of the oncogene MYCN, which identifies a group of patients who have a particularly dire prognosis. Amplified MYCN is used today as a prognostic marker on which therapy design is based to a large extent. An unusual aspect of neuroblastoma is the high rate at which tumors regress spontaneously, even in infants with extensive liver involvement and numerous subcutaneous nodules. Identifying the molecular and cellular basis of spontaneous regression could result in improved therapeutic approaches. Neuroblastoma is a model tumor with many fascinating aspects but has remained a challenge to the pediatric oncologist

  17. The zebrafish goosepimples/myosin Vb mutant exhibits cellular attributes of human microvillus inclusion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Pinto, Clyde Savio; Dharap, Shweta; Jacob, Tressa; Bhargava, Shobha; Sonawane, Mahendra

    2016-11-01

    Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is a life-threatening enteropathy characterised by malabsorption and incapacitating fluid loss due to chronic diarrhoea. Histological analysis has revealed that enterocytes in MVID patients exhibit reduction of microvilli, presence of microvillus inclusion bodies and intestinal villus atrophy, whereas genetic linkage analysis has identified mutations in myosin Vb gene as the main cause of MVID. In order to understand the cellular basis of MVID and the associated formation of inclusion bodies, an animal model that develops ex utero and is tractable genetically as well as by microscopy would be highly useful. Here we report that the intestine of the zebrafish goosepimples (gsp)/myosin Vb (myoVb) mutant shows severe reduction in intestinal folds - structures similar to mammalian villi. The loss of folds is further correlated with changes in the shape of enterocytes. In striking similarity with MVID patients, zebrafish gsp/myoVb mutant larvae exhibit microvillus atrophy, microvillus inclusions and accumulation of secretory material in enterocytes. We propose that the zebrafish gsp/myoVb mutant is a valuable model to study the pathophysiology of MVID. Furthermore, owing to the advantages of zebrafish in screening libraries of small molecules, the gsp mutant will be an ideal tool to identify compounds having therapeutic value against MVID.

  18. Insight into the cellular fate and toxicity of aluminium adjuvants used in clinically approved human vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Matthew; Shardlow, Emma; Exley, Christopher

    2016-08-12

    Aluminium adjuvants remain the most widely used and effective adjuvants in vaccination and immunotherapy. Herein, the particle size distribution (PSD) of aluminium oxyhydroxide and aluminium hydroxyphosphate adjuvants was elucidated in attempt to correlate these properties with the biological responses observed post vaccination. Heightened solubility and potentially the generation of Al(3+) in the lysosomal environment were positively correlated with an increase in cell mortality in vitro, potentially generating a greater inflammatory response at the site of simulated injection. The cellular uptake of aluminium based adjuvants (ABAs) used in clinically approved vaccinations are compared to a commonly used experimental ABA, in an in vitro THP-1 cell model. Using lumogallion as a direct-fluorescent molecular probe for aluminium, complemented with transmission electron microscopy provides further insight into the morphology of internalised particulates, driven by the physicochemical variations of the ABAs investigated. We demonstrate that not all aluminium adjuvants are equal neither in terms of their physical properties nor their biological reactivity and potential toxicities both at the injection site and beyond. High loading of aluminium oxyhydroxide in the cytoplasm of THP-1 cells without immediate cytotoxicity might predispose this form of aluminium adjuvant to its subsequent transport throughout the body including access to the brain.

  19. Insight into the cellular fate and toxicity of aluminium adjuvants used in clinically approved human vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Matthew; Shardlow, Emma; Exley, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Aluminium adjuvants remain the most widely used and effective adjuvants in vaccination and immunotherapy. Herein, the particle size distribution (PSD) of aluminium oxyhydroxide and aluminium hydroxyphosphate adjuvants was elucidated in attempt to correlate these properties with the biological responses observed post vaccination. Heightened solubility and potentially the generation of Al3+ in the lysosomal environment were positively correlated with an increase in cell mortality in vitro, potentially generating a greater inflammatory response at the site of simulated injection. The cellular uptake of aluminium based adjuvants (ABAs) used in clinically approved vaccinations are compared to a commonly used experimental ABA, in an in vitro THP-1 cell model. Using lumogallion as a direct-fluorescent molecular probe for aluminium, complemented with transmission electron microscopy provides further insight into the morphology of internalised particulates, driven by the physicochemical variations of the ABAs investigated. We demonstrate that not all aluminium adjuvants are equal neither in terms of their physical properties nor their biological reactivity and potential toxicities both at the injection site and beyond. High loading of aluminium oxyhydroxide in the cytoplasm of THP-1 cells without immediate cytotoxicity might predispose this form of aluminium adjuvant to its subsequent transport throughout the body including access to the brain.

  20. Mechanism of cytotoxicity by Psoralea corylifolia extract in human breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Vasumathy; Tripathi, Jyoti; Variyar, Prasad; Pandey, Badri Narain

    2014-01-01

    Psoralea corylifolia has been widely used in herbal medicine, and a few studies show its anticancer activity. However, the detailed mechanism of the anticancer activity of P. corylifolia seed extract (PC extract) was not studied. This study evaluates the anticancer activity and underlying mechanism of PC extract in a human breast cancer cell line (MCF7). PC extract caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the proliferation of MCF7 cells and an increase in apoptotic death as measured by annexin-V-FITC and TUNEL assays. Increased cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in cells treated with PC extract further confirmed the apoptotic mode of cell death. There was a decrease (~2-fold) of mitochondrial membrane potential in cells treated with PC extract. In cells treated with PC extract, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a decrease in mitochondrial ROS was observed. A significant decrease in ATP (~1.8-fold) was observed in extract-treated cells. Moreover, MCF7 cells treated with extract showed cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-7, upregulation of Bax, release of cytochrome-c, and loss of mitochondrial integrity. Taken together, these results suggest the involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in PC extract-induced apoptosis in MCF7 cells.

  1. EXTRACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Ferrell, Barbra

    2016-01-01

    The microbial and molecular ecology research communities have made substantial progress on developing standards for annotating samples with environment metadata. However, sample manual annotation is a highly labor intensive process and requires familiarity with the terminologies used. We have the...... and text-mining-assisted curation revealed that EXTRACT speeds up annotation by 15-25% and helps curators to detect terms that would otherwise have been missed.Database URL: https://extract.hcmr.gr/....

  2. Human papillomavirus (HPV) upregulates the cellular deubiquitinase UCHL1 to suppress the keratinocyte's innate immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karim, R.; Tummers, B.; Meyers, C.; Biryukov, J.L.; Alam, S.; Backendorf, C.; Jha, V.; Offringa, R.; van Ommen, G.J.; Melief, C.J.; Guardavaccaro, D.; Boer, J.M.; van der Burg, S.H.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent infection of basal keratinocytes with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) may cause cancer. Keratinocytes are equipped with different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) but hrHPV has developed ways to dampen their signals resulting in minimal inflammation and evasion of host immunity

  3. Cellular radiosensitivity of primary and metastatic human uveal melanoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.M.J. van den Aardweg (Gerard J. M.); N.C. Naus (Nicole); A.C. Verhoeven; J.E.M.M. de Klein (Annelies); G.P.M. Luyten (Gré)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To investigate the radiosensitivity of uveal melanoma cell lines by a clonogenic survival assay, to improve the efficiency of the radiation regimen. METHODS: Four primary and four metastatic human uveal melanoma cell lines were cultured in the presence of

  4. Susceptibility of Human Pancreatic beta Cells for Cytomegalovirus Infection and the Effects on Cellular Immunogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelt, M.J.; Faas, M.M.; de Haan, Bart; Draijer, C.; Hugenholtz, G.C.G.; de Haan, A.; Engelse, M.A.; de Koning, E.J.P.; de Vos, P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection has been suggested to be a causal factor in the development of type 1 diabetes, posttransplantation diabetes, and the failure of islet allografts. This effect of CMV has been interpreted as an indirect effect on the immune system rather than direct

  5. Human papillomavirus (HPV) upregulates the cellular deubiquitinase UCHL1 to suppress the keratinocyte's innate immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karim, R.; Tummers, B.; Meyers, C.; Biryukov, J.L.; Alam, S.; Backendorf, C.; Jha, V.; Offringa, R.; van Ommen, G.J.; Melief, C.J.; Guardavaccaro, D.; Boer, J.M.; van der Burg, S.H.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent infection of basal keratinocytes with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) may cause cancer. Keratinocytes are equipped with different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) but hrHPV has developed ways to dampen their signals resulting in minimal inflammation and evasion of host immunity

  6. Cellular radiosensitivity of primary and metastatic human uveal melanoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.M.J. van den Aardweg (Gerard J. M.); N.C. Naus (Nicole); A.C. Verhoeven; J.E.M.M. de Klein (Annelies); G.P.M. Luyten (Gré)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To investigate the radiosensitivity of uveal melanoma cell lines by a clonogenic survival assay, to improve the efficiency of the radiation regimen. METHODS: Four primary and four metastatic human uveal melanoma cell lines were cultured in the presence of condi

  7. Enhanced cellular responses and distinct gene profiles in human fetoplacental artery endothelial cells under chronic low oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Wang, Kai; Li, Yan; Dai, Cai-Feng; Wang, Ping; Kendziorski, Christina; Chen, Dong-Bao; Zheng, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Fetoplacental endothelial cells are exposed to oxygen levels ranging from 2% to 8% in vivo. However, little is known regarding endothelial function within this range of oxygen because most laboratories use ambient air (21% O2) as a standard culture condition (SCN). We asked whether human umbilical artery endothelial cells (HUAECs) that were steadily exposed to the physiological chronic normoxia (PCN, 3% O2) for ∼20-25 days differed in their proliferative and migratory responses to FGF2 and VEGFA as well as in their global gene expression compared with those in the SCN. We observed that PCN enhanced FGF2- and VEGFA-stimulated cell proliferation and migration. In oxygen reversal experiments (i.e., when PCN cells were exposed to SCN for 24 h and vice versa), we found that preexposure to 21% O2 decreased the migratory ability, but not the proliferative ability, of the PCN-HUAECs in response to FGF2 and VEGFA. These PCN-enhanced cellular responses were associated with increased protein levels of HIF1A and NOS3, but not FGFR1, VEGFR1, and VEGFR2. Microarray analysis demonstrated that PCN up-regulated 74 genes and down-regulated 86, 14 of which were directly regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors as evaluated using in silico analysis. Gene function analysis further indicated that the PCN-regulated genes were highly related to cell proliferation and migration, consistent with the results from our functional assays. Given that PCN significantly alters cellular responses to FGF2 and VEGFA as well as transcription in HUAECs, it is likely that we may need to reexamine the current cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling fetoplacental endothelial functions, which were largely derived from endothelial models established under ambient O2.

  8. Gene Expression Profile Changes and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. In addition, DNA in space can be damaged by toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage affects the accuracy of the radiation risk assessment for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damage, confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) flown on the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB). Damages in the DNA were quantified by immunofluorescence staining for ?-H2AX, which showed similar percentages of different types of stained cells between flight and ground. However, there was a slight shift in the distribution of the ?-H2AX foci number in the flown cells with countable foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. A microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment was also performed. Comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. Similar responses at the RNA level between different gravity conditions were also observed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly

  9. Localization of the cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) gene relative to the acute promyelocytic leukemia-associated breakpoint on human chromosome 15

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); H. de Leeuw (H.); E.J. Dekker (E.); J.M. Rijks (Jolianne); N. Spurr (N.); A.M. Ledbetter (Andrew M.); E. Kootwijk (E.); M.J. Vaessen (Marie-Josée)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractA human genomic fragment comprising the cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) gene was isolated. By using a panel of somatic cell hybrids, this gene could be assigned to human chromosome 15. Subsequently, a possible involvement of the CRABP gene in translocation (15;17) (q22;q11

  10. DNA extraction from fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Hua; Gouda-Vossos, Amany; Dzamko, Nicolas; Halliday, Glenda; Huang, Yue

    2013-10-01

    Both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human brain tissues are invaluable resources for molecular genetic studies of central nervous system diseases, especially neurodegenerative disorders. To identify the optimal method for DNA extraction from human brain tissue, we compared methods on differently-processed tissues. Fragments of LRRK2 and MAPT (257 bp and 483 bp/245 bp) were amplified for evaluation. We found that for FFPE samples, the success rate of DNA extraction was greater when using a commercial kit than a laboratory-based method (successful DNA extraction from 76% versus 33% of samples). PCR amplicon size and storage period were key factors influencing the success rate of DNA extraction from FFPE samples. In the fresh-frozen samples, the DNA extraction success rate was 100% using either a commercial kit (QIAamp DNA Micro) or a laboratory-based method (sample boiling in 0.1 mol/L NaOH, followed by proteinase K digestion, and then DNA extraction using Chelex-100) regardless of PCR amplicon length or tissue storage time. Although the present results demonstrate that PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA can be extracted from both fresh-frozen and FFPE samples, fresh brain tissue is recommended for DNA extraction in future neuropathological studies.

  11. Cellular responses to chlorin-based photosensitizer DH-II-24 under darkness in human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Cheol; Yoo, Je-Ok; Kang, Seong-Sik; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2011-03-01

    We investigated cellular responses to chlorin-based photosensitizer DH-II-24 under darkness in human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells. Cells were loaded with 0.5-10 μg/mL DH-II-24 for 12 h, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular Ca(2+) levels, in situ tissue transglutaminase (tTGase) activity, cell viability, cell morphology and cell cycle were examined. DH-II-24 treatment had no effect on intracellular ROS production or cell morphology, and did not induce cell detachment at any concentrations tested. In addition, cell viability and cell cycle progression were not altered by the photosensitizer. However, DH-II-24 treatment elevated the basal level of intracellular Ca(2+) in a dose-dependent manner and inhibited tTGase activity without affecting tTGase expression levels. Furthermore, DH-II-24 inhibited lysophosphatidic acid-induced activation of tTGase in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 1 μg/mL DH-II-24 significantly elevated intracellular ROS and in situ tTGase activity in parallel with a rapid and large increase in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. DH-II-24-mediated PDT decreased cell viability and induced cell detachment. These results demonstrate that DH-II-24 treatment alone under darkness induced different cellular responses to DH-II-24-mediated PDT.

  12. OCT4B1 Regulates the Cellular Stress Response of Human Dental Pulp Cells with Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Infection and apoptosis are combined triggers for inflammation in dental tissues. Octamer-binding transcription factor 4-B1 (OCT4B1, a novel spliced variant of OCT4 family, could respond to the cellular stress and possess antiapoptotic property. However, its specific role in dental pulpitis remains unknown. Methods. To investigate the effect of OCT4B1 on inflammation of dental pulp cells (DPCs, its expression in inflamed dental pulp tissues and DPCs was examined by in situ hybridization, real-time PCR, and FISH assay. OCT4B1 overexpressed DPCs model was established, confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence staining, and then stimulated with Lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Apoptotic rate was determined by Hoechst/PI staining and FACS. Cell survival rate was calculated by CCK8 assay. Results. In situ hybridization, real-time PCR, and FISH assay revealed that OCT4B1 was extensively expressed in inflamed dental pulp tissues and DPCs with LPS stimulation. Western blot and immunofluorescence staining showed the expression of OCT4B1 and OCT4B increased after OCT4B1 transfection. Hoechst/PI staining and FACS demonstrated that less red/blue fluorescence was detected and apoptotic percentage decreased (3.45% after transfection. CCK8 demonstrated that the survival rate of pCDH-OCT4B1-flag cells increased. Conclusions. OCT4B1 plays an essential role in inflammation and apoptosis of DPCs. OCT4B might operate synergistically with OCT4B1 to reduce apoptosis.

  13. Cellular stress response in human Müller cells (MIO-M1) after bevacizumab treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Monique; Krempel, Paloma Gava; Marquezini, Mônica Valeria; Sholl-Franco, Alfred; Lameu, Amanda; Monteiro, Mário Luiz R; Miguel, Nádia Campos de Oliveira

    2017-07-01

    Bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agent, is widely used in the treatment of retinal vascular diseases. However, due to the essential role Müller cell derived-VEGF plays in the maintenance of retinal neurons and glial cells, cell viability is likely to be affected by VEGF inhibition. We therefore evaluated the effect of bevacizumab-induced VEGF inhibition on Müller cells (MIO-M1) in vitro. MIO-M1 cells were cultured for 12 or 24 h in media containing bevacizumab at 0.25 or 0.5 mg/mL. Controls were cultured in medium only. Cell viability was determined with the trypan blue exclusion test and MTT assay. Caspase-3, beclin-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin content were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Gene expression was evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR. Treatment with bevacizumab did not reduce MIO-M1 cell viability, but increased metabolic activity at 24 h (0.5 mg/mL) and induced apoptosis and autophagy, as shown by the increased caspase-3 levels at 12 h (0.25 and 0.5 mg/mL) and the increased beclin levels at 24 h (0.5 mg/mL). Caspase-3 mRNA was upregulated at 12 h and downregulated at 24 h in cells treated with bevacizumab at 0.25 mg/mL. Bevacizumab treatment was also associated with structural protein abnormalities, with decreased GFAP and vimentin content and upregulated GFAP and vimentin mRNA expression. Although bevacizumab did not significantly affect MIO-M1 cell viability, it led to metabolic and molecular changes (apoptosis, autophagy and structural abnormalities) suggestive of significant cellular toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Simulation of cellular changes on Optical Coherence Tomography of human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Miriam; Araujo, Aderito; Barbeiro, Silvia; Caramelo, Francisco; Correia, Antonio; Marques, Maria Isabel; Pinto, Luis; Serranho, Pedro; Bernardes, Rui; Morgado, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    We present a methodology to assess cell level alterations on the human retina responsible for functional changes observable in the Optical Coherence Tomography data in healthy ageing and in disease conditions, in the absence of structural alterations. The methodology is based in a 3D multilayer Monte Carlo computational model of the human retina. The optical properties of each layer are obtained by solving the Maxwell's equations for 3D domains representative of small regions of those layers, using a Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method (DG-FEM). Here we present the DG-FEM Maxwell 3D model and its validation against Mie's theory for spherical scatterers. We also present an application of our methodology to the assessment of cell level alterations responsible for the OCT data in Diabetic Macular Edema. It was possible to identify which alterations are responsible for the changes observed in the OCT scans of the diseased groups.

  15. Red Ginseng Extract Promotes the Hair Growth in Cultured Human Hair Follicles

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Gyeong-Hun; Park, Ki-young; Cho, Hong-il; Lee, Sang-Min; Han, Ji Su; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan; Shin, Hyoseung; KANG, YONG JUNG; Lee, Dong Hun

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng has been shown to promote hair growth in several recent studies. However, its effects on human hair follicles and its mechanisms of action have not been sufficiently elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the hair growth-promoting effects of red ginseng extract (RGE) and its ginsenosides. The proliferative activities of cultured human hair follicles treated with RGE and ginsenoside-Rb1 were assessed using Ki-67 immunostaining. Their effects on isolated human dermal papilla cells ...

  16. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 controls human colonic epithelial restitution, migration, and Rac1 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Larsen, Sylvester; Linnemann, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    of the study was to investigate the role of cIAP2 for wound healing in the normal human colon. Wound tissue was generated by taking rectosigmoidal biopsies across an experimental ulcer in healthy subjects after 5, 24, and 48 h. In experimental ulcers, the expression of cIAP2 in regenerating intestinal...... epithelial cells (IECs) was increased at the wound edge after 24 h (P

  17. Cellular uptake and imaging studies of glycosylated silica nanoprobe (GSN in human colon adenocarcinoma (HT 29 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehravi B

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Bita Mehravi,1 Mohsen Ahmadi,1 Massoud Amanlou,2 Ahmad Mostaar,1 Mehdi Shafiee Ardestani,3 Negar Ghalandarlaki41Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Drug Design and Development Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 4Department of Biological Science, School of Science, Science and Research branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, IranPurpose: In recent years, molecular imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has gained prominence in the detection of tumor cells. The scope of this study is on molecular imaging and on the cellular uptake study of a glycosylated silica nanoprobe (GSN.Methods: In this study, intracellular uptake (HT 29 cell line of GSN was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, flow cytometry, and fluorescent microscopy. In vitro and in vivo relaxometry of this nanoparticle was determined using a 3 Tesla MRI; biodistribution of GSN and Magnevist® were measured in different tissues.Results: Results suggest that the cellular uptake of GSN was about 70%. The r1 relaxivity of this nanoparticle in the cells was measured to be 12.9 ± 1.6 mM-1 s-1 and on a per lanthanide gadolinium (Gd3+ basis. Results also indicate an average cellular uptake of 0.7 ± 0.009 pg Gd3+ per cell. It should be noted that 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay demonstrated that the cells were effectively labeled without cytotoxicity, and that using MRI for quantitative estimation of delivery and uptake of targeted contrast agents and early detection of human colon cancer cells using targeted contrast agents, is feasible.Conclusion: These results showed that GSN provided a

  18. Sterilization-Induced Changes in Surface Topography of Biodegradable POSS-PCLU and the Cellular Response of Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirimer, Lara; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-06-01

    The field of tissue engineering is rapidly evolving, generating numerous biodegradable materials suited as regeneration platforms. Material sterility is of fundamental importance for clinical translation; however, a few studies have systematically researched the effects of different sterilization methods on biodegradable materials. Here, we exposed a novel bioabsorbable nanocomposite based on a poly(ɛ-caprolactone urea) urethane backbone integrating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanoparticles (POSS-PCLU) to autoclave, microwave, antibiotics, and 70% ethanol sterilization and systematically correlated differences in material characteristics to the attachment, viability, proliferative capacity, and shape of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFa). Nanotopographical profiling of autoclaved or microwaved surfaces revealed relatively deep nano-grooves, increasing total surface area, roughness, and hydrophobicity, which resulted in significantly fewer adherent cells. Antibiotics or 70% ethanol-treated surfaces displayed shallower nano-grooves, a more hydrophilic character, and significantly greater cellular adhesion (ppostproduction processing tool to enhance cytocompatibility of tissue engineering scaffolds.

