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Sample records for human cells leads

  1. Analysis of lead toxicity in human cells

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    Gillis Bruce S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lead is a metal with many recognized adverse health side effects, and yet the molecular processes underlying lead toxicity are still poorly understood. Quantifying the injurious effects of lead is also difficult because of the diagnostic limitations that exist when analyzing human blood and urine specimens for lead toxicity. Results We analyzed the deleterious impact of lead on human cells by measuring its effects on cytokine production and gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Lead activates the secretion of the chemokine IL-8 and impacts mitogen-dependent activation by increasing the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and of the chemokines IL-8 and MIP1-α in the presence of phytohemagglutinin. The recorded changes in gene expression affected major cellular functions, including metallothionein expression, and the expression of cellular metabolic enzymes and protein kinase activity. The expression of 31 genes remained elevated after the removal of lead from the testing medium thereby allowing for the measurement of adverse health effects of lead poisoning. These included thirteen metallothionein transcripts, three endothelial receptor B transcripts and a number of transcripts which encode cellular metabolic enzymes. Cellular responses to lead correlated with blood lead levels and were significantly altered in individuals with higher lead content resultantly affecting the nervous system, the negative regulation of transcription and the induction of apoptosis. In addition, we identified changes in gene expression in individuals with elevated zinc protoporphyrin blood levels and found that genes regulating the transmission of nerve impulses were affected in these individuals. The affected pathways were G-protein mediated signaling, gap junction signaling, synaptic long-term potentiation, neuropathic pain signaling as well as CREB signaling in neurons. Cellular responses to lead were

  2. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells.

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    Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Hervey M; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO₃)₂] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO₃)₂ for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p cell death in Pb(NO₃)₂-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO₃)₂ compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p cells (apoptotic cells) compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO₃)₂ inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure and its associated adverse health effects.

  3. High concentrations of NaCl induce cell swelling leading to senescence in human cells.

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    Yamakami, Yoshimi; Yonekura, Ryuzo; Matsumoto, Yuko; Takauji, Yuki; Miki, Kensuke; Fujii, Michihiko; Ayusawa, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Cell swelling and retardation in DNA replication are always observed in senescent cells. When DNA replication is slowed down with RNA and protein syntheses unchanged in proliferating cells, it causes a phenomenon known as unbalanced growth. The purpose of this study is to assess the role of cell swelling in unbalanced growth in terms of senescence and investigate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We tried to induce cell swelling with minimum damage to cells in this study. We perturbed the osmoregulatory functions to induce cell swelling under hypotonic and hypertonic conditions in normal human fibroblasts. Addition of excess NaCl was found to induce significant cell and nuclear swelling in dose- and time-dependent manners. Excess NaCl immediately retarded DNA replication, accumulated cells at G1 phase of the cell cycle, and eventually deprived division potential of the cells. Such cells showed typical senescent cell shape followed by expression of the typical senescence-associated genes. Excess NaCl also activated ERK1/2, p38, and JNK of the mitogen activated protein kinase family. Addition of U0126, an inhibitor of ERK1/2, prevented appearance of senescent features induced by excess NaCl. These results suggest that hypertonic conditions induce cell swelling due to unbalanced growth, thereby leading to cellular senescence.

  4. Lead Exposure Induces Telomere Instability in Human Cells.

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    Géraldine Pottier

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb is an important environmental contaminant due to its widespread use over many centuries. While it affects primarily every organ system of the body, the most pernicious effects of Pb are on the central nervous system leading to cognitive and behavioral modification. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms responsible for Pb toxicity remain poorly understood. Recent work has suggested that Pb exposure may have consequences on chromosomal integrity as it was shown that Pb exposure leads to the generation of γH2Ax foci, a well-established biomarker for DNA double stranded break (DSB formation. As the chromosomal localization of γH2Ax foci plays an important role in determining the molecular mechanism responsible for their formation, we examined the localization of Pb-induced foci with respect to telomeres. Indeed, short or dysfunctional telomeres (uncapped or damaged telomeres may be recognized as DSB by the DNA repair machinery, leading to "telomere-Induced Foci" (TIFs. In the current study, we show that while Pb exposure did not increase intra-chromosomal foci, it significantly induced TIFs, leading in some cases, to chromosomal abnormalities including telomere loss. The evidence suggests that these chromosomal abnormalities are likely due to perturbation of telomere replication, in particular on the lagging DNA strand. We propose a mechanism by which Pb exposure leads to the loss of telomere maintenance. As numerous studies have demonstrated a role for telomere maintenance in brain development and tissue homeostasis, our results suggest a possible mechanism for lead-induced neurotoxicity.

  5. Effect of lead on IL-8 production and cell proliferation in human oral keratinocytes

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    Thaweboon Srosiri; Poomsawat Sopee; Thaweboon Boonyanit

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of lead on the production of IL-8 and cell proliferation in normal human oral keratinocytes (NHKs). Methods: NHKs were prepared as outgrowths from normal human buccal mucosa. The cells were treated with three concentrations of lead glutamate (4.5í10-5M, 4.5í10-6M and 4.5í10-7M). NHKs grown in glutamic acid were used as control. The amounts of IL-8 secreted in the culture supernatants were evaluated at 12 and 24 h using enzyme-linked immunospecific assay (ELISA). Cell proliferation was determined by the MTT colorimetric assay. Three cultures were used for each experiment, and three independent experiments were performed. Analysis of variance and Duncan’s multiple range tests were used for statistical analysis. Results:An elevation of IL-8 in culture supernatants of NHKs treated with lead at all concentrations at 12 and 24 h after exposure in a dose-dependent manner was revealed. A significant increase in cell numbers was observed only at 24 h exposed to 4.5í10-5M lead glutamate. Conclusions: The capacity of NHKs, to secrete IL-8, enhanced by lead glutamate, is demonstrated here. Induction of cell proliferation is revealed only after exposure to high lead concentration. The elevation of secreted IL-8 is a probable initial sign for the acute inflammatory response and may be involved in the pathogenesis of lead stomatitis.

  6. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic effects of Arsenic and Lead on Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AMSCs).

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    Shakoori, Ar; Ahmad, A

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic and lead, known to have genotoxic and mutagenic effects, are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. The presence of arsenic in drinking water has been a serious health problem in many countries. Human exposure to these metals has also increased due to rapid industrialization and their use in formulation of many products. Liposuction material is a rich source of stem cells. In the present study cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these metals were tested on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs). Cells were exposed to 1-10 μg/ml and 10-100 μg/ml concentration of arsenic and lead, respectively, for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The cytotoxic effects were measured by neutral red uptake assay, while the genotoxic effects were tested by comet assay. The growth of cells decreased with increasing concentration and the duration of exposure to arsenic. Even the morphology of cells was changed; they became round at 10 μg /ml of arsenic. The cell growth was also decreased after exposure to lead, though it proved to be less toxic when cells were exposed for longer duration. The cell morphology remained unchanged. DNA damage was observed in the metal treated cells. Different parameters of comet assay were investigated for control and treated cells which indicated more DNA damage in arsenic treated cells compared to that of lead. Intact nuclei were observed in control cells. Present study clearly demonstrates that both arsenic and lead have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on AMSCs, though arsenic compared to lead has more deleterious effects on AMSCs.

  7. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effects of Arsenic and Lead on Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (AMSCs

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    Shakoori A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic and lead, known to have genotoxic and mutagenic effects, are ubiquitously distributed in the environment. The presence of arsenic in drinking water has been a serious health problem in many countries. Human exposure to these metals has also increased due to rapid industrialization and their use in formulation of many products. Liposuction material is a rich source of stem cells. In the present study cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these metals were tested on adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs. Cells were exposed to 1-10 µg/ml and 10-100 µg/ml concentration of arsenic and lead, respectively, for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The cytotoxic effects were measured by neutral red uptake assay, while the genotoxic effects were tested by comet assay. The growth of cells decreased with increasing concentration and the duration of exposure to arsenic. Even the morphology of cells was changed; they became round at 10 µg /ml of arsenic. The cell growth was also decreased after exposure to lead, though it proved to be less toxic when cells were exposed for longer duration. The cell morphology remained unchanged. DNA damage was observed in the metal treated cells. Different parameters of comet assay were investigated for control and treated cells which indicated more DNA damage in arsenic treated cells compared to that of lead. Intact nuclei were observed in control cells. Present study clearly demonstrates that both arsenic and lead have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on AMSCs, though arsenic compared to lead has more deleterious effects on AMSCs.

  8. Effect of arsenic, cadmium and lead on the induction of apoptosis of normal human mononuclear cells

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    DE LA FUENTE, H; PORTALES-PÉREZ, D; BARANDA, L; DÍAZ-BARRIGA, F; SAAVEDRA-ALANÍS, V; LAYSECA, E; GONZÁLEZ-AMARO, R

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of cadmium, lead and arsenic on the apoptosis of human immune cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) were incubated with increasing concentrations of these metals and then cellular apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and by DNA electrophoresis. We found that arsenic induced a significant level of apoptosis at 15 μm after 48h of incubation. Cadmium had a similar effect, but at higher concentrations (65 μm). In addition, cadmium exerted a cytotoxic effect on MNC that seemed to be independent of the induction of apoptosis. In contrast, concentrations of lead as high as 500 μm were nontoxic and did not induce a significant degree of apoptosis. Additional experiments showed that arsenic at concentrations as low as 1·0 μm had a significant pro-apoptotic effect when cells were cultured in the presence of this pollutant for more than 72. Non-T cells were more susceptible than T lymphocytes to the effect of arsenic and cadmium. Interestingly, MNC from children chronically exposed to arsenic showed a high basal rate of apoptosis and a diminished in vitro sensibility to this metalloid. Our results indicate that both arsenic and cadmium are able to induce apoptosis of lymphoid cells, and suggest that this phenomenon may contribute to their immunotoxic effect in vivo. PMID:12100024

  9. Human herpesvirus-8 infection leads to expansion of the preimmune/natural effector B cell compartment.

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    Silvia Della Bella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS and of some lymphoproliferative disorders of B cells. Most malignancies develop after long-lasting viral dormancy, and a preventing role for both humoral and cellular immune control is suggested by the high frequency of these pathologies in immunosuppressed patients. B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells of peripheral lymphoid organs and blood represent the major reservoir of HHV-8. Due to the dual role of B cells in HHV-8 infection, both as virus reservoir and as agents of humoral immune control, we analyzed the subset distribution and the functional state of peripheral blood B cells in HHV-8-infected individuals with and without cKS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Circulating B cells and their subsets were analyzed by 6-color flow cytometry in the following groups: 1- patients HHV-8 positive with classic KS (cKS (n = 47; 2- subjects HHV-8 positive and cKS negative (HSP (n = 10; 3- healthy controls, HHV-8 negative and cKS negative (HC (n = 43. The number of B cells belonging to the preimmune/natural effector compartment, including transitional, pre-naïve, naïve and MZ-like subsets, was significantly higher among HHV-8 positive subjects, with or without cKS, while was comparable to healthy controls in the antigen-experienced T-cell dependent compartment. The increased number of preimmune/natural effector B cells was associated with increased resistance to spontaneous apoptosis, while it did not correlate with HHV-8 viral load. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that long-lasting HHV-8 infection promotes an imbalance in peripheral B cell subsets, perturbing the equilibrium between earlier and later steps of maturation and activation processes. This observation may broaden our understanding of the complex interplay between viral and immune factors leading HHV-8-infected individuals to develop HHV-8-associated malignancies.

  10. Interaction between Campylobacter and intestinal epithelial cells leads to a different proinflammatory response in human and porcine host.

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    Aguilar, Carmen; Jiménez-Marín, Ángeles; Martins, Rodrigo Prado; Garrido, Juan J

    2014-11-15

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the leading causes of human diarrheal disease throughout the development world. Unlike human beings, gastrointestinal tract of pigs are frequently colonized by Campylobacter to a high level in a commensal manner. The aim of this study was to identify the differences underlying the divergent outcome following Campylobacter challenge in porcine versus human host. In order to address this, a comparative in vitro infection model was combined with microscopy, gentamicin protection assay, ELISA and quantitative PCR techniques. Invasion assays revealed that Campylobacter invaded human cells up to 10-fold more than porcine cells (pCampylobacter in human epithelial cell at early times of infection, whereas a very reduced cytokine gene expression was detected in porcine epithelial cells. These data indicate that Campylobacter fails to invade porcine cells compared to human cells, and this leads to a lack of proinflammatory response induction, probably due to its pathogenic or commensal behavior in human and porcine host, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancing the GLP-1 receptor signaling pathway leads to proliferation and neuroprotection in human neuroblastoma cells

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    Li, Yazhou; Tweedie, David; Mattson, Mark P.; Holloway, Harold W.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an incretin hormone of current interest in type 2 diabetes, is neuroprotective in both cell culture and animal models. To characterize the neuroprotective properties of GLP-1 and associated underlying mechanisms, we over-expressed the GLP-1 receptor (R) on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells to generate a neuronal culture system featuring enhanced GLP-1R signaling. In GLP-1R over-expressing SH-SY5Y (SH-hGLP-1R#9) cells, GLP-1 an...

  12. Pokemon Silencing Leads to Bim-Mediated Anoikis of Human Hepatoma Cell QGY7703

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    Kun Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pokemon is an important proto-oncogene that plays a critical role in cellular oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. Anoikis, which is regulated by Bim-mediated apoptosis, is critical to cancer cell invasion and metastasis. We investigated the role of Pokemon in anoikis, and our results show that Pokemon renders liver cells resistant to anoikis via suppression of Bim transcription. We knocked-down Pokemon in human hepatoma cells QGY7703 with small interfering RNAs (siRNA. Knockdown of Pokemon alone did not significantly affect the growth and survival of QGY7703 cells but notably enhanced their sensitivity to apoptotic stress due to the presence of chemical agents or cell detachment, thereby inducing anoikis, as evidenced by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assays. In contrast, ectopic expression of Pokemon in HL7702 cells led to resistance to anoikis. Dual-luciferase reporter and ChIP assays illustrated that Pokemon suppressed Bim transcription via direct binding to its promoter. Our results suggest that Pokemon prevents anoikis through the suppression of Bim expression, which facilitates tumor cell invasion and metastasis. This Pokemon-Bim pathway may be an effective target for therapeutic intervention for cancer.

  13. Riproximin modulates multiple signaling cascades leading to cytostatic and apoptotic effects in human breast cancer cells.

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    Pervaiz, Asim; Zepp, Michael; Adwan, Hassan; Berger, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Riproximin, a type II ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP), has shown significant cytotoxic effects in diverse types of cancer cells. To better understand its therapeutic potential, elaborated investigations on the mechanistic aspects of riproximin deem crucial. In this study, we focused on riproximin-mediated changes in cellular properties and corresponding molecular pathways in breast cancer cells. Cytotoxicity of riproximin was determined by MTT assay, while the clonogenic and migratory effects were determined by colony formation, migration, and scratch assays. Cytostatic and apoptotic effects were studied by flow cytometry and nuclear staining procedures. Alterations at molecular levels were scrutinized by means of microarray and qRT-PCR methodologies. Riproximin induced significant cytotoxic effects in the selected human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. Profound inhibition of migration and colony formation were observed in both cell lines in response to riproximin exposure. Concomitantly, a significant arrest in S phase and nuclear fragmentation were observed as causes for its cytostatic and apoptotic effects, respectively. Genetic profiling revealed pronounced induction of the anticancer cytokine IL24/MDA-7 and ER-stress-related GADD genes. In addition, prominent inhibition of the genes relevant to migration (RHO GTPases), anti-apoptotic activities (BCL family), and cell cycle (cyclins) was also noticed. Riproximin, with its significant antineoplastic effects, modulates multiple cytostatic and apoptotic pathways in breast cancer cells. Results from these investigations highlight the future therapeutic potential of this naturally occurring compound for breast cancer.

  14. Stimulation of human red blood cells leads to Ca2+-mediated intercellular adhesion

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    Steffen, Patrick; Nguyen, Duc Bach; Müller, Torsten; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kaestner, Lars; Wagner, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are a major component of blood clots, which form physiologically as a response to injury or pathologically in thrombosis. The active participation of RBCs in thrombus solidification has been previously proposed but not yet experimentally proven. Holographic optical tweezers and single-cell force spectroscopy were used to study potential cell-cell adhesion between RBCs. Irreversible intercellular adhesion of RBCs could be induced by stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a compound known to be released by activated platelets. We identified Ca2+ as an essential player in the signaling cascade by directly inducing Ca2+ influx using A23187. Elevation of the internal Ca2+ concentration leads to an intercellular adhesion of RBCs similar to that induced by LPA stimulation. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, the adhesion of the RBCs was identified to be approximately 100 pN, a value large enough to be of significance inside a blood clot or in pathological situations like the vasco-occ...

  15. Cytotoxic and Oxidative Stress Caused by Cadmium and Lead on Human Skin Fibroblast Cells

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    Ali Beman Zaree Mahmodabady

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heavy metals are important occupational andenvironmental pollutants that cause damage to various organs.Although there is no effective therapy for such a poisoning,metallothionein has been shown to play a key role in thedetoxification of cadmium (Cd. Evidence in the literature suggeststhat superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalaseconstitute important defense mechanisms against oxygen toxicity inthe cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect ofcadmium chloride and Pb-acetate on antioxidant enzymes in thehuman skin fibroblast cells (HF2FF.Material and Methods: The human skin fibroblast (HF2FF cellswere incubated in serum-free medium containing 20 μM CdCl2 for18 hr three times a week. The same exposure to an equimolar doseof Pb-acetate was performed. After each exposure and after threetimes exposure the cells were collected and cell viability, thecontents of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px, GSH and malondialdehyde (MDA weremeasured.Results: Cd caused cytotoxicity and inhibition of glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px and SOD activity, as well as depletion of thereduced form of glutathione (GSH in the cell. The level of lipidperoxidation (LP was increased, but catalase activity was notsignificantly altered. These defects were increased with repeatedexposures. The same exposure to an equimolar dose of Pb-acetateevoked only inhibition of GSH-Px and SOD. The values of GSH,catalase and LP activity remained unchanged.Conclusion: The inhibition of GSH-Px and SOD may be consideredas an important biomarker of the toxic effect of metals.

  16. Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Tooth Exhibit Stromal-Derived Inducing Activity and Lead to Generation of Neural Crest Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

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    Khadijeh Karbalaie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The neural crest is a transient structure of early vertebrate embryos that generates neural crest cells (NCCs. These cells can migrate throughout the body and produce a diverse array of mature tissue types. Due to the ethical and technical problems surrounding the isolation of these early human embryo cells, researchers have focused on in vitro studies to produce NCCs and increase their knowledge of neural crest development. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we cultured human embryonic stem cells (hESCs on stromal stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED for a two-week period. We used different approaches to characterize these differentiated cells as neural precursor cells (NPCs and NCCs. Results: In the first co-culture week, hESCs appeared as crater-like structures with marginal rosettes. NPCs derived from these structures expressed the early neural crest marker p75 in addition to numerous other genes associated with neural crest induction such as SNAIL, SLUG, PTX3 and SOX9. Flow cytometry analysis showed 70% of the cells were AP2/P75 positive. Moreover, the cells were able to self-renew, sustain multipotent differentiation potential, and readily form neurospheres in suspension culture. Conclusion: SHED, as an adult stem cell with a neural crest origin, has stromal-derived inducing activity (SDIA and can be used as an NCC inducer from hESCs. These cells provide an invaluable resource to study neural crest differentiation in both normal and disordered human neural crest development.

  17. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

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    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  18. Basic Apoptotic Mechanisms of Lead Toxicity in Human Leukemia (Hl-60) Cells

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    Tchounwou, Paul B.; Carolyn B. Howard; Milner, Jessica N.; Yedjou, Clement G.

    2010-01-01

    Lead exposure represents a medical and public health emergency, especially in children consuming high amounts of lead-contaminated flake paints. It may also cause hematological effects to people of all ages. Recent studies in our laboratory have indicated that apoptosis may be associated with the lead-induced oxidative stress and DNA damage. However, the mechanisms underlying its effect on lymphocytes are still largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the ap...

  19. Selective sensitiveness of mesenchymal stem cells to shock waves leads to anticancer effect in human cancer cell co-cultures.

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    Foglietta, Federica; Duchi, Serena; Canaparo, Roberto; Varchi, Greta; Lucarelli, Enrico; Dozza, Barbara; Serpe, Loredana

    2017-03-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) possess the distinctive feature of homing in on and engrafting into the tumor stroma making their therapeutic applications in cancer treatment very promising. Research into new effectors and external stimuli, which can selectively trigger the release of cytotoxic species from MSC toward the cancer cells, significantly raises their potential. Shock waves (SW) have recently gained recognition for their ability to induce specific biological effects, such as the local generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a non-invasive and tunable manner. We thus investigate whether MSC are able to generate ROS and, in turn, affect cancer cell growth when in co-culture with human glioblastoma (U87) or osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells and exposed to SW. MSC were found to be the cell line that was most sensitive to SW treatment as shown by SW-induced ROS production and cytotoxicity. Notably, U87 and U2OS cancer cell growth was unaffected by SW exposure. However, significant decreases in cancer cell growth, 1.8 fold for U87 and 2.3 fold for U2OS, were observed 24h after the SW treatment of MSC co-cultures with cancer cells. The ROS production induced in MSC by SW exposure was then responsible for lipid peroxidation and cell death in U87 and U2OS cells co-cultured with MSC. This experiment highlights the unique ability of MSC to generate ROS upon SW treatment and induce the cell death of co-cultured cancer cells. SW might therefore be proposed as an innovative tool for MSC-mediated cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Axitinib induces DNA damage response leading to senescence, mitotic catastrophe, and increased NK cell recognition in human renal carcinoma cells.

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    Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Amantini, Consuelo; Santoni, Matteo; Soriani, Alessandra; Nabissi, Massimo; Cardinali, Claudio; Santoni, Angela; Santoni, Giorgio

    2015-11-03

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) including axitinib have been introduced in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) because of their anti-angiogenic properties. However, no evidence are presently available on a direct cytotoxic anti-tumor activity of axitinib in RCC.Herein we reported by western blot analysis that axitinib treatment induces a DNA damage response (DDR) initially characterized by γ-H2AX phosphorylation and Chk1 kinase activation and at later time points by p21 overexpression in A-498 and Caki-2 RCC cells although with a different potency. Analysis by immunocytochemistry for the presence of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in cellular DNA and flow cytometry using the redox-sensitive fluorescent dye DCFDA, demonstrated that DDR response is accompanied by the presence of oxidative DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This response leads to G2/M cell cycle arrest and induces a senescent-like phenotype accompanied by enlargement of cells and increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, which are abrogated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pre-treatment. In addition, axitinib-treated cells undergo to cell death through mitotic catastrophe characterized by micronucleation and abnormal microtubule assembly as assessed by fluorescence microscopy.On the other hand, axitinib, through the DDR induction, is also able to increase the surface NKG2D ligand expression. Accordingly, drug treatment promotes NK cell recognition and degranulation in A-498 RCC cells in a ROS-dependent manner.Collectively, our results indicate that both cytotoxic and immunomodulatory effects on RCC cells can contribute to axitinib anti-tumor activity.

  1. Establishing quiescence in human bone marrow stem cells leads to enhanced osteoblast marker expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Rumman, Mohammad; Kassem, Moustapha;

    expression profiling of the cells demonstrated down-regulation of cyclin (CCNA2, CCND1, CCNE1, CCNB1) and proliferation markers (Ki67) markers during G0 and up-regulation of the osteogenic genes RUNX2 and OPN. RT-PCR analysis of osteogenic differentiation of cells post G0 demonstrated an increase...

  2. Differentiation induced by physiological and pharmacological stimuli leads to increased antigenicity of human neuroblastoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lena-Maria Carlson; Sven P(a)hlman; Anna De Geer; Per Kogner; Jelena Levitskaya

    2008-01-01

    Sympathetic neuronal differentiation is associated with favorable prognosis of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of early childhood. Differentiation agents have proved useful in clinical protocols of NB treatment, but using them as a sole treatment is not sufficient to induce tumor elimination in patients. Therefore, complementary approaches, such as immunotherapy, are warranted. Here we demonstrate that differentiation of NB cell lines and ex vivo isolated tumor cells in response to physiological or pharmacological stimuli is associated with acquisition of increased antigenicity. This manifests as increased expression of surface major histocompatibility class I complexes and ICAM-1 molecules and translates into increased sensitivity of NB cells to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells. The latter is paralleled by enhanced ability of differentiated cells to form immune conjugates and bind increased amounts of granzyme B to the cell surface. We demonstrate, for the first time, that, regardless of the stimulus applied, the differentiation state in NBs is associated with increased tumor antigenicity that enables more efficient elimination of tumor cells by cytotoxic lymphocytes and paves the way for combined application of differentiation-inducing agents and immunotherapy as an auxiliary approach in NB patients.

