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Sample records for human cellular dna

  1. Rational design of human DNA ligase inhibitors that target cellular DNA replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhong, Shijun; Zhu, Xiao; Dziegielewska, Barbara; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, Gerald M; MacKerell, Alexander D; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2008-05-01

    Based on the crystal structure of human DNA ligase I complexed with nicked DNA, computer-aided drug design was used to identify compounds in a database of 1.5 million commercially available low molecular weight chemicals that were predicted to bind to a DNA-binding pocket within the DNA-binding domain of DNA ligase I, thereby inhibiting DNA joining. Ten of 192 candidates specifically inhibited purified human DNA ligase I. Notably, a subset of these compounds was also active against the other human DNA ligases. Three compounds that differed in their specificity for the three human DNA ligases were analyzed further. L82 inhibited DNA ligase I, L67 inhibited DNA ligases I and III, and L189 inhibited DNA ligases I, III, and IV in DNA joining assays with purified proteins and in cell extract assays of DNA replication, base excision repair, and nonhomologous end-joining. L67 and L189 are simple competitive inhibitors with respect to nicked DNA, whereas L82 is an uncompetitive inhibitor that stabilized complex formation between DNA ligase I and nicked DNA. In cell culture assays, L82 was cytostatic whereas L67 and L189 were cytotoxic. Concordant with their ability to inhibit DNA repair in vitro, subtoxic concentrations of L67 and L189 significantly increased the cytotoxicity of DNA-damaging agents. Interestingly, the ligase inhibitors specifically sensitized cancer cells to DNA damage. Thus, these novel human DNA ligase inhibitors will not only provide insights into the cellular function of these enzymes but also serve as lead compounds for the development of anticancer agents.

  2. A human cellular sequence implicated in trk oncogene activation is DNA damage inducible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Scharf, R.; Sharon, R.; Kapten, I. (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel))

    1990-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the repair of UV light-induced DNA damage, have been used to clone DNA-damage-inducible transcripts in human cells. The cDNA clone designated pC-5 hybridizes on RNA gel blots to a 1-kilobase transcript, which is moderately abundant in nontreated cells and whose synthesis is enhanced in human cells following UV irradiation or treatment with several other DNA-damaging agents. UV-enhanced transcription of C-5 RNA is transient and occurs at lower fluences and to a greater extent in DNA-repair-deficient than in DNA-repair-proficient cells. Southern blot analysis indicates that the C-5 gene belongs to a multigene family. A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of C-5 was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that it is homologous to a human cellular sequence encoding the amino-terminal activating sequence of the trk-2h chimeric oncogene. The presence of DNA-damage-responsive sequences at the 5' end of a chimeric oncogene could result in enhanced expression of the oncogene in response to carcinogens.

  3. Dimethylarsenic acid damages cellular DNA and inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication between human skin fibroblast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoXB; DengFR

    2002-01-01

    Although arsenic is identified as a human carcinogen,there is currently no accepted mechanism for its action or an established animal model for evaluating the carcinogenic activity of arsenic.To elucidate the mechanism of arsenic arcinogenesis,we investigated the effect of dimethylarsenic acid(DMAA),the main metabolite of inorganic arsenic in humans,on the cellular DNA and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between human skin fibroblast cells.Single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay was used to detect the DNA damage in human skin fibroblast cells exposed to DMAA,and the GJIC between cells was detected by the scrape loading/dye transfer assay.DMAA at concentrations of 0.01-1.0 mmol·L-1 induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner,and GJIC between human skin fibroblast cells was significantly inhibited by DMAA at 1.0 mmol·L-1.Our results suggest that both genotoxic and nongenotoxic mechanism are involved in the mechanism of DMAA-induced cellular toxicity.

  4. Cell-type specific DNA methylation patterns define human breast cellular identity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Novak

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a role in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and stem cell differentiation. Tissue specific differential methylation has also been well characterized. We sought to extend these studies to create a map of differential DNA methylation between different cell types derived from a single tissue. Using three pairs of isogenic human mammary epithelial and fibroblast cells, promoter region DNA methylation was characterized using MeDIP coupled to microarray analysis. Comparison of DNA methylation between these cell types revealed nearly three thousand cell-type specific differentially methylated regions (ctDMRs. MassARRAY was performed upon 87 ctDMRs to confirm and quantify differential DNA methylation. Each of the examined regions exhibited statistically significant differences ranging from 10-70%. Gene ontology analysis revealed the overrepresentation of many transcription factors involved in developmental processes. Additionally, we have shown that ctDMRs are associated with histone related epigenetic marks and are often aberrantly methylated in breast cancer. Overall, our data suggest that there are thousands of ctDMRs which consistently exhibit differential DNA methylation and may underlie cell type specificity in human breast tissue. In addition, we describe the pathways affected by these differences and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms and physiological overlap between normal cellular differentiation and breast carcinogenesis.

  5. In situ amplification of DNA fragments specific for human Y chromosome in cellular nuclei by PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锡元; 姜海波; 李立家; 马琦; 杨建琪; 刘汀

    1996-01-01

    Using single primer pairs Y3 and Y4, in siru polymerase chain reaction (in situ PCR) was successfully performed on the specimen slides of peripheral leukocytes. By both of the direct digpxiginin-11-dUTP incorporation into PCR products with in situ PCR (direct in situ PCR) and in situ PCR followed by detection of in situ hybridization (indirect in siru PCR), DNA fragments specific for human Y chromosome were obviously amplified in cellular nuclei of specimens on the slides. The results were verified by Southern analysis. The methodology of in situ PCR and its application were discussed.

  6. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  7. Effect of X irradiation on a heterotransplanted human colonic carcinoma before and after a change in the cellular DNA content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Vindeløv, L L; Nielsen, A

    1983-01-01

    A spontaneous change of cellular DNA content occurred in a hyperdiploid human colonic carcinoma grown in nude mice. After the change to hyperpentaploidy the tumor was exposed to single-dose X irradiation, and the effects on growth curves and on the cell cycle, determined by flow cytometric DNA...... analysis (FCM), were compared to results obtained with the tumor prior to the evolutionary event. The results showed that the radiation effects on growth rate and on cell kinetics had changed after the change in cellular DNA content. In the hyperpentaploid tumor the irradiation had no effect...... a partial synchronization of accumulated cells, whereas no synchronization effect was found in the hyperdiploid tumor. The redistribution time was 8-10 days for both tumors. The results indicate that clonal evolution may affect radiosensitivity, and that FCM analysis may prove to be a valuable method...

  8. Trichothiodystrophy, a human DNA repair disorder with heterogeneity in the cellular response to ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, A.R.; Arlett, C.F.; Broughton, B.C.; Harcourt, S.A.; Steingrimsdottir, H.; Stefanini, M.; Malcolm, A.; Taylor, R.; Natarajan, A.T.; Green, S.

    1988-11-01

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brittle hair with reduced sulfur content, ichthyosis, peculiar face, and mental and physical retardation. Some patients are photosensitive. A previous study by Stefanini et al. showed that cells from four photosensitive patients with TTD had a molecular defect in DNA repair, which was not complemented by cells from xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D. In a detailed molecular and cellular study of the effects of UV light on cells cultured from three further TTD patients who did not exhibit photosensitivity we have found an array of different responses. In cells from the first patient, survival, excision repair, and DNA and RNA synthesis following UV irradiation were all normal, whereas in cells from the second patient all these responses were similar to those of excision-defective xeroderma pigmentosum (group D) cells. With the third patient, cell survival measured by colony-forming ability was normal following UV irradiation, even though repair synthesis was only 50% of normal and RNA synthesis was severely reduced. The excision-repair defect in these cells was not complemented by other TTD cell strains. These cellular characteristics of patient 3 have not been described previously for any other cell line. The normal survival may be attributed to the finding that the deficiency in excision-repair is confined to early times after irradiation. Our results pose a number of questions about the relationship between the molecular defect in DNA repair and the clinical symptoms of xeroderma pigmentosum and TTD.

  9. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 µg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by foci and pattern counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (?-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average foci counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profile of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in ?-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not significantly affect

  10. Gene Expression Profile Changes and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. In addition, DNA in space can be damaged by toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage affects the accuracy of the radiation risk assessment for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damage, confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) flown on the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB). Damages in the DNA were quantified by immunofluorescence staining for ?-H2AX, which showed similar percentages of different types of stained cells between flight and ground. However, there was a slight shift in the distribution of the ?-H2AX foci number in the flown cells with countable foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. A microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment was also performed. Comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. Similar responses at the RNA level between different gravity conditions were also observed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly

  11. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 mg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by focus pattern and focus number counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (γg-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average focus counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profiles of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in γg-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not

  12. Reducing the in-vitro electromagnetic field effect of cellular phones on human DNA and the intensity of their emitted radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syldona, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated detrimental effects of cellular phone radiation on in-vitro biological systems. This article introduces a novel in-vitro method for demonstrating conformational changes in human DNA induced by a 5 minute exposure to cellular phone radiation emitted by an actual contemporary cellular phone. Dynamic changes in DNA conformation was determined in real-time by measuring the rate of DNA rewinding (in a spectrophotometer) following exposure to heat which causes the unwinding of the two strands of the helix. Cellular phone radiation produced a 40% increase in the rate of DNA rewinding. This effect was 95% attenuated when the experiment was repeated with the same cellular phone to which was attached a commercially available shielding disk shaped sheet containing a paramagnetic mineral. In a separate series of experiments the intensity of the cellular phone radiation was measured using an electromagnetic frequency spectrum analyzer. The intensity was reduced by approximately 50% in the presence of the shielding disk. Taken together these studies indicate the efficacy of a shielding disk to protect the body from cellular phone radiation.

  13. Peroxiredoxin I and II in human eyes: cellular distribution and association with pterygium and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebe, Sonja; Callahan, Thomas; Power, John H T

    2014-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin I and II are both 2-Cys members of the peroxiredoxin family of antioxidant enzymes and inactivate hydrogen peroxide. On western blotting, both enzymes appeared as 22-kD proteins and were present in the sclera, retina and iris. Immunohistochemistry showed strong cytoplasmic labeling in the basal cells of the corneal epithelial layer and the corneoscleral limbus. The melanocytes within the stroma of the iris and the anterior epithelial cells of the lens also showed strong cytoplasmic labeling. The fibrous structure of the stroma and the posterior surface of the ciliary body were also labeled. There was also strong labeling for both enzymes in the photoreceptors and the inner and outer plexiform layers of the retina. There was increased labeling of peroxiredoxin I and II in pterygium. In normal conjunctiva and cornea, only the basal cell layer showed labeling for peroxiredoxin I and II, whereas, in pterygia, there was strong cytoplasmic labeling in most cells involving the full thickness of the epithelium. Co-localization of the DNA oxidation product 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine antibody with the nuclear dye 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride indicated that the majority of the oxidative damage was cytoplasmic; this suggested that the mitochondrial DNA was most affected by the UV radiation in this condition.

  14. The role of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 on the cellular transport of the DNA methyltransferase inhibitors 5-azacytidine and CP-4200 in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel-Eisenbeiss, Johanna; Hascher, Antje; Hals, Petter-Arnt; Sandvold, Marit Liland; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Lyko, Frank; Rius, Maria

    2013-09-01

    The nucleoside analog 5-azacytidine is an archetypical drug for epigenetic cancer therapy, and its clinical effectiveness has been demonstrated in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). However, therapy resistance in patients with MDS/AML remains a challenging issue. Membrane proteins that are involved in drug uptake are potential mediators of drug resistance. The responsible proteins for the transport of 5-azacytidine into MDS/AML cells are unknown. We have now systematically analyzed the expression and activity of various nucleoside transporters. We identified the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) as the most abundant nucleoside transporter in leukemia cell lines and in AML patient samples. Transport assays using [¹⁴C]5-azacytidine demonstrated Na⁺-independent uptake of the drug into the cells, which was inhibited by S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), a hENT1 inhibitor. The cellular toxicity of 5-azacytidine and its DNA demethylating activity were strongly reduced after hENT1 inhibition. In contrast, the cellular activity of the 5-azacytidine derivative 5-azacytidine-5'-elaidate (CP-4200), a nucleoside transporter-independent drug, persisted after hENT1 inhibition. A strong dependence of 5-azacytidine-induced DNA demethylation on hENT1 activity was also confirmed by array-based DNA methylation profiling, which uncovered hundreds of loci that became demethylated only when hENT1-mediated transport was active. Our data establish hENT1 as a key transporter for the cellular uptake of 5-azacytidine in leukemia cells and raise the possibility that hENT1 expression might be a useful biomarker to predict the efficiency of 5-azacytidine treatments. Furthermore, our data suggest that CP-4200 may represent a valuable compound for the modulation of transporter-related 5-azacytidine resistances.

  15. Differential Roles for the Interferon-inducible IFI16 and AIM2 Innate Immune Sensors for Cytosolic DNA in Cellular Senescence of Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xin; Ponomareva, Larissa; Veeranki, Sudhakar; Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Dickerson, Eric; Choubey, Divaker

    2011-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-inducible IFI16 and AIM2 proteins act as innate immune sensors for cytosolic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Upon sensing dsDNA, the IFI16 protein induces the expression of IFN-β whereas the AIM2 protein forms an inflammasome, which promotes the secretion of IL-1β. Given that the knockdown of IFI16 expression in human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) delays the onset of cellular senescence, we investigated the potential roles for the IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in cellular senescence. We found that increased IFI16 protein levels in old (versus young) HDFs were associated with the induction of IFN-β. In contrast, increased levels of the AIM2 protein in the senescent (versus old) HDFs were associated with increased production of IL-1β. The knockdown of type I IFN-receptor subunit-α, which reduced the basal levels of the IFI16, but not the AIM2, protein delayed the onset of cellular senescence. Accordingly, increased constitutive levels of IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) HDFs were associated with the activation of the IFN-signaling and increased levels of IL-1β. The IFN-β treatment of the young HDFs, which induced the expression of IFI16 and AIM2 proteins, activated a DNA-damage response and also increased basal levels of IL-1β. Interestingly, the knockdown of AIM2 expression in HDFs increased the basal levels of IFI16 protein and activated the IFN-signaling. In contrast, the knockdown of the IFI16 expression in HDFs decreased the basal and dsDNA-induced activation of the IFN-signaling. Collectively, our observations demonstrate differential roles for the IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in cellular senescence and associated secretory phenotype. PMID:21471287

  16. Human DNA Helicase B Functions in Cellular Homologous Recombination and Stimulates Rad51-Mediated 5′-3′ Heteroduplex Extension In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanjian; Yan, Peijun; Fanning, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination is involved in the repair of DNA damage and collapsed replication fork, and is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. Its process involves a network of proteins with different enzymatic activities. Human DNA helicase B (HDHB) is a robust 5′-3′ DNA helicase which accumulates on chromatin in cells exposed to DNA damage. HDHB facilitates cellular recovery from replication stress, but its role in DNA damage response remains unclear. Here we report that HDHB silencing results in reduced sister chromatid exchange, impaired homologous recombination repair, and delayed RPA late-stage foci formation induced by ionizing radiation. Ectopically expressed HDHB colocalizes with Rad51, Rad52, RPA, and ssDNA. In vitro, HDHB stimulates Rad51-mediated heteroduplex extension in 5′-3′ direction. A helicase-defective mutant HDHB failed to promote this reaction. Our studies implicate HDHB promotes homologous recombination in vivo and stimulates 5′-3′ heteroduplex extension during Rad51-mediated strand exchange in vitro. PMID:25617833

  17. Identification of Human N-Myristoylated Proteins from Human Complementary DNA Resources by Cell-Free and Cellular Metabolic Labeling Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamitsu, Emi; Otsuka, Motoaki; Haebara, Tatsuki; Yano, Manami; Matsuzaki, Kanako; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Moriya, Koko; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    To identify physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins, 90 cDNA clones predicted to encode human N-myristoylated proteins were selected from a human cDNA resource (4,369 Kazusa ORFeome project human cDNA clones) by two bioinformatic N-myristoylation prediction systems, NMT-The MYR Predictor and Myristoylator. After database searches to exclude known human N-myristoylated proteins, 37 cDNA clones were selected as potential human N-myristoylated proteins. The susceptibility of these cDNA clones to protein N-myristoylation was first evaluated using fusion proteins in which the N-terminal ten amino acid residues were fused to an epitope-tagged model protein. Then, protein N-myristoylation of the gene products of full-length cDNAs was evaluated by metabolic labeling experiments both in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system and in transfected human cells. As a result, the products of 13 cDNA clones (FBXL7, PPM1B, SAMM50, PLEKHN, AIFM3, C22orf42, STK32A, FAM131C, DRICH1, MCC1, HID1, P2RX5, STK32B) were found to be human N-myristoylated proteins. Analysis of the role of protein N-myristoylation on the intracellular localization of SAMM50, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, revealed that protein N-myristoylation was required for proper targeting of SAMM50 to mitochondria. Thus, the strategy used in this study is useful for the identification of physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins from human cDNA resources. PMID:26308446

  18. Human cellular protein patterns and their link to genome DNA sequence data: usefulness of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and microsequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Rasmussen, H H; Leffers, H

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of cellular protein patterns by computer-aided 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis together with recent advances in protein sequence analysis have made possible the establishment of comprehensive 2-dimensional gel protein databases that may link protein and DNA information and that offer...... a global approach to the study of the cell. Using the integrated approach offered by 2-dimensional gel protein databases it is now possible to reveal phenotype specific protein (or proteins), to microsequence them, to search for homology with previously identified proteins, to clone the cDNAs, to assign...... partial protein sequence to genes for which the full DNA sequence and the chromosome location is known, and to study the regulatory properties and function of groups of proteins that are coordinately expressed in a given biological process. Human 2-dimensional gel protein databases are becoming...

  19. Characterisation of Human Keratinocytes by Measuring Cellular Repair Capacity of UVB-Induced DNA Damage and Monitoring of Cytogenetic Changes in Melanoma Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greinert, R.; Breibart, E.W.; Mitchell, D.; Smida, J.; Volkmer, B

    2000-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms for UV-induced photocarcinogenesis are far from being understood in detail, especially in the case of malignant melanoma of the skin. Nevertheless, it is known that deficiencies in cellular repair processes of UV-induced DNA damage (e.g. in the case of Xeroderma pigmentosum) represent important aetiological factors in the multistep development of skin cancer. The repair kinetics have therefore been studied of an established skin cell line (HaCaT), primary human keratinocytes, melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Our data show a high degree of interindividual variability in cellular repair capacity for UV-induced DNA lesions, which might be due to individual differences in the degree of tolerable damage and/or the onsets of saturation of the enzymatic repair system. The cytogenetic analysis of melanoma cell lines, using spectral karyotyping (SKY) furthermore proves that malignant melanoma of the skin are characterised by high numbers of chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  20. Human Xip1 (C2orf13) is a novel regulator of cellular responses to DNA strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Fugger, Kasper; Danielsen, Jannie Rendtlew

    2007-01-01

    DNA strand breaks arise continuously as the result of intracellular metabolism and in response to a multitude of genotoxic agents. To overcome such challenges to genomic stability, cells have evolved genome surveillance pathways that detect and repair damaged DNA in a coordinated fashion. Here we...

  1. Virus-encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures for cellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkilä, Joona; Eskelinen, Antti-Pekka; Niemelä, Elina H; Linko, Veikko; Frilander, Mikko J; Törmä, Päivi; Kostiainen, Mauri A

    2014-01-01

    DNA origami structures can be programmed into arbitrary shapes with nanometer scale precision, which opens up numerous attractive opportunities to engineer novel functional materials. One intriguing possibility is to use DNA origamis for fully tunable, targeted, and triggered drug delivery. In this work, we demonstrate the coating of DNA origami nanostructures with virus capsid proteins for enhancing cellular delivery. Our approach utilizes purified cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid proteins that can bind and self-assemble on the origami surface through electrostatic interactions and further pack the origami nanostructures inside the viral capsid. Confocal microscopy imaging and transfection studies with a human HEK293 cell line indicate that protein coating improves cellular attachment and delivery of origamis into the cells by 13-fold compared to bare DNA origamis. The presented method could readily find applications not only in sophisticated drug delivery applications but also in organizing intracellular reactions by origami-based templates.

  2. DNA encoding an HIV-1 Gag/human lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 chimera elicits a broad cellular and humoral immune response in Rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Chikhlikar

    Full Text Available Previous studies of HIV-1 p55Gag immunization of mice have demonstrated the usefulness of targeting antigens to the cellular compartment containing the major histocompatibility complex type II (MHC II complex molecules by use of a DNA antigen formulation encoding Gag as a chimera with the mouse lysosome-associated membrane protein (mLAMP/gag. In the present study, we have analyzed the magnitude and breadth of Gag-specific T-lymphocyte and antibody responses elicited in Rhesus macaques after immunization with DNA encoding a human LAMP/gag (hLAMP/gag chimera. ELISPOT analyses indicated that the average Gag-specific IFN-gamma response elicited by the hLAMP/gag chimera was detectable after only two or three naked DNA immunizations in all five immunized macaques and reached an average of 1000 spot-forming cells (SFC/10(6 PBMCs. High IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses were detected in CD8(+-depleted cells, indicating that CD4(+ T-cells play a major role in these responses. The T-cell responses of four of the macaques were also tested by use of ELISPOT to 12 overlapping 15-amino acids (aa peptide pools containing ten peptides each, encompassing the complete Gag protein sequence. The two Mamu 08 immunized macaques responded to eight and twelve of the pools, the Mamu B01 to six, and the other macaque to five pools indicating that the hLAMP/gag DNA antigen formulation elicits a broad T-cell response against Gag. Additionally, there was a strong HIV-1-specific IgG response. The IgG antibody titers increased after each DNA injection, indicating a strong amnestic B-cell response, and were highly elevated in all the macaques after three immunizations. Moreover, the serum of each macaque recognized 13 of the 49 peptides of a 20-aa peptide library covering the complete Gag amino acid sequence. In addition, HIV-1-specific IgA antibodies were present in the plasma and external secretions, including nasal washes. These data support the findings of increased

  3. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Abby M; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors.

  4. Human cellular protein patterns and their link to genome DNA sequence data: usefulness of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and microsequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Rasmussen, H H; Leffers, H;

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of cellular protein patterns by computer-aided 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis together with recent advances in protein sequence analysis have made possible the establishment of comprehensive 2-dimensional gel protein databases that may link protein and DNA information and that offer a...

  5. The yield and quality of cellular and bacterial DNA extracts from human oral rinse samples are variably affected by the cell lysis methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Mohsen; Nair, Raj G; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Zhang, Li; Zulfiker, Abu Hasanat Md; Ahmetagic, Adnan; Good, David; Wei, Ming Q

    2016-03-01

    Recent culture-independent studies have enabled detailed mapping of human microbiome that has not been hitherto achievable by culture-based methods. DNA extraction is a key element of bacterial culture-independent studies that critically impacts on the outcome of the detected microbial profile. Despite the variations in DNA extraction methods described in the literature, no standardized technique is available for the purpose of microbiome profiling. Hence, standardization of DNA extraction methods is urgently needed to yield comparable data from different studies. We examined the effect of eight different cell lysis protocols on the yield and quality of the extracted DNA from oral rinse samples. These samples were exposed to cell lysis techniques based on enzymatic, mechanical, and a combination of enzymatic-mechanical methods. The outcome measures evaluated were total bacterial population, Firmicutes levels and human DNA contamination (in terms of surrogate GAPDH levels). We noted that all three parameters were significantly affected by the method of cell lysis employed. Although the highest yield of gDNA was obtained using lysozyme-achromopeptidase method, the lysozyme-zirconium beads method yielded the peak quantity of total bacterial DNA and Firmicutes with a lower degree of GAPDH contamination compared with the other methods. Taken together our data clearly points to an urgent need for a consensus, standardized DNA extraction technique to evaluate the oral microbiome using oral rinse samples. Further, if Firmicutes levels are the focus of investigation in oral rinse microbiome analyses then the lysozyme-zirconium bead method would be the method of choice in preference to others. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Nanoparticles can cause DNA damage across a cellular barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhabra, Gevdeep; Sood, Aman; Fisher, Brenton; Cartwright, Laura; Saunders, Margaret; Evans, William Howard; Surprenant, Annmarie; Lopez-Castejon, Gloria; Mann, Stephen; Davis, Sean A.; Hails, Lauren A.; Ingham, Eileen; Verkade, Paul; Lane, Jon; Heesom, Kate; Newson, Roger; Case, Charles Patrick

    2009-12-01

    The increasing use of nanoparticles in medicine has raised concerns over their ability to gain access to privileged sites in the body. Here, we show that cobalt-chromium nanoparticles (29.5 +/- 6.3 nm in diameter) can damage human fibroblast cells across an intact cellular barrier without having to cross the barrier. The damage is mediated by a novel mechanism involving transmission of purine nucleotides (such as ATP) and intercellular signalling within the barrier through connexin gap junctions or hemichannels and pannexin channels. The outcome, which includes DNA damage without significant cell death, is different from that observed in cells subjected to direct exposure to nanoparticles. Our results suggest the importance of indirect effects when evaluating the safety of nanoparticles. The potential damage to tissues located behind cellular barriers needs to be considered when using nanoparticles for targeting diseased states.

  7. In vivo monitoring of transfected DNA, gene expression kinetics, and cellular immune responses in mice immunized with a human NIS gene-expressing plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hye-Youn; Jeon, Yong-Hyun; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Chul-Woo

    2016-12-01

    In assessing the effectiveness of DNA vaccines, it is important to monitor: (1) the kinetics of target gene expression in vivo; and (2) the movement of cells that become transfected with the plasmid DNA used in the immunization of a subject. In this study, we used, as a visual imaging marker, expression of the transfected human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene, which enhances intracellular radio-pertechnetate (TcO4-) accumulation. After intradermal (i.d.) and systemic injection of mice with pcDNA-hNIS and radioactive Technetium-99m (Tc-99m), respectively, whole-body images were obtained by nuclear scintigraphy. The migration of mice cells transfected with the hNIS gene was monitored over a 2-week period by gamma-radioactivity counting of isolated cell populations and was demonstrated in peripheral lymphoid tissues, especially in the draining lymph nodes (dLNs). Beginning at 24 h after DNA inoculation and continuing for the 2-week monitoring period, hNIS-expressing cells were observed specifically in the T-cell-rich zones of the paracortical area of the dLNs. Over the same time period, high levels of INF-γ-secreting CD8 T-cells were found in the dLNs of the pcDNA-hNIS immunized mice. Tumor growth was also significantly retarded in the mice that received hNIS DNA immunization followed by inoculation with CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells that had been transfected with the rat NIS gene (rNIS), which is 93% homologous to the hNIS gene. In conclusion, mouse cells transfected with hNIS DNA after i.d. immunization were found to traffic to the dLNs, and hNIS gene expression in these cells continued for at least 2 weeks post immunization. Furthermore, sequential presentation of NIS DNA to T-cells by migratory antigen presenting cells could induce NIS DNA-specific Th1 immune responses and thus retard the growth of NIS-expressing tumors.

  8. Analysis of cellular responses to aflatoxin B{sub 1} in yeast expressing human cytochrome P450 1A2 using cDNA microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Yingying [Departmental of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Breeden, Linda L. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Fan, Wenhong [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Zhao Lueping [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Eaton, David L. [Departmental of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Zarbl, Helmut [Departmental of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States) and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: hzarbl@fhcrc.org

    2006-01-29

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB{sub 1}) is a potent human hepatotoxin and hepatocarcinogen produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus. In human, AFB{sub 1} is bioactivated by cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, primarily CYP1A2, to the genotoxic epoxide that forms N{sup 7}-guanine DNA adducts. To characterize the transcriptional responses to genotoxic insults from AFB{sub 1}, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered to express human CYP1A2 was exposed to doses of AFB{sub 1} that resulted in minimal lethality, but substantial genotoxicity. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated a dose and time dependent S phase delay under the same treatment conditions, indicating a checkpoint response to DNA damage. Replicate cDNA microarray analyses of AFB{sub 1} treated cells showed that about 200 genes were significantly affected by the exposure. The genes activated by AFB{sub 1}-treatment included RAD51, DUN1 and other members of the DNA damage response signature reported in a previous study with methylmethane sulfonate and ionizing radiation [A.P. Gasch, M. Huang, S. Metzner, D. Botstein, S.J. Elledge, P.O. Brown, Genomic expression responses to DNA-damaging agents and the regulatory role of the yeast ATR homolog Mec1p, Mol. Biol. Cell 12 (2001) 2987-3003]. However, unlike previous studies using highly cytotoxic doses, environmental stress response genes [A.P. Gasch, P.T. Spellman, C.M. Kao, O. Carmel-Harel, M.B. Eisen, G. Storz, D. Botstein, P.O. Brown, Genomic expression programs in the response of yeast cells to environmental changes, Mol. Biol. Cell 11 (2000) 4241-4257] were largely unaffected by our dosing regimen. About half of the transcripts affected are also known to be cell cycle regulated. The most strongly repressed transcripts were those encoding the histone genes and a group of genes that are cell cycle regulated and peak in M phase and early G1. These include most of the known daughter-specific genes. The rapid and coordinated repression of histones and M/G1-specific

  9. DNA origami: Nanorobots grab cellular control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, Johann; Willner, Itamar

    2012-04-01

    Self-assembled barrel-like DNA nanostructures carrying active payloads and pre-programmed with logic operations to reconfigure in response to cell-surface cues can trigger a variety of intracellular functions.

  10. Effect of phosphorothioate modifications on the ability of GTn oligodeoxynucleotides to specifically recognize single-stranded DNA-binding proteins and to affect human cancer cellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morassutti, C; Scaggiante, B; Dapas, B; Xodo, L; Tell, G; Quadrifoglio, F

    1999-12-01

    We have previously identified phosphodiester oligonucleotides exclusively made of G and T bases, named GTn, that significantly inhibit human cancer cell growth and recognize specific nuclear single-stranded DNA binding proteins. We wished to examine the ability of the modified GTn oligonucleotides with different degrees of phosphorothioate modifications to bind specifically to the same nuclear proteins recognized by the GTn phosphodiester analogues and their cytotoxic effect on the human T-lymphoblastic CCRF-CEM cell line. We showed that the full phosphorothioate GTn oligonucleotide was neither able to specifically recognize those nuclear proteins, nor cytotoxic. In contrast, the 3'-phosphorothioate-protected GTn oligonucleotides can maintain the specific protein-binding activity. The end-modified phosphorothioate oligonucleotides were also able to elicit the dose-dependent cell growth inhibition effect, but a loss in the cytotoxic ability was observed increasing the extent of sulphur modification of the sequences. Our results indicate that phosphorothioate oligonucleotides directed at specific single-stranded DNA-binding proteins should contain a number of phosphorothioate end-linkages which should be related to the length of the sequence, in order to maintain the same biological activities exerted by their phosphodiester analogues.

  11. Hepatitis B virus DNA integration and transactivation of cellular genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is etiologically related to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Most HCCs contain integrated HBV DNA in hepatocyte, suggesting that the integration may be involved in carcinogenesis. Available data on the integrants from human hepatocellular carcinomas seem to represent primary integrants as well as the products of secondary rearrangements. By means of structural analyses of the possible primary integrants, it has been observed that the replication intermediates of the viral genome are the preferred substrates for integration. The integrated HBV DNA and the target cellular DNA are invariably associated with deletions, possibly reflecting the substrate for, and the mechanism of, the integration reaction. The host DNA sequences as well as the target site of integration in chromosomes are selected randomly suggesting that HBV DNA integration should bring about random mutagenic effects. Analysis of the samples recovered from hepatocellular carcinomas show that the integrated HBV DNA can mediate secondary rearrangements of chromosomes, such as translocations, inversions, deletions and (possibly amplifications. The integration of HBV DNA into the host genome occurs at early steps of clonal tumor expansion. The integration has been shown in a number of cases to affect a variety of cancer-related genes and to exert insertional mutagenesis. However, in contrast to the woodchuck model, in which specific HBV-DNA integration is detectable in most cases, insertional activation or inactivation of cellular genes appears to be a rare event in man. The discovery of transactivating functions exerted by HBx and truncated HBs(urface proteins supports the notion that these could be relevant to hepatocarcinogenesis as these transactivator sequences have been found in a large number of HCC tumors or hepatoma-derived cell lines. The HBx

  12. Analysis of cellular and extracellular DNA in fingerprints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, Julie M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-09

    It has been previously shown that DNA can be recovered from latent fingerprints left on various surfaces [R. A. H. van Oorschot and M. K. Jones, Nature 387, 767 (1997)]. However, the source of the DNA, extracellular versus cellular origin, is difficult to determine. If the DNA is cellular, it is believed to belong to skin cells while extracellular DNA is believed to originate from body fluids such as sweat [D. J. Daly et. al, Forensic Sci. Int. Genet. 6, 41-46 (2012); V. V. Vlassov et. al, BioEssays 29, 654-667 (2007)]. The origin of the DNA in fingerprints has implications for processing and interpretation of forensic evidence. The determination of the origin of DNA in fingerprints is further complicated by the fact that the DNA in fingerprints tends to be at a very low quantity [R. A. H. van Oorschot and M. K. Jones, Nature 387, 767 (1997)]. This study examined fingerprints from five volunteers left on sterilized glass slides and plastic pens. Three fingerprints were left on each glass slide (thumb, index, and middle fingers) while the pens were held as if one was writing with them. The DNA was collected from the objects using the wet swabbing technique (TE buffer). Following collection, the cellular and extracellular components of each sample were separated using centrifugation and an acoustofluidics system. Centrifugation is still the primary separation technique utilized in forensics laboratories, while acoustic focusing uses sound waves to focus large particles (cells) into low pressure nodes, separating them from the rest of the sample matrix. After separation, all samples were quantified using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The overall trend is that there is more DNA in the extracellular fractions than cellular fractions for both centrifugation and acoustofluidic processing. Additionally, more DNA was generally collected from the pen samples than the samples left on glass slides.

  13. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xurui Zhang

    Full Text Available Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research.

  14. The sub-cellular localization of Sulfolobus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristwood, Tamzin; Duggin, Iain G; Wagner, Michaela; Albers, Sonja V; Bell, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Analyses of the DNA replication-associated proteins of hyperthermophilic archaea have yielded considerable insight into the structure and biochemical function of these evolutionarily conserved factors. However, little is known about the regulation and progression of DNA replication in the context of archaeal cells. In the current work, we describe the generation of strains of Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that allow the incorporation of nucleoside analogues during DNA replication. We employ this technology, in conjunction with immunolocalization analyses of replisomes, to investigate the sub-cellular localization of nascent DNA and replisomes. Our data reveal a peripheral localization of replisomes in the cell. Furthermore, while the two replication forks emerging from any one of the three replication origins in the Sulfolobus chromosome remain in close proximity, the three origin loci are separated.

  15. Cellular Uptake of Tile-Assembled DNA Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samet Kocabey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA-based nanostructures have received great attention as molecular vehicles for cellular delivery of biomolecules and cancer drugs. Here, we report on the cellular uptake of tubule-like DNA tile-assembled nanostructures 27 nm in length and 8 nm in diameter that carry siRNA molecules, folic acid and fluorescent dyes. In our observations, the DNA structures are delivered to the endosome and do not reach the cytosol of the GFP-expressing HeLa cells that were used in the experiments. Consistent with this observation, no elevated silencing of the GFP gene could be detected. Furthermore, the presence of up to six molecules of folic acid on the carrier surface did not alter the uptake behavior and gene silencing. We further observed several challenges that have to be considered when performing in vitro and in vivo experiments with DNA structures: (i DNA tile tubes consisting of 42 nt-long oligonucleotides and carrying single- or double-stranded extensions degrade within one hour in cell medium at 37 °C, while the same tubes without extensions are stable for up to eight hours. The degradation is caused mainly by the low concentration of divalent ions in the media. The lifetime in cell medium can be increased drastically by employing DNA tiles that are 84 nt long. (ii Dyes may get cleaved from the oligonucleotides and then accumulate inside the cell close to the mitochondria, which can lead to misinterpretation of data generated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. (iii Single-stranded DNA carrying fluorescent dyes are internalized at similar levels as the DNA tile-assembled tubes used here.

  16. [Cellular immunity in human periapical granuloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrié, B; Grégoire, G

    1991-03-01

    Numerous authors have produced different types of immunoglobulins in analyses of the human periapical granuloma. The present study examines the cellular immunity of the human periapical granuloma, and in particular the distribution of the lymphocyte sub-populations and the macrophage population. The technique used was that of cell surface marking, using monoclonal antibodies on frozen sections. The results reveal equal proportions of inductor T lymphocytes and suppressor T lymphocytes (whereas healthy tissue shows a ratio of 2/1), which explains the chronic nature of the lesion as far as the immune reaction is concerned. The presence of numerous macrophage cells shows that there are important local immune reactions.

  17. Cellular DNA ligase I is recruited to cytoplasmic vaccinia virus factories and masks the role of the vaccinia ligase in viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paran, Nir; De Silva, Frank S; Senkevich, Tatiana G; Moss, Bernard

    2009-12-17

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes DNA polymerase and additional proteins that enable cytoplasmic replication. We confirmed the ability of VACV DNA ligase mutants to replicate and tested the hypothesis that cellular ligases compensate for loss of viral gene expression. RNA silencing of human DNA ligase I expression and a small molecule inhibitor of human DNA ligase I [corrected] severely reduced replication of viral DNA in cells infected with VACV ligase-deficient mutants, indicating that the cellular enzyme plays a complementary role. Replication of ligase-deficient VACV was greatly reduced and delayed in resting primary cells, correlating with initial low levels of ligase I and subsequent viral induction and localization of ligase I in virus factories. These studies indicate that DNA ligation is essential for poxvirus replication and explain the ability of ligase deletion mutants to replicate in dividing cells but exhibit decreased pathogenicity in mice. Encoding its own ligase might allow VACV to "jump-start" DNA synthesis.

  18. Measurement of oxidatively generated base damage in cellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2011-06-03

    This survey focuses on the critical evaluation of the main methods that are currently available for monitoring single and complex oxidatively generated damage to cellular DNA. Among chromatographic methods, HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and to a lesser extent HPLC-ECD which is restricted to a few electroactive nucleobases and nucleosides are appropriate for measuring the formation of single and clustered DNA lesions. Such methods that require optimized protocols for DNA extraction and digestion are sensitive enough for measuring base lesions formed under conditions of severe oxidative stress including exposure to ionizing radiation, UVA light and high intensity UVC laser pulses. In contrast application of GC-MS and HPLC-MS methods that are subject to major drawbacks have been shown to lead to overestimated values of DNA damage. Enzymatic methods that are based on the use of DNA repair glycosylases in order to convert oxidized bases into strand breaks are suitable, even if they are far less specific than HPLC methods, to deal with low levels of single modifications. Several other methods including immunoassays and (32)P-postlabeling methods that are still used suffer from drawbacks and therefore are not recommended. Another difficult topic is the measurement of oxidatively generated clustered DNA lesions that is currently achieved using enzymatic approaches and that would necessitate further investigations.

  19. Caveolar vesicles generate DNA damage and perpetuate cellular aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keith Wheaton

    2011-01-01

    @@ The replicative limit of human fibroblasts has long provided a model to assess the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular aging [1].In culture, fibroblasts which reach the end of their proliferative lifespan acquire profound molecular changes that limit their response to growth factors, and cause permanent exit from the cell cycle [2].

  20. Cytotoxic activity, DNA damage, cellular uptake, apoptosis and western blot analysis of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex against human lung decarcinoma A549 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shang-Hai; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Li, Wei; Han, Bing-Jie; Zhang, Cheng; Zeng, Chuan-Chuan; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2015-11-01

    A new ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex [Ru(dmp)2(pddppn)](ClO4)2Ru1 was synthesized and characterized. The cytotoxic activity in vitro of the complex was evaluated by MTT method. Ru1 shows high effect on the inhibition of the cell growth against BEL-7402, HeLa, MG-63 and A549 cells with low IC50 values of 1.6±0.4, 9.0±0.8, 1.5±0.2 and 1.5±0.3 μM, respectively. The cellular uptake indicates that Ru1 can enter into the cytoplasm and accumulate in the cell nuclei. Ru1 can induce apoptosis in A549 cells and enhance the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, Ru1 can down-regulate the levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-x, Bak, and Bim expression and up-regulate the expression of Bag-1 and Bad. The complex induces apoptosis of A549 cells through an intrinsic ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway, which was accompanied by regulating the expression of caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human cellular protein patterns and their link to genome DNA mapping and sequencing data: towards an integrated approach to the study of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Rasmussen, H H; Leffers, H

    1993-01-01

    two-dimensional gel protein databases will provide an integrated picture of the expression levels and properties of the thousands of protein components of organelles, pathways, and cytoskeletal systems, both under physiological and abnormal conditions, and are expected to lead to the identification...... mapping and sequence information and that offer an integrated approach to the study of gene expression. With the integrated approach offered by two-dimensional gel protein databases it is now possible to reveal phenotype-specific protein(s), to microsequence them, to search for homology with previous...... of new regulatory networks. So far, about 20% (600 out of 2,980) of the total number of proteins recorded in the human keratinocyte protein database have been identified and we are actively gathering qualitative and quantitative biological data on all resolved proteins. Given the current improvements...

  2. Cellular DNA repair cofactors affecting hepatitis B virus infection and replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Zhao; Ning-Bo Hou; Ting Song; Xiang He; Zi-Rui Zheng; Qing-Jun Ma; Li Li; Yan-Hong Zhang; Hui Zhong

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether hepatitis B virus (HBV)infection activates DNA damage response and DNA repair cofactors inhibit HBV infection and replication.METHODS: Human hepatocyte cell line HL7702 was studied. Immunoblotting was performed to test the expression of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-Rad3-related protein (ATR), p21 and the level of phosphorylation of Chk1, p53, H2AX, ATM in HBV-infected or non-infected-cells. Special short RNAi oligos was transfected to induce transient ATR knockdown in HL7702. ATR-ATM chemical inhibitors caffeine (CF) and theophylline (TP), or Chk1 inhibitor 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN01) was studied to determine whether they suppress cellular DNA damage response and MG132 inhibits proteasome.RESULTS: The ATR checkpoint pathway, responding to single-strand breaks in DNA, was activated in response to HBV infection. ATR knockdown cells decreased the HBV DNA yields, implying that HBV infection and replication could activate and exploit the activated DNA damage response. CF/TP or UCN01 reduced the HBV DNA yield by 70% and 80%, respectively. HBV abrogated the ATR-dependent DNA damage signaling pathway by degrading p21, and introduction of the p21 protein before HBV infection reduced the HBV DNA yield. Consistent with this result, p21 accumulation after MG132 treatment also sharply decreased the HBV DNA yield.CONCLUSION: HBV infection can be treated with therapeutic approaches targeting host cell proteins by inhibiting a cellular gene required for HBV replication or by restoring a response abrogated by HBV, thus providing a potential approach to the prevention and treatrnent of HBV infection.

  3. The DNA damage response in viral-induced cellular transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, P A; Luftig, M A

    2012-01-31

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has emerged as a critical tumour suppressor pathway responding to cellular DNA replicative stress downstream of aberrant oncogene over-expression. Recent studies have now implicated the DDR as a sensor of oncogenic virus infection. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which tumour viruses activate and also suppress the host DDR. The mechanism of tumour virus induction of the DDR is intrinsically linked to the need for these viruses to promote an S-phase environment to replicate their nucleic acid during infection. However, inappropriate expression of viral oncoproteins can also activate the DDR through various mechanisms including replicative stress, direct interaction with DDR components and induction of reactive oxygen species. Given the growth-suppressive consequences of activating the DDR, tumour viruses have also evolved mechanisms to attenuate these pathways. Aberrant expression of viral oncoproteins may therefore promote tumourigenesis through increased somatic mutation and aneuploidy due to DDR inactivation. This review will focus on the interplay between oncogenic viruses and the DDR with respect to cellular checkpoint control and transformation.

  4. The involvement of XPC protein in the cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan WANG; Alan DOMBKOWSKI; Lynn CHUANG; Xiao Xin S XU

    2004-01-01

    Recognition of DNA damage is a critical step for DNA damage-mediated cellular response. XPC is an important DNA damage recognition protein involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). We have studied the XPC protein in cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response. Comparison of the microarray data from both normal and XPCdefective human fibroblasts identified 861 XPC-responsive genes in the cisplatin treatment (with minimum fold change≥1.5).The cell cycle and cell proliferation-related genes are the most affected genes by the XPC defect in the treatment. Many other cellular function genes, especially the DNA repair and signal transduction-related genes, were also affected by the XPC defect in the treatment. To validate the microarray data, the transcription levels of some microarray-identified genes were also determined by an RT-PCR based real time PCR assay. The real time PCR results are consistent with the microarray data for most of the tested genes, indicating the reliability of the microarray data. To further validate the microarray data, the cisplatin treatment-mediated caspase-3 activation was also determined. The Western blot hybridization results indicate that the XPC defect greatly attenuates the cisplatin treatment-mediated Caspase-3 activation. We elucidated the role of p53 protein in the XPC protein DNA damage recognition-mediated signaling process. The XPC defect reduces the cisplatin treatment-mediated p53 response. These results suggest that the XPC protein plays an important role in the cisplatin treatment-mediated cellular response. It may also suggest a possible mechanism of cancer cell drug resistance.

  5. At the intersection of non-coding transcription, DNA repair, chromatin structure, and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke eOhsawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that non-coding RNAs play a critical role in regulating gene expression. Recent paradigm-setting studies are now revealing that non-coding RNAs, other than microRNAs, also play intriguing roles in the maintenance of chromatin structure, in the DNA damage response, and in adult human stem cell aging. In this review, we will discuss the complex inter-dependent relationships among non-coding RNA transcription, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and adult stem cell senescence. DNA damage-induced non-coding RNAs transcribed in the vicinity of the DNA break regulate recruitment of the DNA damage machinery and DNA repair efficiency. We will discuss the correlation between non-coding RNAs and DNA damage repair efficiency and the potential role of changing chromatin structures around double-strand break sites. On the other hand, induction of non-coding RNA transcription from the repetitive Alu elements occurs during human stem cell aging and hinders efficient DNA repair causing entry into senescence. We will discuss how this fine balance between transcription and genomic instability may be regulated by the dramatic changes to chromatin structure that accompany cellular senescence.

  6. Extra cellular matrix features in human meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnani, S; Castaldo, C; Di Meglio, F; Sciorio, S; Giordano-Lanza, G

    2000-01-01

    We collected human fetal and adult normal meninges to relate the age of the tissue with the presence of collagenous and non-collagenous components of Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM). Immunohistochemistry led us to observe some differences in the amount and in the distribution of these proteins between the two sets of specimens. In particular, laminin and tenascin seem to be expressed more intensely in fetal meninges when compared to adult ones. In order to investigate whether the morphofunctional characteristics of fetal meninges may be represented in pathological conditions we also studied meningeal specimens from human meningiomas. Our attention was particularly focused on the expression of those non-collagenous proteins involved in nervous cell migration and neuronal morphogenesis as laminin and tenascin, which were present in lesser amount in normal adult specimens. Microscopical evidences led us to hipothesize that these proteins which are synthesized in a good amount during the fetal development of meninges can be newly produced in tumors. On the contrary, the role of tenascin and laminin in adult meninges is probably only interesting for their biophysical characteristics.

  7. DNA-Destabilizing Agents as an Alternative Approach for Targeting DNA: Mechanisms of Action and Cellular Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Lenglet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA targeting drugs represent a large proportion of the actual anticancer drug pharmacopeia, both in terms of drug brands and prescription volumes. Small DNA-interacting molecules share the ability of certain proteins to change the DNA helix's overall organization and geometrical orientation via tilt, roll, twist, slip, and flip effects. In this ocean of DNA-interacting compounds, most stabilize both DNA strands and very few display helix-destabilizing properties. These types of DNA-destabilizing effect are observed with certain mono- or bis-intercalators and DNA alkylating agents (some of which have been or are being developed as cancer drugs. The formation of locally destabilized DNA portions could interfere with protein/DNA recognition and potentially affect several crucial cellular processes, such as DNA repair, replication, and transcription. The present paper describes the molecular basis of DNA destabilization, the cellular impact on protein recognition, and DNA repair processes and the latter's relationships with antitumour efficacy.

  8. Effects of Captan on DNA and DNA metabolic processes in human diploid fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, R D

    1992-01-01

    The fungicide Captan has been examined for its effects on DNA and DNA processing in order to better understand the genotoxicity associated with this agent. Captan treatment resulted in production of DNA single strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links and elicited an excision repair response in human diploid fibroblasts. Captan was also shown to inhibit cellular DNA synthesis and to form stable adducts in herring sperm and human cellular DNA. Misincorporation of nucleotides into Captan-treated synthetic DNA templates was significantly elevated in an in vitro assay using E. coli DNA polymerase I, suggesting that DNA adduct formation by Captan could have mutagenic consequences. In sum, these studies demonstrate that Captan is capable of interacting with DNA at a number of levels and that these interactions could provide the basis for Captan's genotoxicity. The extreme cytotoxicity of this fungicide, however, could be due to other cellular effects since at the IC50 for cell killing, approximately 0.8 microM, none of the above genotoxic events could be detected by the methods employed.

  9. Autoantigenic proteins that bind recombinogenic sequences in Epstein-Barr virus and cellular DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    We have identified conserved autoantigenic cellular proteins that bind to G-rich sequence motifs in recombinogenic regions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA. This binding activity, called TRBP, recognizes the EBV terminal repeats, a locus responsible for interconversion of linear and circular EBV DNA. We found that TRBP also binds to EBV DNA sequences involved in deletion of EBNA2, a gene product required for immortalization. We show that TRBP binds sequences present in repetitive cellular DNA,...

  10. Cadmium: cellular effects, modifications of biomolecules, modulation of DNA repair and genotoxic consequences (a review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, G; Averbeck, D

    2006-11-01

    Cadmium is an important toxic environmental heavy metal. Occupational and environmental pollution with cadmium results mainly from mining, metallurgy industry and manufactures of nickel-cadmium batteries, pigments and plastic stabilizers. Important sources of human intoxication are cigarette smoke as well as food, water and air contaminations. In humans, cadmium exposures have been associated with cancers of the prostate, lungs and testes. Acute exposures are responsible for damage to these organs. Chronic intoxication is associated with obstructive airway disease, emphysema, irreversible renal failure, bone disorders and immuno-suppression. At the cellular level, cadmium affects proliferation, differentiation and causes apoptosis. It has been classified as a carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). However, it is weakly genotoxic. Indirect effects of cadmium provoke generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage. Cadmium modulates also gene expression and signal transduction, reduces activities of proteins involved in antioxidant defenses. Several studies have shown that it interferes with DNA repair. The present review focuses on the effects of cadmium in mammalian cells with special emphasis on the induction of damage to DNA, membranes and proteins, the inhibition of different types of DNA repair and the induction of apoptosis. Current data and hypotheses on the mechanisms involved in cadmium genotoxicity and carcinogenesis are outlined.

  11. A germline polymorphism of DNA polymerase beta induces genomic instability and cellular transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yamtich

    Full Text Available Several germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been identified in the POLB gene, but little is known about their cellular and biochemical impact. DNA Polymerase β (Pol β, encoded by the POLB gene, is the main gap-filling polymerase involved in base excision repair (BER, a pathway that protects the genome from the consequences of oxidative DNA damage. In this study we tested the hypothesis that expression of the POLB germline coding SNP (rs3136797 in mammalian cells could induce a cancerous phenotype. Expression of this SNP in both human and mouse cells induced double-strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and cellular transformation. Following treatment with an alkylating agent, cells expressing this coding SNP accumulated BER intermediate substrates, including single-strand and double-strand breaks. The rs3136797 SNP encodes the P242R variant Pol β protein and biochemical analysis showed that P242R protein had a slower catalytic rate than WT, although P242R binds DNA similarly to WT. Our results suggest that people who carry the rs3136797 germline SNP may be at an increased risk for cancer susceptibility.

  12. The DNA-damage response in human biology and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Stephen P; Bartek, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    , signal its presence and mediate its repair. Such responses, which have an impact on a wide range of cellular events, are biologically significant because they prevent diverse human diseases. Our improving understanding of DNA-damage responses is providing new avenues for disease management....

  13. DNA methylation and healthy human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meaghan J; Goodman, Sarah J; Kobor, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    The process of aging results in a host of changes at the cellular and molecular levels, which include senescence, telomere shortening, and changes in gene expression. Epigenetic patterns also change over the lifespan, suggesting that epigenetic changes may constitute an important component of the aging process. The epigenetic mark that has been most highly studied is DNA methylation, the presence of methyl groups at CpG dinucleotides. These dinucleotides are often located near gene promoters and associate with gene expression levels. Early studies indicated that global levels of DNA methylation increase over the first few years of life and then decrease beginning in late adulthood. Recently, with the advent of microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies, increases in variability of DNA methylation with age have been observed, and a number of site-specific patterns have been identified. It has also been shown that certain CpG sites are highly associated with age, to the extent that prediction models using a small number of these sites can accurately predict the chronological age of the donor. Together, these observations point to the existence of two phenomena that both contribute to age-related DNA methylation changes: epigenetic drift and the epigenetic clock. In this review, we focus on healthy human aging throughout the lifetime and discuss the dynamics of DNA methylation as well as how interactions between the genome, environment, and the epigenome influence aging rates. We also discuss the impact of determining 'epigenetic age' for human health and outline some important caveats to existing and future studies.

  14. Oxidized Extracellular DNA as a Stress Signal in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei V. Ermakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “cell-free DNA” (cfDNA was recently coined for DNA fragments from plasma/serum, while DNA present in in vitro cell culture media is known as extracellular DNA (ecDNA. Under oxidative stress conditions, the levels of oxidative modification of cellular DNA and the rate of cell death increase. Dying cells release their damaged DNA, thus, contributing oxidized DNA fragments to the pool of cfDNA/ecDNA. Oxidized cell-free DNA could serve as a stress signal that promotes irradiation-induced bystander effect. Evidence points to TLR9 as a possible candidate for oxidized DNA sensor. An exposure to oxidized ecDNA stimulates a synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS that evokes an adaptive response that includes transposition of the homologous loci within the nucleus, polymerization and the formation of the stress fibers of the actin, as well as activation of the ribosomal gene expression, and nuclear translocation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2 that, in turn, mediates induction of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, the oxidized DNA is a stress signal released in response to oxidative stress in the cultured cells and, possibly, in the human body; in particular, it might contribute to systemic abscopal effects of localized irradiation treatments.

  15. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-09-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R2 > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity.

  16. A cellular modelsystem of differentiated human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Kristensen, S R; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to select an effective and stable protocol for the differentiation of human satellite cells (Sc) and to identify the optimal time period for the experimental use of differentiated human Sc-cultures. In order to identify the differentiation conditions which give a good su...

  17. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  18. Cellular models for mitochondrial DNA-based diseases: lymphoblastoid cell lines and transmitochondrial cybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, Sun; Xiaoxu, Zhao; Lihua, Qiao; Shuang, Mei; Zhipeng, Nie; Qinghai, Zhang; Yanchun, Ji; Pingping, Jiang; Min-Xin, Guan

    2016-07-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause a variety of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases which have been studied using Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and transmitochondrial cybrids. Individual genetic information is preserved permanently in LCLs while the development of transmitochondrial cybrids provide ex-vivo cellular platform to study molecular mechanism of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases. The cytoplasmic donor cells for previous transmitochondrial cybrids come from patient's tissue or platelet directly. Here, we depicted in details the principle, methods and techniques to establish LCLs from frozen peripheral bloods harboring mitochondrial 4401G > A mutation by infection of Epstein Barr virus, and then to generate cybrids using ρ(0) 206 and LCLs. The process of establishing these two cellular models was summarized into four steps as follows: (1) Generation of LCLs; (2) Transformation; (3) Selection; (4) Verification. To faithfully represent the function of mtDNA mutation, we analyzed and identified the sites of mtDNA mutations and copy numbers of each cellular models as well as the karyotype of transmitochondrial cybrids. Those clones with consistent parameters were selected for preservation and future analysis of the function of point mutations of mtDNA. Although these two cellular models play important roles in understanding molecular mechanism of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases on the cellular level, their limitations should be considered when elucidating the character of tissue specificity of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases.

  19. IFI16, an amplifier of DNA-damage response: Role in cellular senescence and aging-associated inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Divaker; Panchanathan, Ravichandran

    2016-07-01

    DNA-damage induces a DNA-damage response (DDR) in mammalian cells. The response, depending upon the cell-type and the extent of DNA-damage, ultimately results in cell death or cellular senescence. DDR-induced signaling in cells activates the ATM-p53 and ATM-IKKα/β-interferon (IFN)-β signaling pathways, thus leading to an induction of the p53 and IFN-inducible IFI16 gene. Further, upon DNA-damage, DNA accumulates in the cytoplasm, thereby inducing the IFI16 protein and STING-dependent IFN-β production and activation of the IFI16 inflammasome, resulting in the production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and IL-18). Increased expression of IFI16 protein in a variety of cell-types promotes cellular senescence. However, reduced expression of IFI16 in cells promotes cell proliferation. Because expression of the IFI16 gene is induced by activation of DNA-damage response in cells and increased levels of IFI16 protein in cells potentiate the p53-mediated transcriptional activation of genes and p53 and pRb-mediated cell cycle arrest, we discuss how an improved understanding of the role of IFI16 protein in cellular senescence and associated inflammatory secretory phenotype is likely to identify the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of aging-associated human inflammatory diseases and a failure to cancer therapy.

  20. Quantitation by flow microfluorometry of total cellular DNA in Acanthamoeba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulson, P.B.; Tyndall, R.

    1978-01-01

    The DNA content of five speciea of Acanthamoeba was determined by flow microfluorometry. Acanthamoeba castellanii (AC-30), acanthamoeba polyphaga (APG and P-23), acanthamoeba rhysodes, acanthamoeba culbertsoni (A-1), and acanthamoeba royreba were grown in a casitone based medium 24 to 48 hr. The trophozoites were harvested, fixed in 70% ethanol (acidified), pretreated with RNase, stained with propidium diiodide, and evaluated for DNA-bound fluorescence. All species tested had DNA values between 2.0 to 5.0 pg/cell. These results placed DNA/cell values of Acanthamoeba slightly lower than DNA/cell values of other eucaryotic cells and much lower than Amoeba proteus values. These results indicate that FMF may be a useful adjunct in distinguishing Acanthamoeba cells from either eucaryotic cells or some other amoeba. However, differences in DNA/cell between species of Acanthamoeba are small and would not be useful in identification of species.

  1. Cellular Responses to Cisplatin-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alakananda Basu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the most effective anticancer agents widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. It is generally considered as a cytotoxic drug which kills cancer cells by damaging DNA and inhibiting DNA synthesis. How cells respond to cisplatin-induced DNA damage plays a critical role in deciding cisplatin sensitivity. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage activates various signaling pathways to prevent or promote cell death. This paper summarizes our current understandings regarding the mechanisms by which cisplatin induces cell death and the bases of cisplatin resistance. We have discussed various steps, including the entry of cisplatin inside cells, DNA repair, drug detoxification, DNA damage response, and regulation of cisplatin-induced apoptosis by protein kinases. An understanding of how various signaling pathways regulate cisplatin-induced cell death should aid in the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  2. Methods of introducing nucleic acids into cellular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lajoie, Marc J.; Gregg, Christopher J.; Mosberg, Joshua A.; Church, George M.