  19. Human nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of a murine sarcoma virus: studies with cloned viral and cellular DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Kisselev, L L

    1982-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid, pI26, has been constructed by cloning into pBR322 a transforming gene of murine sarcoma virus (a Moloney strain, clone 124, MSV) synthesized by detergent-treated virions. From this plasmid a XbaI-HindIII fragment has been isolated which contains only mos-specific sequences. This mos-specific probe has been used for screening a human gene library cloned in bacteriophage lambda Charon 4A. Of these, 19 clones have been isolated containing mos-related sequences. By physical mapping and molecular hybridization it has been shown that these sequences are neighboured by DNA regions related to Moloney murine leukemia virus. Recombinant phages have also been found containing human inserts related to MLV, not to the mos gene. The possible existence of murine-like endogenous retroviruses in the normal human genome, including that of a sarcoma type, is discussed. By Northern blotting, expression of the cellular c-mos gene has been detected in mouse liver treated with a hepatocarcinogen. The general significance of the suggested model for evaluating the relationship between chemical carcinogenesis and oncogene expression is discussed.

  20. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 µg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by foci and pattern counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (?-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average foci counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profile of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in ?-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not significantly affect

  1. Effects of the antioxidant Pycnogenol on cellular redox systems in U1285 human lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandin, Valentina; Nyström, Christina; Rundlöf, Anna-Klara; Jönsson-Videsäter, Kerstin; Schönlau, Frank; Hörkkö, Jarmo; Björnstedt, Mikael; Fernandes, Aristi P

    2009-01-01

    Pycnogenol, which is extracted from the bark of French maritime pine, has been shown to have antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities. Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) are three central redox enzymes that are active in endogenous defence against oxidative stress in the cell. Treatment of cells with Pycnogenol decreased the activity of both TrxR and GPx in cells by more than 50%, but GR was not affected. As previously reported, both enzymes were induced after treatment with hydrogen peroxide and selenite. The presence of Pycnogenol efficiently decreased selenite-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Addition of Pycnogenol after selenite treatment reduced the mRNA expression and activity of TrxR to basal levels. In contrast, the GPx activity was completely unaffected. The discrepancy between TrxR and GPx regulation may indicate that transcription of TrxR is induced primarily by oxidative stress. As TrxR is induced in various pathological conditions, including tumours and inflammatory conditions, decreased activity mediated by a non-toxic agent such as Pycnogenol may be of great value.

  2. A comparative study of two methods for the isolation of human leucocytes for DNA extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, L H; Ton, S H; Cheong, S K

    1990-06-01

    The 'Dextran' and the 'Buffy-coat' methods for isolation of human leucocytes for DNA extraction were compared on the basis of DNA yield from the same amounts (10 ml) of blood. Human leucocytes from a total of 11 samples were isolated using both methods for each sample after which DNA was extracted. Extracted DNA samples were treated with ribonucleases and proteinase K after which the yields were quantitated by measuring absorbance at 260 nm. The 'Buffy-coat' method yielded a mean concentration of DNA of 476.7 micrograms/ml (range: 212 to 700 micrograms/ml) while the 'Dextran' method yielded 188.4 micrograms/ml (range: 64 to 340 micrograms/ml). The difference was confirmed by subjecting the extracted DNA samples to agarose gel electrophoresis.

  3. Effect of Baliospermum montanum root extract on phagocytosis by human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Kalpana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous extract of roots of Baliospermum montanum was evaluated on preliminary basis for immunomodulatory activity by studying neutrophil phagocytic function. The different concentration of (25, 50, 100 mg/ml of aqueous extract of roots of Baliospermum montanum was subjected to study its effect on different in vitro methods of phagocytosis such as neutrophil locomotion, chemotaxis, immunostimulant activity of phagocytosis of killed Candida albicans and qualitative nitroblue tetrazolium test by using human neutrophils. This preliminary study revealed that Baliospermum montanum extract has stimulated chemotactic, phagocytic and intracellular killing potency of human neutrophils at the different concentration. From the results obtained it can be observed that the aqueous extract of Baliospermum montanum stimulate cell-mediated immune system by increasing neutrophil function.

  4. Trifolium pallidum and Trifolium scabrum extracts in the protection of human plasma components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Olas, Beata; Malinowska, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara; Moniuszko-Szajwaj, Barbara; Kowalska, Iwona; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-02-01

    Clovers (genus: Trifolium) have been used in traditional medicine by many cultures, but the biological activity of the most of these plants still remains unknown. The aim of our in vitro study was to assess the antioxidative action of phenolic extracts from aerial parts of Trifolium scabrum and Trifolium pallidum in human blood plasma, exposed to oxidative stress. In the present study we also demonstrate, for the first time the effects of the tested extracts on coagulative properties and fibrinolytic activity of blood plasma. The protective properties of the examined extracts (0.5-50 μg/ml) against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative stress were estimated by the measurements of 3-nitrotyrosine, thiol groups and the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels. The extracts considerably prevented the oxidative and nitrative damage to plasma proteins. Even the lowest doses of the Trifolium extracts (0.5 μg/ml) were able to markedly reduce 3-nitrotyrosine formation (by about 50%) and to increase the level of -SH groups (by about 30%), in comparison to the plasma exposed to ONOO(-) in the absence of the extracts. The protective action of all the used concentrations of the Trifolium extracts in the prevention of lipid peroxidation was also found. The tested extracts influenced neither the coagulative properties nor fibrinolytic activity of plasma. Moreover, the extracts were able to significantly reduce the inhibitory effect of ONOO(-) on fibrinolytic activity of plasma (assessed with the use of a chromogenic substrate for plasmin).

  5. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges by coal dust and tobacco snuff extracts in human peripheral lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, J.D.; Ong, T.

    1985-01-01

    The organic solvent extracts of sub-bituminous coal dust and tobacco snuff, both together and separately, were tested for the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results indicate that these extracts induced SCEs, and that when tested together synergistically induced SCEs in two of three donors. Studies with the organic solvent extracts of all five ranks of coal indicate that the extracts of bituminous, lignite, and peat, but not anthracite, induced SCEs. Similar experiments conducted with water extracts, induced SCEs, and that anthracite was equivocal. To determine whether individuals differed in their SCE responses to coal dust extracts, lymphocytes from five donors were tested with organic solvent extracts of bituminous and sub-bituminous coal. An analysis of variance indicates that the SCE response was significantly influenced by the donor and each of the two coal extracts. The findings presented here suggest that coal dust, with or without tobacco snuff, may play a role in the elevated incidence of gastric cancer in coal miners. Because water extracts of some ranks of coal induced SCEs, there exists the possibility of adverse environmental effects due to coal leachates.

  6. Multiphoton excitation characteristics of cellular fluorophores of human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Hans Georg; Studier, Hauke; König, Karsten

    2010-04-12

    In vivo multiphoton tomography with a wavelength-tunable femtosecond laser has been performed to investigate the autofluorescence intensity of major endogenous fluorophores of human skin in dependence on the excitation wavelength. In high-resolution multiphoton images of different skin layers, clear trends were found for fluorophores like keratin, NAD(P)H, melanin as well as for the elastin and collagen networks. The analysis of the measurements is supplemented by additional measurements of fluorescence lifetime imaging and signal-decay curves by time-correlated single-photon counting.

  7. Human mucosal in vivo transcriptome responses to three lactobacilli indicate how probiotics may modulate human cellular pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarlen, van P.; Troost, F.J.; Meer, van der C.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Brummer, R.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria, specific representatives of bacterial species that are a common part of the human microbiota, are proposed to deliver health benefits to the consumer by modulation of intestinal function through largely unknown molecular mechanisms. To explore in vivo mucosal responses of healthy

  8. Extracting Three Dimensional Surface Model of Human Kidney from the Visible Human Data Set using Free Software

    CERN Document Server

    P, Kirana Kumara

    2013-01-01

    Three dimensional digital model of a representative human kidney is needed for a surgical simulator that is capable of simulating a laparoscopic surgery involving kidney. Buying a three dimensional computer model of a representative human kidney, or reconstructing a human kidney from an image sequence using commercial software, both involve (sometimes significant amount of) money. In this paper, author has shown that one can obtain a three dimensional surface model of human kidney by making use of images from the Visible Human Data Set and a few free software packages (ImageJ, ITK-SNAP, and MeshLab in particular). Images from the Visible Human Data Set, and the software packages used here, both do not cost anything. Hence, the practice of extracting the geometry of a representative human kidney for free, as illustrated in the present work, could be a free alternative to the use of expensive commercial software or to the purchase of a digital model.

  9. The effect of Lamium album extract on cultivated human corneal epithelial cells (10.014 pRSV-T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Paduch

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Selected Lamium album extracts influence human corneal epithelial cells. Generally, while not toxic, they modulate pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines levels, and decrease NO release by cells; moreover, ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts reduce ROS levels.

  10. Blood or spores? A cautionary note on interpreting cellular debris on human skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, A; Stefanelli, S; Caccianiga, M; Rizzi, A; Bertoglio, B; Sforza, C; Cattaneo, C

    2015-07-01

    The identification of red blood cells on both skeletal human remains and decomposed corpses is of remarkable importance in forensic sciences, irrespective of its diagnostic value; their presence is often perplexing and difficult to interpret especially when in the context of decomposition and taphonomical variables. Some clinical research has focused on the morphological changes of red blood cells over time by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but no research has investigated whether botanical structures can be confused for red blood cells. Since some literature has recently presumed the detection of erythrocyte-like cells on skeletal remains (even ancient) as surely erythrocytes, and most have never taken into consideration the chance of an origin different from blood, such as botanical, the present study aims at verifying the possibility of confusion between erythrocytes and botanical cells by applying SEM analysis and at highlighting the pitfalls in this particular issue through a test submitted to pathologists and natural scientists asked to discriminate between red blood cells and different vegetal structures (60 images obtained by SEM analysis). The results showed that although there are diagnostic features useful in identifying red blood cells from botanical structures, some spores resulted very similar to decaying red blood cells, which calls for attention and great caution when studying decomposed human remains.

  11. Hemin activation of innate cellular response blocks human immunodeficiency virus type-1-induced osteoclastogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kazuyo [Microscopy and Imaging Core Facility, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Adhikari, Rewati [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-08-14

    The normal skeletal developmental and homeostatic process termed osteoclastogenesis is exacerbated in numerous pathological conditions and causes excess bone loss. In cancer and HIV-1-infected patients, this disruption of homeostasis results in osteopenia and eventual osteoporesis. Counteracting the factors responsible for these metabolic disorders remains a challenge for preventing or minimizing this co-morbidity associated with these diseases. In this report, we demonstrate that a hemin-induced host protection mechanism not only suppresses HIV-1 associated osteoclastogenesis, but it also exhibits anti-osteoclastogenic activity for non-infected cells. Since the mode of action of hemin is both physiological and pharmacological through induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an endogenous host protective response to an FDA-licensed therapeutic used to treat another disease, our study suggests an approach to developing novel, safe and effective therapeutic strategies for treating bone disorders, because hemin administration in humans has previously met required FDA safety standards. - Highlights: • HIV-1 infection induced osteoclastogenesis in primary human macrophages. • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited HIV-1-induced osteoclastogenesis in macrophages. • HO-1 induction suppressed RANKL-enhanced osteoclastogenesis in HIV-1-infected macrophages. • This inverse relationship between HO-1 and HIV-1 pathogenesis may define a novel host defense response against HIV-1 infection.

  12. Redefining strategies to introduce tolerance inducing cellular therapy in humans to combat autoimmunity and transplantation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eTen Brinke

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Clinical translation of tolerance-inducing cell therapies requires a novel approach focused on innovative networks, patient involvement and, foremost, a fundamental paradigm shift in thinking from both Academia, Industry and Regulatory Agencies. Tolerance-inducing cell products differ essentially from conventional drugs. They are personalized and target interactive immunological networks to shift the balance towards tolerance. The human cell products are often absent or fundamentally different in animals. This creates important limitations of pre-clinical animal testing for safety and efficacy of these products and calls for novel translational approaches, which require the combined efforts of the different parties involved. Dedicated international and multidisciplinary consortia that focus on clinical translation are of utmost importance. They can help inform and educate regulatory policy makers on the unique requirements for these cell products, ranging from preclinical studies in animals to in vitro human studies. In addition, they can promote reliable immunomonitoring tools. The development of tolerance-inducing cell products requires not only bench-to-bedside but also reverse translation, from bedside back to the bench.

  13. Retrotransposon-Encoded Reverse Transcriptase in the Genesis, Progression and Cellular Plasticity of Human Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinibaldi-Vallebona, Paola; Matteucci, Claudia [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University ‘Tor Vergata’, Rome (Italy); Spadafora, Corrado, E-mail: cspadaf@tin.it [Italian National Institute of Health (ISS), Rome (Italy)

    2011-03-07

    LINE-1 (Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements) and HERVs (Human Endogenous Retroviruses) are two families of autonomously replicating retrotransposons that together account for about 28% of the human genome. Genes harbored within LINE-1 and HERV retrotransposons, particularly those encoding the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme, are generally expressed at low levels in differentiated cells, but their expression is upregulated in transformed cells and embryonic tissues. Here we discuss a recently discovered RT-dependent mechanism that operates in tumorigenesis and reversibly modulates phenotypic and functional variations associated with tumor progression. Downregulation of active LINE-1 elements drastically reduces the tumorigenic potential of cancer cells, paralleled by reduced proliferation and increased differentiation. Pharmacological RT inhibitors (e.g., nevirapine and efavirenz) exert similar effects on tumorigenic cell lines, both in culture and in animal models. The HERV-K family play a distinct complementary role in stress-dependent transition of melanoma cells from an adherent, non-aggressive, to a non-adherent, highly malignant, growth phenotype. In synthesis, the retrotransposon-encoded RT is increasingly emerging as a key regulator of tumor progression and a promising target in a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  14. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype. PMID:27229535

  15. (Some cellular mechanisms influencing the transcription of human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-Fc1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Janina Laska

    Full Text Available DNA methylation and histone acetylation are epigenetic modifications that act as regulators of gene expression. DNA methylation is considered an important mechanism for silencing of retroelements in the mammalian genome. However, the methylation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs is not well investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional potential of HERV-Fc1 proviral 5'LTR in more detail, and examined the specific influence of CpG methylation on this LTR in number of cell lines. Specifically, the role of demethylating chemicals e.g. 5-aza-2' deoxycytidine and Trichostatin-A, in inducing or reactivating expression of HERV-Fc1 specific sequences and the mechanisms were investigated. In our present study, 5-aza-dC is shown to be a powerful inducer of HERV-Fc1, and at the same time it strongly inhibits methylation of DNA. Treatment with this demethylating agent 5-aza-dC, results in significantly increased levels of HERV-Fc1 expression in cells previously not expressing HERV-Fc1, or with a very low expression level. The extent of expression of HERV-Fc1 RNAs precisely correlates with the apparent extent of demethylation of the related DNA sequences. In conclusion, the results suggest that inhibition of DNA methylation/histone deacetylase can interfere with gene silencing mechanisms affecting HERV-Fc1 expression in human cells.

  16. Effects of UMTS cellular phones on human hearing: results of the European project EMFnEAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzini, Marta; Sibella, Federica; Lutman, Mark E; Mishra, Srikanta; Moulin, Annie; Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola; Woznicka, Ewelina; Politanski, Piotr; Zmyslony, Marek; Thuroczy, Gyorgy; Molnár, Ferenc; Kubinyi, Györgyi; Tavartkiladze, George; Bronyakin, Stanislav; Uloziene, Ingrida; Uloza, Virgijlius; Gradauskiene, Egle; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    Abstract The European project EMFnEAR was undertaken to assess potential changes in human auditory function after a short-term exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation produced by UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunication System) mobile phones. Participants were healthy young adults with no hearing or ear disorders. Auditory function was assessed immediately before and after exposure to radiofrequency radiation, and only the exposed ear was tested. Tests for the assessment of auditory function were hearing threshold level (HTL), distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE), contralateral suppression of transiently evoked otoacoustic emission (CAS effect on TEOAE), and auditory evoked potentials (AEP). The exposure consisted of speech at a typical conversational level delivered via an earphone to one ear, plus genuine or sham RF-radiation exposure produced by a commercial phone controlled by a personal computer. Results from 134 participants did not show any consistent pattern of effects on the auditory system after a 20-min UMTS exposure at the maximum output of the phone with 69 mW/kg SAR in the cochlea region in a double blind comparison of genuine and sham exposure. An isolated effect on the hearing threshold at high frequencies was identified, but this was statistically nonsignificant after correction for multiple comparisons. It is concluded that UMTS short-term exposure at the maximum output of consumer mobile phones does not cause measurable immediate effects on the human auditory system.

  17. Cytotoxic effect of Argentine medicinal plant extracts on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffa, M J; Ferraro, G; Wagner, M L; Calcagno, M L; Campos, R H; Cavallaro, L

    2002-03-01

    Methanolic extracts from Achyrocline satureioides (Dc.) Lam, Aristolochia macroura Gomez, Lithraea molleoides (Vell.) Engl., Schinus molle L., unlike those from Celtis spinosa Spreng, Chenopodium ambrosioides L., Petiveria alliacea L., and Plantago major L. showed cytotoxic activity against a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, Hep G2. Schinus molle L. was the most active (IC50=50+/-7 microg/ml). These results call for further studies of these extracts.

  18. Oxygen-independent killing of Bacteroides fragilis by granule extracts from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Wetherall, B L; Pruul, H; McDonald, P J

    1984-01-01

    Granule proteins from human neutrophils were prepared by extraction with acetate, and their antibacterial activity against Bacteroides fragilis was determined. Activity was highly dependent on pH; greatest killing occurred at the most acid pH tested (pH 5.0). Optimum activity was observed at physiological ionic strength and low bacterial numbers. Killing was inhibited by incubation temperatures of less than 37 degrees C. Eight times more extract was required to kill 50% of stationary-phase ba...