  3. Influence of Arsenic (III, Cadmium (II, Chromium (VI, Mercury (II, and Lead (II Ions on Human Triple Negative Breast Cancer (HCC1806 Cell Cytotoxicity and Cell Viability

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    Tsdale F. Mehari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hazardous consequences of heavy metal ions (HMIs on human health necessitate the immediate need to probe fundamentally the interactions and cytotoxic effects of HMIs on humans. This study investigated the influence of five toxic HMIs (arsenic (As (III, cadmium (Cd (II, chromium (Cr (VI, mercury (Hg (II, and lead (Pb (II on human TNBC (HCC 1806 cell viability using optical microscopy, trypan blue dye-exclusion assays, and flow cytometry. The TNBC cells were exposed to varying concentrations of HMIs for 24 and 48 hours. We evaluated the influence of the concentrations and duration of HMIs exposure on TNBC cell viability. Light microscopy, cell viability assays, revealed that after 48-hour treatment of TNBC cells with 1 x 10-5 M of As (III, Cd (II, Hg (II, Cr (IV, and Pb (II resulted in cell viabilities of 23%, 34%, 35%, 56%, 91% respectively, suggesting that As (III has the greatest cytotoxicity (77% cell death while Pb (II showed the least (9% cell death. Furthermore, flow cytometry revealed that while Pb (II, As (III and Cr (IV had significant increases in cell death, Hg (II caused a G1 arrest. Together, this study revealed that HMIs cause a differential cytotoxic effect on TNBC cells and suggest that they may have very different genotoxic targets and implications in their mutagenic potential.

  4. Macrophage interactions with polylactic acid and chitosan scaffolds lead to improved recruitment of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: a comprehensive study with different immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, Hugo R; Esteves, Tiago; Quelhas, Pedro; Barbosa, Mário A; Navarro, Melba; Almeida, Catarina R

    2016-09-01

    Despite the importance of immune cell-biomaterial interactions for the regenerative outcome, few studies have investigated how distinct three-dimensional biomaterials modulate the immune cell-mediated mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) recruitment and function. Thus, this work compares the response of varied primary human immune cell populations triggered by different model scaffolds and describes its functional consequence on recruitment and motility of bone marrow MSC. It was found that polylactic acid (PLA) and chitosan scaffolds lead to an increase in the metabolic activity of macrophages but not of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), natural killer (NK) cells or monocytes. PBMC and NK cells increase their cell number in PLA scaffolds and express a secretion profile that does not promote MSC recruitment. Importantly, chitosan increases IL-8, MIP-1, MCP-1 and RANTES secretion by macrophages while PLA stimulates IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 production, all chemokines that can lead to MSC recruitment. This secretion profile of macrophages in contact with biomaterials correlates with the highest MSC invasion. Furthermore, macrophages enhance stem cell motility within chitosan scaffolds by 44% but not in PLA scaffolds. Thus, macrophages are the cells that in contact with engineered biomaterials become activated to secrete bioactive molecules that stimulate MSC recruitment.

  5. Sustained co-cultivation with human placenta-derived MSCs enhances ALK5/Smad3 signaling in human breast epithelial cells, leading to EMT and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young A; Kang, Myoung Hee; Kim, Byung Soo; Kim, Jun Suk; Seo, Jae Hong

    2009-06-01

    The interaction between mammary epithelial cells and their surrounding microenvironment are important in the development of the mammary gland. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which retain pluripotency for various mesenchymal lineages, may provide a permissive environment for the morphologic alteration and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells. To this end, we investigated whether the interactions between mammary epithelial cells and human placenta-derived MSCs (hPMSC) affect the morphology, proliferation, and differentiation of epithelial cells in a co-culture system. We show that after co-culture with hPMSCs, human mammary epithelial cell lines (MCF-10F and HEMC) underwent significant morphologic alterations and a dramatic increase in ductal-alveolar branching, which was accompanied by a decrease or loss of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and a gain of the mesenchymal markers, alpha-SMA and vimentin. MCF-10F and HEMC proliferation was also inhibited in the presence of hPMSCs, and this retardation in growth was due to cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, in MCF-10F and HMEC cells, hPMSCs induced the production of lipid droplets, milk fat globule protein, and milk protein lactoferrin, which are markers of functional mammary differentiation. We also noticed an elevation in ALK5 and phosphorylated Smad3 protein levels upon hPMSC co-culture. Strikingly, the changes in morphology, proliferation, and differentiation were reversed by treatment with ALK5 or Smad3 knockdown in MCF-10F/hPMSC co-cultures. Collectively, our findings suggest that co-cultivation with hPMSCs leads to epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells through the ALK5/Smad3 signaling pathway.

  6. A novel TLR4-mediated signaling pathway leading to IL-6 responses in human bladder epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongmin Song

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The vigorous cytokine response of immune cells to Gram-negative bacteria is primarily mediated by a recognition molecule, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, which recognizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS and initiates a series of intracellular NF-kappaB-associated signaling events. Recently, bladder epithelial cells (BECs were reported to express TLR4 and to evoke a vigorous cytokine response upon exposure to LPS. We examined intracellular signaling events in human BECs leading to the production of IL-6, a major urinary cytokine, following activation by Escherichia coli and isolated LPS. We observed that in addition to the classical NF-kappaB-associated pathway, TLR4 triggers a distinct and more rapid signaling response involving, sequentially, Ca(2+, adenylyl cyclase 3-generated cAMP, and a transcriptional factor, cAMP response element-binding protein. This capacity of BECs to mobilize secondary messengers and evoke a more rapid IL-6 response might be critical in their role as first responders to microbial challenge in the urinary tract.

  7. Alternate Reading Frame Protein (F Protein) of Hepatitis C Virus: Paradoxical Effects of Activation and Apoptosis on Human Dendritic Cells Lead to Stimulation of T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Singh, Shakti; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to chronic infection in the majority of infected individuals due to lack, failure, or inefficiency of generated adaptive immune responses. In a minority of patients, acute infection is followed by viral clearance. The immune correlates of viral clearance are not clear yet but have been extensively investigated, suggesting that multispecific and multifunctional cellular immunity is involved. The generation of cellular immunity is highly dependent upon how antigen presenting cells (APCs) process and present various viral antigens. Various structural and non-structural HCV proteins derived from the open reading frame (ORF) have been implicated in modulation of dendritic cells (DCs) and APCs. Besides the major ORF proteins, the HCV core region also encodes an alternate reading frame protein (ARFP or F), whose function in viral pathogenesis is not clear. In the current studies, we sought to determine the role of HCV-derived ARFP in modulating dendritic cells and stimulation of T cell responses. Recombinant adenovirus vectors containing F or core protein derived from HCV (genotype 1a) were prepared and used to endogenously express these proteins in dendritic cells. We made an intriguing observation that endogenous expression of F protein in human DCs leads to contrasting effects on activation and apoptosis of DCs, allowing activated DCs to efficiently internalize apoptotic DCs. These in turn result in efficient ability of DCs to process and present antigen and to prime and stimulate F protein derived peptide-specific T cells from HCV-naive individuals. Taken together, our findings suggest important aspects of F protein in modulating DC function and stimulating T cell responses in humans. PMID:24475147

  8. Alternate reading frame protein (F protein of hepatitis C virus: paradoxical effects of activation and apoptosis on human dendritic cells lead to stimulation of T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Kumar Samrat

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV leads to chronic infection in the majority of infected individuals due to lack, failure, or inefficiency of generated adaptive immune responses. In a minority of patients, acute infection is followed by viral clearance. The immune correlates of viral clearance are not clear yet but have been extensively investigated, suggesting that multispecific and multifunctional cellular immunity is involved. The generation of cellular immunity is highly dependent upon how antigen presenting cells (APCs process and present various viral antigens. Various structural and non-structural HCV proteins derived from the open reading frame (ORF have been implicated in modulation of dendritic cells (DCs and APCs. Besides the major ORF proteins, the HCV core region also encodes an alternate reading frame protein (ARFP or F, whose function in viral pathogenesis is not clear. In the current studies, we sought to determine the role of HCV-derived ARFP in modulating dendritic cells and stimulation of T cell responses. Recombinant adenovirus vectors containing F or core protein derived from HCV (genotype 1a were prepared and used to endogenously express these proteins in dendritic cells. We made an intriguing observation that endogenous expression of F protein in human DCs leads to contrasting effects on activation and apoptosis of DCs, allowing activated DCs to efficiently internalize apoptotic DCs. These in turn result in efficient ability of DCs to process and present antigen and to prime and stimulate F protein derived peptide-specific T cells from HCV-naive individuals. Taken together, our findings suggest important aspects of F protein in modulating DC function and stimulating T cell responses in humans.

  9. Immortality, but not oncogenic transformation, of primary human cells leads to epigenetic reprogramming of DNA methylation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Katrina; Clouaire, Thomas; Bao, Xun X; Kemp, Sadie E; Xenophontos, Maria; de Las Heras, Jose Ignacio; Stancheva, Irina

    2014-04-01

    Tumourigenic transformation of normal cells into cancer typically involves several steps resulting in acquisition of unlimited growth potential, evasion of apoptosis and non-responsiveness to growth inhibitory signals. Both genetic and epigenetic changes can contribute to cancer development and progression. Given the vast genetic heterogeneity of human cancers and difficulty to monitor cancer-initiating events in vivo, the precise relationship between acquisition of genetic mutations and the temporal progression of epigenetic alterations in transformed cells is largely unclear. Here, we use an in vitro model system to investigate the contribution of cellular immortality and oncogenic transformation of primary human cells to epigenetic reprogramming of DNA methylation and gene expression. Our data demonstrate that extension of replicative life span of the cells is sufficient to induce accumulation of DNA methylation at gene promoters and large-scale changes in gene expression in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, continuous expression of cooperating oncogenes in immortalized cells, although essential for anchorage-independent growth and evasion of apoptosis, does not affect de novo DNA methylation at promoters and induces subtle expression changes. Taken together, these observations imply that cellular immortality promotes epigenetic adaptation to highly proliferative state, whereas transforming oncogenes confer additional properties to transformed human cells.

  10. N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine Affords Protection against Lead-Induced Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Although lead exposure has declined in recent years as a result of change to lead-free gasoline, several epidemiological have pointed out that it represents a medical and public health emergency, especially in young children consuming high amounts of lead-contaminated flake paints. A previous study in our laboratory indicated that lead exposure induces cytotoxicity in human liver carcinoma cells. In the present study, we evaluated the role of oxidative stress in lead-induced toxicity, and the protective effect of the anti-oxidant n-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC. We hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a role in lead-induced cytotoxicity, and that NAC affords protection against this adverse effect. To test this hypothesis, we performed the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and the trypan blue exclusion test for cell viability. We also performed the thiobarbituric acid test for lipid peroxidation. Data obtained from the MTT assay indicated that NAC significantly increased the viability of HepG2 cells in a dosedependent manner upon 48 hours of exposure. Similar trend was obtained with the trypan blue exclusion test. Data generated from the thiobarbituric acid test showed a significant (p ≤ 0.05 increase of MDA levels in lead nitrate-treated HepG2 cells compared to control cells. Interestingly, the addition of NAC to lead nitrate-treated HepG2 cells significantly decreased cellular content of reactive oxygen species (ROS, as evidenced by the decrease in lipid peroxidation byproducts. Overall, findings from this study suggest that NAC inhibits lead nitrate-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. Hence, NAC may be used as a salvage therapy for lead-induced toxicity in exposed persons.

  11. Exposure of human nasal epithelial cells to formaldehyde does not lead to DNA damage in lymphocytes after co-cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Simone; Moepps, Barbara; Speit, Günter

    2010-07-01

    We performed in vitro co-cultivation experiments with primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC) and isolated lymphocytes to investigate whether reactive formaldehyde (FA) can be passed on from nasal epithelial cells (site of first contact) to lymphocytes located in close proximity and induce DNA damage in these cells. A modified comet assay was used as a sensitive method for the detection of FA-induced DNA-protein cross links (DPX) because DPX are the most relevant type of FA-induced DNA damage. Our results clearly indicate that co-cultivation of lymphocytes with HNEC exposed to FA for 1 h causes a concentration-related induction of DPX in lymphocytes when co-cultivation takes place in the exposure medium. However, when the exposure medium is changed after FA treatment of HNEC and before lymphocytes are added, no induction of DPX is measured in lymphocytes even after exposure of HNEC to high FA concentrations (300 microM) and extended co-cultivation (4 h). Direct measurement of FA in the cell culture medium by a sensitive fluorescent detection kit indicated that FA is actually not released even from highly exposed cells into the cell culture medium. These results suggest that FA that has entered nasal epithelial cells is not released and does not damage other cells in close proximity to the epithelial cells. If these results also apply to the in vivo situation, FA would only be genotoxic towards directly exposed cells (site of first contact) and there should be no significant delivery of inhaled FA to other cells and distant sites. Our results do not support a recently proposed hypothetic mechanism for FA-induced leukaemia by damaging circulating haematopoietic stem cells or haematopoietic progenitor cells in nasal passages, which then travel to the bone marrow and become initiated leukaemic stem cells.

  12. New pyrazolo-[3,4-d]-pyrimidine derivative Src kinase inhibitors lead to cell cycle arrest and tumor growth reduction of human medulloblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Alessandra; Schenone, Silvia; Angelucci, Adriano; Cozzi, Martina; Caracciolo, Valentina; Pentimalli, Francesca; Puca, Andrew; Pucci, Biagio; La Montagna, Raffaele; Bologna, Mauro; Botta, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children, and despite improvements in the overall survival rate, it still lacks an effective treatment. Src plays an important role in cancer, and recently high Src activity was documented in medulloblastoma. In this report, we examined the effects of novel pyrazolo-[3,4-d]-pyrimidine derivative Src inhibitors in medulloblastoma. By MTS assay, we showed that the pyrimidine derivatives indicated as S7, S29, and SI163 greatly reduce the growth rate of medulloblastoma cells by inhibiting Src phosphorylation, compared with HT22 non-neoplastic nerve cells. These compounds also halt cells in the G2/M phase, and this effect likely occurs through the regulation of cdc2 and CDC25C phosphorylation, as shown by Western blot. Moreover, the exposure to pyrimidine derivatives induces apoptosis, assayed by the supravital propidium iodide assay, through modulation of the apoptotic proteins Bax and Bcl2, and inhibits tumor growth in vivo in a mouse model. Notably, S7, S29, and SI163 show major inhibitory effects on medulloblastoma cell growth compared with the chemotherapeutic agents cisplatin and etoposide. In conclusion, our results suggest that S7, S29, and SI163 could be novel attractive candidates for the treatment of medulloblastoma or tumors characterized by high Src activity.—Rossi, A., Schenone, S., Angelucci, A., Cozzi, M., Caracciolo, V., Pentimalli, F., Puca, A., Pucci, B., La Montagna, R., Bologna, M., Botta, M., Giordano, A. New pyrazolo-[3,4-d]-pyrimidine derivative Src kinase inhibitors lead to cell cycle arrest and tumor growth reduction of human medulloblastoma cells. PMID:20354138

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging tracking of ferumoxytol-labeled human neural stem cells: studies leading to clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutova, Margarita; Frank, Joseph A; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Khankaldyyan, Vazgen; Gilchrist, Megan M; Annala, Alexander J; Metz, Marianne Z; Abramyants, Yelena; Herrmann, Kelsey A; Ghoda, Lucy Y; Najbauer, Joseph; Brown, Christine E; Blanchard, M Suzette; Lesniak, Maciej S; Kim, Seung U; Barish, Michael E; Aboody, Karen S; Moats, Rex A

    2013-10-01

    Numerous stem cell-based therapies are currently under clinical investigation, including the use of neural stem cells (NSCs) as delivery vehicles to target therapeutic agents to invasive brain tumors. The ability to monitor the time course, migration, and distribution of stem cells following transplantation into patients would provide critical information for optimizing treatment regimens. No effective cell-tracking methodology has yet garnered clinical acceptance. A highly promising noninvasive method for monitoring NSCs and potentially other cell types in vivo involves preloading them with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) to enable cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here the preclinical studies that led to U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for first-in-human investigational use of ferumoxytol to label NSCs prior to transplantation into brain tumor patients, followed by surveillance serial MRI. A combination of heparin, protamine sulfate, and ferumoxytol (HPF) was used to label the NSCs. HPF labeling did not affect cell viability, growth kinetics, or tumor tropism in vitro, and it enabled MRI visualization of NSC distribution within orthotopic glioma xenografts. MRI revealed dynamic in vivo NSC distribution at multiple time points following intracerebral or intravenous injection into glioma-bearing mice that correlated with histological analysis. Preclinical safety/toxicity studies of intracerebrally administered HPF-labeled NSCs in mice were also performed, and they showed no significant clinical or behavioral changes, no neuronal or systemic toxicities, and no abnormal accumulation of iron in the liver or spleen. These studies support the clinical use of ferumoxytol labeling of cells for post-transplant MRI visualization and tracking.

  14. The bradykinin B2 receptor induces multiple cellular responses leading to the proliferation of human renal carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramarenko II

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Inga I Kramarenko1, Thomas A Morinelli1,2, Marlene A Bunni1,2, John R Raymond Sr3, Maria N Garnovskaya11Department of Medicine (Nephrology Division, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; 2Medical and Research Services of the Ralph H Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC, USA; 3Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USABackground: The vasoactive peptide bradykinin (BK acts as a potent growth factor for normal kidney cells, but there have been few studies on the role of BK in renal cell carcinomas.Purpose: In this study, we tested the hypothesis that BK also acts as a mitogen in kidney carcinomas, and explored the effects of BK in human renal carcinoma A498 cells.Methods: The presence of mRNAs for BK B1 and BK B2 receptors in A498 cells was demonstrated by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. To study BK signaling pathways, we employed fluorescent measurements of intracellular Ca2+, measured changes in extracellular pH as a reflection of Na+/H+ exchange (NHE with a Cytosensor microphysiometer, and assessed extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK activation by Western blotting.Results: Exposure to 100 nM of BK resulted in the rapid elevation of intracellular Ca2+, caused a ≥30% increase in NHE activity, and a ≥300% increase in ERK phosphorylation. All BK signals were blocked by HOE140, a BK B2 receptor antagonist, but not by a B1 receptor antagonist. Inhibitor studies suggest that BK-induced ERK activation requires phospholipase C and protein kinase C activities, and is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent. The amiloride analog 5-(N-methyl-N-isobutyl-amiloride (MIA blocked short-term NHE activation and inhibited ERK phosphorylation, suggesting that NHE is critical for ERK activation by BK. BK induced an approximately 40% increase in the proliferation of A498 cells as assessed by bromodeoxyuridine uptake. This effect was blocked by the ERK inhibitor PD98059, and was dependent on NHE activity

  15. Supporting data of spatiotemporal proliferation of human stromal cells adjusts to nutrient availability and leads to stanniocalcin-1 expression in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Higuera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains seven figures and two tables supporting the research article entitled: spatiotemporal proliferation of human stromal cells adjusts to nutrient availability and leads to stanniocalcin-1 expression in vitro and in vivo [1]. The data explain the culture of stromal cells in vitro in three culture systems: discs, scaffolds and scaffolds in a perfusion bioreactor system. Also, quantification of extracellular matrix components (ECM in vitro and staining of ECM components in vivo can be found here. Finally the quantification of blood vessels dimensions from CD31 signals and representative histograms of stanniocalcin-1 fluorescent signals in negative controls and experimental conditions in vivo are presented.

  16. Individual variability in human tibia lead concentration.

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, A. C.; Parsons, P J; Tang, S.; Moshier, E L

    2001-01-01

    Our aims in this study were to determine proximal-distal variability in adult human tibia lead concentration via electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and to determine whether there were any differences between core and surface tibia lead concentrations. We analyzed duplicate core and surface tibia samples for lead at multiple proximal-distal sections on 10 adult human cadaver legs. Dried bone samples were digested in nitric acid using microwave-assisted heating, a...

  17. The chalcone 2'-hydroxy-4',5'-dimethoxychalcone activates death receptor 5 pathway and leads to apoptosis in human nonsmall cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Su, Ling; Cao, Congmei; Xu, Linyan; Zhong, Diansheng; Xu, Lijia; Liu, Xiangguo

    2013-06-01

    Natural chalcones have been proved to inhibit cancer cells with therapeutic potential, but the underlying molecular mechanism is still largely unexplored. Here, we identified a novel chalcone, 2'-hydroxy-4',5'-dimethoxychalcone (HDMC) and demonstrated that HDMC induced apoptosis in various nonsmall cell lung cancer cells. Further study showed that HDMC elevated cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, thus inducing expressions of ATF4 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Then, death receptor 5 (DR5) was upregulated through ATF4-CHOP axis and eventually resulted in apoptosis. We also found that downregulation of c-FLIPL contributed to HDMC-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, HDMC induces apoptosis in human nonsmall cell lung cancer cells via activation of DR5 signaling pathway, and ROS-mediated ATF4-CHOP axis is involved in the process. Our results further supported the potential for HDMC to be developed as a new antitumor agent for cancer therapy or chemoprevention.

  18. Maturation of dendritic cells by recombinant human CD40L-trimer leads to a homogeneous cell population with enhanced surface marker expression and increased cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    . Effective differentiation of monocytes derived from freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was obtained with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-4. The DC expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecules, CD80, CD83, and CD86 was markedly......-cell activating capacity of the DC. We studied DC phenotype and cytokine production as well as the T-cell proliferation and cytotoxic T lympocyte (CTL) activation induced by DC generated in vitro. In addition, the effect of exposure to recombinant human CD40L-trimer (huCD40LT) on these parameters was investigated...... marker expression and high production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, the induction of responses to allo or recall antigens presented by huCD40LT maturated DC was comparable to the responses obtained with the DC maturated through TNF-alpha exposure....

  19. Continuous activation of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzymes leads to arsenite-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Wang, Dapeng; Ma, Yuan; Xu, Xiguo; Zhu, Zhen; Wang, Xiaojuan; Deng, Hanyi; Li, Chunchun; Chen, Min; Tong, Jian; Yamanaka, Kenzo; An, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Long-term exposure to arsenite leads to human lung cancer, but the underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain obscure. The transcription factor of nuclear factor-erythroid-2 p45-related factor (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant response represents a critical cellular defense mechanism and protection against various diseases. Paradoxically, emerging data suggest that the constitutive activation of Nrf2 is associated with cancer development, progression and chemotherapy resistance. However, the role of Nrf2 in the occurrence of cancer induced by long-term arsenite exposure remains to be fully understood. By establishing transformed human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells via chronic low-dose arsenite treatment, we showed that, in acquiring this malignant phenotype, continuous low level of ROS and sustained enhancement of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzyme levels were observed in the later-stage of arsenite-induced cell transformation. The downregulation of Keap1 level may be responsible for the over-activation of Nrf2 and its target enzymes. To validate these observations, Nrf2 was knocked down in arsenite-transformed HBE cells by SiRNA transfection, and the levels of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzymes, ROS, cell proliferation, migration, and colony formation were determined following these treatments. Results showed that blocked Nrf2 expression significantly reduced Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzyme levels, restored ROS levels, and eventually suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and colony formation of the transformed cells. In summary, the results of the study strongly suggested that the continuous activation of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzymes led to the over-depletion of intracellular ROS levels, which contributed to arsenite-induced HBE cell transformation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. IL-7 Administration to Humans Leads to Expansion of CD8+ and CD4+ Cells but a Relative Decrease of CD4+ T-Regulatory Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Steven A.; Sportès, Claude; Ahmadzadeh, Mojgan; Fry, Terry J.; Ngo, Lien T.; Schwarz, Susan L.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Morton, Kathleen E.; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; Morre, Michel; Buffet, Renaud; Mackall, Crystal L.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Lymphopenia is a serious consequence of HIV infection and the administration of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Although growth factors can be administered to patients to increase circulating neutrophils, there is no effective method to stimulate CD8+ lymphocyte production in humans, in vivo. This report is the first to describe the administration of recombinant interleukin-7 to humans and demonstrates the ability of this cytokine to mediate selective increases in CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes along with a decrease in the percentage of CD4+ T-regulatory cells. These studies suggest an important role for interleukin-7 in the treatment of patients with lymphopenia. PMID:16699374

  1. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Kegel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug induced liver injury (DILI is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2±0.9×106 cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay and cell activity (XTT assay. The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production.

  2. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Victoria; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Liu, Jia L; Zeilinger, Katrin; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC) sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2 ± 0.9 × 10(6) cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay) and cell activity (XTT assay). The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production.