    2017-06-27

    A method of introducing a nucleic acid sequence into a cell is provided where the cell has impaired or inhibited or disrupted DnaG primase activity or impaired or inhibited or disrupted DnaB helicase activity, or larger or increased gaps or distance between Okazaki fragments or lowered or reduced frequency of Okazaki fragment initiation, or the cell has increased single stranded DNA (ssDNA) on the lagging strand of the replication fork including transforming the cell through recombination with a nucleic acid oligomer.

  3. XRCC1 and DNA polymerase β in cellular protection against cytotoxic DNA single-strand breaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julie K Horton; Mary Watson; Donna F Stefanick; Daniel T Shaughnessy; Jack A Taylor; Samuel H Wilson

    2008-01-01

    Single-strand breaks (SSBs) can occur in cells either directly, or indirectly following initiation of base excision re-pair (BER). SSBs generally have blocked termini lacking the conventional 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl groups and require further processing prior to DNA synthesis and ligation. XRCC1 is devoid of any known enzymatic activity, but it can physically interact with other proteins involved in all stages of the overlapping SSB repair and BER pathways, including those that conduct the rate-limiting end-tailoring, and in many cases can stimulate their enzymatic activities. XRCC1-/- mouse fibroblasts are most hypersensitive to agents that produce DNA lesions repaired by monofunctional glycosylase-initiated BER and that result in formation of indirect SSBs. A requirement for the deoxyribose phosphate lyase activity of DNA polymerase β (polβ) is specific to this pathway, whereas pol β is implicated in gap-filling during repair of many types of SSBs. Elevated levels of strand breaks, and diminished repair, have been demonstrated in MMS-treated XRCC1-/-, and to a lesser extent in polβ-/- cell lines, compared with wild-type cells. Thus a strong correlation is observed between cellular sensitivity to MMS and the ability of cells to repair MMS-induced damage. Exposure of wild-type andpolβ-/- cells to an inhibitor of PARP activity dramatically potentiates MMS-induccd cytotoxicity. XRCC1-/- cellsare also sensitized by PARP inhibition demonstrating that PARP-mediated poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays a role inmodulation of cytotoxicity beyond recruitment of XRCC1 to sites of DNA damage.

  4. Potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase in cellular resistance to ionizing radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; ZHANG Hong; WANG Yanling; WANG Xiaohu; HAO Jifang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the ability of DNA-PK-deficient (M059J) and -proficient (M059K) cells to undergo the rate of cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis after 10 Gy X-ray irradiation, and the role of DNA-PK in radiosensitivity. The results showed that M059J cells exhibited hyper-radiosensitivity compared with M059K cells. A strong G2 phase arrest was observed in M059J cells post irradiation. Significant accumulation in the G2 phase in M059J cells was accompanied by apoptosis at 12 h. Altogether, the data suggested that DNA-PK may have two roles in mammalian cells after DNA damage, a role in DNA DSB repair and a second role in DNA-damaged cells to traverse a G2 checkpoint, by which DNA-PK may affect cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation.

  5. Piracy on the molecular level: human herpesviruses manipulate cellular chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Tanner, Anne; Stutz, Eric W; Poole, Brian D; Berges, Bradford K

    2016-03-01

    Cellular chemotaxis is important to tissue homeostasis and proper development. Human herpesvirus species influence cellular chemotaxis by regulating cellular chemokines and chemokine receptors. Herpesviruses also express various viral chemokines and chemokine receptors during infection. These changes to chemokine concentrations and receptor availability assist in the pathogenesis of herpesviruses and contribute to a variety of diseases and malignancies. By interfering with the positioning of host cells during herpesvirus infection, viral spread is assisted, latency can be established and the immune system is prevented from eradicating viral infection.

  6. Analysis of Human Mobility Based on Cellular Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifiansyah, F.; Saptawati, G. A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays not only adult but even teenager and children have then own mobile phones. This phenomena indicates that the mobile phone becomes an important part of everyday’s life. Based on these indication, the amount of cellular data also increased rapidly. Cellular data defined as the data that records communication among mobile phone users. Cellular data is easy to obtain because the telecommunications company had made a record of the data for the billing system of the company. Billing data keeps a log of the users cellular data usage each time. We can obtained information from the data about communication between users. Through data visualization process, an interesting pattern can be seen in the raw cellular data, so that users can obtain prior knowledge to perform data analysis. Cellular data processing can be done using data mining to find out human mobility patterns and on the existing data. In this paper, we use frequent pattern mining and finding association rules to observe the relation between attributes in cellular data and then visualize them. We used weka tools for finding the rules in stage of data mining. Generally, the utilization of cellular data can provide supporting information for the decision making process and become a data support to provide solutions and information needed by the decision makers.

  7. Cellular receptors for human enterovirus species A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorihiro eNishimura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Human enterovirus species A (HEV-A is one of the four species of HEV in the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae. Among HEV-A, coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 and enterovirus 71 (EV71 are the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. Some other types of HEV-A are commonly associated with herpangina. Although HFMD and herpangina due to HEV-A are common febrile diseases among infants and children, EV71 can cause various neurological diseases, such as aseptic meningitis and fatal encephalitis.Recently, two human transmembrane proteins, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 and scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2, were identified as functional receptors for EV71 and CVA16. In in vitro infection experiments using the prototype HEV-A strains, PSGL-1 and SCARB2 could be responsible for the specific receptors for EV71 and CVA16. However, the involvement of both receptors in the in vitro and in vivo infections of clinical isolates of HEV-A has not been clarified yet. To elucidate a diverse array of the clinical outcome of HEV-A-associated diseases, the identification and characterization of HEV-A receptors may provide useful information in understanding the HEV-A pathogenesis at a molecular level.

  8. Expression of DNA-dependent protein kinase in human granulocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annahita SALLMYR; Anna MILLER; Aida GABDOULKHAKOVA; Valentina SAFRONOVA; Gunnel HENRIKSSON; Anders BREDBERG

    2004-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have been reported to completely lack of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) which is composed of Ku protein and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs, needed for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks. Promyelocytic HL-60 cells express a variant form of Ku resulting in enhanced radiation sensitivity. This raises the question if low efficiency of NHEJ, instrumental for the cellular repair of oxidative damage, is a normal characteristic of myeloid differentiation. Here we confirmed the complete lack of DNAPK in P MN protein extracts, and the expression of the truncated Ku86 variant form in HL-60. However, this degradation of DNA-PK was shown to be due to a DNA-PK-degrading protease in PMN and HL-60. In addition, by using a protease-resistant whole cell assay, both Ku86 and DNA-PKcs could be demonstrated in PMN, suggesting the previously reported absence in PMN of DNA-PK to be an artefact. The levels of Ku86 and DNA-PKcs were much reduced in PMN, as compared with that of the lymphocytes, whereas HL-60 displayed a markedly elevated DNA-PK concentration.In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of reduced, not depleted expression of DNA-PK during the mature stages of myeloid differentiation.

  9. Stapling monomeric GCN4 peptides allows for DNA binding and enhanced cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Abhishek; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Ruiz García, Yara; Louage, Benoit; De Geest, Bruno G; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-04-01

    The basic DNA recognition region of the GCN4 protein comprising 23 amino acids has been modified to contain two optimally positioned cysteines which have been linked and stapled using cross-linkers of suitable lengths. This results in stapled peptides with a stabilized α-helical conformation which allows for DNA binding and concurrent enhancement of cellular uptake.

  10. Fluorescent cyanine probe for DNA detection and cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Chao; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2014-03-01

    In our study, two carbazole-based cyanines, 3,6-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-9-methyl carbazole diiodide (A) and 6,6'-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-bis(9-methyl-carbazol-3yl)methane diiodide (B) were synthesized and employed as light-up probes for DNA and cell imaging. Both of the cyanine probes possess a symmetric structure and bis-cationic center. The obvious induced circular dichroism signals in circular dichroism spectra reveal that the molecules can specifically interact with DNA. Strong fluorescence enhancement is observed when these two cyanines are bound to DNA. These cyanine probes show high binding affinity to oligonucleotides but different binding preferences to various secondary structures. Confocal microscopy images of fixed cell stained by the probes exhibit strong brightness and high contrast in nucleus with a very low cytoplasmic background.

  11. The future of human DNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Saade, Fadi; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2012-12-31

    DNA vaccines have evolved greatly over the last 20 years since their invention, but have yet to become a competitive alternative to conventional protein or carbohydrate based human vaccines. Whilst safety concerns were an initial barrier, the Achilles heel of DNA vaccines remains their poor immunogenicity when compared to protein vaccines. A wide variety of strategies have been developed to optimize DNA vaccine immunogenicity, including codon optimization, genetic adjuvants, electroporation and sophisticated prime-boost regimens, with each of these methods having its advantages and limitations. Whilst each of these methods has contributed to incremental improvements in DNA vaccine efficacy, more is still needed if human DNA vaccines are to succeed commercially. This review foresees a final breakthrough in human DNA vaccines will come from application of the latest cutting-edge technologies, including "epigenetics" and "omics" approaches, alongside traditional techniques to improve immunogenicity such as adjuvants and electroporation, thereby overcoming the current limitations of DNA vaccines in humans.

  12. Differential association with cellular substructures of pseudorabies virus DNA during early and late phases of replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Porat, T.; Veach, R.A.; Blankenship, M.L.; Kaplan, A.S.

    1984-12-01

    Pseudorabies virus DNA synthesis can be divided into two phases, early and late, which can be distinguished from each other on the basis of the structures of the replicating DNA. The two types of replicating virus DNA can also be distinguished from each other on the basis of the cellular substructures with which each is associated. Analysis by electron microscopic autoradiography showed that during the first round of replication, nascent virus DNA was found in the vicinity of the nuclear membrane; during later rounds of replication the nascent virus DNA was located centrally within the nucleus. The degree of association of virus DNA synthesized at early and late phases with the nuclear matrix fractions also differed; a larger proportion of late than of early nascent virus DNA was associated with this fraction. While nascent cellular DNA only was associated in significant amounts with the nuclear matrix fraction, a large part (up to 40%) of all the virus DNA remained associated with this fraction. However, no retention of specific virus proteins in this fraction was observed. Except for two virus proteins, which were preferentially extracted from the nuclear matrix, approximately 20% of all virus proteins remained in the nuclear matrix fraction. The large proportion of virus DNA associated with the nuclear fraction indicated that virus DNA may be intimately associated with some proteins.

  13. Photoenzyme probes of photodamage to cells and cellular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    Development of photoenzyme probes for detection of ultraviolet damage to cells and DNA is reviewed with special emphasis on a process using polyethylene glycol to induce cell fusion. Polyethylene glycol is easy to obtain and handle, is gentle to the cells and does not induce latent or productive virus infection; therefore, it may be a general method for insertion of exogenous enzymes into mammalian cells. (PCS)

  14. Cellular delivery of enzyme-loaded DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ora, Ari; Järvihaavisto, Erika; Zhang, Hongbo; Auvinen, Henni; Santos, Hélder A; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Linko, Veikko

    2016-12-01

    In this communication, we show that active enzymes can be delivered into HEK293 cells in vitro when they are attached to tubular DNA origami nanostructures. We use bioluminescent enzymes as a cargo and monitor their activity from a cell lysate. The results show that the enzymes stay intact and retain their activity in the transfection process. The method is highly modular, which makes it a compelling candidate for a great variety of delivery applications.

  15. Analysis of Cellular DNA Content by Flow and Laser Scanning Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Halicka, H. Dorota; Zhao, Hong

    2010-01-01

    This chapter covers several aspects of methodology of DNA content analysis in individual cells that is most commonly used for assessment of DNA ploidy and for enumeration of cells in particular phases of the cell cycle. Briefly presented are general principles of instrumentation and cell analysis by flow- and laser scanning- cytometry. Described are major methods designed to stain DNA with fluorochromes in live cells, in detergent-permeabilized cells, in cells fixed prior to DNA staining as well as in nuclei of cells isolated from paraffin-embedded tissues. Briefly addressed are approaches to estimate cellular DNA content in conjunction with cellular immunophenotype. Discussed are factors that affect accuracy of DNA content measurement such as: (i) differences in chromatin structure of the analyzed cells that restrict DNA accessibility to fluorochromes, (ii) stoichiometry of interaction between fluorochromes and DNA in chromatin and (iii) chemical mass action law defining dependency of fluorochrome binding to DNA in relation to fluorochrome concentration and number of potential binding sites in a sample. Described also are controls used to ensure accuracy of DNA ploidy determination, the principles in ploidy assessment and possible pitfalls in analysis. PMID:20687474

  16. When genome integrity and cell cycle decisions collide: roles of polo kinases in cellular adaptation to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Diego; D'Amours, Damien

    2014-09-01

    The drive to proliferate and the need to maintain genome integrity are two of the most powerful forces acting on biological systems. When these forces enter in conflict, such as in the case of cells experiencing DNA damage, feedback mechanisms are activated to ensure that cellular proliferation is stopped and no further damage is introduced while cells repair their chromosomal lesions. In this circumstance, the DNA damage response dominates over the biological drive to proliferate, and may even result in programmed cell death if the damage cannot be repaired efficiently. Interestingly, the drive to proliferate can under specific conditions overcome the DNA damage response and lead to a reactivation of the proliferative program in checkpoint-arrested cells. This phenomenon is known as adaptation to DNA damage and is observed in all eukaryotic species where the process has been studied, including normal and cancer cells in humans. Polo-like kinases (PLKs) are critical regulators of the adaptation response to DNA damage and they play key roles at the interface of cell cycle and checkpoint-related decisions in cells. Here, we review recent progress in defining the specific roles of PLKs in the adaptation process and how this conserved family of eukaryotic kinases can integrate the fundamental need to preserve genomic integrity with effective cellular proliferation.

  17. The Yin-Yang of DNA Damage Response: Roles in Tumorigenesis and Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Senescent cells are relatively stable, lacking proliferation capacity yet retaining metabolic activity. In contrast, cancer cells are rather invasive and devastating, with uncontrolled proliferative capacity and resistance to cell death signals. Although tumorigenesis and cellular senescence are seemingly opposite pathological events, they are actually driven by a unified mechanism: DNA damage. Integrity of the DNA damage response (DDR network can impose a tumorigenesis barrier by navigating abnormal cells to cellular senescence. Compromise of DDR, possibly due to the inactivation of DDR components, may prevent cellular senescence but at the expense of tumor formation. Here we provide an overview of the fundamental role of DDR in tumorigenesis and cellular senescence, under the light of the Yin-Yang concept of Chinese philosophy. Emphasis is placed on discussing DDR outcome in the light of in vivo models. This information is critical as it can help make better decisions for clinical treatments of cancer patients.

  18. Protein kinase CK2 localizes to sites of DNA double-strand break regulating the cellular response to DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Birgitte B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK is a nuclear complex composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs and a heterodimeric DNA-targeting subunit Ku. DNA-PK is a major component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ repair mechanism, which is activated in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species and radiomimetic drugs. We have recently reported that down-regulation of protein kinase CK2 by siRNA interference results in enhanced cell death specifically in DNA-PKcs-proficient human glioblastoma cells, and this event is accompanied by decreased autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at S2056 and delayed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Results In the present study, we show that CK2 co-localizes with phosphorylated histone H2AX to sites of DNA damage and while CK2 gene knockdown is associated with delayed DNA damage repair, its overexpression accelerates this process. We report for the first time evidence that lack of CK2 destabilizes the interaction of DNA-PKcs with DNA and with Ku80 at sites of genetic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CK2 regulates the phosphorylation levels of DNA-PKcs only in response to direct induction of DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusions Taken together, these results strongly indicate that CK2 plays a prominent role in NHEJ by facilitating and/or stabilizing the binding of DNA-PKcs and, possibly other repair proteins, to the DNA ends contributing to efficient DNA damage repair in mammalian cells.

  19. Cellular interactions of doxorubicin-loaded DNA-modified halloysite nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeonju; Jung, Goo-Eun; Cho, Sang Joon; Geckeler, Kurt E.; Fuchs, Harald

    2013-08-01

    Halloysite nanotube (HNT)-based supramolecular complexes are synthesized and evaluated with respect to their cytotoxicity and effects on cellular structures. As HNTs are water-insoluble, DNA is applied for wrapping the surface of HNTs to enhance their water-dispersibility. To investigate the potential of DNA-wrapped HNTs (HD) as a promising drug delivery carrier, doxorubicin (DOX) is introduced as a model anticancer agent and loaded onto HD. The DOX-loaded, DNA-wrapped HNTs (HDD) show sustained DOX release over two weeks without initial burst of DOX indicating delayed DOX release inside cells. In addition, effects of DNA-wrapped HNTs (HD) or HDD on the cytoskeleton organization of A549 cells are studied by visualizing the distribution of F-actin filaments using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and cellular morphological changes are observed by scanning electron microscopy and scanning ion conductance microscopy.Halloysite nanotube (HNT)-based supramolecular complexes are synthesized and evaluated with respect to their cytotoxicity and effects on cellular structures. As HNTs are water-insoluble, DNA is applied for wrapping the surface of HNTs to enhance their water-dispersibility. To investigate the potential of DNA-wrapped HNTs (HD) as a promising drug delivery carrier, doxorubicin (DOX) is introduced as a model anticancer agent and loaded onto HD. The DOX-loaded, DNA-wrapped HNTs (HDD) show sustained DOX release over two weeks without initial burst of DOX indicating delayed DOX release inside cells. In addition, effects of DNA-wrapped HNTs (HD) or HDD on the cytoskeleton organization of A549 cells are studied by visualizing the distribution of F-actin filaments using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and cellular morphological changes are observed by scanning electron microscopy and scanning ion conductance microscopy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02665e

  20. Irreparable telomeric DNA damage and persistent DDR signalling as a shared causative mechanism of cellular senescence and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiello, Francesca; Herbig, Utz; Longhese, Maria Pia; Fumagalli, Marzia; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA repair and halts cell cycle. If damage is not resolved, cells can enter into an irreversible state of proliferative arrest called cellular senescence. Organismal ageing in mammals is associated with accumulation of markers of cellular senescence and DDR persistence at telomeres. Since the vast majority of the cells in mammals are non-proliferating, how do they age? Are telomeres involved? Also oncogene activation causes cellular senescence due to altered DNA replication and DDR activation in particular at the telomeres. Is there a common mechanism shared among apparently distinct types of cellular senescence? And what is the role of telomeric DNA damage?

  1. Activation of WIP1 phosphatase by HTLV-1 Tax mitigates the cellular response to DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajhal Dayaram

    Full Text Available Genomic instability stemming from dysregulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA damage response (DDR is a common feature of many cancers. The cancer adult T cell leukemia (ATL can occur in individuals infected with human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, and ATL cells contain extensive chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting that they have defects in the recognition or repair of DNA damage. Since Tax is the transforming protein encoded by HTLV-1, we asked whether Tax can affect cell cycle checkpoints and the DDR. Using a combination of flow cytometry and DNA repair assays we showed that Tax-expressing cells exit G(1 phase and initiate DNA replication prematurely following damage. Reduced phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX and RPA2, phosphoproteins that are essential to properly initiate the DDR, was also observed in Tax-expressing cells. To determine the cause of decreased DDR protein phosphorylation in Tax-expressing cells, we examined the cellular phosphatase, WIP1, which is known to dephosphorylate γH2AX. We found that Tax can interact with Wip1 in vivo and in vitro, and that Tax-expressing cells display elevated levels of Wip1 mRNA. In vitro phosphatase assays showed that Tax can enhance Wip1 activity on a γH2AX peptide target by 2-fold. Thus, loss of γH2AX in vivo could be due, in part, to increased expression and activity of WIP1 in the presence of Tax. siRNA knockdown of WIP1 in Tax-expressing cells rescued γH2AX in response to damage, confirming the role of WIP1 in the DDR. These studies demonstrate that Tax can disengage the G(1/S checkpoint by enhancing WIP1 activity, resulting in reduced DDR. Premature G(1 exit of Tax-expressing cells in the presence of DNA lesions creates an environment that tolerates incorporation of random mutations into the host genome.

  2. Molecular and cellular functions of the FANCJ DNA helicase defective in cancer and in Fanconi Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Brosh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The FANCJ DNA helicase is mutated in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer as well as the progressive bone marrow failure disorder Fanconi anemia (FA. FANCJ is linked to cancer suppression and DNA double strand break (DSB repair through its direct interaction with the hereditary breast cancer associated gene product, BRCA1. FANCJ also operates in the FA pathway of interstrand cross-link (ICL repair and contributes to homologous recombination (HR. FANCJ collaborates with a number of DNA metabolizing proteins implicated in DNA damage detection and repair, and plays an important role in cell cycle checkpoint control. In addition to its role in the classical FA pathway, FANCJ is believed to have other functions that are centered on alleviating replication stress. FANCJ resolves G-quadruplex (G4 DNA structures that are known to affect cellular replication and transcription, and potentially plays a role in the preservation and functionality of chromosomal structures such as telomeres. Recent studies suggest that FANCJ helps to maintain chromatin structure and preserve epigenetic stability by facilitating smooth progression of the replication fork when it encounters DNA damage or an alternate DNA structure such as a G4. Ongoing studies suggest a prominent but still not well-understood role of FANCJ in transcriptional regulation, chromosomal structure and function, and DNA damage repair to maintain genomic stability. This review will synthesize our current understanding of the molecular and cellular functions of FANCJ that are critical for chromosomal integrity.

  3. DNA Mismatch Repair System: Repercussions in Cellular Homeostasis and Relationship with Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Cristóbal Conde-Pérezprina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that concern DNA repair have been studied in the last years due to their consequences in cellular homeostasis. The diverse and damaging stimuli that affect DNA integrity, such as changes in the genetic sequence and modifications in gene expression, can disrupt the steady state of the cell and have serious repercussions to pathways that regulate apoptosis, senescence, and cancer. These altered pathways not only modify cellular and organism longevity, but quality of life (“health-span”. The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR is highly conserved between species; its role is paramount in the preservation of DNA integrity, placing it as a necessary focal point in the study of pathways that prolong lifespan, aging, and disease. Here, we review different insights concerning the malfunction or absence of the DNA-MMR and its impact on cellular homeostasis. In particular, we will focus on DNA-MMR mechanisms regulated by known repair proteins MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and MHL1, among others.

  4. DNA Mismatch Repair System: Repercussions in Cellular Homeostasis and Relationship with Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Pérezprina, Juan Cristóbal; León-Galván, Miguel Ángel; Konigsberg, Mina

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms that concern DNA repair have been studied in the last years due to their consequences in cellular homeostasis. The diverse and damaging stimuli that affect DNA integrity, such as changes in the genetic sequence and modifications in gene expression, can disrupt the steady state of the cell and have serious repercussions to pathways that regulate apoptosis, senescence, and cancer. These altered pathways not only modify cellular and organism longevity, but quality of life (“health-span”). The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) is highly conserved between species; its role is paramount in the preservation of DNA integrity, placing it as a necessary focal point in the study of pathways that prolong lifespan, aging, and disease. Here, we review different insights concerning the malfunction or absence of the DNA-MMR and its impact on cellular homeostasis. In particular, we will focus on DNA-MMR mechanisms regulated by known repair proteins MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and MHL1, among others. PMID:23213348

  5. Identification of an mtDNA mutation hot spot in UV-induced mouse skin tumors producing altered cellular biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandova, Jana; Eshaghian, Alex; Shi, Mingjian; Li, Meiling; King, Lloyd E; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing awareness of the role of mtDNA alterations in the development of cancer, as mtDNA point mutations are found at high frequency in a variety of human tumors. To determine the biological effects of mtDNA mutations in UV-induced skin tumors, hairless mice were irradiated to produce tumors, and the tumor mtDNAs were screened for single-nucleotide changes using temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE), followed by direct sequencing. A mutation hot spot (9821insA) in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA arginine (mt-Tr) locus (tRNA(Arg)) was discovered in approximately one-third of premalignant and malignant skin tumors. To determine the functional relevance of this particular mutation in vitro, cybrid cell lines containing different mt-Tr (tRNA(Arg)) alleles were generated. The resulting cybrid cell lines contained the same nuclear genotype and differed only in their mtDNAs. The biochemical analysis of the cybrids revealed that the mutant haplotype is associated with diminished levels of complex I protein (CI), resulting in lower levels of baseline oxygen consumption and lower cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. We hypothesize that this specific mtDNA mutation alters cellular biochemistry, supporting the development of keratinocyte neoplasia.

  6. Nuclear Localization and DNA Binding Properties of a Protein Expressed by Human c-myc Oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Hakan; Leder, Philip

    1984-08-01

    Antisera to the human cellular myc oncogene product were used to identify a human c-myc specific protein with a molecular weight of 65,000. Subcellular fractionation showed that the human c-myc protein is predominantly found in the cell nucleus. The p65 Kc-myc protein binds to double- and single-stranded DNA as measured by a DNA affinity chromatography assay.

  7. DNA Methylation Landscapes of Human Fetal Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slieker, Roderick C.; Roost, Matthias S.; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Suchiman, H. Eka D; Tobi, Elmar W.; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J P; Slagboom, P. Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.

    2015-01-01

    Remodelling the methylome is a hallmark of mammalian development and cell differentiation. However, current knowledge of DNA methylation dynamics in human tissue specification and organ development largely stems from the extrapolation of studies in vitro and animal models. Here, we report on the DNA

  8. Human Papilloma Viral DNA Replicates as a Stable Episome in Cultured Epidermal Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, Robert F.; Taichman, Lorne B.

    1982-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is poorly understood because systems for its growth in tissue culture have not been developed. We report here that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes could be infected with HPV from plantar warts and that the viral DNA persisted and replicated as a stable episome. There were 50-200 copies of viral DNA per cell and there was no evidence to indicate integration of viral DNA into the cellular genome. There was also no evidence to suggest that viral DNA underwent productive replication. We conclude that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes may be a model for the study of certain aspects of HPV biology.

  9. Experimental genomics: The application of DNA microarrays in cellular and molecular biology studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The genome sequence information in combination with DNA microarrays promises to revolutionize the way of cellular and molecular biological research by allowing complex mixtures of RNA and DNA to interrogated in a parallel and quant itative fashion. DNA microarrays can be used to measure levels of gene expressio n for tens of thousands of gene simultaneously and take advantage of all availab le sequence information for experimental design and data interpretation in pursu it of biological understanding. Recent progress in experimental genomics allows DNA microarrays not simply to provide a catalogue of all the genes and informati on about their function, but to understand how the components work together to comprise functioning cells and organisms. This brief review gives a survey of DNA microarrays technology and its applications in genome and gene function analysis, gene expression studies, biological signal and defense system, cell cyclereg ulation, mechanism of transcriptional regulation, proteomics, and the functional ity of food component.

  10. Human Insulin from Recombinant DNA Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Irving S.

    1983-02-01

    Human insulin produced by recombinant DNA technology is the first commercial health care product derived from this technology. Work on this product was initiated before there were federal guidelines for large-scale recombinant DNA work or commercial development of recombinant DNA products. The steps taken to facilitate acceptance of large-scale work and proof of the identity and safety of such a product are described. While basic studies in recombinant DNA technology will continue to have a profound impact on research in the life sciences, commercial applications may well be controlled by economic conditions and the availability of investment capital.

  11. Quantification of cellular uptake of DNA nanostructures by qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okholm, Anders Hauge; Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Vinther, Mathias; Sørensen, Rasmus Schøler; Schaffert, David; Kjems, Jørgen

    2014-05-15

    DNA nanostructures facilitating drug delivery are likely soon to be realized. In the past few decades programmed self-assembly of DNA building blocks have successfully been employed to construct sophisticated nanoscale objects. By conjugating functionalities to DNA, other molecules such as peptides, proteins and polymers can be precisely positioned on DNA nanostructures. This exceptional ability to produce modular nanoscale devices with tunable and controlled behavior has initiated an interest in employing DNA nanostructures for drug delivery. However, to obtain this the relationship between cellular interactions and structural and functional features of the DNA delivery device must be thoroughly investigated. Here, we present a rapid and robust method for the precise quantification of the component materials of DNA origami structures capable of entering cells in vitro. The quantification is performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, allowing a linear dynamic range of detection of five orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the use of this method for high-throughput screening, which could prove efficient to identify key features of DNA nanostructures enabling cell penetration. The method described here is suitable for quantification of in vitro uptake studies but should easily be extended to quantify DNA nanostructures in blood or tissue samples.

  12. Viral and cellular SOS-regulated motor proteins: dsDNA translocation mechanisms with divergent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Annie; Phipps, Kara; Weitao, Tao

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage attacks on bacterial cells have been known to activate the SOS response, a transcriptional response affecting chromosome replication, DNA recombination and repair, cell division and prophage induction. All these functions require double-stranded (ds) DNA translocation by ASCE hexameric motors. This review seeks to delineate the structural and functional characteristics of the SOS response and the SOS-regulated DNA translocases FtsK and RuvB with the phi29 bacteriophage packaging motor gp16 ATPase as a prototype to study bacterial motors. While gp16 ATPase, cellular FtsK and RuvB are similarly comprised of hexameric rings encircling dsDNA and functioning as ATP-driven DNA translocases, they utilize different mechanisms to accomplish separate functions, suggesting a convergent evolution of these motors. The gp16 ATPase and FtsK use a novel revolution mechanism, generating a power stroke between subunits through an entropy-DNA affinity switch and pushing dsDNA inward without rotation of DNA and the motor, whereas RuvB seems to employ a rotation mechanism that remains to be further characterized. While FtsK and RuvB perform essential tasks during the SOS response, their roles may be far more significant as SOS response is involved in antibiotic-inducible bacterial vesiculation and biofilm formation as well as the perspective of the bacteria-cancer evolutionary interaction.

  13. Cellular reprogramming for understanding and treating human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riya Rajan Kanherkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our understanding of cells so radical that it has rewritten the rules of biology. The study of cellular reprogramming has gone from little more than a hypothesis, to applied bioengineering, with the creation of a variety of important cell types. By way of metaphor, we can compare the discovery of reprogramming with the archaeological discovery of the Rosetta stone. This stone slab made possible the initial decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics because it allowed us to see this language in a way that was previously impossible. We propose that cellular reprogramming will have an equally profound impact on understanding and curing human disease, because it allows us to perceive and study molecular biological processes such as differentiation, epigenetics, and chromatin in ways that were likewise previously impossible. Stem cells could be called cellular Rosetta stones because they allow also us to perceive the connections between development, disease, cancer, aging, and regeneration in novel ways. Here we present a comprehensive historical review of stem cells and cellular reprogramming, and illustrate the developing synergy between many previously unconnected fields. We show how stem cells can be used to create in vitro models of human disease and provide examples of how reprogramming is being used to study and treat such diverse diseases as cancer, aging and accelerated aging syndromes, infectious diseases such as AIDS, and epigenetic diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome. While the technology of reprogramming is being developed and refined there have also been significant ongoing developments in other complementary technologies such as gene editing, progenitor cell production, and tissue engineering. These technologies are the foundations of what is becoming a fully-functional field of regenerative medicine and are converging to a point that will allow us to treat almost any

  14. Apoptosis and DNA damage in human spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R John Aitken; Adam J Koppers

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage is frequently encountered in spermatozoa of subfertile males and is correlated with a range of adverse clinical outcomes including impaired fertilization, disrupted preimplantation embryonic development, increased rates of miscarriage and an enhanced risk of disease in the progeny. The etiology of DNA fragmentation in human spermatozoa is closely correlated with the appearance of oxidative base adducts and evidence of impaired spermiogenesis. We hypothesize that oxidative stress impedes spermiogenesis,resulting in the generation of spermatozoa with poorly remodelled chromatin. These defective cells have a tendency to default to an apoptotic pathway associated with motility loss, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine exteriorization and the activation of free radical generation by the mitochondria. The latter induces lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage, which then leads to DNA fragmentation and cell death. The physical architecture of spermatozoa prevents any nucleases activated as a result of this apoptotic process from gaining access to the nuclear DNA and inducing its fragmentation. It is for this reason that a majority of the DNA damage encountered in human spermatozoa seems to be oxidative. Given the important role that oxidative stress seems to have in the etiology of DNA damage, there should be an important role for antioxidants in the treatment of this condition. If oxidative DNA damage in spermatozoa is providing a sensitive readout of systemic oxidative stress, the implications of these findings could stretch beyond our immediate goal of trying to minimize DNA damage in spermatozoa as a prelude to assisted conception therapy.

  15. Temporal order of evolution of DNA replication systems inferred by comparison of cellular and viral DNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The core enzymes of the DNA replication systems show striking diversity among cellular life forms and more so among viruses. In particular, and counter-intuitively, given the central role of DNA in all cells and the mechanistic uniformity of replication, the core enzymes of the replication systems of bacteria and archaea (as well as eukaryotes are unrelated or extremely distantly related. Viruses and plasmids, in addition, possess at least two unique DNA replication systems, namely, the protein-primed and rolling circle modalities of replication. This unexpected diversity makes the origin and evolution of DNA replication systems a particularly challenging and intriguing problem in evolutionary biology. Results I propose a specific succession for the emergence of different DNA replication systems, drawing argument from the differences in their representation among viruses and other selfish replicating elements. In a striking pattern, the DNA replication systems of viruses infecting bacteria and eukaryotes are dominated by the archaeal-type B-family DNA polymerase (PolB whereas the bacterial replicative DNA polymerase (PolC is present only in a handful of bacteriophage genomes. There is no apparent mechanistic impediment to the involvement of the bacterial-type replication machinery in viral DNA replication. Therefore, I hypothesize that the observed, markedly unequal distribution of the replicative DNA polymerases among the known cellular and viral replication systems has a historical explanation. I propose that, among the two types of DNA replication machineries that are found in extant life forms, the archaeal-type, PolB-based system evolved first and had already given rise to a variety of diverse viruses and other selfish elements before the advent of the bacterial, PolC-based machinery. Conceivably, at that stage of evolution, the niches for DNA-viral reproduction have been already filled with viruses replicating with the

  16. Mechanism of Ribonucleotide Incorporation by Human DNA Polymerase η.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F Peter

    2016-02-19

    Ribonucleotides and 2'-deoxyribonucleotides are the basic units for RNA and DNA, respectively, and the only difference is the extra 2'-OH group on the ribonucleotide sugar. Cellular rNTP concentrations are much higher than those of dNTP. When copying DNA, DNA polymerases not only select the base of the incoming dNTP to form a Watson-Crick pair with the template base but also distinguish the sugar moiety. Some DNA polymerases use a steric gate residue to prevent rNTP incorporation by creating a clash with the 2'-OH group. Y-family human DNA polymerase η (hpol η) is of interest because of its spacious active site (especially in the major groove) and tolerance of DNA lesions. Here, we show that hpol η maintains base selectivity when incorporating rNTPs opposite undamaged DNA and the DNA lesions 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer but with rates that are 10(3)-fold lower than for inserting the corresponding dNTPs. X-ray crystal structures show that the hpol η scaffolds the incoming rNTP to pair with the template base (dG) or 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine with a significant propeller twist. As a result, the 2'-OH group avoids a clash with the steric gate, Phe-18, but the distance between primer end and Pα of the incoming rNTP increases by 1 Å, elevating the energy barrier and slowing polymerization compared with dNTP. In addition, Tyr-92 was identified as a second line of defense to maintain the position of Phe-18. This is the first crystal structure of a DNA polymerase with an incoming rNTP opposite a DNA lesion.

  17. Redox regulation of human OGG1 activity in response to cellular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravard, Anne; Vacher, Monique; Gouget, Barbara; Coutant, Alexandre; de Boisferon, Florence Hillairet; Marsin, Stéphanie; Chevillard, Sylvie; Radicella, J Pablo

    2006-10-01

    8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common and mutagenic form of oxidized guanine in DNA, is eliminated mainly through base excision repair. In human cells its repair is initiated by human OGG1 (hOGG1), an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase. We investigated the effects of an acute cadmium exposure of human lymphoblastoid cells on the activity of hOGG1. We show that coinciding with alteration of the redox cellular status, the 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase activity of hOGG1 was nearly completely inhibited. However, the hOGG1 activity returned to normal levels once the redox cellular status was normalized. In vitro, the activity of purified hOGG1 was abolished by cadmium and could not be recovered by EDTA. In cells, however, the reversible inactivation of OGG1 activity by cadmium was strictly associated with reversible oxidation of the protein. Moreover, the 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase activity of purified OGG1 and that from crude extracts were modulated by cysteine-modifying agents. Oxidation of OGG1 by the thiol oxidant diamide led to inhibition of the activity and a protein migration pattern similar to that seen in cadmium-treated cells. These results suggest that cadmium inhibits hOGG1 activity mainly by indirect oxidation of critical cysteine residues and that excretion of the metal from the cells leads to normalization of the redox cell status and restoration of an active hOGG1. The results presented here unveil a novel redox-dependent mechanism for the regulation of OGG1 activity.

  18. CONSECUTIVE IMMUNIZATION WITH RECOMBINANT FOWLPOX VIRUS AND PLASMID DNA FOR ENHANCING CELLULAR AND HUMORAL IMMUNITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗坤; 金宁一; 郭志儒; 秦云龙; 郭炎; 方厚华; 安汝国; 殷震

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the influence of consecutive immunization on cellular and humoral immunity in mice. Methods: We evaluated a consecutive immunization strategy of priming with recombinant fowlpox virus vUTALG and boosting with plasmid DNA pcDNAG encoding HIV-1 capsid protein Gag. Results: In immunized mice, the number of CD4+ T cells from splenic lymphocytes increased significantly and the proliferation response of splenocytes to ConA and LPS elevated markedly and HIV-1-specific antibody response could be induced. Conclusion: Consecutive immunization could increase cellular and humoral immunity responses in mice.

  19. Labeling of Cellular DNA with a Cyclosal Phosphotriester Pronucleotide Analog of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ngoc; Dickson, Charlotte; Zencak, Dusan; Hilko, David H; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2015-10-01

    DNA synthesis is a fundamental biological process central to all proliferating cells, and the design of small molecule probes that allow detection of this DNA is important for many applications. 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine, known as EdU, has become a workhorse for metabolic labeling of DNA in mammalian cells, followed by bioconjugation to a small molecule fluorescent azide using copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), click chemistry, to allow detection. In this study, we demonstrate that a cyclosal phosphotriester pronucleotide analog of EdU is suitable for metabolic incorporation into DNA of proliferating cells and subsequent labeling by CuAAC. This analog has two advantages over EdU; first, by delivering EdU with a preinstalled 5'-monophosphate moiety, it bypasses the need for thymidine kinase processing, and second, the increased lipophilicity compared to EdU may enable passive diffusion across the cell membrane and may circumvent the reliance on nucleoside active transport mechanisms for cellular uptake. These advantages pave the way for the development of additional novel pronucleotides to widen experimental opportunities for future bioconjugation applications involving cellular DNA.

  20. Human more complex than mouse at cellular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E Vinogradov

    Full Text Available The family of transcription factors with the C2H2 zinc finger domain is expanding in the evolution of vertebrates, reaching its highest numbers in the mammals. The question arises: whether an increased amount of these transcription factors is related to embryogenesis, nervous system, pathology or more of them are expressed in individual cells? Among mammals, the primates have a more complex anatomical structure than the rodents (e.g., brain. In this work, I show that a greater number of C2H2-ZF genes are expressed in the human cells than in the mouse cells. The effect is especially pronounced for C2H2-ZF genes accompanied with the KRAB domain. The relative difference between the numbers of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes in the human and mouse cellular transcriptomes even exceeds their difference in the genomes (i.e. a greater subset of existing in the genome genes is expressed in the human cellular transcriptomes compared to the mouse transcriptomes. The evolutionary turnover of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes acts in the direction of the revealed phenomenon, i.e. gene duplication and loss enhances the difference in the relative number of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes between human and mouse cellular transcriptomes. A higher amount of these genes is expressed in the brain and embryonic cells (compared with other tissues, whereas a lower amount--in the cancer cells. It is specifically the C2H2-ZF transcription factors whose repertoire is poorer in the cancer and richer in the brain (other transcription factors taken together do not show this trend. These facts suggest that increase of anatomical complexity is accompanied by a more complex intracellular regulation involving these transcription factors. Malignization is associated with simplification of this regulation. These results agree with the known fact that human cells are more resistant to oncogenic transformation than mouse cells. The list of C2H2-ZF genes whose suppression might be involved in malignization is provided.

  1. Dynamics of the cellular metabolome during human cytomegalovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Munger

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral replication requires energy and macromolecular precursors derived from the metabolic network of the host cell. Despite this reliance, the effect of viral infection on host cell metabolic composition remains poorly understood. Here we applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to measure the levels of 63 different intracellular metabolites at multiple times after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection of human fibroblasts. Parallel microarray analysis provided complementary data on transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways. As the infection progressed, the levels of metabolites involved in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis markedly increased. HCMV-induced transcriptional upregulation of specific glycolytic and citric acid cycle enzymes mirrored the increases in metabolite levels. The peak levels of numerous metabolites during infection far exceeded those observed during normal fibroblast growth or quiescence, demonstrating that HCMV markedly disrupts cellular metabolic homeostasis and institutes its own specific metabolic program.

  2. Concise review: Human cell engineering: cellular reprogramming and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Prashant; Cheng, Linzhao

    2012-01-01

    Cell engineering is defined here as the collective ability to both reset and edit the genome of a mammalian cell. Until recently, this had been extremely challenging to achieve as nontransformed human cells are significantly refractory to both these processes. The recent success in reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells that are self-renewable in culture, coupled with our increasing ability to effect precise and predesigned genomic editing, now readily permits cellular changes at both the genetic and epigenetic levels. These dual capabilities also make possible the generation of genetically matched, disease-free stem cells from patients for regenerative medicine. The objective of this review is to summarize the key enabling developments on these two rapidly evolving research fronts in human cell engineering, highlight unresolved issues, and outline potential future research directions.

  3. Defining the cellular precursors to human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Patricia J.; Arendt, Lisa M.; Skibinski, Adam; Logvinenko, Tanya; Klebba, Ina; Dong, Shumin; Smith, Avi E.; Prat, Aleix; Perou, Charles M.; Gilmore, Hannah; Schnitt, Stuart; Naber, Stephen P.; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Human breast cancers are broadly classified based on their gene-expression profiles into luminal- and basal-type tumors. These two major tumor subtypes express markers corresponding to the major differentiation states of epithelial cells in the breast: luminal (EpCAM+) and basal/myoepithelial (CD10+). However, there are also rare types of breast cancers, such as metaplastic carcinomas, where tumor cells exhibit features of alternate cell types that no longer resemble breast epithelium. Until now, it has been difficult to identify the cell type(s) in the human breast that gives rise to these various forms of breast cancer. Here we report that transformation of EpCAM+ epithelial cells results in the formation of common forms of human breast cancer, including estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative tumors with luminal and basal-like characteristics, respectively, whereas transformation of CD10+ cells results in the development of rare metaplastic tumors reminiscent of the claudin-low subtype. We also demonstrate the existence of CD10+ breast cells with metaplastic traits that can give rise to skin and epidermal tissues. Furthermore, we show that the development of metaplastic breast cancer is attributable, in part, to the transformation of these metaplastic breast epithelial cells. These findings identify normal cellular precursors to human breast cancers and reveal the existence of a population of cells with epidermal progenitor activity within adult human breast tissues. PMID:21940501

  4. Using a cDNA microarray to study cellular gene expression altered by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永忠; 谢建平; 李瑶; 乐军; 陈建平; 淳于利娟; 王洪海

    2003-01-01

    Objective To examine the global effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tuberculosis) infection on macrophages. Methods The gene expression profiling of macrophage U937, in response to infection with M.tuberculosis H37Ra, was monitored using a high-density cDNA microarray. Results M.tuberculosis infection caused 463 differentially expressed genes, of which 366 genes are known genes registered in the Gene Bank. These genes function in various cellular processes including intracellular signalling, cytoskeletal rearrangement, apoptosis, transcriptional regulation, cell surface receptors, cell-mediated immunity as well as a variety of cellular metabolic pathways, and may play key roles in M.tuberculosis infection and intracellular survival. Conclusions M.tuberculosis infection alters the expression of host-cell genes, and these genes will provide a foundation for understanding the infection process of M.tuberculosis. The cDNA microarray is a powerful tool for studying pathogen-host cell interaction.

  5. Identification of the candidate genes associated with cellular rejection in pig-to-human xenotransplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To identify the genes associated with cellular rejection in pig-to-human xenotransplantation, the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used in screening the up-regulated genes from a co-culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and porcine vascular endothelial cell line PIEC. The up-regulated cDNAs were cloned into pGEM-T Easy vector and then sequenced. Nucleic acid homology searches were performed using the BLAST program. A subtracted cDNA library including about 300 clones with the expected up-regulated genes was obtained. Twenty-four of these clones were analyzed by sequencing and homology comparison was made. These clones represent the genes of human perforin (PRF1), proteasome, lymphocyte specific interferon regulatory factor/interferon regulatory factor 4 (LSIRF/IRF 4), muscleblind-like (MBNL) protein and a porcine expressed sequence tag (EST) which has 81% homology with human oxidative-stress responsive 1 (OSR 1). These genes might be the candidate genes which are associated with cellular rejection in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  6. DNA Damage and Its Cellular Response in Mother and Fetus Exposed to Hyperglycemic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusciele Brogin Moreli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS plays a key role in pathogenesis of diabetic complications. ROS are generated by exogenous and endogenous factors such as during hyperglycemia. When ROS production exceeds the detoxification and scavenging capacity of the cell, oxidative stress ensues. Oxidative stress induces DNA damage and when DNA damage exceeds the cellular capacity to repair it, the accumulation of errors can overwhelm the cell resulting in cell death or fixation of genome mutations that can be transmitted to future cell generations. These mutations can lead to and/or play a role in cancer development. This review aims at (i understanding the types and consequences of DNA damage during hyperglycemic pregnancy; (ii identifying the biological role of DNA repair during pregnancy, and (iii proposing clinical interventions to maintain genome integrity. While hyperglycemia can damage the maternal genetic material, the impact of hyperglycemia on fetal cells is still unclear. DNA repair mechanisms may be important to prevent the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia both in mother and in fetus DNA and, as such, prevent the development of diseases in adulthood. Hence, in clinical practice, maternal glycemic control may represent an important point of intervention to prevent the deleterious effects of maternal hyperglycemia to DNA.

  7. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  8. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  9. Sequencing of chloroplast genome using whole cellular DNA and Solexa sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eWu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing of the chloroplast genome using traditional sequencing methods has been difficult because of its size (>120 kb and the complicated procedures required to prepare templates. To explore the feasibility of sequencing the chloroplast genome using DNA extracted from whole cells and Solexa sequencing technology, we sequenced whole cellular DNA isolated from leaves of three Brassica rapa accessions with one lane per accession. In total, 246 Mb, 362Mb, 361 Mb sequence data were generated for the three accessions Chiifu-401-42, Z16 and FT, respectively. Microreads were assembled by reference-guided assembly using the cpDNA sequences of B. rapa, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Nicotiana tabacum. We achieved coverage of more than 99.96% of the cp genome in the three tested accessions using the B. rapa sequence as the reference. When A. thaliana or N. tabacum sequences were used as references, 99.7–99.8% or 95.5–99.7% of the B. rapa chloroplast genome was covered, respectively. These results demonstrated that sequencing of whole cellular DNA isolated from young leaves using the Illumina Genome Analyzer is an efficient method for high-throughput sequencing of chloroplast genome.

  10. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase mediates cellular responses to DNA damage and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanovic, Ana [Institut fuer Pharmazie und Molekulare Biotechnologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Woelfl, Stefan [Institut fuer Pharmazie und Molekulare Biotechnologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 364, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: wolfl@uni-hd.de

    2006-02-22

    Response to DNA damage, lack of nutrients and other stress conditions is an essential property of living systems. The coordinate response includes DNA damage repair, activation of alternate biochemical pathways, adjustment of cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression as well as drastic measures like cellular suicide which prevents proliferation of severely damaged cells. Investigating the transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to low doses of the alkylating agent methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) we observed induction of genes involved in glucose metabolism. RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of the key enzyme in gluconeogenesis fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1) was clearly up-regulated by MMS in glucose-rich medium. Interestingly, deletion of FBP1 led to reduced sensitivity to MMS, but not to other DNA-damaging agents, such as 4-NQO or phleomycin. Reintroduction of FBP1 in the knockout restored the wild-type phenotype while overexpression increased MMS sensitivity of wild-type, shortened life span and increased induction of RNR2 after treatment with MMS. Deletion of FBP1 reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to MMS treatment and in untreated aged cells, and increased the amount of cells able to propagate and to form colonies, but had no influence on the genotoxic effect of MMS. Our results indicate that FBP1 influences the connection between DNA damage, aging and oxidative stress through either direct signalling or an intricate adaptation in energy metabolism.0.

  11. Perinatal transmission of human papilomavirus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombaldi, Renato L; Serafini, Eduardo P; Mandelli, Jovana; Zimmermann, Edineia; Losquiavo, Kamille P

    2009-06-21

    The purpose was to study the perinatal transmission of human papillomavirus DNA (HPV-DNA) in 63 mother-newborn pairs, besides looking at the epidemiological factors involved in the viral DNA transmission. The following sampling methods were used: (1) in the pregnant woman, when was recruited, in cervix and clinical lesions of the vagina, vulva and perineal region; (2) in the newborn, (a) buccal, axillary and inguinal regions; (b) nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c) cord blood; (3) in the children, buccal was repeated in the 4th week and 6th and 12th month of life. HPV-DNA was identified using two methodologies: multiplex PCR (PGMY09 and MY11 primers) and nested-PCR (genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58). Perinatal transmission was considered when concordance was found in type-specific HPV between mother/newborn or mother/child. HPV-DNA genital was detected in 49 pregnant women submitted to delivery. Eleven newborns (22.4%, n = 11/49) were HPV-DNA positive. In 8 cases (16.3%, n = 8/49) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. At the end of the first month of life three children (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA positive, while two remained positive from birth. In 3 cases (100%, n = 3/3) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. In the 6th month, a child (2%, n = 1/49) had become HPV-DNA positive between the 1st and 6th month of life, and there was type specific HPV concordance of mother/newborn samples. All the HPV-DNA positive children (22.4%, n = 11/49) at birth and at the end first month of life (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA negative at the age of 6 months. The HPV-DNA positive child (2%, n = 1/49) from 1st to the 6th month of life became HPV-DNA negative between the 6th and 12th month of life and one child had anogenital warts. In the twelfth month all (100%, n = 49/49) the children studied were HPV-DNA negative. A positive and significant correlation was observed between perinatal transmission

  12. Perinatal transmission of human papilomavirus DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafini Eduardo P

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose was to study the perinatal transmission of human papillomavirus DNA (HPV-DNA in 63 mother-newborn pairs, besides looking at the epidemiological factors involved in the viral DNA transmission. The following sampling methods were used: (1 in the pregnant woman, when was recruited, in cervix and clinical lesions of the vagina, vulva and perineal region; (2 in the newborn, (a buccal, axillary and inguinal regions; (b nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c cord blood; (3 in the children, buccal was repeated in the 4th week and 6th and 12th month of life. HPV-DNA was identified using two methodologies: multiplex PCR (PGMY09 and MY11 primers and nested-PCR (genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58. Perinatal transmission was considered when concordance was found in type-specific HPV between mother/newborn or mother/child. HPV-DNA genital was detected in 49 pregnant women submitted to delivery. Eleven newborns (22.4%, n = 11/49 were HPV-DNA positive. In 8 cases (16.3%, n = 8/49 there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. At the end of the first month of life three children (6.1%, n = 3/49 became HPV-DNA positive, while two remained positive from birth. In 3 cases (100%, n = 3/3 there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. In the 6th month, a child (2%, n = 1/49 had become HPV-DNA positive between the 1st and 6th month of life, and there was type specific HPV concordance of mother/newborn samples. All the HPV-DNA positive children (22.4%, n = 11/49 at birth and at the end first month of life (6.1%, n = 3/49 became HPV-DNA negative at the age of 6 months. The HPV-DNA positive child (2%, n = 1/49 from 1st to the 6th month of life became HPV-DNA negative between the 6th and 12th month of life and one child had anogenital warts. In the twelfth month all (100%, n = 49/49 the children studied were HPV-DNA negative. A positive and significant correlation was observed between perinatal

  13. Cannabinoids inhibit cellular respiration of human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Donna A; Al-Hammadi, Suleiman; Balhaj, Ghazala; Brown, Oliver M; Penefsky, Harvey S; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2010-01-01

    The primary cannabinoids, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) and Delta(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(8)-THC) are known to disturb the mitochondrial function and possess antitumor activities. These observations prompted us to investigate their effects on the mitochondrial O(2) consumption in human oral cancer cells (Tu183). This epithelial cell line overexpresses bcl-2 and is highly resistant to anticancer drugs. A phosphorescence analyzer that measures the time-dependence of O(2) concentration in cellular or mitochondrial suspensions was used for this purpose. A rapid decline in the rate of respiration was observed when Delta(9)-THC or Delta(8)-THC was added to the cells. The inhibition was concentration-dependent, and Delta(9)-THC was the more potent of the two compounds. Anandamide (an endocannabinoid) was ineffective; suggesting the effects of Delta(9)-THC and Delta(8)-THC were not mediated by the cannabinoidreceptors. Inhibition of O(2) consumption by cyanide confirmed the oxidations occurred in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Delta(9)-THC inhibited the respiration of isolated mitochondria from beef heart. These results show the cannabinoids are potent inhibitors of Tu183 cellular respiration and are toxic to this highly malignant tumor.

  14. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom (Scripps); (Maryland-MED); (WU-MED); (LBNL)

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  15. Clonal priming of human lymphocytes: Specificity and cross-reactivity of cellular immune reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, W R; Datiner, A M

    1977-04-23

    Clonal priming in response to chemical and microbial antigens which defines the specificity of cellular immune reactions, was demonstrated by culture techniques. Human leucocyte cultures stimulated with specific antigens typically show peak levels of D.N.A. synthesis after 5 to 7 days in culture. Such primary leucocyte cultures were incubated for 10-20 days, then the cells were gently centrifuged and resuspended in fresh RPMI 1640 with 20% plasma. These secondary or primed cultures typically showed less than 1000 c.p.m. after 48 hours. However, if the original antigenic stimulant was added, specific accelerated responses were seen by 48 hours in the secondary cultures. Lymphocyte clones in these sceondary cultures primed with dinitrophenylated (D.N.P.) antigens (from subjects sensitised to dinitrochlorobenzene) showed enhanced D.N.A. sythesis in response to the same dinitrophenylated antigens and showed varible accelerated responses to related chemically modified antigens. However, D.N.P.-activated clones in these secondary cultures did not show enhanced responses to microbial antigens even though the lymphocytes had been highly responsive to tetanus toxoid and other microbial antigens in primary cultures. The specificity of this clonal activation was further demonstrated by the enhanced response of secondary cultures of tetanus-toxoid-activated clones to tetanus toxoid but not to dinitrophenylated antigens. The abiltty to detect specificity and cross-reactivity of cellular immune reaction has broad implications for investigations of cellular immunity as well as many potential applications in the diagnosis and understanding the patogenesis of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases in which cellular immune discrimination may be involved.

  16. Relationship between histologic grade and cytofluorometric cellular DNA and RNA content in primary bone tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, H; Kusuzaki, K; Kuzuhara, A; Tsuji, Y; Ashihara, T; Gebhardt, M C; Mankin, H J; Springfield, D S; Hirasawa, Y

    2001-01-01

    The diagnosis and grading of bone tumors remains a challenging problem. We studied the relationship between histologic grade and cytofluorometric cellular DNA and RNA content in 108 primary bone tumors. The data included DNA ploidy, mean DNA content (MDC), S-phase fraction (SPF), mean RNA content (MRC) and RNA/DNA ratio (RDR; MRC/MDC) which represents the RNA content normalized for the DNA content. Benign tumors had a diploid stem line with low MDC (mean; 1.04), low SPF (0.9), high MRC (2.41) and high RDR (2.31). Giant cell tumors of bone, which are locally aggressive benign tumors, showed diploidy with relatively higher MDC (1.07, p osteosarcomas revealed aneuploidy with remarkably higher MDC (1.70 in osteosarcomas, p < 0.01) and SPF (6.5, p < 0.01), but lower RDR (1.70, p < 0.01). In contrast, small cell sarcomas, such as Ewing's sarcomas, showed diploidy with low MDC (1.11 in Ewing's sarcomas, N.S.) and SPF (2.5, p < 0.01) and extremely low RDR (1.34, p < 0.01). The RDR value was higher in well-differentiated tumors than in primitive tumors, rendering it useful in grading bone tumors with a diploid stem line. By combining the RDR value with the MDC value, 96% of diploid sarcomas could be distinguished from benign tumors. These results indicate that cellular DNA and RNA content analysis may be of value in assessing the malignant potential of diploid as well as aneuploid bone sarcomas.

  17. Detection of cis- and trans-acting factors in DNA structure-induced genetic instability using in silico and cellular approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guliang Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sequences that can adopt alternative DNA structures (i.e. non-B DNA are very abundant in mammalian genomes, and recent studies have revealed many important biological functions of non-B DNA structures in chromatin remodeling, DNA replication, transcription, and genetic instability. Here, we provide results from an in-silico web-based search engine coupled with cell-based experiments to characterize the roles of non-B DNA conformations in genetic instability in eukaryotes. The purpose of this article is to illustrate strategies that can be used to identify and interrogate the biological roles of non-B DNA structures, particularly on genetic instability. We have included unpublished data using a short H-DNA-forming sequence from the human c-MYC promoter region as an example, and identified two different mechanisms of H-DNA-induced genetic instability in yeast and mammalian cells: a DNA replication-related model of mutagenesis; and a replication-independent cleavage model. Further, we identified candidate proteins involved in H-DNA-induced genetic instability by using a yeast genetic screen. A combination of in silico and cellular methods, as described here, should provide further insight into the contributions of non-B DNA structures in biological functions, genetic evolution, and disease development.