  19. Vitis labrusca extract effects on cellular dynamics and redox modulations in a SH-SY5Y neuronal cell model: a similar role to lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, Gustavo; Laliberte, Victoria Louise Marina; Kim, Helena Kyunghee; Pinguelo, Arsene; Salvador, Mirian; Young, L Trevor; Andreazza, Ana Cristina

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress and calcium imbalance are consistently reported in bipolar disorder (BD). Polymorphism of voltage-dependent calcium channel, L type, alpha 1C subunit (CACNA1c), which is responsible for the regulation of calcium influx, was also shown to have a strong association with BD. These alterations can lead to a number of different consequences in the cell including production of reactive species causing oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA. Lithium is the most frequent medication used for the treatment of BD. Despite lithium's effects, long-term use can result in many negative side effects. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of drugs that may have similar biological effects as lithium without the negative consequences. Moreover, polyphenols are secondary metabolites of plants that present multi-faceted molecular abilities, such as regulation of cellular responses. Vitis labrusca extract (VLE), a complex mixture of polyphenols obtained from seeds of winery wastes of V. labrusca, was previously characterized by our group. This extract presented powerful antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. Therefore, the ability of VLE to ameliorate the consequences of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced redox alterations to cell viability, intracellular calcium levels and the relative levels of the calcium channel CACNA1c in comparison to lithium's effects were evaluated using a neuroblastoma cell model. H2O2 treatment increased cell mortality through apoptotic and necrotic pathways leading to an increase in intracellular calcium levels and alterations to relative CACNA1c levels. VLE and lithium were found to similarly ameliorate cell mortality through regulation of the apoptotic/necrotic pathways, decreasing intracellular calcium levels and preventing alterations to the relative levels of CACNA1c. The findings of this study suggest that VLE exhibits protective properties against oxidative stress-induced alterations similar to that of lithium

  20. Extraction of DNA from human embryos after long-term preservation in formalin and Bouin's solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Momoko; Minegishi, Katsura; Komada, Munekazu; Tsuchiya, Maiko; Kameda, Tomomi; Yamada, Shigehito

    2016-05-01

    The "Kyoto Collection of Human Embryos" at Kyoto University was begun in 1961. Although morphological analyses of samples in the Kyoto Collection have been performed, these embryos have been considered difficult to genetically analyze because they have been preserved in formalin or Bouin's solution for 20-50 years. Owing to the recent advances in molecular biology, it has become possible to extract DNA from long-term fixed tissues. The purpose of this study was to extract DNA from wet preparations of human embryo samples after long-term preservation in fixing solution. We optimized the DNA extraction protocol to be suitable for tissues that have been damaged by long-term fixation, including DNA-protein crosslinking damage. Diluting Li2 CO3 with 70% ethanol effectively removed picric acid from samples fixed in Bouin's solution. Additionally, 20.0 mg/mL proteinase was valuable to lyse the long-term fixed samples. The extracted DNA was checked with PCR amplification using several sets of primers and sequence analysis. The PCR products included at least 295- and 838-bp amplicons. These results show that the extracted DNA is applicable for genetic analyses, and indicate that old embryos in the Kyoto Collection should be made available for future studies. The protocol described in this study can successfully extract DNA from old specimens and, with improvements, should be applicable in research aiming to understand the molecular mechanisms of human congenital anomalies. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  1. Neuroprotective Effect of Human Adipose Stem Cell-Derived Extract in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Gye Sun; Im, Wooseok; Shim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Mijung; Kim, Myung-Jin; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Seong, Seung-Yong; Kim, Manho; Sung, Jung-Joon

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating human neurodegenerative disease. The precise pathogenic mechanisms of the disease remain uncertain, and as of yet, there is no effective cure. Human adipose stem cells (hASC) can be easily obtained during operative procedures. hASC have a clinically feasible potential to treat neurodegenerative disorders, since cytosolic extract of hASC contain a number of essential neurotrophic factors. In this study, we investigated effects of hASC extract on the SOD1 G93A mouse model of ALS and in vitro test. Administration of hASC extract improved motor function and prolonged the time until symptom onset, rotarod failure, and death in ALS mice. In the hASC extracts group, choline acetyltransferase immunostaining in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord showed a large number of motor neurons, suggesting normal morphology. The neuroprotective effect of hASC extract in ALS mice was also suggested by western blot analysis of spinal cord extract from ALS mice and in vitro test. hASC extract treatment significantly increased expression of p-Akt, p-CREB, and PGC-1α in SOD1 G93A mouse model and in vitro test. Our results indicated that hASC extract reduced apoptotic cell death and recovered mutant SOD1-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, hASC extract reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, we have demonstrated, for the first time, that hASC extract exert a potential therapeutic action in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of ALS and in vitro test. These findings suggest that hASC hold promise as a novel therapeutic strategy for treating ALS.

  2. Cytotoxicity screening of Melastoma malabathricum extracts on human breast cancer cell lines in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nurfariza; Ahmad; Roslen; Nur; Aizura; Mat; Alewi; Hadji; Ahamada; Mohammad; Syaiful; Bahari; Abdull; Rasad

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To screen the cytotoxic activity of Melasloma malabathricum(M,malubathricum)against human breast carreer cell line(MCF-7)in vitro.Methods:A three steps extraction protocol using n-hexane,chloroform and methanol as the solvents systems was carried out on leaves,stems and flowers of M.nalabathricum.Dimethyl sulfoxide was used in extracts dilution and serial dilutions were conducted to obtain five different extract concentrations(100μg/mL,50μg/mL,25μg/mL,123μg/rnL and 6.25μg/mL).The evaluation of cell growth was determined using methylene blue assay.Results:Methanol extract from the leaves showed significant anticancer activity against MCF-7cell lines with the TC50value of 7.14μg/ml while methanol and chloroform extract from the flowers exhibited a moderate activity towards MCF-7 cell line,with the IC50value of 33.63μg/mL and 45.76μg/mL respectively after 72 h of treatment.Conclusions:The extracts from leaves and flowers of M.nulabatkricum showed promising anticancer activity toward human breast cancer cell lines with the lowest IC50at 7.14μg/mL while the extracts from stems showed less growth inhibition activity.

  3. Effects of Two Different Rhodiola rosea Extracts on Primary Human Visceral Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pomari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhodiola rosea (Rro has been reported to have various pharmacological properties, including anti-fatigue, anti-stress and anti-inflammatory activity. It is also known to improve glucose and lipid metabolism, but the effects of Rhodiola rosea on adipocyte differentiation and metabolism are not still elucidated. In this study the anti-adipogenic and lipolytic activity of two extracts of Rhodiola rosea, containing 3% salidroside (RS or 1% salidroside and 3% rosavines (RR on primary human visceral adipocytes was investigated. Pre-adipocytes were analyzed after 10 and 20 days of treatment during differentiation and after 7 days of treatment when they reached mature shape. The RS extract significantly induced higher apoptosis and lipolysis in comparison to control cells and to RR extract. In contrast, RR extract significantly reduced triglyceride incorporation during maturation. Differentiation of pre-adipocytes in the presence of RS and RR extracts showed a significant decrease in expression of genes involved in adipocyte function such as SLC2A4 and the adipogenic factor FGF2 and significant increase in expression of genes involved in inhibition of adipogenesis, such as GATA3, WNT3A, WNT10B. Furthermore RR extract, in contrast to RS, significantly down-regulates PPARG, the master regulator of adipogenesis and FABP4. These data support the lipolytic and anti-adipogenetic activity of two different commercial extracts of Rhodiola rosea in primary human visceral pre-adipocytes during differentiation.

  4. Cytotoxicity screening of Melastoma malabathricum extracts on human breast cancer cell lines in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nurfariza Ahmad Roslen; Nur Aizura Mat Alewi; Hadji Ahamada

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To screen the cytotoxic activity of Melastoma malabathricum (M. malabathricum) against human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) in vitro. Methods: A three steps extraction protocol using n-hexane, chloroform and methanol as the solvents systems was carried out on leaves, stems and flowers of M. malabathricum. Dimethyl sulfoxide was used in extracts dilution and serial dilutions were conducted to obtain five different extract concentrations (100 µg/mL, 50 µg/mL, 25 µg/mL, 12.5 µg/mL and 6.25 µg/mL). The evaluation of cell growth was determined using methylene blue assay.Results:Methanol extract from the leaves showed significant anticancer activity against MCF-7 cell lines with the IC50 value of 7.14 µg/ml while methanol and chloroform extract from the flowers exhibited a moderate activity towards MCF-7 cell line with the IC50 value of 33.63 µg/mL and 45.76 µg/mL respectively after 72 h of treatment.Conclusions:The extracts from leaves and flowers of M. malabathricum showed promising anticancer activity toward human breast cancer cell lines with the lowest IC50 at 7.14 µg/mL while the extracts from stems showed less growth inhibition activity.

  5. Study of the betulin enriched birch bark extracts effects on human carcinoma cells and ear inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehelean Cristina A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pentacyclic triterpenes, mainly betulin and betulinic acid, are valuable anticancer agents found in the bark of birch tree. This study evaluates birch bark extracts for the active principles composition. Results New improved extraction methods were applied on the bark of Betula pendula in order to reach the maximum content in active principles. Extracts were analyzed by HPLC-MS, Raman, SERS and 13C NMR spectroscopy which revealed a very high yield of betulin (over 90%. Growth inhibiting effects were measured in vitro on four malignant human cell lines: A431 (skin epidermoid carcinoma, A2780 (ovarian carcinoma, HeLa (cervix adenocarcinoma and MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma, by means of MTT assay. All of the prepared bark extracts exerted a pronounced antiproliferative effect against human cancer cell lines. In vivo studies involved the anti-inflammatory effect of birch extracts on TPA-induced model of inflammation in mice. Conclusions The research revealed the efficacy of the extraction procedures as well as the antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects of birch extracts.

  6. Engineering Human Microbiota: Influencing Cellular and Community Dynamics for Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloszynek, S; Pastor, S; Mell, J C; Nandi, N; Sokhansanj, B; Rosen, G L

    2016-01-01

    The complex relationship between microbiota, human physiology, and environmental perturbations has become a major research focus, particularly with the arrival of culture-free and high-throughput approaches for studying the microbiome. Early enthusiasm has come from results that are largely correlative, but the correlative phase of microbiome research has assisted in defining the key questions of how these microbiota interact with their host. An emerging repertoire for engineering the microbiome places current research on a more experimentally grounded footing. We present a detailed look at the interplay between microbiota and host and how these interactions can be exploited. A particular emphasis is placed on unstable microbial communities, or dysbiosis, and strategies to reestablish stability in these microbial ecosystems. These include manipulation of intermicrobial communication, development of designer probiotics, fecal microbiota transplantation, and synthetic biology.

  7. (Some) cellular mechanisms influencing the transcription of human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-Fc1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laska, Magdalena Janina; Nissen, Kari Konstantin; Nexø, Bjørn Andersen

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation are epigenetic modifications that act as regulators of gene expression. DNA methylation is considered an important mechanism for silencing of retroelements in the mammalian genome. However, the methylation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) is not well...... investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional potential of HERV-Fc1 proviral 5'LTR in more detail, and examined the specific influence of CpG methylation on this LTR in number of cell lines. Specifically, the role of demethylating chemicals e.g. 5-aza-2' deoxycytidine...... and Trichostatin-A, in inducing or reactivating expression of HERV-Fc1 specific sequences and the mechanisms were investigated. In our present study, 5-aza-dC is shown to be a powerful inducer of HERV-Fc1, and at the same time it strongly inhibits methylation of DNA. Treatment with this demethylating agent 5-aza...

  8. Coffee and cardiovascular disease: in vitro, cellular, animal, and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonita, Jennifer Stella; Mandarano, Michael; Shuta, Donna; Vinson, Joe

    2007-03-01

    Coffee is a commonly consumed beverage with potential health benefits. This review will focus on cardiovascular disease. There are three preparations of coffee that are commonly consumed and thus worthy of examination; boiled unfiltered coffee, filtered coffee, and decaffeinated coffee. Coffee has over a thousand chemicals, many formed during the roasting process. From a physiological point of view, the potential bioactives are caffeine, the diterpenes cafestol and kahweol found in the oil, and the polyphenols, most notably chlorogenic acid. We will examine coffee and its bioactives and their connection with and effect on the risk factors which are associated with heart disease such as lipids, blood pressure, inflammation, endothelial function, metabolic syndrome and potentially protective in vivo antioxidant activity. These will be critically examined by means of in vitro studies, cell experiments, animal supplementation, epidemiology, and the most definitive evidence, human trials.

  9. Structure, antihyperglycemic activity and cellular actions of a novel diglycated human insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Harte, F P; Boyd, A C; McKillop, A M;

    2000-01-01

    Human insulin was glycated under hyperglycemic reducing conditions and a novel diglycated form (M(r) 6135.1 Da) was purified by RP-HPLC. Endoproteinase Glu-C digestion combined with mass spectrometry and automated Edman degradation localized glycation to Gly(1) and Phe(1) of the insulin A- and B......-chains, respectively. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of diglycated insulin to mice alone or in combination with glucose (7 nmol/kg) resulted in a 43-61% and 11-34% reduction in glucose lowering activity, respectively, compared with native insulin. Consistent with these findings, diglycated insulin (10(-9) to 10......(-7) mol/liter) was 22-38% less effective (P insulin in stimulating glucose uptake, glucose oxidation and glycogen production in isolated mouse abdominal muscle....

  10. Midazolam Induces Cellular Apoptosis in Human Cancer Cells and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Xenograft Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Kang, Ju-Hee; Lee, Chang Woo; Oh, Seung Hyun; Ryu, Jun Sun; Bae, Yun Soo; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2013-01-01

    Midazolam is a widely used anesthetic of the benzodiazepine class that has shown cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity in neuronal cells and lymphocytes. This study aims to evaluate the effect of midazolam on growth of K562 human leukemia cells and HT29 colon cancer cells. The in vivo effect of midazolam was investigated in BALB/c-nu mice bearing K562 and HT29 cells human tumor xenografts. The results show that midazolam decreased the viability of K562 and HT29 cells by inducing apoptosis and S phase cell-cycle arrest in a concentration-dependent manner. Midazolam activated caspase-9, capspase-3 and PARP indicating induction of the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Midazolam lowered mitochondrial membrane potential and increased apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Midazolam showed reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity through inhibition of NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) enzyme activity in K562 cells. Midazolam caused inhibition of pERK1/2 signaling which led to inhibition of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-XL and XIAP and phosphorylation activation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bid. Midazolam inhibited growth of HT29 tumors in xenograft mice. Collectively our results demonstrate that midazolam caused growth inhibition of cancer cells via activation of the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway of apoptosis and inhibited HT29 tumor growth in xenograft mice. The mechanism underlying these effects of midazolam might be suppression of ROS production leading to modulation of apoptosis and growth regulatory proteins. These findings present possible clinical implications of midazolam as an anesthetic to relieve pain during in vivo anticancer drug delivery and to enhance anticancer efficacy through its ROS-scavenging and pro-apoptotic properties. PMID:24008365

  11. An EMT–Driven Alternative Splicing Program Occurs in Human Breast Cancer and Modulates Cellular Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Balsamo, Michele; Condeelis, John S.; Oktay, Maja H.; Burge, Christopher B.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA–Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT–dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell–cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT–associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT–associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT–associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT–associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT–dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT–associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT–associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression. PMID:21876675

  12. Curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract synergically inhibit inflammatory and catabolic mediator's synthesis by normal bovine and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes in monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comblain, Fanny; Sanchez, Christelle; Lesponne, Isabelle; Balligand, Marc; Serisier, Samuel; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract in normal bovine chondrocytes and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes cultured in monolayer. This study also investigated the synergic or additive effects of these compounds. Enzymatically isolated primary bovine or human chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer until confluence and then incubated for 24 hours or 48 hours in the absence or in the presence of interleukin-1β and with or without curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen or green tea extract, added alone or in combination, at different concentrations. Cell viability was neither affected by these compounds, nor by interleukin 1β. In the absence of interleukin-1β, compounds did not significantly affect bovine chondrocytes metabolism. In human chondrocytes and in the absence of interleukin 1β, curcuminoids extract alone or in combination with hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract significantly inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-3 production. In interleukin-1β-stimulated bovine chondrocytes, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase2, matrix metalloproteinase 3, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motifs 4 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I motifs 5 expressions were decreased by curcuminoids extract alone or in combination with hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract. The combination of the three compounds was significantly more efficient to inhibit interleukin-1β stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression than curcuminoids extract alone. In interleukin-1β-stimulated human chondrocytes, nitric oxide, interleukin-6 and matrix metalloproteinase 3 productions were significantly reduced by curcuminoids extract alone or in combination with hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract. These findings indicate that a mixture of curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen and green tea

  13. Anticancer activity of chloroform extract and sub-fractions of nepeta deflersiana on human breast and lung cancer cells: an in vitro cytotoxicity assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai M Al-Oqail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer is one of the major causes of death worldwide. The plant-derived natural products have received considerable attention in recent years due to their diverse pharmacological properties including anticancer effects. Nepeta deflersiana (ND is used in the folk medicine as antiseptic, carminative, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and for treating rheumatic disorders. However, the anticancer activity of ND chloroform extract has not been explored so far. Objectives: The present study was aimed to investigate the anticancer activities of chloroform Nepeta deflersiana extract and various sub-fractions (ND-1-ND-15 of ND against human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and human lung cancer cells (A-549. Materials and Methods: The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and neutral red uptake assays, and cellular morphological alterations using phase contrast light microscope were studied. Cells were exposed with 10-1000 mg/ml of sub-fractions of ND for 24 h. Results: Results showed that selected sub-fractions of the chloroform extract significantly reduced the cell viability of MCF-7 and A-549 cells, and altered the cellular morphology in a concentration-dependent manner. Among the sub-fractions, ND-10 fraction showed relatively higher cytotoxicity compared to other fractions whereas, ND-1 did not cause any cytotoxicity even at higher concentrations. The A-549 cells were found to be more sensitive to growth inhibition by all the extracts as compared to the MCF-7 cells. Conclusion: The present study provides preliminary screening of anticancer activities of chloroform extract and sub-fractions of ND, which can be further used for the development of a potential therapeutic anticancer agent.

  14. Ethanol extracts of Cinnamomum kanehirai Hayata leaves induce apoptosis in human hepatoma cell through caspase-3 cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Kuo Liu,1 Kuan-Hsing Chen,2 Yann-Lii Leu,3,4 Tzong-Der Way,5 Ling-Wei Wang,6,7 Yu-Jen Chen,8,9,* Yu-Ming Liu6–8,* 1Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan; 2Kidney Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, School of Medicine, 3Graduate Institute of Natural Products, College of Medicine, 4Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 5Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 6Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 7National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 8School of Medicine, Institute of Traditional Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 9Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Inducing apoptosis to susceptible cells is the major mechanism of most cytotoxic anticancer drugs in current use. Cinnamomum kanehirai Hayata (Lauraceae, a unique and native tree of Taiwan, is the major host for the medicinal fungus Antrodia cinnamomea which exhibits anti-cancer activity. Because of the scarcity of A. cinnamomea, C. kanehirai Hayata instead, is used as fork medicine in liver cancer. Here we observed the C. kanehirai Hayata ethanol extract could inhibit the cellular viability of both HepG2 and HA22T/VGH human hepatoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We found the mode of cell death was apoptosis according to cell morphological changes by Liu's stain, oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation by gel electrophoresis, externalization of phosphotidyl serine by detecting Annexin V and hypoploid population by cell cycle analysis. Our results showed that the extracts caused cleavage of caspase-3 and increased enzyme activity of caspase-8 and caspase-9. Caspase 3 inhibitor partially reversed

  15. Assessment of Cellular Responses to Oxidative Stress using MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells, Black Seed (N. Sativa L. Extracts and H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim O. Farah

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Black seed (N. Sativa L is an oriental spice of the family Ranunculaceae that has long been rationally used as a natural medicine for treatment of many acute as well as chronic conditions including cardiovascular disease and immunological disorders. It has been used in the treatment of diabetes, hypertension, and dermatological conditions. There have been very few studies on the effects of N. Sativa as a chemoprevention of chronic diseases as well as in cancer prevention and/or therapy. Oxidative stress is a condition that underlies many acute as well as chronic conditions. The combination and role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in vivo is still a matter of conjecture. Our objective for the present study was to expose MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro (as a chronic disease example to aqueous and alcohol extracts and in combination with H2O2 as an oxidative stressor. Measurement of cell survival under various concentrations and mixtures was conducted using standard cell culture techniques, exposure protocols in 96 well plates and Fluorospectrosphotometry. Following cellular growth to 90% confluencey, exposure to water (WE and ethanol (AE extracts of N. sativa and H2O2 was performed. Cell survival indices were calculated from percent survival using regression analysis. Results showed that the alcohol extract and its mixtures were able to influence the survival of MCF-7 cells (indices ranged from 357.15- 809.50 Bg/ml in descending potency for H2O2+AE to the mix of 3. In contrast, H2O2 alone reduced effectively the survival of MCF-7 cells and the least effective combinations in descending potency were AE+H2O2, WE+H2O2, AE+WE, and WE+AE+H2O2. Mixtures other than AE+H2O2 showed possible interactions and loss of potency. In conclusion, N. Sativa alone or in combination with oxidative stress was found to be effective (in vitro in influencing the survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, unveiling promising opportunities in the field of cancer

  16. The synthesis and characterization of cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of human multidrug resistant proteins MRP1, MRP2 and human breast cancer resistant protein BCRP using membranes obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Prateek A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    CMAC (cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns) have been developed for the study of the human multidrug transporters MRP1, MRP2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The columns were constructed using the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) stationary phase and cellular membrane fragments obtained from Spodopetra frugiperda (Sf9) cells that had been stably transfected with human Mrp1, Mrp2 or Bcrp c-DNA, using a baculovirus expression system. The resulting CMAC(Sf9MRP1)...

  17. The Molecular and Cellular Effect of Homocysteine Metabolism Imbalance on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrieta Škovierová

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is a sulfur-containing non-proteinogenic amino acid derived in methionine metabolism. The increased level of Hcy in plasma, hyperhomocysteinemia, is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardio and cerebrovascular diseases. However, it is still not clear if Hcy is a marker or a causative agent of diseases. More and more research data suggest that Hcy is an important indicator for overall health status. This review represents the current understanding of molecular mechanism of Hcy metabolism and its link to hyperhomocysteinemia-related pathologies in humans. The aberrant Hcy metabolism could lead to the redox imbalance and oxidative stress resulting in elevated protein, nucleic acid and carbohydrate oxidation and lipoperoxidation, products known to be involved in cytotoxicity. Additionally, we examine the role of Hcy in thiolation of proteins, which results in their molecular and functional modifications. We also highlight the relationship between the imbalance in Hcy metabolism and pathogenesis of diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurological and psychiatric disorders, chronic kidney disease, bone tissue damages, gastrointestinal disorders, cancer, and congenital defects.