  3. Controlled aggregation of primary human pancreatic islet cells leads to glucose-responsive pseudoislets comparable to native islets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilderink, Janneke; Spijker, Siebe; Carlotti, Françoise; Lange, Lydia; Engelse, Marten; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Koning, Eelco; Karperien, Marcel; van Apeldoorn, Aart

    2015-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation is a promising treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes. However, pancreatic islets vary in size and shape affecting their survival and function after transplantation because of mass transport limitations. To reduce diffusion restrictions and improve islet cell surv

  4. Oxidative stress mediated Ca(2+) release manifests endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to unfolded protein response in UV-B irradiated human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, Mufti R; Nissar, Ul A; Afnan, Quadri; Rafiq, Rather A; Sharma, Love; Amin, Shajrul; Kaiser, Peerzada; Sharma, Parduman R; Tasduq, Sheikh A

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, an environmental stressor induces number of adverse biological effects (photodamage), including cancer. The damage induced by UV-irradiation in skin cells is initiated by the photochemical generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and consequent activation of unfolded protein response (UPR). To decipher cellular and molecular events responsible for UV-B mediated ER stress and UPR activation in skin cells. The study was performed on human skin fibroblast (Hs68) and keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells exposed to UV-B radiations in lab conditions. Different parameters of UVB induced cellular and molecular changes were analyzed using Western-blotting, microscopic studies and flow cytometry. Our results depicted that UV-B induces an immediate ROS generation that resulted in emptying of ER Ca(2+) stores inducing ER stress and activation of PERK-peIF2α-CHOP pathway. Quenching ROS generation by anti-oxidants prevented Ca(2+) release and subsequent induction of ER stress and UPR activation. UV-B irradiation induced PERK dependent G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in Hs68 and G1/S phase cell cycle arrest in HaCaT. Also our study reflects that UV-B exposure leads to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of apoptotic cascade as evident by AnnexinV/PI staining, decreased expression of Bcl-2 and increased cleavage of PARP-1 protein. UV-B induced Ca(2+) deficit within ER lumen was mediated by immediate ROS generation. Insufficient Ca(2+) concentration within ER lumen developed ER stress leading to UPR activation. These changes were reversed by use of anti-oxidants which quench ROS. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Xanthohumol inhibits STAT3 activation pathway leading to growth suppression and apoptosis induction in human cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokduang, Hasaya; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Namwat, Nisana; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Sangkhamanon, Sakkarn; Yageta, Mika Sakurai; Murakami, Yoshinori; Loilome, Watcharin

    2016-04-01

    STAT3 plays a significant role in the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) associated with the liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini; Ov). Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated flavonoid extracted from hops, has known anticancer activity and could potentially target STAT3. The present study determined the effect of XN on STAT3, as well as ascertained its usefulness against CCA. The CCA cell proliferation at 20 µM and 50 µM of XN was shown to inhibited, while 20 µM partially inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 activation. At 50 µM, the inhibition was complete. The reduction in STAT3 activity at 20 and 50 µM was associated with a significant reduction of CCA cell growth and apoptosis. We also found that the administration of 50 µM XN orally in drinking water to nude mice inoculated with CCA led to a reduction in tumor growth in comparison with controls. In addition, apoptosis of cancer cells increased although there was no visible toxicity. The present study shows that XN can inhibit STAT3 activation both in vivo and in vitro due to suppression of the Akt-NFκB signaling pathway. XN should be considered as a possible therapeutic agent against CCA.

  6. Lack of WDR36 leads to preimplantation embryonic lethality in mice and delays the formation of small subunit ribosomal RNA in human cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallenberger, Martin; Meinel, Dominik M; Kroeber, Markus; Wegner, Michael; Milkereit, Philipp; Bösl, Michael R; Tamm, Ernst R

    2011-02-01

    Mutations in WD repeat domain 36 gene (WDR36) play a causative role in some forms of primary open-angle glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. WDR36 is characterized by the presence of multiple WD40 repeats and shows homology to Utp21, an essential protein component of the yeast small subunit (SSU) processome required for maturation of 18S rRNA. To clarify the functional role of WDR36 in the mammalian organism, we generated and investigated mutant mice with a targeted deletion of Wdr36. In parallel experiments, we used RNA interference to deplete WDR36 mRNA in mouse embryos and cultured human trabecular meshwork (HTM-N) cells. Deletion of Wdr36 in the mouse caused preimplantation embryonic lethality, and essentially similar effects were observed when WDR36 mRNA was depleted in mouse embryos by RNA interference. Depletion of WDR36 mRNA in HTM-N cells caused apoptotic cell death and upregulation of mRNA for BAX, TP53 and CDKN1A. By immunocytochemistry, staining for WDR36 was observed in the nucleolus of cells, which co-localized with that of nucleolar proteins such as nucleophosmin and PWP2. In addition, recombinant and epitope-tagged WDR36 localized to the nucleolus of HTM-N cells. By northern blot analysis, a substantial decrease in 21S rRNA, the precursor of 18S rRNA, was observed following knockdown of WDR36. In addition, metabolic-labeling experiments consistently showed a delay of 18S rRNA maturation in WDR36-depleted cells. Our results provide evidence that WDR36 is an essential protein in mammalian cells which is involved in the nucleolar processing of SSU 18S rRNA.

  7. T-cell receptor/CD28 engagement when combined with prostaglandin E2 treatment leads to potent activation of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Eve; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J

    2003-10-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE(2) treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56(lck) and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus.

  8. Current issues in human lead exposure and regulation of lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J M; Elias, R W; Grant, L D

    1993-01-01

    Concern about lead as a significant public health problem has increased as epidemiological and experimental evidence has mounted regarding adverse health effects at successively lower levels of lead exposure. This concern has led to downward revision of criteria for acceptable blood lead concentrations to the 10 micrograms/dL mark now designated by EPA as a target level for regulatory development and enforcement/clean-up purposes. Much progress has been made in reducing lead exposures during the past 10-15 years, with marked declines evident both in air lead and blood lead concentrations in parallel to the phase-down of lead in gasoline and notable decreases in food lead exposure due to elimination of lead soldered cans by U.S. food processors. With the lessening of exposure from these sources, the importance of other components of multimedia exposure pathways has grown and stimulated increasing regulatory attention and abatement efforts to reduce health risks associated with lead exposure from drinking water, from lead-based paint, and from household dust and soil contaminated by deteriorating paint, smelter emissions, or various other sources. Increasing attention is also being accorded to reduction of occupational lead exposures (including those related to lead abatement activities), with particular concern for protection of men and women during their reproductive years.

  9. Ubiquitous hazardous metal lead induces TNF-{alpha} in human phagocytic THP-1 cells: Primary role of ERK 1/2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Mohd Imran [Fiber Toxicology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Mahatma Gandhi Marg, P.O Box 80, Lucknow 226001, U.P. (India); Islam, Najmul [Department of Biochemistry, J.N Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (India); Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A. [Molecular and Structural Biology Division, Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow (India); Mahdi, Abbas Ali [Department of Biochemistry, C.S.M. Medical University, Lucknow (India); Siddiqui, Huma; Ashquin, Mohd [Fiber Toxicology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Mahatma Gandhi Marg, P.O Box 80, Lucknow 226001, U.P. (India); Ahmad, Iqbal, E-mail: ahmadi@sify.com [Fiber Toxicology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Mahatma Gandhi Marg, P.O Box 80, Lucknow 226001, U.P. (India)

    2011-05-15

    Induction of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) in response to lead (Pb) exposure has been implicated in its immunotoxicity. However, the molecular mechanism by which Pb upregulates the level of TNF-{alpha} is wagely known. An attempt was therefore made to elucidate the mechanistic aspect of TNF-{alpha} induction, mainly focusing transcriptional and post transcriptional regulation via mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation. We observed that exposure of Pb to human monocytic THP-1 cells resulted in significant enhanced production of TNF-{alpha} m-RNA and protein secretion. Moreover, the stability of TNF-{alpha} m-RNA was also increased as indicated by its half life. Notably, activation of ERK 1/2, p38 and JNK in Pb exposed THP-1 was also evident. Specific inhibitor of ERK1/2, PD 98059 caused significant inhibition in production and stability of TNF-{alpha} m-RNA. However, SB 203580 partially inhibited production and stability of TNF-{alpha} m-RNA. Interestingly, a combined exposure of these two inhibitors completely blocked modulation of TNF-{alpha} m-RNA. Data tends to suggest that expression and stability of TNF-{alpha} induction due to Pb exposure is mainly regulated through ERK. Briefly, these observations are useful in understanding some mechanistic aspects of proinflammatory and immunotoxicity of Pb, a globally acknowledged key environmental contaminant.

  10. Lead exposure induces changes in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine clusters in CpG islands in human embryonic stem cells and umbilical cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arko; Cingolani, Pablo; Senut, Marie-Claude; Land, Susan; Mercado-Garcia, Adriana; Tellez-Rojo, Martha M; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Wright, Robert O; Ruden, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to neurotoxicants such as lead (Pb) may cause stable changes in the DNA methylation (5mC) profile of the fetal genome. However, few studies have examined its effect on the DNA de-methylation pathway, specifically the dynamic changes of the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) profile. Therefore, in this study, we investigate the relationship between Pb exposure and 5mC and 5hmC modifications during early development. To study the changes in the 5hmC profile, we use a novel modification of the Infinium™ HumanMethylation450 assay (Illumina, Inc.), which we named HMeDIP-450K assay, in an in vitro human embryonic stem cell model of Pb exposure. We model Pb exposure-associated 5hmC changes as clusters of correlated, adjacent CpG sites, which are co-responding to Pb. We further extend our study to look at Pb-dependent changes in high density 5hmC regions in umbilical cord blood DNA from 48 mother-infant pairs from the Early Life Exposure in Mexico to Environmental Toxicants (ELEMENT) cohort. For our study, we randomly selected umbilical cord blood from 24 male and 24 female children from the 1st and 4th quartiles of Pb levels. Our data show that Pb-associated changes in the 5hmC and 5mC profiles can be divided into sex-dependent and sex-independent categories. Interestingly, differential 5mC sites are better markers of Pb-associated sex-dependent changes compared to differential 5hmC sites. In this study we identified several 5hmC and 5mC genomic loci, which we believe might have some potential as early biomarkers of prenatal Pb exposure.

  11. Erythrophagocytosis of Lead-Exposed Erythrocytes by Renal Tubular Cells: Possible Role in Lead-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, So-Youn; Bae, Ok-Nam; Noh, Ji-Yoon; Kim, Keunyoung; Kang, Seojin; Shin, Young-Jun; Lim, Kyung-Min; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nephrotoxicity associated with lead poisoning has been frequently reported in epidemiological studies, but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully described. Objectives: We examined the role of erythrocytes, one of the major lead reservoirs, in lead-associated nephrotoxicity. Methods and results: Co-incubation of lead-exposed human erythrocytes with HK-2 human renal proximal tubular cells resulted in renal tubular cytotoxicity, suggesting a role of erythrocytes in lead-induc...

  12. The cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 supports cell adhesion through syndecans and triggers signaling events that lead to beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B;

    2000-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of proteins is involved in a variety of cellular interactions, including cell adhesion and ecto- domain shedding. Here we show that ADAM 12 binds to cell surface syndecans. Three forms of recombinant ADAM 12 were used in these experiments: the ...

  13. Attenuation of Telomerase Activity by siRNA Targeted Telomerase RNA Leads to Apoptosis and Inhibition of Proliferation in Human Renal Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rumin Wen; Junjie Liu; Wang Li; Wenfa Yang; Lijun Mao; Junnian Zheng

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Telomerase is an attractive molecular target for cancer therapy because the activation of telomerase is one of the key steps in cell immortalization and carcinogenesis. RNA interference using small-interfering RNA (siRNA) has been demonstrated to be an effective method for inhibiting the expression of a given gene in human cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether inhibition of telomerase activity by siRNA targeted against human telomerase RNA (hTR) can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptotic cell death in human renal carcinoma cells(HRCCs).METHODS The siRNA duplexes for hTR were synthesized and 786-O HRCCs were transfected with different concentrations of hTR-siRNA. The influence on the hTR mRNA level, telomerase activity, as well as the effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis was examined.RESULTS Anti-hTR siRNA treatment of HRCCs resulted in specific reduction of hTR mRNA and inhibition of telomerase activity. Additionally,significant inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis were observed.CONCLUSION siRNA against the hTR gene can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis by blocking telomerase activity of HRCCs. Specific hTR inhibition by siRNA represents a promising new option for renal cancer treatment.

  14. Propylparaben-induced disruption of energy metabolism in human HepG2 cell line leads to increased synthesis of superoxide anions and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeląg, S; Zabłocka, A; Trzeciak, K; Drozd, A; Baranowska-Bosiacka, I; Kolasa, A; Goschorska, M; Chlubek, D; Gutowska, I

    2016-03-01

    The effect of propylparaben (in final concentrations 0.4 ng/ml, 2.3 ng/ml and 4.6 ng/ml) on the energy metabolism of HepG2 hepatocytes, superoxide anion synthesis, apoptosis and necrosis is described. Propylparaben can be toxic to liver cells due to the increased production of superoxide anions, which can contribute to a reduced concentration of superoxide dismutase in vivo and impairment of the body's antioxidant mechanisms. Finally, a further reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential and uncoupling of the respiratory chain resulting in a reduction in ATP concentration as a result of mitochondrial damage may lead to cell death by apoptosis.

  15. An incomplete trafficking defect to the cell-surface leads to paradoxical thrombocytosis for human and murine MPL P106L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favale, Fabrizia; Messaoudi, Kahia; Varghese, Leila N; Boukour, Siham; Pecquet, Christian; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Defour, Jean Philippe; Albu, Roxana-Irina; Bluteau, Olivier; Ballerini, Paola; Leverger, Guy; Plo, Isabelle; Debili, Najet; Raslova, Hana; Favier, Remi; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Vainchenker, William

    2016-12-29

    The mechanisms behind the hereditary thrombocytosis induced by the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL P106L mutant remain unknown. A complete trafficking defect to the cell surface has been reported, suggesting either weak constitutive activity or nonconventional THPO-dependent mechanisms. Here, we report that the thrombocytosis phenotype induced by MPL P106L belongs to the paradoxical group, where low MPL levels on platelets and mature megakaryocytes (MKs) lead to high serum THPO levels, whereas weak but not absent MPL cell-surface localization in earlier MK progenitors allows response to THPO by signaling and amplification of the platelet lineage. MK progenitors from patients showed no spontaneous growth and responded to THPO, and MKs expressed MPL on their cell surface at low levels, whereas their platelets did not respond to THPO. Transduction of MPL P106L in CD34(+) cells showed that this receptor was more efficiently localized at the cell surface on immature than on mature MKs, explaining a proliferative response to THPO of immature cells and a defect in THPO clearance in mature cells. In a retroviral mouse model performed in Mpl(-/-) mice, MPL P106L could induce a thrombocytosis phenotype with high circulating THPO levels. Furthermore, we could select THPO-dependent cell lines with more cell-surface MPL P106L localization that was detected by flow cytometry and [(125)I]-THPO binding. Altogether, these results demonstrate that MPL P106L is a receptor with an incomplete defect in trafficking, which induces a low but not absent localization of the receptor on cell surface and a response to THPO in immature MK cells. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Inhibition of BCL-2 leads to increased apoptosis and delayed neuronal differentiation in human ReNcell VM cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Michael; Jaeger, Alexandra; Weiss, Dieter G; Kriehuber, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    BCL-2 is a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle progression and neural developmental processes. Its function in the latter process is not well understood and needs further elucidation. Therefore, we characterized the protein expression kinetics of BCL-2 and associated regulatory proteins of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway during the process of neuronal differentiation in ReNcell VM cells with and without functional inhibition of BCL-2 by its competitive ligand HA14-1. Inhibition of BCL-2 caused a diminished BCL-2 expression and higher levels of cleaved BAX, activated Caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, all pro-apoptotic markers, when compared with untreated differentiating cells. In parallel, flow cytometric analysis of HA14-1-treated cells revealed a delayed differentiation into HuC/D+ neuronal cells when compared to untreated differentiating cells. In conclusion, BCL-2 possess a protective function in fully differentiated ReNcell VM cells. We propose that the pro-survival signaling of BCL-2 is closely connected with its stimulatory effects on neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells.

  17. Elucidation of changes in molecular signalling leading to increased cellular transformation in oncogenically progressed human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to radiations of increasing LET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang-Hao; Park, Seongmi; Xie, Yang; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D; Story, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    The early transcriptional response and subsequent induction of anchorage-independent growth after exposure to particles of high Z and energy (HZE) as well as γ-rays were examined in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC3KT) immortalised without viral oncogenes and an isogenic variant cell line whose p53 expression was suppressed but that expressed an active mutant K-RAS(V12) (HBEC3KT-P53KRAS). Cell survival following irradiation showed that HBEC3KT-P53KRAS cells were more radioresistant than HBEC3KT cells irrespective of the radiation species. In addition, radiation enhanced the ability of the surviving HBEC3KT-P53RAS cells but not the surviving HBEC3KT cells to grow in anchorage-independent fashion (soft agar colony formation). HZE particle irradiation was far more efficient than γ-rays at rendering HBEC3KT-P53RAS cells permissive for soft agar growth. Gene expression profiles after radiation showed that the molecular response to radiation for HBEC3KT-P53RAS, similar to that for HBEC3KT cells, varies with radiation quality. Several pathways associated with anchorage independent growth, including the HIF-1α, mTOR, IGF-1, RhoA and ERK/MAPK pathways, were over-represented in the irradiated HBEC3KT-P53RAS cells compared to parental HBEC3KT cells. These results suggest that oncogenically progressed human lung epithelial cells are at greater risk for cellular transformation and carcinogenic risk after ionising radiation, but particularly so after HZE radiations. These results have implication for: (i) terrestrial radiation and suggests the possibility of enhanced carcinogenic risk from diagnostic CT screens used for early lung cancer detection; (ii) enhanced carcinogenic risk from heavy particles used in radiotherapy; and (iii) for space radiation, raising the possibility that astronauts harbouring epithelial regions of dysplasia or hyperplasia within the lung that contain oncogenic changes, may have a greater risk for lung cancers based upon their exposure to heavy

  18. Soil is an important pathway of human lead exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Mielke, H W; Reagan, P L

    1998-01-01

    This review shows the equal or greater importance of leaded gasoline-contaminated dust compared to lead-based paint to the child lead problem, and that soil lead, resulting from leaded gasoline and pulverized lead-based paint, is at least or more important than lead-based paint (intact and not pulverized) as a pathway of human lead exposure. Because lead-based paint is a high-dose source, the biologically relevant dosage is similar to lead in soil. Both lead-based paint and soil lead are asso...

  19. Soil is an important pathway of human lead exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Mielke, H W; Reagan, P L

    1998-01-01

    This review shows the equal or greater importance of leaded gasoline-contaminated dust compared to lead-based paint to the child lead problem, and that soil lead, resulting from leaded gasoline and pulverized lead-based paint, is at least or more important than lead-based paint (intact and not pulverized) as a pathway of human lead exposure. Because lead-based paint is a high-dose source, the biologically relevant dosage is similar to lead in soil. Both lead-based paint and soil lead are asso...

  20. Lead sources in human diet in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Johansen, Poul; Mulvad, Gert

    2004-01-01

    Although blood lead levels have declined in Greenland, they are still elevated despite the fact that lead levels in the Greenland environment are very low. Fragments of lead shot in game birds have been suggested as an important source of dietary exposure, and meals of sea birds, particularly eid...

  1. Lead sources in human diet in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Johansen, Poul; Mulvad, Gert

    2004-01-01

    Although blood lead levels have declined in Greenland, they are still elevated despite the fact that lead levels in the Greenland environment are very low. Fragments of lead shot in game birds have been suggested as an important source of dietary exposure, and meals of sea birds, particularly eider......, contain high concentrations of lead. In a cross-sectional population survey in Greenland in 1993-1994, blood lead adjusted for age and sex was found to be associated with the reported consumption of sea birds. Participants reporting less than weekly intake of sea birds had blood lead concentrations...... of approximately 75 microg/L, whereas those who reported eating sea birds several times a week had concentrations of approximately 110 microg/L, and those who reported daily intake had concentrations of 170 microg/L (p = 0.01). Blood lead was not associated with dietary exposure to other local or imported food...

  2. Messenger RNA electroporation of human monocytes, followed by rapid in vitro differentiation, leads to highly stimulatory antigen-loaded mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsaerts, Peter; Van den Bosch, Glenn; Cools, Nathalie; Van Driessche, Ann; Nijs, Griet; Lenjou, Marc; Lardon, Filip; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Van Bockstaele, Dirk R; Berneman, Zwi N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I

    2002-08-15

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional Ag-capturing and -presenting cells of the immune system. Because of their exceptional capability of activating tumor-specific T cells, cancer vaccination research is now shifting toward the formulation of a clinical human DC vaccine. We developed a short term and serum-free culture protocol for rapid generation of fully mature, viable, and highly stimulatory CD83(+) DC. Human monocytes were cultured for 24 h in serum-free AIM-V medium, followed by 24-h maturation by polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (polyI:C). Short term cultured, polyI:C-maturated DC, far more than immature DC, showed typical mature DC markers and high allogeneic stimulatory capacity and had high autologous stimulatory capacity in an influenza model system using peptide-pulsed DC. Electroporation of mRNA as an Ag-loading strategy in these cells was optimized using mRNA encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Monocytes electroporated with EGFP mRNA, followed by short term, serum-free differentiation to mature DC, had a phenotype of DC, and all showed positive EGFP fluorescence. Influenza matrix protein mRNA-electroporated monocytes cultured serum-free and maturated with polyI:C showed high stimulatory capacity in autologous T cell activation experiments. In conclusion, the present short term and serum-free ex vivo DC culture protocol in combination with mRNA electroporation at the monocyte stage imply an important reduction in time and consumables for preparation of Ag-loaded mature DC compared with classical DC culture protocols and might find application in clinical immunotherapy settings.

  3. Transfer of the human NKG2D ligands UL16 binding proteins (ULBP) 1-3 is related to lytic granule release and leads to ligand retransfer and killing of ULBP-recipient natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; García-Cuesta, Eva M; Reyburn, Hugh T; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-09-01

    After immune interactions, membrane fragments can be transferred between cells. This fast transfer of molecules is transient and shows selectivity for certain proteins; however, the constraints underlying acquisition of a protein are unknown. To characterize the mechanism and functional consequences of this process in natural killer (NK) cells, we have compared the transfer of different NKG2D ligands. We show that human NKG2D ligands can be acquired by NK cells with different efficiencies. The main findings are that NKG2D ligand transfer is related to immune activation and receptor-ligand interaction and that NK cells acquire these proteins during interactions with target cells that lead to degranulation. Our results further demonstrate that NK cells that have acquired NKG2D ligands can stimulate activation of autologous NK cells. Surprisingly, NK cells can also re-transfer the acquired molecule to autologous effector cells during this immune recognition that leads to their death. These data demonstrate that transfer of molecules occurs as a consequence of immune recognition and imply that this process might play a role in homeostatic tuning-down of the immune response or be used as marker of interaction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. RNA Amplification Protocol Leads to Biased Polymerase Chain Reaction Results Especially for Low-Copy Transcripts of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Coenen

    Full Text Available The amplification of RNA is becoming increasingly important, as often only limited amounts of cells are available for gene expression analysis. In this study, the gene expression profile of the 39 human homeobox (HOX genes was analyzed in bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (BM-MSCs by reverse transcription (RT- and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. For further unlimited gene expression analysis, Whole Transcriptome Amplification (WTA was used to amplify RNA from human BM-MSCs. However, WTA led to biased RT- and qPCR results, and even non-detectability of HOX transcripts compared to non-amplified BM-MSC samples which instead revealed transcription. It is important to note that the same RNA of the respective human BM-MSC line was used for normal cDNA synthesis by standard reverse transcription (non-amplified RT samples and for cDNA synthesis by WTA (amplified WTA samples. On this account, the different RT- and qPCR results were unexpected applying WTA. The significantly reduced detection of HOX transcripts after WTA has been demonstrated for numerous BM-MSC lines (n = 26 by RT-PCR analysis. Furthermore, undetectable HOX transcripts meaning HOX transcripts of human BM-MSCs that were detected after normal cDNA synthesis, but were no longer detectable after WTA, were consistently observed by qPCR analysis. Finally, qPCR experiments revealed a possible explanation for the differences between amplified and non-amplified BM-MSC samples: an inverse correlation between the biased qPCR results and the low expression level of the respective HOX gene. The PCR analysis of high-copy transcripts like GAPDH or RPL13A revealed unchanged qPCR results after WTA compared to corresponding non-amplified BM-MSC samples. In contrast, WTA led to biased qPCR results for medium-copy HOX transcripts, and even non-detectability of low-copy HOX transcripts of human BM-MSCs resulting in false negative RT- and qPCR data applying WTA.