  18. Functional DNA-containing nanomaterials: cellular applications in biosensing, imaging, and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Lv, Yifan; Gong, Liang; Wang, Ruowen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA performs a vital function as a carrier of genetic code, but in the field of nanotechnology, DNA molecules can catalyze chemical reactions in the cell, that is, DNAzymes, or bind with target-specific ligands, that is, aptamers. These functional DNAs with different modifications have been developed for sensing, imaging, and therapeutic systems. Thus, functional DNAs hold great promise for future applications in nanotechnology and bioanalysis. However, these functional DNAs face challenges, especially in the field of biomedicine. For example, functional DNAs typically require the use of cationic transfection reagents to realize cellular uptake. Such reagents enter the cells, increasing the difficulty of performing bioassays in vivo and potentially damaging the cell's nucleus. To address this obstacle, nanomaterials, such as metallic, carbon, silica, or magnetic materials, have been utilized as DNA carriers or assistants. In this Account, we describe selected examples of functional DNA-containing nanomaterials and their applications from our recent research and those of others. As models, we have chosen to highlight DNA/nanomaterial complexes consisting of gold nanoparticles, graphene oxides, and aptamer-micelles, and we illustrate the potential of such complexes in biosensing, imaging, and medical diagnostics. Under proper conditions, multiple ligand-receptor interactions, decreased steric hindrance, and increased surface roughness can be achieved from a high density of DNA that is bound to the surface of nanomaterials, resulting in a higher affinity for complementary DNA and other targets. In addition, this high density of DNA causes a high local salt concentration and negative charge density, which can prevent DNA degradation. For example, DNAzymes assembled on gold nanoparticles can effectively catalyze chemical reactions even in living cells. And it has been confirmed that DNA-nanomaterial complexes can enter cells more easily than free single

  19. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH Exposure and DNA Adduct Semi-Quantitation in Archived Human Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Margaret Pratt

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are combustion products of organic materials, mixtures of which contain multiple known and probable human carcinogens. PAHs occur in indoor and outdoor air, as well as in char-broiled meats and fish. Human exposure to PAHs occurs by inhalation, ingestion and topical absorption, and subsequently formed metabolites are either rendered hydrophilic and excreted, or bioactivated and bound to cellular macromolecules. The formation of PAH-DNA adducts (DNA binding products, considered a necessary step in PAH-initiated carcinogenesis, has been widely studied in experimental models and has been documented in human tissues. This review describes immunohistochemistry (IHC studies, which reveal localization of PAH-DNA adducts in human tissues, and semi-quantify PAH-DNA adduct levels using the Automated Cellular Imaging System (ACIS. These studies have shown that PAH-DNA adducts concentrate in: basal and supra-basal epithelium of the esophagus, cervix and vulva; glandular epithelium of the prostate; and cytotrophoblast cells and syncitiotrophoblast knots of the placenta. The IHC photomicrographs reveal the ubiquitous nature of PAH-DNA adduct formation in human tissues as well as PAH-DNA adduct accumulation in specific, vulnerable, cell types. This semi-quantative method for PAH-DNA adduct measurement could potentially see widespread use in molecular epidemiology studies.

  20. Acrylamide inhibits cellular differentiation of human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jong-Hang; Chou, Chin-Cheng

    2015-08-01

    This study explores human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) and human glioblastoma (U-1240 MG) cellular differentiation changes under exposure to acrylamide (ACR). Differentiation of SH-SY5Y and U-1240 MG cells were induced by retinoic acid (RA) and butyric acid (BA), respectively. Morphological observations and MTT assay showed that the induced cellular differentiation and cell proliferation were inhibited by ACR in a time- and dose-dependent manner. ACR co-treatment with RA attenuated SH-SY5Y expressions of neurofilament protein-L (NF-L), microtubule-associated protein 1b (MAP1b; 1.2 to 0.7, p < 0.001), MAP2c (2.2 to 0.8, p < 0.05), and Janus kinase1 (JAK1; 1.9 to 0.6, p < 0.001), while ACR co-treatment with BA attenuated U-1240 MG expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), MAP1b (1.2 to 0.6, p < 0.001), MAP2c (1.5 to 0.7, p < 0.01), and JAK1 (2.1 to 0.5, p < 0.001), respectively. ACR also decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) in U-1240 MG cells, while caffeine reversed this suppression of ERK and JNK phosphorylation caused by ACR treatment. These results showed that RA-induced neurogenesis of SH-SY5Y and BA-induced astrogliogenesis of U-1240 MG cells were attenuated by ACR and were associated with down-regulation of MAPs expression and JAK-STAT signaling.

  1. Cellular uptake and intracellular pathways of PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühmann, Tessa; Rimann, Markus; Bittermann, Anne Greet; Hall, Heike

    2008-09-01

    Polycationic molecules form condensates with DNA and are used for gene therapy as an alternative to viral vectors. As clinical efficacy corresponds to cellular uptake, intracellular stability of the condensates, and bioavailability of the DNA, it is crucial to analyze uptake mechanisms and trafficking pathways. Here, a detailed study of uptake, stability, and localization of PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles within COS-7 cells is presented, using FACS analysis to assess the involvement of different uptake mechanisms, colocalization studies with markers indicative for different endocytotic pathways, and immunofluorescence staining to analyze colocalization with intracellular compartments. PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles were internalized in an energy-dependent manner after 2 h and accumulated in the perinuclear region after >6 h. The nanoparticles were found to be stable within the cytoplasm for at least 24 h and did not colocalize with the endosomal pathway. Nanoparticle uptake was approximately 50% inhibited by genistein, an inhibitor of the caveolae-mediated pathway. However, genistein did not inhibit gene expression, and PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles were not colocalized with caveolin-1 indicating that caveolae-mediated endocytosis is not decisive for DNA delivery. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis pathways were reduced by 17 and 24%, respectively, in the presence of the respective inhibitors. When cells were transfected in the presence of double and triple inhibitors, transfection efficiencies were increasingly reduced by 40 and 70%, respectively; however, no differences were found between the different uptake mechanisms. These findings suggest that PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles enter by several pathways and might therefore be an efficient and versatile tool to deliver therapeutic DNA.

  2. Evaluation of cellular responses for a chimeric HBsAg-HCV core DNA vaccine in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yazdanian

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Fusion of HBsAg to HCVcp in the context of a DNA vaccine modality could augment Th1-oriented cellular and CTL responses toward a protective epitope, comparable to that of HCVcp (subunit HCV vaccine immunization.

  3. The interplay among chromatin dynamics, cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms modulates the cellular response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Federico; Giannattasio, Michele; Muzi-Falconi, Marco; Plevani, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    Cells are continuously under the assault of endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress that challenges the integrity of DNA. To cope with such a formidable task cells have evolved surveillance mechanisms, known as checkpoints, and a variety of DNA repair systems responding to different types of DNA lesions. These lesions occur in the context of the chromatin structure and, as expected for all DNA transactions, the cellular response to DNA damage is going to be influenced by the chromatin enviroment. In this review, we will discuss recent studies implicating chromatin remodelling factors and histone modifications in the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and in checkpoint activation in response to UV lesions.

  4. Cellular uptake of fluorophore-labeled glyco-DNA-gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witten, Katrin G.; Ruff, Julie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Mohr, Anne; Goertz, Dieter; Recker, Tobias; Rinis, Natalie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Hospital Aachen (Germany); Rech, Claudia; Elling, Lothar [RWTH Aachen University, Laboratory for Biomaterials, Institute of Biotechnology and Helmholtz-Institute for Biomedical Engineering (Germany); Mueller-Newen, Gerhard [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University Hospital Aachen (Germany); Simon, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.simon@ac.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNP-DNA) were hybridized with complementary di-N-acetyllactosamine-(di-LacNAc, [3Gal({beta}1-4)GlcNAc({beta}1-]2)-modified oligonucleotides to form glycol-functionalized particles, AuNP-DNA-di-LacNAc. While AuNP-DNA are known to be taken up by cells via scavenger receptors, glycol-functionalized particles have shown to be taken up via asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R). In this work, the interaction of these new particles with HepG2 cells was analyzed, which express scavenger receptors class B type I (SR-BI) and ASGP-R. To study the contribution of these receptors as potential mediators for cellular uptake, receptor-blocking experiments were performed with d-lactose, a ligand for ASGP-R, Fucoidan, a putative ligand for SR-BI, and a SR-BI blocking antibody. Labeling with Cy5-modified DNA ligands enabled us to monitor the particle uptake by confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, in order to discriminate the two putative pathways by competitive binding studies. While SR-BI-antibody and d-lactose had no inhibiting effects on particle uptake Fucoidan led to a complete inhibition. Thus, a receptor-mediated uptake by the two receptors studied could not be proven and therefore other uptake mechanisms have to be considered.

  5. Cellular uptake of fluorophore-labeled glyco-DNA-gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Katrin G.; Ruff, Julie; Mohr, Anne; Görtz, Dieter; Recker, Tobias; Rinis, Natalie; Rech, Claudia; Elling, Lothar; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Simon, Ulrich

    2013-10-01

    DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNP-DNA) were hybridized with complementary di- N-acetyllactosamine-( di-LacNAc, [3Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-]2)-modified oligonucleotides to form glycol-functionalized particles, AuNP-DNA- di-LacNAc. While AuNP-DNA are known to be taken up by cells via scavenger receptors, glycol-functionalized particles have shown to be taken up via asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R). In this work, the interaction of these new particles with HepG2 cells was analyzed, which express scavenger receptors class B type I (SR-BI) and ASGP-R. To study the contribution of these receptors as potential mediators for cellular uptake, receptor-blocking experiments were performed with d-lactose, a ligand for ASGP-R, Fucoidan, a putative ligand for SR-BI, and a SR-BI blocking antibody. Labeling with Cy5-modified DNA ligands enabled us to monitor the particle uptake by confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, in order to discriminate the two putative pathways by competitive binding studies. While SR-BI-antibody and d-lactose had no inhibiting effects on particle uptake Fucoidan led to a complete inhibition. Thus, a receptor-mediated uptake by the two receptors studied could not be proven and therefore other uptake mechanisms have to be considered.

  6. Assessment of the cellular internalization of thermolytic phosphorothioate DNA oligonucleotide prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Harsh V; Takeda, Kazuyo; Tami, Cecilia; Verthelyi, Daniela; Beaucage, Serge L

    2013-10-15

    The bioactivity of a CpG-containing phosphorothioate DNA oligonucleotide with thermolytic 2-(N-formyl-N-methylamino)ethyl (fma) thiophosphate groups in mice led us to investigate the parameters affecting the internalization of these thermosensitive DNA prodrugs in various cell lines. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy analyses indicate that 5'-fluoresceinated fma-phosphorothioate DNA sequences are poorly internalized in Vero, HeLa and GC-2 cells. However, when four fma-thiophosphate groups of a 15-nucleotide long oligothymidylate prodrug are replaced with 3-(N,N-dimethylamino)prop-1-yl thiophosphate functions, internalization of the positively charged prodrug, under physiological conditions, increased fourfold in HeLa and 40-fold in Vero or GC-2 cells. No cytotoxic effects are observed in Vero cells even at an extracellular prodrug concentration of 50 μM over a period of 72 h. Confocal microscopy studies show that internalization of the positively charged oligothymidylate prodrug in Vero cells is time-dependent with early trafficking of the DNA sequence through endosomal vesicles and, eventually, to the nucleus of the cells. Thus, the incorporation of four 3-(N,N-dimethylamino)prop-1-yl thiophosphate groups into thermosentive fma-phosphorothioate DNA prodrugs is an attractive strategy for efficient cellular internalization of these nucleic acid-based drugs for potential therapeutic indications.

  7. Ebola virion attachment and entry into human macrophages profoundly effects early cellular gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Wahl-Jensen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV infections are associated with high lethality in primates. ZEBOV primarily targets mononuclear phagocytes, which are activated upon infection and secrete mediators believed to trigger initial stages of pathogenesis. The characterization of the responses of target cells to ZEBOV infection may therefore not only further understanding of pathogenesis but also suggest possible points of therapeutic intervention. Gene expression profiles of primary human macrophages exposed to ZEBOV were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative PCR to gain insight into the cellular response immediately after cell entry. Significant changes in mRNA concentrations encoding for 88 cellular proteins were observed. Most of these proteins have not yet been implicated in ZEBOV infection. Some, however, are inflammatory mediators known to be elevated during the acute phase of disease in the blood of ZEBOV-infected humans. Interestingly, the cellular response occurred within the first hour of Ebola virion exposure, i.e. prior to virus gene expression. This observation supports the hypothesis that virion binding or entry mediated by the spike glycoprotein (GP(1,2 is the primary stimulus for an initial response. Indeed, ZEBOV virions, LPS, and virus-like particles consisting of only the ZEBOV matrix protein VP40 and GP(1,2 (VLP(VP40-GP triggered comparable responses in macrophages, including pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic signals. In contrast, VLP(VP40 (particles lacking GP(1,2 caused an aberrant response. This suggests that GP(1,2 binding to macrophages plays an important role in the immediate cellular response.

  8. Comprehensive cellular-resolution atlas of the adult human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Song-Lin; Royall, Joshua J; Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A C; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H Ronald; Hohmann, John G; Jones, Allan R; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Hof, Patrick R; Fischl, Bruce; Lein, Ed S

    2016-11-01

    Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole-brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high-resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large-format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto- and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127-3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Enhanced cellular radiosensitivity induced by cofilin-1 over-expression is associated with reduced DNA repair capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Lo, Chia-Chien; Chiang, Pei-Hsun; Chiu, Su-Jun; Tsai, Cheng-Han; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Chen, Ran-Chou; Gorbunova, Vera; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A previous report has indicated that over-expression of cofilin-1 (CFL-1), a member of the actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family, enhances cellular radiosensitivity. This study explores, the involvement of various DNA damage responses and repair systems in the enhanced cellular radiosensitivity as well as assessing the role of CFL-1 phosphorylation in radiosensitivity. Materials and Methods Human non-small lung cancer H1299 cells harboring a tet-on gene expression system were used to induce exogenous expression of wild-type CFL-1. Colony formation assays were used to determine cell survival after γ-ray exposure. DNA damage levels were determined by comet assay. DNA repair capacity was assessed by fluorescence-based DNA repair analysis and antibody detection of various repair proteins. The effects of CFL-1 phosphorylation on radiation responses were explored using two mutant CFL-1 proteins, S3D and S3A. Finally, endogenous CFL-1 phosphorylation levels were investigated using latrunculin A (LA), cytochalasin B (CB) and Y27632. Results When phosphorylatable CFL-1 was expressed, radiosensitivity was enhanced after exposure to γ-rays and this was accompanied by DNA damage. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) and p53-binding protein-1 (53BP1) foci, as well as Chk1/2 phosphorylation, were apparently suppressed, although ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase activation was apparently unaffected. In addition, two radiation induced double strand break (DSB) repair, systems, namely homologous recombination repair (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), were suppressed. Moreover, over-expression of CFL-1 S3D and CFL-1 S3A both enhanced radiosensitivity. However, enhanced radiosensitivity and reduced γ-H2AX expression were only detected in cells treated with LA which increased endogenous phospho-CFL-1, and not in cells treated with Y27632, which dephosphorylates CFL-1. Conclusion CFL-1 over-expression enhances radiosensitivity and this

  10. Cellular evidence for selfish spermatogonial selection in aged human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, G J; Goriely, A; Wilkie, A O M

    2014-05-01

    Owing to a recent trend for delayed paternity, the genomic integrity of spermatozoa of older men has become a focus of increased interest. Older fathers are at higher risk for their children to be born with several monogenic conditions collectively termed paternal age effect (PAE) disorders, which include achondroplasia, Apert syndrome and Costello syndrome. These disorders are caused by specific mutations originating almost exclusively from the male germline, in genes encoding components of the tyrosine kinase receptor/RAS/MAPK signalling pathway. These particular mutations, occurring randomly during mitotic divisions of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), are predicted to confer a selective/growth advantage on the mutant SSC. This selective advantage leads to a clonal expansion of the mutant cells over time, which generates mutant spermatozoa at levels significantly above the background mutation rate. This phenomenon, termed selfish spermatogonial selection, is likely to occur in all men. In rare cases, probably because of additional mutational events, selfish spermatogonial selection may lead to spermatocytic seminoma. The studies that initially predicted the clonal nature of selfish spermatogonial selection were based on DNA analysis, rather than the visualization of mutant clones in intact testes. In a recent study that aimed to identify these clones directly, we stained serial sections of fixed testes for expression of melanoma antigen family A4 (MAGEA4), a marker of spermatogonia. A subset of seminiferous tubules with an appearance and distribution compatible with the predicted mutant clones were identified. In these tubules, termed 'immunopositive tubules', there is an increased density of spermatogonia positive for markers related to selfish selection (FGFR3) and SSC self-renewal (phosphorylated AKT). Here we detail the properties of the immunopositive tubules and how they relate to the predicted mutant clones, as well as discussing the utility of

  11. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B. [Drug Sciences Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G. [Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN-LNS), Catania (Italy); Manti, L. [Physics Science Department, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, and National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Naples (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  12. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-02-01

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments.

  13. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  14. Oxidative damage to cellular and isolated DNA by metabolites of a fungicide ortho-phenylphenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, M; Moriya, K; Inoue, S; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    ortho-Phenylphenol (OPP) and its sodium salt, which are used as fungicides and antibacterial agents, have been found to cause carcinomas in the urinary tract of rats. To clarify the carcinogenic mechanism of OPP, we compared the DNA damage inducing ability of an OPP metabolite, phenyl-1,4-benzoquinone (PBQ) with that of another metabolite, phenylhydroquinone (PHQ). Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that PBQ and PHQ induced DNA strand breakage in cultured human cells, but PBQ did it more efficiently than PHQ. Significant increases in 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) were observed in cells treated with PBQ and PHQ, and the increase of 8-oxodG induced by PBQ was significantly higher than that induced by PHQ. Using 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments obtained from human p53 tumor suppressor gene and c-Ha-ras-1 protooncogene, we showed that PBQ plus NADH, and also PHQ, induced DNA damage frequently at thymine residues, in the presence of Cu(II). The intensity of DNA damage by PBQ was stronger than that by PHQ, showing higher importance of PBQ than other OPP metabolites. Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage by PBQ plus NADH and PHQ, suggesting that H2O2 reacts with Cu(I) to produce active species causing DNA damage. Electron spin resonance and UV-visible spectroscopic studies have demonstrated generation of semiquinone radical and superoxide from the reaction of PBQ with NADH or the Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation of PHQ. The present results suggest that these OPP metabolites cause oxidative DNA damage through H2O2 generation in cells, and the damage may lead to mutation and carcinogenesis. It is concluded that PBQ may play a more important role in the expression of OPP carcinogenicity than other OPP metabolites.

  15. Scientists Spot 15 Regions of Human DNA Linked to Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spot 15 Regions of Human DNA Linked to Depression Many are located near genes involved in brain ... identified 15 regions of human DNA associated with depression. These regions may contain genes that increase the ...

  16. The DNA-bending protein HMGB1 is a cellular cofactor of Sleeping Beauty transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Hatem; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Khare, Dheeraj; Heinemann, Udo; Ivics, Zoltán

    2003-05-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is the most active Tc1/ mariner-type transposon in vertebrates. SB contains two transposase-binding sites (DRs) at the end of each terminal inverted repeat (IR), a feature termed the IR/DR structure. We investigated the involvement of cellular proteins in the regulation of SB transposition. Here, we establish that the DNA-bending, high-mobility group protein, HMGB1 is a host-encoded cofactor of SB transposition. Transposition was severely reduced in mouse cells deficient in HMGB1. This effect was rescued by transient over-expression of HMGB1, and was partially complemented by HMGB2, but not with the HMGA1 protein. Over-expression of HMGB1 in wild-type mouse cells enhanced transposition, indicating that HMGB1 can be a limiting factor of transposition. SB transposase was found to interact with HMGB1 in vivo, suggesting that the transposase may recruit HMGB1 to transposon DNA. HMGB1 stimulated preferential binding of the transposase to the DR further from the cleavage site, and promoted bending of DNA fragments containing the transposon IR. We propose that the role of HMGB1 is to ensure that transposase-transposon complexes are first formed at the internal DRs, and subsequently to promote juxtaposition of functional sites in transposon DNA, thereby assisting the formation of synaptic complexes.

  17. Reduced cellular DNA repair capacity after environmentally relevant arsenic exposure. Influence of Ogg1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jordi; Peremartí, Jana; Annangi, Balasubramnayam; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminant known to affect millions of people worldwide. Our previous work demonstrated that chronic sub-toxic i-As concentrations were able to induce biologically significant levels of genotoxic and oxidative DNA damage that were strongly influenced by the Ogg1 genotype. In order to study the nature of the observed levels of damage and the observed differences between MEF Ogg1(+/+) and Ogg1(-/-) genetic backgrounds, the genotoxic and oxidative DNA repair kinetics of 18-weeks exposed MEF cells were evaluated by the comet assay. Results indicate that MEF Ogg1(+/+) and Ogg1(-/-) cells chronically exposed to i-As repair the DNA damage induced by arsenite, potassium bromide and UVC radiation less efficiently than control cells, being that observation clearly more pronounced in MEF Ogg1(-/-) cells. Consequently, exposed cells accumulate a higher percentage of unrepaired DNA damage at the end of the repair period. As an attempt to eliminate i-As associated toxicity, chronically exposed MEF Ogg1(-/-) cells overexpress the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt. This adaptive response confers cells a significant resistance to i-As-induced cell death, but at expenses of accumulating high levels of DNA damage due to their repair impairment. Overall, the work presented here evidences that i-As chronic exposure disrupts the normal cellular repair function, and that oxidative DNA damage-and Ogg1 deficiency-exacerbates this phenomenon. The observed cell death resistance under a chronic scenario of genotoxic and oxidative stress may in turn contribute to the carcinogenic effects of i-As.

  18. HIVIS-DNA or HIVISopt-DNA priming followed by CMDR vaccinia-based boosts induce both humoral and cellular murine immune responses to HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Hinkula

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: HIVIS-DNA was modified to obtain HIVISopt-DNA that had fewer plasmids, and additional epitopes. Even with one DNA prime followed by two MVA-CMDR boosts, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were readily induced by priming with either DNA construct composition. Priming by HIV-DNA augmented neutralizing antibody responses revealed by boosting with the vaccinia-based heterologous sequences. Cellular and antibody responses covered selected strains representing HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE. We assume this is related to the inclusion of heterologous full genes in the vaccine schedule.

  19. Distribution of cellular HSV-1 receptor expression in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathe, Richard; Haas, Juergen G

    2016-12-15

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus linked to a range of acute and chronic neurological disorders affecting distinct regions of the brain. Unusually, HSV-1 entry into cells requires the interaction of viral proteins glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) with distinct cellular receptor proteins. Several different gD and gB receptors have been identified, including TNFRSF14/HVEM and PVRL1/nectin 1 as gD receptors and PILRA, MAG, and MYH9 as gB receptors. We investigated the expression of these receptor molecules in different areas of the adult and developing human brain using online transcriptome databases. Whereas all HSV-1 receptors showed distinct expression patterns in different brain areas, the Allan Brain Atlas (ABA) reported increased expression of both gD and gB receptors in the hippocampus. Specifically, for PVRL1, TNFRFS14, and MYH9, the differential z scores for hippocampal expression, a measure of relative levels of increased expression, rose to 2.9, 2.9, and 2.5, respectively, comparable to the z score for the archetypical hippocampus-enriched mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2, z = 3.1). These data were confirmed at the Human Brain Transcriptome (HBT) database, but HBT data indicate that MAG expression is also enriched in hippocampus. The HBT database allowed the developmental pattern of expression to be investigated; we report that all HSV1 receptors markedly increase in expression levels between gestation and the postnatal/adult periods. These results suggest that differential receptor expression levels of several HSV-1 gD and gB receptors in the adult hippocampus are likely to underlie the susceptibility of this brain region to HSV-1 infection.

  20. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, E.S.

    1991-09-01

    One hundred and forty-seven bronchial samples (generations 3--6) from 66 patients (62 usable; 36 female, 26 male; median age 61) have been dissected by generation from fixed surgical lung specimens obtained after the removal of pathological lesions. In addition, one hundred and fifty-six mongol dog bronchi (generations 2--6) dissected from different lobes of 26 dog lungs have also been similarly prepared. One hundred and twenty-seven human samples have been completely processed for electron microscopy and have yielded 994 electron micrographs of which 655 have been entered into the Computerized Stereological Analysis System (COSAS) and been used for the measurement of the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface. Similarly 328 micrographs of dog epithelium from 33 bronchial samples have been used to measure the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface and have been entered into COSAS. Using the COSAS planimetry program, we continue to expand our established data bases which describe the volume density and nuclear numbers per electron micrograph for 5 cell types of the human bronchial epithelial lining of men and women, as well as smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers and similar parameters for the same 5 epithelial cell types of dog bronchi. Our micrographs of human bronchial epithelium have allowed us to analyze the recent suggestion that the DNA of lymphocytes may be subject to significant damage from Rn progeny while within the lung. Since the last progress report three papers have been submitted for publication. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. The genome-wide DNA sequence specificity of the anti-tumour drug bleomycin in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Vincent; Chen, Jon K; Tanaka, Mark M

    2016-07-01

    The cancer chemotherapeutic agent, bleomycin, cleaves DNA at specific sites. For the first time, the genome-wide DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin breakage was determined in human cells. Utilising Illumina next-generation DNA sequencing techniques, over 200 million bleomycin cleavage sites were examined to elucidate the bleomycin genome-wide DNA selectivity. The genome-wide bleomycin cleavage data were analysed by four different methods to determine the cellular DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin strand breakage. For the most highly cleaved DNA sequences, the preferred site of bleomycin breakage was at 5'-GT* dinucleotide sequences (where the asterisk indicates the bleomycin cleavage site), with lesser cleavage at 5'-GC* dinucleotides. This investigation also determined longer bleomycin cleavage sequences, with preferred cleavage at 5'-GT*A and 5'- TGT* trinucleotide sequences, and 5'-TGT*A tetranucleotides. For cellular DNA, the hexanucleotide DNA sequence 5'-RTGT*AY (where R is a purine and Y is a pyrimidine) was the most highly cleaved DNA sequence. It was striking that alternating purine-pyrimidine sequences were highly cleaved by bleomycin. The highest intensity cleavage sites in cellular and purified DNA were very similar although there were some minor differences. Statistical nucleotide frequency analysis indicated a G nucleotide was present at the -3 position (relative to the cleavage site) in cellular DNA but was absent in purified DNA.

  2. SIRT6 Depletion Suppresses Tumor Growth by Promoting Cellular Senescence Induced by DNA Damage in HCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namgyu; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kwon, Jung-Hee; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Sae Rom; Wang, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2016-01-01

    The role of Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in liver cancer remains controversial. Thus, we identified the specific role of SIRT6 in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SIRT6 expression was significantly higher in HCC cell lines and HCC tissues from 138 patients than in an immortalized hepatocyte cell line, THLE-2 and non-tumor tissues, respectively. SIRT6 knockdown by shRNA suppressed the growth of HCC cells and inhibited HCC tumor growth in vivo. In addition, SIRT6 silencing significantly prevented the growth of HCC cell lines by inducing cellular senescence in the p16/Rb- and p53/p21-pathway independent manners. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of genes involved in nucleosome assembly was apparently altered in SIRT6-depleted Hep3B cells. SIRT6 knockdown promoted G2/M phase arrest and downregulation of genes encoding histone variants associated with nucleosome assembly, which could be attributed to DNA damage. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT6 acts as a tumor promoter by preventing DNA damage and cellular senescence, indicating that SIRT6 represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HCC. PMID:27824900

  3. Chromatin structure and cellular radiosensitivity : A comparison of two human tumour cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, EC; Roesink, JM; Rosemann, M; Brunsting, JF; Driessen, C; Orta, T; Konings, AWT; Peacock, JH; Kampinga, HH

    1996-01-01

    The role of variation in susceptibility to DNA damage induction was studied as a determinant for cellular radiosensitivity. Comparison of the radiosensitive HX142 and radioresistant RT112 cell lines previously revealed higher susceptibility to X-ray-induced DNA damage in the sensitive cell line usin

  4. Chromatin structure and cellular radiosensitivity : A comparison of two human tumour cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, EC; Roesink, JM; Rosemann, M; Brunsting, JF; Driessen, C; Orta, T; Konings, AWT; Peacock, JH; Kampinga, HH

    1996-01-01

    The role of variation in susceptibility to DNA damage induction was studied as a determinant for cellular radiosensitivity. Comparison of the radiosensitive HX142 and radioresistant RT112 cell lines previously revealed higher susceptibility to X-ray-induced DNA damage in the sensitive cell line

  5. DNA-damage response network at the crossroads of cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SCHMITT Estelle; PAQUET Claudie; BEAUCHEMIN Myriam; BERTRAND Richard

    2007-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires a carefully-orchestrated balance between cell proliferation,cellular senescence and cell death.Cells proliferate through a cell cycle that is tightly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase activities.Cellular senescence is a safeguard program limiting the proliferative competence of cells in living organisms.Apoptosis eliminates unwanted cells by the coordinated activity of gene products that regulate and effect cell death.The intimate link between the cell cycle,cellular senescence,apoptosis regulation,cancer development and tumor responses to cancer treatment has become eminently apparent.Extensive research on tumor suppressor genes,oncogenes,the cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory genes has revealed how the DNA damage-sensing and -signaling pathways,referred to as the DNA-damage response network,are tied to cell proliferation,cell-cycle arrest,cellular senescence and apoptosis.DNA-damage responses are complex,involving "sensor" proteins that sense the damage,and transmit signals to "transducer" proteins,which,in turn,convey the signals to numerous "effector" proteins implicated in specific cellular pathways,including DNA repair mechanisms,cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis.The Bcl-2 family of proteins stands among the most crucial regulators of apoptosis and performs vital functions in deciding whether a cell will live or die after cancer chemotherapy and irradiation.In addition,several studies have now revealed that members of the Bcl-2 family also interface with the cell cycle,DNA repair/recombination and cellular senescence,effects that are generally distinct from their function in apoptosis.In this review,we report progress in understanding the molecular networks that regulate cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis after DNA damage,and discuss the influence of some Bcl-2 family members on cell-cycle checkpoint regulation.

  6. A DNA-dependent stress response involving DNA-PK occurs in hypoxic cells and contributes to cellular adaptation to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Fanny; Ousset, Marielle; Biard, Denis; Fallone, Frédérique; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Frit, Philippe; Salles, Bernard; Muller, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) signalling and repair. We report that DNA-PK is activated by mild hypoxia conditions (0.1-1% O₂) as shown by (1) its autophosphorylation on Ser2056, and (2) its mobilisation from a soluble nucleoplasmic compartment to a less extractable nuclear fraction. The recruitment of DNA-PK was not followed by activation and recruitment of the XRCC4-DNA-ligase-IV complex, suggesting that DSBs are not responsible for activation of DNA-PK. To unravel the mechanism of DNA-PK activation, we show that exposure of cells to trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, leads to DNA-PK autophosphorylation and relocalisation to DNA. Histone acetylation (mainly H3K14) is increased in hypoxic cells and treatment with anacardic acid, an inhibitor of histone acetyl transferase, prevented both histone modifications and DNA-PK activation in hypoxic conditions. Importantly, in using either silenced DNA-PK cells or cells exposed to a specific DNA-PK inhibitor (NU7026), we demonstrated that hypoxic DNA-PK activation positively regulates the key transcription factor HIF-1 and one subsequent target gene, GLUT1. Our results show that hypoxia initiates chromatin modification and consequently DNA-PK activation, which positively regulate cellular oxygen-sensing and oxygen-signalling pathways.

  7. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  8. The synthesis and characterization of cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of human multidrug resistant proteins MRP1, MRP2 and human breast cancer resistant protein BCRP using membranes obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Prateek A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    CMAC (cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns) have been developed for the study of the human multidrug transporters MRP1, MRP2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The columns were constructed using the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) stationary phase and cellular membrane fragments obtained from Spodopetra frugiperda (Sf9) cells that had been stably transfected with human Mrp1, Mrp2 or Bcrp c-DNA, using a baculovirus expression system. The resulting CMAC(Sf9MRP1)...

  9. Effect of wavelength and fluence on morphology, cellular and genetic integrity of diabetic wounded human skin fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamse, H.; Hawkins, D.; Houreld, N.

    2006-02-01

    An alternative treatment modality for diabetic wound healing includes low level laser therapy (LLLT). Biostimulation of such wounds may be of benefit to patients by reducing healing time. Structural, cellular and genetic events in diabetic wounded human skin fibroblasts (WS1) were evaluated after exposing cells in culture to a Helium-Neon (632.8nm), a Diode laser (830nm) and a Nd:YAG (Neodynium:Yttrium-Allumina-Gallium) laser (1064nm) at either 5J/cm2 or 16J/cm2. Cells were exposed twice a week and left 24 hours post-irradiation prior to measuring effects. Structural changes were evaluated by assessing colony formation, haptotaxis and chemotaxis. Cellular changes were evaluated using cell viability, (adenosine-triphosphate, ATP production), and proliferation, (alkaline phosphatase, ALP and basic fibroblast growth factor, bFGF expression), while the Comet assay evaluated DNA damage and cytotoxicity was determined assessing membrane permeability for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Caspase 3/7 activity was used as an estimate of apoptosis as a result of irradiation. The irradiated diabetic wounded cells showed structural, cellular as well as molecular resilience comparable to that of unwounded normal skin fibroblast cells. With regards to fluence, 5J/cm2 elicit positive cellular and structural responses while 16J/cm2 increases cellular and genetic damage and cellular morphology is altered. Different wavelengths of LLLT influences the beneficial outcomes of diabetic wounded cells and although all three wavelengths elicit cellular effects, the penetration depth of 830nm plays a significant role in the healing of diabetic wounded human fibroblast cells. Results from this study validate the contribution of LLLT to wound healing and elucidate the biochemical effects at a cellular level while highlighting the role of different dosages and wavelengths in LLLT.

  10. Reduced cellular DNA repair capacity after environmentally relevant arsenic exposure. Influence of Ogg1 deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Jordi; Peremartí, Jana; Annangi, Balasubramnayam [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); Marcos, Ricard, E-mail: ricard.marcos@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, ISCIII, Madrid (Spain); Hernández, Alba, E-mail: alba.hernandez@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, ISCIII, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Repair ability under long-term exposure to arsenic was tested using the comet assay. • Effects were measured under Ogg1 wild-type and deficient backgrounds. • Exposed cells repair less efficiency the DNA damage induced by SA, KBrO{sub 3}, MMA{sup III} or UVC radiation. • Oxidative damage and Ogg1 deficient background exacerbate repair deficiencies. • Overexpression of the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt acts as adaptive mechanism. - Abstract: Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminant known to affect millions of people worldwide. Our previous work demonstrated that chronic sub-toxic i-As concentrations were able to induce biologically significant levels of genotoxic and oxidative DNA damage that were strongly influenced by the Ogg1 genotype. In order to study the nature of the observed levels of damage and the observed differences between MEF Ogg1{sup +/+} and Ogg1{sup −/−} genetic backgrounds, the genotoxic and oxidative DNA repair kinetics of 18-weeks exposed MEF cells were evaluated by the comet assay. Results indicate that MEF Ogg1{sup +/+} and Ogg1{sup −/−} cells chronically exposed to i-As repair the DNA damage induced by arsenite, potassium bromide and UVC radiation less efficiently than control cells, being that observation clearly more pronounced in MEF Ogg1{sup −/−} cells. Consequently, exposed cells accumulate a higher percentage of unrepaired DNA damage at the end of the repair period. As an attempt to eliminate i-As associated toxicity, chronically exposed MEF Ogg1{sup −/−} cells overexpress the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt. This adaptive response confers cells a significant resistance to i-As-induced cell death, but at expenses of accumulating high levels of DNA damage due to their repair impairment. Overall, the work presented here evidences that i-As chronic exposure disrupts the normal cellular repair function, and that oxidative DNA damage—and Ogg1 deficiency

  11. Damage to cellular and isolated DNA induced by a metabolite of aspirin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikawa, Shinji [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: s-oikawa@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); JSPS Research Fellow (Japan); Isono, Yoshiaki [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Kawanishi, Shosuke [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie 513-8670 (Japan)

    2009-02-10

    Aspirin has been proposed as a possible chemopreventive agent. On the other hand, a recent cohort study showed that aspirin may increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. To clarify whether aspirin is potentially carcinogenic, we investigated the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), which is correlated with the incidence of cancer, in cultured cells treated with 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA), a metabolite of aspirin. 2,3-DHBA induced 8-oxodG formation in the PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cell line. 2,3-DHBA-induced DNA single-strand breaks were also revealed by comet assay using PANC-1 cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that 2,3-DHBA increased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PANC-1 cells. The 8-oxodG formation and ROS generation were also observed in the HL-60 leukemia cell line, but not in the hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-resistant clone HP100 cells, suggesting the involvement of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In addition, an hprt mutation assay supported the mutagenicity of 2,3-DHBA. We investigated the mechanism underlying the 2,3-DHBA-induced DNA damage using {sup 32}P-labeled DNA fragments of human tumor suppressor genes. 2,3-DHBA induced DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II) and NADH. DNA damage induced by 2,3-DHBA was enhanced by the addition of histone peptide-6 [AKRHRK]. Interestingly, 2,3-DHBA and histone peptide-6 caused base damage in the 5'-ACG-3' and 5'-CCG-3' sequences, hotspots of the p53 gene. Bathocuproine, a Cu(I) chelator, and catalase inhibited the DNA damage. Typical hydroxyl radical scavengers did not inhibit the DNA damage. These results suggest that ROS derived from the reaction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with Cu(I) participate in the DNA damage. In conclusion, 2,3-DHBA induces oxidative DNA damage and mutations, which may result in carcinogenesis.

  12. Fisetin inhibits cellular proliferation and induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarwal, Akash; Agarwal, Rajesh; Singh, Rana P

    2017-02-01

    The anticancer effects of fisetin, a dietary agent, are largely unknown against human gastric cancer. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms of fisetin-induced inhibition of growth and survival of human gastric carcinoma AGS and SNU-1 cells. Fisetin (25-100 μM) caused significant decrease in the levels of G1 phase cyclins and CDKs, and increased the levels of p53 and its S15 phosphorylation in gastric cancer cells. We also observed that growth suppression and death of non-neoplastic human intestinal FHs74int cells were minimally affected by fisetin. Fisetin strongly increased apoptotic cells and showed mitochondrial membrane depolarization in gastric cancer cells. DNA damage was observed as early as 3 h after fisetin treatment which was accompanied with gamma-H2A.X(S139) phosphorylation and cleavage of PARP. Fisetin-induced apoptosis was observed to be independent of p53. DCFDA and MitoSOX analyses showed an increase in mitochondrial ROS generation in time- and dose-dependent fashion. It also increased cellular nitrite and superoxide generation. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) inhibited ROS generation and also caused protection from fisetin-induced DNA damage. The formation of comets were observed in only fisetin treated cells which was blocked by NAC pre-treatment. Further investigation of the source of ROS, using mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complex inhibitors, suggested that fisetin caused ROS generation specifically through complex I. Collectively, these results for the first time demonstrated that fisetin possesses anticancer potential through ROS production most likely via MRC complex I leading to apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Mishra, Anurag [Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Krynetskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: ekrynets@temple.edu [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  14. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  15. Quantification of human mitochondrial DNA using synthesized DNA standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavlick, Mark F; Lawrence, Helen S; Merritt, R Travis; Fisher, Constance; Isenberg, Alice; Robertson, James M; Budowle, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Successful mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) forensic analysis depends on sufficient quantity and quality of mtDNA. A real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed to assess such characteristics in a DNA sample, which utilizes a duplex, synthetic DNA to ensure optimal quality assurance and quality control. The assay's 105-base pair target sequence facilitates amplification of degraded DNA and is minimally homologous to nonhuman mtDNA. The primers and probe hybridize to a region that has relatively few sequence polymorphisms. The assay can also identify the presence of PCR inhibitors and thus indicate the need for sample repurification. The results show that the assay provides information down to 10 copies and provides a dynamic range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Additional experiments demonstrated that as few as 300 mtDNA copies resulted in successful hypervariable region amplification, information that permits sample conservation and optimized downstream PCR testing. The assay described is rapid, reliable, and robust.

  16. Pleiotropic expression of Epstein--Barr virus DNA in human epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    We have attempted to establish a system that can be used to study the association of Epstein--Barr virus (EBV) with epithelial cells. Attempts were made to transfect human carcinoma cells with EBV DNA. Successful transfection was confirmed by the expression of EBV-specific early antigen (EA), virus capsid antigen, and the presence of virus DNA. The transfecting preparation contained a mixture of EBV and cellular DNA extracted from two producer cell lines, P3HR-1 and AG-876. Our data suggest t...

  17. CELLULAR RESPONSES TO DNA DAMAGE AND ONCOGENESIS BY THE p53 AND pRb/E2F PATHWAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to stress including DNA damage, show multiple options involving the mechanisms of growth arrest. DNA repair and programmed cell death or apoptosis. Failures in these mechanisms can result in oncogenesis or accelerated senescence. Much of the response is coordinated by p53, a nuclear phosphoprotein with a central role in the defences against physical, chemical and pathogenic agents which challenge the DNA integrity. The p53 pathways for mobilising the cellular defences are linked to the pRB/E2D pathways regulating the cell cycle progression. This paper aims to review the current understanding on the networks and main molecular machinery of these processes. In addition, the implications on cellular decision making for the defences as well as revolutionary aspects of these mechanisms are discussed in brief.

  18. Salvia fruticosa reduces intrinsic cellular and H2O2-induced DNA oxidation in HEK 293 cells;assessment using flow cytometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saleem Bani Hani; Mekki Bayachou

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the role of water-soluble extract of Salvia fruticosa (Greek sage) (S. fruticosa) leaves in reducing both intrinsic cellular and H2O2-induced DNA oxidation in cultured human embryonic kidney 293 cells. S. fruticosa, native to the Eastern-Mediterranean basin, is widely used as a medicinal herb for treatment of various diseases. Methods: Dried leaves of S. fruticosa were extracted in phosphate buffer saline and purified using both vacuum and high pressure filtrations. Each mL of the preparation contained (7.1±1.0) mg of extract. HEK-293 cells were incubated in one set with S. fruticosa extract in the presence of 0.1 mmol/L H2O2, and in the other set with the addition of the extract alone. The DNA oxidation was measured using fluorescence upon fluorescein isothiocyanate derivatization of 8-oxoguanine moieties. The fluorescence was measured using flow cytometry technique. Results:Cells incubated 3 h with 150 µL extract and exposed to 0.1 mmol/L H2O2 showed lower intensity of fluorescence, and thus lower DNA oxidation. Moreover, cells incubated 3 h with 100 µL of the extract showed lower intensity of fluorescence, and thus lower intrinsic cellular DNA oxidation compared to control (without S. fruticosa). Conclusions: The results from this study suggest that the water-soluble extract of S. fruticosa leaves protects against both H2O2-induced and intrinsic cellular DNA oxidation in human embryonic kidney 293 cells.

  19. Network signatures of cellular immortalization in human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Sung-Mi; Jung, So-Young; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Mee-Hee; Kim, Jun-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Osong 363-951 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jae-Pil, E-mail: jaepiljeon@hanmail.net [Division of Brain Diseases, Center for Biomedical Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Osong 363-951 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We identified network signatures of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles. •More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCLs. •MicroRNA target genes in LCLs are involved in apoptosis and immune-related functions. •This approach is useful to find functional miRNA targets in specific cell conditions. -- Abstract: Human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) has been used as an in vitro cell model in genetic and pharmacogenomic studies, as well as a good model for studying gene expression regulatory machinery using integrated genomic analyses. In this study, we aimed to identify biological networks of LCL immortalization from transcriptomic profiles of microRNAs and their target genes in LCLs. We first selected differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and microRNAs (DEmiRs) between early passage LCLs (eLCLs) and terminally differentiated late passage LCLs (tLCLs). The in silico and correlation analysis of these DEGs and DEmiRs revealed that 1098 DEG–DEmiR pairs were found to be positively (n = 591 pairs) or negatively (n = 507 pairs) correlated with each other. More than 41% of DEGs are possibly regulated by miRNAs in LCL immortalizations. The target DEGs of DEmiRs were enriched for cellular functions associated with apoptosis, immune response, cell death, JAK–STAT cascade and lymphocyte activation while non-miRNA target DEGs were over-represented for basic cell metabolisms. The target DEGs correlated negatively with miR-548a-3p and miR-219-5p were significantly associated with protein kinase cascade, and the lymphocyte proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. In addition, the miR-106a and miR-424 clusters located in the X chromosome were enriched in DEmiR–mRNA pairs for LCL immortalization. In this study, the integrated transcriptomic analysis of LCLs could identify functional networks of biologically active microRNAs and their target genes involved in LCL immortalization.

  20. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Fengxia [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zhang, Minjie [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Ye [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Genomic Stability, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, MA 02134 (United States); Price, Brendan, E-mail: Brendan_Price@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Genomic Stability, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, MA 02134 (United States); Sun, Yingli, E-mail: sunyl@big.ac.cn [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  1. Two DNA-binding and Nick Recognition Modules in Human DNA Ligase III*

    OpenAIRE

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Human DNA ligase III contains an N-terminal zinc finger domain that binds to nicks and gaps in DNA. This small domain has been described as a DNA nick sensor, but it is not required for DNA nick joining activity in vitro. In light of new structural information for mammalian ligases, we measured the DNA binding affinity and specificity of each domain of DNA ligase III. These studies identified two separate, independent DNA-binding modules in DNA ligase III that each bin...

  2. A candidate DNA vaccine elicits HCV specific humoral and cellular immune responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Xin Zhu; Jing Liu; Ye Ye; You-Hua Xie; Yu-Ying Kong; Guang-Di Li; Yuan Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the immunogenicity of candidate DNA vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) delivered by two plasmids expressing HCV envelope protein 1 (E1) and envelope protein 2 (E2) antigens respectively and to study the effect of CpG adjuvant on this candidate vaccine.METHODS: Recombinant plasmids expressing HCV E1 and E2 antigens respectively were used to simultaneously inoculate mice with or without CpG adjuvant. Antisera were then collected and titers of anti-HCV antibodies were analyzed by ELISA. One month after the last injection, animals were sacrificed to prepare single-cell suspension of splenocytes.These cells were subjected to HCVantigen specific proliferation assays and cytokine secretion assays to evaluate the cellular immune responses of the vaccinated animals.RESULTS: Antibody responses to HCV E1 and E2 antigens were detected in vaccinated animals. Animals receiving CpG adjuvant had slightly lower titers of anti-HCV antibodies in the sera, while the splenocytes from these animals showed higher HCV-antigen specific proliferation. Analysis of cytokine secretion from the splenocytes was consistent with the above results. While no antigen-specific IL-4 secretion was detected for all vaccinated animals, HCV antigen-specific INF-γ secretion was detected for the splenocytes of vaccinated animals. CpG adjuvant enhanced the secretion of INF-γ but did not change the profile of IL-4 secretion.CONCLUSION: Vaccination of mice with plasmids encoding HCV E1 and E2 antigens induces humoral and cellular immune responses. CpG adjuvant significantly enhances the cellular immune response.

  3. Investigation of DNA repair in human oocytes and preimplantation embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroudi, S.

    2010-01-01

    DNA repair genes are expressed in mammalian embryos and in human germinal vesicles, however, little is known about DNA repair in human preimplantation embryos. This project had three aims: 1) to produce a DNA repair profile of human MII oocytes and blastocysts using expression arrays and identify repair pathways that may be active before and after embryonic genome activation; 2) to design an in vitro functional assay that targeted mismatch repair and which could be applied to human oocytes...

  4. Assessing DNA methylation in the developing human intestinal epithelium: potential link to inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraiczy, J; Nayak, K; Ross, A; Raine, T; Mak, T N; Gasparetto, M; Cario, E; Rakyan, V; Heuschkel, R; Zilbauer, M

    2016-05-01

    DNA methylation is one of the major epigenetic mechanisms implicated in regulating cellular development and cell-type-specific gene expression. Here we performed simultaneous genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression analysis on purified intestinal epithelial cells derived from human fetal gut, healthy pediatric biopsies, and children newly diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results were validated using pyrosequencing, real-time PCR, and immunostaining. The functional impact of DNA methylation changes on gene expression was assessed by employing in-vitro assays in intestinal cell lines. DNA methylation analyses allowed identification of 214 genes for which expression is regulated via DNA methylation, i.e. regulatory differentially methylated regions (rDMRs). Pathway and functional analysis of rDMRs suggested a critical role for DNA methylation in regulating gene expression and functional development of the human intestinal epithelium. Moreover, analysis performed on intestinal epithelium of children newly diagnosed with IBD revealed alterations in DNA methylation within genomic loci, which were found to overlap significantly with those undergoing methylation changes during intestinal development. Our study provides novel insights into the physiological role of DNA methylation in regulating functional maturation of the human intestinal epithelium. Moreover, we provide data linking developmentally acquired alterations in the DNA methylation profile to changes seen in pediatric IBD.

  5. Role of extracellular DNA oxidative modification in radiation induced bystander effects in human endotheliocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyuk, Svetlana V. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alekseeva, Anna Yu.; Smirnova, Tatiana D.; Glebova, Kristina V.; Efremova, Liudmila V. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baranova, Ancha [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); School of System Biology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-03

    The development of the bystander effect induced by low doses of irradiation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) depends on extracellular DNA (ecDNA) signaling pathway. We found that the changes in the levels of ROS and NO production by human endothelial cells are components of the radiation induced bystander effect that can be registered at a low dose. We exposed HUVECs to X-ray radiation and studied effects of ecDNA{sup R} isolated from the culture media conditioned by the short-term incubation of irradiated cells on intact HUVECs. Effects of ecDNA{sup R} produced by irradiated cells on ROS and NO production in non-irradiated HUVECs are similar to bystander effect. These effects at least partially depend on TLR9 signaling. We compared the production of the nitric oxide and the ROS in human endothelial cells that were (1) irradiated at a low dose; (2) exposed to the ecDNA{sup R} extracted from the media conditioned by irradiated cells; and (3) exposed to human DNA oxidized in vitro. We found that the cellular responses to all three stimuli described above are essentially similar. We conclude that irradiation-related oxidation of the ecDNA is an important component of the ecDNA-mediated bystander effect.

  6. Plasmid DNA Vaccine Co-Immunisation Modulates Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Intranasal Inoculation in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah F L King

    Full Text Available An effective HIV vaccine will likely require induction of both mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses. We investigated whether intramuscular (IM delivery of electroporated plasmid DNA vaccine and simultaneous protein vaccinations by intranasal (IN and IM routes could be combined to induce mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses to a model HIV-1 CN54 gp140 antigen in mice.Co-immunisation of DNA with intranasal protein successfully elicited both serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses, whereas DNA and IM protein co-delivery did not induce systemic or mucosal IgA responses. Cellular IFNγ responses were preserved in co-immunisation protocols compared to protein-only vaccination groups. The addition of DNA to IN protein vaccination reduced the strong Th2 bias observed with IN protein vaccination alone. Luminex analysis also revealed that co-immunisation with DNA and IN protein induced expression of cytokines that promote B-cell function, generation of TFH cells and CCR5 ligands that can reduce HIV infectivity.These data suggest that while IN inoculation alone elicits both cellular and humoral responses, co-administration with homologous DNA vaccination can tailor these towards a more balanced Th1/Th2 phenotype modulating the cellular cytokine profile while eliciting high-levels of antigen-specific antibody. This work provides insights on how to generate differential immune responses within the same vaccination visit, and supports co-immunisation with DNA and protein by a mucosal route as a potential delivery strategy for HIV vaccines.

  7. DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate nanoparticles elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajadhar Bhakta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of pEGFP (plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-encapsulated PEGylated (meaning polyethylene glycol coated magnesium phosphate nanoparticles (referred to as MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles for the induction of immune responses was investigated in a mouse model. MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles induced enhanced serum antibody and antigen-specific T-lymphocyte responses, as well as increased IFN-γ and IL-12 levels compared to naked pEGFP when administered via intravenous, intraperitoneal or intramuscular routes. A significant macrophage response, both in size and activity, was also observed when mice were immunized with the nanoparticle formulation. The response was highly specific for the antigen, as the increase in interaction between macrophages and lymphocytes as well as lymphocyte proliferation took place only when they were re-stimulated with recombinant green fluorescence protein (rGFP. Thus the nanoparticle formulation elicited both humoral as well as cellular responses. Cytokine profiling revealed the induction of Th-1 type responses. The results suggest DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate (MgPi nanoparticles may constitute a safer, more stable and cost-efficient DNA vaccine formulation.

  8. Origin of giant viruses from smaller DNA viruses not from a fourth domain of cellular life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yutin, Natalya; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-10-01

    The numerous and diverse eukaryotic viruses with large double-stranded DNA genomes that at least partially reproduce in the cytoplasm of infected cells apparently evolved from a single virus ancestor. This major group of viruses is known as Nucleocytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) or the proposed order Megavirales. Among the "Megavirales", there are three groups of giant viruses with genomes exceeding 500kb, namely Mimiviruses, Pithoviruses, and Pandoraviruses that hold the current record of viral genome size, about 2.5Mb. Phylogenetic analysis of conserved, ancestral NLCDV genes clearly shows that these three groups of giant viruses have three distinct origins within the "Megavirales". The Mimiviruses constitute a distinct family that is distantly related to Phycodnaviridae, Pandoraviruses originate from a common ancestor with Coccolithoviruses within the Phycodnaviridae family, and Pithoviruses are related to Iridoviridae and Marseilleviridae. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of gene gain and loss events during the evolution of the "Megavirales" indicates that each group of giant viruses evolved from viruses with substantially smaller and simpler gene repertoires. Initial phylogenetic analysis of universal genes, such as translation system components, encoded by some giant viruses, in particular Mimiviruses, has led to the hypothesis that giant viruses descend from a fourth, probably extinct domain of cellular life. The results of our comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of giant viruses refute the fourth domain hypothesis and instead indicate that the universal genes have been independently acquired by different giant viruses from their eukaryotic hosts.

  9. Recombinational DNA repair and human disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2002-11-30

    We review the genes and proteins related to the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) pathway that are implicated in cancer through either genetic disorders that predispose to cancer through chromosome instability or the occurrence of somatic mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), and an ataxia-like disorder (ATLD), are chromosome instability disorders that are defective in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), NBS, and Mre11 genes, respectively. These genes are critical in maintaining cellular resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which kills largely by the production of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Bloom syndrome involves a defect in the BLM helicase, which seems to play a role in restarting DNA replication forks that are blocked at lesions, thereby promoting chromosome stability. The Werner syndrome gene (WRN) helicase, another member of the RecQ family like BLM, has very recently been found to help mediate homologous recombination. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically complex chromosomal instability disorder involving seven or more genes, one of which is BRCA2. FA may be at least partially caused by the aberrant production of reactive oxidative species. The breast cancer-associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are strongly implicated in HRR; BRCA2 associates with Rad51 and appears to regulate its activity. We discuss in detail the phenotypes of the various mutant cell lines and the signaling pathways mediated by the ATM kinase. ATM's phosphorylation targets can be grouped into oxidative stress-mediated transcriptional changes, cell cycle checkpoints, and recombinational repair. We present the DNA damage response pathways by using the DSB as the prototype lesion, whose incorrect repair can initiate and augment karyotypic abnormalities.

  10. Identification of dually acylated proteins from complementary DNA resources by cell-free and cellular metabolic labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Koko; Kimoto, Mayumi; Matsuzaki, Kanako; Kiwado, Aya; Takamitsu, Emi; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2016-10-15

    To establish a strategy to identify dually fatty acylated proteins from cDNA resources, seven N-myristoylated proteins with cysteine (Cys) residues within the 10 N-terminal residues were selected as potential candidates among 27 N-myristoylated proteins identified from a model human cDNA resource. Seven proteins C-terminally tagged with FLAG tag or EGFP were generated and their susceptibility to protein N-myristoylation and S-palmitoylation were evaluated by metabolic labeling with [(3)H]myristic acid or [(3)H]palmitic acid either in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system or in transfected mammalian cells. As a result, EEPD1, one of five proteins (RFTN1, EEPD1, GNAI1, PDE2A, RNF11) found to be dually acylated, was shown to be a novel dually fatty acylated protein. Metabolic labeling experiments using G2A and C7S mutants of EEPD1-EGFP revealed that the palmitoylation site of EEPD1 is Cys at position 7. Analysis of the intracellular localization of EEPD1 C-terminally tagged with FLAG tag or EGFP and its G2A and C7S mutants revealed that the dual acylation directs EEPD1 to localize to the plasma membrane. Thus, dually fatty acylated proteins can be identified from cDNA resources by cell-free and cellular metabolic labeling of N-myristoylated proteins with Cys residue(s) close to the N-myristoylated N-terminus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative Study on the Immunogenicity between Hsp70 DNA Vaccine and Hsp65 DNA Vaccine in Human Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI; Wuxing; HUANG; Hailang; YUAN; Ye; HU; Jiajie; HUANGFU; Yongmu

    2001-01-01

    The BALB/c mice were immunized with Hsp70 DNA and Hsp65 DNA vaccines in human Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Eight weeks after immunization, the eyeballs were removed, blood and spleen taken, and intraperitoneal macrophages were harvested. The lymphocytic stimulating index(SI) was used to measure the cellular proliferating ability and NO release to measure the phagocytic activity of the macrophages. With ELISA kit, the levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ(IFN-γ) in serum and the splenic lymphocytic cultured supernatant were detected. The results showed that after the mice were immunized with 100 μg/mouse of Hsp70 DNA vaccine intramuscularly, the splenic lymphocytic proliferating ability in the mice was significantly increased as compared with that in the control group, vector group and Hsp65 DNA vaccine group (P<0. 01); The contents of NO in the intraperitoneal macrophages of the mice were significantly lower than in the control group and Hsp65 DNA vaccine group (P<0. 01); The levels of serum IL-2 in the mice were significantly higher than in the control group, but there was no statistical difference between Hsp65 DNA group and vector group (P>0. 05); The contents of serum IFN-γ in the mice were significantly higher than in the control group, but significantly lower than in the Hsp65 DNA vaccine group (P<0. 05). It was indicated that immunization with Hsp70 DNA vaccine could obviously enhance the immune response, but its intensity seemed inferior to Hsp65 DNA vaccine. The anti-infection mechanisms and clinical use in the future of the vaccines of Hsp70 DNA and Hsp65 DNA are worth further studying.

  12. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Smita S Patel

    2016-01-01

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE—a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding su...