  18. Cellular Responses in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Treated with Three Endodontic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Victoria-Escandell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs are of special relevance in future regenerative dental therapies. Characterizing cytotoxicity and genotoxicity produced by endodontic materials is required to evaluate the potential for regeneration of injured tissues in future strategies combining regenerative and root canal therapies. This study explores the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity mediated by oxidative stress of three endodontic materials that are widely used on HDPSCs: a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA-Angelus white, an epoxy resin sealant (AH-Plus cement, and an MTA-based cement sealer (MTA-Fillapex. Cell viability and cell death rate were assessed by flow cytometry. Oxidative stress was measured by OxyBlot. Levels of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated by Western blot. Genotoxicity was studied by quantifying the expression levels of DNA damage sensors such as ATM and RAD53 genes and DNA damage repair sensors such as RAD51 and PARP-1. Results indicate that AH-Plus increased apoptosis, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity markers in HDPSCs. MTA-Fillapex was the most cytotoxic oxidative stress inductor and genotoxic material for HDPSCs at longer times in preincubated cell culture medium, and MTA-Angelus was less cytotoxic and genotoxic than AH-Plus and MTA-Fillapex at all times assayed.

  19. Efficiency of Human Epiphyseal Chondrocytes with Differential Replication Numbers for Cellular Therapy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiyo Nasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell-based therapy for cartilage or bone requires a large number of cells; serial passages of chondrocytes are, therefore, needed. However, fates of expanded chondrocytes from extra fingers remain unclarified. The chondrocytes from human epiphyses morphologically changed from small polygonal cells to bipolar elongated spindle cells and to large polygonal cells with degeneration at early passages. Gene of type II collagen was expressed in the cells only at a primary culture (Passage 0 and Passage 1 (P1 cells. The nodules by implantation of P0 to P8 cells were composed of cartilage and perichondrium. The cartilage consisted of chondrocytes with round nuclei and type II collagen-positive matrix, and the perichondrium consisted of spindle cells with type I collage-positive matrix. The cartilage and perichondrium developed to bone with marrow cavity through enchondral ossification. Chondrogenesis and osteogenesis by epiphyseal chondrocytes depended on replication number in culture. It is noteworthy to take population doubling level in correlation with pharmaceutical efficacy into consideration when we use chondrocytes for cell-based therapies.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor-23 induces cellular senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells from skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Chisato; Iso, Yoshitaka; Mizukami, Takuya; Otabe, Koji; Sasai, Masahiro; Kurata, Masaaki; Sanbe, Takeyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro; Miyazaki, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-02-12

    Although muscle wasting and/or degeneration are prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease, it remains unknown whether FGF-23 influences muscle homeostasis and regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in skeletal muscle are distinct from satellite cells and have a known association with muscle degeneration. In this study we sought to investigate the effects of FGF-23 on MSCs isolated from human skeletal muscle in vitro. The MSCs expressed FGF receptors (1 through 4) and angiotensin-II type 1 receptor, but no traces of the Klotho gene were detected. MSCs and satellite cells were treated with FGF-23 and angiotensin-II for 48 h. Treatment with FGF-23 significantly decreased the number of MSCs compared to controls, while treatment with angiotensin-II did not. FGF-23 and angiotensin-II both left the cell counts of the satellite cells unchanged. The FGF-23-treated MSCs exhibited the senescent phenotype, as judged by senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay, cell morphology, and increased expression of p53 and p21 in western blot analysis. FGF-23 also significantly altered the gene expression of oxidative stress regulators in the cells. In conclusion, FGF-23 induced premature senescence in MSCs from skeletal muscle via the p53/p21/oxidative-stress pathway. The interaction between the MSCs and FGF-23 may play a key role in the impaired muscle reparative mechanisms of chronic kidney disease.

  1. Cellular and molecular effects for mutation induction in normal human cells irradiated with accelerated neon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kato, Takeshi; Yatagai, Fumio; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-02-22

    We investigated the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of mutation induction on the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in normal human fibroblast-like cells irradiated with accelerated neon-ion beams. The cells were irradiated with neon-ion beams at various LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/microm. Neon-ion beams were accelerated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Mutation induction at the HPRT locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine-resistant clones. The mutation spectrum of the deletion pattern of exons of mutants was analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The dose-response curves increased steeply up to 0.5 Gy and leveled off or decreased between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, compared to the response to (137)Cs gamma-rays. The mutation frequency increased up to 105 keV/microm and then there was a downward trend with increasing LET values. The deletion pattern of exons was non-specific. About 75-100% of the mutants produced using LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/mum showed all or partial deletions of exons, while among gamma-ray-induced mutants 30% showed no deletions, 30% partial deletions and 40% complete deletions. These results suggested that the dose-response curves of neon-ion-induced mutations were dependent upon LET values, but the deletion pattern of DNA was not.

  2. AFM studies of cellular mechanics during osteogenic differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, Pan; Chen, Jia-Nan; Cai, Ji-Ye; Cai, Xiao-Fang; Ding, Hui; Pan, Yun-Long

    2010-01-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are becoming an important source of cells for regenerative medicine given with apparent advantages of accessibility, renewal capacity and multipotentiality. In this study, the mechanical properties of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs), such as the average Young's modulus, were determined by atomic force microscopy (3.97 ± 0.53 kPa for hAFSCs vs. 1.52 ± 0.63 kPa for fully differentiated osteoblasts). These differences in cell elasticity result primarily from differential actin cytoskeleton organization in these two cell types. Furthermore, ultrastructures, nanostructural details on the surface of cell, were visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was clearly shown that surface of osteoblasts were covered by mineralized particles, and the histogram of particles size showed that most of the particles on the surface of osteoblasts distributed from 200 to 400 nm in diameter, while the diameter of hAFSCs particles ranged from 100 to 200 nm. In contrast, there were some dips on the surface of hAFSCs, and particles were smaller than that of osteoblasts. Additionally, as osteogenic differentiation of hAFSCs progressed, more and more stress fibers were replaced by a thinner actin network which is characteristic of mature osteoblasts. These results can improve our understanding of the mechanical properties of hAFSCs during osteogenic differentiation. AFM can be used as a powerful tool for detecting ultrastructures and mechanical properties.

  3. Molecular and Cellular Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Human Lung Cancer Cells: Potential Therapeutic Implications

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    Gabriela Vilema-Enríquez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has a very high mortality-to-incidence ratio, representing one of the main causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Therefore, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Several diseases including lung cancer have been associated with the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS from which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is one of the most studied. Despite the fact that H2O2 may have opposite effects on cell proliferation depending on the concentration and cell type, it triggers several antiproliferative responses. H2O2 produces both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions, increases the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and increases p53 activity and other transcription factors orchestrating cancer cell death. In addition, H2O2 facilitates the endocytosis of oligonucleotides, affects membrane proteins, induces calcium release, and decreases cancer cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, the MAPK pathway and the expression of genes related to inflammation including interleukins, TNF-α, and NF-κB are also affected by H2O2. Herein, we will summarize the main effects of hydrogen peroxide on human lung cancer leading to suggesting it as a potential therapeutic tool to fight this disease. Because of the multimechanistic nature of this molecule, novel therapeutic approaches for lung cancer based on the use of H2O2 may help to decrease the mortality from this malignancy.

  4. [Determination of amphetamines in human urine using microwave extraction-gas chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jifen; Sun, Hongfeng; Ye, Nengsheng; Gu, Xuexin; Li, Wenjun; Li, Ying

    2008-03-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of methamphetamine (MA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in human urine using microwave extraction-gas chromatography(GC). To improve the extraction efficiency, experimental parameters of the extraction, including extraction solvent and its amount, pH value of the urine sample, extraction time and temperature were investigated. The optimal conditions were as follows: the pH value of urine sample at pH 12, cyclohexane as extraction solvent, extraction at 40 degrees C for 10 min. The average recoveries of MA, MDA and MDMA with this extraction method were 92.25%, 85.94% and 91.50%, the relative standard deviations were 5.5%, 5.5% and 6.1%(n = 5), and the limits of detection were 10, 20 and 20 ng/mL, respectively. Using this method, MA, MDA and MDMA need not be derivatized and can be separated from the matrix. The results indicate that the developed method is rapid, accurate and sensitive, and can be used for the simultaneous determination of MA, MDA and MDMA in urine samples.

  5. Evaluation of antimicrobial properties of four plant extracts against human pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anjali Rawani; Sudin Pal; GoutamChandra

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antibacterial activity of the extracts of Alternanthera philoxeroides (A. philoxeroides), Plumeria obtusa (P. obtusa), Polyalthia cerasoides (P. cerasoides) and Ixoraacuminate (I. acuminate) against human pathogens. Methods: Aqueous and chloroform: methanol (1:1) extracts of the dried leaf of A. philoxeroides, flowers of P. obtusa, fruits of P. cerasoides and flowers of I. acuminate were tested in vitro by the disk diffusion method against four bacterial strains, namely, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonasaeruginosa. Susceptibility of four reference bacterial strains to some antibiotics in nutrient agar was also tested. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined and qualitative phytochemical analysis of the crude extract of the tested plant parts was done. Results: Both the aqueous and the chloroform: methanol (1:1) extracts of P. cerasoides showed the strongest activity, followed by flowers of P. obtusa, leaves of A. philoxeroides and flowers of I. acuminate. Aqueous extracts of all the plant parts appeared to have less antibacterial activity than the chloroform:methanol (1:1) extracts. The result of phytochemical analysis of the crude extract of the tested plants showed that flavonoid was absent from all plant parts whereas steroid was present in all tested plant parts. Conclusions: The results support that these plant extracts can be used for the treatment of bacterial diseases.

  6. Wound healing potential of Spirulina platensis extracts on human dermal fibroblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarina, Pauzi Nur Aimi; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abas, Faridah; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis) is a well renowned nutri-supplement due to its high nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to examine the wound healing efficiency of Spirulina platensis at various solvent extracts using in vitro scratch assay on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). Various gradient solvent extracts (50 μg/ml of methanolic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts) from Spirulina platensis were treated on HDF cells to acquire its wound healing properties through scratch assay and in this investigation we have used allantoin, as a positive control to compare efficacy among the phytoextracts. Interestingly, aqueous extract were found to stimulate proliferation and migration of HDF cells at given concentrations and enhanced closure rate of wound area within 24 hours after treatment. Methanolic and ethanolic extracts have shown proliferative effect, however these extracts did not aid in the migration and closure of wound area when compared to aqueous extract. Based on phytochemical profile of the plant extracts analyzed by LC-MS/MS, it was shown that compounds supposedly involved in accelerating wound healing are cinnamic acid, narigenin, kaempferol, temsirolimus, phosphatidylserine isomeric derivatives and sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Our findings concluded that blue-green algae may pose potential biomedical application to treat various chronic wounds especially in diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27004048

  7. Interaction mechanism between green tea extract and human α-amylase for reducing starch digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo; Jiang, Huan; Zhang, Tao; Li, Xingfeng

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of the green tea extract on human pancreatic α-amylase activity and its molecular mechanism. The green tea extract was composed of epicatechin (59.2%), epigallocatechin gallate (14.6%) and epicatechin gallate (26.2%) as determined by HPLC analysis. Enzyme activity measurement showed that % inhibition and IC50 of the green tea extract (10%, based on starch) were 63.5% and 2.07 mg/ml, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant remained unchanged but the maximal velocity decreased from 0.43 (control) to 0.07 mg/(ml × min) (4 mg/ml of the green tea extract), indicating that the green tea extract was an effective inhibitor against α-amylase with a non-competitive mode. The fluorescence data revealed that the green tea extract bound with α-amylase to form a new complex with static quenching mechanism. Docking study showed the epicatechin gallate in the green tea extract presented stronger affinity than epigallocatechin gallate, with more number of amino acid residues involved in amylase binding with hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals forces. Thus, the green tea extract could be used to manipulate starch digestion for potential health benefits.

  8. Wound healing potential of Spirulina platensis extracts on human dermal fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarina, Pauzi Nur Aimi; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abas, Faridah; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis) is a well renowned nutri-supplement due to its high nutritional and medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to examine the wound healing efficiency of Spirulina platensis at various solvent extracts using in vitro scratch assay on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). Various gradient solvent extracts (50 μg/ml of methanolic, ethanolic and aqueous extracts) from Spirulina platensis were treated on HDF cells to acquire its wound healing properties through scratch assay and in this investigation we have used allantoin, as a positive control to compare efficacy among the phytoextracts. Interestingly, aqueous extract were found to stimulate proliferation and migration of HDF cells at given concentrations and enhanced closure rate of wound area within 24 hours after treatment. Methanolic and ethanolic extracts have shown proliferative effect, however these extracts did not aid in the migration and closure of wound area when compared to aqueous extract. Based on phytochemical profile of the plant extracts analyzed by LC-MS/MS, it was shown that compounds supposedly involved in accelerating wound healing are cinnamic acid, narigenin, kaempferol, temsirolimus, phosphatidylserine isomeric derivatives and sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Our findings concluded that blue-green algae may pose potential biomedical application to treat various chronic wounds especially in diabetes mellitus patients.

  9. Methanolic Extract of Plumbago Zeylanica - A Remarkable Antibacterial Agent Against Many Human and Agricultural Pathogens

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    Mukesh Kumar Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The current investigation was carried out to determine the cytotoxic and the antimicrobial activities of methanolic extracts of Plumbago zeylanica. Methods: The stems, leaves, and whole plants were air dried and extracted with methanol by using a Soxhlet extractor for 72 hours at 55 - 60°C. The antimicrobial activities were determined from the zones of inhibition, which were measured by using the agar well diffusion method, and the cytotoxicity assays were performed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay method. Results: The methanolic extracts of the stem and the leaves of Plumbago zeylanica were tested against six bacterial species and nine fungal species, and both extracts showed antimicrobial activity in a dose-dependent manner. The leaf extract of Plumbago zeylanica showed maximum antimicrobial activity against both Staphylococcus aureus sub sp aureus and Fusarium oxysporum. The stem extract was found to be more antimicrobial against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Penicillium expansum species. MTT assays were used to test the cytotoxicity of the whole plant extract in the HCT-116 and the K-562 cell lines, and that extract was shown to have weak cytotoxicity in both cell lines. Conclusion: In the present study, the methanolic stem extracts of Plumbago zeylanica were found to possess remarkable antibacterial activities against many human and agricultural pathogens. The extracts were also found to possess significant antifungal activities, but the antifungal activities were less than the antibacterial activities. Finally, the extracts were found to have weak cytotoxicities in the HCT-116 and the K-562 cell lines.

  10. Methanolic Extract of Plumbago Zeylanica - A Remarkable Antibacterial Agent Against Many Human and Agricultural Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ajit; Sawarkar, Hemant; Gupta, Anshita; Gidwani, Bina; Dhongade, Hemant; Tripathi, Dulal Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The current investigation was carried out to determine the cytotoxic and the antimicrobial activities of methanolic extracts of Plumbago zeylanica. Methods: The stems, leaves, and whole plants were air dried and extracted with methanol by using a Soxhlet extractor for 72 hours at 55 - 60°C. The antimicrobial activities were determined from the zones of inhibition, which were measured by using the agar well diffusion method, and the cytotoxicity assays were performed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay method. Results: The methanolic extracts of the stem and the leaves of Plumbago zeylanica were tested against six bacterial species and nine fungal species, and both extracts showed antimicrobial activity in a dose-dependent manner. The leaf extract of Plumbago zeylanica showed maximum antimicrobial activity against both Staphylococcus aureus sub sp aureus and Fusarium oxysporum. The stem extract was found to be more antimicrobial against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Penicillium expansum species. MTT assays were used to test the cytotoxicity of the whole plant extract in the HCT-116 and the K-562 cell lines, and that extract was shown to have weak cytotoxicity in both cell lines. Conclusion: In the present study, the methanolic stem extracts of Plumbago zeylanica were found to possess remarkable antibacterial activities against many human and agricultural pathogens. The extracts were also found to possess significant antifungal activities, but the antifungal activities were less than the antibacterial activities. Finally, the extracts were found to have weak cytotoxicities in the HCT-116 and the K-562 cell lines.

  11. In vitro anti-proliferative activity of clove extract on human gastric carcinoma

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    A. Karimi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Cancer cell resistance to common chemotherapy agents is on rise. Plants are considered valuable sources of herbal drugs for cancer therapy. The present study was conducted to investigate the in vitro antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and apoptosis-inducing properties of clove (Syzygium aromaticum L. extract in human gastric carcinoma (AGS. Methods: Crude ethanol extract of S. aromaticum dried buds was prepared and  in vitro anti-proliferative effects of the extract on AGS and normal Human dermal fibroblasts (HDF cell lines were studied by MTT assay. To examine apoptosis induction, AGS cells were incubated with IC50 concentrations of the extract, stained with propidium iodide (PI and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Antioxidant activity and total phenolics and flavonoids contents were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay, Folin-Ciocalteu method, and aluminum chloride colorimetric method, respectively. Results: The IC50 of DPPH and total phenolics and flavonoids contents of the extract were 10.05±1.93 μg/mL, 225.6±40 mg GAE/g, and 29.30±2.35 mgRUT/g, respectively. The IC50 of the extract against HDFs was 649 µg/mL, higher than AGS cells, which was 118.7 g/mL at 48 h after treatment. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the extract induced cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Crude ethanol S. aromaticum extract had high total phenolics content, and suppressed the proliferation of human gastric cancer cells, likely due to apoptosis induction. Further studies should be conducted to determine the mechanisms of its anticancer effects.

  12. Role of LIMP-2 in the intracellular trafficking of β-glucosidase in different human cellular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malini, Erika; Zampieri, Stefania; Deganuto, Marta; Romanello, Milena; Sechi, Annalisa; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Acid β-glucosidase (GCase), the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease (GD), is transported to lysosomes by the lysosomal integral membrane protein (LIMP)-2. In humans, LIMP-2 deficiency leads to action myoclonus-renal failure (AMRF) syndrome. GD and AMRF syndrome share some clinical features. However, they are different from clinical and biochemical points of view, suggesting that the role of LIMP-2 in the targeting of GCase would be different in different tissues. Besides, the role of LIMP-2 in the uptake and trafficking of the human recombinant (hr)GCase used in the treatment of GD is unknown. Thus, we compared GCase activity and intracellular localization in immortalized lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and a neuronal model derived from multipotent adult stem cells, from a patient with AMRF syndrome, patients with GD, and control subjects. In fibroblasts and neuronlike cells, GCase targeting to the lysosomes is completely dependent on LIMP-2, whereas in blood cells, GCase is partially targeted to lysosomes by a LIMP-2-independent mechanism. Although hrGCase cellular uptake is independent of LIMP-2, its trafficking to the lysosomes is mediated by this receptor. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the intracellular trafficking of GCase and in the pathogeneses of GD and AMRF syndrome.

  13. Cellular localization of Y-box binding protein 1 in brain tissue of rats, macaques, and humans

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    Horn Anja

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 is considered to be one of the key regulators of transcription and translation. However, so far only limited knowledge exists regarding its cellular distribution in the adult brain. Results Analysis of YB-1 immunolabelling as well as double-labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN in rat brain tissue revealed a predominant neuronal expression in the dentate gyrus, the cornu ammonis pyramidal cell layer, layer III of the piriform cortex as well as throughout all layers of the parahippocampal cortex. In the hilus of the hippocampus single neurons expressed YB-1. The neuronal expression pattern was comparable in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex of adult macaques and humans. Double-labelling of YB-1 with the endothelial cell marker Glut-1, the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein, and the astrocytic marker GFAP did not indicate a co-localization. Following status epilepticus in rats, no induction of YB-1 occurred in brain capillary endothelial cells and neurons. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrates that YB-1 is predominantly expressed in neurons in the adult brain of rats, macaques and humans. Lack of a co-localization with Glut-1 and P-glycoprotein argues against a direct role of YB-1 in the regulation of blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein.