  5. Proteasome-independent major histocompatibility complex class I cross-presentation mediated by papaya mosaic virus-like particles leads to expansion of specific human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Denis; Beauseigle, Diane; Denis, Jérome; Morin, Hélène; Paré, Christine; Lamarre, Alain; Lapointe, Réjean

    2007-02-01

    The development of versatile vaccine platforms is a priority that is recognized by health authorities worldwide; such platforms should induce both arms of the immune system, the humoral and cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte responses. In this study, we have established that a vaccine platform based on the coat protein of papaya mosaic virus (PapMV CP), previously shown to induce a humoral response, can induce major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I cross-presentation of HLA-A*0201 epitopes from gp100, a melanoma antigen, and from influenza virus M1 matrix protein. PapMV proteins were able to assemble into stable virus-like particles (VLPs) in a crystalline and repetitive structure. When we pulsed HLA-A*0201+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs) with the recombinant PapMV FLU or gp100, we noted that antigen-specific CD8+ T cells were highly reactive to these APCs, demonstrating that the epitope from the VLPs were processed and loaded on the MHC class I complex. APCs were preincubated with two different proteasome inhibitors, which did not affect the efficiency of peptide presentation on MHC class I. Classical presentation from an endogenous antigen was abolished in the same conditions. Clearly, antigen presentation mediated by the PapMV system was proteasome independent. Finally, PapMV-pulsed APCs had the capacity to expand highly avid antigen-specific T cells against the influenza virus M1 HLA-A*0201 epitope when cocultured with autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study demonstrates the potential of PapMV for MHC class I cross-presentation and for the expansion of human antigen-specific T cells. It makes VLPs from PapMV CP a very attractive platform to trigger cellular responses for vaccine development against chronic infectious diseases and cancers.

  6. Cadmium, cobalt and lead cause stress response, cell cycle deregulation and increased steroid as well as xenobiotic metabolism in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells which is coordinated by at least nine transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glahn, Felix; Wiese, Jan; Foth, Heidi [Martin-Luther-University, Halle-Wittenberg, Institute of Environmental Toxicology, Halle/Saale (Germany); Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Guthke, Reinhard [Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology, Hans Knoell Institute, Jena (Germany); Zellmer, Sebastian; Gebhardt, Rolf [University of Leipzig, Institute of Biochemistry, Medical Faculty, Leipzig (Germany); Golka, Klaus; Degen, Gisela H.; Hermes, Matthias; Schormann, Wiebke; Brulport, Marc; Bauer, Alexander; Bedawy, Essam [IfADo, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Dortmund (Germany); Hergenroeder, Roland [ISAS, Institute for Analytical Sciences, Dortmund (Germany); Lehmann, Thomas [Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Hengstler, Jan G. [IfADo, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Dortmund (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    Workers occupationally exposed to cadmium, cobalt and lead have been reported to have increased levels of DNA damage. To analyze whether in vivo relevant concentrations of heavy metals cause systematic alterations in RNA expression patterns, we performed a gene array study using primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Cells were incubated with 15{mu}g/l Cd(II), 25{mu}g/l Co(II) and 550{mu}g/l Pb(II) either with individual substances or in combination. Differentially expressed genes were filtered out and used to identify enriched GO categories as well as KEGG pathways and to identify transcription factors whose binding sites are enriched in a given set of promoters. Interestingly, combined exposure to Cd(II), Co(II) and Pb(II) caused a coordinated response of at least seven stress response-related transcription factors, namely Oct-1, HIC1, TGIF, CREB, ATF4, SRF and YY1. A stress response was further corroborated by up regulation of genes involved in glutathione metabolism. A second major response to heavy metal exposure was deregulation of the cell cycle as evidenced by down regulation of the transcription factors ELK-1 and the Ets transcription factor GABP, as well as deregulation of genes involved in purine and pyrimidine metabolism. A third and surprising response was up regulation of genes involved in steroid metabolism, whereby promoter analysis identified up regulation of SRY that is known to play a role in sex determination. A forth response was up regulation of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes, particularly of dihydrodiol dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (AKR1C1, AKR1C2). Incubations with individual heavy metals showed that the response of AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 was predominantly caused by lead. In conclusion, we have shown that in vivo relevant concentrations of Cd(II), Co(II) and Pb(II) cause a complex and coordinated response in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. This study gives an overview of the most responsive genes. (orig.)

  7. Perovskite Solar Cells: Beyond Methylammonium Lead Iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, Pablo P; Agarwala, Shweta; Koh, Teck Ming; Mathews, Nripan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2015-03-05

    Organic-inorganic lead halide based perovskites solar cells are by far the highest efficiency solution-processed solar cells, threatening to challenge thin film and polycrystalline silicon ones. Despite the intense research in this area, concerns surrounding the long-term stability as well as the toxicity of lead in the archetypal perovskite, CH3NH3PbI3, have the potential to derail commercialization. Although the search for Pb-free perovskites have naturally shifted to other transition metal cations and formulations that replace the organic moiety, efficiencies with these substitutions are still substantially lower than those of the Pb-perovskite. The perovskite family offers rich multitudes of crystal structures and substituents with the potential to uncover new and exciting photophysical phenomena that hold the promise of higher solar cell efficiencies. In addressing materials beyond CH3NH3PbI3, this Perspective will discuss a broad palette of elemental substitutions, solid solutions, and multidimensional families that will provide the next fillip toward market viability of the perovskite solar cells.

  8. Genetic Inactivation of ATRX Leads to a Decrease in the Amount of Telomeric Cohesin and Level of Telomere Transcription in Human Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Rita; Demattei, Marie-Véronique; Episkopou, Harikleia; Augé-Gouillou, Corinne; Decottignies, Anabelle; Grandin, Nathalie; Charbonneau, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked), a chromatin-remodeling protein, are associated with the telomerase-independent ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) pathway of telomere maintenance in several types of cancer, including human gliomas. In telomerase-positive glioma cells, we found by immunofluorescence that ATRX localized not far from the chromosome ends but not exactly at the telomere termini. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments confirmed a subtelomeric localization for ATRX, yet short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated genetic inactivation of ATRX failed to trigger the ALT pathway. Cohesin has been recently shown to be part of telomeric chromatin. Here, using ChIP, we showed that genetic inactivation of ATRX provoked diminution in the amount of cohesin in subtelomeric regions of telomerase-positive glioma cells. Inactivation of ATRX also led to diminution in the amount of TERRAs, noncoding RNAs resulting from transcription of telomeric DNA, as well as to a decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) levels at the telomeres. Our data suggest that ATRX might establish functional interactions with cohesin on telomeric chromatin in order to control TERRA levels and that one or the other or both of these events might be relevant to the triggering of the ALT pathway in cancer cells that exhibit genetic inactivation of ATRX.

  9. Targeting human dendritic cells via DEC-205 using PLGA nanoparticles leads to enhanced cross-presentation of a melanoma-associated antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saluja SS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sandeep S Saluja,1 Douglas J Hanlon,1 Fiona A Sharp,2 Enping Hong,2 David Khalil,1 Eve Robinson,1 Robert Tigelaar,1 Tarek M Fahmy,2,3 Richard L Edelson1 1Department of Dermatology, Yale University School of Medicine, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, 3Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Targeting antigen to dendritic cells (DCs is a powerful and novel strategy for vaccination. Priming or loading DCs with antigen controls whether subsequent immunity will develop and hence whether effective vaccination can be achieved. The goal of our present work was to increase the potency of DC-based antitumor vaccines by overcoming inherent limitations associated with antigen stability and cross-presentation. Nanoparticles prepared from the biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid have been extensively used in clinical settings for drug delivery and are currently the subject of intensive investigation as antigen delivery vehicles for vaccine applications. Here we describe a nanoparticulate delivery system with the ability to simultaneously carry a high density of protein-based antigen while displaying a DC targeting ligand on its surface. Utilizing a targeting motif specific for the DC-associated surface ligand DEC-205, we show that targeted nanoparticles encapsulating a MART-127–35 peptide are both internalized and cross-presented with significantly higher efficiency than isotype control-coated nanoparticles in human cells. In addition, the DEC-205-labeled nanoparticles rapidly escape from the DC endosomal compartment and do not colocalize with markers of early (EEA-1 or late endosome/lysosome (LAMP-1. This indicates that encapsulated antigens delivered by nanoparticles may have direct access to the class I cytoplasmic major histocompatibility complex loading machinery, overcoming the need for “classical” cross-presentation and facilitating heightened DC

  10. Introduction of the human pro. cap alpha. 1(I) collagen gene into pro. cap alpha. 1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnieke, A.; Dziadek, M.; Bateman, J.; Mascara, T.; Harbers, K.; Gelinas, R.; Jaenisch, R.

    1987-02-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of pro..cap alpha..2 mRNA are synthesized. The authors have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse pro..cap alpha..2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human ..cap alpha..1 chains and one mouse ..cap alpha..2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both ..cap alpha..1(I) and ..cap alpha..2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the ..cap alpha..(I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human ..cap alpha.. chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow the authors to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected pro..cap alpha..1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I.

  11. Spatiotemporal proliferation of human stromal cells adjusts to nutrient availability and leads to stanniocalcin-1 expression in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera, G.A.; Fernandes, H.; Spitters, T.W.G.M.; Peppel, J. van de; Aufferman, N.; Truckenmueller, R.; Escalante; Stoop, R.; Leeuwen, J.P. van; Boer, J. de; Subramaniam, V.; Karperien, M.; Blitterswijk, C. van; Boxtel, A. van; Moroni, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cells and tissues are intrinsically adapted to molecular gradients and use them to maintain or change their activity. The effect of such gradients is particularly important for cell populations that have an intrinsic capacity to differentiate into multiple cell lineages, such as bone marrow derived

  12. The trans-well coculture of human synovial mesenchymal stem cells with chondrocytes leads to self-organization, chondrogenic differentiation, and secretion of TGFβ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Heidt, Emanuel; Bernstein, Anke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSC) possess a high chondrogenic differentiation potential, which possibly supports natural and surgically induced healing of cartilage lesions. We hypothesized enhanced chondrogenesis of SMSC caused by the vicinity of chondrocytes (CHDR). METHODS....... RESULTS: After 7 days, phase-contrast microscopy revealed cell aggregation of SMSC in coculture with CHDR. Afterwards, cells formed spheres and lost adherence. However, this phenomenon was not observed when culturing SMSC alone. Fluorescence labeling showed concurrent collagen type II expression. Addition...

  13. Co-operation of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to transcriptional activation of the human haem oxygenase-1 gene promoter in a hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Matsuura, Naomi; Kurokawa, Takako; Takahashi, Yuji; Miura, Takashi

    2002-11-01

    We reported previously that the 5'-flanking region (nucleotides -1976 to -1655) of the human haem oxygenase-1 ( hHO-1 ) gene enhances hHO-1 promoter activity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells, but not in HeLa cells [Takahashi, Takahashi, Ito, Nagano, Shibahara and Miura (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1447, 231-235]. To define more precisely the regulatory elements involved, in the present study we have functionally dissected this region and localized the enhancer to a 50 bp fragment (-1793 to -1744). Site-direct mutagenesis analysis revealed that two regions were responsible for this enhancer activity, i.e. a hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) homologous region and a GC box motif homologous region. Mutation in either region alone moderately decreased enhancer activity. However, mutations in both regions reduced promoter activity to the basal level. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated that the P5-2 fragment (-1793 to -1744) interacted with at least two nuclear factors, i.e. HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3. Co-transfection experiments using Drosophila SL2 cells revealed that HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3 synergistically stimulated the enhancer activity of the P5-2 fragment. These results indicate that co-operation of HNF-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to the activation of hHO-1 gene expression in hepatoma cells.

  14. Grape seed extract targets mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress leading to cytoprotective autophagy and apoptotic death in human head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrotriya, Sangeeta; Deep, Gagan; Lopert, Pamela; Patel, Manisha; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2015-12-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a major killer worldwide and innovative measures are urgently warranted to lower the morbidity and mortality caused by this malignancy. Aberrant redox and metabolic status in HNSCC cells offer a unique opportunity to specifically target cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of grape seed extract (GSE) to target the redox and bioenergetic alterations in HNSCC cells. GSE treatment decreased the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity, increased the mitochondrial superoxide levels and depleted the levels of cellular antioxidant (glutathione), thus resulting in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in human HNSCC Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Polyethylene glycol-SOD addition reversed the GSE-mediated apoptosis without restoring complex III activity. Along with redox changes, GSE inhibited the extracellular acidification rate (representing glycolysis) and oxygen consumption rate (indicating oxidative phosphorylation) leading to metabolic stress in HNSCC cells. Molecular studies revealed that GSE activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and suppressed Akt/mTOR/4E-BP1/S6K signaling in both Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Interestingly, GSE increased the autophagic load specifically in FaDu cells, and autophagy inhibition significantly augmented the apoptosis in these cells. Consistent with in vitro results, in vivo analyses also showed that GSE feeding in nude mice activated AMPK and induced-autophagy in FaDu xenograft tumor tissues. Overall, these findings are innovative as we for the first time showed that GSE targets ETC complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress, thereby, causing autophagy and apoptotic death in HNSCC cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Lead--the toxic metal to stay with human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srianujata, S

    1998-07-01

    Lead has been known to be toxic to most living things at high dose. It is found naturally in earth and present in almost all parts of the environment, such as foods, air, water, dust, soil, paint, and tissues of living organisms including human. This metal is being used in various aspects including the manufacturing of storage batteries, production of chemicals, paints and gasoline additives. It is also used to make various metal products, e.g. sheet lead, solder, and pipes. Human exposure to lead is mainly from foods and other environments. However, it is expected that exposure to environmental lead is normally excessive and produces toxic effects. The well-known and excessive environmental exposures are air of industrial and heavy traffic areas. Use of leaded gasoline has caused the main lead pollution for years in almost every big city. Therefore, city inhabitants normally exposed to lead much more than those who live in the rural area. The most vulnerable groups at risk to lead exposure are fetuses and preschool age children. Young children in the 2-3 year-old age may be the most at risk for exposure to contaminated soil. Adults are affected when exposure is excessive in the working place and causing lead poisoning. Toxicities are mainly on heme biosynthesis, neurological effects including encepharopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and most importantly on I.Q. deficits. It also affects renal tissues to produce acute and chronic nephropathy and elevated blood pressure. There are studies of lead exposure of various means and the effects on human health, both in children and adults. Lead in environment and human exposure are expected to stay with us for long to come, due the still required lead use in many fields, particularly the use of lead in storage batteries and others. The magnitude of exposure will depend solely on the control of use by not allowing the contamination of lead in our environment to be excessive.

  16. Simvastatin induces NFκB/p65 down-regulation and JNK1/c-Jun/ATF-2 activation, leading to matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) but not MMP-2 down-regulation in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Jung; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to explore the signaling pathways associated with the effect of simvastatin on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 expression in human leukemia K562 cells. In sharp contrast to its insignificant effect on MMP-2, simvastatin down-regulated MMP-9 protein expression and mRNA levels in K562 cells. Simvastatin-induced Pin1 down-regulation evoked NFκB/p65 degradation. Meanwhile, simvastatin induced JNK-mediated c-Jun and ATF-2 activation. Over-expression of Pin1 suppressed simvastatin-induced MMP-9 down-regulation. Treatment with SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) or knock-down of JNK1 reduced MMP-2 expression in simvastatin-treated cells. Simvastatin enhanced the binding of c-Jun/ATF-2 with the MMP-2 promoter. Down-regulation of c-Jun or ATF-2 by siRNA revealed that c-Jun/ATF-2 activation was crucial for MMP-2 expression. Suppression of p65 activation or knock-down of Pin1 by shRNA reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in K562 cells. Over-expression of constitutively active JNK1 rescued MMP-2 expression in Pin1 shRNA-transfected cells. Simvastatin treatment also suppressed MMP-9 but not MMP-2 expression in human leukemia U937 and KU812 cells. Taken together, our data indicate that simvastatin-induced p65 instability leads to MMP-9 down-regulation in leukemia cells, while simvastatin-induced JNK1/c-Jun/ATF-2 activation maintains the MMP-2 expression underlying p65 down-regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lead shot from hunting as a source of lead in human blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Poul [National Environmental Research Institute, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)]. E-mail: poj@dmu.dk; Pedersen, Henning Sloth [Primary Health Care Center, DK-3900 Nuuk (Greenland); Asmund, Gert [National Environmental Research Institute, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Riget, Frank [National Environmental Research Institute, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2006-07-15

    This study investigates the relationship between the intake of birds hunted with lead shot and the lead concentration in human blood. Fifty adult men from Nuuk, Greenland took part in the study. From September 2003 to June 2004 they regularly gave blood samples and recorded how many birds they ate. We found a clear relationship between the number of bird meals and blood lead and also a clear seasonal variation. The concentration was highest in mid-winter when bird consumption is at its highest. Blood lead was low (15 {mu}g/L, mean concentration) among the participants reporting not eating birds. Among those reporting to eat birds regularly, blood lead was significantly higher, up to 128 {mu}g/L (mean concentration). Concentrations depended on the frequency of bird meals: the more the bird meals, the higher the resulting blood lead. This clear relationship points to lead shot as the dominating lead source to people in Greenland. - Birds hunted with lead shot and consumed are a source of lead in human blood.

  18. A green lead hydrometallurgical process based on a hydrogen-lead oxide fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Junqing; Sun, Yanzhi; Li, Wei; Knight, James; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    The automobile industry consumed 9 million metric tons of lead in 2012 for lead-acid batteries. Recycling lead from spent lead-acid batteries is not only related to the sustainable development of the lead industry, but also to the reduction of lead pollution in the environment. The existing lead pyrometallurgical processes have two main issues, toxic lead emission into the environment and high energy consumption; the developing hydrometallurgical processes have the disadvantages of high electricity consumption, use of toxic chemicals and severe corrosion of metallic components. Here we demonstrate a new green hydrometallurgical process to recover lead based on a hydrogen-lead oxide fuel cell. High-purity lead, along with electricity, is produced with only water as the by-product. It has a >99.5% lead yield, which is higher than that of the existing pyrometallurgical processes (95-97%). This greatly reduces lead pollution to the environment.

  19. TGF-β1 downregulates COX-2 expression leading to decrease of PGE2 production in human lung cancer A549 cells, which is involved in fibrotic response to TGF-β1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erina Takai

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-β1 is a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in various pathophysiological processes, including cancer progression and fibrotic disorders. Here, we show that treatment with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL induced downregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, leading to reduced synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, in human lung cancer A549 cells. Treatment of cells with specific inhibitors of COX-2 or PGE2 receptor resulted in growth inhibition, indicating that the COX-2/PGE2 pathway contributes to proliferation in an autocrine manner. TGF-β1 treatment induced growth inhibition, which was attenuated by exogenous PGE2. TGF-β1 is also a potent inducer of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT, a phenotype change in which epithelial cells differentiate into fibroblastoid cells. Supplementation with PGE2 or PGE2 receptor EP4 agonist PGE1-alcohol, as compared with EP1/3 agonist sulprostone, inhibited TGF-β1-induced expression of fibronectin and collagen I (extracellular matrix components. Exogenous PGE2 or PGE2 receptor agonists also suppressed actin remodeling induced by TGF-β1. These results suggest that PGE2 has an anti-fibrotic effect. We conclude that TGF-β1-induced downregulation of COX-2/PGE2 signaling is involved in facilitation of fibrotic EMT response in A549 cells.

  20. TGF-β1 Downregulates COX-2 Expression Leading to Decrease of PGE2 Production in Human Lung Cancer A549 Cells, Which Is Involved in Fibrotic Response to TGF-β1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Erina; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Kojima, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-β1) is a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in various pathophysiological processes, including cancer progression and fibrotic disorders. Here, we show that treatment with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL) induced downregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), leading to reduced synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), in human lung cancer A549 cells. Treatment of cells with specific inhibitors of COX-2 or PGE2 receptor resulted in growth inhibition, indicating that the COX-2/PGE2 pathway contributes to proliferation in an autocrine manner. TGF-β1 treatment induced growth inhibition, which was attenuated by exogenous PGE2. TGF-β1 is also a potent inducer of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a phenotype change in which epithelial cells differentiate into fibroblastoid cells. Supplementation with PGE2 or PGE2 receptor EP4 agonist PGE1-alcohol, as compared with EP1/3 agonist sulprostone, inhibited TGF-β1-induced expression of fibronectin and collagen I (extracellular matrix components). Exogenous PGE2 or PGE2 receptor agonists also suppressed actin remodeling induced by TGF-β1. These results suggest that PGE2 has an anti-fibrotic effect. We conclude that TGF-β1-induced downregulation of COX-2/PGE2 signaling is involved in facilitation of fibrotic EMT response in A549 cells. PMID:24098479

  1. Converging signals synergistically activate the LAMC2 promoter and lead to accumulation of the laminin gamma 2 chain in human colon carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jørgen; Kirkeby, Lene T; Brorsson, Marianne M;

    2003-01-01

    the synergistic activation of the LAMC2 gene is mediated via different cis-elements and results in an overproduction of the laminin gamma 2 chain relative to the other laminin-5 constituent chains. This difference may explain why laminin gamma 2 chains accumulate in the cells at the invasive front of colon...

  2. A combination of biomolecules enhances expression of E-cadherin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gene leading to increased cell proliferation in primary human meniscal cells: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Mamatha M; Elakkiya, V; Gopinathan, J; Sabarinath, C; Shanthakumari, S; Sahanand, K Santosh; Dinakar Rai, B K; Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Selvakumar, R

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigates the impact of biomolecules (biotin, glucose, chondroitin sulphate, proline) as supplement, (individual and in combination) on primary human meniscus cell proliferation. Primary human meniscus cells isolated from patients undergoing meniscectomy were maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM). The isolated cells were treated with above mentioned biomolecules as individual (0-100 µg/ml) and in combinations, as a supplement to DMEM. Based on the individual biomolecule study, a unique combination of biomolecules (UCM) was finalized using one way ANOVA analysis. With the addition of UCM as supplement to DMEM, meniscal cells reached 100 % confluency within 4 days in 60 mm culture plate; whereas the cells in medium devoid of UCM, required 36 days for reaching confluency. The impact of UCM on cell viability, doubling time, histology, gene expression, biomarkers expression, extra cellular matrix synthesis, meniscus cell proliferation with respect to passages and donor's age were investigated. The gene expression studies for E-cadherin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR∆) using RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical analysis for Ki67, CD34 and Vimentin confirmed that UCM has significant impact on cell proliferation. The extracellular collagen and glycosaminoglycan secretion in cells supplemented with UCM were found to increase by 31 and 37 fold respectively, when compared to control on the 4th day. The cell doubling time was reduced significantly when supplemented with UCM. The addition of UCM showed positive influence on different passages and age groups. Hence, this optimized UCM can be used as an effective supplement for meniscal tissue engineering.

  3. Ballard: leading the fuel cell charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-10-01

    This article outlines the role of Ballard Power Systems in the development of fuel cells, and their strategy in concentrating on fuel cells for cars, buses, trucks, and stationary and portable power plants. Market drivers; costs; the concept of a fuel cell as a component of a power plant, and customers and competition are discussed. California's fuel cell partnership for testing fuel cell vehicles, the shrinking of fuel cell sizes and weights, aspects of piracy and copyright, and fuel types and sources are examined. (UK)

  4. Regional distribution of lead in human milk from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M A; Ragab, A A; Kamel, A; Jones, J; el-Sebae, A K

    1996-05-01

    Bioaccumulation of lead during chronic exposure and its mobilization and secretion with mother's milk constitute a serious health hazard to the newly born children. Lead levels in human breast milk of 120 Egyptian women representing 20 different governorates throughout Egypt were determined using a graphite furnace Atomic Absorption spectrometer. According to the daily permissible intake (DPI) value established by the WHO of 5.0 micrograms/kg/d in mother's milk, the mean values of lead were around the permissible level in most of the Egyptian governorates. However, lead levels in mother's milk from Alexandria, Assiut and Cairo were significantly higher than the permissible value. Higher lead levels in mother's milk from these governorates may be attributed to heavy automobile traffic using leaded gasoline in addition to the use of lead water pipelines in these areas.

  5. Decreased expression of CHIP leads to increased angiogenesis via VEGF-VEGFR2 pathway and poor prognosis in human renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Li, Hai-long; Chen, Hai-rong; Shi, Mei-lin; Liu, Qing-hua; Pan, Zhen-qiang; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-nian

    2015-05-29

    CHIP (c-terminal Hsp70-interacting protein) is an E3 ligase which may play different roles in different cancers. The elucidation of the VHL-HIF-1α (hypoxia inducible factor-1α)-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) pathway has led to the development of targeted therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, little is known about the role of CHIP and the relationship between CHIP and VEGF-VEGFR2 (VEGF receptor 2) pathway in RCC. In this study, we found that the expression of CHIP was downregulated and significantly correlated with pT status (P = 0.022) and TNM stage (P = 0.022) in 304 RCC and 35 normal renal tissues using tissue microarray. Moreover, low expression of CHIP is a strong and independent negative prognostic value for RCC. In vitro, CHIP negatively regulated RCC cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. In addition, ELISA tests showed that restoration of CHIP inhibited, while knockdown promoted, the secreted level of VEGF. Furthermore, western blot indicated that the VEGFR2 protein level was reduced after CHIP overexpression. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that CHIP may be involved in RCC angiogenesis through regulating VEGF secretion and expression of VEGFR2. CHIP may serve as promising prognostic biomarker of angiogenesis and may constitute a potential therapeutic target in RCC.