  13. Cellular HIV-1 DNA levels in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy strongly correlate with therapy initiation timing but not with therapy duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Yasuharu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral reservoir size refers to cellular human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 DNA levels in CD4+ T lymphocytes of peripheral blood obtained from patients with plasma HIV-1-RNA levels (viral load, VL maintained below the detection limit by antiretroviral therapy (ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA levels in CD4+ lymphocytes in such patients to investigate their clinical significance. Methods CD4+ T lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of 61 patients with a VL maintained at less than 50 copies/ml for at least 4 months by ART and total DNA was purified. HIV-1 DNA was quantified by nested PCR to calculate the copy number per 1 million CD4+ lymphocytes (relative amount and the copy number in 1 ml of blood (absolute amount. For statistical analysis, the Spearman rank or Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used, with a significance level of 5%. Results CD4 cell counts at the time of sampling negatively correlated with the relative amount of HIV-1 DNA (median = 33 copies/million CD4+ lymphocytes; interquartile range [IQR] = 7-123 copies/million CD4+ lymphocytes, but were not correlated with the absolute amounts (median = 17 copies/ml; IQR = 5-67 copies/ml. Both absolute and relative amounts of HIV-1 DNA were significantly lower in six patients in whom ART was initiated before positive seroconversion than in 55 patients in whom ART was initiated in the chronic phase, as shown by Western blotting. CD4 cell counts before ART introduction were also negatively correlated with both the relative and absolute amounts of HIV-1 DNA. Only the relative amounts of HIV-1 DNA negatively correlated with the duration of VL maintenance below the detection limit, while the absolute amounts were not significantly correlated with this period. Conclusions The amounts of cellular HIV-1 DNA in patients with VLs maintained below the detection limit by the introduction of ART correlated with the timing of ART initiation but not with the duration of ART. In

  14. Chromatin remodeling of human subtelomeres and TERRA promoters upon cellular senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Peter E.; Tobi, Elmar W.; Balog, Judit; Schouten, Suzanne G.; Kremer, Dennis; El Bouazzaoui, Fatiha; Henneman, Peter; Putter, Hein; Eline Slagboom, P.; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2013-01-01

    Subtelomeres are patchworks of evolutionary conserved sequence blocks and harbor the transcriptional start sites for telomere repeat containing RNAs (TERRA). Recent studies suggest that the interplay between telomeres and subtelomeric chromatin is required for maintaining telomere function. To further characterize chromatin remodeling of subtelomeres in relation to telomere shortening and cellular senescence, we systematically quantified histone modifications and DNA methylation at the subtelomeres of chromosomes 7q and 11q in primary human WI-38 fibroblasts. Upon senescence, both subtelomeres were characterized by a decrease in markers of constitutive heterochromatin, suggesting relative chromatin relaxation. However, we did not find increased levels of markers of euchromatin or derepression of the 7q VIPR2 gene. The repressed state of the subtelomeres was maintained upon senescence, which could be attributed to a rise in levels of facultative heterochromatin markers at both subtelomeres. While senescence-induced subtelomeric chromatin remodeling was similar for both chromosomes, chromatin remodeling at TERRA promoters displayed chromosome-specific patterns. At the 7q TERRA promoter, chromatin structure was co-regulated with the more proximal subtelomere. In contrast, the 11q TERRA promoter, which was previously shown to be bound by CCCTC-binding factor CTCF, displayed lower levels of markers of constitutive heterochromatin that did not change upon senescence, whereas levels of markers of facultative heterochromatin decreased upon senescence. In line with the chromatin state data, transcription of 11q TERRA but not 7q TERRA was detected. Our study provides a detailed description of human subtelomeric chromatin dynamics and shows distinct regulation of the TERRA promoters of 7q and 11q upon cellular senescence. PMID:23644601

  15. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models

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    Kiran Musunuru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  16. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musunuru, Kiran

    2013-07-01

    Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  17. In vitro ZnCl2 cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human leukocytes: Zero-order kinetic cellular zinc influx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pereira de Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is an essential trace element for cellular viability, but concentrations above physiologic level may lead to cellular damage. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro ZnCl2 genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in human leukocyte cells. This was assessed in an unprecedented way that correlated the level of intracellular Zn after cell exposition with the cellular damage. The exposure to increased Zn concentrations (2.5-20 µg mL-1, showed significantly reduced cellular leukocyte viability. However, significant DNA damages were observed only when the Zn exposure concentrations were from 10-20 µg mL-1. The Zn intracellular levels found in leukocytes was from 72.25-268.9 ρg cell-1, starting to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity at concentrations of 95.68 and 126.2 ρg cell-1, respectively. The relationship between the exposure concentration and intracellular levels of Zn suggests that the influx of Zn, in the form of ZnCl2, occurs in human leukocytes under zero-order kinetics.

  18. Cell type-dependent induction of DNA damage by 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields does not result in significant cellular dysfunctions.

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    Shanshan Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although IARC clarifies radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF as possible human carcinogen, the debate on its health impact continues due to the inconsistent results. Genotoxic effect has been considered as a golden standard to determine if an environmental factor is a carcinogen, but the currently available data for RF-EMF remain controversial. As an environmental stimulus, the effect of RF-EMF on cellular DNA may be subtle. Therefore, more sensitive method and systematic research strategy are warranted to evaluate its genotoxicity. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether RF-EMF does induce DNA damage and if the effect is cell-type dependent by adopting a more sensitive method γH2AX foci formation; and to investigate the biological consequences if RF-EMF does increase γH2AX foci formation. METHODS: Six different types of cells were intermittently exposed to GSM 1800 MHz RF-EMF at a specific absorption rate of 3.0 W/kg for 1 h or 24 h, then subjected to immunostaining with anti-γH2AX antibody. The biological consequences in γH2AX-elevated cell type were further explored with comet and TUNEL assays, flow cytometry, and cell growth assay. RESULTS: Exposure to RF-EMF for 24 h significantly induced γH2AX foci formation in Chinese hamster lung cells and Human skin fibroblasts (HSFs, but not the other cells. However, RF-EMF-elevated γH2AX foci formation in HSF cells did not result in detectable DNA fragmentation, sustainable cell cycle arrest, cell proliferation or viability change. RF-EMF exposure slightly but not significantly increased the cellular ROS level. CONCLUSIONS: RF-EMF induces DNA damage in a cell type-dependent manner, but the elevated γH2AX foci formation in HSF cells does not result in significant cellular dysfunctions.

  19. Cell type-dependent induction of DNA damage by 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields does not result in significant cellular dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanshan; Chen, Guangdi; Chen, Chunjing; Sun, Chuan; Zhang, Danying; Murbach, Manuel; Kuster, Niels; Zeng, Qunli; Xu, Zhengping

    2013-01-01

    Although IARC clarifies radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) as possible human carcinogen, the debate on its health impact continues due to the inconsistent results. Genotoxic effect has been considered as a golden standard to determine if an environmental factor is a carcinogen, but the currently available data for RF-EMF remain controversial. As an environmental stimulus, the effect of RF-EMF on cellular DNA may be subtle. Therefore, more sensitive method and systematic research strategy are warranted to evaluate its genotoxicity. To determine whether RF-EMF does induce DNA damage and if the effect is cell-type dependent by adopting a more sensitive method γH2AX foci formation; and to investigate the biological consequences if RF-EMF does increase γH2AX foci formation. Six different types of cells were intermittently exposed to GSM 1800 MHz RF-EMF at a specific absorption rate of 3.0 W/kg for 1 h or 24 h, then subjected to immunostaining with anti-γH2AX antibody. The biological consequences in γH2AX-elevated cell type were further explored with comet and TUNEL assays, flow cytometry, and cell growth assay. Exposure to RF-EMF for 24 h significantly induced γH2AX foci formation in Chinese hamster lung cells and Human skin fibroblasts (HSFs), but not the other cells. However, RF-EMF-elevated γH2AX foci formation in HSF cells did not result in detectable DNA fragmentation, sustainable cell cycle arrest, cell proliferation or viability change. RF-EMF exposure slightly but not significantly increased the cellular ROS level. RF-EMF induces DNA damage in a cell type-dependent manner, but the elevated γH2AX foci formation in HSF cells does not result in significant cellular dysfunctions.

  20. P21-PARP-1 Pathway Is Involved in Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung DNA Damage and Cellular Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sundar, Isaac K.; Gorbunova, Vera; Rahman, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage triggers cellular senescence, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung diseases. Both p21CDKN1A (p21) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) are involved in DNA damage and repair. However, the role of p21-PARP-1 axis in regulating CS-induced lung DNA damage and cellular senescence remains unknown. We hypothesized that CS causes DNA damage and cellular senescence through a p21-PARP-1 axis. To test this hypothesis, we determined the levels of γH2AX (a marker for DNA double-strand breaks) as well as non-homologous end joining proteins (Ku70 and Ku80) in lungs of mice exposed to CS. We found that the level of γH2AX was increased, whereas the level of Ku70 was reduced in lungs of CS-exposed mice. Furthermore, p21 deletion reduced the level of γH2AX, but augmented the levels of Ku70, Ku80, and PAR in lungs by CS. Administration of PARP-1 inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide increased CS-induced DNA damage, but lowered the levels of Ku70 and Ku80, in lungs of p21 knockout mice. Moreover, 3-aminobenzamide increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, but decreased the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in mouse lungs in response to CS. Interestingly, 3-aminobenzamide treatment had no effect on neutrophil influx into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by CS. These results demonstrate that the p21-PARP-1 pathway is involved in CS-induced DNA damage and cellular senescence. PMID:24244594

  1. P21-PARP-1 pathway is involved in cigarette smoke-induced lung DNA damage and cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Yao

    Full Text Available Persistent DNA damage triggers cellular senescence, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke (CS-induced lung diseases. Both p21(CDKN1A (p21 and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 are involved in DNA damage and repair. However, the role of p21-PARP-1 axis in regulating CS-induced lung DNA damage and cellular senescence remains unknown. We hypothesized that CS causes DNA damage and cellular senescence through a p21-PARP-1 axis. To test this hypothesis, we determined the levels of γH2AX (a marker for DNA double-strand breaks as well as non-homologous end joining proteins (Ku70 and Ku80 in lungs of mice exposed to CS. We found that the level of γH2AX was increased, whereas the level of Ku70 was reduced in lungs of CS-exposed mice. Furthermore, p21 deletion reduced the level of γH2AX, but augmented the levels of Ku70, Ku80, and PAR in lungs by CS. Administration of PARP-1 inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide increased CS-induced DNA damage, but lowered the levels of Ku70 and Ku80, in lungs of p21 knockout mice. Moreover, 3-aminobenzamide increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, but decreased the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in mouse lungs in response to CS. Interestingly, 3-aminobenzamide treatment had no effect on neutrophil influx into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by CS. These results demonstrate that the p21-PARP-1 pathway is involved in CS-induced DNA damage and cellular senescence.

  2. DNA demethylation upregulated Nrf2 expression in Alzheimer's disease cellular model

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    Huimin eCao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is an important transcription factor in the defense against oxidative stress. Cumulative evidence has shown that oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Previous animal and clinical studies had observed decreased expression of Nrf2 in AD. However, the underlying regulation mechanisms of Nrf2 in AD remain unclear. Here, we used the DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza to test whether Nrf2 expression was regulated by methylation in N2a cells characterizing by expressing human Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (N2a/APPswe. We found 5-Aza treatment increased Nrf2 at both mRNA and protein levels via down-regulating the expression of Dnmts and DNA demethylation. In addition, 5-Aza mediated upregulation of Nrf2 expression was concomitant with increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and higher expression of Nrf2 downstream target gene NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductas (NQO1. Our study showed that DNA demethylation promoted the Nrf2 cell signaling pathway, which may enhance the antioxidant system against AD development.

  3. Searching for cellular partners of hantaviral nonstructural protein NSs: Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library and analysis of cellular interactome.

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    Tuomas Rönnberg

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae are negative-strand RNA viruses with a tripartite genome. The small (S segment encodes the nucleocapsid protein and, in some hantaviruses, also the nonstructural protein (NSs. The aim of this study was to find potential cellular partners for the hantaviral NSs protein. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library was performed followed by a search for potential NSs protein counterparts via analyzing a cellular interactome. The resulting interaction network was shown to form logical, clustered structures. Furthermore, several potential binding partners for the NSs protein, for instance ACBD3, were identified and, to prove the principle, interaction between NSs and ACBD3 proteins was demonstrated biochemically.

  4. Searching for cellular partners of hantaviral nonstructural protein NSs: Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library and analysis of cellular interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Tuomas; Jääskeläinen, Kirsi; Blot, Guillaume; Parviainen, Ville; Vaheri, Antti; Renkonen, Risto; Bouloy, Michele; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae) are negative-strand RNA viruses with a tripartite genome. The small (S) segment encodes the nucleocapsid protein and, in some hantaviruses, also the nonstructural protein (NSs). The aim of this study was to find potential cellular partners for the hantaviral NSs protein. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening of mouse cDNA library was performed followed by a search for potential NSs protein counterparts via analyzing a cellular interactome. The resulting interaction network was shown to form logical, clustered structures. Furthermore, several potential binding partners for the NSs protein, for instance ACBD3, were identified and, to prove the principle, interaction between NSs and ACBD3 proteins was demonstrated biochemically.

  5. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR.

  6. DNA Damage Signaling Is Required for Replication of Human Bocavirus 1 DNA in Dividing HEK293 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xuefeng; Xu, Peng; Zou, Wei; Shen, Weiran; Peng, Jianxin; Liu, Kaiyu; Engelhardt, John F; Yan, Ziying; Qiu, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), an emerging human-pathogenic respiratory virus, is a member of the genus Bocaparvovirus of the Parvoviridae family. In human airway epithelium air-liquid interface (HAE-ALI) cultures, HBoV1 infection initiates a DNA damage response (DDR), activating all three phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PI3KKs): ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs. In this context, activation of PI3KKs is a requirement for amplification of the HBoV1 genome (X. Deng, Z. Yan, F. Cheng, J. F. Engelhardt, and J. Qiu, PLoS Pathog, 12:e1005399, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1005399), and HBoV1 replicates only in terminally differentiated, nondividing cells. This report builds on the previous discovery that the replication of HBoV1 DNA can also occur in dividing HEK293 cells, demonstrating that such replication is likewise dependent on a DDR. Transfection of HEK293 cells with the duplex DNA genome of HBoV1 induces hallmarks of DDR, including phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA32, as well as activation of all three PI3KKs. The large viral nonstructural protein NS1 is sufficient to induce the DDR and the activation of the three PI3KKs. Pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of any one of the PI3KKs significantly decreases both the replication of HBoV1 DNA and the downstream production of progeny virions. The DDR induced by the HBoV1 NS1 protein does not cause obvious damage to cellular DNA or arrest of the cell cycle. Notably, key DNA replication factors and major DNA repair DNA polymerases (polymerase η [Pol η] and polymerase κ [Pol κ]) are recruited to the viral DNA replication centers and facilitate HBoV1 DNA replication. Our study provides the first evidence of the DDR-dependent parvovirus DNA replication that occurs in dividing cells and is independent of cell cycle arrest.

  7. Human identification & forensic analyses of degraded or low level DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westen, Antoinette-Andrea

    2013-01-01

    DNA-based human identification is employed in varying situations, such as disaster victim identification, relationship testing and forensic analyses. When DNA is of low quality and/or quantity, standard methods for DNA profiling may not suffice. The research described in this thesis is aimed at the

  8. Human identification & forensic analyses of degraded or low level DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westen, Antoinette-Andrea

    2013-01-01

    DNA-based human identification is employed in varying situations, such as disaster victim identification, relationship testing and forensic analyses. When DNA is of low quality and/or quantity, standard methods for DNA profiling may not suffice. The research described in this thesis is aimed at the

  9. Inhibition of Cellular Entry of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus by Amphipathic DNA Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew M.; Rojek, Jillian M.; Gundersen, Anette; Ströher, Ute; Juteau, Jean-Marc; Vaillant, Andrew; Kunz, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) represents a powerful experimental model for the study of the basic virology and pathogenesis of arenaviruses. In the present study, we used the LCMV model to evaluate the anti-viral potential of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides against arenaviruses. Our findings indicate that amphipathic DNA polymers (APs) are potent inhibitors of infection with a series of LCMV isolates with IC50 in the low nanomolar range. APs target the surface glycoprotein (GP) of LCMV and block viral entry and cell-cell propagation of the virus, without affecting later steps in replication or release of progeny virus from infected cells. The anti-viral action of APs is sequence-independent but is critically dependent on their size and hydrophobicity. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that APs disrupt the interaction between LCMVGP and its cellular receptor, α-dystroglycan. Exposure of LCMV to APs does not affect the stability of the GP virion spike and has no effect on the conformation of a neutralizing antibody epitope, suggesting rather subtle changes in the conformation and/or conformational dynamics of the viral GP. PMID:18022208

  10. Inhibition of Influenza Virus Replication by DNA Aptamers Targeting a Cellular Component of Translation Initiation

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    Paloma Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of the influenza virus hinders the use of broad spectrum antiviral drugs and favors the appearance of resistant strains. Single-stranded DNA aptamers represent an innovative approach with potential application as antiviral compounds. The mRNAs of influenza virus possess a 5′cap structure and a 3′poly(A tail that makes them structurally indistinguishable from cellular mRNAs. However, selective translation of viral mRNAs occurs in infected cells through a discriminatory mechanism, whereby viral polymerase and NS1 interact with components of the translation initiation complex, such as the eIF4GI and PABP1 proteins. We have studied the potential of two specific aptamers that recognize PABP1 (ApPABP7 and ApPABP11 to act as anti-influenza drugs. Both aptamers reduce viral genome expression and the production of infective influenza virus particles. The interaction of viral polymerase with the eIF4GI translation initiation factor is hindered by transfection of infected cells with both PABP1 aptamers, and ApPABP11 also inhibits the association of NS1 with PABP1 and eIF4GI. These results indicate that aptamers targeting the host factors that interact with viral proteins may potentially have a broad therapeutic spectrum, reducing the appearance of escape mutants and resistant subtypes.

  11. Cellular HIV-1 DNA levels in drug sensitive strains are equivalent to those in drug resistant strains in newly-diagnosed patients in Europe.

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    Victoria L Demetriou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 genotypic drug resistance is an important threat to the success of antiretroviral therapy and transmitted resistance has reached 9% prevalence in Europe. Studies have demonstrated that HIV-1 DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC have a predictive value for disease progression, independently of CD4 counts and plasma viral load. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Molecular-beacon-based real-time PCR was used to measure HIV-1 second template switch (STS DNA in PBMC in newly-diagnosed HIV-1 patients across Europe. These patients were representative for the HIV-1 epidemic in the participating countries and were carrying either drug-resistant or sensitive viral strains. The assay design was improved from a previous version to specifically detect M-group HIV-1 and human CCR5 alleles. The findings resulted in a median of 3.32 log(10 HIV-1 copies/10(6 PBMC and demonstrated for the first time no correlation between cellular HIV-1 DNA load and transmitted drug-resistance. A weak association between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels with plasma viral RNA load and CD4(+ T-cell counts was also reconfirmed. Co-receptor tropism for 91% of samples, whether or not they conferred resistance, was CCR5. A comparison of pol sequences derived from RNA and DNA, resulted in a high similarity between the two. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: An improved molecular-beacon-based real-time PCR assay is reported for the measurement of HIV-1 DNA in PBMC and has investigated the association between cellular HIV-1 DNA levels and transmitted resistance to antiretroviral therapy in newly-diagnosed patients from across Europe. The findings show no correlation between these two parameters, suggesting that transmitted resistance does not impact disease progression in HIV-1 infected individuals. The CCR5 co-receptor tropism predominance implies that both resistant and non-resistant strains behave similarly in early infection. Furthermore, a correlation found between RNA

  12. Human parvovirus B19: a mechanistic overview of infection and DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Qiu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a human pathogen that belongs to genus Erythroparvovirus of the Parvoviridae family, which is composed of a group of small DNA viruses with a linear single-stranded DNA genome. B19V mainly infects human erythroid progenitor cells and causes mild to severe hematological disorders in patients. However, recent clinical studies indicate that B19V also infects nonerythroid lineage cells, such as myocardial endothelial cells, and may be associated with other disease outcomes. Several cell culture systems, including permissive and semipermissive erythroid lineage cells, nonpermissive human embryonic kidney 293 cells and recently reported myocardial endothelial cells, have been used to study the mechanisms underlying B19V infection and B19V DNA replication. This review aims to summarize recent advances in B19V studies with a focus on the mechanisms of B19V tropism specific to different cell types and the cellular pathways involved in B19V DNA replication including cellular signaling transduction and cell cycle arrest. PMID:26097496

  13. DNA damage induction and/or repair as mammalian cell biomarker for the prediction of cellular radiation response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumstark-Khan, C.

    DNA damage and its repair processes are key factors in cancer induction and also in the treatment of malignancies. Cancer prevention during extended space missions becomes a topic of great importance for space radiobiology. The knowledge of individual responsiveness would allow the protection strategy to be tailored optimally in each case. Radiobiological analysis of cultured cells derived from tissue explants from individuals has shown that measurement of the surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) may be used to predict the individual responsiveness. However, clonogenic assays are timeconsuming, thus alternative assays for the determination of radiore-sponse are being sought. For that reason CHO cell strains having different repair capacities were used for examining whether DNA strand break repair is a suitable experimental design to allow predictive statements. Cellular survival (CFA assay) and DNA strand breaks (total DNA strand breaks: FADU technique; DSBs: non-denaturing elution) were determined in parallel immediately after irradiation as well as after a 24 hour recovery period according to dose. There were no correlations between the dose-response curves of the initial level of DNA strand breaks and parameters that describe clonogenic survival curves (SF2). A good correlation exists between intrinsic cellular radioresistance and the extent of residual DNA strand breaks.

  14. GHK and DNA: Resetting the Human Genome to Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Pickart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During human aging there is an increase in the activity of inflammatory, cancer promoting, and tissue destructive genes plus a decrease in the activity of regenerative and reparative genes. The human blood tripeptide GHK possesses many positive effects but declines with age. It improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, and boney tissue, increases collagen and glycosaminoglycans, stimulates synthesis of decorin, increases angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, and increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, GHK has been found to reset genes of diseased cells from patients with cancer or COPD to a more healthy state. Cancer cells reset their programmed cell death system while COPD patients’ cells shut down tissue destructive genes and stimulate repair and remodeling activities. In this paper, we discuss GHK’s effect on genes that suppress fibrinogen synthesis, the insulin/insulin-like system, and cancer growth plus activation of genes that increase the ubiquitin-proteasome system, DNA repair, antioxidant systems, and healing by the TGF beta superfamily. A variety of methods and dosages to effectively use GHK to reset genes to a healthier state are also discussed.

  15. AFM studies of environmental effects on nanomechanical properties and cellular structure of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Chen, Nianhuan

    2006-01-01

    Characterization of cellular structure and physical and mechanical properties of hair are essential to develop better cosmetic products and advance biological and cosmetic science. Although the morphology of the cellular structure of human hair has been traditionally investigated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, these techniques provide limited capability to in situ study of the physical and mechanical properties of human hair in various environments. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) overcomes these problems and can be used for characterization in ambient conditions without requiring specific sample preparations and surface treatment. In this study, film thickness, adhesive forces and effective Young's modulus of various hair surfaces were measured at different environments (humidity and temperature) using force calibration plot technique with an AFM. Torsional resonance mode phase contrast images were also taken in order to characterize the morphology and cellular structure changes of human hair at different humidity. The correlation between the nanomechanical properties and the cellular structure of hair is discussed.

  16. Human interstitial cellular model in therapeutics of heart valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Caimei; Tang, Hai; Mei, Zijian; Li, Nichujie; Zeng, Zhi; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Yin, Yulong; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Yang, Xiaoping

    2017-05-23

    Calcific aortic valve disease is a common, severe heart condition that is currently with no proven, effective drug treatment and requires a surgical valve replacement or an entire heart explanation. Thus, developing novel, targeted therapeutic approaches becomes a major goal for cardiovascular disease research. To achieve this goal, isolated heart valve interstitial cells could be an advanced model to explore molecular mechanisms and measure drug efficacy. Based on this progress, molecular mechanisms that harbor components of  inflammation and fibrosis coupled with proteins, for example, BMP-2, TLRs, RANKL, Osteoprotegerin, have been proposed. Small molecules or antibodies targeting these proteins have shown promising efficacy for either reversing or slowing down calcification development in vitro. In this review, we summarize these potential therapeutics with some highlights of interstitial cellular models.

  17. Modulation of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number to Induce Hepatocytic Differentiation of Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghjiani, Vijesh; Cain, Jason E; Lee, William; Vaithilingam, Vijayaganapathy; Tuch, Bernard E; St John, Justin C

    2017-09-05

    Mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) copy number is tightly regulated during pluripotency and differentiation. There is increased demand of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during differentiation for energy-intensive cell types such as hepatocytes and neurons to meet the cell's functional requirements. During hepatocyte differentiation, mtDNA copy number should be synchronously increased to generate sufficient ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. Unlike bone marrow mesenchymal cells, mtDNA copy number failed to increase by 28 days of differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC) into hepatocyte-like cells (HLC) despite their expression of some end-stage hepatic markers. This was due to higher levels of DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA, the mtDNA-specific replication factor. Treatment with a DNA demethylation agent, 5-azacytidine, resulted in increased mtDNA copy number, reduced DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA, and reduced hepatic gene expression. Depletion of mtDNA followed by subsequent differentiation did not increase mtDNA copy number, but reduced DNA methylation at exon 2 of POLGA and increased expression of hepatic and pluripotency genes. We encapsulated hAEC in barium alginate microcapsules and subsequently differentiated them into HLC. Encapsulation resulted in no net increase of mtDNA copy number but a significant reduction in DNA methylation of POLGA. RNAseq analysis showed that differentiated HLC express hepatocyte-specific genes but also increased expression of inflammatory interferon genes. Differentiation in encapsulated cells showed suppression of inflammatory genes as well as increased expression of genes associated with hepatocyte function pathways and networks. This study demonstrates that an increase in classical hepatic gene expression can be achieved in HLC through encapsulation, although they fail to effectively regulate mtDNA copy number.

  18. Persistent organic pollutants alter DNA methylation during human adipocyte differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dungen, van den Myrthe; Murk, Tinka; Steegenga, Wilma; Gils-Kok, van Dieuwertje

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling was performed in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiated into adipocytes (day 10) while being continuously exposed to either one of three different persistent organic pollutants (POPs), namely TCDD, PFOS, and TBT. The Illumina Infinium 450K Human DNA

  19. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zhu, Jingde; Tian, Geng;

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome) analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold pe...

  20. Rapid Extraction of Human DNA Containing Humic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Sutlović, Davorka; Definis Gojanović, Marija; Anđelinović, Šimun

    2007-01-01

    The identification process of dead bodies or human remains is nowadays conducted in numerous fields of forensic science, archeology and other judicial cases. A particular problem is the isolation and DNA typing of human remains found in mass graves, due to the degradation process, as well as post mortal DNA contamination with bacteria, fungi, humic acids, metals, etc. In this study, the influence of humic acid (HA) on the DNA extraction and typing is investigated. If present in...

  1. Structural basis of human PCNA sliding on DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de March, Matteo; Merino, Nekane; Barrera-Vilarmau, Susana; Crehuet, Ramon; Onesti, Silvia; Blanco, Francisco J.; de Biasio, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Sliding clamps encircle DNA and tether polymerases and other factors to the genomic template. However, the molecular mechanism of clamp sliding on DNA is unknown. Using crystallography, NMR and molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that the human clamp PCNA recognizes DNA through a double patch of basic residues within the ring channel, arranged in a right-hand spiral that matches the pitch of B-DNA. We propose that PCNA slides by tracking the DNA backbone via a `cogwheel' mechanism based on short-lived polar interactions, which keep the orientation of the clamp invariant relative to DNA. Mutation of residues at the PCNA-DNA interface has been shown to impair the initiation of DNA synthesis by polymerase δ (pol δ). Therefore, our findings suggest that a clamp correctly oriented on DNA is necessary for the assembly of a replication-competent PCNA-pol δ holoenzyme.

  2. Cellular and molecular portrait of eleven human glioblastoma cell lines under photon and carbon ion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandon, S; Magné, N; Battiston-Montagne, P; Hau-Desbat, N-H; Diaz, O; Beuve, M; Constanzo, J; Chargari, C; Poncet, D; Chautard, E; Ardail, D; Alphonse, G; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C

    2015-04-28

    This study aimed to examine the cellular and molecular long-term responses of glioblastomas to radiotherapy and hadrontherapy in order to better understand the biological effects of carbon beams in cancer treatment. Eleven human glioblastoma cell lines, displaying gradual radiosensitivity, were irradiated with photons or carbon ions. Independently of p53 or O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase(1) status, all cell lines responded to irradiation by a G2/M phase arrest followed by the appearance of mitotic catastrophe, which was concluded by a ceramide-dependent-apoptotic cell death. Statistical analysis demonstrated that: (i) the SF2(2) and the D10(3) values for photon are correlated with that obtained in response to carbon ions; (ii) regardless of the p53, MGMT status, and radiosensitivity, the release of ceramide is associated with the induction of late apoptosis; and (iii) the appearance of polyploid cells after photon irradiation could predict the Relative Biological Efficiency(4) to carbon ions. This large collection of data should increase our knowledge in glioblastoma radiobiology in order to better understand, and to later individualize, appropriate radiotherapy treatment for patients who are good candidates.

  3. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Ramakrishna, Gayatri, E-mail: gayatrirama1@gmail.com [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Department of Research, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Delhi 110070 (India)

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  4. Effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic waves (RF-EMW) from cellular phones on human ejaculated semen: an in vitro pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashok; Desai, Nisarg R; Makker, Kartikeya; Varghese, Alex; Mouradi, Rand; Sabanegh, Edmund; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate effects of cellular phone radiofrequency electromagnetic waves (RF-EMW) during talk mode on unprocessed (neat) ejaculated human semen. Prospective pilot study. Center for reproductive medicine laboratory in tertiary hospital setting. Neat semen samples from normal healthy donors (n = 23) and infertile patients (n = 9). After liquefaction, neat semen samples were divided into two aliquots. One aliquot (experimental) from each patient was exposed to cellular phone radiation (in talk mode) for 1 h, and the second aliquot (unexposed) served as the control sample under identical conditions. Evaluation of sperm parameters (motility, viability), reactive oxygen species (ROS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of semen, ROS-TAC score, and sperm DNA damage. Samples exposed to RF-EMW showed a significant decrease in sperm motility and viability, increase in ROS level, and decrease in ROS-TAC score. Levels of TAC and DNA damage showed no significant differences from the unexposed group. Radiofrequency electromagnetic waves emitted from cell phones may lead to oxidative stress in human semen. We speculate that keeping the cell phone in a trouser pocket in talk mode may negatively affect spermatozoa and impair male fertility.

  5. Human DNA ligase and DNA polymerase as molecular targets for heavy metals and anticancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.

    1992-01-01

    DNA ligase and DNA polymerase play important roles in DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Frequencies of spontaneous and chemical- and physical-induced mutations are correlated to the fidelity of DNA replication. This dissertation elucidates the mechanisms of the DNA ligation reaction by DNA ligases and demonstrates that human DNA ligase I and DNA polymerase [alpha] are the molecular targets for two metal ions, Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+], and an anticancer drug, F-ara-ATP. The formation of the AMP-DNA intermediate and the successive ligation reaction by human DNA ligases were analyzed. Both reactions showed their substrate specificity for ligases I and II, required Mg2+, and were inhibited by ATP. A protein inhibitor from HeLa cells and specific for human DNA ligase I but not ligase II and T4 ligase was discovered. It reversibly inhibited DNA ligation activity but not the AMP-binding activity due to the formation of a reversible ligase I-inhibitor complex. F-ara-ATP inhibited human DNA ligase I activity by competing with ATP for the AMP-binding site of DNA ligase I, forming a ligase I-F-ara-AMP complex, as well as when it was incorporated at 3[prime]-terminus of DNA nick by DNA polymerase [alpha]. All steps of the DNA ligation reaction were inhibited by Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+] in a concentration-dependent manner. Both ions did not show the ability to change the fidelity of DNA ligation reaction catalyzed by human DNA ligase I. However, Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+] showed their contradictory effects on the fidelity of the reaction by human DNA polymerase [alpha]. Zn[sup 2+] decreased the frequency of misinsertion but less affected that of mispair extension. On the contrary, Cd[sup 2+] increased the frequencies of both misinsertion and mispair extension at very low concentration. The data provided strong evidence in the molecular mechanisms for the mutagenicity of zinc and cadmium, and were comparable with the results previously reported.

  6. Cellular Proteome Dynamics during Differentiation of Human Primary Myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Barrio, Inigo; Mortensen, Tenna Pavia;

    2015-01-01

    and the complex temporal protein dynamics accompanying the differentiation of primary human muscle cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the advantages of applying a MS-based quantitative approach, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), for studying human myogenesis...... dynamic expression profiles during the course of myogenic differentiation and quantified 2240 proteins, 243 of which were regulated. These changes in protein expression occurred in sequential waves and underlined vast reprogramming in key processes governing cell fate decisions, i.e., cell cycle...

  7. 1,2,3,4-Diepoxybutane-Induced DNA-Protein Cross-Linking in Human Fibrosarcoma (HT1080) Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB) is the key carcinogenic metabolite of 1,3-butadiene (BD), an important industrial and environmental chemical present in urban air and in cigarette smoke. DEB is a genotoxic bis-electrophile capable of cross-linking cellular biomolecules to form DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). In the present work, mass spectrometry-based proteomics was employed to characterize DEB-mediated DNA-protein cross-linking in human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells. Over 150 proteins ...

  8. Effective Cellular Uptake and Efflux of Thyroid Hormone by Human Monocarboxylate Transporter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesema, Edith C. H.; Jansen, Jurgen; Jachtenberg, Jan-willem; Visser, W. Edward; Kester, Monique H. A.; Visser, Theo J.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular entry of thyroid hormone is mediated by plasma membrane transporters, among others a T-type (aromatic) amino acid transporter. Monocarboxylate transporter 10 (MCT10) has been reported to transport aromatic amino acids but not iodothyronines. Within the MCT family, MCT10 is most homologous to MCT8, which is a very important iodothyronine transporter but does not transport amino acids. In view of this paradox, we decided to reinvestigate the possible transport of thyroid hormone by human (h) MCT10 in comparison with hMCT8. Transfection of COS1 cells with hMCT10 cDNA resulted in 1) the production of an approximately 55 kDa protein located to the plasma membrane as shown by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy, 2) a strong increase in the affinity labeling of intracellular type I deiodinase by N-bromoacetyl-[125I]T3, 3) a marked stimulation of cellular T4 and, particularly, T3 uptake, 4) a significant inhibition of T3 uptake by phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan of 12.5%, 22.2%, and 51.4%, respectively, and 5) a marked increase in the intracellular deiodination of T4 and T3 by different deiodinases. Cotransfection studies using the cytosolic thyroid hormone-binding protein μ-crystallin (CRYM) indicated that hMCT10 facilitates both cellular uptake and efflux of T4 and T3. In the absence of CRYM, hMCT10 and hMCT8 increased T3 uptake after 5 min incubation up to 4.0- and 1.9-fold, and in the presence of CRYM up to 6.9- and 5.8-fold, respectively. hMCT10 was less active toward T4 than hMCT8. These findings establish that hMCT10 is at least as active a thyroid hormone transporter as hMCT8, and that both transporters facilitate iodothyronine uptake as well as efflux. PMID:18337592

  9. Magnolol Affects Cellular Proliferation, Polyamine Biosynthesis and Catabolism-Linked Protein Expression and Associated Cellular Signaling Pathways in Human Prostate Cancer Cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan T. McKeown

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men in Canada and the United States. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development and progression of many cancers, including prostate cancer. Context and purpose of this study: This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on cellular proliferation and proliferation-linked activities of PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Results: PC3 cells exposed to magnolol at a concentration of 80 μM for 6 hours exhibited decreased protein expression of ornithine decarboxylase, a key regulator in polyamine biosynthesis, as well as affecting the expression of other proteins involved in polyamine biosynthesis and catabolism. Furthermore, protein expression of the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, a key regulatory protein associated with DNA synthesis, was significantly decreased. Finally, the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, NFκB (nuclear factor of kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and AP-1 (activator protein 1 cellular signaling pathways were assayed to determine which, if any, of these pathways magnolol exposure would alter. Protein expressions of p-JNK-1 and c-jun were significantly increased while p-p38, JNK-1/2, PI3Kp85, p-PI3Kp85, p-Akt, NFκBp65, p-IκBα and IκBα protein expressions were significantly decreased. Conclusions: These alterations further support the anti-proliferative effects of magnolol on PC3 human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggest that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  10. Modulation of cellular and humoral immune responses to anHIV-1 DNA vaccine by interleukin-12 and interleukin-18 DNA immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙永涛; 王福祥; 孙永年; 徐哲; 王临旭; 刘娟; 白雪帆; 黄长形

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-18 (IL-18)DNA immunization on immune response induced by HIV-1 DNA vaccine and to explore new strategies for therapeutic HIV DNA vaccine.Methods: The recombinant expression vector pCI-neoGAG was constructed by inserting HIV Gag gene into the eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo. Balb/c mice were immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone or co-immunized with the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18. Anti-HIV antibody and IFN-γ were tested by ELISA, and splenocytes were isolated for detecting antigen-specific lymphoproliferative responses and specific CTL response by MTT assay and LDH assay respectively. Results: The antiHIV antibody titers of mice co-immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 were lower than that of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone( P < 0.01). In contrast, the IFN-γ level of mice co-immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 was higher than that of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone ( P <0.01). Furthermore, compared with mice injected with pCI-neoGAG alone, the specific CTL cytotoxity activity and antigenspecific lymphoproliferative responses of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 were significantly enhanced respectively ( P < 0.01). Conclusion: The DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 together with HIV DNA vaccine may enhance specific Th-1 responses and cellular immune response elicited in mice. Hence, the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 are promising immune adjuvants for HIV-1 DNA vaccine.

  11. Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 stimulates DNA end joining and activates DSB repair activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Kiran; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Kundu, Tapas K

    2009-01-23

    Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 is a highly abundant nuclear protein that is involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from transcription to chromatin organization. Earlier, we have shown that PC4, a positive activator of p53, overexpresses upon genotoxic insult in a p53-dependent manner. In the present study, we show that PC4 stimulates ligase-mediated DNA end joining irrespective of the source of DNA ligase. Pull-down assays reveal that PC4 helps in the association of DNA ends through its C-terminal domain. In vitro nonhomologous end-joining assays with cell-free extracts show that PC4 enhances the joining of noncomplementary DNA ends. Interestingly, we found that PC4 activates double-strand break (DSB) repair activity through stimulation of DSB rejoining in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate PC4 as an activator of nonhomologous end joining and DSB repair activity.

  12. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  13. Molecular cloning and analysis of functional cDNA and genomic clones encoding bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Shubeita, H E; Sambrook, J F; McCormick, A M

    1987-01-01

    A recombinant cDNA clone, pCRABP-HS1, encoding cellular retinoic acid-binding protein was isolated from a bovine adrenal cDNA library. COS-7 cells transfected with pCRABP-HS1 produced a biologically active retinoic acid-binding protein molecule of the expected molecular mass (15.5 kDa). RNA blot hybridization analysis using pCRABP-HS1 as a probe revealed a single 1050-nucleotide mRNA species in bovine adrenal, uterus, and testis, tissues that contain the highest levels of retinoic acid-bindin...

  14. A cellular model system of differentiated human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Kristensen, S R; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to select an effective and stable protocol for the differentiation of human satellite cells (Sc) and to identify the optimal time period for the experimental use of differentiated human Sc-cultures. In order to identify the differentiation conditions which give a good...... survival of myotubes and a high grade of differentiation, Sc-cultures were induced to differentiate in media supplemented with either 2% fetal calf serum (FCS) 2% horse serum (HS) or 10% HS. Based on higher CK-activities in cultures differentiating in FCS-supplemented media compared to horse sera, fetal......-cultures in the period from day 4 to 8 after induction of differentiation as only minor differentation-related changes will take place in the cells during this period of time....

  15. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, E.S.

    1992-09-01

    Quantitative data of the human bronchial epithelial cells at possible risk for malignant transformation in lung cancer is crucial for accurate radon dosimetry and risk analysis. The locations and other parameters of the nuclei which may be damaged by [alpha] particles must be determined and compared in different airway generations, among smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers, between men and women and in people of different ages. This proposal includes extended morphometric studies on electron micrographs of human epithelium of defined airway generations and in parallel on electron micrographs of the dog bronchial lining. The second part of this proposal describes studies to quantitate the cycling bronchial epithelial population(s) using proliferation markers and immunocytochemistry on frozen and paraffin sections and similar labeling of isolated bronchial epithelial cells sorted flow cytometry.

  16. Oxidized DNA induces an adaptive response in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyuk, Svetlana V., E-mail: svet.kostyuk@gmail.com [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tabakov, Viacheslav J.; Chestkov, Valerij V.; Konkova, Marina S.; Glebova, Kristina V.; Baydakova, Galina V.; Ershova, Elizaveta S.; Izhevskaya, Vera L. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baranova, Ancha, E-mail: abaranov@gmu.edu [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Center for the Study of Chronic Metabolic Diseases, School of System Biology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Veiko, Natalia N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • We describe the effects of gDNAOX on human fibroblasts cultivated in serum withdrawal conditions. • gDNAOX evokes an adaptive response in human fibroblasts. • gDNAOX increases the survival rates in serum starving cell populations. • gDNAOX enhances the survival rates in cell populations irradiated at 1.2 Gy dose. • gDNAOX up-regulates NRF2 and inhibits NF-kappaB-signaling. - Abstract: Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells contains a substantial proportion of oxidized nucleotides, thus, forming cfDNA{sup OX}. The levels of cfDNA{sup OX} are increased in the serum of patients with chronic diseases. Oxidation of DNA turns it into a stress signal. The samples of genomic DNA (gDNA) oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}in vitro (gDNA{sup OX}) induce effects similar to that of DNA released from damaged cells. Here we describe the effects of gDNA{sup OX} on human fibroblasts cultivated in the stressful conditions of serum withdrawal. In these cells, gDNA{sup OX} evokes an adaptive response that leads to an increase in the rates of survival in serum starving cell populations as well as in populations irradiated at the dose of 1.2 Gy. These effects are not seen in control populations of fibroblasts treated with non-modified gDNA. In particular, the exposure to gDNA{sup OX} leads to a decrease in the expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 and an increase in levels of PSNA, a decrease in the proportion of subG1- and G2/M cells, a decrease in proportion of cells with double strand breaks (DSBs). Both gDNA{sup OX} and gDNA suppress the expression of DNA sensors TLR9 and AIM2 and up-regulate nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (NRF2), while only gDNA{sup OX} inhibits NF-κB signaling. gDNA{sup OX} is a model for oxidized cfDNA{sup OX} that is released from the dying tumor cells and being carried to the distant organs. The systemic effects of oxidized DNA have to be taken into account when treating tumors. In particular, the damaged DNA

  17. Effects of beta interferon on human fibroblasts at different population doubling levels. Proliferation, cell volume, thymidine uptake, and DNA synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Cellular aging had no effect on the ability of beta interferon to increase cell volume and population doubling time in 76-109 cells, a line of human skin fibroblasts. However, DNA synthesis in cells at high population doubling levels (PDL 55-70) was inhibited after 72 h of beta interferon treatment (1,000 U/ml) while no inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed in cells at middle population doubling levels (PDL 30-40).

  18. Comparing the effects of mitochondrial targeted and localized antioxidants with cellular antioxidants in human skin cells exposed to UVA and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewole, Anne O; Wilmot, Marie-Claire; Fowler, Mark; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer and aging are linked to increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly following exposure to ultraviolet A (UVA) in sunlight. As mitochondria are the main source of cellular ROS, this study compared the protective effects of mitochondria-targeted and -localized antioxidants (MitoQ and tiron, respectively) with cellular antioxidants against oxidative stress-induced [UVA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)] mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in human dermal fibroblasts. With the use of a long quantitative PCR assay, tiron (EC50 10 mM) was found to confer complete (100%) protection (Pantioxidants investigated. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway provides cellular protection against oxidative stress. An ELISA assay for the Nrf2 target gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and studies using Nrf2 small interfering RNA both indicated that tiron's mode of action was Nrf2 independent. The comet assay showed that tiron's protective effect against H2O2-induced nuclear DNA damage was greater than the cellular antioxidants and MitoQ (Pantioxidants.

  19. DNA Aptamers in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinchang Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers have a promising role in the field of life science and have been extensively researched for application as analytical tools, therapeutic agents and as vehicles for targeted drug delivery. Compared with RNA aptamers, DNA aptamers have inherent advantages in stability and facility of generation and synthesis. To better understand the specific potential of DNA aptamers, an overview of the progress in the generation and application of DNA aptamers in human disease diagnosis and therapy are presented in this review. Special attention is given to researches that are relatively close to practical application. DNA aptamers are expected to have great potential in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases.

  20. DNA Methylation of Cellular Retinoic Acid-Binding Proteins in Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano-Ortiz, Ana L.; Salcedo-Vargas, Mauricio; Vargas-Requena, Claudia L.; López-Díaz, José A.; De la Mora-Covarrubias, Antonio; Silva-Espinoza, Juan C.; Jiménez-Vega, Florinda

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the methylation status of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) gene promoters and associated them with demographic characteristics, habits, and the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) in patients with cervical cancer (CC), low and high squamous intraepithelial lesions, and no intraepithelial lesion. Women (n = 158) were selected from the Colposcopy Clinic of Sanitary Jurisdiction II in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Demographic characteristics and habit information were collected. Cervical biopsy and endocervical scraping were used to determine methylation in promoter regions by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction technique. We found hemi-methylation patterns in the promoter regions of CRABP1 and CRABP2; there was 28.5% hemi-methylation in CRABP1 and 7.0% in that of CRABP2. Methylation in CRABP1 was associated with age (≥35 years, P = 0.002), family history of cancer (P = 0.032), the presence of HPV-16 (P = 0.013), and no alcohol intake (P = 0.035). These epigenetic changes could be involved in the CC process, and CRABP1 has the potential to be a predictive molecular marker of retinoid therapy response. PMID:27867303

  1. Sperm DNA fragmentation affects epigenetic feature in human male pronucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, H; Mohseni-Kouchesfehani, H; Eslami-Arshaghi, T; Salehi, M

    2017-03-06

    To evaluate whether the sperm DNA fragmentation affects male pronucleus epigenetic factors, semen analysis was performed and DNA fragmentation was assessed by the method of sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Human-mouse interspecies fertilisation was used to create human male pronucleus. Male pronucleus DNA methylation and H4K12 acetylation were evaluated by immunostaining. Results showed a significant positive correlation between the level of sperm DNA fragmentation and DNA methylation in male pronuclei. In other words, an increase in DNA damage caused an upsurge in DNA methylation. In the case of H4K12 acetylation, no correlation was detected between DNA damage and the level of histone acetylation in the normal group, but results for the group in which male pronuclei were derived from sperm cells with DNA fragmentation, increased DNA damage led to a decreased acetylation level. Sperm DNA fragmentation interferes with the active demethylation process and disrupts the insertion of histones into the male chromatin in the male pronucleus, following fertilisation. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Quantification of cellular uptake of DNA nanostructures by qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Anders Hauge; Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Vinther, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    DNA nanostructures facilitating drug delivery are likely soon to be realized. In the past few decades programmed self-assembly of DNA building blocks have successfully been employed to construct sophisticated nanoscale objects. By conjugating functionalities to DNA, other molecules such as peptid...

  3. Thiol oxidation by nitrosative stress: Cellular localization in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrillana, María E; Uribe, Pamela; Villegas, Juana V; Álvarez, Juan; Sánchez, Raúl; Fornés, Miguel W

    2016-10-01

    Peroxynitrite is a highly reactive nitrogen species and when it is generated at high levels it causes nitrosative stress, an important cause of impaired sperm function. High levels of peroxynitrite have been shown to correlate with decreased semen quality in infertile men. Thiol groups in sperm are mainly found in enzymes, antioxidant molecules, and structural proteins in the axoneme. Peroxynitrite primarily reacts with thiol groups of cysteine-containing proteins. Although it is well known that peroxynitrite oxidizes sulfhydryl groups in sperm, the subcellular localization of this oxidation remains unknown. The main objective of this study was to establish the subcellular localization of peroxynitrite-induced nitrosative stress in thiol groups and its relation to sperm motility in human spermatozoa. For this purpose, spermatozoa from healthy donors were exposed in vitro to 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a compound which generates peroxynitrite. In order to detect peroxynitrite and reduced thiol groups, the fluorescent probes, dihydrorhodamine 123 and monobromobimane (mBBr), were used respectively. Sperm viability was analyzed by propidium iodide staining. Peroxynitrite generation and thiol redox state were monitored by confocal microscopy whereas sperm viability was evaluated by flow cytometry. Sperm motility was analyzed by CASA using the ISAS(®) system. The results showed that exposure of human spermatozoa to peroxynitrite results in increased thiol oxidation which is mainly localized in the sperm head and principal piece regions. Thiol oxidation was associated with motility loss. The high susceptibility of thiol groups to peroxynitrite-induced oxidation could explain, at least in part, the negative effect of reactive nitrogen species on sperm motility. DHR: dihydrorhodamine 123; mBBr: monobromobimane ONOO(-): peroxynitrite RNS: reactive nitrogen species RFI: relative fluorescence intensity SIN-1: 3-morpholinosydnonimine CASA: Computer-Aided Sperm Analysis

  4. Human RAD52 Captures and Holds DNA Strands, Increases DNA Flexibility, and Prevents Melting of Duplex DNA: Implications for DNA Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Brouwer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Human RAD52 promotes annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA. In-depth knowledge of RAD52-DNA interaction is required to understand how its activity is integrated in DNA repair processes. Here, we visualize individual fluorescent RAD52 complexes interacting with single DNA molecules. The interaction with ssDNA is rapid, static, and tight, where ssDNA appears to wrap around RAD52 complexes that promote intra-molecular bridging. With double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, interaction is slower, weaker, and often diffusive. Interestingly, force spectroscopy experiments show that RAD52 alters the mechanics dsDNA by enhancing DNA flexibility and increasing DNA contour length, suggesting intercalation. RAD52 binding changes the nature of the overstretching transition of dsDNA and prevents DNA melting, which is advantageous for strand clamping during or after annealing. DNA-bound RAD52 is efficient at capturing ssDNA in trans. Together, these effects may help key steps in DNA repair, such as second-end capture during homologous recombination or strand annealing during RAD51-independent recombination reactions.

  5. Comparative interactomics for virus-human protein-protein interactions: DNA viruses versus RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmuş, Saliha; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular pathogens and completely depend on their hosts for survival and reproduction. The strategies adopted by viruses to exploit host cell processes and to evade host immune systems during infections may differ largely with the type of the viral genetic material. An improved understanding of these viral infection mechanisms is only possible through a better understanding of the pathogen-host interactions (PHIs) that enable viruses to enter into the host cells and manipulate the cellular mechanisms to their own advantage. Experimentally-verified protein-protein interaction (PPI) data of pathogen-host systems only became available at large scale within the last decade. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the current PHI networks belonging to DNA and RNA viruses and their human host, to get insights into the infection strategies used by these viral groups. We investigated the functional properties of human proteins in the PHI networks, to observe and compare the attack strategies of DNA and RNA viruses. We observed that DNA viruses are able to attack both human cellular and metabolic processes simultaneously during infections. On the other hand, RNA viruses preferentially interact with human proteins functioning in specific cellular processes as well as in intracellular transport and localization within the cell. Observing virus-targeted human proteins, we propose heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins and transporter proteins as potential antiviral therapeutic targets. The observed common and specific infection mechanisms in terms of viral strategies to attack human proteins may provide crucial information for further design of broad and specific next-generation antiviral therapeutics.

  6. DNA damage by carbonyl stress in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Michael J.; Wondrak, Georg T.; Laurean, Daniel Cervantes; Jacobson, Myron K.; Jacobson, Elaine L

    2003-01-28

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are potent mediators of cellular carbonyl stress originating from endogenous chemical processes such as lipid peroxidation and glycation. Skin deterioration as observed in photoaging and diabetes has been linked to accumulative protein damage from glycation, but the effects of carbonyl stress on skin cell genomic integrity are ill defined. In this study, the genotoxic effects of acute carbonyl stress on HaCaT keratinocytes and CF3 fibroblasts were assessed. Administration of the {alpha}-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal and methylglyoxal as physiologically relevant RCS inhibited skin cell proliferation, led to intra-cellular protein glycation as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sup {epsilon}}-(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML) in histones, and caused extensive DNA strand cleavage as assessed by the comet assay. These effects were prevented by treatment with the carbonyl scavenger D-penicillamine. Both glyoxal and methylglyoxal damaged DNA in intact cells. Glyoxal caused DNA strand breaks while methylglyoxal produced extensive DNA-protein cross-linking as evidenced by pronounced nuclear condensation and total suppression of comet formation. Glycation by glyoxal and methylglyoxal resulted in histone cross-linking in vitro and induced oxygen-dependent cleavage of plasmid DNA, which was partly suppressed by the hydroxyl scavenger mannitol. We suggest that a chemical mechanism of cellular DNA damage by carbonyl stress occurs in which histone glycoxidation is followed by reactive oxygen induced DNA stand breaks. The genotoxic potential of RCS in cultured skin cells and its suppression by a carbonyl scavenger as described in this study have implications for skin damage and carcinogenesis and its prevention by agents selective for carbonyl stress.

  7. Comparison of mitochondrial mutation spectra in ageing human colonic epithelium and disease: absence of evidence for purifying selection in somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greaves, L.C.; Elson, J.L.; Nooteboom, M.; Grady, J.P.; Taylor, G.A.; Taylor, R.W.; Mathers, J.C.; Kirkwood, T.B.; Turnbull, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Human ageing has been predicted to be caused by the accumulation of molecular damage in cells and tissues. Somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been documented in a number of ageing tissues and have been shown to be associated with cellular mitochondrial dysfunction. It is unknown whethe

  8. The cellular inflammatory response in human spinal cords after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jennifer C; Norenberg, Michael D; Ramsay, David A; Dekaban, Gregory A; Marcillo, Alexander E; Saenz, Alvaro D; Pasquale-Styles, Melissa; Dietrich, W Dalton; Weaver, Lynne C

    2006-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) provokes an inflammatory response that generates substantial secondary damage within the cord but also may contribute to its repair. Anti-inflammatory treatment of human SCI and its timing must be based on knowledge of the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the time after injury when they appear and then decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. Using post-mortem spinal cords, we evaluated the time course and distribution of pathological change, infiltrating neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes, and microglial activation in injured spinal cords from patients who were 'dead at the scene' or who survived for intervals up to 1 year after SCI. SCI caused zones of pathological change, including areas of inflammation and necrosis in the acute cases, and cystic cavities with longer survival (Zone 1), mantles of less severe change, including axonal swellings, inflammation and Wallerian degeneration (Zone 2) and histologically intact areas (Zone 3). Zone 1 areas increased in size with time after injury whereas the overall injury (size of the Zones 1 and 2 combined) remained relatively constant from the time (1-3 days) when damage was first visible. The distribution of inflammatory cells correlated well with the location of Zone 1, and sometimes of Zone 2. Neutrophils, visualized by their expression of human neutrophil alpha-defensins (defensin), entered the spinal cord by haemorrhage or extravasation, were most numerous 1-3 days after SCI, and were detectable for up to 10 days after SCI. Significant numbers of activated CD68-immunoreactive ramified microglia and a few monocytes/macrophages were in injured tissue within 1-3 days of SCI. Activated microglia, a few monocytes/macrophages and numerous phagocytic macrophages were present for weeks to months after SCI. A few CD8(+) lymphocytes were in the injured cords throughout the sampling intervals. Expression by the inflammatory cells of the oxidative

  9. Association of Global DNA Methylation and Global DNA Hydroxymethylation with Metals and Other Exposures in Human Blood DNA Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wan-yee; Shang, Yan; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Ledesma, Marta; Leon, Montserrat; Laclaustra, Martin; Pollak, Jonathan; Guallar, Eliseo; Cole, Shelley A.; Fallin, M. Dani; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between human blood DNA global methylation and global hydroxymethylation has not been evaluated in population-based studies. No studies have evaluated environmental determinants of global DNA hydroxymethylation, including exposure to metals. Objective: We evaluated the association between global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation in 48 Strong Heart Study participants for which selected metals had been measured in urine at baseline and DNA was available from 1989–1991 (visit 1) and 1998–1999 (visit 3). Methods: We measured the percentage of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in samples using capture and detection antibodies followed by colorimetric quantification. We explored the association of participant characteristics (i.e., age, adiposity, smoking, and metal exposure) with both global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation. Results: The Spearman’s correlation coefficient for 5-mC and 5-hmC levels was 0.32 (p = 0.03) at visit 1 and 0.54 (p Ledesma M, Leon M, Laclaustra M, Pollak J, Guallar E, Cole SA, Fallin MD, Navas-Acien A. 2014. Association of global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation with metals and other exposures in human blood DNA samples. Environ Health Perspect 122:946–954; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306674 PMID:24769358

  10. [DNA image-fluorimetry of individual human chromosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, N A; Sakuta, G A; Rozanov, Iu M; Shteĭn, G I; Kudriavtsev, B N

    2013-01-01

    Mucrofluorimetric method for the determination of DNA content in individual human chromosomes has been developed. The method is based on a preliminary identification of chromosomes with Hoechst 33258, followed by staining of the chromosomes with Feulgen reaction using Schiffs reagent type ethidium bromide-SO2, then measuring the fluorescence intensity of the chromosomes using an image analyzer. The method allows to determine the DNA content of individual chromosomes with accuracy up to 4.5 fg. DNA content of individual human chromosomes, their p-and q-arms as well as homologous chromosomes were measured using the developed method. It has been shown that the DNA content in the chromosomes of normal human karyotype is unstable. Fluctuations in the DNA content in some chromosomes can vary 35-40 fg.

  11. Quantitative model of cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence in primary human fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Schäuble

    Full Text Available Primary human fibroblasts in tissue culture undergo a limited number of cell divisions before entering a non-replicative "senescent" state. At early population doublings (PD, fibroblasts are proliferation-competent displaying exponential growth. During further cell passaging, an increasing number of cells become cell cycle arrested and finally senescent. This transition from proliferating to senescent cells is driven by a number of endogenous and exogenous stress factors. Here, we have developed a new quantitative model for the stepwise transition from proliferating human fibroblasts (P via reversibly cell cycle arrested (C to irreversibly arrested senescent cells (S. In this model, the transition from P to C and to S is driven by a stress function γ and a cellular stress response function F which describes the time-delayed cellular response to experimentally induced irradiation stress. The application of this model based on senescence marker quantification at the single-cell level allowed to discriminate between the cellular states P, C, and S and delivers the transition rates between the P, C and S states for different human fibroblast cell types. Model-derived quantification unexpectedly revealed significant differences in the stress response of different fibroblast cell lines. Evaluating marker specificity, we found that SA-β-Gal is a good quantitative marker for cellular senescence in WI-38 and BJ cells, however much less so in MRC-5 cells. Furthermore we found that WI-38 cells are more sensitive to stress than BJ and MRC-5 cells. Thus, the explicit separation of stress induction from the cellular stress response, and the differentiation between three cellular states P, C and S allows for the first time to quantitatively assess the response of primary human fibroblasts towards endogenous and exogenous stress during cellular ageing.

  12. DNA methylation profiling of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22

    OpenAIRE

    Eckhardt, Florian; Lewin, Joern; Cortese, Rene; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Attwood, John; Burger, Matthias; Burton, John; Cox, Tony V.; Davies, Rob; Down, Thomas A; Haefliger, Carolina; Horton, Roger; Howe, Kevin; Jackson, David K.; Kunde, Jan

    2006-01-01

    DNA methylation constitutes the most stable type of epigenetic modifications modulating the transcriptional plasticity of mammalian genomes. Using bisulfite DNA sequencing, we report high-resolution methylation reference profiles of human chromosomes 6, 20 and 22, providing a resource of about 1.9 million CpG methylation values derived from 12 different tissues. Analysis of 6 annotation categories, revealed evolutionary conserved regions to be the predominant sites for differential DNA methyl...