  14. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  15. CD34(-) cells at the apex of the human hematopoietic stem cell hierarchy have distinctive cellular and molecular signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Currie, Erin; Palmer, Hector G; Foster, Katie E; Taussig, David C; Bonnet, Dominique

    2013-08-01

    In addition to well-characterized CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), the human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) hierarchy contains a rare CD34(-) population with severe combined immunodeficiency-repopulating capacity. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of these CD34(-) cells or their relationship to the CD34(+) populations. Here, we show that the self-renewing Lin(-)CD34(-)CD38(-)CD93(hi) population contains cells that not only function as HSCs, but can also be placed above the CD34(+) populations in the hematopoietic hierarchy. These cells have an active Notch pathway, in which signaling through Delta4 is crucial for maintenance of the primitive state, and combined signals from Jagged1 and TGF-β are important in controlling its quiescence. They are also refractory to proliferative signals and show a repressed canonical Wnt pathway, in part regulated by Notch. Overall, therefore, CD34(-) cells represent an immature and quiescent human HSC population maintained through a distinctive network of cellular signaling interactions.

  16. Cellular responses induced by Cu(II quinolinonato complexes in human tumor and hepatic cells

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    Trávníček Zdeněk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspired by the unprecedented historical success of cisplatin, one of the most important research directions in bioinorganic and medicinal chemistry is dedicated to the development of new anticancer compounds with the potential to surpass it in antitumor activity, while having lower unwanted side-effects. Therefore, a series of copper(II mixed-ligand complexes of the type [Cu(qui(L]Y · xH2O (1–6, where Hqui = 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H-quinolinone, Y = NO3 (1, 3, 5 or BF4 (2, 4, 6, and L = 1,10-phenanthroline (phen (1, 2, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen (3, 4 and bathophenanthroline (bphen (5, 6, was studied for their in vitro cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines (A549 lung carcinoma, HeLa cervix epitheloid carcinoma, G361 melanoma cells, A2780 ovarian carcinoma, A2780cis cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma, LNCaP androgen-sensitive prostate adenocarcinoma and THP-1 monocytic leukemia. Results The tested complexes displayed a stronger cytotoxic effect against all the cancer cells as compared to cisplatin. The highest cytotoxicity was found for the complexes 4 (IC50 = 0.36 ± 0.05 μM and 0.56 ± 0.15 μM, 5 (IC50 = 0.66 ± 0.07 μM and 0.73 ± 0.08 μM and 6 (IC50 = 0.57 ± 0.11 μM and 0.70 ± 0.20 μM against A2780, and A2780cis respectively, as compared with the values of 12.0 ± 0.8 μM and 27.0 ± 4.6 μM determined for cisplatin. Moreover, the tested complexes were much less cytotoxic to primary human hepatocytes than to the cancer cells. The complexes 5 and 6 exhibited significantly high ability to modulate secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α (2873 ± 238 pg/mL and 3284 ± 139 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively and IL-1β (1177 ± 128 pg/mL and 1087 ± 101 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively tested on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells as compared with the values of 1173

  17. Multiple, but Concerted Cellular Activities of the Human Protein Hap46/BAG-1M and Isoforms

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    Ulrich Gehring

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The closely related human and murine proteins Hap46/BAG-1M and BAG-1, respectively, were discovered more than a decade ago by molecular cloning techniques. These and the larger isoform Hap50/BAG-1L, as well as shorter isoforms, have the ability to interact with a seemingly unlimited array of proteins of completely unrelated structures. This problem was partially resolved when it was realized that molecular chaperones of the hsp70 heat shock protein family are major primary association partners, binding being mediated by the carboxy terminal BAG-domain and the ATP-binding domain of hsp70 chaperones. The latter, in turn, can associate with an almost unlimited variety of proteins through their substrate-binding domains, so that ternary complexes may result. The protein folding activity of hsp70 chaperones is affected by interactions with Hap46/BAG-1M or isoforms. However, there also exist several proteins which bind to Hap46/BAG-1M and isoforms independent of hsp70 mediation. Moreover, Hap46/BAG-1M and Hap50/BAG-1L, but not the shorter isoforms, can bind to DNA in a sequence-independent manner by making use of positively charged regions close to their amino terminal ends. This is the molecular basis for their effects on transcription which are of major physiological relevance, as discussed here in terms of a model. The related proteins Hap50/BAG-1L and Hap46/BAG-1M may thus serve as molecular links between such diverse bioactivities as regulation of gene expression and protein quality control. These activities are coordinated and synergize in helping cells to cope with conditions of external stress. Moreover, they recently became markers for the aggressiveness of several cancer types.

  18. Safrole-induced cellular Ca2+ increases and death in human osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsueh-Chi; Cheng, He-Hsiung; Huang, Chun-Jen; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Chen, I-Shu; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Chang, Hong-Tai; Huang, Jong-Khing; Chen, Jin-Shyr; Lu, Yih-Chau; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2006-08-01

    The effect of the carcinogen safrole on intracellular Ca2+ movement has not been explored in osteoblast-like cells. This study examined whether safrole could alter Ca2+ handling and viability in MG63 human osteosarcoma cells. Cytosolic free Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i) in populations of cells were measured using fura-2 as a fluorescent Ca2+ probe. Safrole at concentrations above 130 microM increased [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 450 microM. The Ca2+ signal was reduced by 30% by removing extracellular Ca2+. Addition of Ca2+ after safrole had depleted intracellular Ca2+ induced Ca2+ influx, suggesting that safrole caused Ca2+ entry. In Ca2+-free medium, after pretreatment with 650 microM safrole, 1 microM thapsigargin (an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump inhibitor) failed to release more Ca2+; and pretreatment with thapsigargin inhibited most of the safrole-induced [Ca2+]i increases. Inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 did not affect safrole-induced Ca2+ release; whereas activation of protein kinase C with phorbol ester enhanced safrole-induced [Ca2+]i increase. Trypan exclusion assays revealed that incubation with 65 microM safrole for 30 min did not kill cells, but incubation with 650 microM safrole for 10-30 min nearly killed all cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated that safrole evoked apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Safrole-induced cytotoxicity was not reversed by chelation of Ca2+ with BAPTA. Collectively, the data suggest that in MG63 cells, safrole induced a [Ca2+]i increase by causing Ca2+ release mainly from the endoplasmic reticulum in a phospholipase C-independent manner. The safrole response involved Ca2+ influx and is modulated by protein kinase C. Furthermore, safrole can cause apoptosis in a Ca2+-independent manner.

  19. IAPP modulates cellular autophagy, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix metabolism in human intervertebral disc cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinghuo; Song, Yu; Liu, Wei; Wang, Kun; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuai; Duan, Zhenfeng; Shao, Zengwu; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenic process of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is characterized by imbalance in the extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism. Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells have important roles in maintaining the proper structure and tissue homeostasis of disc ECM. These cells need adequate supply of glucose and oxygen. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) exerts its biological effects by regulating glucose metabolism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of IAPP in degenerated IVD tissue, and IAPP modulation of ECM metabolism in human NP cells, especially the crosstalk mechanism between apoptosis and autophagy in these cells. We found that the expression of IAPP and Calcr-RAMP decreased considerably during IDD progression, along with the decrease in the expression of AG, BG, and Col2A1. Induction of IAPP in NP cells by transfection with pLV-IAPP enhanced the synthesis of aggrecan and Col2A1 and attenuated the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1. Upregulation of IAPP also affected the expression of the catabolic markers—matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 3, 9 and 13 and ADAMTS 4 and 5. Downregulation of IAPP by siRNA inhibited the expression of anabolic genes but increased the expression of catabolic genes and inflammatory factors. The expressions of autophagic and apoptotic markers in NP cells transfected with pLV-IAPP were upregulated, including BECLIN1, ATG5, ATG7, LC3 II/I and Bcl-2, while significantly increase in the expression of Bax and Caspase-3 in NP cells transfected with pLV-siIAPP. Mechanistically, PI3K/AKT-mTOR and p38/JNK MAPK signal pathways were involved. We propose that IAPP might play a pivotal role in the development of IDD, by regulating ECM metabolism and controlling the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy in NP, thus potentially offering a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of IDD.

  20. Cellular distribution of Glut-1 and Glut-5 in benign and malignant human prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinicke, Karin; Sotomayor, Paula; Cisterna, Pedro; Delgado, Carolina; Nualart, Francisco; Godoy, Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Over-expression of hexose transporters (Gluts), specifically Glut-1, is a common event in human malignancies. In prostate cancer (CaP), however, expression of Gluts has been characterized poorly. In this study, expression and distribution of Glut-1 and Glut-5 proteins were characterized using immunohistochemistry in 76 specimens of benign prostate, 10 specimens of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), and 28 specimens of CaP. In addition, mRNA expression of Glut-2, Glut-7, Glut-9, and Glut-11 was analyzed in a set of five specimens of benign prostate and CaP. In benign prostate, Glut-1 localized to the basal cells and to the basolateral membrane of secretory/luminal epithelial cells. Glut-5, however, localized to the apical membrane of secretory/luminal epithelial cells. In HGPIN, Glut-1 was immunohistochemically undetectable. Glut-5, however, localized to the apical membrane of the neoplastic epithelial cells. In CaP, Glut-1 and Glut-5, were immunohistochemically undetectable. However, over-expression of GLUT1 was observed in some specimens of highly proliferative intraductal CaP. Glut-7, Glut-9, and Glut-11 mRNAs were detected in benign prostate and CaP, however, only Glut-11 mRNA was consistently up-regulated in CaP compared to benign prostate. Low levels of expression of Glut-1 protein in the majority of CaP could explain, at least in part, the limited clinical applicability of positron emission tomography using 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for imaging CaP. Moreover, expression of Glut-5 in HGPIN suggested that fructose could be utilized as potential metabolic substrate in HGPIN. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in regulation/dysregulation of Gluts in CaP could provide insight in the understanding of hexose metabolism in CaP.

  1. Effect of the Extract of Endophytic fungus, Nigrospora sphaerica CL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : The ... After 12 h treatment, interaction of extract with MRSA cells resulted in the formation of pit ... Keywords: Endophytic fungus, Nigrospora sphaerica, Antimicrobial activity, Cellular structure ... human population, veterinary and aquaculture.

  2. Assessing the impact of protein extraction methods for human gut metaproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Leyuan; Mayne, Janice; Ning, Zhibin; Stintzi, Alain; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-07-10

    Metaproteomics is a promising methodology for the functional characterizations of the gut microbiome. However, the performance of metaproteomic analysis is affected by protein extraction protocols in terms of the amount of protein recovered and the relative abundance of different bacteria observed in microbiome. Currently, there is a lack of consistency on protein extraction methods in published metaproteomics studies. Here we evaluated the effects of different protein extraction methods on human fecal metaproteome characterizations. We found that sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-based lysis buffer obtained higher protein yields and peptide/protein group identifications compared to urea and the non-ionic detergent-based B-Per buffer. The addition of bead beating to any of the extraction buffers increased both protein yields and protein identifications. As well, bead beating led to a significant increase of the relative abundances of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. We also demonstrated that ultrasonication, another commonly used mechanical disruption approach, performed even better than bead beating for gut microbial protein extractions. Importantly, proteins of the basic metabolic pathways showed significantly higher relative abundances when using ultrasonication. Overall, these results demonstrate that protein extraction protocols markedly impact the metaproteomic results and recommend a protein extraction protocol with both SDS and ultrasonication for metaproteomic studies. The gut microbiome is emerging as an important factor influencing human health. Metaproteomics is promising for advancing the understanding of the functional roles of the microbiome in disease. However, metaproteomics suffers from a lack of consistent sample preparation procedures. In the present study, protein extraction protocols for fecal microbiome samples were evaluated for their effects on protein yields, peptide identifications, protein group identifications, taxonomic compositions and

  3. EXTRACTING HUMAN BEHAVIORAL PATTERNS BY MINING GEO-SOCIAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Forghani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Accessibility of positioning technologies such as GPS offer the opportunity to store one’s travel experience and publish it on the web. Using this feature in web-based social networks and considering location information shared by users as a bridge connecting the users’ network to location information layer leads to the formation of Geo-Social Networks. The availability of large amounts of geographical and social data on these networks provides rich sources of information that can be utilized for studying human behavior through data analysis in a spatial-temporal-social context. This paper attempts to investigate the behavior of around 1150 users of Foursquare network by making use of their check-ins. The authors analyzed the metadata associated with the whereabouts of the users, with an emphasis on the type of places, to uncover patterns across different temporal and geographical scales for venue category usage. The authors found five groups of meaningful patterns that can explore region characteristics and recognize a number of major crowd behaviors that recur over time and space.

  4. Reducing the in-vitro electromagnetic field effect of cellular phones on human DNA and the intensity of their emitted radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syldona, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated detrimental effects of cellular phone radiation on in-vitro biological systems. This article introduces a novel in-vitro method for demonstrating conformational changes in human DNA induced by a 5 minute exposure to cellular phone radiation emitted by an actual contemporary cellular phone. Dynamic changes in DNA conformation was determined in real-time by measuring the rate of DNA rewinding (in a spectrophotometer) following exposure to heat which causes the unwinding of the two strands of the helix. Cellular phone radiation produced a 40% increase in the rate of DNA rewinding. This effect was 95% attenuated when the experiment was repeated with the same cellular phone to which was attached a commercially available shielding disk shaped sheet containing a paramagnetic mineral. In a separate series of experiments the intensity of the cellular phone radiation was measured using an electromagnetic frequency spectrum analyzer. The intensity was reduced by approximately 50% in the presence of the shielding disk. Taken together these studies indicate the efficacy of a shielding disk to protect the body from cellular phone radiation.

  5. In vitro antibacterial activity of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis flower extract against human pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruban P; Gajalakshmi K

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To access the in vitro antibacterial activity of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (H. rosa- sinensis) flower extract against human pathogens. Methods: Antibacterial activity was evaluated by using disc and agar diffusion methods. The protein was run through poly acrylmide gel electrophoresis to view their protein profile. Results: The results showed that the cold extraction illustrates a maximum zone of inhibition against Bacillus subtillis (B. subtillis), Escherichia coli (E. coli) viz., (17.00 ± 2.91), (14.50 ± 1.71) mm, followed by hot extraction against, E. coli, Salmonella sp. as (11.66 ± 3.14), (10.60 ± 3.09) mm. In methanol extraction showed a highest zone of inhibition recorded against B. subtillis, E. coli as (18.86 ± 0.18), (18.00 ± 1.63) mm pursued by ethanol extraction showed utmost zone of inhibition recorded against Salmonella sp. at (20.40 ± 1.54) mm. The crude protein from flower showed a maximum inhibitory zone observed against Salmonella sp., E. coliviz., (16.55 ± 1.16), (14.30 ± 2.86) mm. The flower material can be taken as an alternative source of antibacterial agent against the human pathogens. Conclusions: The extracts of the H. rosa-sinensis are proved to have potential antibacterial activity, further studies are highly need for the drug development.

  6. Withania somnifera Root Extract Has Potent Cytotoxic Effect against Human Malignant Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Babli; Singh, Shruti; Thakur, Suman S

    2015-01-01

    In Ayurveda, Withania somnifera is commonly known as Ashwagandha, its roots are specifically used in medicinal and clinical applications. It possesses numerous therapeutic actions which include anti-inflammatory, sedative, hypnotic and narcotic. Extracts from this plant have been reported for its anticancer properties. In this study we evaluated for the first time, the cytotoxic effect of Withania root extract on human malignant melanoma A375 cells. The crude extract of Withania was tested for cytotoxicity against A375 cells by MTT assay. Cell morphology of treated A375 cells was visualized through phase contrast as well as fluorescence microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to check DNA fragmentation of the crude extract treated cells. Crude extract of Withania root has the potency to reduce viable cell count in dose as well as time dependent manner. Morphological change of the A375 cells was also observed in treated groups in comparison to untreated or vehicle treated control. Apoptotic body and nuclear blebbing were observed in DAPI stained treated cells under fluorescence microscope. A ladder of fragmented DNA was noticed in treated cells. Thus it might be said that the crude water extract of Withania somnifera has potent cytotoxic effect on human malignant melanoma A375 cells.

  7. The role of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 on the cellular transport of the DNA methyltransferase inhibitors 5-azacytidine and CP-4200 in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel-Eisenbeiss, Johanna; Hascher, Antje; Hals, Petter-Arnt; Sandvold, Marit Liland; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Lyko, Frank; Rius, Maria

    2013-09-01

    The nucleoside analog 5-azacytidine is an archetypical drug for epigenetic cancer therapy, and its clinical effectiveness has been demonstrated in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). However, therapy resistance in patients with MDS/AML remains a challenging issue. Membrane proteins that are involved in drug uptake are potential mediators of drug resistance. The responsible proteins for the transport of 5-azacytidine into MDS/AML cells are unknown. We have now systematically analyzed the expression and activity of various nucleoside transporters. We identified the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) as the most abundant nucleoside transporter in leukemia cell lines and in AML patient samples. Transport assays using [¹⁴C]5-azacytidine demonstrated Na⁺-independent uptake of the drug into the cells, which was inhibited by S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), a hENT1 inhibitor. The cellular toxicity of 5-azacytidine and its DNA demethylating activity were strongly reduced after hENT1 inhibition. In contrast, the cellular activity of the 5-azacytidine derivative 5-azacytidine-5'-elaidate (CP-4200), a nucleoside transporter-independent drug, persisted after hENT1 inhibition. A strong dependence of 5-azacytidine-induced DNA demethylation on hENT1 activity was also confirmed by array-based DNA methylation profiling, which uncovered hundreds of loci that became demethylated only when hENT1-mediated transport was active. Our data establish hENT1 as a key transporter for the cellular uptake of 5-azacytidine in leukemia cells and raise the possibility that hENT1 expression might be a useful biomarker to predict the efficiency of 5-azacytidine treatments. Furthermore, our data suggest that CP-4200 may represent a valuable compound for the modulation of transporter-related 5-azacytidine resistances.

  8. Anti-Endometriotic Effects of Pueraria Flower Extract in Human Endometriotic Cells and Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ji‐Hyun Kim; Jeong‐Hwa Woo; Hye Mi Kim; Myung Sook Oh; Dae Sik Jang; Jung‐Hye Choi

    2017-01-01

    Pueraria flowers have been used as a vegetable and an ingredient for tea and jelly. In this study, we investigated the effects of Pueraria flower extract (PFE) on endometriosis, a common gynaecological disease characterised by local sterile inflammation of peritoneal cavity. PFE suppressed the adhesion of human endometriotic cells 11Z and 12Z to human mesothelial Met5A cells. In addition, PFE significantly inhibited the migration of 11Z and 12Z cells as shown by woundhealing and transwel...

  9. Topical nicotinamide modulates cellular energy metabolism and provides broad-spectrum protection against ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirabu, G; Yiasemides, E; Halliday, G M; Park, J; Damian, D L

    2009-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation can profoundly suppress the cutaneous immune system, thus enhancing carcinogenesis. Agents that prevent UV-induced immunosuppression may thus reduce skin cancer. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) prevents UV-induced immunosuppression and carcinogenesis in mice, and solar-simulated (ss) UV-induced immunosuppression in humans. Its effectiveness against different UV wavebands and mechanism of action is as yet unknown. To determine the effects and mechanisms of topical nicotinamide on UV-induced suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses in humans. Healthy Mantoux-positive volunteers in four randomised, double-blinded studies were irradiated with solar-simulated (ss)UV (UVB + UVA) or narrowband UVB (300 nm) or UVA (385 nm). Topical nicotinamide (0.2% or 5%) or its vehicle were applied immediately after each irradiation. Mantoux testing was performed at irradiated sites and adjacent unirradiated control sites 48 h after the first irradiation and measured 72 h later. Immunosuppression was calculated as the difference in Mantoux-induced erythema and induration at test sites compared to control sites. Human keratinocyte cell cultures, with and without ssUV and nicotinamide, were used for quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assessment of TP53 and enzymes that regulate oxidative phosphorylation. Nicotinamide cooperated with ssUV to increase enzymes involved in cellular energy metabolism and p53, and significantly protected against immunosuppression caused by UVB, longwave UVA and single and repeated ssUV exposures. Longwave UVA, which is poorly filtered by most sunscreens, was highly immune suppressive even at doses equivalent to 20 min of sun exposure. Nicotinamide, which protected against both UVB and UVA, is a promising agent for skin cancer prevention.

  10. Human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells as cellular delivery vehicles for treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Weijun; Wang, Lina; Zhou, Manqian; Liu, Ze; Hu, Shijun; Tong, Lingling; Liu, Yanhua; Fan, Yan; Kong, Deling; Zheng, Yizhou; Han, Zhongchao; Wu, Joseph C; Xiang, Rong; Li, Zongjin

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have shown tropism towards primary tumors or metastases and are thus potential vehicles for targeting tumor therapy. However, the source of adult EPCs is limited, which highlights the need for a consistent and renewable source of endothelial cells for clinical applications. Here, we investigated the potential of human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hESC-ECs) as cellular delivery vehicles for therapy of metastatic breast cancer. In order to provide an initial assessment of the therapeutic potency of hESC-ECs, we treated human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells with hESC-EC conditioned medium (EC-CM) in vitro. The results showed that hESC-ECs could suppress the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and thereby inhibit the proliferation and migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. To track and evaluate the possibility of hESC-EC-employed therapy, we employed the bioluminescence imaging (BLI) technology. To study the therapeutic potential of hESC-ECs, we established lung metastasis models by intravenous injection of MDA-MB-231 cells labeled with firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) to NOD/SCID mice. In mice with lung metastases, we injected hESC-ECs armed with herpes simplex virus truncated thymidine kinase (HSV-ttk) intravenously on days 11, 16, 21, and 26 after MDA-MB-231 cell injection. The NOD/SCID mice were subsequently treated with ganciclovir (GCV), and the growth status of tumor was monitored by Fluc imaging. We found that MDA-MB-231 tumors were significantly inhibited by intravenously injected hESC-ECs. The tumor-suppressive effects of the hESC-ECs, by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and inducing tumor cell death through bystander effect in human metastatic breast cancer model, provide previously unexplored therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment.