  6. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  7. Nucleofection of Rat Pheochromocytoma PC-12 Cells with Human Mutated Beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein Gene (APP-sw) Leads to Reduced Viability, Autophagy-Like Process, and Increased Expression and Secretion of Beta Amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Pająk; Elżbieta Kania; Arkadiusz Orzechowski

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells are immune to physiological stimuli directed to evoke programmed cell death. Besides, metabolic inhibitors are incapable of sensitizing PC-12 cells to extrinsic or intrinsic apoptosis unless they are used in toxic concentrations. Surprisingly, these cells become receptive to cell deletion after human APP-sw gene expression. We observed reduced cell viability in GFP vector + APP-sw-nucleofected cells (drop by 36%) but not in GFP vector − or GFP vector + APP-wt-nucl...

  8. Strategies For Human Exploration Leading To Human Colonization of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitherman, David; Everett, Harmon

    2009-01-01

    Enabling the commercial development of space is key to the future colonization of space and key to a viable space exploration program. Without commercial development following in the footsteps of exploration it is difficult to justify and maintain public interest in the efforts. NASA's exploration program has suffered from the lack of a good commercial economic strategy for decades. Only small advances in commercial space have moved forward, and only up to Earth orbit with the commercial satellite industry. A way to move beyond this phase is to begin the establishment of human commercial activities in space in partnership with the human exploration program. In 2007 and 2008, the authors researched scenarios to make space exploration and commercial space development more feasible as part of their graduate work in the Space Architecture Program at the Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture at the University of Houston, Houston, Texas. Through this research it became apparent that the problems facing future colonization are much larger than the technology being developed or the international missions that our space agencies are pursuing. These issues are addressed in this paper with recommendations for space exploration, commercial development, and space policy that are needed to form a strategic plan for human expansion into space. In conclusion, the authors found that the current direction in space as carried out by our space agencies around the world is definitely needed, but is inadequate and incapable of resolving all of the issues that inhibit commercial space development. A bolder vision with strategic planning designed to grow infrastructures and set up a legal framework for commercial markets will go a long way toward enabling the future colonization of space.

  9. Cellular and molecular toxicology of lead. I. Effect of lead on cultured cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusell, M.; O' Cheskey, S.; Gerschenson, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    Growth studies were done on a cultured rat liver cell line (RLC-GAI) grown in a chemically defined medium in the presence of lead nitrate. Lead reversibly inhibited the growth of these cells even after 6 d of exposure to the heavy metal. To compare lead sensitivity in various cell lines, GI50 and LD50 values were determined in the RLC-GAI cells as well as two glioma cell lines (B82 and C/sub 6/) and a neuroblastoma cell line (N18). The LD50 values paralleled but were consistently lower than the GI50 values. Since lead is known to affect heme synthesis, hemin was added to test the possibility of preventing the growth-inhibitory effect of the lead. The growth capacity of lead-treated cells did not change with the addition of hemin. It is thought that differentiated cultured cell lines such as these could be useful in examining the molecular mechanism of lead toxicity.

  10. Gallic acid causes inactivating phosphorylation of cdc25A/cdc25C-cdc2 via ATM-Chk2 activation, leading to cell cycle arrest, and induces apoptosis in human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Alpna; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2006-12-01

    We recently reported that gallic acid is a major active agent responsible for grape seed extract activity in DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells. The present study was conducted to examine its efficacy and associated mechanism. Gallic acid treatment of DU145 cells resulted in a strong cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic death in a dose- and time-dependent manner, together with a decrease in cyclin-dependent kinases and cyclins but strong induction in Cip1/p21. Additional mechanistic studies showed that gallic acid induces an early Tyr(15) phosphorylation of cell division cycle 2 (cdc2). Further upstream, gallic acid also induced phosphorylation of both cdc25A and cdc25C via ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) activation as a DNA damage response evidenced by increased phospho-histone 2AX (H2A.X) that is phosphorylated by ATM in response to DNA damage. Time kinetics of ATM phosphorylation, together with those of H2A.X and Chk2, was in accordance with an inactivating phosphorylation of cdc25A and cdc25C phosphatases and cdc2 kinase, suggesting that gallic acid increases cdc25A/C-cdc2 phosphorylation and thereby inactivation via ATM-Chk2 pathway following DNA damage that induces cell cycle arrest. Caffeine, an ATM/ataxia telangiectasia-rad3-related inhibitor, reversed gallic acid-caused ATM and H2A.X phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest, supporting the role of ATM pathway in gallic acid-induced cell cycle arrest. Additionally, gallic acid caused caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly(ADP)ribose polymerase cleavage, but pan-caspase inhibitor did not reverse apoptosis, suggesting an additional caspase-independent apoptotic mechanism. Together, this is the first report identifying gallic acid efficacy and associated mechanisms in an advanced and androgen-independent human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells, suggesting future in vivo efficacy studies with this agent in preclinical prostate cancer models.

  11. The detrimental effects of lead on human and animal health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Mohammed Abdulrazzaq; Hezmee, Mohd Noor Mohd; Haron, Abd Wahid; Sabri, Mohd Yusof Mohd; Rajion, Mohd Ali

    2016-01-01

    Lead, a chemical element in the carbon group with symbol Pb (from Latin: Plumbum, meaning “the liquid silver”) and has an atomic number 82 in the periodic table. It was the first element that was characterized by its kind of toxicity. In animal systems, lead (Pb) has been incriminated in a wide spectrum of toxic effects and it is considered one of the persistent ubiquitous heavy metals. Being exposed to this metal could lead to the change of testicular functions in human beings as well as in the wildlife. The lead poising is a real threat to the public health, especially in the developing countries. Accordingly, great efforts on the part of the occupational and public health have been taken to curb the dangers of this metal. Hematopoietic, renal, reproductive, and central nervous system are among the parts of the human body and systems that are vulnerable toward the dangers following exposure to high level of Pb. In this review, we discussed the massive harmful impact that leads acetate toxicity has on the animals and the worrying fact that this harmful toxicant can be found quite easily in the environment and abundance. Highlighting its (Pb) effects on various organs in the biological systems, its economic, as well as scientific importance, with the view to educate the public/professionals who work in this area. In this study, we focus on the current studies and research related to lead toxicity in animals and also to a certain extent toward human as well. PMID:27397992

  12. The detrimental effects of lead on human and animal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdulrazzaq Assi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lead, a chemical element in the carbon group with symbol Pb (from Latin: Plumbum, meaning “the liquid silver” and has an atomic number 82 in the periodic table. It was the first element that was characterized by its kind of toxicity. In animal systems, lead (Pb has been incriminated in a wide spectrum of toxic effects and it is considered one of the persistent ubiquitous heavy metals. Being exposed to this metal could lead to the change of testicular functions in human beings as well as in the wildlife. The lead poising is a real threat to the public health, especially in the developing countries. Accordingly, great efforts on the part of the occupational and public health have been taken to curb the dangers of this metal. Hematopoietic, renal, reproductive, and central nervous system are among the parts of the human body and systems that are vulnerable toward the dangers following exposure to high level of Pb. In this review, we discussed the massive harmful impact that leads acetate toxicity has on the animals and the worrying fact that this harmful toxicant can be found quite easily in the environment and abundance. Highlighting its (Pb effects on various organs in the biological systems, its economic, as well as scientific importance, with the view to educate the public/professionals who work in this area. In this study, we focus on the current studies and research related to lead toxicity in animals and also to a certain extent toward human as well.

  13. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-28

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states.

  14. Co-infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1: does immune activation lead to a faster progression to AIDS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Wilson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data have shown that HTLV-1 is prevalent among HIV positive patients in Mozambique, although the impact of HTLV-1 infection on HIV disease progression remains controversial. Our aim was to determine the phenotypic profile of T lymphocytes subsets among Mozambican patients co-infected by HIV and HTLV-1. Methods We enrolled 29 patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and HIV (co-infected, 59 patients mono-infected by HIV (HIV and 16 healthy controls (HC, respectively. For phenotypic analysis, cells were stained with the following fluorochrome-labeled anti-human monoclonal antibodies CD4-APC, CD8-PerCP, CD25-PE, CD62L-FITC, CD45RA-FITC. CD45RO-PE, CD38-PE; being analysed by four-colour flow cytometry. Results We initially found that CD4+ T cell counts were significantly higher in co-infected, as compared to HIV groups. Moreover, CD4+ T Lymphocytes from co-infected patients presented significantly higher levels of CD45RO and CD25, but lower levels of CD45RA and CD62L, strongly indicating that CD4+ T cells are more activated under HTLV-1 plus HIV co-infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients progress with higher CD4+ T cell counts and higher levels of activation markers. In this context, it is conceivable that in co-infected individuals, these higher levels of activation may account for a faster progression to AIDS.

  15. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Suppressor T cells - a sensitive target of lead toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambach, A.; Stiller-Winkler, R.; Oberbarnscheidt, J.; Ewers, J.

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed to investigate the effect of chronic low level lead exposure on the regulatory functions of T cells in the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in mice. Female mice were exposed to lead (as lead acetate) in the diet at 545 (group 1) and 2180 ppm (group 2) for 10 weeks. Lead exposure resulting in blood lead levels (PbB) of about 50 ..mu..g/100 g (group 1) produced a substantial increase of the number of IgG antibodies secreting spleen cells on days 3 and 4 after challenge. At the higher exposure level (group 2; PbB 60-80 ..mu..g/100 g) a suppression of the number of IgG plaque forming cells was observed. The IgM response was much smaller than the IgG response. Although differences between the group means were small, the results indicate that there also is an enhancement of the IgM response in the lower dosage group on days 3 and 4. In a second experiment the effect of in vivo lead exposure on antigenic competition was examined. Lead substantially reduced the effect of antigenic competition. Results of both experiments suggest that suppressor T cells rather than helper T cells may represent the primary target for lead. Throughout this study serum complement C3 levels were determined. Complement C3 levels tended to be reduced in the lead exposed groups before as well as after inocculation with SRBC. (orig.*.

  17. Suppressor T cells - a sensitive target of lead toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambach, A.; Stiller-Winkler, R.; Oberbarnscheidt, J.; Ewers, U.

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed to investigate the effect of chronic low level lead exposure on the regulatory functions of T cells in the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in mice. Female mice were exposed to lead (as lead acetate) in the diet at 545 (group 1) and 2180 ppm (group 2) for 10 weeks. Lead exposure resulting in blood lead levels (PbB) of about 50 ..mu..g/100 g (group 1) produced a substantial increase of the number of IgG antibodies secreting spleen cells on days 3 and 4 after challenge. At the higher exposure level (group 2; PbB 60-80 ..mu..m/100 g) a suppression of the number of IgG plawue forming cells was observed. The IgM response was much smaller than the IgG response. Although differences between the group means were small, the results indicate that there also is an enhancement of the IgM response in the lower dosage group on days 3 and 4. In a second experiment the effect of in vivo lead exposure on antigenic competition was examined. Lead substantially reduced the effect of antigenic competition. Results of both experiments suggest that suppressor T cells rather than helper T cells may represent the primary target for lead. Throughout this study serum complement C3 levels were determined. Complement C3 levels tended to be reduced in the lead exposed groups before as well as after inocculation with SRBC.

  18. Search for naive human pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simone Aparecida Siqueira Fonseca; Roberta Montero Costas; Lygia Veiga Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Normal mouse pluripotent stem cells were originallyderived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of blastocystsand shown to be the in vitro equivalent of those preimplantationembryonic cells, and thus were calledembryonic stem cells (ESCs). More than a decade later,pluripotent cells were isolated from the ICM of humanblastocysts. Despite being called human ESCs, thesecells differ significantly from mouse ESCs, includingdifferent morphology and mechanisms of control ofpluripotency, suggesting distinct embryonic originsof ESCs from the two species. Subsequently, mousepluripotent stem cells were established from the ICMderivedepiblast of post-implantation embryos. Thesemouse epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) are morphologicaland epigenetically more similar to human ESCs. Thisraised the question of whether cells from the humanICM are in a more advanced differentiation stage thantheir murine counterpart, or whether the availableculture conditions were not adequate to maintain thosehuman cells in their in vivo state, leading to a transitioninto EpiSC-like cells in vitro . More recently, novel cultureconditions allowed the conversion of human ESCs intomouse ESC-like cells called naive (or ground state)human ESCs, and the derivation of naive human ESCsfrom blastocysts. Here we will review the characteristicsof each type of pluripotent stem cells, how (andwhether) these relate to different stages of embryonicdevelopment, and discuss the potential implications ofnaive human ESCs in research and therapy.

  19. Lead tolerance of metallothionein -overexpressed human adipose -derived mesenchymal stem cells%金属硫蛋白修饰人脂肪来源间充质干细胞对铅的耐受性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芸; 纪惜銮; 罗朝霞; 杨顺; 刘晓雷; 李结明; 谢亮; 姜舒

    2015-01-01

    目的:构建携带金属硫蛋白( MT)基因的慢病毒载体,验证其在人脂肪来源间充质干细胞( hADSCs)中的表达及分析其对铅中毒的作用。方法通过慢病毒载体pLenti-CMV-hChR 2(E123T-H134R)-EYFP系统,构建MT基因过表达慢病毒载体pLenti-CMV-MT2A-EYFP,感染hADSCs,构建携带MT基因的hADSCs ( MT-hADSCs),应用免疫细胞荧光法检测金属硫蛋白的表达情况。实验分为空白对照组、空载病毒组、重组病毒感染组分析MT-hADSCs对铅的耐受性,采用MTT法检测各组细胞的存活率。结果成功构建携带金属硫蛋白基因的慢病毒载体pLenti-CMV-MT2A-EYFP感染hADSCs,金属硫蛋白获得有效表达,MTT法检测结果显示重组病毒感染组细胞与空白对照组和空载病毒感染组细胞的存活率相比显著提高,具有统计学意义( P<0.05)。结论通过慢病毒载体在hADSCs中有效表达的金属硫蛋白可提高hADSCs对铅的耐受性,证实金属硫蛋白能降低重金属铅对细胞的毒性作用。%Objective The lentiviral vector was recombined with metal-lothionein ( MT) gene to identify the MT overexpression in human adi-pose-derived mesenchymal stem cells ( hADSCs) after transfection and then to study the lead tolerance of genetically modified hADSCs with MT (MT-hADSCs).Methods The recombinant plenti-CMV-MT2A-EYFP vector was constructed with pLenti -CMV -hChR 2 ( E123 T -H134R)-EYFP and MT2A gene for transfecting hADSCs to obtain the MT-hADSCs.The overexpression of MT in hADSCs was identified by immunofluorescence assay.The MTT method was used to assess the cell viability of hADSCs, hADSCs transfected with empty vector, and MT-hADSCs, all of which were treated with lead acetate.Results The re-combinant plenti -CMV -MT2A -EYFP was successfully constructed and transfected into hADSCs.The overexpression of MT was positively detected in the MT -hADSCs.The tolerance of MT-hADSCs to

  20. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found? Who is at risk? What are the health effects of lead? Get educational material about lead Get certified as a Lead Abatement Worker, or other abatement discipline Lead in drinking water Lead air pollution Test your child Check and maintain your home ...

  1. Cell encoding recombinant human erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, A.K.; Withy, R.M.; Zabrecky, J.R.; Masiello, N.C.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes a C127 cell transformed with a recombinant DNA vector. It comprises: a DNA sequence encoding human erythropoietin, the transformed cell being capable of producing N-linked and O-linked glycosylated human erythropoietin.

  2. Recycling Perovskite Solar Cells To Avoid Lead Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Andreas; Petrus, Michiel L; Huber, Niklas; Bristow, Helen; Hu, Yinghong; Bein, Thomas; Docampo, Pablo

    2016-05-25

    Methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) perovskite based solar cells have recently emerged as a serious competitor for large scale and low-cost photovoltaic technologies. However, since these solar cells contain toxic lead, a sustainable procedure for handling the cells after their operational lifetime is required to prevent exposure of the environment to lead and to comply with international electronic waste disposal regulations. Herein, we report a procedure to remove every layer of the solar cells separately, which gives the possibility to selectively isolate the different materials. Besides isolating the toxic lead iodide in high yield, we show that the PbI2 can be reused for the preparation of new solar cells with comparable performance and in this way avoid lead waste. Furthermore, we show that the most expensive part of the solar cell, the conductive glass (FTO), can be reused several times without any reduction in the performance of the devices. With our simple recycling procedure, we address both the risk of contamination and the waste disposal of perovskite based solar cells while further reducing the cost of the system. This brings perovskite solar cells one step closer to their introduction into commercial systems.

  3. Nucleofection of rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells with human mutated beta-amyloid precursor protein gene (APP-sw) leads to reduced viability, autophagy-like process, and increased expression and secretion of beta amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pająk, Beata; Kania, Elżbieta; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells are immune to physiological stimuli directed to evoke programmed cell death. Besides, metabolic inhibitors are incapable of sensitizing PC-12 cells to extrinsic or intrinsic apoptosis unless they are used in toxic concentrations. Surprisingly, these cells become receptive to cell deletion after human APP-sw gene expression. We observed reduced cell viability in GFP vector + APP-sw-nucleofected cells (drop by 36%) but not in GFP vector - or GFP vector + APP-wt-nucleofected cells. Lower viability was accompanied by higher expression of Aβ 1-16 and elevated secretion of Aβ 1-40 (in average 53.58 pg/mL). At the ultrastructural level autophagy-like process was demonstrated to occur in APP-sw-nucleofected cells with numerous autophagosomes and multivesicular bodies but without autolysosomes. Human APP-sw gene is harmful to PC-12 cells and cells are additionally driven to incomplete autophagy-like process. When stimulated by TRAIL or nystatin, CLU protein expression accompanies early phase of autophagy.

  4. Nucleofection of Rat Pheochromocytoma PC-12 Cells with Human Mutated Beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein Gene (APP-sw Leads to Reduced Viability, Autophagy-Like Process, and Increased Expression and Secretion of Beta Amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Pająk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells are immune to physiological stimuli directed to evoke programmed cell death. Besides, metabolic inhibitors are incapable of sensitizing PC-12 cells to extrinsic or intrinsic apoptosis unless they are used in toxic concentrations. Surprisingly, these cells become receptive to cell deletion after human APP-sw gene expression. We observed reduced cell viability in GFP vector + APP-sw-nucleofected cells (drop by 36% but not in GFP vector − or GFP vector + APP-wt-nucleofected cells. Lower viability was accompanied by higher expression of Aβ 1-16 and elevated secretion of Aβ 1-40 (in average 53.58 pg/mL. At the ultrastructural level autophagy-like process was demonstrated to occur in APP-sw-nucleofected cells with numerous autophagosomes and multivesicular bodies but without autolysosomes. Human APP-sw gene is harmful to PC-12 cells and cells are additionally driven to incomplete autophagy-like process. When stimulated by TRAIL or nystatin, CLU protein expression accompanies early phase of autophagy.

  5. Innate Valpha14(+) natural killer T cells mature dendritic cells, leading to strong adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Steinman, Ralph M

    2007-12-01

    The observation that the glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) is a potent stimulator of natural killer T (NKT) cells has provided an important means for investigating NKT cell biology. alpha-GalCer is presented on CD1d to the invariant NKT receptor, leading to interleukin-12 (IL-12) production by dendritic cells (DCs) and to NK cell activation. We review our research on the tumor-protective properties of alpha-GalCer, particularly the major role played by DCs. We compared administration of alpha-GalCer on mature DCs with soluble glycolipid and found that DCs induced more prolonged interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by NKT cells and better protection against B16 melanoma. Human alpha-GalCer-loaded DCs also expanded NKT cell numbers in cancer patients. alpha-GalCer-activated NKT cells were then found to induce DC maturation in vivo. The maturing DCs produced IL-12, upregulated co-stimulatory molecules, and induced adaptive immunity to captured cellular antigens, including prolonged, combined CD4(+)/CD8(+) T-cell immunity to dying tumor cells. Surprisingly, co-stimulator-poor tumor cells, if directly loaded with alpha-GalCer ('tumor/Gal') and injected intravenously, also induced strong NKT- and NK-cell responses. The latter killed the tumor/Gal, which were subsequently cross presented by CD1d on DCs to elicit DC maturation and prolonged adaptive T-cell immunity, which lasted 6-12 months. These findings help explain tumor protection via alpha-GalCer and urge development of the DC-NKT axis to provide innate and adaptive immunity to human cancers.

  6. Secondary lead poisoning a projectile housed in the human body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Bernardo Gerstner Garcés

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available 72 1024x768 Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE With the increase of violence and use of firearms in Colombia, we may see more cases of lead poisoning in our environment, and must be prepared to diagnose and treat them. Subtle signs and symptoms as unexplained anemia, gastro-intestinal discomfort and abdominal cramps, and severe as changes in behavior and neurological status, nephropathy, and unexplained death, may be associated with a history of gunshot wounds and projectiles in the human body, and must offer the patient knowledge and management strategies of pathology.

  7. Derivation of naive human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Carol B; Nelson, Angelique M; Mecham, Brigham; Hesson, Jennifer; Zhou, Wenyu; Jonlin, Erica C; Jimenez-Caliani, Antonio J; Deng, Xinxian; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Cook, Savannah; Tesar, Paul J; Okada, Jeffrey; Margaretha, Lilyana; Sperber, Henrik; Choi, Michael; Blau, C Anthony; Treuting, Piper M; Hawkins, R David; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2014-03-25

    The naïve pluripotent state has been shown in mice to lead to broad and more robust developmental potential relative to primed mouse epiblast cells. The human naïve ES cell state has eluded derivation without the use of transgenes, and forced expression of OCT4, KLF4, and KLF2 allows maintenance of human cells in a naïve state [Hanna J, et al. (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(20):9222-9227]. We describe two routes to generate nontransgenic naïve human ES cells (hESCs). The first is by reverse toggling of preexisting primed hESC lines by preculture in the histone deacetylase inhibitors butyrate and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, followed by culture in MEK/ERK and GSK3 inhibitors (2i) with FGF2. The second route is by direct derivation from a human embryo in 2i with FGF2. We show that human naïve cells meet mouse criteria for the naïve state by growth characteristics, antibody labeling profile, gene expression, X-inactivation profile, mitochondrial morphology, microRNA profile and development in the context of teratomas. hESCs can exist in a naïve state without the need for transgenes. Direct derivation is an elusive, but attainable, process, leading to cells at the earliest stage of in vitro pluripotency described for humans. Reverse toggling of primed cells to naïve is efficient and reproducible.

  8. Macrophage specific overexpression of the human macrophage scavenger receptor in transgenic mice, using a 180-kb yeast artificial chromosome, leads to enhanced foam cell formation of isolated peritoneal macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winther, M.P.J. de; Dijk, K.W. van; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Heus, J.J.; Wijers, E.R.; Bos, A.C. van den; Breuer, M.; Frants, R.R.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors class A (MSR) are thought to play an important role in atherogenesis by mediating the unrestricted uptake of modified lipoproteins by macrophages in the vessel wall leading to foam cell formation. To investigate the in vivo role of the MSR in this process, a transgenic

  9. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2015-03-01

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility - acto-myosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignment of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility.

  10. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22028.001 PMID:28130921

  11. Influence of lead on auxin-induced cell elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Burzyński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of lead chloride on plant tissue growth is described. Lead reduced elongation of etiolated wheat coleoptile segments, green pea epicotyl fragments and etiolated and green sunflower hypocotyls. Green tissues were more susceptible to lead than etiolated ones. PbCl2 in a 10-4 M concentration significantly reduced plastic and elastic extensibility of the wheat coleoptile cell walls and diminished the hydration of sunflower hypocotyl segments. Auxin (indolyl-3-acetic acid - IAA applied in concentration optimal for growth of the particular tissues partly attenuated the inhibitory action of lead on elongation, plastic and elastic extensibility and water absorption. Auxin applied in supraoptimal concentrations did not abolish the inhibitory action of lead on tissue growth.

  12. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Appendix I Appendix II Tables Figures State Programs Alabama Alaska Arizona ... Tool Kit Resources Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Training Center (HHLPPTC) Training Tracks File Formats Help: ...