  13. DNA and bone structure preservation in medieval human skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Norton, Andrew L; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Ali, Nadir; Elmrghni, Samir; Gil, Cristiane D; Sasso, Gisela R S; Dixon, Ronald A; Nader, Helena B

    2015-06-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural data from archaeological human bones are scarce, particularly data that have been correlated with information on the preservation of molecules such as DNA. Here we examine the bone structure of macroscopically well-preserved medieval human skeletons by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry, and the quantity and quality of DNA extracted from these skeletons. DNA technology has been increasingly used for analyzing physical evidence in archaeological forensics; however, the isolation of ancient DNA is difficult since it is highly degraded, extraction yields are low and the co-extraction of PCR inhibitors is a problem. We adapted and optimised a method that is frequently used for isolating DNA from modern samples, Chelex(®) 100 (Bio-Rad) extraction, for isolating DNA from archaeological human bones and teeth. The isolated DNA was analysed by real-time PCR using primers targeting the sex determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) and STR typing using the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler PCR Amplification kit. Our results clearly show the preservation of bone matrix in medieval bones and the presence of intact osteocytes with well preserved encapsulated nuclei. In addition, we show how effective Chelex(®) 100 is for isolating ancient DNA from archaeological bones and teeth. This optimised method is suitable for STR typing using kits aimed specifically at degraded and difficult DNA templates since amplicons of up to 250bp were successfully amplified.

  14. Reversibility of cellular aging by reprogramming through an embryonic-like state : a new paradigm for human cell rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Lemaitre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provides a unique opportunity to derive patient-specific stem cells with potential application in autologous tissue replacement therapies and without the ethical concerns of Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC. However, this strategy still suffers from several hurdles that need to be overcome before clinical applications. Among them, cellular senescence, which contributes to aging and restricted longevity, has been described as a barrier to the derivation of iPSCs. This suggests that aging might be an important limitation for therapeutic purposes for elderly individuals. Senescence is characterized by an irreversible cell cycle arrest in response to various forms of stress, including activation of oncogenes, shortened telomeres, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction. To overcome this barrier, we developed an optimized 6-factor-based reprogramming protocol that is able to cause efficient reversing of cellular senescence and reprogramming into iPSCs. We demonstrated that iPSCs derived from senescent and centenarian fibroblasts have reset telomere size, gene expression profiles, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial metabolism, and are indistinguishable from hESC. Finally, we demonstrate that re-differentiation led to rejuvenated cells with a reset cellular physiology, defining a new paradigm for human cell rejuvenation. We discuss the molecular mechanisms involved in cell reprogramming of senescent cells. 

  15. Markov chain for estimating human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov chain was proposed to estimate the human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern. One DNA sequence was taken randomly from 100 sequences in Genbank. The nucleotide transition matrix and mutation transition matrix were estimated from this sequence. We determined whether the states (mutation/normal) are recurrent or transient. The results showed that both of them are recurrent.

  16. Retroviral DNA integration: viral and cellular determinants of target-site selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K Lewinski

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses differ in their preferences for sites for viral DNA integration in the chromosomes of infected cells. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV integrates preferentially within active transcription units, whereas murine leukemia virus (MLV integrates preferentially near transcription start sites and CpG islands. We investigated the viral determinants of integration-site selection using HIV chimeras with MLV genes substituted for their HIV counterparts. We found that transferring the MLV integrase (IN coding region into HIV (to make HIVmIN caused the hybrid to integrate with a specificity close to that of MLV. Addition of MLV gag (to make HIVmGagmIN further increased the similarity of target-site selection to that of MLV. A chimeric virus with MLV Gag only (HIVmGag displayed targeting preferences different from that of both HIV and MLV, further implicating Gag proteins in targeting as well as IN. We also report a genome-wide analysis indicating that MLV, but not HIV, favors integration near DNase I-hypersensitive sites (i.e., +/- 1 kb, and that HIVmIN and HIVmGagmIN also favored integration near these features. These findings reveal that IN is the principal viral determinant of integration specificity; they also reveal a new role for Gag-derived proteins, and strengthen models for integration targeting based on tethering of viral IN proteins to host proteins.

  17. The molecular and cellular response of normal and progressed human bronchial epithelial cells to HZE particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Larsen, Jill

    We have used a model of non-oncogenically immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cells to determine the response of such cells to particles found outside the protection of the earth’s electromagnetic field. We have identified an enhanced frequency of cellular transformation, as measured by growth in soft agar, for both 56Fe and 28Si (1 GeV/n) that is maximal (4-6 fold) at 0.25 Gy and 0.40 Gy, respectively. At 4 months post-irradiation 38 individual soft agar clones were isolated. These clones were characterized extensively for cellular and molecular changes. Gene expression analysis suggested that these clones had down-regulated several genes associated with anti-oxidant pathways including GLS2, GPX1 and 4, SOD2, PIG3, and NQO1 amongst others. As a result, many of these transformed clones were exposed to high levels of intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS), although there appeared not to be any enhanced mitochondrial ROS. DNA repair pathways associated with ATM/ATR signaling were also upregulated. However, these transformants do not develop into tumors when injected into immune-compromised mice, suggesting that they have not progressed sufficiently to become oncogenic. Therefore we chose 6 soft agar clones for continuous culture for an additional 14 months. Amongst the 6 clones, only one clone showed any significant change in phenotype. Clone 3kt-ff.2a, propagated for 18 months, were 2-fold more radioresistant, had a shortened doubling time and the background rate of transformation more than doubled. Furthermore, the morphology of transformed clones changed. Clones from this culture are being compared to the original clone as well as the parental HBEC3KT and will be injected into immune-compromised mice for oncogenic potential. Oncogenically progressed HBECs, HBEC3KT cells that overexpress a mutant RAS gene and where p53 has been knocked down, designated HBEC3KTR53, responded quite differently to HZE particle exposure. First, these cells are more

  18. Epitope DNA vaccines against tuberculosis: spacers and ubiquitin modulates cellular immune responses elicited by epitope DNA vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang QM; Sun SH; Hu ZL; Zhou FJ; Yin M; Xiao CJ; Zhang JC

    2005-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses are crucial in the protection against tuberculosis. In this study, we constructed epitope DNA vaccines (p3-M-38) encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes of MPT64 and 38 kDa proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In order to observe the influence of spacer sequence (Ala-Ala-Tyr) or ubiquitin (UbGR) on the efficacy of the two CTL epitopes, we also constructed DNA vaccines, p3-M-S(spacer)-38, p3-Ub (UbGR)-M-S-38 and p3-Ub-M-38. The immune responses elicited by the four DNA vaccines were tested in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. The cytotoxicity of T cells was detected by LDH-release method and by enzyme-linked immunospot assay for epitope-specific cells secreting interferon-gamma. The results showed that DNA immunization with p3-M-38 vaccine could induce epitope-specific CD8+ CTL response and that the spacer sequence (AAY) only enhanced M epitope presentation. The protein-targeting sequence (UbGR) enhanced the immunogenicity of the two epitopes. The finding that defined spacer sequences at C-terminus and protein-targeting degradation modulated the immune response of epitope string DNA vaccines will be of importance for the further development of multi-epitope DNA vaccines against tuberculosis.

  19. Evolutionarily conserved and nonconserved cellular localizations and functions of human SIRT proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Eriko; Park, Jean Y; Burneskis, Jenna M; Barrett, J Carl; Horikawa, Izumi

    2005-10-01

    Sir2 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that extends lifespan in yeast and worms. This study examines seven human proteins homologous to Sir2 (SIRT1 through SIRT7) for cellular localization, expression profiles, protein deacetylation activity, and effects on human cell lifespan. We found that: 1) three nuclear SIRT proteins (SIRT1, SIRT6, and SIRT7) show different subnuclear localizations: SIRT6 and SIRT7 are associated with heterochromatic regions and nucleoli, respectively, where yeast Sir2 functions; 2) SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are localized in mitochondria, an organelle that links aging and energy metabolism; 3) cellular p53 is a major in vivo substrate of SIRT1 deacetylase, but not the other six SIRT proteins; 4) SIRT1, but not the other two nuclear SIRT proteins, shows an in vitro deacetylase activity on histone H4 and p53 peptides; and 5) overexpression of any one of the seven SIRT proteins does not extend cellular replicative lifespan in normal human fibroblasts or prostate epithelial cells. This study supports the notion that multiple human SIRT proteins have evolutionarily conserved and nonconserved functions at different cellular locations and reveals that the lifespan of normal human cells, in contrast to that of lower eukaryotes, cannot be manipulated by increased expression of a single SIRT protein.

  20. Dynamic modeling of cellular response to DNA damage based on p53 stress response networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinpeng Qi; Yongsheng Ding; Shihuang Shao

    2009-01-01

    Under acute perturbations from the outside, cells can trigger self-defensive mechanisms to fight against genome stress. To investigate the cellular response to continuous ion radiation (IR), a dynamic model for p53 stress response networks at the cellular level is proposed. The model can successfully be used to simulate the dynamic processes of double-strand breaks (DSBs) generation and their repair, switch-like ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation, oscillations occurring in the p53-MDM2 feedback loop, as well as toxins elimination triggered by p53 stress response networks. Especially, the model can predict the plausible outcomes of cellular response under different IR dose regimes.

  1. Synergistic and additive effects of cimetidine and levamisole on cellular immune responses to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, X; Yang, Y; Wang, J

    2013-02-01

    We and others have previously shown that both cimetidine (CIM) and levamisole (LMS) enhance humoral and cellular responses to DNA vaccines via different mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the synergistic and additive effects of CIM and LMS on the potency of antigen-specific immunities generated by a DNA vaccine encoding the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, pVax-S2). Compared with CIM or LMS alone, the combination of CIM and LMS elicited a robust HBsAg-specific cellular response that was characterized by higher IgG2a, but did not further increase HBsAg-specific antibody IgG and IgG1 production. Consistent with these results, the combination of CIM and LMS produced the highest level of IL-2 and IFN-γ in antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, whereas the combination of CIM and LMS did not further increase IL-4 production. Significantly, a robust HBsAg-specific cytotoxic response was also observed in the animals immunized with pVax-S2 in the presence of the combination of CIM and LMS. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that the combination of CIM and LMS promoted dendritic cell (DC) activation and blocked anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β production in CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells. These findings suggest that CIM and LMS have the synergistic and additive ability to enhance cellular response to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine, which may be mediated by DC activation and inhibition of anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. Thus, the combination of cimetidine and levamisole may be useful as an effective adjuvant in DNA vaccinations for chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

  2. Enhanced genetic analysis of single human bioparticles recovered by simplified micromanipulation from forensic 'touch DNA' evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farash, Katherine; Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2015-03-09

    DNA profiles can be obtained from 'touch DNA' evidence, which comprises microscopic traces of human biological material. Current methods for the recovery of trace DNA employ cotton swabs or adhesive tape to sample an area of interest. However, such a 'blind-swabbing' approach will co-sample cellular material from the different individuals, even if the individuals' cells are located in geographically distinct locations on the item. Thus, some of the DNA mixtures encountered in touch DNA samples are artificially created by the swabbing itself. In some instances, a victim's DNA may be found in significant excess thus masking any potential perpetrator's DNA. In order to circumvent the challenges with standard recovery and analysis methods, we have developed a lower cost, 'smart analysis' method that results in enhanced genetic analysis of touch DNA evidence. We describe an optimized and efficient micromanipulation recovery strategy for the collection of bio-particles present in touch DNA samples, as well as an enhanced amplification strategy involving a one-step 5 µl microvolume lysis/STR amplification to permit the recovery of STR profiles from the bio-particle donor(s). The use of individual or few (i.e., "clumps") bioparticles results in the ability to obtain single source profiles. These procedures represent alternative enhanced techniques for the isolation and analysis of single bioparticles from forensic touch DNA evidence. While not necessary in every forensic investigation, the method could be highly beneficial for the recovery of a single source perpetrator DNA profile in cases involving physical assault (e.g., strangulation) that may not be possible using standard analysis techniques. Additionally, the strategies developed here offer an opportunity to obtain genetic information at the single cell level from a variety of other non-forensic trace biological material.

  3. Effect of inhibitors of cellular metabolism on postradiation repair and degradation of DNA in rat thymocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivannik, B.P.; Golubeva, R.V.; Proskuryakov, S.Ya.; Murzaev, V.I.; Ryabchenko, N.I.

    1979-10-01

    The viscosimetric method was used to determine the molecular weight of high polymer single-stranded DNA in alkaline nuclear lysates for the study of the effects of a number of inhibitors of synthesis of DNA (hydroxyurea), macroergic elements (2,4-dinitrophenol, EDTA) and DNAase (Na/sup +/ citrate, Ca/sup + +/ ions) on the process of repair and secondary post-radiation degradation of DNA of rat thymocytes exposed to radiation in a dosage of 3 kR.

  4. Transcriptomal profiling of the cellular response to DNA damage mediated by Slug (Snai2)

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Caro, M.; Bermejo-Rodríguez, C.; González-Herrero, I; Sánchez-Beato, M; Piris, M. A.; Sánchez-García, I

    2008-01-01

    Snai2-deficient cells are radiosensitive to DNA damage. The function of Snai2 in response to DNA damage seems to be critical for its function in normal development and cancer. Here, we applied a functional genomics approach that combined gene-expression profiling and computational molecular network analysis to obtain global dissection of the Snai2-dependent transcriptional response to DNA damage in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), which undergo p53-dependent growth arrest in respon...

  5. Human papillomavirus DNA in plasma of patients with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voravud Narin

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV is a crucial etiological factor for cervical cancer (CC development. From a diagnostic view-point, the consistent presence of HPV in CC allows the viral DNA to be used as a genetic marker. The aims of this study were to evaluate the presence, physical status and clinical significant of HPV DNA in circulation of CC patients. Results Whereas 6 out of 50 (12% HPV positive CC patients revealed plasma HPV DNA, it was detected in none of 20 normal controls or 13 HPV negative CC cases. The plasma DNA exhibited an HPV type identical to the HPV in the primary tumors and the DNA from both sources was integrated into host genome. Interestingly, several findings suggested an association between plasma HPV DNA and metastasis. First, three of the HPV DNA positive cases were CC patients with clinical stage IVB or recurrence with distance metastases (P = 0.001, RR = 15.67. Second, the amount of plasma HPV DNA from metastatic patients to be three times more than three other patients without metastases. Finally, the later cases had tendency to develop recurrence distant metastases within one year after complete treatment when compared with other HPV associated CC patients with the same stage but without the present of plasma HPV DNA. Conclusions The plasma HPV DNA originated from the CC, was associated with metastasis and could be used as a marker representing the circulating free CC DNA.

  6. Human papillomavirus DNA in plasma of patients with HPV16 DNA-positive uterine cervical cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Takako; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Nishida, Noriyuki; Yamasaki, Kentaro; Miura, Kiyonori; Katamine, Shigeru; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The squamous cell carcinoma antigen is considered the most accurate serologic tumor marker for uterine cervical carcinoma. However, serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels were found to correlate significantly with clinical severity of atopic dermatitis and chronic renal failure. The present study was conducted in patients with human papillomavirus 16 DNA-positive uterine cervical cancer to determine the plasma level of human papillomavirus 16 DNA and the diagnostic values of...

  7. The cellular composition of the human immune system is shaped by age and cohabitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Edward J; Dooley, James; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lee, James C; Wouters, Carine; Meyts, Isabelle; Goris, An; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Linterman, Michelle A; Liston, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Detailed population-level description of the human immune system has recently become achievable. We used a 'systems-level' approach to establish a resource of cellular immune profiles of 670 healthy individuals. We report a high level of interindividual variation, with low longitudinal variation, at the level of cellular subset composition of the immune system. Despite the profound effects of antigen exposure on individual antigen-specific clones, the cellular subset structure proved highly elastic, with transient vaccination-induced changes followed by a return to the individual's unique baseline. Notably, the largest influence on immunological variation identified was cohabitation, with 50% less immunological variation between individuals who share an environment (as parents) than between people in the wider population. These results identify local environmental conditions as a key factor in shaping the human immune system.

  8. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M;

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related...... subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic...... repair. We have also shown that deficiency of POLD3 leads to an increase in RPA-bound ssDNA when cells are under replication stress, suggesting that POLD3 plays a role in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Considering that DNA replication stress is a source of genome instability...

  9. A DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Agustin F.; Assenov, Yassen; Martin-Subero, Jose Ignacio; Balint, Balazs; Siebert, Reiner; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hidalgo, Manuel; Tan, Aik-Choon; Galm, Oliver; Ferrer, Isidre; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Villanueva, Alberto; Carmona, Javier; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Berdasco, Maria; Moreno, Victor; Capella, Gabriel; Monk, David; Ballestar, Esteban; Ropero, Santiago; Martinez, Ramon; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Prosper, Felipe; Agirre, Xabier; Fraga, Mario F.; Graña, Osvaldo; Perez-Jurado, Luis; Mora, Jaume; Puig, Susana; Prat, Jaime; Badimon, Lina; Puca, Annibale A.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Lengauer, Thomas; Bridgewater, John; Bock, Christoph; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Most of the studies characterizing DNA methylation patterns have been restricted to particular genomic loci in a limited number of human samples and pathological conditions. Herein, we present a compromise between an extremely comprehensive study of a human sample population with an intermediate level of resolution of CpGs at the genomic level. We obtained a DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples in which we interrogated 1505 CpG sites. The DNA methylation patterns revealed show this epigenetic mark to be critical in tissue-type definition and stemness, particularly around transcription start sites that are not within a CpG island. For disease, the generated DNA methylation fingerprints show that, during tumorigenesis, human cancer cells underwent a progressive gain of promoter CpG-island hypermethylation and a loss of CpG methylation in non-CpG-island promoters. Although transformed cells are those in which DNA methylation disruption is more obvious, we observed that other common human diseases, such as neurological and autoimmune disorders, had their own distinct DNA methylation profiles. Most importantly, we provide proof of principle that the DNA methylation fingerprints obtained might be useful for translational purposes by showing that we are able to identify the tumor type origin of cancers of unknown primary origin (CUPs). Thus, the DNA methylation patterns identified across the largest spectrum of samples, tissues, and diseases reported to date constitute a baseline for developing higher-resolution DNA methylation maps and provide important clues concerning the contribution of CpG methylation to tissue identity and its changes in the most prevalent human diseases. PMID:21613409

  10. Molecular cloning and analysis of functional cDNA and genomic clones encoding bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubeita, H E; Sambrook, J F; McCormick, A M

    1987-08-01

    A recombinant cDNA clone, pCRABP-HS1, encoding cellular retinoic acid-binding protein was isolated from a bovine adrenal cDNA library. COS-7 cells transfected with pCRABP-HS1 produced a biologically active retinoic acid-binding protein molecule of the expected molecular mass (15.5 kDa). RNA blot hybridization analysis using pCRABP-HS1 as a probe revealed a single 1050-nucleotide mRNA species in bovine adrenal, uterus, and testis, tissues that contain the highest levels of retinoic acid-binding activity. No hybridization was detected in RNA extracted from ovary, spleen, kidney, or liver, which contain relatively low levels of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein activity. Analysis of genomic clones isolated from an EcoRI bovine genomic library demonstrated that the bovine cellular retinoic acid-binding protein gene is composed of four exons and three introns. Two putative promoter sequences were identified in the cloned 5' sequence of the gene.

  11. How do human cells react to the absence of mitochondrial DNA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Mineri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial biogenesis is under the control of two different genetic systems: the nuclear genome (nDNA and the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA. The mtDNA is a circular genome of 16.6 kb encoding 13 of the approximately 90 subunits that form the respiratory chain, the remaining ones being encoded by the nDNA. Eukaryotic cells are able to monitor and respond to changes in mitochondrial function through alterations in nuclear gene expression, a phenomenon first defined in yeast and known as retrograde regulation. To investigate how the cellular transcriptome is modified in response to the absence of mtDNA, we used Affymetrix HG-U133A GeneChip arrays to study the gene expression profile of two human cell lines, 143BTK(- and A549, which had been entirely depleted of mtDNA (rho(o cells, and compared it with that of corresponding undepleted parental cells (rho(+ cells. RESULTS: Our data indicate that absence of mtDNA is associated with: i a down-regulation of cell cycle control genes and a reduction of cell replication rate, ii a down-regulation of nuclear-encoded subunits of complex III of the respiratory chain and iii a down-regulation of a gene described as the human homolog of ELAC2 of E. coli, which encodes a protein that we show to also target to the mitochondrial compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate a strong correlation between mitochondrial biogenesis and cell cycle control and suggest that some proteins could have a double role: for instance in controlling both cell cycle progression and mitochondrial functions. In addition, the finding that ELAC2 and maybe other transcripts that are located into mitochondria, are down-regulated in rho(o cells, make them good candidates for human disorders associated with defective replication and expression of mtDNA.

  12. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Wagner, Sebastian A; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hickson, Ian D; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic analysis of proteins modified by SUMO2 in response to DNA replication stress in S phase in human cells. We have identified a panel of 22 SUMO2 targets with increased SUMOylation during DNA replication stress, many of which play key functions within the DNA replication machinery and/or in the cellular response to DNA damage. Interestingly, POLD3 was found modified most significantly in response to a low dose aphidicolin treatment protocol that promotes common fragile site (CFS) breakage. POLD3 is the human ortholog of POL32 in budding yeast, and has been shown to act during break-induced recombinational repair. We have also shown that deficiency of POLD3 leads to an increase in RPA-bound ssDNA when cells are under replication stress, suggesting that POLD3 plays a role in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Considering that DNA replication stress is a source of genome instability, and that excessive replication stress is a hallmark of pre-neoplastic and tumor cells, our characterization of SUMO2 targets during a perturbed S-phase should provide a valuable resource for future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology.

  13. Human RECQ1 is a DNA damage responsive protein required for genotoxic stress resistance and suppression of sister chromatid exchanges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA helicases are ubiquitous enzymes that unwind DNA in an ATP-dependent and directionally specific manner. Unwinding of double-stranded DNA is essential for the processes of DNA repair, recombination, transcription, and DNA replication. Five human DNA helicases sharing sequence similarity with the E. coli RecQ helicase have been identified. Three of the human RecQ helicases are implicated in hereditary diseases (Bloom syndrome, Werner syndrome, and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome which display clinical symptoms of premature aging and cancer. RECQ1 helicase is the most highly expressed of the human RecQ helicases; however, a genetic disease has yet not been linked to mutations in the RECQ1 gene, and the biological functions of human RECQ1 in cellular DNA metabolism are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we report that RECQ1 becomes phosphorylated upon DNA damage and forms irradiation-induced nuclear foci that associate with chromatin in human cells. Depletion of RECQ1 renders human cells sensitive to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation or the topoisomerase inhibitor camptothecin, and results in spontaneous gamma-H2AX foci and elevated sister chromatid exchanges, indicating aberrant repair of DNA breaks. Consistent with a role in homologous recombinational repair, endogenous RECQ1 is associated with the strand exchange protein Rad51 and the two proteins directly interact with high affinity. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these results provide the first evidence for a role of human RECQ1 in the response to DNA damage and chromosomal stability maintenance and point to the vital importance of RECQ1 in genome homeostasis.

  14. Cellular development of the human cochlea and the regenerative potential of hair follicle bulge stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Locher, heiko

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic development of the human cochlea (the organ of hearing) has been investigated for over one hundred years. However, little is still known about the development on a cellular and protein level, which is important to better understand etiologies and pathologies of various types of sensori

  15. Cellular development of the human cochlea and the regenerative potential of hair follicle bulge stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Locher, heiko

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic development of the human cochlea (the organ of hearing) has been investigated for over one hundred years. However, little is still known about the development on a cellular and protein level, which is important to better understand etiologies and pathologies of various types of

  16. Dental DNA fingerprinting in identification of human remains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K L Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances in molecular biology have revolutionized all aspects of dentistry. DNA, the language of life yields information beyond our imagination, both in health or disease. DNA fingerprinting is a tool used to unravel all the mysteries associated with the oral cavity and its manifestations during diseased conditions. It is being increasingly used in analyzing various scenarios related to forensic science. The technical advances in molecular biology have propelled the analysis of the DNA into routine usage in crime laboratories for rapid and early diagnosis. DNA is an excellent means for identification of unidentified human remains. As dental pulp is surrounded by dentin and enamel, which forms dental armor, it offers the best source of DNA for reliable genetic type in forensic science. This paper summarizes the recent literature on use of this technique in identification of unidentified human remains.

  17. Rapid extraction and preservation of genomic DNA from human samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundaram, D; Kim, J-H; Yeo, W-H; Oh, K; Lee, K-H; Kim, M-H; Ryew, S-M; Ahn, S-G; Gao, D; Cangelosi, G A; Chung, J-H

    2013-02-01

    Simple and rapid extraction of human genomic DNA remains a bottleneck for genome analysis and disease diagnosis. Current methods using microfilters require cumbersome, multiple handling steps in part because salt conditions must be controlled for attraction and elution of DNA in porous silica. We report a novel extraction method of human genomic DNA from buccal swab and saliva samples. DNA is attracted onto a gold-coated microchip by an electric field and capillary action while the captured DNA is eluted by thermal heating at 70 °C. A prototype device was designed to handle four microchips, and a compatible protocol was developed. The extracted DNA using microchips was characterized by qPCR for different sample volumes, using different lengths of PCR amplicon, and nuclear and mitochondrial genes. In comparison with a commercial kit, an equivalent yield of DNA extraction was achieved with fewer steps. Room-temperature preservation for 1 month was demonstrated for captured DNA, facilitating straightforward collection, delivery, and handling of genomic DNA in an environment-friendly protocol.

  18. Princess takamatsu symposium on DNA repair and human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Lawrence A; Nishimura, Susumu

    2010-06-01

    The 40th International Symposium of the Princess Takamatsu Cancer Research Fund, entitled "DNA Repair and Human Cancers," was held on November 10-12, 2009 at Hotel Grand Palace, Tokyo, Japan. The meeting focused on the role of DNA repair in preventing mutations by endogenous and exogenous DNA damage and increasing the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents by interfering with DNA repair. The 14 presentations by the speakers from the United States, four from the United Kingdom, one each from Italy, The Netherlands, and France, and 13 from Japan, covered most aspects of DNA repair, spanning DNA damage, molecular structures of repair enzymes, and clinical studies on inhibition of DNA repair processes. Extensive time was reserved for discussions with the active participation of the 150 invited Japanese scientists. The choice of a symposium on DNA repair in human cancers resulted in part from the excellent basic and clinical studies that have been carried out for many years in Japan, and the general lack of recognition versus the importance of DNA repair in understanding carcinogenesis. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  19. Cellular target of UVB-induced DNA damage resulting in local suppression of contact hypersensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, A.A.; Shreedhar, V.; Roza, L.; Krutmann, J.; Kripke, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data are reviewed that lend support to the hypothesis that formation of DNA damage is the initiation event of local suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiaton and that the antigen-presenting cell (APC) is an important traget for this DNA da

  20. DNA repair pathways in radiation induced cellular damage: a molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.R. van Veelen (Lieneke)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ DNA damage, especially double-strand breaks, can be induced by endogenous or exogenous darnaging agents, such as ionizing radiation. Repair of DNA damage is very important in maintaining genomic stability. Incorrect repair may lead to chromosomal aberrations,

  1. DNA repair pathways in radiation induced cellular damage: a molecular approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.R. van Veelen (Lieneke)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ DNA damage, especially double-strand breaks, can be induced by endogenous or exogenous darnaging agents, such as ionizing radiation. Repair of DNA damage is very important in maintaining genomic stability. Incorrect repair may lead to chromosomal aberrations, translocat

  2. Enhancing cellular immune response to HBV M DNA vaccine in mice by codelivery of interleukin-18 recombinant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建忠; 朱海红; 刘克洲; 陈智

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of interleukin-18 (IL-18) on immune response induced by plasmid encoding hepatitis B virus middle protein antigen and to explore new strategies for prophylactic and therapeutic HBV DNA vaccines.Methods:BALB/c mice were immunized with pCMV-M alone or co-immunized with pcDNA3-18 and pCMV-M and then their sera were collected for analysing anti-HBsAg antibody by ELISA;splenocytes were isolated for detecting specific CTL response and cytokine assay in vitro.Results:The anti-HBs antibody level of mice co-immunized with pcDNA3-18 and pCMV-M was slightly higher than that of mice immunized with pCMV-M alone,but there was not significantly different (P>0.05).Compared with mice injected with pCMV-M, the specific CTL cytotoxity activity of mice immunized with pcDNA3-18 and pCMV-M was significantly enhanced (P0.05).Conclusion:The plasmid encoding IL-18 together with HBV M gene DNA vaccines may enhance specific TH1 cells and CTL cellular immune response induced in mice, so that IL-18 is a promising immune adjuvant.

  3. Cellular development of the human cochlea and the regenerative potential of hair follicle bulge stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic development of the human cochlea (the organ of hearing) has been investigated for over one hundred years. However, little is still known about the development on a cellular and protein level, which is important to better understand etiologies and pathologies of various types of sensorineural hearing loss. Knowledge of the normal gene expression patterns and cell fate specification in the human cochlea has therefore the potential to aid in the development of gene and cell-based t...

  4. Evolutionarily Conserved and Nonconserved Cellular Localizations and Functions of Human SIRT Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Michishita, Eriko; Park, Jean Y.; Burneskis, Jenna M.; Barrett, J. Carl; Horikawa, Izumi

    2005-01-01

    Sir2 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that extends lifespan in yeast and worms. This study examines seven human proteins homologous to Sir2 (SIRT1 through SIRT7) for cellular localization, expression profiles, protein deacetylation activity, and effects on human cell lifespan. We found that: 1) three nuclear SIRT proteins (SIRT1, SIRT6, and SIRT7) show different subnuclear localizations: SIRT6 and SIRT7 are associated with heterochromatic regions and nucleoli, respectively, where yeast...

  5. Digital Cellular Solid Pressure Vessels: A Novel Approach for Human Habitation in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellucci, Daniel; Jenett, Benjamin; Cheung, Kenneth C.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely assumed that human exploration beyond Earth's orbit will require vehicles capable of providing long duration habitats that simulate an Earth-like environment - consistent artificial gravity, breathable atmosphere, and sufficient living space- while requiring the minimum possible launch mass. This paper examines how the qualities of digital cellular solids - high-performance, repairability, reconfigurability, tunable mechanical response - allow the accomplishment of long-duration habitat objectives at a fraction of the mass required for traditional structural technologies. To illustrate the impact digital cellular solids could make as a replacement to conventional habitat subsystems, we compare recent proposed deep space habitat structural systems with a digital cellular solids pressure vessel design that consists of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) digital cellular solid cylindrical framework that is lined with an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) skin. We use the analytical treatment of a linear specific modulus scaling cellular solid to find the minimum mass pressure vessel for a structure and find that, for equivalent habitable volume and appropriate safety factors, the use of digital cellular solids provides clear methods for producing structures that are not only repairable and reconfigurable, but also higher performance than their conventionally manufactured counterparts.

  6. Concurrent genotyping of Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and human cytokine SNP sites using whole genome amplified DNA derived from minute amounts of gastric biopsy specimen DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borch Kurt

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial and cellular genotyping is becoming increasingly important in the diagnosis of infectious diseases. However, difficulties in obtaining sufficient amount of bacterial and cellular DNA extracted from the same human biopsy specimens is often a limiting factor. In this study, total DNA (host and bacterial DNA was isolated from minute amounts of gastric biopsy specimens and amplified by means of whole genome amplification using the multiple displacement amplification (MDA technique. Subsequently, MDA-DNA was used for concurrent Helicobacter pylori and human host cellular DNA genotyping analysis using PCR-based methods. Results Total DNA was isolated from gastric biopsy specimens of 12 subjects with gastritis and 16 control subjects having a normal mucosa. The DNA was amplified using a multiple displacement amplification (MDA kit. Next, concurrent genotyping was performed using H. pylori-specific virulence gene PCR amplification assays, pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rDNA and PCR characterisation of various host genes. This includes Interleukin 1-beta (IL1B and Interferon-gamma receptor (IFNGR1 SNP analysis, and Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN variable tandem repeats (VNTR in intron 2. Finally, regions of the vacA-gene were PCR amplified using M13-sequence tagged primers which allowed for direct DNA sequencing, omitting cloning of PCR amplicons. H. pylori specific multiplex PCR assays revealed the presence of H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypic variations in 11 of 12 gastritis biopsy specimens. Using pyrosequencing, 16S rDNA variable V3 region signatures of H. pylori were found in 11 of 12 individuals with gastritis, but in none of the control subjects. Similarly, IL1B and IFNGR1-SNP and IL1RN-VNTR patterns could be established in all individuals. Furthermore, sequencing of M13-sequence tagged vacA-PCR amplicons revealed the presence of highly diverse H. pylori vacA-s/i/m regions. Conclusion The PCR

  7. The linguistics of DNA. [HUMAN GENOME PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searls, D.B. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States))

    Discusses the structure of DNA and RNA and the mechanisms of transcription and translation in relation to the grammatical rules of language. The ultimate purpose is to design a grammar which can be used to write flexible, adaptive computer programs for searching nucleotide sequences, with the goal of being able to search large sequences for gene-coding regions. 11 refs., 16 figs.

  8. The dynamic DNA methylomes of double-stranded DNA viruses associated with human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Agustin F.; Rosales, Cecilia; Lopez-Nieva, Pilar; Graña, Osvaldo; Ballestar, Esteban; Ropero, Santiago; Espada, Jesus; Melo, Sonia A.; Lujambio, Amaia; Fraga, Mario F.; Pino, Irene; Javierre, Biola; Carmona, Francisco J.; Acquadro, Francesco; Steenbergen, Renske D.M.; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Meijer, Chris J.; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Lloveras, Belen; Capella, Gabriel; Quer, Josep; Buti, Maria; Esteban, Juan-Ignacio; Allende, Helena; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Castellsague, Xavier; Minarovits, Janos; Ponce, Jordi; Capello, Daniela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz; Gomez-Lopez, Gonzalo; Pisano, David G.; Valencia, Alfonso; Piris, Miguel Angel; Bosch, Francesc X.; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Kieff, Elliott; Esteller, Manel

    2009-01-01

    The natural history of cancers associated with virus exposure is intriguing, since only a minority of human tissues infected with these viruses inevitably progress to cancer. However, the molecular reasons why the infection is controlled or instead progresses to subsequent stages of tumorigenesis are largely unknown. In this article, we provide the first complete DNA methylomes of double-stranded DNA viruses associated with human cancer that might provide important clues to help us understand the described process. Using bisulfite genomic sequencing of multiple clones, we have obtained the DNA methylation status of every CpG dinucleotide in the genome of the Human Papilloma Viruses 16 and 18 and Human Hepatitis B Virus, and in all the transcription start sites of the Epstein-Barr Virus. These viruses are associated with infectious diseases (such as hepatitis B and infectious mononucleosis) and the development of human tumors (cervical, hepatic, and nasopharyngeal cancers, and lymphoma), and are responsible for 1 million deaths worldwide every year. The DNA methylomes presented provide evidence of the dynamic nature of the epigenome in contrast to the genome. We observed that the DNA methylome of these viruses evolves from an unmethylated to a highly methylated genome in association with the progression of the disease, from asymptomatic healthy carriers, through chronically infected tissues and pre-malignant lesions, to the full-blown invasive tumor. The observed DNA methylation changes have a major functional impact on the biological behavior of the viruses. PMID:19208682

  9. DNA methylation changes in human lung epithelia cells exposed to multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Marta I; Rubio, Laura; Bayón, Gustavo F; Cobo, Isabel; Menendez, Pablo; Morales, Paula; Mangas, Cristina; Urdinguio, Rocio G; Lopez, Virginia; Valdes, Adolfo; Vales, Gerard; Marcos, Ricard; Torrecillas, Ramon; Fernández, Agustin F; Fraga, Mario F

    2017-09-13

    Humans are increasingly exposed to nanoparticles and, although many of their physiological effects have been described, the molecular mechanisms underlying them are still largely unknown. The present study aimed to determine the possible role of certain epigenetic mechanisms in the cellular response of human lung epithelial cells that are triggered by long-term exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The results showed that exposure to TiO2NPs had only minor effects on genome-wide DNA methylation. However, we identified 755 CpG sites showing consistent DNA hypomethylation in cells exposed to MWCNTs. These sites were mainly located at low density CpG regions and enhancers, and very frequently on the X chromosome. Our results thus suggest that long-term MWCNT exposure may have important effects on the epigenome.

  10. Human resource management practices in ZAIN cellular communications company operating in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulieman Ibraheem Shelash Mohammad

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the best human resource management (HRM practices at ZAIN; cellular communications company operating in Jordan. study consisted of employees in ZAIN Cellular Communications Company in Jordan. All participants of this study were employees working in the organization - staff, team leaders, supervisors, programmers, project leaders, business analysts, managers, assistant managers. The findings in the paper that there are relatively high levels of practice for the areas of Training and development, Performance Appraisal, along with Communication and information sharing. Recruitment and selection is the one area, on the other hand, where a considerably lower mean level of practice exists .

  11. Nonneutral mitochondrial DNA variation in humans and chimpanzees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachman, M.W.; Aquadro, C.F. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Brown, W.M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    We sequenced the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (ND3) gene from a sample of 61 humans, five common chimpanzees, and one gorilla to test whether patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation are consistent with a neutral model of molecular evolution. Within humans and within chimpanzees, the ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions was higher than observed in comparisons between species, contrary to neutral expectations. To test the generality of this result, we reanalyzed published human RFLP data from the entire mitochondrial genome. Gains of restriction sites relative to a known human mtDNA sequence were used to infer unambiguous nucleotide substitutions. We also compared the complete mtDNA sequences of three humans. Both the RFLP data and the sequence data reveal a higher ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions within humans than is seen between species. This pattern is observed at most or all human mitochondrial genes and is inconsistent with a strictly neutral model. These data suggest that many mitochondrial protein polymorphisms are slightly deleterious, consistent with studies of human mitochondrial diseases. 59 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Effects of incense smoke on human lymphocyte DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Yim Tong; Sok Wa Leong, Kosca; Keong Lam, Kason; Min Min Hong, Cynthia; Kai Mui Lee, Daphne; Teng Fun Chan, Yui; Benzie, Iris F F

    2009-01-01

    Incense burning is common in Southeast Asia, where it is a traditional and ceremonial practice in deity worship and paying respect to ancestors. However, incense emissions are an important source of indoor air pollution in Asia, and may induce health problems to those exposed. In this in vitro study the effects of incense emissions on human DNA were investigated using the comet assay. Particulates in smoke from six kinds of incense were trapped in saline or ethanol and human lymphocytes were exposed under controlled conditions. Results showed that DNA damage, including strand breaks, was induced by both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of two samples. The ethanolic extract of one sample induced DNA damage, while no significant DNA damage was found in the remaining three samples. The mechanisms underlying DNA damage induced by incense emissions were also investigated. Catalase (CAT), sodium azide, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were co-incubated with extract, which exerted significant DNA damaging effects. Results showed that CAT with or without SOD diminished DNA damage, whereas sodium azide did not seem able to reduce DNA damage. Data indicate there are potential adverse health effects of such exposure, particularly for temple workers.

  13. Cellular immunostimulation by CpG-sequence-coated DNA origami structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, Verena J; Heidegger, Simon; Sandholzer, Nadja; Nickels, Philipp C; Suhartha, Nina A; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Liedl, Tim

    2011-12-27

    To investigate the potential of DNA origami constructs as programmable and noncytotoxic immunostimulants, we tested the immune responses induced by hollow 30-helix DNA origami tubes covered with up to 62 cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sequences in freshly isolated spleen cells. Unmethylated CpG sequences that are highly specific for bacterial DNA are recognized by a specialized receptor of the innate immune system localized in the endosome, the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). When incubated with oligonucleotides containing CpGs, immune cells are stimulated through TLR9 to produce and secrete cytokine mediators such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70), a process associated with the initiation of an immune response. In our studies, the DNA origami tube built from an 8634 nt long variant of the commonly used single-stranded DNA origami scaffold M13mp18 and 227 staple oligonucleotides decorated with 62 CpG-containing oligonucleotides triggered a strong immune response, characterized by cytokine production and immune cell activation, which was entirely dependent on TLR9 stimulation. Such decorated origami tubes also triggered higher immunostimulation than equal amounts of CpG oligonucleotides associated with a standard carrier system such as Lipofectamine. In the absence of CpG oligonucleotides, cytokine production induced by the origami tubes was low and was not related to TLR9 recognition. Fluorescent microscopy revealed localization of CpG-containing DNA origami structures in the endosome. The DNA constructs showed in contrast to Lipofectamine no detectable toxicity and did not affect the viability of splenocytes. We thus demonstrate that DNA origami constructs represent a delivery system for CpG oligonucleotides that is both efficient and nontoxic.

  14. Cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of positively charged chitosan gold nanoparticles in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seon Young; Jang, Soo Hwa [Seoul National University, Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Institute for Veterinary Science (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin; Jeong, Saeromi; Park, Jin Ho; Ock, Kwang Su [Soongsil University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kangtaek [Yonsei University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Sung Ik [Kyung Hee University, College of Environment and Applied Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sang-Woo, E-mail: sjoo@ssu.ac.kr [Soongsil University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong, E-mail: leeso@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Institute for Veterinary Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and mechanisms of cytotoxicity of the positively charged Au nanoparticles (NPs) were examined in A549 cells, which are one of the most characterized pulmonary cellular systems. Positively charged Au NPs were prepared by chemical reduction using chitosan. The dimension and surface charge of Au NPs were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. The uptake of Au NPs into A549 cells was also monitored using TEM and dark-field microscopy (DFM) and z-stack confocal microRaman spectroscopy. DFM live cell imaging was also performed to monitor the entry of chitosan Au NPs in real time. The cytotoxic assay, using both methylthiazol tetrazolium and lactate dehydrogenase assays revealed that positively charged Au NPs decreased cell viability. Flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, real-time PCR, and western blot analysis suggest that positively charged chitosan Au NPs provoke cell damage through both apoptotic and necrotic pathways.

  15. Structural and functional interaction between the human DNA repair proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peï-Yu; Frit, Philippe; Meesala, SriLakshmi; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Modesti, Mauro; Andres, Sara N; Huang, Ying; Sekiguchi, JoAnn; Calsou, Patrick; Salles, Bernard; Junop, Murray S

    2009-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  16. Structural and Functional Interaction Between the Human DNA Repair Proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.; Meesala, S; Dauvillier, S; Modesti, M; Andres, S; Huang, Y; Sekiguchi, J; Calsou, P; Salles, B; Junop, M

    2009-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  17. Blocking human contaminant DNA during PCR allows amplification of rare mammal species from sedimentary ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boessenkool, Sanne; Epp, Laura S.; Haile, James Seymour

    2012-01-01

    , or bias, during the PCR. In this study, we test the utility of human-specific blocking primers in mammal diversity analyses of ancient permafrost samples from Siberia. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) on human and mammoth DNA, we first optimized the design and concentration of blocking primer in the PCR...

  18. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Tainer, John A; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation.

  19. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  20. Persistent organic pollutants alter DNA methylation during human adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Dungen, Myrthe W; Murk, Albertinka J; Kok, Dieuwertje E; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2017-04-01

    Ubiquitous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) can accumulate in humans where they might influence differentiation of adipocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DNA methylation is one of the underlying mechanisms by which POPs affect adipocyte differentiation, and to what extent DNA methylation can be related to gene transcription. Adipocyte differentiation was induced in two human cell models with continuous exposure to different POPs throughout differentiation. From the seven tested POPs, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) decreased lipid accumulation, while tributyltin (TBT) increased lipid accumulation. In human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), TCDD and TBT induced opposite gene expression profiles, whereas after PFOS exposure gene expression remained relatively stable. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis showed that all three POPs affected DNA methylation patterns in adipogenic and other genes, possibly related to the phenotypic outcome, but without concomitant gene expression changes. Differential methylation was predominantly detected in intergenic regions, where the biological relevance of alterations in DNA methylation is unclear. This study demonstrates that POPs, at environmentally relevant levels, are able to induce differential DNA methylation in human differentiating adipocytes. Copyright © 2017 Wageningen University. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacterial Intoxication Evokes Cellular Senescence with Persistent DNA Damage and Cytokine Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blazkova, Hana; Krejcikova, Katerina; Moudry, Pavel;

    2009-01-01

    to such intoxication are mechanistically incompletely understood. Here we show that both normal and cancer cells (BJ, IMR-90 and WI-38 fibroblasts, HeLa and U2-OS cell lines) that survive the acute phase of intoxication by Haemophilus ducreyi CDT possess the hallmarks of cellular senescence. This characteristic...

  2. The Impact of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway on DNA Repair Mechanisms in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhong Meng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Defined cellular mechanisms have evolved that recognize and repair DNA to protect the integrity of its structure and sequence when encountering assaults from endogenous and exogenous sources. There are five major DNA repair pathways: mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, direct repair, base excision repair and DNA double strand break repair (including non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination repair. Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is a feature of many cancer types. The Hh pathway has been documented to be indispensable for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis, cancer stemness, and chemoresistance. The functional transcription activators of the Hh pathway include the GLI proteins. Inhibition of the activity of GLI can interfere with almost all DNA repair types in human cancer, indicating that Hh/GLI functions may play an important role in enabling tumor cells to survive lethal types of DNA damage induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus, Hh signaling presents an important therapeutic target to overcome DNA repair-enabled multi-drug resistance and consequently increase chemotherapeutic response in the treatment of cancer.

  3. The Impact of Hedgehog Signaling Pathway on DNA Repair Mechanisms in Human Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Erhong; Hanna, Ann; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A., E-mail: lsamant@uab.edu [Department of Pathology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, WTI320D, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    Defined cellular mechanisms have evolved that recognize and repair DNA to protect the integrity of its structure and sequence when encountering assaults from endogenous and exogenous sources. There are five major DNA repair pathways: mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, direct repair, base excision repair and DNA double strand break repair (including non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination repair). Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a feature of many cancer types. The Hh pathway has been documented to be indispensable for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis, cancer stemness, and chemoresistance. The functional transcription activators of the Hh pathway include the GLI proteins. Inhibition of the activity of GLI can interfere with almost all DNA repair types in human cancer, indicating that Hh/GLI functions may play an important role in enabling tumor cells to survive lethal types of DNA damage induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thus, Hh signaling presents an important therapeutic target to overcome DNA repair-enabled multi-drug resistance and consequently increase chemotherapeutic response in the treatment of cancer.

  4. The impact of the C-terminal domain on the interaction of human DNA topoisomerase II α and β with DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L Gilroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type II DNA topoisomerases are essential, ubiquitous enzymes that act to relieve topological problems arising in DNA from normal cellular activity. Their mechanism of action involves the ATP-dependent transport of one DNA duplex through a transient break in a second DNA duplex; metal ions are essential for strand passage. Humans have two isoforms, topoisomerase IIα and topoisomerase IIβ, that have distinct roles in the cell. The C-terminal domain has been linked to isoform specific differences in activity and DNA interaction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the role of the C-terminal domain in the binding of human topoisomerase IIα and topoisomerase IIβ to DNA in fluorescence anisotropy assays using full length and C-terminally truncated enzymes. We find that the C-terminal domain of topoisomerase IIβ but not topoisomerase IIα affects the binding of the enzyme to the DNA. The presence of metal ions has no effect on DNA binding. Additionally, we have examined strand passage of the full length and truncated enzymes in the presence of a number of supporting metal ions and find that there is no difference in relative decatenation between isoforms. We find that calcium and manganese, in addition to magnesium, can support strand passage by the human topoisomerase II enzymes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The C-terminal domain of topoisomerase IIβ, but not that of topoisomerase IIα, alters the enzyme's K(D for DNA binding. This is consistent with previous data and may be related to the differential modes of action of the two isoforms in vivo. We also show strand passage with different supporting metal ions for human topoisomerase IIα or topoisomerase IIβ, either full length or C-terminally truncated. They all show the same preferences, whereby Mg > Ca > Mn.

  5. Cellular transformation by human papillomaviruses: Lessons learned by comparing high- and low-risk viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Roman, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of papillomaviruses (PVs) has been appreciated since the 1930s yet the mechanisms of virally-mediated cellular transformation are still being revealed. Reasons for this include: a) the oncoproteins are multifunctional, b) there is an ever-growing list of cellular interacting proteins, c) more than one cellular protein may bind to a given region of the oncoprotein, and d) there is only limited information on the proteins encoded by the corresponding non-oncogenic PVs. The perspective of this review will be to contrast the activities of the viral E6 and E7 proteins encoded by the oncogenic human PVs (termed high-risk HPVs) to those encoded by their non-oncogenic counterparts (termed low-risk HPVs) in an attempt to sort out viral life cycle-related functions from oncogenic functions. The review will emphasize lessons learned from the cell culture studies of the HPVs causing mucosal/genital tract cancers. PMID:22284986

  6. Prediction of cellular radiosensitivity from DNA damage induced by gamma-rays and carbon ion irradiation in canine tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Seiichi; Van Khoa, Tran; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo; Ogihara, Kikumi; Ueno, Shunji; Ito, Nobuhiko

    2005-11-01

    Diseases of companion animals are shifting from infectious diseases to neoplasms (cancer), and since radiation therapy is one of the effective choices available for cancer treatment, the application of radiotherapy in veterinary medicine is likely to increase. However tumor tissues have different radiosensitivities, and therefore it is important to determine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumors in individual patients in advance of radiotherapy. We have studied the relationship between the surviving cell fraction measured by a clonogenic assay and DNA double strand breaks detected by a comet assay under neutral conditions in three canine tumor cell lines, after gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation. In all the cell lines, cell death assessed by the clonogenic assay was much higher following irradiation with carbon ions than with gamma-rays. The initial and residual (4 hr) DNA damage due to gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation were higher in a radiosensitive cell line than in a radioresistant cell line. The surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) showed a tendency for correlation with both the initial and residual DNA damage. In particular, the residual damage per Gy was significantly correlated with SF2, regardless of the type of radiation. This indicates that cellular radiosensitivity can be predicted by detection of radiation-induced residual DNA damage.

  7. Pitfalls in the analysis of ancient human mtDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The retrieval of DNA from ancient human specimens is not always successful owing to DNA deterioration and contamination although it is vital to provide new insights into the genetic structure of ancient people and to reconstruct the past history. Normally, only short DNA fragments can be retrieved from the ancient specimens. How to identify the authenticity of DNA obtained and to uncover the information it contained are difficult. We employed the ancient mtDNAs reported from Central Asia (including Xinjiang, China) as an example to discern potentially extraneous DNA contamination based on the updated mtDNA phylogeny derived from mtDNA control region, coding region, as well as complete sequence information. Our results demonstrated that many mtDNAs reported are more or less problematic. Starting from a reliable mtDNA phylogeney and combining the available modern data into analysis, one can ascertain the authenticity of the ancient DNA, distinguish the potential errors in a data set, and efficiently decipher the meager information it harbored. The reappraisal of the mtDNAs with the age of more than 2000 years from Central Asia gave support to the suggestion of extensively (pre)historical gene admixture in this region.

  8. Genome-wide analysis in human colorectal cancer cells reveals ischemia-mediated expression of motility genes via DNA hypomethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, Karolina; Skowronki, Karolina; Andrews, Joseph; Rodenhiser, David I; Coomber, Brenda L

    2014-01-01

    DNA hypomethylation is an important epigenetic modification found to occur in many different cancer types, leading to the upregulation of previously silenced genes and loss of genomic stability. We previously demonstrated that hypoxia and hypoglycaemia (ischemia), two common micro-environmental changes in solid tumours, decrease DNA methylation through the downregulation of DNMTs in human colorectal cancer cells. Here, we utilized a genome-wide cross-platform approach to identify genes hypomethylated and upregulated by ischemia. Following exposure to hypoxia or hypoglycaemia, methylated DNA from human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116) was immunoprecipitated and analysed with an Affymetrix promoter array. Additionally, RNA was isolated and analysed in parallel with an Affymetrix expression array. Ingenuity pathway analysis software revealed that a significant proportion of the genes hypomethylated and upregulated were involved in cellular movement, including PLAUR and CYR61. A Matrigel invasion assay revealed that indeed HCT116 cells grown in hypoxic or hypoglycaemic conditions have increased mobility capabilities. Confirmation of upregulated expression of cellular movement genes was performed with qPCR. The correlation between ischemia and metastasis is well established in cancer progression, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for this common observation have not been clearly identified. Our novel data suggests that hypoxia and hypoglycaemia may be driving changes in DNA methylation through downregulation of DNMTs. This is the first report to our knowledge that provides an explanation for the increased metastatic potential seen in ischemic cells; i.e. that ischemia could be driving DNA hypomethylation and increasing expression of cellular movement genes.

  9. D-ribose inhibits DNA repair synthesis in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunica, G.; Marini, M.; Brunelli, M.A.; Chiricolo, M.; Franceschi, C.

    1986-07-31

    D-ribose is cytotoxic for quiescent human lymphocytes and severely inhibits their PHA-induced proliferation at concentrations (25-50 mM) at which other simple sugars are ineffective. In order to explain these effects, DNA repair synthesis was evaluated in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes treated with hydroxyurea and irradiated. D-ribose, in contrast to other reducing sugars, did not induce repair synthesis and therefore did not apparently damage DNA in a direct way, although it markedly inhibited gamma ray-induced repair. Taking into account that lymphocytes must rejoin physiologically-formed DNA strand breaks in order to enter the cell cycle, we suggest that D-ribose exerts its cytotoxic activity by interfering with metabolic pathways critical for the repair of DNA breaks.

  10. Isolation and characterization of DNA probes for human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, P C

    1990-01-01

    A coordinated effort to map and sequence the human genome has recently become a national priority. Chromosome 21, the smallest human chromosome accounting for less than 2% of the human genome, is an attractive model system for developing and evaluating genome mapping technology. Several strategies are currently being explored including the development of chromosome 21 libraries from somatic cell hybrids as reported here, the cloning of chromosome 21 in yeast artificial chromosomes (McCormick et al., 1989b), and the construction of chromosome 21 libraries using chromosome flow-sorting techniques (Fuscoe et al., 1989). This report describes the approaches used to identify DNA probes that are useful for mapping chromosome 21. Probes were successfully isolated from both phage and cosmid libraries made from two somatic cell hybrids that contain human chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome. The 15 cosmid clones from the WA17 library, reduced to cloned DNA sequences of an average size of 3 kb, total 525 kb of DNA which is approximately 1% of chromosome 21. From these clones, a set of polymorphic DNA markers that span the length of the long arm of chromosome 21 has been generated. All of the probes thus far analyzed from the WA17 libraries have been mapped to chromosome 21 both by physical and genetic mapping methods. It is therefore likely that the WA17 hybrid cell line contains human chromosome 21 as the only human component, in agreement with cytogenetic observation. The 153E7b cosmid libraries will provide an alternative source of cloned chromosome 21 DNA. Library screening techniques can be employed to obtain cloned DNA sequences from the same genetic loci of the two different chromosome 21s. Comparative analysis will allow direct estimation of DNA sequence variation for different regions of chromosome 21. Mapped DNA probes make possible the molecular analysis of chromosome 21 at a level of resolution not achievable by classical cytogenetic techniques (Graw et al

  11. DNA-binding, cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, apoptosis and photocleavage studies of Ru(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Deepika; C Shobha Devi; Y Praveen Kumar; K Laxma Reddy; P Venkat Reddy; D Anil Kumar; Surya S Singh; S Satyanarayana

    2016-07-01

    Two Ru(II) complexes [Ru(phen)2bppp](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(phen)27-Br-dppz](ClO4)2 (2) [phen=1,10 phenanthroline, 7-Br-dppz=7-fluorodipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, bppp=11-bromo-pyrido[2',3':5,6]pyrazino[2,3-f] [1,10]phenanthroline] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ES-MS, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and IR. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the complexes examined against a panel of cancer cell lines (HeLa, Du145 and A549) by MTT method, both complexes show prominent anticancer activity against various cancer cells. Live cell imaging study and flow cytometric analysis demonstrate that both the complexes 1 and 2 could cross the cell membrane accumulating in the nucleus. Further, flow cytometry experiments showed that the cytotoxic Ru(II) complexes 1 and 2 induced apoptosis of HeLa tumor cell lines. Photo induced DNA cleavage studies have been performed and results indicate that both the complexes efficiently photo cleave pBR322 DNA. The binding properties of two complexes toward CT-DNA were investigated by various optical methods and viscosity measurements. The experimental results suggested that both Ru(II) complexes can intercalate into DNA base pairs. The complexes were docked into DNA-base pairs using the GOLD docking program.

  12. Functional interactions of DNA topoisomerases with a human replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurashidova, Gulnara; Radulescu, Sorina; Sandoval, Oscar; Zahariev, Sotir; Danailov, Miltcho B; Demidovich, Alexander; Santamaria, Laura; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Riva, Silvano; Falaschi, Arturo

    2007-02-21

    The human DNA replication origin, located in the lamin B2 gene, interacts with the DNA topoisomerases I and II in a cell cycle-modulated manner. The topoisomerases interact in vivo and in vitro with precise bonds ahead of the start sites of bidirectional replication, within the pre-replicative complex region; topoisomerase I is bound in M, early G1 and G1/S border and topoisomerase II in M and the middle of G1. The Orc2 protein competes for the same sites of the origin bound by either topoisomerase in different moments of the cell cycle; furthermore, it interacts on the DNA with topoisomerase II during the assembly of the pre-replicative complex and with DNA-bound topoisomerase I at the G1/S border. Inhibition of topoisomerase I activity abolishes origin firing. Thus, the two topoisomerases are closely associated with the replicative complexes, and DNA topology plays an essential functional role in origin activation.

  13. Estimating the effect of human base excision repair protein variants on the repair of oxidative DNA base damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed a complex association between human genetic variance and cancer risk. Quantitative biological modeling based on experimental data can play a critical role in interpreting the effect of genetic variation on biochemical pathways relevant to cancer development and progression. Defects in human DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins can reduce cellular tolerance to oxidative DNA base damage caused by endogenous and exogenous sources, such as exposure to toxins and ionizing radiation. If not repaired, DNA base damage leads to cell dysfunction and mutagenesis, consequently leading to cancer, disease, and aging. Population screens have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in many BER proteins and some have been purified and found to exhibit mild kinetic defects. Epidemiologic studies have led to conflicting conclusions on the association between single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in BER proteins and cancer risk. Using experimental data for cellular concentration and the kinetics of normal and variant BER proteins, we apply a previously developed and tested human BER pathway model to (i) estimate the effect of mild variants on BER of abasic sites and 8-oxoguanine, a prominent oxidative DNA base modification, (ii) identify ranges of variation associated with substantial BER capacity loss, and (iii) reveal nonintuitive consequences of multiple simultaneous variants. Our findings support previous work suggesting that mild BER variants have a minimal effect on pathway capacity whereas more severe defects and simultaneous variation in several BER proteins can lead to inefficient repair and potentially deleterious consequences of cellular damage.

  14. Purification of human leucocyte DNA: proteinase K is not necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, A M; Georgalis, A M; Benton, L R; Canavan, K L; Atchison, B A

    1992-03-01

    A rapid nontoxic method for the purification of DNA from human leucocytes is described. Preliminary experiments which tested different methods of DNA purification indicated that digestion of proteins with proteinase K was unnecessary. This led to the development of a simple procedure involving lysis of the cells in SDS followed by extraction with 6 M NaCl. The method described overcomes the requirement for lengthy incubations in the presence of expensive proteinase K and subsequent extraction with toxic chemicals.