  11. In vitro anticancer activity of extracts of Mentha Spp. against human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Hussain, Shabir; Gupta, Moni; Saxena, Ajit Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In vitro anticancer potential of methanolic and aqueous extracts of whole plants of Mentha arvensis, M. longifolia, M. spicata and M. viridis at concentration of 100 μg/ml was evaluated against eight human cancer cell lines--A-549, COLO-205, HCT-116, MCF-7, NCI-H322, PC-3, THP-1 and U-87MG from six different origins (breast, colon, glioblastoma, lung, leukemia and prostate) using sulphorhodamine blue (SRB) assay. Methanolic extracts of above-mentioned Mentha Spp. displayed anti-proliferative effect in the range of 70-97% against four human cancer cell lines, namely COLO-205, MCF-7, NCI-H322 and THP-1; however, aqueous extracts were found to be active against HCT-116 and PC-3. The results indicate that Mentha Spp. contain certain constituents with cytotoxic properties which may find use in developing anticancer agents.

  12. Protective Effect of Strawberry Extract against Inflammatory Stress Induced in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Gasparrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A protracted pro-inflammatory state is a major contributing factor in the development, progression and complication of the most common chronic pathologies. Fruit and vegetables represent the main sources of dietary antioxidants and their consumption can be considered an efficient tool to counteract inflammatory states. In this context an evaluation of the protective effects of strawberry extracts on inflammatory stress induced by E. coli LPS on human dermal fibroblast cells was performed in terms of viability assays, ROS and nitrite production and biomarkers of oxidative damage of the main biological macromolecules. The results demonstrated that strawberry extracts exerted an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS-treated cells, through an increase in cell viability, and the reduction of ROS and nitrite levels, and lipid, protein and DNA damage. This work showed for the first time the potential health benefits of strawberry extract against inflammatory and oxidative stress in LPS-treated human dermal fibroblast cells.

  13. Antimutagenic effect of aqueous extract from Agaricus brasiliensis on culture of human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Paula H; Nascimento, José S; Rocha, Beatriz H G; Piana, Clause F B; Santos, Raquel A; Takahashi, Catarina S

    2013-02-01

    The mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis (sun mushroom), native from the southeast of Brazil, is well known by its medicinal properties that include effects on diabetes, cholesterol levels, and osteoporosis. The antimutagenic effects of A. brasiliensis has been investigated recently and revealed some controversial results depending on the temperature by which the A. brasiliensis tea is obtained. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the A. brasiliensis extract prepared in two different temperatures, 4°C and 25°C, on the doxorubicin-induced DNA strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in human lymphocytes. The results demonstrated that A. brasiliensis was able to reduce the DXR-induced DNA damage in both temperatures; however, the CA test was more sensitive to demonstrate a better reduction when the cells were treated with an extract obtained at 25°C. A. brasiliensis extract obtained in different temperatures exhibited antigenotoxic and anticlastogenic effects in human lymphocytes.

  14. Hypocholesterolemic property of Yucca schidigera and Quillaja saponaria extracts in human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Park, Sang-Kyu; Kang, Sung-Il; Kang, Han-Chul; Oh, Han-Jin; Bae, Chul-Young; Bae, Dong-Ho

    2003-12-01

    This study was undertaken to observe the effects of the blend of partially purified Yucca schidigera and Quillaja saponaria extracts on cholesterol levels in the human's blood and gastrointestinal functions, and to determine if a new cholesterol-lowering drug can be developed by the further purification of the extracts. Ultrafiltration and sequential diafiltration increased the amounts of steroidal saponin in aqueous yucca extract and terpenoid saponin in aqueous quillaja extract from 9.3% and 21.4% to 17.2% and 61.8%, respectively. Taking 0.9 mg of the blend (6:4, v:v) of the resulting filtrates a day for 4 weeks resulted in the decreases in total and LDL cholesterol levels in blood plasma of hyper-cholesterolemic patients with enhancement in gastrointestinal symptoms of patients.

  15. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 mg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by focus pattern and focus number counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (γg-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average focus counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profiles of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in γg-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not

  16. The extracts of bredigite bioceramics enhanced the pluripotency of human dental pulp cellss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Liu, Lu; Wu, Chengtie; Yang, Ruiqi; Chang, Jiang; Wei, Xi

    2017-09-02

    Biomaterials have a profound effect on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, but few studies have reported the role of extracts from bioceramics in the regulation of stem cell pluripotency. The present study investigated the effects of bioceramics extracts, including silicate bredigite (Ca7 MgSi4 O16 ) and conventional β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), on the pluripotency and the multilineage differentiation potential of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which is a known regulator of hDPCs pluripotency, was used as a reference. Bredigite extracts significantly promoted cell growth, proliferation, TERT expression and maintained hDPCs in a presenescent state. The extracts of bredigite significantly up-regulated the expression of pluripotency-related genes such as Stro1, Oct4 and Sox2, and further promoted the multilineage differentiation of hDPCs after odontogenic/adipogenic induction. The stimulation of bredigite extracts on hDPCs pluripotency was comparable to that of bFGF, whereas β-TCP extracts lacked these properties. Our results suggested for the first time that bredigite extracts enhance the pluripotency of dental-derived stem cells, paving the way for extended applications in regenerative medicine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Oxidative Stress Induced by Cigarette Smoke Extracts in Human Brain Cells (T98G) and Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HBMEC) in Mono- and Co-Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hyeong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Kwang-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine oxidative stress induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in human brain cells (T98G) and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) in mono- and co-culture systems. Cell viability of T98G cells exposed to CSC (0.05-4 mg/ml) was significantly decreased compared to CSE (0.025-20%). There were no marked differences between quantities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by either CSE (2, 4, and 10%) or CSC (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/ml) treatment compared to control. However, a significant effect was noted in ROS generation following CSC incubation at 4mg/ml. Cellular integrity of HBMEC decreased to 74 and 64% within 120 h of exposure at the IC50 value of CSE and CSC, respectively. This study suggests that chronic exposure to cigarette smoking might initiate damage to the blood-brain barrier.

  18. Vinegar as a disinfectant of extracted human teeth for dental educational use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Tijare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Extracted human teeth are routinely used in dentistry to learn technical and preclinical skills. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has adopted guidelines for infection control of extracted teeth used for research and teaching, requiring that teeth be sterilized before use. Many of the proposed disinfection methods starting from use of formalin, sodium hypochlorite and to autoclaving have their own drawbacks and may not be practical. Aim: To assess the effectiveness of vinegar for disinfection/sterilization of extracted human teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 extracted non-carious human teeth were kept in seven disinfectant media-10% formalin, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 70% alcohol, vinegar, neem extract and normal saline. Ten samples were placed in each disinfectant individually for a period of 7 days, at room temperature. In all, 10 teeth were treated with microwave irradiation at 650 W for 3 min. Later, teeth from each group were placed individually in separate test tubes containing 10 ml of tryptic soy broth at 37°C for 48 h to observe the evidence of growth of microorganisms. Semiquantitative analysis of all the samples was done in Clade agar at 37°C for 48 h. Statistical Analysis Used: The number of teeth disinfected in each group was compared using Chi square test. Results: 10% formalin, 3% hydrogen peroxide and vinegar were totally effective. The result was statistically significant with a Chi square value of 61.414 and P < 0.001. Conclusions: Vinegar can be used as an effective disinfectant medium for extracted human teeth.

  19. Selected Activities of Citrus Maxima Merr. Fruits on Human Endothelial Cells: Enhancing Cell Migration and Delaying Cellular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiwan Buachan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial injury and damage as well as accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS in aging play a significant role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Recent studies show an association of high citrus fruit intake with a lower risk of CVD and stroke but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects of pummelo (Citrus maxima Merr. var. Tubtim Siam, CM fruit extract on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs migration and aging. The freeze-dried powder of fruit extract was characterized for antioxidant capacity (FRAP assay and certain natural antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, gallic acid, hesperidin, and naringin (HPLC. Short-term (48 h co-cultivation of HUVECs with CM enhanced cell migration as evaluated by a scratch wound assay and Boyden chamber assay. A long-term treatment with CM for 35 days significantly increased HUVEC proliferation capability as indicated by population doubling level (PDL. CM also delayed the onset of aging phenotype shown by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal staining. Furthermore, CM was able to attenuate increased ROS levels in aged cells when determined by 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCDHF while eNOS mRNA expression was increased but the eNOS protein level was not changed. Thus, further in vivo and clinical studies are warranted to support the use of pummelo as a functional fruit for endothelial health and CVD risk reduction.

  20. Paramyxovirus Infection Mimics In Vivo Cellular Dynamics in Three-Demensional Human Bronchio-Epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatly, Anne M.; Lin, Yen-Huei; McCarthy, Maureen; Chen, Wei; Miller, Lynn Z.; Quiroz, Jorge; Nowak, Becky M.; Lerch, Robert A.; Udem, Stephen A.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    , cotton rat, guinea pig, ferret, and hamster) fail to accurately imitate viral replication and human disease states (8). Lacking an authentic model has impeded the development and evaluation of live, attenuated vaccine candidates. Development of a physiologically relevant in vitro tissue culture model that reproduces characteristics of the HRE, the primary target of RSV and PIV3, would aid in predicting clinical attenuation and safety of vaccine candidates. Successful tissue engineering of a 3D human intestinal model using novel NASA technology inspired the development of a tri-culture 3D model for the HRE. Sequential layering of primary mesenchymal cells (comprised of normal human fibroblasts and endothelial cells) followed by BEAS-2B epithelial cells derived from human bronchi and tracheae were recapitulated on Cultisphere and/or cytodex3 microcarriers in cylindrical vessels that rotate horizontally creating an organized epithelial structure. Horizontal rotation randomizes the gravity vector modeling aspects of microgravity. Mesenchymal and epithelial cells grown under these conditions reproduce the structural organization, multi-cellular complexity, and differentiation state of the HRE. The opportunity to study respiratory viruses in a nasal epithelium model is invaluable because the most promising respiratory virus vaccine candidates are live attenuated viruses for intranasal administration. Here we characterize the interactions of respiratory viruses and epithelial cells grown under modeled microgravity in comparison to gravity-ladened monolayers. 3D HBE TLAs and traditional monolayers (2D) are infected at 35 C, the upper temperature of the upper HRE, to simulate in vivo infection conditions. Growth kinetics of wild type (wt) RSV and PIV3 viruses were compared in 2D and 3D cells to that of strains attenuated in humans or rhesus macaques. This novel 3D HBE model also offers an opportunity to study whether the epithelial cell function, especially in host defenses

  1. The Cellular Toxicity of PM2.5 Emitted from Coal Combustion in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGFeiFei; GENGChunMei; HAO WeiDong; ZHAO YongDong; LIQin; WANG HongMei; QIAN Yan

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the relationship between different components offineparticulate matter (PM2.5) emitted from coal combustion and their cytotoxic effect in the vascular endothelial cells. MethodsCoal-fired PM2.5was sampled using a fixed-source dilution channel and flow sampler. The sample components were analyzed by ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy(ICP-AES). The PM2.5suspension was extracted using an ultrasonic water-bath method and thenhuman umbilical vein endothelial cells (EA.hy926) were treated withvarious concentrations of the PM2.5 suspension. Cell proliferation,oxidativeDNA damage, and global DNA methylation levelswere used to measurethe cellulartoxicity of PM2.5emitted fromcoalcombustion. ResultsComparedtoothertypesof coal-fired PM2.5preparations,thePM2.5 suspension from Yinchuan coal had the highest cytotoxicity.PM2.5 suspension from Datong coal hadthe highest toxic effectwhile that fromYinchuan coal had the lowest.Exposure to coal-fired PM2.5 from Jingxi coalresulted inlower 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels. At the same dose, PM2.5 emitted from coal combustion could produce more severeDNAimpairmentcompared to that produced by carbon black.Cell survival rate was negatively correlated with chloride and potassiumionscontent.The5-methylcytosine(5-mC) level waspositively correlated withMnandnegatively correlated withZn levels.The 8-OHdG% level was positively correlated withboth MnandFe. ConclusionPM2.5 emitted from coal combustion can decrease cell viability, increase global DNA methylation, and causeoxidativeDNA damage inEA.hy926 cells. Metalcomponentsmay be important factors that influence cellular toxicity.

  2. Morinda citrifolia L. fruit extracts modulates H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human liposarcoma SW872 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhomally, Z; Somanah, J; Bahorun, T; Neergheen-Bhujun, V S

    2016-07-01

    Morinda citrifolia L. commonly known as noni is used by the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries due to the plethora of pharmacological activities of its metabolites. In Mauritius, the fruits of M. citrifolia are used in folk medicine against a number of indications. The present study aimed at evaluating the antioxidant activity of ripe and unripe noni fruit at both biochemical and cellular levels. Using an array of established assay systems, the fruit antioxidant propensity was assessed in terms of its radical scavenging, iron reducing and metal chelating potentials. Ascorbic acid, total phenolic and total flavonoid contents of the fruits were also determined. The ascorbic acid content of ripe noni was 76.24 ± 1.13 mg/100 g while total phenolics of ripe and unripe fruit extracts were 748.40 ± 8.85 μg and 770.34 ± 2.27 μg GAE g(-1) FW respectively. Both the ripe and unripe extracts of M. citrifolia were potent scavengers of nitric oxide, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals. The ferric reducing capacity ranged from 11.26 ± 0.33 to 11.90 ± 0.20 mM Fe(2+) g(-1) FW while the IC50 values for the iron (II) chelating power were 0.50 ± 0.01 and 1.74 ± 0.01 g FW/mL for the ripe and unripe fruit extracts respectively. Cellular studies additionally demonstrated that noni were able to dose-dependently counteract accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress, a potential obesogenic factor within human liposarcoma SW872 cells as well as significantly restore cell death within the concentration range of 0.106-0.813 g/mL. Results reported herein suggest noni as an interesting source of prophylactic antioxidants modulated by its polyphenol composition.

  3. The molecular mechanisms of Curcuma Wenyujin extract-mediated inhibitory effects on human esophageal carcinoma cells in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    景钊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the molecular mechanisms of Curcuma Wenyujin extract-mediated inhibitory effects on human esophageal carcinoma cells. Methods The Curcuma Wenyujin extract was obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. TE-1 cells were divided into 4 groups after adherence.

  4. The Hydroalcoholic Extract of Matricaria chamomilla Suppresses Migration and Invasion of Human Breast Cancer MDA-MB-468 and MCF-7 Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikseresht, Mohsen; Kamali, Ali Mohammad; Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Delaviz, Hamdollah; Toori, Mehdi Akbartabar; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Mahmoudi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Matricaria chamomilla is an aromatic plant with antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the inhibitory role of M. chamomilla on migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells remains unclear. This study investigated the methods to evaluate these anticancer mechanisms of M. chamomilla on human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cell lines. The cells were treated with hydroalcoholic extract of M. chamomilla at different concentrations (50-1300 μg/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 h in a culture medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum. This study quantified the 50% growth inhibition concentrations (IC50) by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay; apoptosis and necrosis through Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide staining; cell proliferation and clone formation by clonogenic assay as well as cellular migration, invasion, and attachment. After 24, 48, and 72 h of treatment, the IC50levels were 992 ± 2.3 μg/mL, 893 ± 5.4 μg/mL, and 785 ± 4.8 μg/mL against MDA-MB-468, respectively, and 1288 ± 5.6 μg/mL, 926 ± 2.5 μg/mL, and 921 ± 3.5 μg/mL, against MCF-7, respectively. Furthermore, increasing the extract concentrations induced cellular apoptosis and necrosis and decreased cellular invasion or migration through 8 μm pores, colonization and attachment in a dose-dependent manner. It indicated time- and dose-dependent anti-invasive and antimigrative or proliferative and antitoxic effects of hydroalcoholic extract of aerial parts of chamomile on breast cancer cells. This study demonstrated an effective plant in preventing or treating breast cancer. Antioxidant compounds in Matricaria chamomilla have anticancer effects.Hydroalcoholic extract of M. chamomilla controls cellular proliferation and apoptosis induction.Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide staining suggested that the extract induces apoptosis more than necrosis.Hydroalcoholic extract of M. chamomilla prevents colonization and cellular migration of human breast

  5. Cytotoxicity of Marchantia convoluta leaf extracts to human liver and lung cancer cells

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    Xiao J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity of three extracts (petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol from a plant used in folk medicine, Marchantia convoluta, to human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H1299 and liver carcinoma (HepG2 cell lines was tested. After 72-h incubation of lung and liver cancer cell cultures with varying concentrations of extracts (15 to 200 µg/mL, cytotoxicity was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and reported in terms of cell viability. The extracts that showed a significant cytotoxicity were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to identify the components. The ethyl acetate, but not the petroleum ether or n-butanol extract, had a significant cytotoxicity against lung and liver carcinoma cells with IC50 values of 100 and 30 µg/mL, respectively. A high concentration of ethyl acetate extract (100 µg/mL rapidly reduced the number of H1299 cells. At lower concentrations of ethyl acetate extract (15, 30, and 40 µg/mL, the numbers of HepG2 cells started to decrease markedly. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the ethyl acetate extract revealed the presence of several compounds such as phytol (23.42%, 1,2,4-tripropylbenzene (13.09%, 9-cedranone (12.75%, ledene oxide (7.22%, caryophyllene (1.82%, and caryophyllene oxide (1.15%. HPLC analysis result showed that there were no flavonoids in ethyl acetate extract, but flavonoids are abundant in n-butanol extract. Further studies are needed regarding the identification, toxicity, and mechanism of action of active compounds.

  6. Cytotoxic activity of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed extract and oil against human cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Hua Wong; Wai Yan Tan; Chin Ping Tan; Kamariah Long; Kar Lin Nyam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the cytotoxic properties of both the kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed extract and kenaf seed oil on human cervical cancer, human breast cancer, human colon cancer and human lung cancer cell lines.Methods:kenaf seed oil on human cancer cell lines was evaluated by using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and sulforhodamine B assays. Cell morphological changes were observed by using an inverted light microscope.Results:The in vitro cytotoxic activity of the kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed extract and cancer cell lines. Morphological alterations in the cell lines after KSE and KSO treatment were observed. KSE and KSO possessed effective cytotoxic activities against all the cell lines been selected.Conclusions:KSE and KSO could be potential sources of natural anti-cancer agents. Further The kenaf seed extract (KSE) exhibited a lower IC50 than kenaf seed oil (KSO) in all of the investigations on using kenaf seeds for anti-proliferative properties are warranted.

  7. Differential expression proteomics of human colorectal cancer based on a syngeneic cellular model for the progression of adenoma to carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Udo; Razawi, Hanieh; Hommer, Julia; Engelmann, Katja; Schwientek, Tilo; Müller, Stefan; Baldus, Stephan E; Patsos, Georgios; Corfield, Anthony P; Paraskeva, Christos; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2010-01-01

    This is the first differential expression proteomics study on a human syngeneic cellular in vitro progression model of the colorectal adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence, the anchorage-dependent non-tumorigenic adenoma derived cell line AA/C1 and the derived anchorage-independent and tumorigenic carcinoma cell line AA/C1/SB10C. The study is based on quantitative 2-DE and is complemented by Western blot validation. Excluding redundancies due to proteolysis and post-translational modified isoforms of over 2000 protein spots, 13 proteins were revealed as regulated with statistical variance being within the 95th confidence level and were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting in MALDI MS. Progression-associated proteins belong to the functional complexes of anaerobic glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, steroid biosynthesis, prostaglandin biosynthesis, the regulation and maintenance of the cytoskeleton, protein biosynthesis and degradation, the regulation of apoptosis or other functions. Partial but significant overlap was revealed with previous proteomics and transcriptomics studies in colorectal carcinoma. Among upregulated proteins we identified 3-HMG-CoA synthase, protein phosphatase 1, prostaglandin E synthase 2, villin 1, annexin A1, triosephosphate isomerase, phosphoserine aminotransferase 1, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1), while glucose-regulated protein 78, cathepsin D, lamin A/C and quinolate phosphoribosyltransferase were downregulated.