  13. A lead isotopic study of the human bioaccessibility of lead in urban soils from Glasgow, Scotland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, John G., E-mail: J.G.Farmer@ed.ac.uk [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JN, Scotland (United Kingdom); Broadway, Andrew [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JN, Scotland (United Kingdom); Cave, Mark R.; Wragg, Joanna [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, England (United Kingdom); Fordyce, Fiona M. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh, EH9 3LA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Graham, Margaret C.; Ngwenya, Bryne T. [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JN, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bewley, Richard J.F. [URS Corporation Ltd, Manchester, M1 6HS, England (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-01

    The human bioaccessibility of lead (Pb) in Pb-contaminated soils from the Glasgow area was determined by the Unified Bioaccessibility Research Group of Europe (BARGE) Method (UBM), an in vitro physiologically based extraction scheme that mimics the chemical environment of the human gastrointestinal system and contains both stomach and intestine compartments. For 27 soils ranging in total Pb concentration from 126 to 2160 mg kg{sup -1} (median 539 mg kg{sup -1}), bioaccessibility as determined by the 'stomach' simulation (pH {approx} 1.5) was 46-1580 mg kg{sup -1}, equivalent to 23-77% (mean 52%) of soil total Pb concentration. The corresponding bioaccessibility data for the 'stomach + intestine' simulation (pH {approx} 6.3) were 6-623 mg kg{sup -1} and 2-42% (mean 22%) of soil Pb concentration. The soil {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios ranged from 1.057 to 1.175. Three-isotope plots of {sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb against {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb demonstrated that {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios were intermediate between values for source end-member extremes of imported Australian Pb ore (1.04) - used in the manufacture of alkyl Pb compounds (1.06-1.10) formerly added to petrol - and indigenous Pb ores/coal (1.17-1.19). The {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios of the UBM 'stomach' extracts were similar (< 0.01 difference) to those of the soil for 26 of the 27 samples (r = 0.993, p < 0.001) and lower in 24 of them. A slight preference for lower {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratio was discernible in the UBM. However, the source of Pb appeared to be less important in determining the extent of UBM-bioaccessible Pb than the overall soil total Pb concentration and the soil phases with which the Pb was associated. The significant phases identified in a subset of samples were carbonates, manganese oxides, iron-aluminium oxyhydroxides and clays. - Highlights: {yields} We determined the human bioaccessibility of Pb in urban soils by in vitro extraction. {yields} We

  14. Polyaniline–lead sulfate based cell with supercapattery behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsadek A. Alguail

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemically synthesized polyaniline and lead sulfate are investigated as a possible active material of the aqueous based hybrid asymmetric supercapacitors. The electrochemical characteristics of polyaniline (doping-dedoping reactions, as well as electrical characteristics (specific capacitance, capacity, energy, and power of the PbSO4|PANI cell, are determined. Based on the estimated specific energy and power, it is suggested that investigated cell could be classified as “supercapattery” type of electrochemical power sources.

  15. Genome engineering in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  16. Improving the Performance of Formamidinium and Cesium Lead Triiodide Perovskite Solar Cells using Lead Thiocyanate Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Wang, Changlei; Grice, Corey R; Shrestha, Niraj; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Dewei; Liao, Weiqiang; Cimaroli, Alexander J; Roland, Paul J; Ellingson, Randy J; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-12-08

    Formamidinium lead triiodide (FAPbI3 ) is considered as an alternative to methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI3 ) because of its lower band gap and better thermal stability. However, owing to the large size of FA cations, it is difficult to synthesize high-quality FAPbI3 thin films without the formation of an undesirable yellow phase. Smaller sized cations, such as MA and Cs, have been successfully used to suppress the formation of the yellow phase. Whereas FA and MA lead triiodide perovskite solar cells (PVSCs) have achieved power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) higher than 20 %, the PCEs of formamidinium and cesium lead triiodide (FA1-x Csx PbI3 ) PVSCs have been only approximately 16.5 %. Herein, we report our examination of the main factors limiting the PCEs of (FA1-x Csx PbI3 ) PVSCs. We find that one of the main limiting factors could be the small grain sizes (≈120 nm), which leads to relatively short carrier lifetimes. We further find that adding a small amount of lead thiocyanate [Pb(SCN)2 ] to the precursors can enlarge the grain size of (FA1-x Csx PbI3 ) perovskite thin films and significantly increase carrier lifetimes. As a result, we are able to fabricate (FA1-x Csx PbI3 ) PVSCs with significantly improved open-circuit voltages and fill factors and, therefore, enhanced PCEs. With an optimal 0.5 mol % Pb(SCN)2 additive, the average PCE is increased from 16.18±0.50 (13.45±0.78) % to 18.16±0.54 (16.86±0.63) % for planar FA0.8 Cs0.2 PbI3 PVSCs if measured under reverse (forward) voltage scans. The champion cell registers a PCE of 19.57 (18.12) % if measured under a reverse (forward) voltage scan, which is comparable to that of the best-performing MA-containing planar FA-based lead halide PVSCs. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Radiative efficiency of lead iodide based perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Malinkiewicz, Olga; Baumann, Andreas; Deibel, Carsten; Snaith, Henry J.; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Bolink, Henk J.

    2014-08-01

    The maximum efficiency of any solar cell can be evaluated in terms of its corresponding ability to emit light. We herein determine the important figure of merit of radiative efficiency for Methylammonium Lead Iodide perovskite solar cells and, to put in context, relate it to an organic photovoltaic (OPV) model device. We evaluate the reciprocity relation between electroluminescence and photovoltaic quantum efficiency and conclude that the emission from the perovskite devices is dominated by a sharp band-to-band transition that has a radiative efficiency much higher than that of an average OPV device. As a consequence, the perovskite have the benefit of retaining an open circuit voltage ~0.14 V closer to its radiative limit than the OPV cell. Additionally, and in contrast to OPVs, we show that the photoluminescence of the perovskite solar cell is substantially quenched under short circuit conditions in accordance with how an ideal photovoltaic cell should operate.

  18. Determination of Lead in Human Calculi and Its Effects on Renal Function of Lead Occupational Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Memon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Seventy five samples of renal and eighteen samples of supra gingival calculi of lead recycling workers were collected over the period of seven years (2008-2014 and studied for the accumulation of lead. The results were compared with those of non exposed subjects. The lead content of calculi was investigated for its dependence on type and composition of calculi, blood lead, job status and duration of exposure. The effect of blood lead and renal calculi was also investigated in relation to kidney function of respective subjects. The mean lead levels of various types of calculi were found to follow the order as phosphate > oxalate > urate .> cystine while single principal group of supra gingival calculi resulted in lower levels of metal. The lead content of calculi positively correlated with phosphate content of both of the renal (r = 0.655 and supra gingival calculi (r= 0.866, Impaired renal function was more pronounced in active workers and depended on blood lead levels in addition to presence of metal in renal calculi

  19. Reduction of 8-oxodGTP in the nucleotide pool by hMTH1 leads to reduction in mutations in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 exposed to UVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotouhi, Asal; Skioeld, Sara; Shakeri-Manesh, Sara; Osterman-Golkar, Siv; Wojcik, Andrzej; Jenssen, Dag; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: siamak.haghdoost@gmt.su.se [Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, SE-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-10-01

    UVA has been suggested to play an important role in UV-induced mutagenesis. The mechanisms by which UVA induces mutations are still a matter of debate. Our aim was to investigate the protective capacity of hMTH1, a nucleotide pool sanitization enzyme with 8-oxodGTPase activity. Human B lymphoblastoid cells were stably transfected with shRNA directed against hMTH1. Clonogenic survival, mutations, intracellular and extracellular levels of 8-oxodG (8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and dG in the nucleotide pool of UVA-irradiated transfected and non-transfected cells were investigated. Mutations were determined in the thymidine kinase locus. Intracellular 8-oxodG and dG were measured using a modified ELISA and HPLC, respectively, after extraction of the nucleotide pool and conversion of nucleotides to their corresponding nucleosides. 8-oxodG in the medium was measured using ELISA. UVA-induced mutations were significantly higher while the survival was slightly lower in transfected compared to non-transfected cells. The increased mutation rate in transfected cells at increased exposure correlated with enhanced levels of 8-oxodG in the nucleotide pool, and a somewhat reduced level of 8-oxodG in the medium. The results indicate that the nucleotide pool is a significant target for UVA-induced mutations and implicates that hMTH1 plays an important role in protecting cells from UVA-induced oxidative stress.

  20. Toxicity of uranium and lead on osteoblastic bone cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, S.; Thiebault, C.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, CNRS, UMR9956, Lab Pierre Sue, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Malaval, L. [INSERM, 42023 Saint Etienne (France)

    2007-07-01

    Bone is one of the main retention organs affected by uranium (U) and lead (Pb). Intoxications have been documented to inhibit bone formation and impair bone modeling and remodeling. However, only few studies dealt with cellular and molecular mechanisms of their toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute cytotoxicity of U and Pb and their phenotypic effects on ROS17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. The most likely forms of the toxics in contact with cells after blood contamination were selected for cell exposure. Results show that whatever their speciation, bone cells are always more sensitive to Pb than to U. Moreover, Pb is toxic when it is left free in the exposure medium or when it is complexed with bicarbonate, cysteine or citrate, but not with albumin or phosphate. U is more cytotoxic when it is complexed with transferrin than with bicarbonate. A direct correlation between toxicity and cellular accumulation could be observed. Beside, exposure of U or Pb to bone cells induces a speciation-dependant variation of RNA expression of two markers of bone formation and mineralization: osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP). OCN and BSP-expression could be activated in sub-toxic condition, respectively, by Pb-albumin (1.6-fold) and U-bicarbonate (2.3-fold). In the meantime, U-transferrin and Pb-citrate lead to an inhibition of the two markers. This study shows a complex mechanism of toxicity of two heavy metals with a significant phenotypic impact on osteoblastic cells highly dependant on metal speciation which controls cell accumulation. (authors)

  1. Biobanking human embryonic stem cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell banks curating and distributing human embryonic stem cells have been established in a number of countries and by a number of private institutions. This paper identifies and critically discusses a number of arguments that are used to justify the importance of such banks in policy...... are curiously absent from the particular stem cell banking policy discourse. This to some extent artificially isolates this discourse from the broader discussions about the flows of reproductive materials and tissues in modern society, and such isolation may lead to the interests of important actors being...

  2. Diffusion inside living human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, N.; Jeon, J. -H.; Loft, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring lipid granules diffuse in the cytoplasm and can be used as tracers to map out the viscoelastic landscape inside living cells. Using optical trapping and single particle tracking we found that lipid granules exhibit anomalous diffusion inside human umbilical vein endothelial...... cells. For these cells the exact diffusional pattern of a particular granule depends on the physiological state of the cell and on the localization of the granule within the cytoplasm. Granules located close to the actin rich periphery of the cell move less than those located towards to the center...... of the cell or within the nucleus. Also, granules in cells which are stressed by intense laser illumination or which have attached to a surface for a long period of time move in a more restricted fashion than those within healthy cells. For granules diffusing in healthy cells, in regions away from the cell...

  3. Internalization of NK cells into tumor cells requires ezrin and leads to programmed cell-in-cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Zhen Guo; Peng Xia; Tingting Liu; Jufang Wang; Shan Li; Lihua Sun; Jianxin Lu; Qian Wen; Mingqian Zhou; Li Ma; Xia Ding; Xiaoning Wang; Xuebiao Yao

    2009-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes are key players in the orchestration of immune response and elimination of defective cells. We have previously reported that natural killer (NK) cells enter target tumor cells, leading to either target cell death or self-destruction within tumor cells. However, it has remained elusive as to the fate of NK cells after internaliza-tion and whether the heterotypic cell-in-cell process is different from that of the homotypic cell-in-cell event recently named entosis. Here, we show that NK cells undergo a cell-in-cell process with the ultimate fate of apoptosis within tumor cells and reveal that the internalization process requires the actin cytoskeletal regulator, ezrin. To visualize how NK cells enter into tumor cells, we carried out real-time dual color imaging analyses of NK cell internalization into tumor cells. Surprisingly, most NK cells commit to programmed cell death after their entry into tumor cells, which is distinctively different from entosis observed in the homotypic cell-in-cell process. The apoptotic cell death of the internalized NK cells was evident by activation of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, NK cell death after internalization is attenuated by the caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, confirming apoptosis as the mode of NK cell death within tumor cells. To determine protein factors essential for the entry of NK cells into tumor cells, we car-ried out siRNA-based knockdown analysis and discovered a critical role of ezrin in NK cell internalization. Impor-tantly, PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ezrin promotes the NK cell internalization process. Our findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which ezrin governs NK cell internalization into tumor cells.

  4. Persistent photovoltage in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, A.; Tvingstedt, K.; Heiber, M. C.; Väth, S.; Momblona, C.; Bolink, H. J.; Dyakonov, V.

    2014-08-01

    We herein perform open circuit voltage decay (OCVD) measurements on methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite solar cells to increase the understanding of the charge carrier recombination dynamics in this emerging technology. Optically pulsed OCVD measurements are conducted on CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells and compared to results from another type of thin-film photovoltaics, namely, the two reference polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cell devices based on P3HT:PC60BM and PTB7:PC70BM blends. We observe two very different time domains of the voltage transient in the perovskite solar cell with a first drop on a short time scale that is similar to the decay in the studied organic solar cells. However, 65%-70% of the maximum photovoltage persists on much longer timescales in the perovskite solar cell than in the organic devices. In addition, we find that the recombination dynamics in all time regimes are dependent on the starting illumination intensity, which is also not observed in the organic devices. We then discuss the potential origins of these unique behaviors.

  5. Persistent photovoltage in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baumann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We herein perform open circuit voltage decay (OCVD measurements on methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells to increase the understanding of the charge carrier recombination dynamics in this emerging technology. Optically pulsed OCVD measurements are conducted on CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells and compared to results from another type of thin-film photovoltaics, namely, the two reference polymer–fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cell devices based on P3HT:PC60BM and PTB7:PC70BM blends. We observe two very different time domains of the voltage transient in the perovskite solar cell with a first drop on a short time scale that is similar to the decay in the studied organic solar cells. However, 65%–70% of the maximum photovoltage persists on much longer timescales in the perovskite solar cell than in the organic devices. In addition, we find that the recombination dynamics in all time regimes are dependent on the starting illumination intensity, which is also not observed in the organic devices. We then discuss the potential origins of these unique behaviors.

  6. Natural killer cells in human autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that play a critical role in early host defense against viruses. Through their cytolytic capacity and generation of cytokines and chemokines, NK cells modulate the activity of other components of the innate and adaptive immune systems and have been implicated in the initiation or maintenance of autoimmune responses. This review focuses on recent research elucidating a potential immunoregulatory role for NK cells in T-cell and B-cell-mediated autoimmune disorders in humans, with a particular focus on multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. A better understanding of the contributions of NK cells to the development of autoimmunity may lead to novel therapeutic targets in these diseases. PMID:23856014

  7. Lead concentration in meat from lead-killed moose and predicted human exposure using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindboe, M; Henrichsen, E N; Høgåsen, H R; Bernhoft, A

    2012-01-01

    Lead-based hunting ammunitions are still common in most countries. On impact such ammunition releases fragments which are widely distributed within the carcass. In Norway, wild game is an important meat source for segments of the population and 95% of hunters use lead-based bullets. In this paper, we have investigated the lead content of ground meat from moose (Alces alces) intended for human consumption in Norway, and have predicted human exposure through this source. Fifty-two samples from different batches of ground meat from moose killed with lead-based bullets were randomly collected. The lead content was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The lead intake from exposure to moose meat over time, depending on the frequency of intake and portion size, was predicted using Monte Carlo simulation. In 81% of the batches, lead levels were above the limit of quantification of 0.03 mg kg(-1), ranging up to 110 mg kg(-1). The mean lead concentration was 5.6 mg kg(-1), i.e. 56 times the European Commission limit for lead in meat. For consumers eating a moderate meat serving (2 g kg(-1) bw), a single serving would give a lead intake of 11 µg kg(-1) bw on average, with maximum of 220 µg kg(-1) bw. Using Monte Carlo simulation, the median (and 97.5th percentile) predicted weekly intake of lead from moose meat was 12 µg kg(-1) bw (27 µg kg(-1) bw) for one serving per week and 25 µg kg(-1) bw (45 µg kg(-1) bw) for two servings per week. The results indicate that the intake of meat from big game shot with lead-based bullets imposes a significant contribution to the total human lead exposure. The provisional tolerable weekly intake set by the World Health Organization (WHO) of 25 µg kg(-1) bw is likely to be exceeded in people eating moose meat on a regular basis. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has recently concluded that adverse effects may be present at even lower exposure doses. Hence, even occasional consumption of big game meat with lead levels as

  8. Recent progress in efficient hybrid lead halide perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin; Yuan, Huailiang; Li, Junpeng; Xu, Xiaobao; Shen, Yan; Lin, Hong; Wang, Mingkui

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has been improved from 9.7 to 19.3%, with the highest value of 20.1% achieved in 2014. Such a high photovoltaic performance can be attributed to optically high absorption characteristics and balanced charge transport properties with long diffusion lengths of the hybrid lead halide perovskite materials. In this review, some fundamental details of hybrid lead iodide perovskite materials, various fabrication techniques and device structures are described, aiming for a better understanding of these materials and thus highly efficient PSC devices. In addition, some advantages and open issues are discussed here to outline the prospects and challenges of using perovskites in commercial photovoltaic devices. PMID:27877815

  9. Recent progress in efficient hybrid lead halide perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin; Yuan, Huailiang; Li, Junpeng; Xu, Xiaobao; Shen, Yan; Lin, Hong; Wang, Mingkui

    2015-06-01

    The efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has been improved from 9.7 to 19.3%, with the highest value of 20.1% achieved in 2014. Such a high photovoltaic performance can be attributed to optically high absorption characteristics and balanced charge transport properties with long diffusion lengths of the hybrid lead halide perovskite materials. In this review, some fundamental details of hybrid lead iodide perovskite materials, various fabrication techniques and device structures are described, aiming for a better understanding of these materials and thus highly efficient PSC devices. In addition, some advantages and open issues are discussed here to outline the prospects and challenges of using perovskites in commercial photovoltaic devices.

  10. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self-renewal and......Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self...... of clinical applications, e.g., non-healing bone fractures and defects and also non-skeletal degenerative diseases like heart failure. Currently, the numbers of clinical trials that employ MSC are increasing. However, several biological and biotechnological challenges need to be overcome to benefit from...

  11. Distinct signaling pathways leading to the induction of human β-defensin 2 by stimulating an electrolyticaly-generated acid functional water and double strand RNA in oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojoubori, Takahiro; Nishio, Yukina; Asano, Masatake; Nishida, Tetsuya; Komiyama, Kazuo; Ito, Koichi

    2014-04-01

    Defensins, a major family of cationic antimicrobial peptides, play important roles in innate immunity. In the present study, we investigated whether double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a by-product of RNA virus replication, can induce human β-defensins-2 (hBD-2) expression in oral epithelial cells (OECs). We also examined the hBD-2-inducible activity of acid-electrolyzed functional water (FW). The results indicated that both dsRNA- and FW-induced hBD-2 expression in OECs. The induction efficiency was much higher for FW than for dsRNA. FW-induced production of hBD-2 was clearly observed by immunofluorescence staining. A luciferase assay was performed with 1.2 kb of the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the hBD-2 gene. The results indicated that the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-binding site proximal to the translation initiation site was indispensable for dsRNA-stimulated hBD-2 expression, but not in the case of FW. Moreover, FW-stimulated hBD-2 expression did not depend on NF-κB activity; instead, FW inhibited NF-κB activity. Pretreatment of the cells with specific inhibitors against NF-κB further confirmed NF-κB-independent hBD-2 induction by FW. In analogy to the results for intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), the dsRNA signal, but not FW, was sensed by toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in OECs. These results suggested that hBD-2 expression induced by dsRNA and FW is regulated by distinct mechanisms in OECs.

  12. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  13. Lead poisoning in China: a health and human rights crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jane E; Amon, Joseph J

    2012-12-15

    Acute and chronic lead poisoning is occurring throughout China and is a major cause of childhood morbidity. The Chinese government's emphasis on industrial development and poverty reduction has, over the past three decades, decreased by 500 million the number of people surviving on less than one dollar per day, but has caused significant environmental degradation that threatens public health. Drawing upon in-depth interviews conducted in 2009 and 2010 with families affected by lead poisoning, environmental activists, journalists, government and civil society organization officials in Shaanxi, Henan, Hunan, and Yunnan provinces, as well as a review of scientific and Chinese media, and health and environmental legal and policy analysis, we examine the intersection of civil, political, economic, and social rights related to access to information, screening, treatment, and remediation related to lead poisoning. In-depth interviews in each province uncovered: censorship and intimidation of journalists, environmental activists, and parents seeking information about sources and prevention of lead poisoning; denial of screening for lead poisoning, often based upon arbitrary eligibility criteria; and inadequate and inappropriate treatment being promoted and provided by health facilities. Over the past decade, the Chinese government has prioritized health care and invested billions of dollars towards universal health coverage, and strengthened environmental to address industrial pollution and guarantee access to information on the environment. Yet, despite these reforms, information remains constrained and citizens seeking information and redress are sometimes arrested, in violation of Chinese and international law. Local government officials and national environmental policies continue to prioritize economic development over environmental protection. To effectively address lead poisoning requires an emphasis on prevention, and to combat industrial pollution requires

  14. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  15. Ionic transport in hybrid lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Christopher; Frost, Jarvist M.; Barnes, Piers R. F.; O'Regan, Brian C.; Walsh, Aron; Islam, M. Saiful

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells based on organic–inorganic halide perovskites have recently shown rapidly rising power conversion efficiencies, but exhibit unusual behaviour such as current–voltage hysteresis and a low-frequency giant dielectric response. Ionic transport has been suggested to be an important factor contributing to these effects; however, the chemical origin of this transport and the mobile species are unclear. Here, the activation energies for ionic migration in methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) are derived from first principles, and are compared with kinetic data extracted from the current–voltage response of a perovskite-based solar cell. We identify the microscopic transport mechanisms, and find facile vacancy-assisted migration of iodide ions with an activation energy of 0.6 eV, in good agreement with the kinetic measurements. The results of this combined computational and experimental study suggest that hybrid halide perovskites are mixed ionic–electronic conductors, a finding that has major implications for solar cell device architectures. PMID:26105623

  16. Stem Cells: A Renaissance in Human Biology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-16

    The understanding of human biology and how it relates to that of other species represents an ancient quest. Limited access to human material, particularly during early development, has restricted researchers to only scratching the surface of this inherently challenging subject. Recent technological innovations, such as single cell "omics" and human stem cell derivation, have now greatly accelerated our ability to gain insights into uniquely human biology. The opportunities afforded to delve molecularly into scarce material and to model human embryogenesis and pathophysiological processes are leading to new insights of human development and are changing our understanding of disease and choice of therapy options.

  17. GOLPH3 drives cell migration by promoting Golgi reorientation and directional trafficking to the leading edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengke; Peterman, Marshall C; Davis, Robert L; Oegema, Karen; Shiau, Andrew K; Field, Seth J

    2016-12-01

    The mechanism of directional cell migration remains an important problem, with relevance to cancer invasion and metastasis. GOLPH3 is a common oncogenic driver of human cancers, and is the first oncogene that functions at the Golgi in trafficking to the plasma membrane. Overexpression of GOLPH3 is reported to drive enhanced cell migration. Here we show that the phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate/GOLPH3/myosin 18A/F-actin pathway that is critical for Golgi-to-plasma membrane trafficking is necessary and limiting for directional cell migration. By linking the Golgi to the actin cytoskeleton, GOLPH3 promotes reorientation of the Golgi toward the leading edge. GOLPH3 also promotes reorientation of lysosomes (but not other organelles) toward the leading edge. However, lysosome function is dispensable for migration and the GOLPH3 dependence of lysosome movement is indirect, via GOLPH3's effect on the Golgi. By driving reorientation of the Golgi to the leading edge and driving forward trafficking, particularly to the leading edge, overexpression of GOLPH3 drives trafficking to the leading edge of the cell, which is functionally important for directional cell migration. Our identification of a novel pathway for Golgi reorientation controlled by GOLPH3 provides new insight into the mechanism of directional cell migration with important implications for understanding GOLPH3's role in cancer. © 2016 Xing, Peterman, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  18. Erythroid differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells is independent of donor cell type of origin

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic memory in induced pluripotent stem cells, which is related to the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, might lead to variations in the differentiation capacities of the pluripotent stem cells. In this context, induced pluripotent stem cells from human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells might be more suitable for hematopoietic differentiation than the commonly used fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. To investigate the influence of an epigenetic memory on the ex...

  19. Touch five factors to growing and leading a human organization

    CERN Document Server

    Maffin, Tod

    2014-01-01

    For better or worse, digital business has fundamentally changed how organizations hire, market their services, and connect with stakeholders. The problem is, in an effort to use technology to connect more effectively, we have lost the humanity - that critical person-to-person connection. This book will show you how to restore that connection.