  15. Aqueous extract of Crataegus azarolus protects against DNA damage in human lymphoblast Cell K562 and enhances antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Nadia; Bouhlel, Inès; Chaabane, Fadwa; Bzéouich, Imèn Mokdad; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2014-02-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the cellular antioxidant effect of the aqueous extract of Crataegus azarolus and its antigenotoxic potential using human myelogenous cells, K562. The antioxidant capacity of this extract was evaluated by determining its cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) in K562 cells. Also, preceding antigenotoxicity assessment, its eventual genotoxicity property was investigated by evaluating its capacity to induce the DNA degradation of treated cell nuclei. As no genotoxicity was detected at different exposure times, its ability to protect cell DNA against H2O2 oxidative effect was investigated, using the "comet assay." It appears that 800 μg/mL of extract inhibited the genotoxicity induced by H2O2 with a rate of 41.30 %, after 4 h of incubation. In addition, this extract revealed a significant cellular antioxidant capacity against the reactive oxygen species in K562 cells.

  16. Ionizing radiation and tritium transmutation both cause formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine in cellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teebor, G W; Frenkel, K; Goldstein, M S

    1984-01-01

    HeLa cells grown in the presence of [methyl-3H]thymidine contained large amounts of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (HMdU) in their DNA. When the cells were grown in [6-3H]thymidine and their DNA was labeled to the same specific activity, no HMdU was present. When such [6-3H]thymidine-labeled cells were exposed to increasing amounts of gamma-radiation, small but increasing amounts of HMdU were formed in their DNA. This indicates that HMdU can be formed in DNA by two distinct mechanisms. The first is the result of the transmutation of 3H to 3He (beta decay) in the methyl group of thymidine, leading to formation of a carbocation. This short-lived ion reacts with hydroxide ions of water, yielding the hydroxymethyl group. HMdU that is formed by this mechanism is formed at the rate of beta decay of 3H. It appears only in [methyl-3H]thymidine residues and is present in the DNA of both nonirradiated and gamma-irradiated cells. The second mechanism is the result of the radiolysis of water caused by ionizing radiation. The resultant radical species, particularly hydroxyl radicals, may react with many sites on DNA. When the methyl group of thymine is attacked by hydroxyl radicals, the hydroxymethyl group is formed. The formation of HMdU by this mechanism was detected only when [6-3H]thymidine-labeled cells were used, since transmutation of 3H in position 6 of thymine cannot yield HMdU.

  17. Human neuronal tau promoting the melting temperature of DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The hyperchromic effect of ultraviolet spectroscopy shows that adding recombinant human neuronal tau to the solution of calf thymus DNA will promote the melting temperature (Tm) from 67℃ to 81℃. Similar result has been detected when adding tau to plasmid pBluescript-Ⅱ SK, by raising Tm from 75℃ to 85℃. The kinetics of thermal denaturation of DNA with tau is much slower than that of control. It suggests that tau may stabilize the double helix conformation of DNA.

  18. Comprehensive DNA methylation analysis of human neuroblastoma cells treated with blonanserin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yui; Nishioka, Masaki; Bundo, Miki; Sunaga, Fumiko; Kasai, Kiyoto; Iwamoto, Kazuya

    2014-03-20

    Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic drug for schizophrenia. The pharmacological actions of blonanserin are shown to be the antagonism of dopamine receptor 2 and serotonin receptors. However, its molecular mechanisms in brain cells have not been fully characterized. Accumulating evidence suggests that antipsychotic drugs and mood stabilizers show epigenetic effects on a wide range of genes in animal and cellular models. We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis targeting 479,814 CpG sites of cultured human neuroblastoma cells administered with blonanserin. We found that 3,057 CpG sites showed statistically significant changes in DNA methylation at two different doses of blonanserin (1.36 nM and 13.6 nM). These included hypermethylated CpG sites that were enriched in genes related to axonogenesis and cell morphogenesis involved in neuron differentiation. We also showed that the global effect on DNA methylome depends on the concentration of the drug. With a high dose of blonanserin, the overall methylation levels across all CpG sites significantly increased. These increases in DNA methylation were prominent in the CpG sites distant from promoter regions. We further examined DNA methylation changes in specific genes implicated for the actions of antipsychotic drugs, such as the dopamine receptor 2 (DRD2) gene and the serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A) gene. We observed that CpG sites that were located within DRD2 and HTR2A genes were significantly hypermethylated by blonanserin. The DNA methylation changes induced by the treatment with blonanserin will be useful for understanding its pharmacological actions at the cellular level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of Streptococcus mutans Genomic DNA in Human DNA Samples Extracted from Saliva and Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Deeley, Kathleen B.; Callahan, Nicholas F.; Noel, Jacqueline B.; Anjomshoaa, Ida; Carricato, Wendy M.; Schulhof, Louise P.; DeSensi, Rebecca S.; Gandhi, Pooja; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Rozhon, Christopher; Patir, Asli; Yildirim, Mine; Poletta, Fernando A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Wendell, Steven; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Seymen, Figen; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W.; Modesto, Adriana; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Caries is a multifactorial disease, and studies aiming to unravel the factors modulating its etiology must consider all known predisposing factors. One major factor is bacterial colonization, and Streptococcus mutans is the main microorganism associated with the initiation of the disease. In our studies, we have access to DNA samples extracted from human saliva and blood. In this report, we tested a real-time PCR assay developed to detect copies of genomic DNA from Streptococcus mutans in 1,424 DNA samples from humans. Our results suggest that we can determine the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in both DNA samples from caries-free and caries-affected individuals. However, we were not able to detect the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in any DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood, which suggests the assay may not be sensitive enough for this goal. Values of the threshold cycle of the real-time PCR reaction correlate with higher levels of caries experience in children, but this correlation could not be detected for adults. PMID:21731912

  20. Finding human promoter groups based on DNA physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jia; Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Hongya; Yan, Hong

    2009-10-01

    DNA rigidity is an important physical property originating from the DNA three-dimensional structure. Although the general DNA rigidity patterns in human promoters have been investigated, their distinct roles in transcription are largely unknown. In this paper, we discover four highly distinct human promoter groups based on similarity of their rigidity profiles. First, we find that all promoter groups conserve relatively rigid DNAs at the canonical TATA box [a consensus TATA(A/T)A(A/T) sequence] position, which are important physical signals in binding transcription factors. Second, we find that the genes activated by each group of promoters share significant biological functions based on their gene ontology annotations. Finally, we find that these human promoter groups correlate with the tissue-specific gene expression.

  1. Finding human promoter groups based on DNA physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jia; Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Hongya; Yan, Hong

    2009-10-01

    DNA rigidity is an important physical property originating from the DNA three-dimensional structure. Although the general DNA rigidity patterns in human promoters have been investigated, their distinct roles in transcription are largely unknown. In this paper, we discover four highly distinct human promoter groups based on similarity of their rigidity profiles. First, we find that all promoter groups conserve relatively rigid DNAs at the canonical TATA box [a consensus TATA(A/T)A(A/T) sequence] position, which are important physical signals in binding transcription factors. Second, we find that the genes activated by each group of promoters share significant biological functions based on their gene ontology annotations. Finally, we find that these human promoter groups correlate with the tissue-specific gene expression.

  2. Nuclear microanalysis of the human amnion: A study of ionic cellular exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafindrabe, L.; Moretto, Ph.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.; Bara, M.; Guiet-Bara, A.

    1995-09-01

    The epithelial cells of the human amniotic membrane have been extensively studied by electrophysiologists with the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of transmembrane ionic transfers. In order to provide complementary information about this model, nuclear microanalysis was performed using the CENBG ion microbeam. Quantitative mapping of the human amnion was carried out and the distributions of most mono- and divalent ions involved in cellular pathways (Na +, Mg 2+, Cl -, Ca 2+) were determined. The ionic cellular content was also compared, before and after incubation in a Hanks' physiological fluid and the resultant ions transfers were determined. The aim of this paper is to expose the advances of this experimental model, more particularly after the development of simulation programs which improved the accuracy of PIXE analysis in the measurement of low energy X-rays emitters. Statistically significant results can now be extracted and can be explained taking into account the results of previous electrophysiological experiments.

  3. Extracellular DNA affects NO content in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremova, L V; Alekseeva, A Yu; Konkova, M S; Kostyuk, S V; Ershova, E S; Smirnova, T D; Konorova, I L; Veiko, N N

    2010-08-01

    Fragments of extracellular DNA are permanently released into the blood flow due to cell apoptosis and possible de novo DNA synthesis. To find out whether extracellular DNA can affect the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), one of key vascular tone regulators, we studied in vitro effects of three artificial DNA probes with different sequences and 10 samples of extracellular DNA (obtained from healthy people and patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis) on NO synthesis in endothelial cell culture (HUVEC). For detection of NO in live cells and culture medium, we used a NO-specific agent CuFL penetrating into the cells and forming a fluorescent product FL-NO upon interaction with NO. Human genome DNA fragments affected the content of NO in endothelial cells; this effect depended on both the base sequence and concentration of DNA fragments. Addition of artificial DNA and extracellular DNA from healthy people into the cell culture in a low concentration (5 ng/ml) increased the detected NO concentration by 4-fold at most. Cytosine-guanine (CG)-rich fragment of the transcribed sequence of ribosomal repeat was the most powerful NO-inductor. The effect of DNA fragments on NO synthesis was comparable with that of low doses of oxidizing agents, H(2)O(2) and 17β-estradiol. Extracellular DNA samples obtained from patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis decreased NO content in cells and medium by 1.3-28 times compared to the control; the effect correlated with the content of CG-rich sequences.

  4. Differential regulation of the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks in G1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Jacqueline H; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are potentially lethal DNA lesions that can be repaired by either homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). We show that DSBs induced by ionizing radiation (IR) are efficiently processed for HR and bound by Rfa1 during G1, while endonuclease-in...

  5. Harmonising measurements of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in cellular DNA and urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Cooke, Marcus S; Collins, Andrew;

    2012-01-01

    protocols. Recent attention on optimal conditions for the comet assay may lead to better understanding of the most critical steps in procedure, which generate variation in DNA damage levels between laboratories. Measurements of urinary excretion of oxidatively generated 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine...

  6. DNA replication restart and cellular dynamics of Hef helicase/nuclease protein in Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestini, Roxane; Delpech, Floriane; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how frequently spontaneous replication arrests occur and how archaea deal with these arrests are very interesting and challenging research topics. Here we will described how genetic and imaging studies have revealed the central role of the archaeal helicase/nuclease Hef belonging to the XPF/MUS81/FANCM family of endonucleases in repair of arrested replication forks. Special focus will be on description of a recently developed combination of genetic and imaging tools to study the dynamic localization of a functional Hef::GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) fusion protein in the living cells of halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii. As Archaea provide an excellent and unique model for understanding how DNA replication is regulated to allow replication of a circular DNA molecule either from single or multiple replication origins, we will also summarize recent studies that have revealed peculiar features regarding DNA replication, particularly in halophilic archaea. We strongly believe that fundamental knowledge of our on-going studies will shed light on the evolutionary history of the DNA replication machinery and will help to establish general rules concerning replication restart and the key role of recombination proteins not only in bacteria, yeast and higher eukaryotes but also in archaea.

  7. The mutation rate of the human mtDNA deletion mtDNA4977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkar, R; Navidi, W; Tavaré, S; Dang, M H; Chomyn, A; Attardi, G; Cortopassi, G; Arnheim, N

    1996-10-01

    The human mitochondrial mutation mtDNA4977 is a 4,977-bp deletion that originates between two 13-bp direct repeats. We grew 220 colonies of cells, each from a single human cell. For each colony, we counted the number of cells and amplified the DNA by PCR to test for the presence of a deletion. To estimate the mutation fate, we used a model that describes the relationship between the mutation rate and the probability that a colony of a given size will contain no mutants, taking into account such factors as possible mitochondrial turnover and mistyping due to PCR error. We estimate that the mutation rate for mtDNA4977 in cultured human cells is 5.95 x 10(-8) per mitochondrial genome replication. This method can be applied to specific chromosomal, as well as mitochondrial, mutations.

  8. The mutation rate of the human mtDNA deletion mtDNA{sup 4977}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenkar, R. [Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, CO (United States); Navidi, W. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Tavare, S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The human mitochondrial mutation mtDNA{sup 4977} is a 4,977-bp deletion that originates between two 13-bp direct repeats. We grew 220 colonies of cells, each from a single human cell. For each colony, we counted the number of cells and amplified the DNA by PCR to test for the presence of a deletion. To estimate the mutation rate, we used a model that describes the relationship between the mutation rate and the probability that a colony of a given size will contain no mutants, taking into account such factors as possible mitochondrial turnover and mistyping due to PCR error. We estimate that the mutation rate for mtDNA{sup 4977} in cultured human cells is 5.95 x 10{sup {minus}8} per mitochondrial genome replication. This method can be applied to specific chromosomal, as well as mitochondrial, mutations. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Differential effects of IL-15 on the generation, maintenance and cytotoxic potential of adaptive cellular responses induced by DNA vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyao; Valentin, Antonio; Ng, Sinnie; Beach, Rachel Kelly; Alicea, Candido; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N

    2015-02-25

    IL-15 is an important cytokine for the regulation of lymphocyte homeostasis. However, the role of IL-15 in the generation, maintenance and cytotoxic potential of antigen specific T cells is not fully understood. Because the route of antigenic delivery and the vaccine modality could influence the IL-15 requirement for mounting and preserving cytotoxic T cell responses, we have investigated the immunogenicity of DNA-based vaccines in IL-15 KO mice. DNA vaccination with SIV Gag induced antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the absence of IL-15. However, the absolute number of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells was decreased in IL-15 KO mice compared to WT animals, suggesting that IL-15 is important for the generation of maximal number of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Interestingly, antigen-specific memory CD8 cells could be efficiently boosted 8 months after the final vaccination in both WT and KO strains of mice, suggesting that the maintenance of antigen-specific long-term memory T cells induced by DNA vaccination is comparable in the absence and presence of IL-15. Importantly, boosting by DNA 8-months after vaccination revealed severely reduced granzyme B content in CD8(+) T cells of IL-15 KO mice compared to WT mice. This suggests that the cytotoxic potential of the long-term memory CD8(+) T cells is impaired. These results suggest that IL-15 is not essential for the generation and maintenance of adaptive cellular responses upon DNA vaccination, but it is critical for the preservation of maximal numbers and for the activity of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. DNA damage responses: mechanisms and roles in human disease: 2007 G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastan, Michael B

    2008-04-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in elucidating the molecular controls of cellular responses to DNA damage in mammalian cells. Much of our understanding of the mechanisms involved in cellular DNA damage response pathways has come from studies of human cancer susceptibility syndromes that are altered in DNA damage responses. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the gene mutated in the disorder ataxia-telangiectasia, codes for a protein kinase that is a central mediator of responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in cells. Once activated, ATM phosphorylates numerous substrates in the cell that modulate the response of the cell to the DNA damage. We recently developed a novel system to create DNA DSBs at defined endogenous sites in the human genome and used this system to detect protein recruitment and loss at and around these breaks by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Results from this system showed the functional importance of ATM kinase activity and phosphorylation in the response to DSBs and supported a model in which ordered chromatin structure changes that occur after DNA breakage and that depend on functional NBS1 and ATM facilitate DNA DSB repair. Insights about these pathways provide us with opportunities to develop new approaches to benefit patients. Examples and opportunities for developing inhibitors that act as sensitizers to chemotherapy or radiation therapy or activators that could improve responses to cellular stresses, such as oxidative damage, are discussed. Relevant to the latter, we have shown benefits of an ATM activator in disease settings ranging from metabolic syndrome to cancer prevention.

  11. Transcription of human respiratory syncytial virus genome RNA in vitro: requirement of cellular factor(s).

    OpenAIRE

    Barik, S

    1992-01-01

    Extracts made from human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected Hep-2 cells synthesized mRNAs encoded by all known viral genes. In contrast, RSV ribonucleoproteins purified from infected cells failed to transcribe in vitro; transcription was restored by addition of a cytoplasmic extract of uninfected Hep-2 cells, demonstrating that a cellular factor(s) has a role in RSV gene expression. Quantitation of the individual gene mRNAs transcribed in vitro revealed polarity of transcription of th...

  12. Downregulation of Wip1 phosphatase modulates the cellular threshold of DNA damage signaling in mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macurek, Libor; Benada, Jan; Müllers, Erik; Halim, Vincentius A.; Krejčíková, Kateřina; Burdová, Kamila; Pecháčková, Sona; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lindqvist, Arne; Medema, René H.; Bartek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Cells are constantly challenged by DNA damage and protect their genome integrity by activation of an evolutionary conserved DNA damage response pathway (DDR). A central core of DDR is composed of a spatiotemporally ordered net of post-translational modifications, among which protein phosphorylation plays a major role. Activation of checkpoint kinases ATM/ATR and Chk1/2 leads to a temporal arrest in cell cycle progression (checkpoint) and allows time for DNA repair. Following DNA repair, cells re-enter the cell cycle by checkpoint recovery. Wip1 phosphatase (also called PPM1D) dephosphorylates multiple proteins involved in DDR and is essential for timely termination of the DDR. Here we have investigated how Wip1 is regulated in the context of the cell cycle. We found that Wip1 activity is downregulated by several mechanisms during mitosis. Wip1 protein abundance increases from G1 phase to G2 and declines in mitosis. Decreased abundance of Wip1 during mitosis is caused by proteasomal degradation. In addition, Wip1 is phosphorylated at multiple residues during mitosis, and this leads to inhibition of its enzymatic activity. Importantly, ectopic expression of Wip1 reduced γH2AX staining in mitotic cells and decreased the number of 53BP1 nuclear bodies in G1 cells. We propose that the combined decrease and inhibition of Wip1 in mitosis decreases the threshold necessary for DDR activation and enables cells to react adequately even to modest levels of DNA damage encountered during unperturbed mitotic progression. PMID:23255129

  13. Gorilla and orangutan brains conform to the primate cellular scaling rules: implications for human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Kaas, Jon H

    2011-01-01

    Gorillas and orangutans are primates at least as large as humans, but their brains amount to about one third of the size of the human brain. This discrepancy has been used as evidence that the human brain is about 3 times larger than it should be for a primate species of its body size. In contrast to the view that the human brain is special in its size, we have suggested that it is the great apes that might have evolved bodies that are unusually large, on the basis of our recent finding that the cellular composition of the human brain matches that expected for a primate brain of its size, making the human brain a linearly scaled-up primate brain in its number of cells. To investigate whether the brain of great apes also conforms to the primate cellular scaling rules identified previously, we determine the numbers of neuronal and other cells that compose the orangutan and gorilla cerebella, use these numbers to calculate the size of the brain and of the cerebral cortex expected for these species, and show that these match the sizes described in the literature. Our results suggest that the brains of great apes also scale linearly in their numbers of neurons like other primate brains, including humans. The conformity of great apes and humans to the linear cellular scaling rules that apply to other primates that diverged earlier in primate evolution indicates that prehistoric Homo species as well as other hominins must have had brains that conformed to the same scaling rules, irrespective of their body size. We then used those scaling rules and published estimated brain volumes for various hominin species to predict the numbers of neurons that composed their brains. We predict that Homo heidelbergensis and Homo neanderthalensis had brains with approximately 80 billion neurons, within the range of variation found in modern Homo sapiens. We propose that while the cellular scaling rules that apply to the primate brain have remained stable in hominin evolution (since they

  14. The human DNA-activated protein kinase, DNA-PK: Substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.W.; Connelly, M.A.; Zhang, H.; Sipley, J.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biology Dept.; Lees-Miller, S.P.; Lintott, L.G. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, E. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Lab. of Cell Biology

    1994-11-05

    Although much has been learned about the structure and function of p53 and the probable sequence of subsequent events that lead to cell cycle arrest, little is known about how DNA damage is detected and the nature of the signal that is generated by DNA damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests that protein kinases may be involved. In vitro, human DNA-PK phosphorylates a variety of nuclear DNA-binding, regulatory proteins including the tumor suppressor protein p53, the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, the heat shock protein hsp90, the large tumor antigen (TAg) of simian virus 40, a variety of transcription factors including Fos, Jun, serum response factor (SRF), Myc, Sp1, Oct-1, TFIID, E2F, the estrogen receptor, and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (reviewed in Anderson, 1993; Jackson et al., 1993). However, for most of these proteins, the sites that are phosphorylated by DNA-PK are not known. To determine if the sites that were phosphorylated in vitro also were phosphorylated in vivo and if DNA-PK recognized a preferred protein sequence, the authors identified the sites phosphorylated by DNA-PK in several substrates by direct protein sequence analysis. Each phosphorylated serine or threonine is followed immediately by glutamine in the polypeptide chain; at no other positions are the amino acid residues obviously constrained.

  15. The human DNA-activated protein kinase, DNA-PK: Substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.W.; Connelly, M.A.; Zhang, H.; Sipley, J.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biology Dept.; Lees-Miller, S.P.; Lintott, L.G. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, E. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Lab. of Cell Biology

    1994-11-05

    Although much has been learned about the structure and function of p53 and the probable sequence of subsequent events that lead to cell cycle arrest, little is known about how DNA damage is detected and the nature of the signal that is generated by DNA damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests that protein kinases may be involved. In vitro, human DNA-PK phosphorylates a variety of nuclear DNA-binding, regulatory proteins including the tumor suppressor protein p53, the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, the heat shock protein hsp90, the large tumor antigen (TAg) of simian virus 40, a variety of transcription factors including Fos, Jun, serum response factor (SRF), Myc, Sp1, Oct-1, TFIID, E2F, the estrogen receptor, and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (reviewed in Anderson, 1993; Jackson et al., 1993). However, for most of these proteins, the sites that are phosphorylated by DNA-PK are not known. To determine if the sites that were phosphorylated in vitro also were phosphorylated in vivo and if DNA-PK recognized a preferred protein sequence, the authors identified the sites phosphorylated by DNA-PK in several substrates by direct protein sequence analysis. Each phosphorylated serine or threonine is followed immediately by glutamine in the polypeptide chain; at no other positions are the amino acid residues obviously constrained.

  16. Coal tar residues produce both DNA adducts and oxidative DNA damage in human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadon, S A; Sumerel, J; Minton, T A; Tischler, A

    1995-12-01

    In the present study we compare the metabolic activation of coal tar, as measured by the production of both DNA adducts and oxidative DNA damage, with that of a single carcinogen that is a constituent of this complex mixture in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). We find that a significant level of DNA adducts, detected by 32P-postlabeling, are formed in HMEC following exposure to coal tar residues. This treatment also results in the generation of high levels of oxidative DNA damage, as measured by the production of one type of oxidative base modification, thymine glycols. The amounts of both DNA adducts and thymine varied considerably between the various coal tar residues and did not correlate with either the total amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) or the amount of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) present in the residue. Fractionating the residue from one of the sites by sequential extraction with organic solvents indicated that while the ability to produce both types of DNA damage was contained mostly in a hexane-soluble fraction, a benzene-soluble fraction produced high levels of reactive oxygens relative to the number of total DNA adducts. We find that the total amount of PAH or B[a]P present in the coal tars from the various sites was not a predictor of the level of total DNA damage formed.

  17. Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles show high efficacy and specificity at DNA delivery to human glioblastoma in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Cázares, Hugo; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Young, Noah P; Abutaleb, Ameer O; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Green, Jordan J

    2014-05-27

    Current glioblastoma therapies are insufficient to prevent tumor recurrence and eventual death. Here, we describe a method to treat malignant glioma by nonviral DNA delivery using biodegradable poly(β-amino ester)s (PBAEs), with a focus on the brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), the tumor cell population believed to be responsible for the formation of new tumors and resistance to many conventional therapies. We show transfection efficacy of >60% and low biomaterial-mediated cytotoxicity in primary human BTICs in vitro even when the BTICs are grown as 3-D oncospheres. Intriguingly, we find that these polymeric nanoparticles show intrinsic specificity for nonviral transfection of primary human BTICs over primary healthy human neural progenitor cells and that this specificity is not due to differences in cellular growth rate or total cellular uptake of nanoparticles. Moreover, we demonstrate that biodegradable PBAE/DNA nanoparticles can be fabricated, lyophilized, and then stored for at least 2 years without losing efficacy, increasing the translational relevance of this technology. Using lyophilized nanoparticles, we show transgene expression by tumor cells after intratumoral injection into an orthotopic murine model of human glioblastoma. PBAE/DNA nanoparticles were more effective than naked DNA at exogenous gene expression in vivo, and tumor cells were transfected more effectively than noninvaded brain parenchyma in vivo. This work shows the potential of nonviral gene delivery tools to target human brain tumors.

  18. Cloning, expression and characterization of human tissue-specific DNA polymerase λ2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    DNA polymerase (POL) λ plays an important role during DNA repair and DNA nonhomologous recom-bination processes. A novel POL λ variant was cloned from a human liver cDNA library and named POL λ2 (GenBank Accession No. AY302442). POL λ2 has 2206 base pairs in length with an open reading frame of 1452 base pairs encoding a 482-amino-acids protein. Bioinformatics analysis reveals that POL λ2 spans 7.9 kb on human chromosome 10q24 and is composed of 8 exons and 7 introns. It has the specific domain of DNA polymerase X family-POL Xc at the C-terminus and BRCT domain at the N-terminus. POL λ2 was localized predominantly in nucleus in transfected L0-2 cells. It was expressed abundantly in liver and testis, weakly in ovary, and undetectably in other tested human tissues. In comparison with the expression ratio between POL λ and POL λ2 in normal liver tissues and hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC) adjacent tissues, the ratio was aberrant in 80% of those 15 HCC specimens examined due to the up-regulated expression of POL λ. This abnormality might be involved in hepato-carcinogenesis. The recombinant POL λ2 with His-tag was expressed as a soluble active protein in E. coli BL21 (DE3)CONDON Plus and purified by Ni-NTA resin and then desalted by Superdex-75 chro-matography in an FPLC system. The analysis using isotope α-32P-dCTP incorporation in vitro showed that the purified recombinant POL λ2 exhibited DNA polymerase activity.

  19. Prospects for DNA methods to measure human heritable mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1985-06-14

    A workshop cosponsored by ICPEMC and the US Department of Energy was held in Alta, Utah, December 9-13, 1984 to examine the extent to which DNA-oriented methods might provide new approaches to the important but intractable problem of measuring mutation rates in control and exposed human populations. The workshop identified and analyzed six DNA methods for detection of human heritable mutation, including several created at the meeting, and concluded that none of the methods combine sufficient feasibility and efficiency to be recommended for general application. 8 refs.

  20. Distribution patterns of postmortem damage in human mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders J

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of postmortem damage in mitochondrial DNA retrieved from 37 ancient human DNA samples was analyzed by cloning and was compared with a selection of published animal data. A relative rate of damage (rho(v)) was calculated for nucleotide positions within the human hypervariable region......, such as MT5, have lower in vivo mutation rates and lower postmortem-damage rates. The postmortem data also identify a possible functional subregion of the HVR1, termed "low-diversity 1," through the lack of sequence damage. The amount of postmortem damage observed in mitochondrial coding regions...

  1. (Some cellular mechanisms influencing the transcription of human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-Fc1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Janina Laska

    Full Text Available DNA methylation and histone acetylation are epigenetic modifications that act as regulators of gene expression. DNA methylation is considered an important mechanism for silencing of retroelements in the mammalian genome. However, the methylation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs is not well investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional potential of HERV-Fc1 proviral 5'LTR in more detail, and examined the specific influence of CpG methylation on this LTR in number of cell lines. Specifically, the role of demethylating chemicals e.g. 5-aza-2' deoxycytidine and Trichostatin-A, in inducing or reactivating expression of HERV-Fc1 specific sequences and the mechanisms were investigated. In our present study, 5-aza-dC is shown to be a powerful inducer of HERV-Fc1, and at the same time it strongly inhibits methylation of DNA. Treatment with this demethylating agent 5-aza-dC, results in significantly increased levels of HERV-Fc1 expression in cells previously not expressing HERV-Fc1, or with a very low expression level. The extent of expression of HERV-Fc1 RNAs precisely correlates with the apparent extent of demethylation of the related DNA sequences. In conclusion, the results suggest that inhibition of DNA methylation/histone deacetylase can interfere with gene silencing mechanisms affecting HERV-Fc1 expression in human cells.

  2. Human nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of a murine sarcoma virus: studies with cloned viral and cellular DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Kisselev, L L

    1982-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid, pI26, has been constructed by cloning into pBR322 a transforming gene of murine sarcoma virus (a Moloney strain, clone 124, MSV) synthesized by detergent-treated virions. From this plasmid a XbaI-HindIII fragment has been isolated which contains only mos-specific sequences. This mos-specific probe has been used for screening a human gene library cloned in bacteriophage lambda Charon 4A. Of these, 19 clones have been isolated containing mos-related sequences. By physical mapping and molecular hybridization it has been shown that these sequences are neighboured by DNA regions related to Moloney murine leukemia virus. Recombinant phages have also been found containing human inserts related to MLV, not to the mos gene. The possible existence of murine-like endogenous retroviruses in the normal human genome, including that of a sarcoma type, is discussed. By Northern blotting, expression of the cellular c-mos gene has been detected in mouse liver treated with a hepatocarcinogen. The general significance of the suggested model for evaluating the relationship between chemical carcinogenesis and oncogene expression is discussed.

  3. DNA methylation-based variation between human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Farzeen; Ghai, Meenu

    2017-02-01

    Several studies have proved that DNA methylation affects regulation of gene expression and development. Epigenome-wide studies have reported variation in methylation patterns between populations, including Caucasians, non-Caucasians (Blacks), Hispanics, Arabs, and numerous populations of the African continent. Not only has DNA methylation differences shown to impact externally visible characteristics, but is also a potential biomarker for underlying racial health disparities between human populations. Ethnicity-related methylation differences set their mark during early embryonic development. Genetic variations, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and environmental factors, such as age, dietary folate, socioeconomic status, and smoking, impacts DNA methylation levels, which reciprocally impacts expression of phenotypes. Studies show that it is necessary to address these external influences when attempting to differentiate between populations since the relative impacts of these factors on the human methylome remain uncertain. The present review summarises several reported attempts to establish the contribution of differential DNA methylation to natural human variation, and shows that DNA methylation could represent new opportunities for risk stratification and prevention of several diseases amongst populations world-wide. Variation of methylation patterns between human populations is an exciting prospect which inspires further valuable research to apply the concept in routine medical and forensic casework. However, trans-generational inheritance needs to be quantified to decipher the proportion of variation contributed by DNA methylation. The future holds thorough evaluation of the epigenome to understand quantification, heritability, and the effect of DNA methylation on phenotypes. In addition, methylation profiling of the same ethnic groups across geographical locations will shed light on conserved methylation differences in populations.

  4. Inaccurate DNA synthesis in cell extracts of yeast producing active human DNA polymerase iota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena V Makarova

    Full Text Available Mammalian Pol ι has an unusual combination of properties: it is stimulated by Mn(2+ ions, can bypass some DNA lesions and misincorporates "G" opposite template "T" more frequently than incorporates the correct "A." We recently proposed a method of detection of Pol ι activity in animal cell extracts, based on primer extension opposite the template T with a high concentration of only two nucleotides, dGTP and dATP (incorporation of "G" versus "A" method of Gening, abbreviated as "misGvA". We provide unambiguous proof of the "misGvA" approach concept and extend the applicability of the method for the studies of variants of Pol ι in the yeast model system with different cation cofactors. We produced human Pol ι in baker's yeast, which do not have a POLI ortholog. The "misGvA" activity is absent in cell extracts containing an empty vector, or producing catalytically dead Pol ι, or Pol ι lacking exon 2, but is robust in the strain producing wild-type Pol ι or its catalytic core, or protein with the active center L62I mutant. The signature pattern of primer extension products resulting from inaccurate DNA synthesis by extracts of cells producing either Pol ι or human Pol η is different. The DNA sequence of the template is critical for the detection of the infidelity of DNA synthesis attributed to DNA Pol ι. The primer/template and composition of the exogenous DNA precursor pool can be adapted to monitor replication fidelity in cell extracts expressing various error-prone Pols or mutator variants of accurate Pols. Finally, we demonstrate that the mutation rates in yeast strains producing human DNA Pols ι and η are not elevated over the control strain, despite highly inaccurate DNA synthesis by their extracts.

  5. Structural chromosome abnormalities, increased DNA strand breaks and DNA strand break repair deficiency in dermal fibroblasts from old female human donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Seggewiß, Sabine; Walter, Regina; Tigges, Julia; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bürkle, Alexander; Ohse, Sebastian; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Boege, Fritz

    2015-02-01

    Dermal fibroblasts provide a paradigmatic model of cellular adaptation to long-term exogenous stress and ageing processes driven thereby. Here we addressed whether fibroblast ageing analysedex vivo entails genome instability. Dermal fibroblasts from human female donors aged 20-67 years were studied in primary culture at low population doubling. Under these conditions, the incidence of replicative senescence and rates of age-correlated telomere shortening were insignificant. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed age-related impairment of mitosis, telomere and chromosome maintenance and induction of genes associated with DNA repair and non-homologous end-joining, most notably XRCC4 and ligase 4. We observed an age-correlated drop in proliferative capacity and age-correlated increases in heterochromatin marks, structural chromosome abnormalities (deletions, translocations and chromatid breaks), DNA strand breaks and histone H2AX-phosphorylation. In a third of the cells from old and middle-aged donors repair of X-ray induced DNA strand breaks was impaired despite up-regulation of DNA repair genes. The distinct phenotype of genome instability, increased heterochromatinisation and (in 30% of the cases futile) up-regulation of DNA repair genes was stably maintained over several cell passages indicating that it represents a feature of geroconversion that is distinct from cellular senescence, as it does not encompass a block of proliferation.

  6. Sequence-selective DNA recognition and enhanced cellular up-take by peptide-steroid conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz García, Yara; Iyer, Abhishek; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Pabon, Y Vladimir; Louage, Benoit; Honcharenko, Malgorzata; De Geest, Bruno G; Smith, C I Edvard; Strömberg, Roger; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-12-25

    Several GCN4 bZIP TF models have previously been designed and synthesized. However, the synthetic routes towards these constructs are typically tedious and difficult. We here describe the substitution of the Leucine zipper domain of the protein by a deoxycholic acid derivative appending the two GCN4 binding region peptides through an optimized double azide-alkyne cycloaddition click reaction. In addition to achieving sequence specific dsDNA binding, we have investigated the potential of these compounds to enter cells. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry show the beneficial influence of the steroid on cell uptake. This unique synthetic model of the bZIP TF thus combines sequence specific dsDNA binding properties with enhanced cell-uptake. Given the unique properties of deoxycholic acid and the convergent nature of the synthesis, we believe this work represents a key achievement in the field of TF mimicry.

  7. p53 represses human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication via the viral E2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Iain M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA replication can be inhibited by the cellular tumour suppressor protein p53. However, the mechanism through which p53 inhibits viral replication and the role that this might play in the HPV life cycle are not known. The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for efficient HPV DNA replication and also regulates viral gene expression. E2 represses transcription of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and can thereby modulate indirectly host cell proliferation and survival. In addition, the E2 protein from HPV 16 has been shown to bind p53 and to be capable of inducing apoptosis independently of E6 and E7. Results Here we use a panel of E2 mutants to confirm that mutations which block the induction of apoptosis via this E6/E7-independent pathway, have little or no effect on the induction of apoptosis by the E6/E7-dependent pathway. Although these mutations in E2 do not affect the ability of the protein to mediate HPV DNA replication, they do abrogate the repressive effects of p53 on the transcriptional activity of E2 and prevent the inhibition of E2-dependent HPV DNA replication by p53. Conclusion These data suggest that p53 down-regulates HPV 16 DNA replication via the E2 protein.

  8. Retrieval of human DNA from rodent-human genomic libraries by a recombination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, R L; Bruns, G A; Dryja, T P; Kurnit, D M

    1983-09-01

    Human Alu repeat ("BLUR") sequences have been cloned into the mini-plasmid vector piVX. The resulting piBLUR clones have been used to rescue selectively, by recombination, bacteriophage carrying human DNA sequences from genomic libraries constructed using DNA from rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. piBLUR clones are able to retrieve human clones from such libraries because at least one Alu family repeat is present on most 15 to 20 kb fragments of human DNA and because of the relative species-specificity of the sequences comprising the Alu family. The rapid, selective plaque purification achieved results in the construction of a collection of recombinant phage carrying diverse human DNA inserts from a specific subset of the human karyotype. Subfragments of two recombinants rescued from a mouse-human somatic cell hybrid containing human chromosomes X, 10, 13, and 22 were mapped to human chromosomes X and 13, respectively, demonstrating the utility of this protocol for the isolation of human chromosome-specific DNA sequences from appropriate somatic cell hybrids.

  9. Direct visualization of both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in human cells via an uncommon spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguerre, Aurélien; Wong, Judy M. Y.; Monchaud, David

    2016-01-01

    Guanine-rich DNA or RNA sequences can fold into higher-order, four-stranded structures termed quadruplexes that are suspected to play pivotal roles in cellular mechanisms including the control of the genome integrity and gene expression. However, the biological relevance of quadruplexes is still a matter of debate owing to the paucity of unbiased evidences of their existence in cells. Recent reports on quadruplex-specific antibodies and small-molecule fluorescent probes help dispel reservations and accumulating evidences now pointing towards the cellular relevance of quadruplexes. To better assess and comprehend their biology, developing new versatile tools to detect both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in cells is essential. We report here a smart fluorescent probe that allows for the simple detection of quadruplexes thanks to an uncommon spectroscopic mechanism known as the red-edge effect (REE). We demonstrate that this effect could open avenues to greatly enhance the ability to visualize both DNA and RNA quadruplexes in human cells, using simple protocols and fluorescence detection facilities. PMID:27535322

  10. Roadmap to cellular reprogramming--manipulating transcriptional networks with DNA, RNA, proteins and small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörsdörfer, P; Thier, M; Kadari, A; Edenhofer, F

    2013-06-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that the plasticity of mammalian somatic cells is much higher than previously assumed and that ectopic expression of transcription factors may have the potential to induce the conversion of any cell type into another. Fibroblast cells can be converted into embryonic stem cell-like cells, neural cells, cardiomyocytes, macrophage-like cells as well as blood progenitors. Additionally, the conversion of astrocytes into neurons or neural stem cells into monocytes has been demonstrated. Nowadays, in the era of systems biology, continuously growing holistic data sets are providing increasing insights into core transcriptional networks and cellular signaling pathways. This knowledge enables cell biologists to understand how cellular fate is determined and how it could be manipulated. As a consequence for biomedical applications, it might be soon possible to convert patient specific somatic cells directly into desired transplantable other cell types. The clinical value, however, of such reprogrammed cells is currently limited due to the invasiveness of methods applied to induce reprogramming factor activity. This review will focus on experimental strategies to ectopically induce cell fate modulators. We will emphasize those strategies that enable efficient and robust overexpression of transcription factors by minimal genetic alterations of the host genome. Furthermore, we will discuss procedures devoid of any genomic manipulation, such as the direct delivery of mRNA, proteins, or the use of small molecules. By this, we aim to give a comprehensive overview on state of the art techniques that harbor the potential to generate safe reprogrammed cells for clinical applications.

  11. Assessment of Human DNA Repair (NER) Capacity With DNA Repair Rate (DRR) by Comet Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI ZHENG; JI-LIANG HE; LI-FEN JIN; JIAN-LIN LOU; BAO-HONG WANG

    2005-01-01

    Objective Alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate DNA repair (nucleotide excision repair, NER) capacity of human fresh lymphocytes from 12 young healthy non-smokers (6 males and 6 females). Methods Lymphocytes were exposed to UV-C (254 nm) at the dose rate of 1.5 J/m2/sec. Novobiocin (NOV) and aphidicolin (APC), DNA repair inhibitors, were utilized to imitate the deficiency of DNA repair capacity at the incision and ligation steps of NER. Lymphocytes from each donor were divided into three grougs: UVC group, UVC plus NOV group, and UVC plus APC group. DNA single strand breaks were detected in UVC irradiated cells incubated for 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, and 240 min after UVC irradiation. DNA repair rate (DRR) served as an indicator of DNA repair capacity. Results The results indicated that the maximum DNA damage (i.e. maximum tail length) in the UVC group mainly appeared at 90 min. The ranges of DRRs in the UVC group were 62.84%-98.71%. Average DRR value was 81.84%. The DRR difference between males and females was not significant (P<0.05). However, the average DRR value in the UVC plus NOV group and the UVC plus APC group was 52.98% and 39.57% respectively, which were significantly lower than that in the UVC group (P<0.01). Conclusion The comet assay is a rapid, simple and sensitive screening test to assess individual DNA repair (NER) capacity. It is suggested that the time to detect DNA single strand breaks in comet assay should include 0 (before UV irradiation), 90 and 240 min after exposure to 1.5 J·m-2 UVC at least. The DRR, as an indicator, can represent the individual DNA repair capacity in comet assay.

  12. An agent-based model of cellular dynamics and circadian variability in human endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung T Nguyen

    Full Text Available As cellular variability and circadian rhythmicity play critical roles in immune and inflammatory responses, we present in this study an agent-based model of human endotoxemia to examine the interplay between circadian controls, cellular variability and stochastic dynamics of inflammatory cytokines. The model is qualitatively validated by its ability to reproduce circadian dynamics of inflammatory mediators and critical inflammatory responses after endotoxin administration in vivo. Novel computational concepts are proposed to characterize the cellular variability and synchronization of inflammatory cytokines in a population of heterogeneous leukocytes. Our results suggest that there is a decrease in cell-to-cell variability of inflammatory cytokines while their synchronization is increased after endotoxin challenge. Model parameters that are responsible for IκB production stimulated by NFκB activation and for the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines have large impacts on system behaviors. Additionally, examining time-dependent systemic responses revealed that the system is least vulnerable to endotoxin in the early morning and most vulnerable around midnight. Although much remains to be explored, proposed computational concepts and the model we have pioneered will provide important insights for future investigations and extensions, especially for single-cell studies to discover how cellular variability contributes to clinical implications.

  13. The involvement of human RECQL4 in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Karmakar, Parimal; Aamann, Maria Diget

    2010-01-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder associated with mutation in RECQL4 gene, a member of the human RecQ helicases. The disease is characterized by genomic instability, skeletal abnormalities and predisposition to malignant tumors, especially osteosarcomas....... The precise role of RECQL4 in cellular pathways is largely unknown; however, recent evidence suggests its involvement in multiple DNA metabolic pathways. This study investigates the roles of RECQL4 in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The results show that RECQL4-deficient fibroblasts are moderately...... sensitive to gamma-irradiation and accumulate more gammaH2AX and 53BP1 foci than control fibroblasts. This is suggestive of defects in efficient repair of DSB's in the RECQL4-deficient fibroblasts. Real time imaging of live cells using laser confocal microscopy shows that RECQL4 is recruited early to laser...

  14. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zhu, Jingde; Tian, Geng

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome) analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold per...... strand), we report a comprehensive (92.62%) methylome and analysis of the unique sequences in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the same Asian individual whose genome was deciphered in the YH project. PBMC constitute an important source for clinical blood tests world-wide. We found...... that 68.4% of CpG sites and 80% displayed allele-specific expression (ASE). These data demonstrate that ASM is a recurrent phenomenon and is highly correlated with ASE in human PBMCs. Together with recently reported similar studies, our study provides a comprehensive resource for future epigenomic...

  15. The effect of a DNA repair gene on cellular invasiveness: XRCC3 over-expression in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica L Martinez-Marignac

    Full Text Available Over-expression of DNA repair genes has been associated with resistance to radiation and DNA-damage induced by chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. More recently, based on the analysis of genome expression profiling, it was proposed that over-expression of DNA repair genes enhances the invasive behaviour of tumour cells. In this study we present experimental evidence utilizing functional assays to test this hypothesis. We assessed the effect of the DNA repair proteins known as X-ray complementing protein 3 (XRCC3 and RAD51, to the invasive behavior of the MCF-7 luminal epithelial-like and BT20 basal-like triple negative human breast cancer cell lines. We report that stable or transient over-expression of XRCC3 but not RAD51 increased invasiveness in both cell lines in vitro. Moreover, XRCC3 over-expressing MCF-7 cells also showed a higher tumorigenesis in vivo and this phenotype was associated with increased activity of the metalloproteinase MMP-9 and the expression of known modulators of cell-cell adhesion and metastasis such as CD44, ID-1, DDR1 and TFF1. Our results suggest that in addition to its' role in facilitating repair of DNA damage, XRCC3 affects invasiveness of breast cancer cell lines and the expression of genes associated with cell adhesion and invasion.

  16. Genome-Wide Prediction of DNA Methylation Using DNA Composition and Sequence Complexity in Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengchao; Yao, Shixin; Li, Xinghao; Chen, Chujia; Hu, Xuehai

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a significant role in transcriptional regulation by repressing activity. Change of the DNA methylation level is an important factor affecting the expression of target genes and downstream phenotypes. Because current experimental technologies can only assay a small proportion of CpG sites in the human genome, it is urgent to develop reliable computational models for predicting genome-wide DNA methylation. Here, we proposed a novel algorithm that accurately extracted sequence complexity features (seven features) and developed a support-vector-machine-based prediction model with integration of the reported DNA composition features (trinucleotide frequency and GC content, 65 features) by utilizing the methylation profiles of embryonic stem cells in human. The prediction results from 22 human chromosomes with size-varied windows showed that the 600-bp window achieved the best average accuracy of 94.7%. Moreover, comparisons with two existing methods further showed the superiority of our model, and cross-species predictions on mouse data also demonstrated that our model has certain generalization ability. Finally, a statistical test of the experimental data and the predicted data on functional regions annotated by ChromHMM found that six out of 10 regions were consistent, which implies reliable prediction of unassayed CpG sites. Accordingly, we believe that our novel model will be useful and reliable in predicting DNA methylation. PMID:28212312

  17. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  18. Sulforaphane induces DNA single strand breaks in cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sestili, Piero, E-mail: piero.sestili@uniurb.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Paolillo, Marco [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Lenzi, Monia [Dipartimento di Farmacologia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Colombo, Evelin; Vallorani, Luciana; Casadei, Lucia; Martinelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomolecolari, Via Maggetti, 21, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , 61029 Urbino, PU (Italy); Fimognari, Carmela [Dipartimento di Farmacologia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-07-07

    Sulforaphane (SFR), an isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, possesses growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing activities in cancer cell lines. Recently, SFR has been shown to promote the mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human cancer cell lines. The present study was undertaken to see whether SFR-derived ROS might cause DNA damage in cultured human cells, namely T limphoblastoid Jurkat and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). 1-3 h treatments with 10-30 {mu}M SFR elicited intracellular ROS formation (as assayed with dihydrorhodamine, DHR, oxidation) as well as DNA breakage (as assessed with fast halo assay, FHA). These effects lacked cell-type specificity, since could be observed in both Jurkat and HUVEC. Differential-pH FHA analysis of damaged DNA showed that SFR causes frank DNA single strand breaks (SSBs); no DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were found within the considered treatment times (up to 3 h). SFR-derived ROS were formed at the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) level: indeed rotenone or myxothiazol (MRC Complex I and III inhibitors, respectively) abrogated ROS formation. Furthermore ROS were not formed in Jurkat cells pharmacologically depleted of respiring mitochondria (MRC-/Jurkat). Formation of ROS was causally linked to the induction of SSBs: indeed all the experimental conditions capable of preventing ROS formation also prevented the damage of nuclear DNA from SFR-intoxicated cells. As to the toxicological relevance of SSBs, we found that their prevention slightly but significantly attenuated SFR cytotoxicity, suggesting that high-dose SFR toxicity is the result of a complex series of events among which GSH depletion seems to play a pivotal role. In conclusion, the present study identifies a novel mechanism contributing to SFR toxicity which - since DNA damage is a prominent mechanism underlying the cytotoxic activity of established antineoplastic agents - might help to exploit the therapeutic value

  19. Destabilization of the human epigenome: consequences of foreign DNA insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stefanie; Hofmann, Andrea; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Doerfler, Walter

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported changes of DNA methylation and transcription patterns in mammalian cells that carry integrated foreign DNA. Experiments were now designed to assess the epigenetic consequences of inserting a 5.6 kbp plasmid into the human genome. Differential transcription and CpG methylation patterns were compared between transgenomic and nontransgenomic cell clones by using gene chip microarray systems. In 4.7% of the 28.869 gene segments analyzed, transcriptional activities were up- or downregulated in the transgenomic cell clones. Genome-wide profiling revealed differential methylation in 3791 of > 480,000 CpG's examined in transgenomic versus nontransgenomic clones. The data document genome-wide effects of foreign DNA insertions on the epigenetic stability of human cells. Many fields in experimental biology and medicine employ transgenomic or otherwise genome-manipulated cells or organisms without considering the epigenetic consequences for the recipient genomes.

  20. (Some) cellular mechanisms influencing the transcription of human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-Fc1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laska, Magdalena Janina; Nissen, Kari Konstantin; Nexø, Bjørn Andersen

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation are epigenetic modifications that act as regulators of gene expression. DNA methylation is considered an important mechanism for silencing of retroelements in the mammalian genome. However, the methylation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) is not well...... investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional potential of HERV-Fc1 proviral 5'LTR in more detail, and examined the specific influence of CpG methylation on this LTR in number of cell lines. Specifically, the role of demethylating chemicals e.g. 5-aza-2' deoxycytidine...... and Trichostatin-A, in inducing or reactivating expression of HERV-Fc1 specific sequences and the mechanisms were investigated. In our present study, 5-aza-dC is shown to be a powerful inducer of HERV-Fc1, and at the same time it strongly inhibits methylation of DNA. Treatment with this demethylating agent 5-aza...

  1. False-positive Human Papillomavirus DNA tests in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Pribac, Igor; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2011-01-01

    Based on data from randomised controlled trials (RCT) on primary cervical screening, it has been reported that the problem of more frequent false-positive tests in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA screening compared to cytology could be overcome. However, these reports predominantly operated...

  2. Ancient DNA in human bone remains from Pompeii archaeological site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollaro, M; Di Bernardo, G; Galano, G; Galderisi, U; Guarino, F; Angelini, F; Cascino, A

    1998-06-29

    aDNA extraction and amplification procedures have been optimized for Pompeian human bone remains whose diagenesis has been determined by histological analysis. Single copy genes amplification (X and Y amelogenin loci and Y specific alphoid repeat sequences) have been performed and compared with anthropometric data on sexing.

  3. Cellular morphological parameters of the human urinary bladder (malignant and normal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Ahmad; Keshtkar, Asghar; Lawford, Pat

    2007-06-01

    The normal and malignant cellular morphological parameters (intra- and extracellular spaces of the human urinary bladder) were obtained from analysis of digital images of bladder histology sections. Then these cellular morphological parameters were compared with the same parameters obtained from the literature for the bladder tissue. However, the limited quantitative data about these parameters available in the literature for bladder cell sizes and other geometrical parameters such as extra-cellular space does not provide a scientific basis to construct accurate structural models of normal and malignant bladder tissue. Therefore, there is usually no quantitative discussion of cell sizes in literature but the measured data in this work can provide a reasonable estimation of expected morphological parameter changes of bladder tissue with pathology. To produce this quantitative information, and also, to build a suitable models in another study using electrical properties of the tissue, 10 digital images of histological sections of normal, and six sections from malignant areas of the human urinary bladder, were chosen randomly (ex vivo). Finally, the measured data showed that there is a significant difference between the cell dimensions (in basal and intermediate layers) of normal and malignant bladder tissues.

  4. Human cytomegalovirus antigens in malignant gliomas as targets for adoptive cellular therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eLandi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor in adults, with over 12,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year. Over the last decade, investigators have reliably identified human cytomegalovirus (HCMV proteins, nucleic acids, and virions in most high-grade gliomas, including glioblastoma (GBM. This discovery is significant because human cytomegalovirus gene products can be targeted by immune-based therapies.In this review, we describe the current level of understanding regarding the presence and role in pathogenesis of HCMV in GBM. We describe our success detecting and expanding HCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill GBM cells and explain how these cells can be used as a platform for enhanced cellular therapies. We discuss alternative approaches that capitalize on HCMV infection to treat patients with HCMV-positive tumors. Adoptive cellular therapy for HCMV-positive GBM has been tried in a small number of patients with some benefit, but we reason why, to date, these approaches generally fail to generate long-term remission or cure. We conjecture how cellular therapy for GBM can be improved and describe the barriers that must be overcome to cure these patients.

  5. Effect of hydrophobic scaffold on the cellular uptake and gene transfection activities of DNA-encapsulating liposomal nanoparticles via intracerebroventricular administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Hidetaka; Nakatani, Taichi; Kuroki, Kimiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; Tange, Kota; Nakai, Yuta; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-07-25

    Efficient DNA carriers are needed as a gene medication for curing brain disorders. In the present study, the function of a neutral lipid envelope-type nanoparticle (LNP) encapsulating pDNA was evaluated after intracerebroventricular administration. The lipid envelope was composed of a series of SS-cleavable and pH-activated lipid like materials (ssPalm) including myristic acid, vitamin A and vitamin E in the hydrophobic scaffold (LNPssPalmM, LNPssPalmA, LNPssPalmE, respectively). The LNPssPalmA and LNPssPalmE were extensively distributed in the corpus callosum, and then gene expression occurred mainly astrocytes in this region, while not in LNPssPalmM. The recombinant human ApoE3-dependent enhancement of the uptake into an astrocyte-derived cell line (KT-5) was observed in LNPssPalmA and LNPssPalmE. Thus, ApoE in the brain plays a key role in the cellular uptake of these particles by astrocytes, and this uptake is dependent on the structure of the hydrophobic scaffold.

  6. DNA damage and cellular death in oral mucosa cells of children who have undergone panoramic dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelieri, Fernanda; Oliveira, Gabriela R. de [Sao Paulo Metodista University (UMESP), Department of Orthodontics, Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sannomiya, Eduardo K. [Sao Paulo Metodista University (UMESP), Department of Dento-Maxillofacial Radiology, Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ribeiro, Daniel A. [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Department of Health Sciences, Santos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Departamento de Ciencias da Saude, Santos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    Despite wide use as a diagnostic tool in medical and dental practice, radiography can induce cytotoxic effects and genetic damage. To evaluate DNA damage (micronucleus) and cellular death (pyknosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis) in exfoliated buccal mucosa cells taken from healthy children following exposure to radiation during dental radiography. A total of 17 children who had undergone panoramic dental radiography were included. We found no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) between micronucleated oral mucosa cells in children before and after exposure to radiation. On the other hand, radiation did cause other nuclear alterations closely related to cytotoxicity including karyorrhexis, pyknosis and karyolysis. Taken together, these results indicate that panoramic dental radiography might not induce chromosomal damage, but may be cytotoxic. Overall, the results reinforce the importance of evaluating the health side effects of radiography and contribute to the micronucleus database, which will improve our understanding and practice of this methodology in children. (orig.)

  7. Low Dose Iron Treatments Induce a DNA Damage Response in Human Endothelial Cells within Minutes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês G Mollet

    Full Text Available Spontaneous reports from patients able to report vascular sequelae in real time, and recognition that serum non transferrin bound iron may reach or exceed 10μmol/L in the blood stream after iron tablets or infusions, led us to hypothesize that conventional iron treatments may provoke acute vascular injury. This prompted us to examine whether a phenotype could be observed in normal human endothelial cells treated with low dose iron.Confluent primary human endothelial cells (EC were treated with filter-sterilized iron (II citrate or fresh media for RNA sequencing and validation studies. RNA transcript profiles were evaluated using directional RNA sequencing with no pre-specification of target sequences. Alignments were counted for exons and junctions of the gene strand only, blinded to treatment types.Rapid changes in RNA transcript profiles were observed in endothelial cells treated with 10μmol/L iron (II citrate, compared to media-treated cells. Clustering for Gene Ontology (GO performed on all differentially expressed genes revealed significant differences in biological process terms between iron and media-treated EC, whereas 10 sets of an equivalent number of randomly selected genes from the respective EC gene datasets showed no significant differences in any GO terms. After 1 hour, differentially expressed genes clustered to vesicle mediated transport, protein catabolism, and cell cycle (Benjamini p = 0.0016, 0.0024 and 0.0032 respectively, and by 6 hours, to cellular response to DNA damage stimulus most significantly through DNA repair genes FANCG, BLM, and H2AFX. Comet assays demonstrated that 10μM iron treatment elicited DNA damage within 1 hour. This was accompanied by a brisk DNA damage response pulse, as ascertained by the development of DNA damage response (DDR foci, and p53 stabilization.These data suggest that low dose iron treatments are sufficient to modify the vascular endothelium, and induce a DNA damage response.

  8. Cellular characterization of human dermal fibroblasts, focus on mitochondria and maple syrup urine disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Guerra, Paula

    and functions are expressed in HDFs’ culture environment. Studies of molecular disease mechanisms often point to the involvement of mitochondria. Mitochondria are involved in the regulation of cell cycle and programmed cell death as well as cellular stress responses because they are the main producers......Cell phenotyping of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) from patients with inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) provide invaluable information for diagnosis, disease aetiology, predicting prognosis, and monitoring of treatments. HDFs possess the genetic composition of patients and many pathways...... of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Advances in technology help the study of complex situations with large amount of data, like cellular phenotyping in cell culture. Image cytometry is an emerging technique that combines morphological information and fluorescent intensity data from single cells. We defined...

  9. A cellular microRNA mediates antiviral defense in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Dunoyer, Patrice; Arar, Khalil; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Eyquem, Stephanie; Himber, Christophe; Saïb, Ali; Voinnet, Olivier

    2005-04-22

    In eukaryotes, 21- to 24-nucleotide-long RNAs engage in sequence-specific interactions that inhibit gene expression by RNA silencing. This process has regulatory roles involving microRNAs and, in plants and insects, it also forms the basis of a defense mechanism directed by small interfering RNAs that derive from replicative or integrated viral genomes. We show that a cellular microRNA effectively restricts the accumulation of the retrovirus primate foamy virus type 1 (PFV-1) in human cells. PFV-1 also encodes a protein, Tas, that suppresses microRNA-directed functions in mammalian cells and displays cross-kingdom antisilencing activities. Therefore, through fortuitous recognition of foreign nucleic acids, cellular microRNAs have direct antiviral effects in addition to their regulatory functions.