  8. Genome-wide siRNA screen identifies the retromer as a cellular entry factor for human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovsky, Alex; Popa, Andreea; Pimienta, Genaro; Wyler, Michael; Bhan, Ashima; Kuruvilla, Leena; Guie, Marie-Aude; Poffenberger, Adrian C; Nelson, Christian D S; Atwood, Walter J; DiMaio, Daniel

    2013-04-30

    Despite major advances in our understanding of many aspects of human papillomavirus (HPV) biology, HPV entry is poorly understood. To identify cellular genes required for HPV entry, we conducted a genome-wide screen for siRNAs that inhibited infection of HeLa cells by HPV16 pseudovirus. Many retrograde transport factors were required for efficient infection, including multiple subunits of the retromer, which initiates retrograde transport from the endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). The retromer has not been previously implicated in virus entry. Furthermore, HPV16 capsid proteins arrive in the TGN/Golgi in a retromer-dependent fashion during entry, and incoming HPV proteins form a stable complex with retromer subunits. We propose that HPV16 directly engages the retromer at the early or late endosome and traffics to the TGN/Golgi via the retrograde pathway during cell entry. These results provide important insights into HPV entry, identify numerous potential antiviral targets, and suggest that the role of the retromer in infection by other viruses should be assessed.

  9. Initiation points for cellular deoxyribonucleic acid replication in human lymphoid cells converted by Epstein-Barr virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheim, A.; Shlomai, Z.; Ben-Bassat, H.

    1981-08-01

    Replicon size was estimated in two Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human lymphoma lines, BJAB and Ramos, and four EBV-positive lines derived from the former ones by infection (conversion) with two viral strains, B95-8 and P3HR-1. Logarithmic cultures were pulse-labeled with (/sup -3/H)thymidine, and the deoxyribonucleic acid was spread on microscopic slides and autoradiographed by the method of Huberman and Riggs. Three of the four EBV-converted cell lines, BJAB/B95-8, Ra/B95-8, and Ra/HRIK, were found to have significantly shorter replicons (41, 21, 54% shorter, respectively), i.e., more initiation points, than their EBV-negative parents. BJAB/HRIK had replicons which were only slightly shorter (11%) than those of BJAB. However, analysis of track length demonstrated that extensive track fusion occurred during the labeling of BJAB/HRIK, implying that its true average replicon size is shorter than the observed value. The results indicate that in analogy to simian virus 40, EBV activates new initiation points for cellular DNA replication in EBV-transformed cells.

  10. Potential for Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity for Control of Human Cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J. Aicheler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is an important pathogen that infects the majority of the population worldwide, yet, currently, there is no licensed vaccine. Despite HCMV encoding at least seven Natural Killer (NK cell evasion genes, NK cells remain critical for the control of infection in vivo. Classically Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC is mediated by CD16, which is found on the surface of the NK cell in a complex with FcεRI-γ chains and/or CD3ζ chains. Ninety percent of NK cells express the Fc receptor CD16; thus, they have the potential to initiate ADCC. HCMV has a profound effect on the NK cell repertoire, such that up to 10-fold expansions of NKG2C+ cells can be seen in HCMV seropositive individuals. These NKG2C+ cells are reported to be FcεRI-γ deficient and possess variable levels of CD16+, yet have striking ADCC functions. A subset of HCMV cell surface proteins will induce robust antibody responses that could render cells susceptible to ADCC. We will consider how the strong anti-HCMV function of NKG2C+ FcεRI-γ-deficient NK cells could potentially be harnessed in the clinic to treat patients suffering from HCMV disease and in the development of an efficacious HCMV vaccine.

  11. Translocation of annexin Ⅰ from cellular membrane to the nuclear membrane in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Liu; Xiao-Hang Zhao; Hui-Xin Wang; Ning Lu; You-Sheng Mao; Fang Liu; Ying Wang; Hai-Rong Zhang; Kun Wang; Min Wu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the alteration of the annexin I subcellular localization in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC)and the correlation between the translocation and the tumorigenesis of ESCC.METHODS: The protein localization of annexin I was detected in both human ESCC tissues and cell line via the indirect immunofiuorescence strategy.RESULTS: In the normal esophageal epithelia the annexin I was mainly located on the plasma membrane and formed a consecutive typical trammels net. Annexin I protein also expressed dispersively in cytoplasm and the nuclei without specific localization on the nuclear membrane. In esophageal cancer annexin I decreased very sharply with scattered disappearance on the cellular membrane, however it translocated and highly expressed on the nuclear membrane,which was never found in normal esophageal epithelia. In cultured esophageal cancer cell line annexin I protein was also focused on the nuclear membrane, which was consistent with the result from esophageal cancer tissues.CONCLUSION: This observation suggests that the translocation of annexin I protein in ESCC may correlate with the tumorigenesis of the esophageal cancer.

  12. Investigation of potential effects of cellular phones on human auditory function by means of distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Thomas; Boege, Paul; von Mikusch-Buchberg, Jutta; Raczek, Johannes

    2005-03-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) are thought to act like piezoelectric transducers that amplify low sounds and hence enable the ear's exquisite sensitivity. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) reflect OHC function. The present study investigated potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) of GSM (Global System for Mobile Communication) cellular phones on OHCs by means of DPOAEs. DPOAE measurements were performed during exposure, i.e., between consecutive GSM signal pulses, and during sham exposure (no EMF) in 28 normally hearing subjects at tone frequencies around 4 kHz. For a reliable DPOAE measurement, a 900-MHz GSM-like signal was used where transmission pause was increased from 4.034 ms (GSM standard) to 24.204 ms. Peak transmitter power was set to 20 W, corresponding to a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.1 W/kg. No significant change in the DPOAE level in response to the EMF exposure was found. However, when undesired side effects on DPOAEs were compensated, in some subjects an extremely small EMF-exposure-correlated change in the DPOAE level (< 1 dB) was observed. In view of the very large dynamic range of hearing in humans (120 dB), it is suggested that this observation is physiologically irrelevant.

  13. Fecal collection, ambient preservation, and DNA extraction for PCR amplification of bacterial and human markers from human feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechvatal, Jordan M; Ram, Jeffrey L; Basson, Marc D; Namprachan, Phanramphoei; Niec, Stephanie R; Badsha, Kawsar Z; Matherly, Larry H; Majumdar, Adhip P N; Kato, Ikuko

    2008-02-01

    Feces contain intestinal bacteria and exfoliated epithelial cells that may provide useful information concerning gastrointestinal tract health. Intestinal bacteria that synthesize or metabolize potential carcinogens and produce anti-tumorigenic products may have relevance to colorectal cancer, the second most common cause of cancer deaths in the USA. To facilitate epidemiological studies relating bacterial and epithelial cell DNA and RNA markers, preservative/extraction methods suitable for self-collection and shipping of fecal samples at room temperature were tested. Purification and PCR amplification of fecal DNA were compared after preservation of stool samples in RNAlater (R) or Paxgene (P), or after drying over silica gel (S) or on Whatman FTA cards (W). Comparisons were made to samples frozen in liquid nitrogen (N2). DNA purification methods included Whatman (accompanying FTA cards), Mo-Bio Fecal (MB), Qiagen Stool (QS), and others. Extraction methods were compared for amount of DNA extracted, DNA amplifiable in a real-time SYBR-Green quantitative PCR format, and the presence of PCR inhibitors. DNA can be extracted after room temperature storage for five days from W, R, S and P, and from N2 frozen samples. High amounts of total DNA and PCR-amplifiable Bacteroides spp. DNA (34%+/-9% of total DNA) with relatively little PCR inhibition were especially obtained with QS extraction applied to R preserved samples (method QS-R). DNA for human reduced folate carrier (SLC19A1) genomic sequence was also detected in 90% of the QS-R extracts. Thus, fecal DNA is well preserved by methods suitable for self-collection that may be useful in future molecular epidemiological studies of intestinal bacteria and human cancer markers.

  14. Differential Effects of Tea Extracts on Growth and Cytokine Production by Normal and Leukemic Human Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bayer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tea is one of the world’s most highly consumed beverages, second only to water. It is affordable and abundant and thus has great potential for improving health of those in both developed and developing areas. Green, oolong, and black teas differ in the extent of fermentation and types of bioactive polyphenols produced. Green tea and its major polyphenol decrease growth of some cancer cells and effect production of immune system cytokines. This study compares the effects of different types of tea extracts on viability and cytokine production by normal and leukemic human T lymphocytes. Generation of the toxic reactive oxygen species H2O2 by extracts was also examined.Methods: The Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and mitogen-stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used in this study. Cell viability was determined by (3-4,5-dimethylthiamizol-2-yl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and production of interleukin-2 by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay. Levels of H2O2 generated by tea extracts were determined using the xylenol-orange method.Results: We found that green, oolong, and black tea extracts differentially effect the growth and viability of T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, substantially decreasing both growth and viability of leukemic T lymphocytes and having much lesser effects on their normal counterparts. Tea extracts also had differential effects on the production of the T lymphocyte growth factor interleukin-2, significantly decreasing production by leukemic cells while having only minor effects on normal cells. All three extracts induced H2O2 generation, with green and oolong tea extracts having the greatest effect. Leukemic cells were much more susceptible to growth inhibition and killing by H2O2 than normal lymphocytes.Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(4:72-85 Conclusions: The three tea extracts studied altered leukemic T lymphocyte

  15. Correlation of particle properties with cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xinhui [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liang, Tong [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, Changsheng [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yuan, Yuan, E-mail: yyuan@ecust.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Qian, Jiangchao, E-mail: jiangchaoqian@ecust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Three types of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAPNs) were synthesized employing a sonochemistry-assisted microwave method by changing microwave power (from 200 to 300 W) or using calcination treatment: L200 (200 W, lyophilization), L300 (300 W, lyophilization) and C200 (200 W, lyophilization & calcination). Their physiochemical properties were characterized and correlated with cytotoxicity to human gastric cancer cells (MGC80-3). The major differences among these HAPN preparations were their size and specific surface area, with the L200 showing a smaller size and higher specific surface area. Although all HAPNs inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of cancer cells, L200 exhibited the greatest toxicity. All types of HAPNs were internalized through energy-dependent pathways, but the L200 nanoparticles were more efficiently uptaken by MGC80-3 cells. Inhibitor studies with dynasore and methyl-β-cyclodextrin suggested that caveolae-mediated endocytosis and, to a much lesser extent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, were involved in cellular uptake of the various preparations, whereas the inhibition of endocytosis was more obvious for L200. Using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled HAPNs and laser-scanning confocal microscopy, we found that all forms of nanoparticles were present in the cytoplasm, and some L200 HAPNs were even found within nuclei. Treatment with all HAPN preparations led to the increase in the intracellular calcium level with the highest level detected for L200. - Highlights: • Three types of HAPNs (L200, L300 and C200) were synthesized employing a sonochemistry-assisted microwave method. • L200 exhibited the greatest cytotoxicity to human gastric cancer (MGC80-3) cells. • L200 showed a smaller size and higher specific surface area. • The L200 nanoparticles were more efficiently uptaken by MGC80-3 cells through energy-dependent pathways. • L200 caused the most significant increase in the intracellular calcium level.

  16. Exposure of humans to ambient levels of ozone for 6. 6 hours causes cellular and biochemical changes in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, R.B.; McDonnell, W.F.; Mann, R.; Becker, S.; House, D.E.; Schreinemachers, D.; Koren, H.S. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1991-01-01

    An acute (2 h) exposure of humans to 0.4 ppm ozone initiates biochemical changes in the lung that result in the production of components mediating inflammation and acute lung damage as well as components having the potential to lead to long-term effects such as fibrosis. However, many people are exposed to lower levels of ozone than this, but for periods of several hours. Therefore, it is important to determine if a prolonged exposure to low levels of ozone is also capable of causing cellular and biochemical changes in the lung. Nonsmoking males were randomly exposed to filtered air and either 0.10 ppm ozone or 0.08 ppm ozone for 6.6 h with moderate exercise (40 liters/min). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 18 h after each exposure, and cells and fluid were analyzed. The BAL fluid of volunteers exposed to 0.10 ppm ozone had significant increases in neutrophils (PMNs), protein, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), fibronectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) compared with BAL fluid from the same volunteers exposed to filtered air. In addition, there was a decrease in the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize yeast via the complement receptor. Exposure to 0.08 ppm ozone resulted in significant increases in PMNs, PGE2, LDH, IL-6, alpha 1-antitrypsin, and decreased phagocytosis via the complement receptor. However, BAL fluid protein and fibronectin were no longer significantly elevated. We conclude that exposure of humans to as low a level as 0.08 ppm for 6.6 h is sufficient to initiate an inflammatory reaction in the lung.

  17. A comprehensive method for extraction and quantitative analysis of sterols and secosteroids from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jeffrey G; Smith, Daniel D; Stiles, Ashlee R; Russell, David W

    2012-07-01

    We describe the development of a method for the extraction and analysis of 62 sterols, oxysterols, and secosteroids from human plasma using a combination of HPLC-MS and GC-MS. Deuterated standards are added to 200 μl of human plasma. Bulk lipids are extracted with methanol:dichloromethane, the sample is hydrolyzed using a novel procedure, and sterols and secosteroids are isolated using solid-phase extraction (SPE). Compounds are resolved on C₁₈ core-shell HPLC columns and by GC. Sterols and oxysterols are measured using triple quadrupole mass spectrometers, and lathosterol is measured using GC-MS. Detection for each compound measured by HPLC-MS was ∪ 1 ng/ml of plasma. Extraction efficiency was between 85 and 110%; day-to-day variability showed a relative standard error of <10%. Numerous oxysterols were detected, including the side chain oxysterols 22-, 24-, 25-, and 27-hydroxycholesterol, as well as ring-structure oxysterols 7α- and 4β-hydroxycholesterol. Intermediates from the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway were also detected, including zymosterol, desmosterol, and lanosterol. This method also allowed the quantification of six secosteroids, including the 25-hydroxylated species of vitamins D₂ and D₃. Application of this method to plasma samples revealed that at least 50 samples could be extracted in a routine day.

  18. Antioxidant and genoprotective effects of spent coffee extracts in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Jimena; Arbillaga, Leire; de Peña, M Paz; Cid, Concepcion

    2013-10-01

    Spent coffee has been shown as a good source of hydrophilic antioxidant compounds. The ability of two spent coffee extracts rich in caffeoylquinic acids, mainly dicaffeoylquinic acids, and caffeine (Arabica filter and Robusta espresso) to protect against oxidation and DNA damage in human cells (HeLa) was evaluated at short (2 h) and long (24 h) exposure times. Cell viability (MTT) was not affected by spent coffee extracts (>80%) up to 1000 μg/mL after 2 h. Both spent coffee extracts significantly reduced the increase of ROS level and DNA strand breaks (29-73% protection by comet assay) induced by H₂O₂. Pretreatment of cells with robusta spent coffee extract also decreased Ro photosensitizer-induced oxidative DNA damage after 24 h exposure. The higher effectiveness of Robusta spent coffee extract, with less caffeoylquinic acids and melanoidins, might be due to other antioxidant compounds, such as caffeine and other Maillard reaction products. This work evidences the potential antioxidant and genoprotective properties of spent coffee in human cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Toxicological and melanin synthesis effects of Polygonum multiflorum root extracts on zebrafish embryos and human melanocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Thi Hoai Dang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum multiflorum (PM has been commmonly used as folk medicine for treatment of various conditions, such as early graying of hair in humans. However, there have been limited studies which have evaluated the toxicological and biological effects of PM in vitro as well as in vivo. In this study, PM root extracts in ethyl acetate (PM-E and in distilled water (PM-W were examined for their effects on the development of teratogenic defects/deaths. Additionally, they were evaluated for their effects on melanin formation in human melanocytes and pigmentation in embryos/larvae of wild type strain AB zebrafish (Danio rerio. Our results showed that PM root extracts at concentrations of 40 mg/L and 105 mg/L induced the development of teratogenic defects, including yolk sac edema (or heart edema, hemovascular defects, necrosis and abnormal trunk in zebrafish embryos at 4 days post fertilization; teratogenic indexes (TIs were 1.43 and 0.63 for ethyl acetate extract and distilled water extract, respectively. Our results also demonstrated that PM-W significantly increased the pigmentation level of embryos/larvae and induced melanin formation in human melanocytes. The amount of melanin in PM-W-exposed embryos/larvae was 2.2-fold and 1.71-fold greater than those in the control embryos/larvae and control melanocytes, respectively. Our study also showed that the increased level of pigmentation in PM-W embryos/larvae or melanin biosynthesis in melanocytes were both regulated by activation of tyrosinase. Conclusively, our study suggests that PM root extracts could be used as potential agents for treatment of early hair graying as well as various other diseases related to loss of pigmentation. However, these PM root extracts may also have some negative effects on embryos; therefore it should be careful when using for women during pregnancy. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(9.000: 808-818

  20. An improved high-throughput lipid extraction method for the analysis of human brain lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Sarah K; Jenner, Andrew M; Mitchell, Todd W; Brown, Simon H J; Halliday, Glenda M; Garner, Brett

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a protocol suitable for high-throughput lipidomic analysis of human brain samples. The traditional Folch extraction (using chloroform and glass-glass homogenization) was compared to a high-throughput method combining methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) extraction with mechanical homogenization utilizing ceramic beads. This high-throughput method significantly reduced sample handling time and increased efficiency compared to glass-glass homogenizing. Furthermore, replacing chloroform with MTBE is safer (less carcinogenic/toxic), with lipids dissolving in the upper phase, allowing for easier pipetting and the potential for automation (i.e., robotics). Both methods were applied to the analysis of human occipital cortex. Lipid species (including ceramides, sphingomyelins, choline glycerophospholipids, ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylserines) were analyzed via electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and sterol species were analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. No differences in lipid species composition were evident when the lipid extraction protocols were compared, indicating that MTBE extraction with mechanical bead homogenization provides an improved method for the lipidomic profiling of human brain tissue.

  1. Evaluation of methods for the extraction and purification of DNA from the human microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanqing Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA extraction is an essential step in all cultivation-independent approaches to characterize microbial diversity, including that associated with the human body. A fundamental challenge in using these approaches has been to isolate DNA that is representative of the microbial community sampled. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we statistically evaluated six commonly used DNA extraction procedures using eleven human-associated bacterial species and a mock community that contained equal numbers of those eleven species. These methods were compared on the basis of DNA yield, DNA shearing, reproducibility, and most importantly representation of microbial diversity. The analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences from a mock community showed that the observed species abundances were significantly different from the expected species abundances for all six DNA extraction methods used. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Protocols that included bead beating and/or mutanolysin produced significantly better bacterial community structure representation than methods without both of them. The reproducibility of all six methods was similar, and results from different experimenters and different times were in good agreement. Based on the evaluations done it appears that DNA extraction procedures for bacterial community analysis of human associated samples should include bead beating and/or mutanolysin to effectively lyse cells.

  2. Simultaneous transdermal extraction of glucose and lactate from human subjects by reverse iontophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak S Ching

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Tak S Ching1, Patricia Connolly21Asia University, Taiwan; 2Bioengineering Unit, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland, UKAbstract: This study investigated the possibility of simultaneously extracting glucose and lactate from human subjects, at the same skin location, using transdermal reverse iontophoresis. Transdermal monitoring using iontophoresis is made possible by the skin’s permeability to small molecules and the nanoporous and microporous nature of the structure of skin. The study was intended to provide information which could be used to develop a full, biosensor-based, monitoring system for multiple parameters from transdermal extraction. As a precursor to the human study, in vitro reverse iontophoresis experiments were performed in an artificial skin system to establish the optimum current waveforms to be applied during iontophoresis. In the human study, a bipolar DC current waveform (with reversal of the electrode current direction every 15 minutes was applied to ten healthy volunteers via skin electrodes and utilized for simultaneous glucose and lactate transdermal extraction at an applied current density of 300 µA/cm2. Glucose and lactate were successfully extracted through each subject’s skin into the conducting gel that formed part of each iontophoresis electrode. The results suggest that it will be possible to noninvasively and simultaneously monitor glucose and lactate levels in patients using this approach and this could have future applications in diagnostic monitoring for a variety of medical conditions.Keywords: transdermal, iontophoresis, glucose, lactate, diagnostic monitoring

  3. Simultaneous transdermal extraction of glucose and lactate from human subjects by reverse iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Tak S; Connolly, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility of simultaneously extracting glucose and lactate from human subjects, at the same skin location, using transdermal reverse iontophoresis. Transdermal monitoring using iontophoresis is made possible by the skin's permeability to small molecules and the nanoporous and microporous nature of the structure of skin. The study was intended to provide information which could be used to develop a full, biosensor-based, monitoring system for multiple parameters from transdermal extraction. As a precursor to the human study, in vitro reverse iontophoresis experiments were performed in an artificial skin system to establish the optimum current waveforms to be applied during iontophoresis. In the human study, a bipolar DC current waveform (with reversal of the electrode current direction every 15 minutes) was applied to ten healthy volunteers via skin electrodes and utilized for simultaneous glucose and lactate transdermal extraction at an applied current density of 300 microA/cm2. Glucose and lactate were successfully extracted through each subject's skin into the conducting gel that formed part of each iontophoresis electrode. The results suggest that it will be possible to noninvasively and simultaneously monitor glucose and lactate levels in patients using this approach and this could have future applications in diagnostic monitoring for a variety of medical conditions.