  20. Stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells leads to epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Ju, E-mail: juzi.cui@gmail.com [The Key Laboratory of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital & Beijing Institute of Geriatrics, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); Department of Biochemistry, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Jin, Guoxiang; Yu, Bin [Department of Biochemistry, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wang, Zai [Department of Biochemistry, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Lin, Raozhou [Department of Biochemistry, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Huang, Jian-Dong, E-mail: jdhuang@hku.hk [Department of Biochemistry, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); The Centre for Synthetic Biology Engineering Research, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Shenzhen (China)

    2015-07-17

    Polarization of epithelial cells requires vectorial sorting and transport of polarity proteins to apical or basolateral domains. Kif5b is the mouse homologue of the human ubiquitous Kinesin Heavy Chain (uKHC). To investigate the function of Kif5b in epithelial cells, we examined the phenotypes of Kif5b-deficient MDCK cells. Stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation rate, profound changes in cell morphology, loss of epithelial cell marker, and gain of mesenchymal marker, as well as increased cell migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis abilities. E-cadherin and NMMIIA could interact with Kif5b in polarized MDCK cells, and their expression levels were decreased in Kif5b-deficient MDCK cells. Overexpression of E-cadherin and NMMIIA in Kif5b depleted MDCK cells could decrease mesenchymal marker expression and cell migration ability. These results indicate that stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells can lead to epithelial–mesenchymal transition, which is mediated by defective E-cadherin and NMMIIA expression. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation rate. • Kif5b deficient MDCK cells underwent epithelial–mesenchymal transition. • E-cadherin and NMMIIA could interact with Kif5b in polarized MDCK cells. • Decreased E-cadherin and NMMIIA levels mediate EMT in Kif5b deficient MDCK cells. • Overexpression of E-cadherin and NMMIIA reverse the effects of Kif5b knockdown.

  1. Genotoxicity of lead, cadmium and arsenic in cultured mammalian cells (A{sub L})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, M.; Waldren, C.; Gustafson, D. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States)] [and others

    1997-10-01

    Heavy metal(s) cause tympanic and neurologic damage in humans. Although implicated in cancer and birth defects, metals have been weakly mutagenic in bacterial and mammalian cell assays. We have, therefore, studied genotoxic effects of arsenic [NaASO{sub 2}], cadmium [CdCl{sub 2}], and lead [Pb(C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O{sub 2})] in the human X hamster hybrid A{sub L} cells which were constructed so as to detect low level mutagenicity. A{sub L} cells contain one human chromosome, no. 11, in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) background. Mutations affecting MIC1 gene are detected via a complement-mediated toxicity assay in which cells expressing the S1 antigen encoded by MIC1 are killed: S1{sup -} mutants survive. The MIC1 gene is not hostage to neighbor genes so that mutations of any size in chromosome 11 are detectable. We found that suppression of glutathione (GSH) by BSO (buthione-S,R-sulfoximine) made Pb and Cd more lethal to A{sub L} cells. The LD{sub 50}s for Pb were 25 and 4 {mu}g/ml without and with BSO, respectively. For Cd these values were 0.3 and 0.08 {mu}g/ml respectively. The LD{sub 50} of As was 0.8 {mu}g/ml; BSO`s effect was not determined. In mutation studies at the S1{sup -} locus, lead`s slight activity was increased 10 fold by BSO (from 4 to 40 mutants/10{sup 6} clonable cells/{mu}g). Arsenic without BSO was mutagenic (140 mutants/LD{sub 50}); Cd was not. These mutagenic activities are 1/10 to 1/100 less than {sup 137}Cs-{gamma} rays. These results further demonstrate the value of the A{sub L} assay in evaluating weak mutagens.

  2. Human embryonic stem cells handbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available After the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine was awarded jointly to Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent it became imperative to write down the review for a book entirely devoted to human embryonic stem cells (hES, those cells that are a urgent need for researchers, those cells that rekindle the ethical debates and finally, last but not least, those cells whose study paved the way to obtain induced pluripotent stem cells by the OSKC’s Yamanaka method (the OSKC acronim refers, for those not familiar with the topic, to the four stemness genes used to transfect somatic fibroblasts: Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc....

  3. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  4. Mitochondria defects are involved in lead-acetate-induced adult hematopoietic stem cell decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Jia, Dao-Yong; Cai, Shi-Zhong; Li, Cheng-Peng; Zhang, Meng-Si; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Yan, Chong-Huai; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2015-05-19

    Occupational high-grade lead exposure has been reduced in recent decades as a result of increased regulation. However, environmental lead exposure remains widespread, and is associated with severe toxicity implicated in human diseases. We performed oral intragastric administration of various dose lead acetate to adult Sprague Dawley rats to define the role of lead exposure in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) function, and to clarify its underlying mechanism. Lead acetate-exposed rats exhibited developmental abnormalities in myeloid and lymphoid lineages, and a significant decline in immune functions. It also showed HSCs functional decline associated with senescent phenotype with low grade lead acetate exposure or apoptotic phenotype with relative higher grade dose exposure. Mechanistic exploration showed a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the lead acetate-exposed CD90(+)CD45(-) compartment, which correlated with functional defects in cellular mitochondria. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with the antioxidant vitamin C led to reversion of the CD90(+)CD45(-) compartment functional decline. These results indicate that lead acetate perturbs the hematopoietic balance of adult HSCs, associated with cellular mitochondria defects, increased intracellular ROS generation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Are newborn rat-derived neural stem cells more sensitive to lead neurotoxicity?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ho Chan; Mingyong Gao; Wutian Wu

    2013-01-01

    Lead ion (Pb2+) has been proven to be a neurotoxin due to its neurotoxicity on mammalian nervous system, especially for the developing brains of juveniles. However, many reported studies involved the negative effects of Pb2+ on adult neural cells of humans or other mammals, only few of which have examined the effects of Pb2+ on neural stem cells. The purpose of this study was to reveal the biological effects of Pb2+ from lead acetate [Pb (CH3COO)2] on viability, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells derived from the hippocampus of newborn rats aged 7 days and adult rats aged 90 days, respectively. This study was carried out in three parts. In the first part, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MTT viability assay) was used to detect the effects of Pb2+ on the cell viability of passage 2 hippocampal neural stem cells after 200 μM Pb2+, followed by immunocytochemical staining with anti-bromodeoxyuridine to demonstrate the effects of Pb2+ on cell proliferation. In the last part, passage 2 hippocampal neural Immunocytochemical staining with anti-microtubule-associated protein 2 (a neuron marker), anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (an astrocyte marker), and anti-RIP (an oligodendrocyte marker) was performed to detect the differentiation commitment of affected neural stem cells after 6 days. The data showed that Pb2+ inhibited not only the viability and proliferation of rat hippocampal neural stem cells, but also their neuronal and oligodendrocyte differentiation in vitro. Moreover, increased activity of astrocyte differentiation of hippocampal neural stem cells from both newborn and adult rats was observed after exposure to high concentration of lead ion in vitro. These findings suggest that hippocampal neural stem cells of newborn rats were more sensitive than those from adult rats to Pb2+ cytotoxicity.

  6. Photoinduced Giant Dielectric Constant in Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez-Perez, Emilio J; Sanchez, Rafael S; Badia, Laura; Garcia-Belmonte, Germá; Kang, Yong Soo; Mora-Sero, Ivan; Bisquert, Juan

    2014-07-03

    Organic-inorganic lead trihalide perovskites have emerged as an outstanding photovoltaic material that demonstrated a high 17.9% conversion efficiency of sunlight to electricity in a short time. We have found a giant dielectric constant (GDC) phenomenon in these materials consisting on a low frequency dielectric constant in the dark of the order of ε0 = 1000. We also found an unprecedented behavior in which ε0 further increases under illumination or by charge injection at applied bias. We observe that ε0 increases nearly linearly with the illumination intensity up to an additional factor 1000 under 1 sun. Measurement of a variety of samples of different morphologies, compositions, and different types of contacts shows that the GDC is an intrinsic property of MAPbX3 (MA = CH3NH3(+)). We hypothesize that the large dielectric response is induced by structural fluctuations. Photoinduced carriers modify the local unit cell equilibrium and change the polarizability, assisted by the freedom of rotation of MA. The study opens a way for the understanding of a key aspect of the photovoltaic operation of high efficiency perovskite solar cells.

  7. Generation of mature hematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togarrati, Padma Priya; Suknuntha, Kran

    2012-06-01

    A number of malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders are associated with the abnormal production of mature blood cells or primitive hematopoietic precursors. Their capacity for continuous self-renewal without loss of pluripotency and the ability to differentiate into adult cell types from all three primitive germ layers make human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) attractive complementary cell sources for large-scale production of transfusable mature blood cell components in cell replacement therapies. The generation of patient-specific hematopoietic stem/precursor cells from iPSCs by the regulated manipulation of various factors involved in reprograming to ensure complete pluripotency, and developing innovative differentiation strategies for generating unlimited supply of clinically safe, transplantable, HLA-matched cells from hiPSCs to outnumber the inadequate source of hematopoietic stem cells obtained from cord blood, bone marrow and peripheral blood, would have a major impact on the field of regenerative and personalized medicine leading to translation of these results from bench to bedside.

  8. Derivation and differentiation of haploid human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagi, Ido; Chia, Gloryn; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Peretz, Mordecai; Weissbein, Uri; Sui, Lina; Sauer, Mark V; Yanuka, Ofra; Egli, Dieter; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2016-04-07

    Diploidy is a fundamental genetic feature in mammals, in which haploid cells normally arise only as post-meiotic germ cells that serve to ensure a diploid genome upon fertilization. Gamete manipulation has yielded haploid embryonic stem (ES) cells from several mammalian species, but haploid human ES cells have yet to be reported. Here we generated and analysed a collection of human parthenogenetic ES cell lines originating from haploid oocytes, leading to the successful isolation and maintenance of human ES cell lines with a normal haploid karyotype. Haploid human ES cells exhibited typical pluripotent stem cell characteristics, such as self-renewal capacity and a pluripotency-specific molecular signature. Moreover, we demonstrated the utility of these cells as a platform for loss-of-function genetic screening. Although haploid human ES cells resembled their diploid counterparts, they also displayed distinct properties including differential regulation of X chromosome inactivation and of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, alongside reduction in absolute gene expression levels and cell size. Surprisingly, we found that a haploid human genome is compatible not only with the undifferentiated pluripotent state, but also with differentiated somatic fates representing all three embryonic germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, despite a persistent dosage imbalance between the autosomes and X chromosome. We expect that haploid human ES cells will provide novel means for studying human functional genomics and development.

  9. Epithelial cell extrusion leads to breaches in the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Julia J; Davis, Elisabeth M; Wine, Eytan; Lou, Yuefei; Rudzinski, Jan K; Alipour, Misagh; Boulanger, Pierre; Thiesen, Aducio L; Sergi, Consolato; Fedorak, Richard N; Muruve, Daniel; Madsen, Karen L; Irvin, Randall T

    2013-04-01

    Two distinct forms of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) extrusion are described: 1 with preserved epithelial integrity and 1 that introduced breaches in the epithelial lining. In this study, we sought to determine the mechanism underlying the IEC extrusion that alters the permeability of the gut epithelium. IEC extrusions in polarized T84 monolayer were induced with nigericin. Epithelial permeability was assessed with transepithelial electrical resistance and movements of latex microspheres and green fluorescent protein-transfected Escherichia coli across the monolayer. In vivo IEC extrusion was modulated in wild-type and a colitic (interleukin-10 knock-out) mouse model with caspase-1 activation and inhibition. Luminal aspirates and mucosal biopsies from control patients and patients with inflammatory bowel disease were analyzed for caspase-1 and caspase-3&7 activation. Caspase-1-induced IEC extrusion in T84 monolayers resulted in dose-dependent and time-dependent barrier dysfunction, reversible with caspase-1 inhibition. Moreover, the movements of microspheres and microbes across the treated epithelial monolayers were observed. Increased caspase-1-mediated IEC extrusion in interleukin-10 knock-out mice corresponded to enhanced permeation of dextran, microspheres, and translocation of E. coli compared with wild type. Caspase-1 inhibition in interleukin-10 knock-out mice resulted in a time-dependent reduction in cell extrusion and normalization of permeability to microspheres. Increased IEC extrusion in wild-type mice was induced with caspase-1 activation. In human luminal aspirates, the ratio of positively stained caspase-1 to caspase-3&7 cells were 1:1 and 2:1 in control patients and patients with inflammatory bowel disease, respectively; these observations were confirmed by cytochemical analysis of mucosal biopsies. IEC extrusion mediated by caspase-1 activation contributes to altered intestinal permeability in vitro and in vivo.

  10. A fence barrier method of leading edge cell capture for explorative biochemical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Lucas J; Murray, Rachael Z; Thompson, Erik W; Leavesley, David I

    2017-02-17

    The scratch or wound-healing assay is used ubiquitously for investigating re-epithelialisation and has already revealed the importance of cells comprising the leading edge of healing epithelial wounds. However it is currently limited to studying the effect of known biochemical agents on the tissue of choice. Here we present an adaptation that extends the utility of this model to encompass the collection of cells from the leading edge of migrating epithelial sheets making available explorative biochemical analyses. The method is scalable and does not require expensive apparatus, making it suitable for large and small laboratories alike. We detail the application of our method and exemplify proof of principle data derived from primary human keratinocyte cultures.

  11. Guidance signalling regulates leading edge behaviour during collective cell migration of cardiac cells in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Qanber; Jacobs, J Roger

    2016-11-15

    Collective cell migration is the coordinated movement of cells, which organize tissues during morphogenesis, repair and some cancers. The motile cell membrane of the advancing front in collective cell migration is termed the Leading Edge. The embryonic development of the vertebrate and Drosophila hearts are both characterized by the coordinated medial migration of a bilateral cluster of mesodermal cells. In Drosophila, the cardioblasts form cohesive bilateral rows that migrate collectively as a unit towards the dorsal midline to form the dorsal vessel. We have characterized the collective cell migration of cardioblasts as an in vivo quantitative model to study the behaviour of the Leading Edge. We investigated whether guidance signalling through Slit and Netrin pathways plays a role in cell migration during heart development. Through time-lapse imaging and quantitative assessment of migratory behaviour of the cardioblasts in loss-of-function mutants, we demonstrate that both Slit and Netrin mediated signals are autonomously and concomitantly required to maximize migration velocity, filopodial and lamellipodial activities. Additionally, we show that another Slit and Netrin receptor, Dscam1, the role of which during heart development was previously unknown, is required for both normal migration of cardioblasts and luminal expansion. Leading edge behaviour analysis revealed a dosage dependent genetic interaction between Slit and Netrin receptors suggesting that downstream signalling through these receptors converge on a common output that increases leading edge activity of the cardioblasts. Finally, we found that guidance signalling maintains the balance between epithelial and mesenchymal characteristics of the migrating cardioblasts.

  12. Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Keelin; Chan, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    Stem cells have been isolated at all stages of development from the early developing embryo to the post-reproductive adult organism. However, the fetal environment is unique as it is the only time in ontogeny that there is migration of stem cells in large numbers into different organ compartments. While fetal neural and haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been well characterised, only recently have mesenchymal stem cells from the human fetus been isolated and evaluated. Our group have characterised in human fetal blood, liver and bone marrow a population of non-haemopoietic, non-endothelial cells with an immunophenotype similar to adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These cells, human fetal mesenchymal stem cells (hfMSC), are true multipotent stem cells with greater self-renewal and differentiation capacity than their adult counterparts. They circulate in first trimester fetal blood and have been found to traffic into the maternal circulation, engrafting in bone marrow, where they remain microchimeric for decades after pregnancy. Though fetal microchimerism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, the biological role of hfMSC microchimerism is unknown. Potential downstream applications of hfMSC include their use as a target cell for non-invasive pre-natal diagnosis from maternal blood, and for fetal cellular and gene therapy. Using hfMSC in fetal therapy offers the theoretical advantages of avoidance of immune rejection, increased engraftment, and treatment before disease pathology sets in. Aside from allogeneic hfMSC in utero transplantation, the use of autologous hfMSC has been brought a step forward with the development of early blood sampling techniques, efficient viral transduction and clonal expansion. Work is ongoing to determine hfMSC fate post-transplantation in murine models of genetic disease. In this review we will examine what is known about hfMSC biology, as well as discussing areas for future research. The

  13. {delta}-ALAD activity variations in red blood cells in response to lead accumulation in rock doves (Columba livia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, M.; Tejedor, M.C. [Universidad de Alcala de Henares (Spain)

    1992-10-01

    The enzyme {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase ({delta}-ALAD, E.C. 4.2.1.24), catalyses the second step of the haeme biosynthetic pathway and is required to maintain the haemoglobin and cytochrome content in red cells. {delta}-ALAD is not only found in bone marrow cells, the major site of haeme synthesis, but also in circulating erythrocytes and other tissues. An inverse correlation was found between {delta}-ALAD activity in red blood cells and lead concentration in the blood. The degree of {delta}-ALAD inhibition in erythrocytes has been widely accepted as a standard bioassay to detect acute and chronic lead exposure in humans and in avians. The value of this parameter as an indicator for environmental lead has been often reported in doves and Scanlon. In lead-treated rats, an increase in {delta}-ALAD activity in bone marrow cells and in blood samples was shown by radioimmunoassay at 5 and 9 days after the treatment. Similarly, the amount of {delta}-ALAD seems to be more sensitive to lead in avian species than in mammals, the usefulness of blood {delta}-ALAD activity as an index of lead exposure has already been questioned by Hutton in the pigeon and by Jaffe et al. in humans. The present investigation studied the toxic effects of lead on rock dove red blood cell {delta}-ALAD activity in two situations: in doves treated with lead acetate in the laboratory and in doves exposed to the environment of Alcala de Henares. The final lead blood concentrations were lower in the environmental than in the laboratory doves. {delta}-ALAD activity in bone marrow cells and the relationships between lead accumulation and enzyme activity in red cells, are examined. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Stable lead isotopes in environmental health with emphasis on human investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulson, Brian [Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia); CSIRO Exploration and Mining North Ryde NSW 1670 (Australia)], E-mail: bgulson@gse.mq.edu.au

    2008-08-01

    There has been widespread use of stable lead isotopes in the earth sciences for more than 40 years focussed on the origin and age of rocks and minerals with lesser application in environmental investigations where the emphasis has been directed typically to the source of lead in environmental media such as air, water and soils. In contrast, the number of environmental health investigations focussed on humans (and primates) is limited in spite of the demonstrated utility of the approach in pioneering studies in the early 1970's. This paper reviews the status of lead isotopes in human investigations especially over the past 2 decades, the period over which most activity has taken place. Following a brief introduction to the method, examples are provided illustrating the use of lead isotopes in a wide spectrum of activities including sources and pathways of lead in diverse environments from urban to mining communities, various applications associated with pregnancy, the contribution of bone lead to blood lead including in the elderly, the half-life of lead in blood, and lead in bones and other media. A brief outline of critical research on non-human primates is also given. The lead isotope method is a powerful technique for tracing lead and could be employed more widely in human investigations.

  15. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrvatin, Sinisa; O'Donnell, Charles W; Deng, Francis; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; DiIorio, Philip; Rezania, Alireza; Gifford, David K; Melton, Douglas A

    2014-02-25

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic β cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in vitro and their in vivo counterparts are essential to validate hPSC-derived cells. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of sorted insulin-expressing (INS(+)) cells derived from three independent hPSC lines, human fetal pancreata, and adult human islets points to two major conclusions: (i) Different hPSC lines produce highly similar INS(+) cells and (ii) hPSC-derived INS(+) (hPSC-INS(+)) cells more closely resemble human fetal β cells than adult β cells. This study provides a direct comparison of transcriptional programs between pure hPSC-INS(+) cells and true β cells and provides a catalog of genes whose manipulation may convert hPSC-INS(+) cells into functional β cells.

  16. Stem-cell-specific endocytic degradation defects lead to intestinal dysplasia in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Nagy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available UV radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG is a tumor suppressor involved in autophagy, endocytosis and DNA damage repair, but how its loss contributes to colorectal cancer is poorly understood. Here, we show that UVRAG deficiency in Drosophila intestinal stem cells leads to uncontrolled proliferation and impaired differentiation without preventing autophagy. As a result, affected animals suffer from gut dysfunction and short lifespan. Dysplasia upon loss of UVRAG is characterized by the accumulation of endocytosed ligands and sustained activation of STAT and JNK signaling, and attenuation of these pathways suppresses stem cell hyperproliferation. Importantly, the inhibition of early (dynamin-dependent or late (Rab7-dependent steps of endocytosis in intestinal stem cells also induces hyperproliferation and dysplasia. Our data raise the possibility that endocytic, but not autophagic, defects contribute to UVRAG-deficient colorectal cancer development in humans.

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes Affecting Human Natural Killer Cell Cytolytic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ham, Hyoungjun; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synaps...

  18. Up-regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) leads to the potent anti-proliferative effect of androgen deprivation therapy combined with 5-FU in human prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Rumi; Oie, Shinji; Takahashi, Masayuki; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Oka, Toshinori; Itoh, Kohji

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the synergistic mechanism of anti-androgen and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combination therapy against castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Four prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP, 22Rv1, DU145 and PC3, were examined for their growth dependency on androgens and the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). We assessed the expression changes of certain growth factor receptors and regulating proteins when treated with 5-FU, and found that 5-FU increased the expression of the IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3). Furthermore, 5-FU inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and p70 S6K, while the knockdown of IGFBP3 reduced the levels of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleaved by 5-FU in PC3 cells. Therefore, the up-regulation of IGFBP3 by 5-FU not only inhibits cell growth by reducing the IGF1 signal but also induces apoptosis in PC3 cells. The synergistic effect of bicalutamide and 5-FU on 22Rv1 cells was reduced by IGFBP3 gene silencing using small-interfering RNA. These results suggest that the up-regulation of IGFBP3 induced by 5-FU plays an important role in the potent anti-tumor effect of 5-FU combined with anti-androgens on CRPC. Androgen-deprivation therapy combined with 5-FU could therefore be an appropriate therapy for CRPC patients.

  19. Lack of beta1 integrins in enteric neural crest cells leads to a Hirschsprung-like phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breau, Marie A; Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    crest cells fail to colonise the gut completely, leading to an aganglionosis of the descending colon, which resembles the human Hirschsprung's disease. Moreover, beta1-null enteric neural crest cells form abnormal aggregates in the gut wall, leading to a severe alteration of the ganglia network...... organisation. Organotypic cultures of gut explants reveal that beta1-null enteric neural crest cells show impaired adhesion on extracellular matrix and enhanced intercellular adhesion properties. They display migration defects in collagen gels and gut tissue environments. We also provide evidence that beta1...

  20. Cellular and molecular toxicology of lead. I. Effect of lead on cultured cell proliferation. [Comparison of toxicity to rat liver, glioma, and neuroblastoma cell lives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusell, M.; O' Cheskey, S.; Gerschenson, L.E.

    1978-07-01

    Growth studies were done on a cultured rat liver cell line (RLC-GAI) grown in a chemically defined medium in the presence of lead nitrate. Lead reversibly inhibited the growth of these cells even after 6 d of exposure to the heavy metal. To compare lead sensitivity in various cell lines, G150 and LD50 values were determined in the RLC-GAI cells as well as two glioma cell lines (B82 and C/sub 6/) and a neuroblastoma cell line (N18). The LD50 values paralleled but were consistently lower than the G150 values. Since lead is known to affect heme synthesis, hemin was added to test the possibility of preventing the growth-inhibitory effect of the lead. The growth capacity of lead-treated cells did not change with the addition of hemin. It is thought that differential cultured cell lines such as these could be useful in examining the molecular mechanism of lead toxicity.

  1. Characterizing motility dynamics in human RPE cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Furu; Miller, Donald T.

    2017-02-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, however, are often compromised in ageing and ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, but while in vivo biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. Recently we addressed this problem by using organelle motility as a novel contrast agent to enhance the RPE cell in conjunction with 3D resolution of adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) to section the RPE layer. In this study, we expand on the central novelty of our method - organelle motility - by characterizing the dynamics of the motility in individual RPE cells, important because of its direct link to RPE physiology. To do this, AO-OCT videos of the same retinal patch were acquired at approximately 1 min intervals or less, time stamped, and registered in 3D with sub-cellular accuracy. Motility was quantified by an exponential decay time constant, the time for motility to decorrelate the speckle field across an RPE cell. In two normal subjects, we found the decay time constant to be just 3 seconds, thus indicating rapid motility in normal RPE cells.