  10. Translesion synthesis past acrolein-derived DNA adducts by human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiviswanathan, Rajesh; Minko, Irina G; Lloyd, R Stephen; Copeland, William C

    2013-05-17

    Acrolein, a mutagenic aldehyde, is produced endogenously by lipid peroxidation and exogenously by combustion of organic materials, including tobacco products. Acrolein reacts with DNA bases forming exocyclic DNA adducts, such as γ-hydroxy-1,N(2)-propano-2'-deoxyguanosine (γ-HOPdG) and γ-hydroxy-1,N(6)-propano-2'-deoxyadenosine (γ-HOPdA). The bulky γ-HOPdG adduct blocks DNA synthesis by replicative polymerases but can be bypassed by translesion synthesis polymerases in the nucleus. Although acrolein-induced adducts are likely to be formed and persist in mitochondrial DNA, animal cell mitochondria lack specialized translesion DNA synthesis polymerases to tolerate these lesions. Thus, it is important to understand how pol γ, the sole mitochondrial DNA polymerase in human cells, acts on acrolein-adducted DNA. To address this question, we investigated the ability of pol γ to bypass the minor groove γ-HOPdG and major groove γ-HOPdA adducts using single nucleotide incorporation and primer extension analyses. The efficiency of pol γ-catalyzed bypass of γ-HOPdG was low, and surprisingly, pol γ preferred to incorporate purine nucleotides opposite the adduct. Pol γ also exhibited ∼2-fold lower rates of excision of the misincorporated purine nucleotides opposite γ-HOPdG compared with the corresponding nucleotides opposite dG. Extension of primers from the termini opposite γ-HOPdG was accomplished only following error-prone purine nucleotide incorporation. However, pol γ preferentially incorporated dT opposite the γ-HOPdA adduct and efficiently extended primers from the correctly paired terminus, indicating that γ-HOPdA is probably nonmutagenic. In summary, our data suggest that acrolein-induced exocyclic DNA lesions can be bypassed by mitochondrial DNA polymerase but, in the case of the minor groove γ-HOPdG adduct, at the cost of unprecedented high mutation rates.

  11. Dynamics of the human nuclear proteome in response to DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirksen, Eef Hubert Cecil

    2006-01-01

    The genome is constantly challenged by factors that can induce DNA damage and thereby threaten the viability of the cell. If DNA damage remains unrepaired it can lead to the development of cancer. Although much is known about the role of proteins and protein complexes in the cellular response to DNA

  12. Longevity and composition of cellular immune responses following experimental Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne C Teirlinck

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to Plasmodium falciparum parasites, in particular interferon-gamma (IFNγ production, play an important role in anti-malarial immunity. However, clinical immunity to malaria develops slowly amongst naturally exposed populations, the dynamics of cellular responses in relation to exposure are difficult to study and data about the persistence of such responses are controversial. Here we assess the longevity and composition of cellular immune responses following experimental malaria infection in human volunteers. We conducted a longitudinal study of cellular immunological responses to sporozoites (PfSpz and asexual blood-stage (PfRBC malaria parasites in naïve human volunteers undergoing single (n = 5 or multiple (n = 10 experimental P. falciparum infections under highly controlled conditions. IFNγ and interleukin-2 (IL-2 responses following in vitro re-stimulation were measured by flow-cytometry prior to, during and more than one year post infection. We show that cellular responses to both PfSpz and PfRBC are induced and remain almost undiminished up to 14 months after even a single malaria episode. Remarkably, not only 'adaptive' but also 'innate' lymphocyte subsets contribute to the increased IFNγ response, including αβT cells, γδT cells and NK cells. Furthermore, results from depletion and autologous recombination experiments of lymphocyte subsets suggest that immunological memory for PfRBC is carried within both the αβT cells and γδT compartments. Indeed, the majority of cytokine producing T lymphocytes express an CD45RO(+ CD62L(- effector memory (EM phenotype both early and late post infection. Finally, we demonstrate that malaria infection induces and maintains polyfunctional (IFNγ(+IL-2(+ EM responses against both PfRBC and PfSpz, previously found to be associated with protection. These data demonstrate that cellular responses can be readily induced and are long-lived following infection with P

  13. Cellular immune responses of BALB/c mice induced by intramuscular injection of PRRSV-ORF5 DNA vaccine with different doses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Anchun; WANG Mingshu; CHEN Xiwen; XINI Nigen; DOU Wenbo; LI Xuemei; LIU Wumei; WANG Gang; ZHANG Pingying

    2007-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with 50 μg,100 μg,200 μg of pcDNA-PRRSV-ORF5 DNA vaccine respectively by intramuscular injection,with PBS and pcDNA3.1(+)as controls.Fluorescence activated cell Sorter (FACS)was used to detect the number of CD4+ and CD8+T-lymphocytes.T-lymphocyte proliferation test was used to detect proliferation of the T-lymphocyte cells in peripheral blood lymphocytes of mice vaccinated with pcDNA-PRRSV-ORF5 DNA vaccine.The results showed that the difference in ConA response to T-lymphocytes in blood was highly significant between all experimental groups and the control group(P<0.01).The number of CD4+T-lymphocytes in experimental groups was significantly higher than that of the control group 7d after vaccination.The number of CD8+ T-lymphocytes in the experimental groups was higher than that of the control group 28 d after vaccination.Mice immunized with a higher dose(200 μg)of DNA vaccine demonstrated higher cellular immune response than those immunized with a lower dose(100 μg,50 μg)of DNA vaccine.The results demonstrated that pcDNA-PRRSV-ORF5 DNA vaccine could induce a good cellular immune response which may be dose-dependent.

  14. Arecoline, a major alkaloid of areca nut, inhibits p53, represses DNA repair, and triggers DNA damage response in human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Shan; Lee, Ka-Wo; Huang, Jau-Ling; Liu, Yu-Sen; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Kuo, Wen-Rei; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Lin, Chang-Shen; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2008-07-30

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer declared that areca nut was carcinogenic to human. Areca nut is the main component of betel quid (BQ), which is commonly consumed in Asia. Epidemiological studies have shown that BQ chewing is a predominant risk factor for oral and pharyngeal cancers. It has been known that areca nut is genotoxic to human epithelial cells. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying areca nut-associated genotoxicity are not fully understood. Here we showed that arecoline, a major alkaloid of areca nut, might contribute to oral carcinogenesis through inhibiting p53 and DNA repair. We found, on the biological aspect, that arecoline could induce gamma-H2AX phosphorylation, a sensitive DNA damage marker, in KB, HEp-2, and 293 cells, suggesting that DNA damages were elicited by arecoline. This phenomenon was supported by the observations of arecoline-induced hyperphosphorylation of ATM, Nbs1, Chk1/2, p53, and Cdc25C, as well as G2/M cell cycle arrest, indicating that a cellular DNA damage response was activated. To explore the possible mechanism accounting for arecoline-elicited DNA damages, we found that arecoline could inhibit p53 by its expression and transactivation function. As a result, the expression of p53-regulated p21(WAF1) and the p53-activated DNA repair were repressed by arecoline. Finally, we showed that p53 mRNA transcripts were frequently down-regulated in BQ-associated oral cancer, suggesting that arecoline-mediated p53 inhibition might play a role in BQ-associated tumorigenesis.

  15. 1,2,3,4-Diepoxybutane-induced DNA-protein cross-linking in human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherezghiher, Teshome B; Ming, Xun; Villalta, Peter W; Campbell, Colin; Tretyakova, Natalia Y

    2013-05-03

    1,2,3,4-Diepoxybutane (DEB) is the key carcinogenic metabolite of 1,3-butadiene (BD), an important industrial and environmental chemical present in urban air and in cigarette smoke. DEB is a genotoxic bis-electrophile capable of cross-linking cellular biomolecules to form DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). In the present work, mass spectrometry-based proteomics was employed to characterize DEB-mediated DNA-protein cross-linking in human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells. Over 150 proteins including histones, high mobility group proteins, transcription factors, splicing factors, and tubulins were found among those covalently cross-linked to chromosomal DNA in the presence of DEB. A large portion of the cross-linked proteins are known factors involved in DNA binding, transcriptional regulation, cell signaling, DNA repair, and DNA damage response. HPLC-ESI(+)-MS/MS analysis of total proteolytic digests revealed the presence of 1-(S-cysteinyl)-4-(guan-7-yl)-2,3-butanediol conjugates, confirming that DEB forms DPCs between cysteine thiols within proteins and the N-7 guanine positions within DNA. However, relatively high concentrations of DEB were required to achieve significant DPC formation, indicating that it is a poor cross-linking agent as compared to antitumor nitrogen mustards and platinum compounds.

  16. Traumatic stress and human DNA methylation: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkers, Christiaan H; Kalafateli, Aimilia Lydia; Rutten, Bart P F; Kas, Martien J; Kaminsky, Zachary; Turner, Jonathan D; Boks, Marco P M

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies have identified persistent and functional effects of traumatic stress on the epigenome. This review discusses the clinical evidence for trauma-induced changes in DNA methylation across the life span in humans. Studies are reviewed based on reports of trauma exposure during the prenatal period (13 studies), early life (20 studies), and adulthood (ten studies). Even though it is apparent that traumatic stress influences the human epigenome, there are significant drawbacks in the existing human literature. These include a lack of longitudinal studies, methodological heterogeneity, selection of tissue type, and the influence of developmental stage and trauma type on methylation outcomes. These issues are discussed in order to present a way in which future studies can gain more insight into the functional relevance of trauma-related DNA methylation changes. Epigenetic studies investigating the detrimental effects of traumatic stress have great potential for an improved detection and treatment of trauma-related psychiatric disorders.

  17. Cellular Tug-of-War: Forces at Work and DNA Stretching in Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brian; Kilfoil, Maria L.

    2013-03-01

    In the microscopic world of the cell dominated by thermal noise, a cell must be able to successfully segregate its DNA with high fidelity in order to pass its genetic information on to its progeny. In this process of mitosis in eukaryotes, driving forces act on the cytoskeleton-based architecture called the mitotic spindle to promote this division. Our preliminary data demonstrates that the dynamics of this process in yeast cells is universal. Moreover, the dynamics suggest an increasing load as the chromosomes are pulled apart. To investigate this, we use three-dimensional imaging to track the dynamics of the poles of this architecture and the points of attachment to chromosomes simultaneously and with high spatial resolution. We analyze the relative motions of chromosomes as they are organized before segregation and as they are pulled apart, using this data to investigate the force-response behavior of this cytoskeleton-chromosome polymer system.

  18. DNA integrity of human leukocytes after magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szerencsi, Ágnes; Kubinyi, Györgyi; Váliczkó, Éva; Juhász, Péter; Rudas, Gábor; Mester, Ádám; Jánossy, Gábor; Bakos, József; Thuróczy, György

    2013-10-01

    This study focuses on the effects of high-field (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans on the DNA integrity of human leukocytes in vitro in order to validate the study where genotoxic effects were obtained and published by Lee et al. The scanning protocol and exposure situation were the same as those used under routine clinical brain MRI scan. Peripheral blood samples from healthy non-smoking male donors were exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) produced by 3T magnetic resonance imaging equipment for 0, 22, 45, 67, and 89 min during the scanning procedure. Samples of positive control were exposed to ionizing radiation (4 Gy of (60)Co-γ). Single breaks of DNA in leukocytes were detected by single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). Chromosome breakage, chromosome loss and micronuclei formations were detected by a micronucleus test (MN). Three independent experiments were performed. The data of comet tail DNA%, olive tail moment and micronucleus frequency showed no DNA damages due to MRI exposure. The results of the Comet assay and the micronucleus test indicate that the applied exposure of MRI does not appear to produce breaks in the DNA and has no significant effect on DNA integrity.

  19. DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

  20. Assessment of okadaic acid effects on cytotoxicity, DNA damage and DNA repair in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Méndez, Josefina; Pásaro, Eduardo; Cemeli, Eduardo; Anderson, Diana; Laffon, Blanca

    2010-07-07

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a phycotoxin produced by several types of dinoflagellates causing diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) in humans. Symptoms induced by DSP toxins are mainly gastrointestinal, but the intoxication does not appear to be fatal. Despite this, this toxin presents a potential threat to human health even at concentrations too low to induce acute toxicity, since previous animal studies have shown that OA has very potent tumour promoting activity. However, its concrete action mechanism has not been described yet and the results reported with regard to OA cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are often contradictory. In the present study, the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of OA on three different types of human cells (peripheral blood leukocytes, HepG2 hepatoma cells, and SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells) were evaluated. Cells were treated with a range of OA concentrations in the presence and absence of S9 fraction, and MTT test and Comet assay were performed in order to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively. The possible effects of OA on DNA repair were also studied by means of the DNA repair competence assay, using bleomycin as DNA damage inductor. Treatment with OA in absence of S9 fraction induced not statistically significant decrease in cell viability and significant increase in DNA damage in all cell types at the highest concentrations investigated. However, only SHSY5Y cells showed OA induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in presence of S9 fraction. Furthermore, we found that OA can induce modulations in DNA repair processes when exposure was performed prior to BLM treatment, in co-exposure, or during the subsequent DNA repair process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. THE HUMORAL AND CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES INDUCED BY HPV18L1-E6/E7 DNA VACCINES IN MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jin; Li Xu; Li Ang; Wang Yili; Si Lüsheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective To construct eukaryotic expression vector of HPV18 L1- E6, E7 chimeric gene and examine the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by this DNA vaccines in mice. Methods The C-terminal of major capsid protein L1 gene and mutant zinc finger domains of early E6/7 oncogenes in HPV18 were integrated and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to generate vaccines pVAX1-L1E6Mxx, E7Mxx. CHO cells were transiently transfected with the individual construct. Target protein expressions in the lysate of the transfected cells were measured by ELISA and immunocytochemistry. After BALB/c mice were vaccinated with various recombinant plasmids(pVAX1-L1-E6M3 or pVAX1-L1-E7M3) and immunie adjuvants (pLXHDmB7-2 or LTB) through different administration routes (intramuscular or intranasal) , the great cellular immune responses were produced as revealed by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and lymphocyte proliferation, and the expression of IL-4 and IFN- γ cells in CD4+ and CD8+subpopulations. Results The highly efficient expression of pVAX1-L1E6Mxx, E7Mxx vector in host eukaryotic cells were demonstrated both by ELISA and immunocytochemistry. The level of specific serum IgG against HPV in experiment groups mice was much higher than that of control group, and intranuscular immunization group had the highest antibody level. Intramuscular immunization groups were superior to intranasal immunization groups in DTH response, splenocyte proliferation and CD8+ IFN-γ + cells number, but CD4+ IL4+ cell number was higher in intranasal immunization groups. The immunization groups using pLXHDmB7-2 as adjuvant were superior to other groups in immunoresponse. Conclusion These DNA vaccines produce remarkable cellular and humoral immuneresponses in the mouse and may provide as prophylatic and therapeutic candidates for HPV induced cancer treatment.

  2. Cellular expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor in the human antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V C; Sagot, M A; Wong, H; Buchan, A M

    2000-03-15

    The localization of the neurokinin 1 receptor in rat and guinea pig gastrointestinal tract has been extensively studied but not in human tissues. The present study used antibodies to characterize the cellular expression of neurokinin 1 receptors in human antrum. Cryostat sections (40-80 microm) were immunostained for the neurokinin 1 receptor double labeled with substance P, von Willebrand's factor, c-kit, fibronectin, S-100, serotonin, gastrin and somatostatin. Neurokinin 1 receptor-immunoreactivity was observed on neurons within the myenteric and submucosal plexuses surrounded by substance P-immunoreactive fibers and on von Willebrand's factor-immunoreactive endothelial cells lining blood vessels throughout the antral wall. c-Kit-immunoreactive interstitial cells of Cajal and gastrin cells were co-stained by the monoclonal neurokinin 1 receptor antibody. Finally, there was no evidence for the presence of the neurokinin 1 receptor on fibroblasts, Schwann, somatostatin, serotonin or smooth muscle cells. This study clearly demonstrates an expanded cellular expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor in the human antrum.

  3. Human parvovirus B19 DNA is not detected in Guthrie cards from children who have developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Priftakis, Peter; Broliden, Kristina

    2004-01-01

    related to human diseases, including erythema infectiosum and aplastic crisis, but it has not yet been considered to be involved in the development of ALL. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate, whether prenatal B19 infection could still be indirectly correlated with the development...... of childhood ALL. PROCEDURES: Fifty-four Guthrie cards, collected at 3-5 days of age, from Swedish children who subsequently developed ALL, as well as from 50 healthy controls, were investigated by nested PCR for the presence of B19 DNA. RESULTS: B19 DNA was not detected in any of the Guthrie cards from ALL...... patients or from healthy controls, although all tested samples had amplifiable cellular DNA as confirmed by an HLA DQ specific PCR. CONCLUSION: B19 DNA was not found in any of the Guthrie cards from children who later developed ALL or in the healthy controls. These findings suggest that it is less likely...

  4. Modulation of DNA Damage and Repair Pathways by Human Tumour Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hollingworth

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available With between 10% and 15% of human cancers attributable to viral infection, there is great interest, from both a scientific and clinical viewpoint, as to how these pathogens modulate host cell functions. Seven human tumour viruses have been identified as being involved in the development of specific malignancies. It has long been known that the introduction of chromosomal aberrations is a common feature of viral infections. Intensive research over the past two decades has subsequently revealed that viruses specifically interact with cellular mechanisms responsible for the recognition and repair of DNA lesions, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR. These interactions can involve activation and deactivation of individual DDR pathways as well as the recruitment of specific proteins to sites of viral replication. Since the DDR has evolved to protect the genome from the accumulation of deleterious mutations, deregulation is inevitably associated with an increased risk of tumour formation. This review summarises the current literature regarding the complex relationship between known human tumour viruses and the DDR and aims to shed light on how these interactions can contribute to genomic instability and ultimately the development of human cancers.

  5. Detecting multiple DNA human profile from a mosquito blood meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabêlo, K C N; Albuquerque, C M R; Tavares, V B; Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Moura, R R; Brandão, L A C; Crovella, S

    2016-08-26

    Criminal traces commonly found at crime scenes may present mixtures from two or more individuals. The scene of the crime is important for the collection of various types of traces in order to find the perpetrator of the crime. Thus, we propose that hematophagous mosquitoes found at crime scenes can be used to perform genetic testing of human blood and aid in suspect investigation. The aim of the study was to obtain a single Aedes aegypti mosquito profile from a human DNA mixture containing genetic materials of four individuals. We also determined the effect of blood acquisition time by setting time intervals of 24, 48, and 72 h after the blood meal. STR loci and amelogenin were analyzed, and the results showed that human DNA profiles could be obtained from hematophagous mosquitos at 24 h following the blood meal. It is possible that hematophagous mosquitoes can be used as biological remains at the scene of the crime, and can be used to detect human DNA profiles of up to four individuals.

  6. Role of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans in infection of human adenovirus serotype 3 and 35.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Tuve

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Species B human adenoviruses (Ads are increasingly associated with outbreaks of acute respiratory disease in U.S. military personnel and civil population. The initial interaction of Ads with cellular attachment receptors on host cells is via Ad fiber knob protein. Our previous studies showed that one species B Ad receptor is the complement receptor CD46 that is used by serotypes 11, 16, 21, 35, and 50 but not by serotypes 3, 7, and 14. In this study, we attempted to identify yet-unknown species B cellular receptors. For this purpose we used recombinant Ad3 and Ad35 fiber knobs in high-throughput receptor screening methods including mass spectrometry analysis and glycan arrays. Surprisingly, we found that the main interacting surface molecules of Ad3 fiber knob are cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. We subsequently found that HSPGs acted as low-affinity co-receptors for Ad3 but did not represent the main receptor of this serotype. Our study also revealed a new CD46-independent infection pathway of Ad35. This Ad35 infection mechanism is mediated by cellular HSPGs. The interaction of Ad35 with HSPGs is not via fiber knob, whereas Ad3 interacts with HSPGs via fiber knob. Both Ad3 and Ad35 interacted specifically with the sulfated regions within HSPGs that have also been implicated in binding physiologic ligands. In conclusion, our findings show that Ad3 and Ad35 directly utilize HSPGs as co-receptors for infection. Our data suggest that adenoviruses evolved to simulate the presence of physiologic HSPG ligands in order to increase infection.

  7. DNA-duplex linker for AFM-SELEX of DNA aptamer against human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Musashi; Okumura, Yuzo; Amino, Tomokazu; Miyachi, Yusuke; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-02-15

    DNA-duplex interactions in thymines and adenins are used as a linker for the novel methodology of Atomic Force Microscope-Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXpotential enrichment (AFM-SELEX). This study used the hydrogen bonds in 10 mer of both thymines (T10) and adenines (A10). Initially, the interactive force in T10-A10 was measured by AFM, which returned an average interactive force of approximately 350pN. Based on this result, DNA aptamers against human serum albumin could be selected in the 4th round, and 15 different clones could be sequenced. The lowest dissociation constant of the selected aptamer was identified via surface plasmon resonance, and it proved to be identical to that of the commercial aptamer. Therefore, specific hydrogen bonds in DNA can be useful linkers for AFM-SELEX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hafis Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bum-Chan [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su-Hyung [Laboratory of Translational Immunology and Vaccinology, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eui-Cheol, E-mail: ecshin@kaist.ac.kr [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  9. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  10. Hydroxyl-radical-induced oxidation of 5-methylcytosine in isolated and cellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madugundu, Guru S; Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard

    2014-06-01

    The methylation and oxidative demethylation of cytosine in CpG dinucleotides plays a critical role in the regulation of genes during cell differentiation, embryogenesis and carcinogenesis. Despite its low abundance, 5-methylcytosine (5mC) is a hotspot for mutations in mammalian cells. Here, we measured five oxidation products of 5mC together with the analogous products of cytosine and thymine in DNA exposed to ionizing radiation in oxygenated aqueous solution. The products can be divided into those that arise from hydroxyl radical (•OH) addition at the 5,6-double bond of 5mC (glycol, hydantoin and imidazolidine products) and those that arise from H-atom abstraction from the methyl group of 5mC including 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and 5-formylcytosine (5fC). Based on the analysis of these products, we show that the total damage at 5mC is about 2-fold greater than that at C in identical sequences. The formation of hydantoin products of 5mC is favored, compared to analogous reactions of thymine and cytosine, which favor the formation of glycol products. The distribution of oxidation products is sequence dependent in specific ODN duplexes. In the case of 5mC, the formation of 5hmC and 5fC represents about half of the total of •OH-induced oxidation products of 5mC. Several products of thymine, cytosine, 5mC, as well as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8oxoG), were also estimated in irradiated cells.

  11. Differential role of nonhomologous end joining factors in the generation, DNA damage response, and myeloid differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Felgentreff (Kerstin); L. Du (Likun); K.G. Weinacht (Katja); K. Dobbs (Kerry); M. Bartish (Margarita); S. Giliani; T. Schlaeger (Thorsten); A. DeVine (Alexander); A. Schambach (Axel); L. Woodbine (Lisa); E.G. Davies (Graham); S.N. Baxi (Sachin); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); J. Bleesing (Jack); A.R. Gennery (Andrew); J. Manis (John); Q. Pan-Hammarström (Qiang); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractNonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a key pathway for efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and V(D)J recombination. NHEJ defects in humans cause immunodeficiency and increased cellular sensitivity to ionizing irradiation (IR) and are variably associated with growth

  12. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  13. DNA strand breaks in human nasal respiratory epithelium are induced upon exposure to urban pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon-Garciduenas, L.; Osnaya-Brizuela, N.; Ramirez-Martinez, L. [Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, Mexico City (Mexico)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    All organisms have the ability to respond and adapt to a myriad of environmental insults. The human respiratory epithelium, when exposed to oxidant gases in photochemical smog, is at risk of DNA damage and requires efficient cellular adaptative responses to resist the environmentally induced cell damage. Ozone and its reaction products induce in vitro and in vivo DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in respiratory epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. To determine if exposure to a polluted atmosphere with ozone as the main criteria pollutant of 19 children and 13 adult males who lived in a low-polluted Pacific port, 69 males and 16 children who were permanent residents of Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), and 22 young males newly arrived to SWMMC and followed for 12 weeks. Respiratory symptoms, nasal cytology and histopathology, cell viabilities, and single-cell gel electrophoresis were investigated. Atmospheric pollutant data were obtained from a fixed-site monitoring station. SWMMC volunteers spent >7 hr/day outdoors and all had upper respiratory symptoms. A significant difference in the numbers of DNA-damaged nasal cells was observed between control and chronically exposed subjects, both in children (p<0.00001) and in adults (p>0.01). SSBs in newly arrived subjects quickly increased upon arrival to the city, from 39.8 {+-}8.34% in the first week to 67.29 {+-}2.35 by week 2. Thereafter, the number of cells with SSBs remained stable in spite of the continuous increase in cumulative ozone, suggesting a threshold for cumulative DNA nasal damage. Exposure to a polluted urban atmosphere induces SSBs in human nasal respiratory epithelium, and nasal SSBs could serve as a biomarker of ozone exposure. Further, because DNA strand breaks are a threat to cell viability and genome integrity and appear to be a critical lesion responsible for p53 induction, nasal SSBs should be evaluated in ozone-exposed individuals. 43 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. A promoter DNA demethylation landscape of human hematopoietic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Fernández, Agustín F; Urdinguio, Rocío G; Suárez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Mangas, Cristina; Pérez-García, Vicente; Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Ferrero, Cecilia; Assenov, Yassen; Bock, Christoph; Menendez, Pablo; Carrera, Ana Clara; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Fraga, Mario F

    2012-01-01

    Global mechanisms defining the gene expression programs specific for hematopoiesis are still not fully understood. Here, we show that promoter DNA demethylation is associated with the activation of hematopoietic-specific genes. Using genome-wide promoter methylation arrays, we identified 694 hematopoietic-specific genes repressed by promoter DNA methylation in human embryonic stem cells and whose loss of methylation in hematopoietic can be associated with gene expression. The association between promoter methylation and gene expression was studied for many hematopoietic-specific genes including CD45, CD34, CD28, CD19, the T cell receptor (TCR), the MHC class II gene HLA-DR, perforin 1 and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and results indicated that DNA demethylation was not always sufficient for gene activation. Promoter demethylation occurred either early during embryonic development or later on during hematopoietic differentiation. Analysis of the genome-wide promoter methylation status of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from somatic CD34(+) HSPCs and differentiated derivatives from CD34(+) HSPCs confirmed the role of DNA methylation in regulating the expression of genes of the hemato-immune system, and indicated that promoter methylation of these genes may be associated to stemness. Together, these data suggest that promoter DNA demethylation might play a role in the tissue/cell-specific genome-wide gene regulation within the hematopoietic compartment.

  15. Recovery of latent fingerprints and DNA on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färber, Doris; Seul, Andrea; Weisser, Hans-Joachim; Bohnert, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The project "Latent Fingerprints and DNA on Human Skin" was the first systematic research in Europe dealing with detection of fingerprints and DNA left by offenders on the skin of corpses. One thousand samples gave results that allow general statements on the materials and methods used. The tests were carried out according to a uniform trial structure. Fingerprints were deposited by natural donors on corpses. The latent fingerprints were treated with magnetic powder or black fingerprint powder. Afterward, they were lifted with silicone casting material (Isomark(®)) or gelatine foil. All lifts were swabbed to recover DNA. It was possible to visualize comparable and identifiable fingerprints on the skin of corpses (16%). In the same categories, magnetic powder (18.4%) yielded better results than black fingerprint powder (13.6%). The number of comparable and identifiable fingerprints decreased on the lifts (12.7%). Isomark(®) (14.9%) was the better lifting material in comparison with gelatine foil (10.1%). In one-third of the samples, DNA could be extracted from the powdered and lifted latents. Black fingerprint powder delivered the better result with a rate of 2.2% for full DNA profiles and profiles useful for exclusion in comparison with 1.8% for the magnetic powder traces. Isomark(®) (3.1%) yielded better results than gelatine foil (0.6%).

  16. Isolation of cellular lipid droplets: two purification techniques starting from yeast cells and human placentas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannik, Jaana; Meyers, Alex; Dalhaimer, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Lipid droplets are dynamic organelles that can be found in most eukaryotic and certain prokaryotic cells. Structurally, the droplets consist of a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer. One of the most useful techniques in determining the cellular roles of droplets has been proteomic identification of bound proteins, which can be isolated along with the droplets. Here, two methods are described to isolate lipid droplets and their bound proteins from two wide-ranging eukaryotes: fission yeast and human placental villous cells. Although both techniques have differences, the main method-- density gradient centrifugation--is shared by both preparations. This shows the wide applicability of the presented droplet isolation techniques. In the first protocol, yeast cells are converted into spheroplasts by enzymatic digestion of their cell walls. The resulting spheroplasts are then gently lysed in a loose-fitting homogenizer. Ficoll is added to the lysate to provide a density gradient, and the mixture is centrifuged three times. After the first spin, the lipid droplets are localized to the white-colored floating layer of the centrifuge tubes along with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the plasma membrane, and vacuoles. Two subsequent spins are used to remove these other three organelles. The result is a layer that has only droplets and bound proteins. In the second protocol, placental villous cells are isolated from human term placentas by enzymatic digestion with trypsin and DNase I. The cells are homogenized in a loose-fitting homogenizer. Low-speed and medium-speed centrifugation steps are used to remove unbroken cells, cellular debris, nuclei, and mitochondria. Sucrose is added to the homogenate to provide a density gradient and the mixture is centrifuged to separate the lipid droplets from the other cellular fractions. The purity of the lipid droplets in both protocols is confirmed by Western Blot analysis. The droplet fractions from both preps

  17. Gene markers of cellular aging in human multipotent stromal cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellayr, Ian H; Catalano, Jennifer G; Lababidi, Samir; Yang, Amy X; Lo Surdo, Jessica L; Bauer, Steven R; Puri, Raj K

    2014-04-28

    Human multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow or other tissue sources have great potential to treat a wide range of injuries and disorders in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In particular, MSCs have inherent characteristics to suppress the immune system and are being studied in clinical studies to prevent graft-versus-host disease. MSCs can be expanded in vitro and have potential for differentiation into multiple cell lineages. However, the impact of cell passaging on gene expression and function of the cells has not been determined. Commercially available human MSCs derived from bone marrow from six different donors, grown under identical culture conditions and harvested at cell passages 3, 5, and 7, were analyzed with gene-expression profiling by using microarray technology. The phenotype of these cells did not change as reported previously; however, a statistical analysis revealed a set of 78 significant genes that were distinguishable in expression between passages 3 and 7. None of these significant genes corresponded to the markers established by the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) for MSC identification. When the significant gene lists were analyzed through pathway analysis, these genes were involved in the top-scoring networks of cellular growth and proliferation and cellular development. A meta-analysis of the literature for significant genes revealed that the MSCs seem to be undergoing differentiation into a senescent cell type when cultured extensively. Consistent with the differences in gene expression at passage 3 and 7, MSCs exhibited a significantly greater potential for cell division at passage 3 in comparison to passage 7. Our results identified specific gene markers that distinguish aging MSCs grown in cell culture. Confirmatory studies are needed to correlate these molecular markers with biologic attributes that may facilitate the development of assays to test the quality of MSCs

  18. Nuclear responses to depletion of mitochondrial DNA in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K; Neufer, P D; Williams, R S

    1995-11-01

    The derivation of human cell lines devoid of mitochondrial (mt) DNA (rho 0) provides an opportunity to study nuclear responses to a chronic impairment of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Expression of several nuclear genes is induced in human rho 0 cells, including those encoding integral proteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane, intermediate filaments, and ribosomes. In contrast to conditions in which mitochondrial respiration is altered acutely, expression of heat shock proteins and immediate early genes is not induced. Mitochondria from rho 0 cells maintain a transmembrane electrochemical potential and are distributed within the cytoplasm of these cells in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells. We conclude that a chronic deficiency of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation produced by elimination of mtDNA is associated with a different pattern of gene induction than that provoked by other acute or subacute conditions that impair mitochondrial respiration or create energy demands in excess of mitochondrial respiratory capacity.

  19. DNA-binding specificities of human transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolma, Arttu; Yan, Jian; Whitington, Thomas; Toivonen, Jarkko; Nitta, Kazuhiro R; Rastas, Pasi; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Enge, Martin; Taipale, Mikko; Wei, Gonghong; Palin, Kimmo; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Vincentelli, Renaud; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Hughes, Timothy R; Lemaire, Patrick; Ukkonen, Esko; Kivioja, Teemu; Taipale, Jussi

    2013-01-17

    Although the proteins that read the gene regulatory code, transcription factors (TFs), have been largely identified, it is not well known which sequences TFs can recognize. We have analyzed the sequence-specific binding of human TFs using high-throughput SELEX and ChIP sequencing. A total of 830 binding profiles were obtained, describing 239 distinctly different binding specificities. The models represent the majority of human TFs, approximately doubling the coverage compared to existing systematic studies. Our results reveal additional specificity determinants for a large number of factors for which a partial specificity was known, including a commonly observed A- or T-rich stretch that flanks the core motifs. Global analysis of the data revealed that homodimer orientation and spacing preferences, and base-stacking interactions, have a larger role in TF-DNA binding than previously appreciated. We further describe a binding model incorporating these features that is required to understand binding of TFs to DNA.

  20. DNA barcoding of fungi causing infections in humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinyi, Laszlo; Lackner, Michaela; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meyer, Wieland

    2016-02-01

    Correct species identification is becoming increasingly important in clinical diagnostics. Till now, many mycological laboratories rely on conventional phenotypic identification. But this is slow and strongly operator-dependent. Therefore, to improve the quality of pathogen identification, rapid, reliable, and objective identification methods are essential. One of the most encouraging approaches is molecular barcoding using the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the rDNA, which is rapid, easily achievable, accurate, and applicable directly from clinical specimens. It relies on the comparison of a single ITS sequence with a curated reference database. The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM) working group for DNA barcoding has recently established such a database, focusing on the majority of human and animal pathogenic fungi (ISHAM-ITS, freely accessible at http://www.isham.org/ or directly from http://its.mycologylab.org). For some fungi the use of secondary barcodes may be necessary.

  1. Recurrent DNA inversion rearrangements in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores, Margarita; Morales, Lucía; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that reiterated sequences in the human genome are targets for nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR), which facilitates genomic rearrangements. We have used a PCR-based approach to identify breakpoint regions of rearranged structures in the human genome...... on chromosomes 3, 15, and 19, were analyzed. The relative proportion of wild-type to rearranged structures was determined in DNA samples from blood obtained from different, unrelated individuals. The results obtained indicate that recurrent genomic rearrangements occur at relatively high frequency in somatic...... cells. Interestingly, the rearrangements studied were significantly more abundant in adults than in newborn individuals, suggesting that such DNA rearrangements might start to appear during embryogenesis or fetal life and continue to accumulate after birth. The relevance of our results in regard...

  2. CD16 is indispensable for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Kok Loon; Shimasaki, Noriko; Teo, Esmeralda Chi Yuan; Quek, Jeffrey Kim Siang; Yong, Hao Xiang; Diong, Colin Phipps; Bertoletti, Antonio; Linn, Yeh Ching; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is exerted by immune cells expressing surface Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) against cells coated with antibody, such as virus-infected or transformed cells. CD16, the FcγRIIIA, is essential for ADCC by NK cells, and is also expressed by a subset of human blood monocytes. We found that human CD16− expressing monocytes have a broad spectrum of ADCC capacities and can kill cancer cell lines, primary leukemic cells and hepatitis B virus-infected cells in the presence of specific antibodies. Engagement of CD16 on monocytes by antibody bound to target cells activated β2-integrins and induced TNFα secretion. In turn, this induced TNFR expression on the target cells, making them susceptible to TNFα-mediated cell death. Treatment with TLR agonists, DAMPs or cytokines, such as IFNγ, further enhanced ADCC. Monocytes lacking CD16 did not exert ADCC but acquired this property after CD16 expression was induced by either cytokine stimulation or transient transfection. Notably, CD16+ monocytes from patients with leukemia also exerted potent ADCC. Hence, CD16+ monocytes are important effectors of ADCC, suggesting further developments of this property in the context of cellular therapies for cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:27670158

  3. A Cellular Star Atlas: Using Astrocytes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Disease Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eKrencik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available What roles do astrocytes play in human disease? This question remains unanswered for nearly every human neurological disorder. Yet, because of their abundance and complexity astrocytes can impact neurological function in many ways. The differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs into neuronal and glial subtypes, including astrocytes, is becoming routine, thus their use as tools for modeling neurodevelopment and disease will provide one important approach to answer this question. When designing experiments, careful consideration must be given to choosing paradigms for differentiation, maturation, and functional analysis of these temporally asynchronous cellular populations in culture. In the case of astrocytes, they display heterogeneous characteristics depending upon species of origin, brain region, developmental stage, environmental factors, and disease states, all of which may render experimental results highly variable. In this review, challenges and future directions are discussed for using hPSC-derived astroglial progenitors and mature astrocytes for neurodevelopmental studies with a focus on exploring human astrocyte effects upon neuronal function. As new technologies emerge to measure the functions of astrocytes in vitro and in vivo, there is also a need for a standardized source of human astrocytes that are most relevant to the diseases of interest.

  4. Effects of cellular origin on differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shijun; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Shao, Ning-Yi; Lee, Won Hee; Chen, Haodong; Snyder, Michael P; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-06-02

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from various types of somatic cells by transient overexpression of 4 Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4). Patient-specific iPSC derivatives (e.g., neuronal, cardiac, hepatic, muscular, and endothelial cells [ECs]) hold great promise in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the cellular origin can affect the differentiation, in vivo behavior, and single-cell gene expression signatures of human iPSC-derived ECs. We derived human iPSCs from 3 types of somatic cells of the same individuals: fibroblasts (FB-iPSCs), ECs (EC-iPSCs), and cardiac progenitor cells (CPC-iPSCs). We then differentiated them into ECs by sequential administration of Activin, BMP4, bFGF, and VEGF. EC-iPSCs at early passage (10 < P < 20) showed higher EC differentiation propensity and gene expression of EC-specific markers (PECAM1 and NOS3) than FB-iPSCs and CPC-iPSCs. In vivo transplanted EC-iPSC-ECs were recovered with a higher percentage of CD31(+) population and expressed higher EC-specific gene expression markers (PECAM1, KDR, and ICAM) as revealed by microfluidic single-cell quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro EC-iPSC-ECs maintained a higher CD31(+) population than FB-iPSC-ECs and CPC-iPSC-ECs with long-term culturing and passaging. These results indicate that cellular origin may influence lineage differentiation propensity of human iPSCs; hence, the somatic memory carried by early passage iPSCs should be carefully considered before clinical translation.

  5. Effects of cellular origin on differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell–derived endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming-Tao; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Lee, Won Hee; Snyder, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from various types of somatic cells by transient overexpression of 4 Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4). Patient-specific iPSC derivatives (e.g., neuronal, cardiac, hepatic, muscular, and endothelial cells [ECs]) hold great promise in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the cellular origin can affect the differentiation, in vivo behavior, and single-cell gene expression signatures of human iPSC–derived ECs. We derived human iPSCs from 3 types of somatic cells of the same individuals: fibroblasts (FB-iPSCs), ECs (EC-iPSCs), and cardiac progenitor cells (CPC-iPSCs). We then differentiated them into ECs by sequential administration of Activin, BMP4, bFGF, and VEGF. EC-iPSCs at early passage (10 < P < 20) showed higher EC differentiation propensity and gene expression of EC-specific markers (PECAM1 and NOS3) than FB-iPSCs and CPC-iPSCs. In vivo transplanted EC-iPSC–ECs were recovered with a higher percentage of CD31+ population and expressed higher EC-specific gene expression markers (PECAM1, KDR, and ICAM) as revealed by microfluidic single-cell quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro EC-iPSC–ECs maintained a higher CD31+ population than FB-iPSC–ECs and CPC-iPSC–ECs with long-term culturing and passaging. These results indicate that cellular origin may influence lineage differentiation propensity of human iPSCs; hence, the somatic memory carried by early passage iPSCs should be carefully considered before clinical translation. PMID:27398408

  6. Selection of LNA-containing DNA aptamers against recombinant human CD73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elle, Ida C; Karlsen, Kasper K; Terp, Mikkel G; Larsen, Niels; Nielsen, Ronni; Derbyshire, Nicola; Mandrup, Susanne; Ditzel, Henrik J; Wengel, Jesper

    2015-05-01

    LNA-containing DNA aptamers against CD73 (human ecto-5'-nucleotidase), a protein frequently overexpressed in solid tumours, were isolated by SELEX. A pre-defined stem-loop library, containing LNA in the forward primer region, was enriched with CD73 binding sequences through six rounds of SELEX with recombinant his-tagged CD73 immobilised on anti-his plates. Enriched pools isolated from rounds one, three and six were subjected to next-generation sequencing and analysed for enrichment using custom bioinformatics software. The software identified aptamer sequences via the primers and then performed several steps including sequence unification, clustering and alignment to identify enriched sequences. Three enriched sequences were synthesised for further analysis, two of which showed sequence similarities. These sequences exhibited binding to the recombinant CD73 with KD values of 10 nM and 3.5 nM when tested by surface plasmon resonance. Truncated variants of these aptamers and variants where the LNA nucleotides were substituted for the DNA equivalent also exhibited affinity for the recombinant CD73 in the low nanomolar range. In enzyme inhibition assays with recombinant CD73 the aptamer sequences were able to decrease the activity of the protein. However, the aptamers exhibited no binding to cellular CD73 by flow cytometry analysis likely since the epitope recognised by the aptamer was not available for binding on the cellular protein.

  7. Detection of extracellular genomic DNA scaffold in human thrombus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oklu, Rahmi; Albadawi, Hassan; Watkins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mechanisms underlying transition of a thrombus susceptible to tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) fibrinolysis to one that is resistant is unclear. Demonstration of a new possible thrombus scaffold may open new avenues of research in thrombolysis and may provide mechanistic insight...... thrombi. CONCLUSIONS: Extensive detection of genomic DNA associated with histones in the extracellular matrix of human and mouse thrombi suggest the presence of a new thrombus-associated scaffold....

  8. DNA typing of Calliphorids collected from human corpses in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, R; Tan, T C; Lee, H L; Nazni, W A; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2013-03-01

    Estimation of post-mortem interval (PMI) is crucial for time of death determination. The advent of DNA-based identification techniques forensic entomology saw the beginning of a proliferation of molecular studies into forensically important Calliphoridae (Diptera). The use of DNA to characterise morphologically indistinguishable immature calliphorids was recognised as a valuable molecular tool with enormous practical utility. The local entomofauna in most cases is important for the examination of entomological evidences. The survey of the local entomofauna has become a fundamental first step in forensic entomological studies, because different geographical distributions, seasonal and environmental factors may influence the decomposition process and the occurrence of different insect species on corpses. In this study, calliphorids were collected from 13 human corpses recovered from indoors, outdoors and aquatic conditions during the post-mortem examination by pathologists from the government hospitals in Malaysia. Only two species, Chrysomya megacephala and Chrysomya rufifacies were recovered from human corpses. DNA sequencing was performed to study the mitochondrial encoded COI gene and to evaluate the suitability of the 1300 base pairs of COI fragments for identification of blow fly species collected from real crime scene. The COI gene from blow fly specimens were sequenced and deposited in GenBank to expand local databases. The sequenced COI gene was useful in identifying calliphorids retrieved from human corpses.

  9. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P; Bernstein, Bradley E; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K; Ward, Lucas D; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L; Farnham, Peggy J; Feingold, Elise A; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C; Gilbert, David M; Gingeras, Thomas R; Green, Eric D; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D; Myers, Richard M; Pazin, Michael J; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P; Hardison, Ross C

    2014-04-29

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease.

  10. Mobilization of Nuclear Copper by Green Tea Polyphenol Epicatechin-3-Gallate and Subsequent Prooxidant Breakage of Cellular DNA: Implications for Cancer Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Farhan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological as well as experimental evidence exists in support of chemopreventive and anticancer properties of green tea and its constituents. The gallocatechin, epicatechin-3-gallate is a major polyphenol present in green tea, shown responsible for these effects. Plant-derived polyphenolic compounds are established natural antioxidants which are capable of catalyzing oxidative DNA degradation of cellular DNA, alone as well as in the presence of transition metal ions, such as copper. Here we present evidence to support that, similar to various other polyphenoic compounds, epicatechin-3-gallate also causes oxidative degradation of cellular DNA. Single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis (Comet assay was used to assess DNA breakage in lymphocytes that were exposed to various concentrations of epicatechin-3-gallate. Inhibition of DNA breakage in the presence of scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS suggested involvement of ROS generation. Addition of neocuproine (a cell membrane permeable Cu(I chelator inhibited DNA degradation, dose-dependently, in intact lymphocytes. In contrast, bathocuproine, which does not permeate cell membrane, was observed to be ineffective. We further show that epicatechin-3-gallate degrades DNA in cell nuclei, which can also be inhibited by neocuproine, suggesting mobilization of nuclear copper in this reaction as well. Our results are indicative of ROS generation, possibly through mobilization of endogenous copper ions, and support our long-standing hypothesis of a prooxidant activity of plant-derived polyphenols as a mechanism for their documented anticancer properties.

  11. Initiation points for cellular deoxyribonucleic acid replication in human lymphoid cells converted by Epstein-Barr virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheim, A.; Shlomai, Z.; Ben-Bassat, H.

    1981-08-01

    Replicon size was estimated in two Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human lymphoma lines, BJAB and Ramos, and four EBV-positive lines derived from the former ones by infection (conversion) with two viral strains, B95-8 and P3HR-1. Logarithmic cultures were pulse-labeled with (/sup -3/H)thymidine, and the deoxyribonucleic acid was spread on microscopic slides and autoradiographed by the method of Huberman and Riggs. Three of the four EBV-converted cell lines, BJAB/B95-8, Ra/B95-8, and Ra/HRIK, were found to have significantly shorter replicons (41, 21, 54% shorter, respectively), i.e., more initiation points, than their EBV-negative parents. BJAB/HRIK had replicons which were only slightly shorter (11%) than those of BJAB. However, analysis of track length demonstrated that extensive track fusion occurred during the labeling of BJAB/HRIK, implying that its true average replicon size is shorter than the observed value. The results indicate that in analogy to simian virus 40, EBV activates new initiation points for cellular DNA replication in EBV-transformed cells.

  12. Nonviral Gene Targeting at rDNA Locus of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjin Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic modification, such as the addition of exogenous genes to the MSC genome, is crucial to their use as cellular vehicles. Due to the risks associated with viral vectors such as insertional mutagenesis, the safer nonviral vectors have drawn a great deal of attention. Methods. VEGF, bFGF, vitamin C, and insulin-transferrin-selenium-X were supplemented in the MSC culture medium. The cells’ proliferation and survival capacity was measured by MTT, determination of the cumulative number of cells, and a colony-forming efficiency assay. The plasmid pHr2-NL was constructed and nucleofected into MSCs. The recombinants were selected using G418 and characterized using PCR and Southern blotting. Results. BFGF is critical to MSC growth and it acted synergistically with vitamin C, VEGF, and ITS-X, causing the cells to expand significantly. The neomycin gene was targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs using a nonviral human ribosomal targeting vector. The recombinant MSCs retained multipotential differentiation capacity, typical levels of hMSC surface marker expression, and a normal karyotype, and none were tumorigenic in nude mice. Conclusions. Exogenous genes can be targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs while maintaining the characteristics of MSCs. This is the first nonviral gene targeting of hMSCs.

  13. Trapping DNA replication origins from the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eki, Toshihiko; Murakami, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2013-04-17

    Synthesis of chromosomal DNA is initiated from multiple origins of replication in higher eukaryotes; however, little is known about these origins' structures. We isolated the origin-derived nascent DNAs from a human repair-deficient cell line by blocking the replication forks near the origins using two different origin-trapping methods (i.e., UV- or chemical crosslinker-treatment and cell synchronization in early S phase using DNA replication inhibitors). Single-stranded DNAs (of 0.5-3 kb) that accumulated after such treatments were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). BrdU-labeled DNA was immunopurified after fractionation by alkaline sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cloned by complementary-strand synthesis and PCR amplification. Competitive PCR revealed an increased abundance of DNA derived from known replication origins (c-myc and lamin B2 genes) in the nascent DNA fractions from the UV-treated or crosslinked cells. Nucleotide sequences of 85 and 208 kb were obtained from the two libraries (I and II) prepared from the UV-treated log-phase cells and early S phase arrested cells, respectively. The libraries differed from each other in their G+C composition and replication-related motif contents, suggesting that differences existed between the origin fragments isolated by the two different origin-trapping methods. The replication activities for seven out of 12 putative origin loci from the early-S phase cells were shown by competitive PCR. We mapped 117 (library I) and 172 (library II) putative origin loci to the human genome; approximately 60% and 50% of these loci were assigned to the G-band and intragenic regions, respectively. Analyses of the flanking sequences of the mapped loci suggested that the putative origin loci tended to associate with genes (including conserved sites) and DNase I hypersensitive sites; however, poor correlations were found between such loci and the CpG islands, transcription start sites, and K27-acetylated histone H3 peaks.

  14. The catalytic A1 domains of cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin are potent DNA adjuvants that evoke mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Kenneth; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Egan, Michael; Schwartz, Jennifer; Fouts, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    DNA encoded adjuvants are well known for increasing the magnitude of cellular and/or humoral immune responses directed against vaccine antigens. DNA adjuvants can also tune immune responses directed against vaccine antigens to better protect against infection of the target organism. Two potent DNA adjuvants that have unique abilities to tune immune responses are the catalytic A1 domains of Cholera Toxin (CTA1) and Heat-Labile Enterotoxin (LTA1). Here, we have characterized the adjuvant activities of CTA1 and LTA1 using HIV and SIV genes as model antigens. Both of these adjuvants enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on par with those induced by the well-characterized cytokine adjuvants IL-12 and GM-CSF. CTA1 and LTA1 preferentially enhanced cellular responses to the intracellular antigen SIVmac239-gag over those for the secreted HIVBaL-gp120 antigen. IL-12, GM-CSF and electroporation did the opposite suggesting differences in the mechanisms of actions of these diverse adjuvants. Combinations of CTA1 or LTA1 with IL-12 or GM-CSF generated additive and better balanced cellular responses to both of these antigens. Consistent with observations made with the holotoxin and the CTA1-DD adjuvant, CTA1 and LTA1 evoked mixed Th1/Th17 cellular immune responses. Together, these results show that CTA1 and LTA1 are potent DNA vaccine adjuvants that favor the intracellular antigen gag over the secreted antigen gp120 and evoke mixed Th1/Th17 responses against both of these antigens. The results also indicate that achieving a balanced immune response to multiple intracellular and extracellular antigens delivered via DNA vaccination may require combining adjuvants that have different and complementary mechanisms of action.

  15. Resveratrol mobilizes endogenous copper in human peripheral lymphocytes leading to oxidative DNA breakage: a putative mechanism for chemoprevention of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, S M; Ullah, M F; Azmi, A S; Ahmad, A; Shamim, U; Zubair, H; Khan, H Y

    2010-06-01

    Plant polyphenols are important components of human diet, and a number of them are considered to possess chemopreventive and therapeutic properties against cancer. They are recognized as naturally occurring anti-oxidants but also act as pro-oxidants catalyzing DNA degradation in the presence of metal ions such as copper. The plant polyphenol resveratrol confers resistance to plants against fungal agents and has been implicated as a cancer chemopreventive agent. Of particular interest is the observation that resveratrol has been found to induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines but not in normal cells. Over the last few years, we have shown that resveratrol is capable of causing DNA breakage in cells such as human lymphocytes. Such cellular DNA breakage is inhibited by copper specific chelators but not by iron and zinc chelating agents. Similar results are obtained by using permeabilized cells or with isolated nuclei, indicating that chromatin-bound copper is mobilized in this reaction. It is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies. Therefore, cancer cells may be more subject to electron transfer between copper ions and resveratrol to generate reactive oxygen species responsible for DNA cleavage. The results are in support of our hypothesis that anti-cancer mechanism of plant polyphenols involves mobilization of endogenous copper and the consequent pro-oxidant action. Such a mechanism better explains the anti-cancer effects of resveratrol, as it accounts for the preferential cytotoxicity towards cancer cells.

  16. Inhibition of thyrotropin-stimulated DNA synthesis by microinjection of inhibitors of cellular Ras and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupperman, E; Wen, W; Meinkoth, J L

    1993-08-01

    Microinjection of a dominant interfering mutant of Ras (N17 Ras) caused a significant reduction in thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH])-stimulated DNA synthesis in rat thyroid cells. A similar reduction was observed following injection of the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Coinjection of both inhibitors almost completely abolished TSH-induced DNA synthesis. In contrast to TSH, overexpression of cellular Ras protein did not stimulate the expression of a cyclic AMP response element-regulated reporter gene. Similarly, injection of N17 Ras had no effect on TSH-stimulated reporter gene expression. Moreover, overexpression of cellular Ras protein stimulated similar levels of DNA synthesis in the presence or absence of the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor. Together, these results suggest that in Wistar rat thyroid cells, a full mitogenic response to TSH requires both Ras and cyclic APK-dependent protein kinase.

  17. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1.

  18. Cellular and molecular alterations in human epithelial cells transformed by high let radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Sutter, T.; Willey, J. C.; Suzuki, K.

    An understanding of the radiobiological effects of high LET radiation is essential for human risk estimation and radiation protection. In the present study, we show that a single, 30 cGy dose of 150 keV/mum ^4He ions can malignantly transform human papillomavirus immortalized human bronchial epithelial [BEP2D] cells. Transformed cells produce progressively growing tumors in nude mice. The transformation frequency by the single dose of alpha particles is estimated to be approximately 4 x 10^-7. Based on the average cross-sectional area of BEP2D cells, it can be calculated that a mean traversal of 1.4 particles per cell is sufficient to induce tumorigenic conversion of these cells 3 to 4 months post-irradiation. Tumorigenic BEP2D cells overexpress mutated p53 tumor suppressor oncoproteins in addition to the cell cycle control gene cyclin D1 and D2. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular changes at the various stages in radiation carcinogenesis involving human cells.

  19. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-09-02

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown.

  20. Human DNA quantification and sample quality assessment: Developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Margaret M; Thompson, Jonelle M; McLaren, Robert S; Purpero, Vincent M; Thomas, Kelli J; Dobrowski, Patricia A; DeGroot, Gretchen A; Romsos, Erica L; Storts, Douglas R

    2016-07-01

    Quantification of the total amount of human DNA isolated from a forensic evidence item is crucial for DNA normalization prior to short tandem repeat (STR) DNA analysis and a federal quality assurance standard requirement. Previous commercial quantification methods determine the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations, but provide limited information about the condition of the DNA sample. The PowerQuant(®) System includes targets for quantification of total human and total human male DNA as well as targets for evaluating whether the human DNA is degraded and/or PCR inhibitors are present in the sample. A developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) System was completed, following SWGDAM Validation Guidelines, to evaluate the assay's specificity, sensitivity, precision and accuracy, as well as the ability to detect degraded DNA or PCR inhibitors. In addition to the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations in a sample, data from the degradation target and internal PCR control (IPC) provide a forensic DNA analyst meaningful information about the quality of the isolated human DNA and the presence of PCR inhibitors in the sample that can be used to determine the most effective workflow and assist downstream interpretation.

  1. Thermodynamics of the DNA damage repair steps of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita A Kuznetsov

    Full Text Available Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1 is a key enzyme responsible for initiating the base excision repair of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG. In this study a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of hOGG1 with specific and non-specific DNA-substrates is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. The standard Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of specific stages of the repair process were determined via kinetic measurements over a temperature range using the van't Hoff approach. The three steps which are accompanied with changes in the DNA conformations were detected via 2-aminopurine fluorescence in the process of binding and recognition of damaged oxoG base by hOGG1. The thermodynamic analysis has demonstrated that the initial step of the DNA substrates binding is mainly governed by energy due to favorable interactions in the process of formation of the recognition contacts, which results in negative enthalpy change, as well as due to partial desolvation of the surface between the DNA and enzyme, which results in positive entropy change. Discrimination of non-specific G base versus specific oxoG base is occurring in the second step of the oxoG-substrate binding. This step requires energy consumption which is compensated by the positive entropy contribution. The third binding step is the final adjustment of the enzyme/substrate complex to achieve the catalytically competent state which is characterized by large endothermicity compensated by a significant increase of entropy originated from the dehydration of the DNA grooves.

  2. Genome-wide analysis in human colorectal cancer cells reveals ischemia-mediated expression of motility genes via DNA hypomethylation.

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    Karolina Skowronski

    Full Text Available DNA hypomethylation is an important epigenetic modification found to occur in many different cancer types, leading to the upregulation of previously silenced genes and loss of genomic stability. We previously demonstrated that hypoxia and hypoglycaemia (ischemia, two common micro-environmental changes in solid tumours, decrease DNA methylation through the downregulation of DNMTs in human colorectal cancer cells. Here, we utilized a genome-wide cross-platform approach to identify genes hypomethylated and upregulated by ischemia. Following exposure to hypoxia or hypoglycaemia, methylated DNA from human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 was immunoprecipitated and analysed with an Affymetrix promoter array. Additionally, RNA was isolated and analysed in parallel with an Affymetrix expression array. Ingenuity pathway analysis software revealed that a significant proportion of the genes hypomethylated and upregulated were involved in cellular movement, including PLAUR and CYR61. A Matrigel invasion assay revealed that indeed HCT116 cells grown in hypoxic or hypoglycaemic conditions have increased mobility capabilities. Confirmation of upregulated expression of cellular movement genes was performed with qPCR. The correlation between ischemia and metastasis is well established in cancer progression, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for this common observation have not been clearly identified. Our novel data suggests that hypoxia and hypoglycaemia may be driving changes in DNA methylation through downregulation of DNMTs. This is the first report to our knowledge that provides an explanation for the increased metastatic potential seen in ischemic cells; i.e. that ischemia could be driving DNA hypomethylation and increasing expression of cellular movement genes.

  3. Cellular and biomolecular responses of human ovarian cancer cells to cytostatic dinuclear platinum(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Miaoxin; Wang, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Jianhui; Fan, Damin; Zhang, Yangmiao; Zhang, Junfeng; Guo, Zijian

    2011-03-01

    Polynuclear platinum(II) complexes represent a class of potential anticancer agents that have shown promising pharmacological properties in preclinical studies. The nature of cellular responses induced by these complexes, however, is poorly understood. In this research, the cellular responses of human ovarian cancer COC1 cells to dinuclear platinum(II) complexes {[cis-Pt(NH₃)₂Cl]₂L¹}(NO₃)₂ (1) and {[cis-Pt(NH₃)₂Cl]₂L²}(NO₃)₂ (2) (L¹ = α,α'-diamino-p-xylene, L² = 4,4'-methylenedianiline) has been studied using cisplatin as a reference. The effect of platinum complexes on the proliferation, death mode, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell cycle progression has been examined by MTT assay and flow cytometry. The activation of cell cycle checkpoint kinases (CHK1/2), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) of the cells by the complexes has also been analyzed using phospho-specific flow cytometry. Complex 1 is more cytotoxic than complex 2 and cisplatin at most concentrations; complex 2 and cisplatin are comparably cytotoxic. These complexes kill the cells through an apoptotic or apoptosis-like pathway characterized by exposure of phosphatidylserine and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Complex 1 shows the strongest inductive effect on the morphological changes of the cells, followed by cisplatin and complex 2. Complexes 1 and 2 arrest the cell cycle in G2 or M phase, while cisplatin arrests the cell cycle in S phase. The influence of these complexes on CHK1/2, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK varies with the dose of the drugs or reaction time. Activation of phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-p38 MAPK by these complexes is closely related to the cytostatic activity. The results demonstrate that dinuclear platinum(II) complexes can induce some cellular responses different from those caused by cisplatin.