  4. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity of Sagebrush Plain Extract on Human Breast Cancer MCF7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Gordanian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Several studies have reported anti-cancer properties of sagebrush plain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the methanol extract of sagebrush plain on human breast cancer MCF7 cells. Methods: In the present experimental study, the toxic effects of methanol extracts of flowers, leaves, stems and roots of sagebrush plain from of Khorassan and Esfahan province were tested on human breast cancer cells MCF-7 and normal cells HEK293 . Plant samples were extracted by methanol and their toxic effects on normal and breast cancer cells at concentrations of 5.62, 125, 250 and 500 µg/ml was determined by MTT. Both breast cancer cells MCF-7 and normal HEK293 cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium and DMEM containing 10% fetal calf serums were cultured. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: The methanol extract of sagebrush showed toxicity on MCF7 cells. The extract of Khorasan showed higher toxicity than Esfahan province. IC50 of sagebrush plant for all parts of the plant were obtained more than 500 µg/ml, but the IC50 of sagebrush plant of Khorasan region in leaf and flower were 205 ± 1.3 and 213 ± 5.3µg respectively. The leaves and flowers in both cases had the highest cytotoxicity. Plant extracts in both regions did not show significant cytotoxicity on normal HEK293 cells. Conclusion: The extract of the sagebrush plain region of Khorasan region showed greater cytotoxicity than Esfahan. It seems that different environmental conditionshas considerable cytotoxicity. Keywords: Sagebrush Plain, MTT, Breast Cancer

  5. Amorphous Silica Particles Relevant in Food Industry Influence Cellular Growth and Associated Signaling Pathways in Human Gastric Carcinoma Cells

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    Anja Wittig

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured silica particles are commonly used in biomedical and biotechnical fields, as well as, in cosmetics and food industry. Thus, their environmental and health impacts are of great interest and effects after oral uptake are only rarely investigated. In the present study, the toxicological effects of commercially available nano-scaled silica with a nominal primary diameter of 12 nm were investigated on the human gastric carcinoma cell line GXF251L. Besides the analysis of cytotoxic and proliferative effects and the comparison with effects of particles with a nominal primary diameter of 200 nm, emphasis was also given to their influence on the cellular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK signaling pathways—both of them deeply involved in the regulation of cellular processes like cell cycle progression, differentiation or proliferation. The investigated silica nanoparticles (NPs were found to stimulate cell proliferation as measured by microscopy and the sulforhodamine B assay. In accordance, the nuclear level of the proliferation marker Ki-67 was enhanced in a concentration-dependent manner. At high particle concentrations also necrosis was induced. Finally, silica NPs affected the EGFR and MAPK pathways at various levels dependent on concentration and time. However, classical activation of the EGFR, to be reflected by enhanced levels of phosphorylation, could be excluded as major trigger of the proliferative stimulus. After 45 min of incubation the level of phosphorylated EGFR did not increase, whereas enhanced levels of total EGFR protein were observed. These results indicate interference with the complex homeostasis of the EGFR protein, whereby up to 24 h no impact on the transcription level was detected. In addition, downstream on the level of the MAP kinases ERK1/2 short term incubation appeared to affect total protein levels without clear increase in phosphorylation. Depending on the

  6. Amorphous Silica Particles Relevant in Food Industry Influence Cellular Growth and Associated Signaling Pathways in Human Gastric Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Anja; Gehrke, Helge; Del Favero, Giorgia; Fritz, Eva-Maria; Al-Rawi, Marco; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten; Sami, Haider; Ogris, Manfred; Marko, Doris

    2017-01-13

    Nanostructured silica particles are commonly used in biomedical and biotechnical fields, as well as, in cosmetics and food industry. Thus, their environmental and health impacts are of great interest and effects after oral uptake are only rarely investigated. In the present study, the toxicological effects of commercially available nano-scaled silica with a nominal primary diameter of 12 nm were investigated on the human gastric carcinoma cell line GXF251L. Besides the analysis of cytotoxic and proliferative effects and the comparison with effects of particles with a nominal primary diameter of 200 nm, emphasis was also given to their influence on the cellular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways-both of them deeply involved in the regulation of cellular processes like cell cycle progression, differentiation or proliferation. The investigated silica nanoparticles (NPs) were found to stimulate cell proliferation as measured by microscopy and the sulforhodamine B assay. In accordance, the nuclear level of the proliferation marker Ki-67 was enhanced in a concentration-dependent manner. At high particle concentrations also necrosis was induced. Finally, silica NPs affected the EGFR and MAPK pathways at various levels dependent on concentration and time. However, classical activation of the EGFR, to be reflected by enhanced levels of phosphorylation, could be excluded as major trigger of the proliferative stimulus. After 45 min of incubation the level of phosphorylated EGFR did not increase, whereas enhanced levels of total EGFR protein were observed. These results indicate interference with the complex homeostasis of the EGFR protein, whereby up to 24 h no impact on the transcription level was detected. In addition, downstream on the level of the MAP kinases ERK1/2 short term incubation appeared to affect total protein levels without clear increase in phosphorylation. Depending on the concentration

  7. Antifungal activity of different neem leaf extracts and the nimonol against some important human pathogens

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    D.A Mahmoud

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of aqueous, ethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts from neem leaves on growth of some human pathogens (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, Candida albicans and Microsporum gypseum in vitro. Different concentrations (5, 10, 15 and 20% prepared from these extracts inhibited the growth of the test pathogens and the effect gradually increased with concentration. The 20% ethyl acetate extract gave the strongest inhibition compared with the activity obtained by the same concentration of the other extracts. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC analysis of ethyl acetate extract showed the presence of a main component (nimonol which was purified and chemically confirmed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopic analysis. The 20% ethyl acetate extract lost a part of its antifungal effect after pooling out the nimonol and this loss in activity was variable on test pathogens. The purified nimonol as a separate compound did not show any antifungal activity when assayed against all the six fungal pathogens.

  8. Antifungal activity of different neem leaf extracts and the nimonol against some important human pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, D.A.; Hassanein, N.M.; Youssef, K.A.; Abou Zeid, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of aqueous, ethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts from neem leaves on growth of some human pathogens (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, Candida albicans and Microsporum gypseum) in vitro. Different concentrations (5, 10, 15 and 20%) prepared from these extracts inhibited the growth of the test pathogens and the effect gradually increased with concentration. The 20% ethyl acetate extract gave the strongest inhibition compared with the activity obtained by the same concentration of the other extracts. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis of ethyl acetate extract showed the presence of a main component (nimonol) which was purified and chemically confirmed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis. The 20% ethyl acetate extract lost a part of its antifungal effect after pooling out the nimonol and this loss in activity was variable on test pathogens. The purified nimonol as a separate compound did not show any antifungal activity when assayed against all the six fungal pathogens. PMID:24031718

  9. Determination of triamterene in human plasma and urine after its cloud point extraction

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    Ahad Bavili Tabrizi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical approach was developed involving cloud point extraction (CPE and spectrofluorimetric determination of triamterene (TM in biological fluids. A urine or plasma sample was prepared and adjusted to pH 7, then TM was quickly extracted using CPE, using 0.05% (w/v of Triton X-114 as the extractant. The main factors that affected the extraction efficiency (the pH of the sample, the Triton X-114 concentration, the addition of salt, the extraction time and temperature, and the centrifugation time and speed were studied and optimized. The method gave calibration curves for TM with good linearities and correlation coefficients (r higher than 0.99. The method showed good precision and accuracy, with intra- and inter-assay precisions of less than 8.50% at all concentrations. Standard addition recovery tests were carried out, and the recoveries ranged from 94.7% to 114%. The limits of detection and quantification were 3.90 and 11.7 µg L-1, respectively, for urine and 5.80 and 18.0 µg L-1, respectively, for plasma. The newly developed, environmentally friendly method was successfully used to extract and determine TM in human urine samples.

  10. Molecular events underlying maggot extract promoted rat in vivo and human in vitro skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei-Nan; Li, Hong; Zhong, Li-Xia; Sun, Yuan; Yu, Li-Jun; Wu, Mo-Li; Zhang, Lin-Lin; Kong, Qing-You; Wang, Shou-Yu; Lv, De-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Maggot extracts promote wound healing, but their bioactive part(s) and molecular effects on the regenerating tissues/cells remain largely unclear. These issues are addressed here by treating rat skin wounds, human keratinocyte line/HaCat and fibroblasts with maggot secretion/excretion, and the extracts of maggots without and with secretion/excretion. The wound closure rates, cell proliferation activities, and statuses of wound healing-related signaling pathways (STAT3, Notch1, Wnt2, NF-κB, and TGF-beta/Smad3) and their downstream gene expression (c-Myc, cyclin D1, and VEGF) are evaluated by multiple approaches. The results reveal that the maggot extracts, especially the one from the maggots without secretion/excretion, show the best wound healing-promoting effects in terms of quicker wound closure rates and more rapid growth of keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Of the five signaling pathways checked, the ones mediated by TGF-beta/Smad3, and STAT3 are activated in the untreated wounds and become further enhanced by the maggot extracts, accompanied with c-Myc, VEGF, and cyclin D1 up-regulation. Our results thus show (1) that both body extract and secretion/excretion of maggots contain favorable wound healing elements and (2) that the enhancement of TGF-beta/Smad3 and STAT3 signaling activities may be the main molecular effects of maggot extracts on the wound tissues.

  11. A salting out and resin procedure for extracting Schistosoma mansoni DNA from human urine samples

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    Rodrigues Nilton B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper a simple and cheap salting out and resin (InstaGene matrix® resin - BioRad DNA extraction method from urine for PCR assays is introduced. The DNA of the fluke Schistosoma mansoni was chosen as the target since schistosomiasis lacks a suitable diagnostic tool which is sensitive enough to detect low worm burden. It is well known that the PCR technique provides high sensitivity and specificity in detecting parasite DNA. Therefore it is of paramount importance to take advantage of its excellent performance by providing a simple to handle and reliable DNA extraction procedure, which permits the diagnosis of the disease in easily obtainable urine samples. Findings The description of the extraction procedure is given. This extraction procedure was tested for reproducibility and efficiency in artificially contaminated human urine samples. The reproducibility reached 100%, showing positive results in 5 assay repetitions of 5 tested samples each containing 20 ng DNA/5 ml. The efficiency of the extraction procedure was also evaluated in a serial dilution of the original 20 ng DNA/5 ml sample. Detectable DNA was extracted when it was at a concentration of 1.28 pg DNA/mL, revealing the high efficiency of this procedure. Conclusions This methodology represents a promising tool for schistosomiasis diagnosis utilizing a bio-molecular technique in urine samples which is now ready to be tested under field conditions and may be applicable to the diagnosis of other parasitic diseases.

  12. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction as an efficient tool for removal of phospholipids from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ask, Kristine Skoglund; Bardakci, Turgay; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2016-01-01

    Generic Parallel Artificial Liquid Membrane Extraction (PALME) methods for non-polar basic and non-polar acidic drugs from human plasma were investigated with respect to phospholipid removal. In both cases, extractions in 96-well format were performed from plasma (125μL), through 4μL organic solv...... matrix effects were investigated with fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and quetiapine as model analytes. No signs of matrix effects were observed. Finally, PALME was evaluated for the aforementioned drug substances, and data were in accordance with European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines....

  13. Lectins in extracts of certain Polygonaceae seed precipitate animal and human serums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, E B; Spindler, J W

    1968-06-28

    Seeds of four species of Polygonaceae were tested for lectins that precipitate human and animal serums. Rumex crispus, Polygonum convolvulus, and Polygonum pennsylvanicum developed specific precipitate bands on double diffusion on agar gel plates. These bands were enhanced and increased in number when extracts were tested against serums from patients with certain diseases. When tested against lyophilized serum, no precipitate bands developed. The active substance cannot be dialyzed through cellulose membrane against running tap water for 16 hours, and it is heat stable. Extracts from Fagopyrum esculentum developed no precipitate bands.

  14. Recombinant human proinsulin from transgenic corn endosperm: solvent screening and extraction studies

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    C. S. Farinas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant pharmaceutical proteins are being produced in different systems such as bacteria and mammalian cell cultures. The use of transgenic plants as bioreactors has recently arisen as an alternative system offering many practical and economic advantages. However, finding an optimum strategy for the downstream processing (DSP of recombinant proteins from plants still remains a challenge. In this work, we studied the extraction of recombinant human proinsulin (rhProinsulin produced in the endosperm of transgenic corn seeds. An efficient extraction solvent was selected and the effects of temperature, solvent-to-solid ratio, time, and impeller rotational speed on the extraction were evaluated using an experimental design. After an extraction kinetics study, temperature was further evaluated to maximize rhProinsulin concentration in the extracts and to minimize the native corn components carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, and proteins. A high efficiency condition for extracting rhProinsulin with the selected solvent - 50 mM sodium bicarbonate buffer pH 10.0 and 5 mM DTT - was an extraction time of 2 h at a solvent-to-solid ratio of 10:1 and 25º C. The maximum rhProinsulin concentration in the extracts at that condition was 18.87 mg l-1 or 0.42% of the total soluble protein. These values are within the range in which the production of pharmaceutical proteins in plants can be competitive with other expression systems. The results presented provide information for the development of an additional production platform for the hormone insulin.

  15. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction of acidic drugs from human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Pijuán, Mercedes; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    The new sample preparation concept "Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction (PALME)" was evaluated for extraction of the acidic drugs ketoprofen, fenoprofen, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, and gemfibrozil from human plasma samples. Plasma samples (250 μL) were loaded into individual wells in a 96-well donor plate and diluted with HCl to protonate the acidic drugs. The acidic drugs were extracted as protonated species from the individual plasma samples, through corresponding artificial liquid membranes each comprising 2 μL of dihexyl ether, and into corresponding acceptor solutions each comprising 50 μL of 25 mM ammonia solution (pH 10). The liquid membranes and the acceptor solutions were located in a 96-well filter plate, which was sandwiched with the 96-well donor plate during extraction. Parallel extraction of several samples was performed for 15 to 60 min, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection of the individual acceptor solutions. Important PALME parameters including the chemical composition of the liquid membrane, extraction time, and sample pH were optimized, and the extraction performance was evaluated. Except for flurbiprofen, exhaustive extraction was accomplished from plasma. Linearity was obtained for all six drugs in the range 0.025-10 μg/mL, with r (2) values ranging between 0.998 and 1.000. Precision data were in the range 3-22% RSD, and accuracy data were within 72-130% with spiked plasma samples. Based on the current experiences, PALME showed substantial potential for future high-throughput bioanalysis of non-polar acidic drugs.

  16. Automatic Extraction of Destinations, Origins and Route Parts from Human Generated Route Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Mitra, Prasenjit; Klippel, Alexander; Maceachren, Alan

    Researchers from the cognitive and spatial sciences are studying text descriptions of movement patterns in order to examine how humans communicate and understand spatial information. In particular, route directions offer a rich source of information on how cognitive systems conceptualize movement patterns by segmenting them into meaningful parts. Route directions are composed using a plethora of cognitive spatial organization principles: changing levels of granularity, hierarchical organization, incorporation of cognitively and perceptually salient elements, and so forth. Identifying such information in text documents automatically is crucial for enabling machine-understanding of human spatial language. The benefits are: a) creating opportunities for large-scale studies of human linguistic behavior; b) extracting and georeferencing salient entities (landmarks) that are used by human route direction providers; c) developing methods to translate route directions to sketches and maps; and d) enabling queries on large corpora of crawled/analyzed movement data. In this paper, we introduce our approach and implementations that bring us closer to the goal of automatically processing linguistic route directions. We report on research directed at one part of the larger problem, that is, extracting the three most critical parts of route directions and movement patterns in general: origin, destination, and route parts. We use machine-learning based algorithms to extract these parts of routes, including, for example, destination names and types. We prove the effectiveness of our approach in several experiments using hand-tagged corpora.

  17. Chemical composition of lucerne leaf extract (EFL) and its applications as a phytobiotic in human nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaweł, Eliza

    2012-01-01

    Lucerne, a valuable plant grown mainly for animal feed, is rich in protein, minerals (Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, P, Zn, Si), vitamins (A, B, C, D, E, K, U), phytochemical substances (carotene, chlorophyll, coumarins, isoflavones, alkaloids, saponins), contains secondary metabolites of plants (phytoestrogens: isoflavones and coumestrol), and antinutritional components (phytates, L-canavanine, saponins). It may be used as a dietary supplement in human nutrition. The proteins found in lucerne are comprised of numerous exogenous and semi-exogenous amino acids which are desirable for human body. Extract from the leaves of alfalfa (EFL - l'Extrait Foliaire de Luzerne) practically does not contain mycotoxins and pesticide pollutants. It is a completely natural product, safe even in a long-term supplementation. Extract from the leaves of alfalfa has a positive, multidirectional impact on the human body. It increases the level of estrogen, prevents atherosclerosis, helps blood circulation and strenghtens immunity, protects against the development of dangerous diseases of the digestive tract, combats anemia and many other health ailments. The results of preclinical studies indicate that alfalfa leaf extract enriched with vitamin C (EFL) can be a dietary supplement supporting the human body in fighting malnutrition, ischemic diseases, and various disorders of digestive tract. It also strengthens and enhances immunity.

  18. Chemical composition of lucerne leaf extract (EFL and its applications as a phytobiotic in human nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Gaweł

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available   Lucerne, a valuable plant grown mainly for animal feed, is rich in protein, minerals (Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, P, Zn, Si, vitamins (A, B, C, D, E, K, U, phytochemical substances (carotene, chlorophyll, coumarins, isoflavones, alkaloids, saponins, contains secondary metabolites of plants (phytoestrogens: isoflavones and coumestrol, and antinutritional components (phytates, L-canavanine, saponins. It may be used as a dietary supplement in human nutrition. The proteins found in lucerne are comprised of numerous exogenous and semi-exogenous amino acids which are desirable for human body. Extract from the leaves of alfalfa (EFL – l’Extrait Foliaire de Luzerne practically does not contain mycotoxins and pesticide pollutants. It is a completely natural product, safe even in a long-term supplementation. Extract from the leaves of alfalfa has a positive, multidirectional impact on the human body. It increases the level of estrogen, prevents atherosclerosis, helps blood circulation and strenghtens immunity, protects against the development of dangerous diseases of the digestive tract, combats anemia and many other health ailments. The results of preclinical studies indicate that alfalfa leaf extract enriched with vitamin C (EFL can be a dietary supplement supporting the human body in fighting malnutrition, ischemic diseases, and various disorders of digestive tract. It also strengthens and enhances immunity.  

  19. Toona Sinensis Extracts Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in the Human Lung Large Cell Carcinoma

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    Cheng-Yuan Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Toona sinensis extracts have been shown to exhibit anti-cancer effects in human ovarian cancer cell lines, human promyelocytic leukemia cells and human lung adenocarcinoma. Its safety has also been confirmed in animal studies. However, its anti-cancer properties in human lung large cell carcinoma have not been studied. Here, we used a powder obtained by freeze-drying the super-natant of centrifuged crude extract from Toona sinensis leaves (TSL-1 to treat the human lung carcinoma cell line H661. Cell viability was evaluated by the 3-(4-,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that TSL-1 blocked H661 cell cycle progression. Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of cell cycle proteins that promote cell cycle progression, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1, and increased the expression of proteins that inhibit cell cycle progression, including p27. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that TSL-1 induced H661 cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that TSL-1 reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2, and degraded the DNA repair protein, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. TSL-1 shows potential as a novel therapeutic agent or for use as an adjuvant for treating human lung large cell carcinoma.

  20. Apoptosis of human Breast Cancer Cells induced by Ethylacetate Extracts of Propolis

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    Syamsudin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Propolis has been ethno medically claimed to possess a wide array of biological activities including anticancer activity. The purpose of this research was to verify the folklore claim. Approach: This study was performed in a human breast carcinoma cell, MCF-7. Extract of propolis from different solvent, ethylacetate and n-buthanol showed induced apoptotic cells was detected by flow cytometry. Results: The results demonstrated that ethylacetate extract of propolis can induce apoptosis in MCF-7 as large as 13.21% during the 24 h incubation. On the other hand, doxorubicin is able to induce apoptosis as large as 18.89% during the 24 h incubation. Conclusion: The extracts of propolis ethylacetate had cytotoxic activity and triggers apoptosis on MCF-7 cells.