  4. Persistent Loss of Hepatitis B Virus Markers in Serum without Cellular Immunity by Combination of Peginterferon and Entecavir Therapy in Humanized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takuro; Imamura, Michio; Hayes, C Nelson; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Kan, Hiromi; Tsuge, Masataka; Abe-Chayama, Hiromi; Zhang, Yizhou; Makokha, Grace Naswa; Aikata, Hiroshi; Miki, Daiki; Ochi, Hidenori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2017-09-01

    Nucleot(s)ide analogues and peginterferon (PEG-IFN) treatment are the only approved therapies for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, complete eradication of the virus, as indicated by persistent loss of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), is rare among treated patients. This is due to long-term persistence of the HBV genome in infected hepatocytes in the form of covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). In this study, we investigated whether administration of a large dose of a nucleoside analogue in combination with PEG-IFN can achieve long-term loss of HBsAg in human hepatocyte chimeric mice. Mice were treated with a high dose of entecavir and/or PEG-IFN for 6 weeks. High-dose combination therapy with both drugs resulted in persistently negative HBV DNA in serum. Although small amounts of HBV DNA and cccDNA (0.1 and 0.01 copy/cell, respectively) remained in the mouse livers, some of the mice remained persistently negative for serum HBV DNA at 13 weeks after cessation of the therapy. Serum HBsAg and hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg) continued to decrease and eventually became negative at 12 weeks after cessation of the therapy. Analysis of the HBV genome in treated mice showed accumulation of G-to-A hypermutation and CpG III island methylation. Persistent loss of serum HBV DNA and loss of HBV markers by high-dose entecavir and PEG-IFN combination treatment in chimeric mice suggests that control of HBV can be achieved even in the absence of a cellular immune response. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingrui Li

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold per strand, we report a comprehensive (92.62% methylome and analysis of the unique sequences in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from the same Asian individual whose genome was deciphered in the YH project. PBMC constitute an important source for clinical blood tests world-wide. We found that 68.4% of CpG sites and 80% displayed allele-specific expression (ASE. These data demonstrate that ASM is a recurrent phenomenon and is highly correlated with ASE in human PBMCs. Together with recently reported similar studies, our study provides a comprehensive resource for future epigenomic research and confirms new sequencing technology as a paradigm for large-scale epigenomics studies.

  6. Positive impact of sucrose supplementation during slow freezing of cat ovarian tissues on cellular viability, follicle morphology, and DNA integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanpradit, Nae; Comizzoli, Pierre; Srisuwatanasagul, Sayamon; Chatdarong, Kaywalee

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the study were to (1) examine and optimize the impact of sucrose during slow freezing and (2) compare the results of two freezing methods (slow freezing and vitrification) on cellular viability (germinal and stromal cells), follicle morphology, DNA integrity, and gap junction protein expression (connexin 43 [Cx 43]). Different sucrose supplementations (0, 0.1, and 0.3 M) in standard freezing medium were compared before and after slow freezing. Ovarian tissue slow frozen using 0.1- (4.0 ± 0.4) or 0.3-M sucrose (3.9 ± 0.5) yielded better follicular viability (number of positive follicles per 0.0625 mm(2)) than the group without sucrose (1.9 ± 0.2; P sucrose-treated groups (0.1 M, 47.4% and 0.3 M, 43.5%) than the group without sucrose (0 M, 33.8%; P sucrose groups (0.1 M, 1.2% and 0.3 M, 1.9%) than the group without sucrose (7.7%; P sucrose concentrations. In terms of the freezing methods used, vitrified ovarian tissues had fewer viable follicles (3.2 ± 0.6) than the slow-freezing method (4.6 ± 0.6; P sucrose supplementation and slow-freezing method on the follicular viability, follicular histologic appearances of follicles, and apoptosis of the follicles and stromal cells in cat ovarian tissues.

  7. Holes influence the mutation spectrum of human mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagran, Martha; Miller, John

    Mutations drive evolution and disease, showing highly non-random patterns of variant frequency vs. nucleotide position. We use computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)] to reveal sites of enhanced hole probability in selected regions of human mitochondrial DNA. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. The hole spectra are quantum mechanically computed using a two-stranded tight binding model of DNA. We observe significant correlation between spectra of hole probabilities and of genetic variation frequencies from the MITOMAP database. These results suggest that hole-enhanced mutation mechanisms exert a substantial, perhaps dominant, influence on mutation patterns in DNA. One example is where a trapped hole induces a hydrogen bond shift, known as tautomerization, which then triggers a base-pair mismatch during replication. Our results deepen overall understanding of sequence specific mutation rates, encompassing both hotspots and cold spots, which drive molecular evolution.

  8. Environmental car exhaust pollution damages human sperm chromatin and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, A E; La Vignera, S; Condorelli, R A; Perdichizzi, A; Valenti, D; Asero, P; Carbone, U; Boggia, B; De Rosa, N; Lombardi, G; D'Agata, R; Vicari, L O; Vicari, E; De Rosa, M

    2011-06-01

    The adverse role of traffic pollutants on male fertility is well known. Aim of this study was to evaluate their effects on sperm chromatin/DNA integrity. To accomplish this, 36 men working at motorway tollgates and 32 unexposed healthy men (controls) were enrolled. All of them were interviewed about their lifestyle. Hormone, semen samples, and environmental and biological markers of pollution were evaluated. Sperm chromatin and DNA integrity were evaluated by flow cytometry following propidium iodide staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. LH, FSH, and testosterone serum levels were within the normal range in tollgate workers. Sperm concentration, total sperm count, total and progressive motility, and normal forms were significantly lower in these men compared with controls. Motorway tollgate workers had a significantly higher percentage of spermatozoa with damaged chromatin and DNA fragmentation, a late sign of apoptosis, compared with controls. A significant direct correlation was found between spermatozoa with damaged chromatin or fragmented DNA and the length of occupational exposure, suggesting a time-dependent relationship. This study showed that car exhaust exposure has a genotoxic effect on human spermatozoa. This may be of relevant importance not only for the reproductive performance of the men exposed, but also for the offspring health.

  9. DNA Prime-Boost Vaccine Regimen To Increase Breadth, Magnitude, and Cytotoxicity of the Cellular Immune Responses to Subdominant Gag Epitopes of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xintao; Valentin, Antonio; Dayton, Frances; Kulkarni, Viraj; Alicea, Candido; Rosati, Margherita; Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Gautam, Rajeev; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Martin, Malcolm A; Mullins, James I; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2016-11-15

    HIV sequence diversity and the propensity of eliciting immunodominant responses targeting variable regions of the HIV proteome are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. An HIV-derived conserved element (CE) p24(gag) plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine is able to redirect immunodominant responses to otherwise subdominant and often more vulnerable viral targets. By homology to the HIV immunogen, seven CE were identified in SIV p27(Gag) Analysis of 31 rhesus macaques vaccinated with full-length SIV gag pDNA showed inefficient induction (58% response rate) of cellular responses targeting these CE. In contrast, all 14 macaques immunized with SIV p27CE pDNA developed robust T cell responses recognizing CE. Vaccination with p27CE pDNA was also critical for the efficient induction and increased the frequency of Ag-specific T cells with cytotoxic potential (granzyme B(+) CD107a(+)) targeting subdominant CE epitopes, compared with the responses elicited by the p57(gag) pDNA vaccine. Following p27CE pDNA priming, two booster regimens, gag pDNA or codelivery of p27CE+gag pDNA, significantly increased the levels of CE-specific T cells. However, the CE+gag pDNA booster vaccination elicited significantly broader CE epitope recognition, and thus, a more profound alteration of the immunodominance hierarchy. Vaccination with HIV molecules showed that CE+gag pDNA booster regimen further expanded the breadth of HIV CE responses. Hence, SIV/HIV vaccine regimens comprising CE pDNA prime and CE+gag pDNA booster vaccination significantly increased cytotoxic T cell responses to subdominant highly conserved Gag epitopes and maximized response breadth. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. CBFA1 and topoisomerase I mRNA levels decline during cellular aging of human trabecular osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, M; Kveiborg, Marie; Kassem, M

    2000-01-01

    reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). There is a progressive and significant reduction of the CBFA1 steady-state mRNA level down to 50% during cellular aging of human osteoblasts. In comparison to the normal cells, human osteosarcoma cell lines SaOS-2 and KHOS/NP, and the SV40...

  11. Extending breath analysis to the cellular level: current thoughts on the human microbiome and the expression of organic compounds in the human exposome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human biomarkers are comprised of compounds from cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, and the microbiome of bacteria in the gut, genitourinary, and pulmonary tracts. When we examine patterns in human biomarkers to discern human health state or diagnose specific diseases, it is...

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

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    Jinsil Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The amnion is a specialized tissue in contact with the amniotic fluid, which is in a constantly changing state. To investigate the importance of epigenetic events in this tissue in the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of human amnion from term (with and without labor and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth. Functional analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed biologically relevant enriched gene sets. Bisulfite sequencing analysis of the promoter region of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene detected two CpG dinucleotides showing significant methylation differences among the three groups of samples. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3 gene in preterm amnion was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR. This work provides preliminary evidence that DNA methylation changes in the amnion may be at least partially involved in the physiological process of labor and the etiology of preterm birth and suggests that DNA methylation profiles, in combination with other biological data, may provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying normal and pathological pregnancies.

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsil; Pitlick, Mitchell M.; Christine, Paul J.; Schaefer, Amanda R.; Saleme, Cesar; Comas, Belén; Cosentino, Viviana; Gadow, Enrique; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    The amnion is a specialized tissue in contact with the amniotic fluid, which is in a constantly changing state. To investigate the importance of epigenetic events in this tissue in the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of human amnion from term (with and without labor) and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth. Functional analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed biologically relevant enriched gene sets. Bisulfite sequencing analysis of the promoter region of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene detected two CpG dinucleotides showing significant methylation differences among the three groups of samples. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3) gene in preterm amnion was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR. This work provides preliminary evidence that DNA methylation changes in the amnion may be at least partially involved in the physiological process of labor and the etiology of preterm birth and suggests that DNA methylation profiles, in combination with other biological data, may provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:23533356

  14. Exploring the utility of human DNA methylation arrays for profiling mouse genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nicholas C; Ng, Jane; Hall, Nathan E; Lunke, Sebastian; Salmanidis, Marika; Brumatti, Gabriela; Ekert, Paul G; Craig, Jeffrey M; Saffery, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Illumina Infinium Human Methylation (HM) BeadChips are widely used for measuring genome-scale DNA methylation, particularly in relation to epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) studies. The methylation profile of human samples can be assessed accurately and reproducibly using the HM27 BeadChip (27,578 CpG sites) or its successor, the HM450 BeadChip (482,421 CpG sites). To date no mouse equivalent has been developed, greatly hindering the application of this methodology to the wide range of valuable murine models of disease and development currently in existence. We found 1308 and 13,715 probes from HM27 and HM450 BeadChip respectively, uniquely matched the bisulfite converted reference mouse genome (mm9). We demonstrate reproducible measurements of DNA methylation at these probes in a range of mouse tissue samples and in a murine cell line model of acute myeloid leukaemia. In the absence of a mouse counterpart, the Infinium Human Methylation BeadChip arrays have utility for methylation profiling in non-human species.

  15. Human Rad51 mediated DNA unwinding is facilitated by conditions that favour Rad51-dsDNA aggregation

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    Kulkarni Anagha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Rad51 (RAD51, analogous to its bacterial homolog, RecA, binds and unwinds double stranded DNA (dsDNA in the presence of certain nucleotide cofactors. ATP hydrolysis is not required for this process, because even ATP non hydrolysable analogs like AMP-PNP and ATPγS, support DNA unwinding. Even ADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, feebly supports DNA unwinding. Results We find that human Rad52 (RAD52 stimulates RAD51 mediated DNA unwinding in the presence of all Adenine nucleotide cofactors, (except in AMP and no nucleotide conditions that intrinsically fail to support unwinding reaction while enhancing aggregation of RAD51-dsDNA complexes in parallel. Interestingly, salt at low concentration can substitute the role of RAD52, in facilitating aggregation of RAD51-dsDNA complexes, that concomitantly also leads to better unwinding. Conclusion RAD52 itself being a highly aggregated protein perhaps acts as scaffold to bring together RAD51 and DNA molecules into large co-aggregates of RAD52-RAD51-DNA complexes to promote RAD51 mediated DNA unwinding reaction, when appropriate nucleotide cofactors are available, presumably through macromolecular crowding effects. Our work highlights the functional link between aggregation of protein-DNA complexes and DNA unwinding in RAD51 system.

  16. Cruising the cellular highways: How human papillomavirus travels from the surface to the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Guion, Lucile G; Sapp, Martin

    2017-03-02

    The non-enveloped human papillomaviruses (HPVs) specifically target epithelial cells of the skin and mucosa. Successful infection requires a lesion in the stratified tissue for access to the basal cells. Herein, we discuss our recent progress in understanding binding, internalization, uncoating, and intracellular trafficking of HPV particles. Our focus will be on HPV type 16, which is the most common HPV type associated with various anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. The study of HPV entry has revealed a number of novel cellular pathways utilized during infection. These include but are not restricted to the following: a previously uncharacterized form of endocytosis, membrane penetration by a capsid protein, the use of retromer complexes for trafficking to the trans-Golgi network, the requirement for nuclear envelope breakdown and microtubule-mediated transport during mitosis for nuclear entry, the existence of membrane-bound intranuclear vesicles harboring HPV genome, and the requirement of PML protein for efficient transcription of incoming viral genome. The continued study of these pathways may reveal new roles in basic biological cellular processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of propolis on mitotic and cellular proliferation indices in human blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoro, A.; Almonacid, M.; Villaescusa, J. [Valencia Hospital Univ. la Fe, Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica (Spain); Barquinero, J. [Barcelona Univ. Autonom, Servicio de Dosimetria Biologica, Unidad de Antropologia, Dept. de Biologia Animal, Vegetal y Ecologia, barcelona (Spain); Barrios, L. [Barcelona Univ. Autonoma, Dept. de Biologia Celular y Fisiologia. Unidad de Biologia Celular (Spain); Verdu, G. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear (Spain); Perez, J. [Hospital la Fe, Seccion de Radiofisica, Servicio de Radioterapia, valencia (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The study of the frequency of chromosomal aberrations per cell is the tool used in Biological dosimetry studies. Using dose-effect calibration curve obtained in our laboratory, we can evaluate the radioprotector effect of the EEP (ethanolic extract of propolis) in cultures in vitro. Propolis is the generic name for resinous substance collected by honeybees. The results showed a reduction in chromosomal aberrations's frequency of up to 50 %. The following study consisted of analyzing human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to 2 Gy {gamma} rays, in presence and absence of EEP, the change in the frequency of chromosome aberrations was analysed with biological dosimetry. The protection against the formation of dicentric and ring was dose-dependent, but there seemed to be a maximum protection, i.e. a further increase in the concentration of EEP does not show additional protection. This work studies the effect of the EEP of the cellular cycle using the mitotic and cellular proliferation index, as an alternative for the screening cytostatic activity. The results indicate that the lymphocytes which were cultures in presence of EEP exhibited a significant and dependent-concentration decrease in mitotic index and proliferation kinetics. The possible mechanisms involved in the radioprotective influence of EEP are discussed. (authors)

  18. Evolutionarily different alphoid repeat DNA on homologous chromosomes in human and chimpanzee.

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, A L; Laursen, H B; Jones, C; Bak, A L

    1992-01-01

    Centromeric alphoid DNA in primates represents a class of evolving repeat DNA. In humans, chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid DNA while chromosomes 14 and 22 share another subfamily. We show that similar pairwise homogenizations occur in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), where chromosomes 14 and 22, homologous to human chromosomes 13 and 21, share one partially homogenized alphoid DNA subfamily and chromosomes 15 and 23, homologous to human chromosomes 14 and 22, share anothe...

  19. Immortality, but not oncogenic transformation, of primary human cells leads to epigenetic reprogramming of DNA methylation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Katrina; Clouaire, Thomas; Bao, Xun X; Kemp, Sadie E; Xenophontos, Maria; de Las Heras, Jose Ignacio; Stancheva, Irina

    2014-04-01

    Tumourigenic transformation of normal cells into cancer typically involves several steps resulting in acquisition of unlimited growth potential, evasion of apoptosis and non-responsiveness to growth inhibitory signals. Both genetic and epigenetic changes can contribute to cancer development and progression. Given the vast genetic heterogeneity of human cancers and difficulty to monitor cancer-initiating events in vivo, the precise relationship between acquisition of genetic mutations and the temporal progression of epigenetic alterations in transformed cells is largely unclear. Here, we use an in vitro model system to investigate the contribution of cellular immortality and oncogenic transformation of primary human cells to epigenetic reprogramming of DNA methylation and gene expression. Our data demonstrate that extension of replicative life span of the cells is sufficient to induce accumulation of DNA methylation at gene promoters and large-scale changes in gene expression in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, continuous expression of cooperating oncogenes in immortalized cells, although essential for anchorage-independent growth and evasion of apoptosis, does not affect de novo DNA methylation at promoters and induces subtle expression changes. Taken together, these observations imply that cellular immortality promotes epigenetic adaptation to highly proliferative state, whereas transforming oncogenes confer additional properties to transformed human cells.

  20. The nuclear proteome and DNA-binding fraction of human Raji lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Silke; Cordwell, Stuart J; Crossett, Ben; Baker, Mark S; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-04-01

    Purification of organelles and analysis of their proteins is an important initial step for biological proteomics, simplifying the proteome prior to analysis by established techniques such as two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2-DLC) or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Nuclear proteins play a central role in regulating gene expression, but are often under-represented in proteomic studies due to their lower abundance in comparison to cellular 'housekeeping' metabolic enzymes and structural proteins. A reliable procedure for separation and proteomic analysis of nuclear proteins would be useful for investigations of cell proliferation and differentiation during disease processes (e.g., human cancer). In this study, we have purified nuclei from the human Burkitt's lymphoma B-cell line, Raji, using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The integrity and purity of the nuclei were assessed by light microscopy and proteins from the nuclear fractions were separated by 2-DE and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). A total of 124 unique proteins were identified, of which 91% (n=110) were predicted to be nuclear using PSORT. Proteins from the nuclear fraction were subjected to affinity chromatography on DNA-agarose to isolate DNA-binding proteins. From this purified fraction, 131 unique proteins were identified, of which 69% (n=90) were known or predicted DNA-binding proteins. Purification of nuclei and subsequent enrichment of DNA-binding proteins allowed identification of a total of 209 unique proteins, many involved in transcription and/or correlated with lymphoma, leukemia or cancer in general. The data obtained should be valuable for identification of biomarkers and targets for cancer therapy, and for furthering our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying lymphoma development and progression.

  1. DNA repair and cell cycle biomarkers of radiation exposure and inflammation stress in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Budworth

    Full Text Available DNA damage and repair are hallmarks of cellular responses to ionizing radiation. We hypothesized that monitoring the expression of DNA repair-associated genes would enhance the detection of individuals exposed to radiation versus other forms of physiological stress. We employed the human blood ex vivo radiation model to investigate the expression responses of DNA repair genes in repeated blood samples from healthy, non-smoking men and women exposed to 2 Gy of X-rays in the context of inflammation stress mimicked by the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Radiation exposure significantly modulated the transcript expression of 12 genes of 40 tested (2.2E-06human blood ex vivo dataset, and 100% accuracy for discriminating patients who received total body radiation. Three genes of this panel (CDKN1A, FDXR and BBC3 were also highly sensitive to LPS treatment in the absence of radiation exposure, and LPS co-treatment significantly affected their radiation responses. At the protein level, BAX and pCHK2-thr68 were elevated after radiation exposure, but the pCHK2-thr68 response was significantly decreased in the presence of LPS. Our combined panel yields an estimated 4-group accuracy of ∼90% to discriminate between radiation alone, inflammation alone, or combined exposures. Our findings suggest that DNA repair gene expression may be helpful to identify biodosimeters of exposure to radiation, especially within high-complexity exposure scenarios.

  2. [Detection of DNA human cytomegalovirus of a molecular methods: hybrid capture DNA CMV by immunocompromised].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhiri, Leila; Arrouji, Zakia; Slim, Amine; Ben Redjeb, Saida

    2006-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the beta-virus herpes family, is a ubiquitous human pathogen. After a primary infection, HCMV establishes life latency. HCMV rarely causes symptomatic disease in an immunocompetent host, however, it is a major cause of infectious morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals and developing fetuses. The HCMV genome consists of 240 kbp of double stranded DNA. Early diagnosis molecular of CMV infection is important. The objective of this study was to develop a molecular methods: Quantitative Hybrid capture for the detection of DNA CMV. We present results for 200 immunocompromised collected from 1999 to 2003 (122 men and 78 women, whom mean age was 35 years). Our results showed that 25% of women and 36% of men were positif for hybrid capture DNA CMV. This simple test (cold probe) provide quantitative and fast results. Also the efficacity of anti-CMV therapy can be followed. More over, in contrary with pp65-antigenemia assay and CMV PCR, this test can be managed on biopsy sample.

  3. Association between DNA methylation and multidrug resistance in human glioma SHG-44 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Xu, Zhong-Ye; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between DNA methylation and multidrug resistance (MDR) in glioma and identify novel effectors responsible for MDR in human gliomas. An MDR glioma cell line, SGH-44/ADM, was developed using adriamycin (ADM) impulse treatment. Cryopreservation, recovery and withdrawal were performed to evaluate the stability of SGH-44/ADM cells. The adherence rate and cellular morphology were observed by microscopy, and the cell growth curve and doubling time were determined. DNA methylation was analyzed using a methylated DNA immunoprecipitation microarray chip (MeDIP-Chip). The cell cycle, Rh123 ingestion and exudation, and SGH-44/ADM apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. SGH-44/ADM cells showed little difference as compared with parental cells, except that SGH-44/ADM cells were bigger in size with a wizened nucleus. Compared to SGH-44 cells, a larger proportion of SGH-44/ADM cells remained in G1 and S phase, as measured by flow cytometry. The MDR of SGH-44/ADM was associated with the upregulation of multi-drug resistance 1, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2); protein kinase C α (PKCα); however, the expression of these genes was not associated with DNA methylation. In the MeDIP-Chip analysis, 74 functions were markedly enhanced, and seven significant pathways were observed. Genes including SNAP47, ARRB2, PARD6B, TGFB1, VPS4B and CBLB were identified by gene ontology analysis. The predominant molecular mechanism of MDR in SGH-44/ADM cells was identified as exocytosis and efflux. The expression of COX-2, PKCα and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) was not found to be associated with DNA methylation. Genes including SNAP47, VAMP4 and VAMP3 may serve as the downstream effectors of Pgp, COX-2 or PKCα; however, further experiments are required to verify these observations.

  4. Linking DNA adduct formation and human cancer risk in chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Miriam C

    2016-08-01

    Over two centuries ago, Sir Percival Pott, a London surgeon, published a pioneering treatise showing that soot exposure was the cause of high incidences of scrotal cancers occurring in young men who worked as chimney sweeps. Practicing at a time when cellular pathology was not yet recognized, Sir Percival nonetheless observed that the high incidence and short latency of the chimney sweep cancers, was fundamentally different from the rare scrotal cancers typically found in elderly men. Furthermore, his diagnosis that the etiology of these cancers was related to chimney soot exposure, was absolutely accurate, conceptually novel, and initiated the field of "occupational cancer epidemiology." After many intervening years of research focused on mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis, briefly described here, it is clear that DNA damage, or DNA adduct formation, is "necessary but not sufficient" for tumor induction, and that many additional factors contribute to carcinogenesis. This review includes a synopsis of carcinogen-induced DNA adduct formation in experimental models and in the human population, with particular attention paid to molecular dosimetry and molecular cancer epidemiology. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:499-507, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A unique epigenetic signature is associated with active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Su, Trent; Ferrari, Roberto; Li, Jing-Yu; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2014-02-01

    The cellular epigenetic landscape changes as pluripotent stem cells differentiate to somatic cells or when differentiated cells transform to a cancerous state. These epigenetic changes are commonly correlated with differences in gene expression. Whether active DNA replication is also associated with distinct chromatin environments in these developmentally and phenotypically diverse cell types has not been known. Here, we used BrdU-seq to map active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), normal primary fibroblasts and a cancer cell line, and correlated these maps to the epigenome. In all cell lines, the majority of BrdU peaks were enriched in euchromatin and at DNA repetitive elements, especially at microsatellite repeats, and coincided with previously determined replication origins. The most prominent BrdU peaks were shared between all cells but a sizable fraction of the peaks were specific to each cell type and associated with cell type-specific genes. Surprisingly, the BrdU peaks that were common to all cell lines were associated with H3K18ac, H3K56ac, and H4K20me1 histone marks only in hESCs but not in normal fibroblasts or cancer cells. Depletion of the histone acetyltransferases for H3K18 and H3K56 dramatically decreased the number and intensity of BrdU peaks in hESCs. Our data reveal a unique epigenetic signature that distinguishes active replication loci in hESCs from normal somatic or malignant cells.

  6. Helium-neon laser irradiation enhances DNA synthesis in a human neuroblastoma cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Michael R.; Gump, Frank; Wu, Wen-hsien

    1993-07-01

    To gain further insight into the mechanism of cell photostimulation by laser light ((lambda) equals 632.8 nm), DNA synthesis was measured in the human neuroblastoma cell line BE(2)-C. Cells were irradiated at high density to establish the characteristics of cellular energy into S- phase in response to laser stimulation. BE(2)-C cells after release from a quiescent, growth arrested state exhibited increased incorporation of isotope 12 hours after replating at subconfluent density in the presence of 2.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and [3H] thymidine. In contrast, cells replated under the same conditions, but stimulated with 15% FBS exhibited a time lag of approximately 16 hours in apparent DNA synthesis. These results were not corroborated by flow cytometry. Laser irradiation did not affect the fraction of cells entering S-phase. It therefore appears that the stimulatory effect of He-Ne laser irradiation on BE(2)-C cells is to enhance DNA synthesis while not altering the G1-S transition rate.

  7. The use of dimorphic Alu insertions in human DNA fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novick, G.E.; Gonzalez, T.; Garrison, J.; Novick, C.C.; Herrera, R.J. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Batzer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Deininger, P.L. [Louisiana State Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). Medical Center

    1992-12-04

    We have characterized certain Human Specific Alu Insertions as either dimorphic (TPA25, PV92, APO), sightly dimorphic (C2N4 and C4N4) or monomorphic (C3N1, C4N6, C4N2, C4N5, C4N8), based on studies of Caucasian, Asian, American Black and African Black populations. Our approach is based upon: (1) PCR amplification using primers directed to the sequences that flank the site of insertion of the different Alu elements studied; (2) gel electrophoresis and scoring according to the presence or absence of an Alu insertion in one or both homologous chromosomes; (3) allelic frequencies calculated and compared according to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Our DNA fingerprinting procedure using PCR amplification of dimorphic Human Specific Alu insertions, is stable enough to be used not only as a tool for genetic mapping but also to characterize populations, study migrational patterns and track the inheritance of human genetic disorders.

  8. Oral administration of copper to rats leads to increased lymphocyte cellular DNA degradation by dietary polyphenols: implications for a cancer preventive mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Husain Y; Zubair, Haseeb; Ullah, Mohd F; Ahmad, Aamir; Hadi, Sheikh M

    2011-12-01

    To account for the observed anticancer properties of plant polyphenols, we have earlier proposed a mechanism which involves the mobilization of endogenous copper ions by polyphenols leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that serve as proximal DNA cleaving agents and lead to cell death. Over the last decade we have proceeded to validate our hypothesis with considerable success. As a further confirmation of our hypothesis, in this paper we first show that oral administration of copper to rats leads to elevated copper levels in lymphocytes. When such lymphocytes with a copper overload were isolated and treated with polyphenols EGCG, genistein and resveratrol, an increased level of DNA breakage was observed. Further, preincubation of lymphocytes having elevated copper levels with the membrane permeable copper chelator neocuproine, resulted in inhibition of polyphenol induced DNA degradation. However, membrane impermeable chelator of copper bathocuproine, as well as iron and zinc chelators were ineffective in causing such inhibition in DNA breakage, confirming the involvement of endogenous copper in polyphenol induced cellular DNA degradation. It is well established that serum and tissue concentrations of copper are greatly increased in various malignancies. In view of this fact, the present results further confirm our earlier findings and strengthen our hypothesis that an important anticancer mechanism of plant polyphenols could be the mobilization of intracellular copper leading to ROS-mediated cellular DNA breakage. In this context, it may be noted that cancer cells are under considerable oxidative stress and increasing such stress to cytotoxic levels could be a successful anticancer approach.

  9. Shock-induced damage to mitochondrial function and some cellular antioxidant mechanisms in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbucci, G G; Gasparetto, A; Candiani, A; Crimi, G; Antonelli, M; Bufi, M; De Blasi, R A; Cooper, M B; Gohil, K

    1985-01-01

    The effects of circulatory shock on skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative activity in various substrates and cytochrome oxidase activity have been investigated using samples of muscle obtained by the needle biopsy technique from human subjects. The effect of shock on superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione content of skeletal muscle was also examined. The results show that there is a large decrease in cytochrome oxidase activity during shock and also in the capacity of the mitochondria to oxidize either succinate, or pyruvate, or palmitoyl carnitine. There is a fall in the tissue content of superoxide dismutase and in the total glutathione present. Furthermore, an increased oxidized glutathione content causes a decrease in the molar ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione present in the muscle. These findings suggest that mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) oxidative damage can play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of circulatory shock and support the hypothesis of oxygen-free radical involvement in the cellular injury.

  10. Effects of Environmental Pollutants on Cellular Iron Homeostasis and Ultimate Links to Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreinemachers, Dina M; Ghio, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic disease has increased in the past several decades, and environmental pollutants have been implicated. The magnitude and variety of diseases may indicate the malfunctioning of some basic mechanisms underlying human health. Environmental pollutants demonstrate a capability to complex iron through electronegative functional groups containing oxygen, nitrogen, or sulfur. Cellular exposure to the chemical or its metabolite may cause a loss of requisite functional iron from intracellular sites. The cell is compelled to acquire further iron critical to its survival by activation of iron-responsive proteins and increasing iron import. Iron homeostasis in the exposed cells is altered due to a new equilibrium being established between iron-requiring cells and the inappropriate chelator (the pollutant or its catabolite). Following exposure to environmental pollutants, the perturbation of functional iron homeostasis may be the mechanism leading to adverse biological effects. Understanding the mechanism may lead to intervention methods for this major public health concern.

  11. Study on Effect of Aloe Glue on Cytogenetics, Cellular Immunity and Cell Proliferation of Human Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jiahua; WEN Shaluo; XIA Yun; ZHANG Lijun

    2002-01-01

    Objective To provide the scientific evidence for the exploiture of aloe resource. Methods Cytological combined determination was used to study the effect of aloe glue(0.01 ~ 0.3ml) on cytogenetics, cellular immunity and cell proliferation of human cells. Results SCE and MNR in varying dose groups had no significant differences as compared with control group( P > 0.05). LTR was significantly higher than that of control group(P < 0.005). MI was significantly higher than that of control group ( P < 0.05). M3 and PRI in highest dose group had significant differences as compared with control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion Aloe gel had no significant effect on cytogenetics. But it had activating effects on immunity and proliferation of cells.

  12. Cellular immune response of humans to the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio M. Rodrigues

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available The cellular immune response to the circumsporozoite (CS protein of plasmodium vivax of individuals from malaria-endemic areas of Brazil was studied. We examined the in vitro proliferative response of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of 22 individuals when stimulated with a CS recombinant protein (rPvCS-2 and two other synthetic peptides based on the sequenceof the P. vivax CS protein. Seven of the individuals from malaria-endemic area displayed an antigen specific in vitro proliferative responseto the recombinant protein PvCS-2 and one out of 6, proliferative response to the peptide 308-320. In contrast, none of the individuals displayed a proliferative reponse when stimulated with the D/A peptide which represent some of the repeated units present in this CS protein. Our study, therefore, provides evidence for the presence, withinthe major surface antigen of P. vivax sporozoites, of epitopes capble to induce proliferation of human PBMC.

  13. DNA structure in human RNA polymerase II promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1998-01-01

    the high-bendability regions position nucleosomes at the downstream end of the transcriptional start point, and consider the possibility of interaction between histone-like TAFs and this area. We also propose the use of this structural signature in computational promoter-finding algorithms.......The fact that DNA three-dimensional structure is important for transcriptional regulation begs the question of whether eukaryotic promoters contain general structural features independently of what genes they control. We present an analysis of a large set of human RNA polymerase II promoters...... with a very low level of sequence similarity. The sequences, which include both TATA-containing and TATA-less promoters, are aligned by hidden Markov models. Using three different models of sequence-derived DNA bendability, the aligned promoters display a common structural profile with bendability being low...

  14. Realistic numerical modelling of human head tissue exposure to electromagnetic waves from cellular phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarella, Gilles; Clatz, Olivier; Lanteri, Stéphane; Beaume, Grégory; Oudot, Steve; Pons, Jean-Philippe; Piperno, Sergo; Joly, Patrick; Wiart, Joe

    2006-06-01

    The ever-rising diffusion of cellular phones has brought about an increased concern for the possible consequences of electromagnetic radiation on human health. Possible thermal effects have been investigated, via experimentation or simulation, by several research projects in the last decade. Concerning numerical modeling, the power absorption in a user's head is generally computed using discretized models built from clinical MRI data. The vast majority of such numerical studies have been conducted using Finite Differences Time Domain methods, although strong limitations of their accuracy are due to heterogeneity, poor definition of the detailed structures of head tissues (staircasing effects), etc. In order to propose numerical modeling using Finite Element or Discontinuous Galerkin Time Domain methods, reliable automated tools for the unstructured discretization of human heads are also needed. Results presented in this article aim at filling the gap between human head MRI images and the accurate numerical modeling of wave propagation in biological tissues and its thermal effects. To cite this article: G. Scarella et al., C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  15. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, Michael J. [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Medicine, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Molecular Sciences, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Longhurst, Celia M.; Baker, Benjamin [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Homayouni, Ramin [Department of Biology, Bioinformatics Program, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Speich, Henry E.; Kotha, Jayaprakash [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Jennings, Lisa K., E-mail: ljennings@uthsc.edu [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Medicine, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Molecular Sciences, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Biology, Bioinformatics Program, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD9 is differentially expressed in human Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. • We found that CD9 expression promotes these cells proliferation. • CD9 expression also increases HDAC activity. • HDAC inhibition decreased both cell proliferation and importantly CD9 expression. • CD9 may dictate HDAC efficacy and play a role in HDAC regulation. - Abstract: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9–Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity.

  16. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  17. Commonly consumed and specialty dietary mushrooms reduce cellular proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Keith R; Brophy, Sara K

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, over one million women will be newly diagnosed with breast cancer in the next year. Moreover, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the USA. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that consumption of dietary mushrooms can protect against breast cancer. In this study, we tested and compared the ability of five commonly consumed or specialty mushrooms to modulate cell number balance in the cancer process using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Hot water extracts (80°C for 2 h) of maitake (MT, Grifola frondosa), crimini (CRIM, Agaricus bisporus), portabella (PORT, Agaricus bisporus), oyster (OYS, Pleurotus ostreatus) and white button (WB, Agaricus bisporus) mushrooms or water alone (5% v/v) were incubated for 24 h with MCF-7 cells. Cellular proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly (P mushrooms, with MT and OYS being the most effective. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction, an often used mitochondrion-dependent marker of proliferation, was unchanged although decreased (P > 0.05) by 15% with OYS extract. Lactate dehydrogenase release, as a marker of necrosis, was significantly increased after incubation with MT but not with other test mushrooms. Furthermore, MT extract significantly increased apoptosis, or programmed cell death, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl end labeling method, whereas other test mushrooms displayed trends of ∼15%. The total numbers of cells per flask, determined by hemacytometry, were not different from control cultures. Overall, all test mushrooms significantly suppressed cellular proliferation, with MT further significantly inducing apoptosis and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. This suggests that both common and specialty mushrooms may be chemoprotective against breast cancer.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Human and Porcine Neurons and Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Jeremy J.; Hansen, Brian; Portnoy, Sharon; Lee, Choong-Heon; King, Michael A.; Fey, Michael; Vincent, Franck; Stanisz, Greg J; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Blackband, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    With its unparalleled ability to safely generate high-contrast images of soft tissues, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has remained at the forefront of diagnostic clinical medicine. Unfortunately due to resolution limitations, clinical scans are most useful for detecting macroscopic structural changes associated with a small number of pathologies. Moreover, due to a longstanding inability to directly observe magnetic resonance (MR) signal behavior at the cellular level, such information is poorly characterized and generally must be inferred. With the advent of the MR microscope in 1986 came the ability to measure MR signal properties of theretofore unobservable tissue structures. Recently, further improvements in hardware technology have made possible the ability to visualize mammalian cellular structure. In the current study, we expand upon previous work by imaging the neuronal cell bodies and processes of human and porcine α-motor neurons. Complimentary imaging studies are conducted in pig tissue in order to demonstrate qualitative similarities to human samples. Also, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were generated inside porcine α-motor neuron cell bodies and portions of their largest processes (mean = 1.7±0.5 μm2/ms based on 53 pixels) as well as in areas containing a mixture of extracellular space, microvasculature, and neuropil (0.59±0.37 μm2/ms based on 33 pixels). Three-dimensional reconstruction of MR images containing α-motor neurons shows the spatial arrangement of neuronal projections between adjacent cells. Such advancements in imaging portend the ability to construct accurate models of MR signal behavior based on direct observation and measurement of the components which comprise functional tissues. These tools would not only be useful for improving our interpretation of macroscopic MRI performed in the clinic, but they could potentially be used to develop new methods of differential diagnosis to aid in the early detection of a

  19. An integrative analysis of DNA methylation and RNA-Seq data for human heart, kidney and liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Linglin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many groups, including our own, have proposed the use of DNA methylation profiles as biomarkers for various disease states. While much research has been done identifying DNA methylation signatures in cancer vs. normal etc., we still lack sufficient knowledge of the role that differential methylation plays during normal cellular differentiation and tissue specification. We also need thorough, genome level studies to determine the meaning of methylation of individual CpG dinucleotides in terms of gene expression. Results In this study, we have used (insert statistical method here to compile unique DNA methylation signatures from normal human heart, lung, and kidney using the Illumina Infinium 27 K methylation arraysand compared those to gene expression by RNA sequencing. We have identified unique signatures of global DNA methylation for human heart, kidney and liver, and showed that DNA methylation data can be used to correctly classify various tissues. It indicates that DNA methylation reflects tissue specificity and may play an important role in tissue differentiation. The integrative analysis of methylation and RNA-Seq data showed that gene methylation and its transcriptional levels were comprehensively correlated. The location of methylation markers in terms of distance to transcription start site and CpG island showed no effects on the regulation of gene expression by DNA methylation in normal tissues. Conclusions This study showed that an integrative analysis of methylation array and RNA-Seq data can be utilized to discover the global regulation of gene expression by DNA methylation and suggests that DNA methylation plays an important role in normal tissue differentiation via modulation of gene expression.

  20. A model for DNA binding by the human XPF and ERCC1 complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833673

    2009-01-01

    Cellular DNA is the carrier of genetic information. Therefore, maintaining genome stability is essential for the existence of all living organisms. Integrity of our genome is constantly threatened by a large variety of endogenous and exogenous agents, which generate a plethora of DNA lesions. For

  1. Association between Urinary Excretion of Cortisol and Markers of Oxidatively Damaged DNA and RNA in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Anders; Broedbaek, Kasper; Weimann, Allan

    2011-01-01

    to cellular constituents such as DNA and RNA, a phenomenon which has been implicated in aging processes. We investigated the relationship between 24 h excretion of urinary cortisol and markers of oxidatively generated DNA and RNA damage, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine...

  2. Immunogenicity analysis following human immunodeficiency virus recombinant DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus Tian Tan prime-boost immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cunxia; Du, Shouwen; Li, Chang; Wang, Yuhang; Wang, Maopeng; Li, Yi; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Xiao; Ren, Dayong; Qin, Yanqing; Ren, Jingqiang; Jin, Ningyi

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed and compared the immunogenicity of various immunization strategies in mice using combinations of recombinant DNA (pCCMp24) and recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan (rddVTT-CCMp24). Intramuscular immunization was performed on days 0 (prime) and 21 (boost). The immunogenicity of the vaccine schedules was determined by measuring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific binding antibody levels and cytokine (interleukin-2 and interleukin-4) concentrations in peripheral blood, analyzing lymphocyte proliferation capacity against HIV epitopes and CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio, and monitoring interferon-gamma levels at different times post-immunization. The results showed that pCCMp24, rddVTT-CCMp24 and their prime-boost immunization induced humoral and cellular immune responses. The pCCMp24/rddVTT-CCMp24 immunization strategy increased CD8(+) T cells and induced more IFN-γ-secreting cells compared with single-shot rDNA. The prime-boost immunization strategy also induced the generation of cellular immunological memory to HIV epitope peptides. These results demonstrated that prime-boost immunization with rDNA and rddVTT-CCMp24 had a tendency to induce greater cellular immune response than single-shot vaccinations, especially IFN-γ response, providing a basis for further studies.

  3. Cellular phenotype impacts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral protein R subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrucci Adriano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr is a virion-associated regulatory protein that functions at several points within the viral life cycle and has been shown to accumulate primarily in the nucleus and at the nuclear envelope. However, most studies have investigated Vpr localization employing cell types irrelevant to HIV-1 pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of how cellular phenotype might impact HIV-1 Vpr intracellular localization, Vpr localization was examined in several cell lines representing major cellular targets for HIV-1 infection within the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and central nervous system (CNS. Results Utilizing a green fluorescent protein-tagged Vpr, we detected Vpr mainly in foci inside the nucleus, at the nuclear envelope, and around the nucleoli, with dispersed accumulation in the cytoplasm of human endothelial kidney 293T cells. No differences were observed in Vpr localization pattern with respect to either the location of the tag (N- or C-terminus or the presence of other viral proteins. Subsequently, the Vpr localization pattern was explored in two primary HIV-1 target cells within the peripheral blood: the CD4+ T lymphocyte (represented by the Jurkat CD4+ T-cell line and the monocyte-macrophage (represented by the U-937 cell line. Vpr was found primarily in speckles within the cytoplasm of the Jurkat T cells, whereas it accumulated predominantly intranuclearly in U-937 monocytic cells. These patterns differ from that observed in a bone marrow progenitor cell line (TF-1, wherein Vpr localized mainly at the nuclear envelope with some intranuclear punctuate staining. Within the CNS, we examined two astroglioma cell lines and found that Vpr displayed a perinuclear and cytoplasmic distribution. Conclusions The results suggest that the pattern of Vpr localization depends on cellular phenotype, probably owing to interactions between Vpr and cell type-specific host

  4. Synthesis, DNA binding, cellular DNA lesion and cytotoxicity of a series of new benzimidazole-based Schiff base copper(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anup; Anbu, Sellamuthu; Sharma, Gunjan; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Koch, Biplob; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2015-12-14

    A series of new benzimidazole containing compounds 2-((1-R-1-H-benzimidazol-2-yl)phenyl-imino)naphthol HL(1-3) (R = methyl, ethyl or propyl, respectively) have been synthesized by Schiff base condensation of 2-(1-R-1-H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)aniline and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde. The reactions of HL(1-3) with Cu(NO3)2·2.5H2O led to the corresponding copper(II) complexes [Cu(L)(NO3)] 1-3. All the compounds were characterized by conventional analytical techniques and, for 1 and 3, also by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The interactions of complexes 1-3 with calf thymus DNA were studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques and the calculated binding constants (K(b)) are in the range of 3.5 × 10(5) M(-1)-3.2 × 10(5) M(-1). Complexes 1-3 effectively bind DNA through an intercalative mode, as proved by molecular docking studies. The binding affinity of the complexes decreases with the size increase of the N-alkyl substituent, in the order of 1 > 2 > 3, which is also in accord with the calculated LUMO(complex) energies. They show substantial in vitro cytotoxic effect against human lung (A-549), breast (MDA-MB-231) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. Complex 1 exhibits a significant inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the A-549 cancer cells. The antiproliferative efficacy of 1 has also been analysed by a DNA fragmentation assay, fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and nuclear morphology using a fluorescence microscope. The possible mode for the apoptosis pathway of 1 has also been evaluated by a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation study.

  5. Radioactive cDNA microarray (II): Gene expression profiling of antidepressant treatment by human cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Rhee Hun; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Min Su; Shin, Kyung Ho; Choe, Jae Gol; Kim, Meyoung Kon [College of Medicine, Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in primary care, associated with impaired patient functioning and well-being. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a commonly prescribed antidepressant compound. Its action is primarily attributed to selective inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the central nervous system. Objectives ; the aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine the usefulness for investigation of the transcription profiles in depression patients, and (2) to assess the differences in gene expression profiles between positive response group and negative response groups by fluoxetine treatment. This study included 53 patients with major depression (26 in positive response group with antidepressant treatment, 27 in negative response group with antidepressant treatment), and 53 healthy controls. To examine the difference of gene expression profile in depression patients, radioactive complementary DNA microarrays were used to evaluate changes in the expression of 1,152 genes in total. Using 33p-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signaling. Gene transcription profiles were classified into several categories in accordance with the antidepressant gene-regulation. The gene profiles were significantly up-(22 genes) and down-(16 genes) regulated in the positive response group when compared to the control group. Also, in the negative response group, 35 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated when compared to the control group. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology.

  6. Robotics for recombinant DNA and human genetics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    In October of 1989, molecular biologists throughout the world formally embarked on ultimately determining the set of genetic instructions for a human being. Called by some the Manhattan Project'' a molecular biology, pursuit of this goal is projected to require approximately 3000 man years of effort over a 15-year period. The Humane Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort that has the goal of analyzing the structure of human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and determining the location of all human genes. The Department of Energy (DOE) has designated three of its national laboratories as centers for the Human Genome Project. These are Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). These laboratories are currently working on different, but complementary technology development areas in support of the Human Genome Project. The robotics group at LANL is currently working at developing the technologies that address the problems associated with physical mapping. This article describes some of these problems and discusses some of the robotics approaches and engineering tolls applicable to their solution. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

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    José J. Gaforio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  8. Hydroxytyrosol protects against oxidative DNA damage in human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J

    2011-10-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol's effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  9. Cidofovir is active against human papillomavirus positive and negative head and neck and cervical tumor cells by causing DNA damage as one of its working mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Barbara; Nogueira, Tatiane; Stranska, Ruzena; Naesens, Lieve; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer and a large fraction of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Cidofovir (CDV) proved efficacious in the treatment of several HPV-induced benign and malignant hyper proliferations. To provide a better insight into how CDV selectively eradicates transformed cells, HPV+ and HPV− cervical carcinoma and HNSCC cell lines were compared to normal cells for antiproliferative effects, CDV metabolism, drug incorporation into cellular DNA, and DNA damage. Incorporation of CDV into cellular DNA was higher in tumor cells than in normal cells and correlated with CDV antiproliferative effects, which were independent of HPV status. Increase in phospho-ATM levels was detected following CDV exposure and higher levels of γ-H2AX (a quantitative marker of double-strand breaks) were measured in tumor cells compared to normal cells. A correlation between DNA damage and CDV incorporation into DNA was found but not between DNA damage and CDV antiproliferative effects. These data indicate that CDV antiproliferative effects result from incorporation of the drug into DNA causing DNA damage. However, the anti-tumor effects of CDV cannot be exclusively ascribed to DNA damage. Furthermore, CDV can be considered a promising broad spectrum anti-cancer agent, not restricted to HPV+ lesions. PMID:27331622

  10. Longevity and composition of cellular immune responses following experimental Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teirlinck, A.C.; McCall, M.B.B.; Roestenberg, M.; Scholzen, A.; Woestenenk, R.M.; Mast, Q. de; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Hermsen, C.C.; Luty, A.J.F.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular responses to Plasmodium falciparum parasites, in particular interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) production, play an important role in anti-malarial immunity. However, clinical immunity to malaria develops slowly amongst naturally exposed populations, the dynamics of cellular responses in relation

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of the p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene in S-Phase of the Cell-Cycle and the Cellular Response to DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Reisman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor induces the transcription of genes that negatively regulate progression of the cell cycle in response to DNA damage or other cellular stressors and thus participates in maintaining genome stability. Numerous studies have demonstrated that p53 transcription is activated before or during early S-phase in cells progressing from G0/G1 into S-phase through the combined action of two DNA-binding factors RBP-Jκ and C/EBPβ-2. Here, we review evidence that this induction occurs to provide available p53 mRNA in order to prepare the cell for DNA damage in S-phase, this ensuring a rapid response to DNA damage before exiting this stage of the cell cycle.

  12. Base composition at mtDNA boundaries suggests a DNA triple helix model for human mitochondrial DNA large-scale rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocher, Christophe; Letellier, Thierry; Copeland, William C; Lestienne, Patrick

    2002-06-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to account for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability based on the presence of short homologous sequences (direct repeats, DR) at the potential boundaries of mtDNA rearrangements. Among them, slippage-mispairing of the replication complex during the asymmetric replication cycle of the mammalian mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to account for the preferential localization of deletions. This mechanism involves a transfer of the replication complex from the first neo-synthesized heavy (H) strand of the DR1, to the DR2, thus bypassing the intervening sequence and producing a deleted molecule. Nevertheless, the nature of the bonds between the DNA strands remains unknown as the forward sequence of DR2, beyond the replication complex, stays double-stranded. Here, we have analyzed the base composition of the DR at the boundaries of mtDNA deletions and duplications and found a skewed pyrimidine content of about 75% in the light-strand DNA template. This suggests the possible building of a DNA triple helix between the G-rich neo-synthesized DR1 and the base-paired homologous G.C-rich DR2. In vitro experiments with the purified human DNA polymerase gamma subunits enabled us to show that the third DNA strand may be used as a primer for DNA replication, using a template with the direct repeat forming a hairpin, with which the primer could initiate DNA replication. These data suggest a novel molecular basis for mitochondrial DNA rearrangements through the distributive nature of the DNA polymerase gamma, at the level of the direct repeats. A general model accounting for large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletion and duplication is proposed. These experiments extend to a DNA polymerase from an eucaryote source the use of a DNA triple helix strand as a primer, like other DNA polymerases from phage and bacterial origins.

  13. Cellular and synaptic localization of EAAT2a in human cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello eMelone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical techniques to analyze the distribution, cellular and synaptic localization of EAAT2, the main glutamate transporter, in normal human neocortex. EAAT2a immunoreactivity was in all layers and consisted of small neuropilar puncta and rare cells. In white matter EAAT2a+ cells were numerous. Electron microscopic studies showed that in gray matter ∼77% of immunoreactive elements were astrocytic processes, ∼14% axon terminals, ∼2.8% dendrites, whereas ∼5% were unidentifiable. In white matter, ∼81% were astrocytic processes, ∼17% were myelinated axons and ∼2.0% were unidentified. EAAT2a immunoreactivity was never in microglial cells and oligodendrocytes. Pre-embedding electron microscopy showed that ∼67% of EAAT2a expressed at (or in the vicinity of asymmetric synapses was in astrocytes, ∼17% in axon terminals, while ∼13% was both in astrocytes and in axons. Post-embeddeding electron microscopy studies showed that in astrocytic processes contacting asymmetric synapses and in axon terminals, gold particle density was ∼25.1 and ∼2.8 particles/µm2, respectively, and was concentrated in a membrane region extending for ∼300 nm from the active zone edge. Besides representing the first detailed description of EAAT2a in human cerebral cortex, these findings may contribute to understanding its role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases.

  14. The human-induced pluripotent stem cell initiative—data resources for cellular genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Ian; Harrison, Peter W.; Faulconbridge, Adam; Flicek, Paul; Parkinson, Helen; Clarke, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Initiative (HipSci) isf establishing a large catalogue of human iPSC lines, arguably the most well characterized collection to date. The HipSci portal enables researchers to choose the right cell line for their experiment, and makes HipSci's rich catalogue of assay data easy to discover and reuse. Each cell line has genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and cellular phenotyping data. Data are deposited in the appropriate EMBL-EBI archives, including the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA), ArrayExpress and PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) databases. The project will make 500 cell lines from healthy individuals, and from 150 patients with rare genetic diseases; these will be available through the European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC). As of August 2016, 238 cell lines are available for purchase. Project data is presented through the HipSci data portal (http://www.hipsci.org/lines) and is downloadable from the associated FTP site (ftp://ftp.hipsci.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp). The data portal presents a summary matrix of the HipSci cell lines, showing available data types. Each line has its own page containing descriptive metadata, quality information, and links to archived assay data. Analysis results are also available in a Track Hub, allowing visualization in the context of public genomic annotations (http://www.hipsci.org/data/trackhubs). PMID:27733501

  15. The human-induced pluripotent stem cell initiative-data resources for cellular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Ian; Harrison, Peter W; Faulconbridge, Adam; Flicek, Paul; Parkinson, Helen; Clarke, Laura

    2017-01-04

    The Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Initiative (HipSci) isf establishing a large catalogue of human iPSC lines, arguably the most well characterized collection to date. The HipSci portal enables researchers to choose the right cell line for their experiment, and makes HipSci's rich catalogue of assay data easy to discover and reuse. Each cell line has genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and cellular phenotyping data. Data are deposited in the appropriate EMBL-EBI archives, including the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA), European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA), ArrayExpress and PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) databases. The project will make 500 cell lines from healthy individuals, and from 150 patients with rare genetic diseases; these will be available through the European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC). As of August 2016, 238 cell lines are available for purchase. Project data is presented through the HipSci data portal (http://www.hipsci.org/lines) and is downloadable from the associated FTP site (ftp://ftp.hipsci.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp). The data portal presents a summary matrix of the HipSci cell lines, showing available data types. Each line has its own page containing descriptive metadata, quality information, and links to archived assay data. Analysis results are also available in a Track Hub, allowing visualization in the context of public genomic annotations (http://www.hipsci.org/data/trackhubs). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Determination of cellular lipids bound to human CD1d molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl Cox

    Full Text Available CD1 molecules are glycoproteins that present lipid antigens at the cell surface for immunological recognition by specialized populations of T lymphocytes. Prior experimental data suggest a wide variety of lipid species can bind to CD1 molecules, but little is known about the characteristics of cellular ligands that are selected for presentation. Here we have molecularly characterized lipids bound to the human CD1d isoform. Ligands were eluted from secreted CD1d molecules and separated by normal phase HPLC, then characterized by mass spectroscopy. A total of 177 lipid species were molecularly identified, comprising glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. The glycerophospholipids included common diacylglycerol species, reduced forms known as plasmalogens, lyso-phospholipids (monoacyl species, and cardiolipins (tetraacyl species. The sphingolipids included sphingomyelins and glycosylated forms, such as the ganglioside GM3. These results demonstrate that human CD1d molecules bind a surprising diversity of lipid structures within the secretory pathway, including compounds that have been reported to play roles in cancer, autoimmune diseases, lipid signaling, and cell death.

  17. Long-Term Calorie Restriction Enhances Cellular Quality-Control Processes in Human Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR retards aging, acts as a hormetic intervention, and increases serum corticosterone and HSP70 expression in rodents. However, less is known regarding the effects of CR on these factors in humans. Serum cortisol and molecular chaperones and autophagic proteins were measured in the skeletal muscle of subjects on CR diets for 3–15 years and in control volunteers. Serum cortisol was higher in the CR group than in age-matched sedentary and endurance athlete groups (15.6 ± 4.6 ng/dl versus 12.3 ± 3.9 ng/dl and 11.2 ± 2.7 ng/dl, respectively; p ≤ 0.001. HSP70, Grp78, beclin-1, and LC3 mRNA and/or protein levels were higher in the skeletal muscle of the CR group compared to controls. Our data indicate that CR in humans is associated with sustained rises in serum cortisol, reduced inflammation, and increases in key molecular chaperones and autophagic mediators involved in cellular protein quality control and removal of dysfunctional proteins and organelles.

  18. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in human macrophages: uptake, intracellular distribution and cellular responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A; Tentschert, J; Jungnickel, H; Goetz, M E; Luch, A [BfR - Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Product Safety, Thielallee 88-92, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Graf, P [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Mantion, A; Thuenemann, A F [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Draude, F; Galla, S; Arlinghaus, H F [University of Muenster, Institute of Physics, Wilhelm Klemm Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Plendl, J [Free University of Berlin, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, Koserstrasse 20, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Masic, A; Taubert, A, E-mail: andrea.haase@bfr.bund.de, E-mail: alexandre.mantion@bam.de [University of Potsdam, Institute of Chemistry, Karl- Liebknecht- Strasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2011-07-06

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are among the most commercialized nanoparticles worldwide. They can be found in many diverse products, mostly because of their antibacterial properties. Despite its widespread use only little data on possible adverse health effects exist. It is difficult to compare biological data from different studies due to the great variety in sizes, coatings or shapes of the particles. Here, we applied a novel synthesis approach to obtain SNP, which are covalently stabilized by a small peptide. This enables a tight control of both size and shape. We applied these SNP in two different sizes of 20 or 40 nm (Ag20Pep and Ag40Pep) and analyzed responses of THP-1-derived human macrophages. Similar gold nanoparticles with the same coating (Au20Pep) were used for comparison and found to be non-toxic. We assessed the cytotoxicity of particles and confirmed their cellular uptake via transmission electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Importantly a majority of the SNP could be detected as individual particles spread throughout the cells. Furthermore we studied several types of oxidative stress related responses such as induction of heme oxygenase I or formation of protein carbonyls. In summary, our data demonstrate that even low doses of SNP exerted adverse effects in human macrophages.

  19. Mitochondrial proteomics on human fibroblasts for identification of metabolic imbalance and cellular stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bross Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial proteins are central to various metabolic activities and are key regulators of apoptosis. Disturbance of mitochondrial proteins is therefore often associated with disease. Large scale protein data are required to capture the mitochondrial protein levels and mass spectrometry based proteomics is suitable for generating such data. To study the relative quantities of mitochondrial proteins in cells from cultivated human skin fibroblasts we applied a proteomic method based on nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of iTRAQ-labeled peptides. Results When fibroblast cultures were exposed to mild metabolic stress – by cultivation in galactose medium- the amount of mitochondria appeared to be maintained whereas the levels of individual proteins were altered. Proteins of respiratory chain complex I and IV were increased together with NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of the citric acid cycle illustrating cellular strategies to cope with altered energy metabolism. Furthermore, quantitative protein data, with a median standard error below 6%, were obtained for the following mitochondrial pathways: fatty acid oxidation, citric acid cycle, respiratory chain, antioxidant systems, amino acid metabolism, mitochondrial translation, protein quality control, mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis. Conclusion The robust analytical platform in combination with a well-defined compendium of mitochondrial proteins allowed quantification of single proteins as well as mapping of entire pathways. This enabled characterization of the interplay between metabolism and stress response in human cells exposed to mild stress.

  20. DNA Sequences Proximal to Human Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Breakpoints Prevalent in Human Disease Form G-quadruplexes, a Class of DNA Structures Inefficiently Unwound by the Mitochondrial Replicative Twinkle Helicase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharti, S.K.; Sommers, J.A.; Zhou, J.; Kaplan, D.L.; Spelbrink, J.N.; Mergny, J.L.; Brosh, R.M., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA deletions are prominent in human genetic disorders, cancer, and aging. It is thought that stalling of the mitochondrial replication machinery during DNA synthesis is a prominent source of mitochondrial genome instability; however, the precise molecular determinants of defective