  2. Trans-differentiation of prostatic stromal cells leads to decreased glycoprotein hormone alpha production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpold, Holger; Mascher, Katarina; Untergasser, Gerold; Plas, Eugen; Hermann, Martin; Berger, Peter

    2002-11-01

    Age-related development of benign prostatic hyperplasia is an important health issue in developed countries. The histopathogenetic hallmark of this disease is the increase in relative and absolute numbers of smooth muscle cells (SMC). Glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit (GPHalpha) is expressed in the human prostate, and, because of its structural similarities to other cystine knot growth factors, it has been considered to have growth regulatory functions of its own. Primary cell cultures allowing for selective cultivation of prostatic epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and SMC were established. Directed trans-differentiation and cellular homogeneity was pursued by confocal scanning laser microscopy with cell type-specific markers. GPHalpha production by these cells was assessed by immunofluorimetric assays. Its predominant source was young fibroblasts, whereas replicative senescent fibroblasts, SMC, and control fibroblasts from foreskin did not produce significant amounts. Functionally, GPHalpha reduced growth of stromal cells at concentrations of 10 and 100 nmol/liter as shown by cell viability assays. It is concluded that histogenetic reorganization over the adult lifetime, guided by endocrine factors like steroid hormones together with senescence of fibroblasts, leads to a decreased production of growth inhibitors, such as GPHalpha, favoring proliferation and the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  3. MHC class I ligation of human T cells activates the ZAP70 and p56lck tyrosine kinases, leads to an alternative phenotype of the TCR/CD3 zeta-chain, and induces apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Bregenholt, S; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1997-01-01

    that the ZAP70 tyrosine kinase is tyrosine phosphorylated in Jurkat T cells and in purified peripheral T cells after MHC-I ligation. The tyrosine-phosphorylated ZAP70 kinase exhibits a particular phenotype with low affinities for proteins at 21, 40, 60, and 120 kDa, proteins normally co-precipitated with ZAP70...... after TCR/CD3 stimulation. The phosphorylation of ZAP70 after MHC-I ligation was dependent on TCR/CD3 surface expression. One of the natural substrates for ZAP70 is the zeta-chain dimer of the TCR/CD3 complex. MHC-I cross-linking induces a phosphorylated zeta-protein that migrates as a dimer at 42 k...... of the zeta-chain and the ZAP70 kinase following MHC-I ligation. Previous studies have demonstrated that lack or diminished activation of ZAP70 is involved in the induction of anergy or apoptosis in T cells. Likewise, MHC-I cross-linking of Jurkat T cells results in growth arrest and induction of apoptosis...

  4. The potency of human testicular stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikhovskaya, J.V.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we evaluate the stem cell state of cells present in primary human testicular cell cultures as well as their origin and relation to germ or somatic lineages within testicular tissue. We conclude that human testis-derived embryonic stem cell-like (htES-like) colonies arising in primary

  5. Lead levels in human teeth from the inhabitants of Mexico City from three different historical periods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansilla, J.; Solis, C.; Chavez, M.E. [Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, Direccion de Antropologia Fisica, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    Human teeth from pre-Columbian, colonial and contemporary population groups were analyzed by PIXE in order to evaluate the lead contents in the inhabitants of Mexico City through different historical periods. Lead contents showed significant differences among the three groups, in Pre-Columbian teeth no lead was found, colonial teeth showed higher lead levels than contemporary ones. This results suggest that the native americans had no exposure to this toxic metal. The lead-glaze pottery introduced by the Spaniards, utilized in pottery and lead pipes, was the main source of lead in the colonial period. In recent teeth the deposited lead is mainly due to the absorption from the contaminated atmosphere. (Author)

  6. Effects of inorganic lead on the differentiation and growth of cultured hippocampal and neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, T; Audesirk, G; Ferguson, C; Shugarts, D

    1991-01-01

    Lead exposure has devastating effects on the developing nervous system, and has been implicated in variety of behavioral and cognitive deficits as well as neural morphological abnormalities. Since lead impacts many calcium-dependent processes, one likely mechanism of lead toxicity is its disruption of calcium dependent processes, among which is neuronal differentiation. We investigated the effects of inorganic lead on survival and several parameters of differentiation of cultured neurons. Three different cell types were used: Rat hippocampal neurons (a primary CNS cell type), B50 rat neuroblastoma cells (a transformed CNS-derived cell line), and N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells (a transformed peripherally-derived cell line). Lead concentrations ranged from low nM to 1 mM. Lead effects differed considerably among the three cell types, with B50 cells least affected. Lead effects were generally multimodal, with fewest effects observed at intermediate concentrations. Lead inhibited neurite initiation in hippocampal neurons, but stimulated initiation in N1E-115 cells. In those cells that differentiated, lead increased dendrite numbers in hippocampal neurons and neurite numbers in N1E-115 cells. Lead exposure increased both the length and the degree of branching of axons in hippocampal neurons and the length of neurites in N1E-115 cells. We hypothesize that lead impacts multiple regulatory processes that influence neuron survival and differentiation, and that its effects show differing dose-dependencies. The differing responses of the different cell types to lead suggests that differentiation may be regulated in different ways by the three types of cells. Alternatively, or additionally, the cell types may differ in their ability to compensate for, sequester, or expel lead.

  7. Relevancy of human exposure via house dust to the contaminants lead and asbestos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen AG; Lijzen JPA; SIR; LER

    2004-01-01

    The present report addresses the issues whether house dust is likely to contribute substantially to the exposure of humans, in particular for the contaminants lead and asbestos. House dust consists for 30-70% of soil material, indicating that contaminated soil can lead to contaminated house dust. It

  8. Relevancy of human exposure via house dust to the contaminants lead and asbestos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen AG; Lijzen JPA; SIR; LER

    2004-01-01

    The present report addresses the issues whether house dust is likely to contribute substantially to the exposure of humans, in particular for the contaminants lead and asbestos. House dust consists for 30-70% of soil material, indicating that contaminated soil can lead to contaminated house dust. It

  9. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Li Zhou; Claire N Medine; Liang Zhu; David C Hay

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation.This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells.Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease.In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases.In recent years,efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own.In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology.

  10. The human airway epithelial basal cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Hackett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the "human airway basal cell signature" as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of

  11. Generation and application of human iPS cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Ghun; RAO LingJun; CHENG LinZhao; XIAO Lei

    2009-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of unlimited proliferation and maintenance of pluripo-tency in vitro; these properties may lead to potential applications in regenerative medicine.However,immune rejection hampers the allogenic application of human ES cells.Over-expression of several specific transcription factors has been used to reprogram human adult cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells,which are similar to hESCs in many aspects.The iPS technique makes it possible to produce patient-specific pluripotent stem cells for transplantation therapy without immune rejection.However,some challenges remain,including viral vector integration into the genome,the existence of exogenous oncogenic factors,and low induction efficiency.Here,we review recent advances in human iPS methodology,as well as remaining challenges and its potential applications.

  12. Generation of human melanocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Ohta

    Full Text Available Epidermal melanocytes play an important role in protecting the skin from UV rays, and their functional impairment results in pigment disorders. Additionally, melanomas are considered to arise from mutations that accumulate in melanocyte stem cells. The mechanisms underlying melanocyte differentiation and the defining characteristics of melanocyte stem cells in humans are, however, largely unknown. In the present study, we set out to generate melanocytes from human iPS cells in vitro, leading to a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of human melanocyte differentiation. We generated iPS cell lines from human dermal fibroblasts using the Yamanaka factors (SOX2, OCT3/4, and KLF4, with or without c-MYC. These iPS cell lines were subsequently used to form embryoid bodies (EBs and then differentiated into melanocytes via culture supplementation with Wnt3a, SCF, and ET-3. Seven weeks after inducing differentiation, pigmented cells expressing melanocyte markers such as MITF, tyrosinase, SILV, and TYRP1, were detected. Melanosomes were identified in these pigmented cells by electron microscopy, and global gene expression profiling of the pigmented cells showed a high similarity to that of human primary foreskin-derived melanocytes, suggesting the successful generation of melanocytes from iPS cells. This in vitro differentiation system should prove useful for understanding human melanocyte biology and revealing the mechanism of various pigment cell disorders, including melanoma.

  13. Faster increases in human life expectancy could lead to slower population aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren C Sanderson

    Full Text Available Counterintuitively, faster increases in human life expectancy could lead to slower population aging. The conventional view that faster increases in human life expectancy would lead to faster population aging is based on the assumption that people become old at a fixed chronological age. A preferable alternative is to base measures of aging on people's time left to death, because this is more closely related to the characteristics that are associated with old age. Using this alternative interpretation, we show that faster increases in life expectancy would lead to slower population aging. Among other things, this finding affects the assessment of the speed at which countries will age.

  14. Faster Increases in Human Life Expectancy Could Lead to Slower Population Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Counterintuitively, faster increases in human life expectancy could lead to slower population aging. The conventional view that faster increases in human life expectancy would lead to faster population aging is based on the assumption that people become old at a fixed chronological age. A preferable alternative is to base measures of aging on people’s time left to death, because this is more closely related to the characteristics that are associated with old age. Using this alternative interpretation, we show that faster increases in life expectancy would lead to slower population aging. Among other things, this finding affects the assessment of the speed at which countries will age. PMID:25876033

  15. Rho GTPases and regulation of cell migration and polarization in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. METHODS: Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. RESULTS: Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. CONCLUSION: Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells.

  16. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in a very small amounts in many mammalian tissues and cells, including human reproductive tracts and fluids. Recently, the presence of N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA, the most characterised member of endocannabinoids, and its congeners palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and oleylethanolamide (OEA in seminal plasma, oviductal fluid, and follicular fluids was demonstrated. AEA has been shown to bind not only type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors, but also type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1, while PEA and OEA are inactive with respect to classical cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 but activate TRPV1 or peroxisome proliferator activate receptors (PPARs. This review concerns the most recent experimental data on PEA and OEA, endocannabinoid-like molecules which appear to exert their action exclusively on sperm cells with altered features, such as membrane characteristics and kinematic parameters. Their beneficial effects on these cells could suggest a possible pharmacological use of PEA and OEA on patients affected by some forms of idiopathic infertility.

  17. Protective effect of boric acid on lead- and cadmium-induced genotoxicity in V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustündağ, Aylin; Behm, Claudia; Föllmann, Wolfram; Duydu, Yalçin; Degen, Gisela H

    2014-06-01

    The toxic heavy metals cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are important environmental pollutants which can cause serious damage to human health. As the metal ions (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) accumulate in the organism, there is special concern regarding chronic toxicity and damage to the genetic material. Metal-induced genotoxicity has been attributed to indirect mechanisms, such as induction of oxidative stress and interference with DNA repair. Boron is a naturally occurring element and considered to be an essential micronutrient, although the cellular activities of boron compounds remain largely unexplored. The present study has been conducted to evaluate potential protective effects of boric acid (BA) against genotoxicity induced by cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and lead chloride (PbCl2) in V79 cell cultures. Cytotoxicity assays (neutral red uptake and cell titer blue assay) served to determine suitable concentrations for subsequent genotoxicity assays. Chromosomal damage and DNA strand breaks were assessed by micronucleus tests and comet assays. Both PbCl2 and CdCl2 (at 3, 5 and 10 µM) were shown to induce concentration-dependent increases in micronucleus frequencies and DNA strand breaks in V79 cells. BA itself was not cytotoxic (up to 300 µM) and showed no genotoxic effects. Pretreatment of cells with low levels of BA (2.5 and 10 µM) was found to strongly reduce the genotoxic effects of the tested metals. Based on the findings of this in vitro study, it can be suggested that boron provides an efficient protection against the induction of DNA strand breaks and micronuclei by lead and cadmium. Further studies on the underlying mechanisms for the protective effect of boron are needed.

  18. Lead-induced nitric oxide generation plays a critical role in lead uptake by Pogonatherum crinitum root cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Sun, Lian; Jin, Haihong; Chen, Qian; Chen, Zunwei; Xu, Maojun

    2012-10-01

    The effects of lead (Pb) on endogenous nitric oxide (NO) generation, the role of NO in Pb uptake and the origin of Pb-induced NO production in Pogonatherum crinitum root cells were evaluated. Pb treatment induced rapid NO generation, showing that Pb exposure triggered endogenous NO signaling of the cells. Pre-treatment of the cells with the NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline -1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) not only abolished the Pb-triggered NO burst but also reduced Pb contents of the cells. Moreover, Pb exposure enhanced nitrate reductase (NR) activity of the cells. The NR inhibitors tungstate and glutamine not only suppressed the Pb-enhanced NR activities but also reduced the Pb-triggered NO generation. Pre-treatment of the cells with tungstate and glutamine suppressed Pb accumulation and the suppression could be restored by application of exogenous NO via its donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Together, our results indicated that Pb exposure enhanced NR activity and triggered the NO burst of P. crinitum root cells. Furthermore, the data demonstrated that NR was responsible for the Pb-triggered NO burst and that NR-mediated NO generation played a critical role in Pb uptake by P. crinitum root cells. Thus, our results suggest a potential strategy for controlling Pb uptake by plants by targeting NR as a source of Pb-triggered NO production.

  19. Ionic transport in hybrid lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eames, Christopher; Frost, Jarvist M; Barnes, Piers R F; O'Regan, Brian C; Walsh, Aron; Islam, M Saiful

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic halide perovskites have recently shown rapidly rising power conversion efficiencies, but exhibit unusual behaviour such as current-voltage hysteresis and a low...

  20. Tau excess impairs mitosis and kinesin-5 function, leading to aneuploidy and cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Bougé

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, cell cycle defects and associated aneuploidy have been described. However, the importance of these defects in the physiopathology of AD and the underlying mechanistic processes are largely unknown, in particular with respect to the microtubule (MT-binding protein Tau, which is found in excess in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of affected individuals. Although it has long been known that Tau is phosphorylated during mitosis to generate a lower affinity for MTs, there is, to our knowledge, no indication that an excess of this protein could affect mitosis. Here, we studied the effect of an excess of human Tau (hTau protein on cell mitosis in vivo. Using the Drosophila developing wing disc epithelium as a model, we show that an excess of hTau induces a mitotic arrest, with the presence of monopolar spindles. This mitotic defect leads to aneuploidy and apoptotic cell death. We studied the mechanism of action of hTau and found that the MT-binding domain of hTau is responsible for these defects. We also demonstrate that the effects of hTau occur via the inhibition of the function of the kinesin Klp61F, the Drosophila homologue of kinesin-5 (also called Eg5 or KIF11. We finally show that this deleterious effect of hTau is also found in other Drosophila cell types (neuroblasts and tissues (the developing eye disc, as well as in human HeLa cells. By demonstrating that MT-bound Tau inhibits the Eg5 kinesin and cell mitosis, our work provides a new framework to consider the role of Tau in neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Tau excess impairs mitosis and kinesin-5 function, leading to aneuploidy and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougé, Anne-Laure; Parmentier, Marie-Laure

    2016-03-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), cell cycle defects and associated aneuploidy have been described. However, the importance of these defects in the physiopathology of AD and the underlying mechanistic processes are largely unknown, in particular with respect to the microtubule (MT)-binding protein Tau, which is found in excess in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of affected individuals. Although it has long been known that Tau is phosphorylated during mitosis to generate a lower affinity for MTs, there is, to our knowledge, no indication that an excess of this protein could affect mitosis. Here, we studied the effect of an excess of human Tau (hTau) protein on cell mitosis in vivo. Using the Drosophila developing wing disc epithelium as a model, we show that an excess of hTau induces a mitotic arrest, with the presence of monopolar spindles. This mitotic defect leads to aneuploidy and apoptotic cell death. We studied the mechanism of action of hTau and found that the MT-binding domain of hTau is responsible for these defects. We also demonstrate that the effects of hTau occur via the inhibition of the function of the kinesin Klp61F, the Drosophila homologue of kinesin-5 (also called Eg5 or KIF11). We finally show that this deleterious effect of hTau is also found in other Drosophila cell types (neuroblasts) and tissues (the developing eye disc), as well as in human HeLa cells. By demonstrating that MT-bound Tau inhibits the Eg5 kinesin and cell mitosis, our work provides a new framework to consider the role of Tau in neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Reduced expression of citrate synthase leads to excessive superoxide formation and cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Quanxiang; Zhao, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaochun; Nie, Yao; Li, Ping; Liu, Tingyan; Ge, Ruli; Han, Fengchan

    2017-02-16

    A/J mice are a mouse model of age-related hearing loss. It has been demonstrated that a mutation in gene of citrate synthase (CS) contributes to the early onset of hearing loss occurring at about one month of age. To understand the effects of a decreased CS activity that results from the mutation in Cs gene on hearing loss in A/J mice, human kidney cell line (293T) was transiently transfected with short hairpin RNA for Cs (shRNA-Cs) to reduce expression of CS. In comparison with those of cells transfected with a scrambled sequence (shRNA-NC), the oxygen consumption rate and adenosine trisphosphate (ATP) production level were decreased in 293T cells transfected with shRNA-Cs. Meanwhile, excessive superoxide production was induced as determined by mitochondrial superoxide formation assay (MitoSOX) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) detection. Moreover, the expression levels of BIP (binding immunoglobulin protein) and CHOP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein), markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress, were upregulated. Furthermore, apoptosis related molecule caspase-3 and the mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced. It is therefore concluded that downregulation of Cs expression in 293T cells leads to low level of ATP production, excessive superoxide formation and cell apoptosis, which implies a possible mechanism for hearing loss in A/J mice.

  3. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  4. Effects of Lead on Temporal Response Properties of Retinal Ganglion Cells in Developing Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮迪云; 汤立新; 赵晨; 郭宇静

    1994-01-01

    Neonatal rats have taken in lead, during the period from their parturition to their weaning, from the milk of dams fed with water containing 0.2% lead acetate solutions. The alterations in the temporal response properties of retinal ganglion cells in adult rats (90 days) following the lead exposure at their developing stage have been studied. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the lead exposure in neonatal rats causes decreases in the optimal temporal frequency, bandwidth at half amplitude, temporal resolution and response phase of the retinal ganglion cells in adult rats. Compared with the sustained cells, the transient cells have a much greater alteration in temporal response properties.

  5. Connexin mutant embryonic stem cells and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiyomasa; Nishii; Yosaburo; Shibata; Yasushi; Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular communication via gap junctions allows cells within multicellular organisms to share small molecules. The effect of such interactions has been elucidated using mouse gene knockout strategies. Although several mutations in human gap junction-encoding connexin(Cx) have been described, Cx mutants in mice do not always recapitulate the human disease. Among the 20 mouse Cxs, Cx26, Cx43, and Cx45 play roles in early cardiac or placental development, and disruption of the genes results in lethality that hampers further analyses. Embryonic stem cells(ESCs) that lack Cx43 or Cx45 have made analysis feasible in both in vitro differentiated cell cultures and in vivo chimeric tissues. The success of mouse ESCs studies is leading to the use of induced pluripotent stem cells to learn more about the pathogenesis of human Cx diseases. This review summarizes the current status of mouse Cx disruption models and ESC differentiation studies, and discusses their implication for understanding human Cx diseases.

  6. Connexin mutant embryonic stem cells and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, Kiyomasa; Shibata, Yosaburo; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2014-11-26

    Intercellular communication via gap junctions allows cells within multicellular organisms to share small molecules. The effect of such interactions has been elucidated using mouse gene knockout strategies. Although several mutations in human gap junction-encoding connexin (Cx) have been described, Cx mutants in mice do not always recapitulate the human disease. Among the 20 mouse Cxs, Cx26, Cx43, and Cx45 play roles in early cardiac or placental development, and disruption of the genes results in lethality that hampers further analyses. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that lack Cx43 or Cx45 have made analysis feasible in both in vitro differentiated cell cultures and in vivo chimeric tissues. The success of mouse ESCs studies is leading to the use of induced pluripotent stem cells to learn more about the pathogenesis of human Cx diseases. This review summarizes the current status of mouse Cx disruption models and ESC differentiation studies, and discusses their implication for understanding human Cx diseases.

  7. Preparation of pancreatic β-cells from human iPS cells with small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells obtained from patients are expected to be a useful source for cell transplantation therapy, because many patients (including those with type 1 diabetes and severe type 2 diabetes) are on waiting lists for transplantation for a long time due to the shortage of donors. At present, many concerns related to clinical application of human iPS cells have been raised, but rapid development of methods for the establishment, culture, and standardization of iPS cells will lead autologous cell therapy to be realistic sooner or later. However, establishment of a method for preparing some of desired cell types is still challenging. Regarding pancreatic β-cells, there have been many reports about differentiation of these cells from human embryonic stem (ES)/iPS cells, but a protocol for clinical application has still not been established. Since there is clear proof that cell transplantation therapy is effective for diabetes based on the results of clinical islet transplantation, pancreatic β-cells prepared from human iPS cells are considered likely to be effective for reducing the burden on patients. In this article, the current status of procedures for preparing pancreatic β-cells from human ES/iPS cells, including effective use of small molecules, is summarized, and some of the problems that still need to be overcome are discussed.

  8. Lead bullet fragments in venison from rifle-killed deer: potential for human dietary exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Grainger Hunt

    Full Text Available Human consumers of wildlife killed with lead ammunition may be exposed to health risks associated with lead ingestion. This hypothesis is based on published studies showing elevated blood lead concentrations in subsistence hunter populations, retention of ammunition residues in the tissues of hunter-killed animals, and systemic, cognitive, and behavioral disorders associated with human lead body burdens once considered safe. Our objective was to determine the incidence and bioavailability of lead bullet fragments in hunter-killed venison, a widely-eaten food among hunters and their families. We radiographed 30 eviscerated carcasses of White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus shot by hunters with standard lead-core, copper-jacketed bullets under normal hunting conditions. All carcasses showed metal fragments (geometric mean = 136 fragments, range = 15-409 and widespread fragment dispersion. We took each carcass to a separate meat processor and fluoroscopically scanned the resulting meat packages; fluoroscopy revealed metal fragments in the ground meat packages of 24 (80% of the 30 deer; 32% of 234 ground meat packages contained at least one fragment. Fragments were identified as lead by ICP in 93% of 27 samples. Isotope ratios of lead in meat matched the ratios of bullets, and differed from background lead in bone. We fed fragment-containing venison to four pigs to test bioavailability; four controls received venison without fragments from the same deer. Mean blood lead concentrations in pigs peaked at 2.29 microg/dL (maximum 3.8 microg/dL 2 days following ingestion of fragment-containing venison, significantly higher than the 0.63 microg/dL averaged by controls. We conclude that people risk exposure to bioavailable lead from bullet fragments when they eat venison from deer killed with standard lead-based rifle bullets and processed under normal procedures. At risk in the U.S. are some ten million hunters, their families, and low

  9. IMMUNORESPONSES OF HUMANIZED SCID MICE TO HUMAN LUNG CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈力真; 王树蕙; 张云; 王世真

    1996-01-01

    HuPBL-SCID mice were used to explore how they would response to human ttmoor cells of 801/MLC.Living 801/MLC cells appeared to be fetal to the the mice due to the production of human TNF. The huP-BL-SCID rniee did not generate any noticeable amotmt of specific human immunoglobttlin either by single immunization with living 801/MLC cells or by repeated immunization with irradiated 801/MLC cells. Our preliminary experiments with huPBL-SCID mice showed that such chimeras would he a very useful models for tumor immunological researches.

  10. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  11. Blockade of Wnt-1 signaling leads to anti-tumor effects in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grepper Susan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is an aggressive cancer, and is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Standard therapy is ineffective partly because HCC is intrinsically resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Its poor prognosis and limited treatment options make it critical to develop novel and selective chemotherapeutic agents. Since the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is essential in HCC carcinogenesis, we studied the inhibition of Wnt-1-mediated signaling as a potential molecular target in HCC. Results We demonstrated that Wnt-1 is highly expressed in human hepatoma cell lines and a subgroup of human HCC tissues compared to paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. An anti-Wnt-1 antibody dose-dependently decreased viability and proliferation of Huh7 and Hep40 cells over-expressing Wnt-1 and harboring wild type β-catenin, but did not affect normal hepatocytes with undetectable Wnt-1 expression. Apoptosis was also observed in Huh7 and Hep40 cells after treatment with anti-Wnt-1 antibody. In these two cell lines, the anti-Wnt-1 antibody decreased β-catenin/Tcf4 transcriptional activities, which were associated with down-regulation of the endogenous β-catenin/Tcf4 target genes c-Myc, cyclin D1, and survivin. Intratumoral injection of anti-Wnt-1 antibody suppressed in vivo tumor growth in a Huh7 xenograft model, which was also associated with apoptosis and reduced c-Myc, cyclin D1, and survivin expressions. Conclusion Our results suggest that Wnt-1 is a survival factor for HCC cells, and that the blockade of Wnt-1-mediated signaling may offer a potential pathway-specific therapeutic strategy for the treatment of a subgroup of HCC that over-expresses Wnt-1.

  12. Acetylcholinesterase from Human Erythrocytes as a Surrogate Biomarker of Lead Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead induced neurotoxicity in the people engaged in different occupations has received wide attention but very little studies have been carried out to monitor occupational neurotoxicity directly due to lead exposure using biochemical methods. In the present paper an endeavour has been made in order to assess the lead mediated neurotoxicity by in vitro assay of the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE from human erythrocytes in presence of different concentrations of lead. The results suggested that the activity of this enzyme was localized in membrane bound fraction and it was found to be highly stable up to 30 days when stored at −20°C in phosphate buffer (50 mM, pH 7.4 containing 0.2% Triton X-100. The erythrocyte’s AChE exhibited Km for acetylcholinesterase to be 0.1 mM. Lead caused sharp inhibition of the enzyme and its IC50 value was computed to be 1.34 mM. The inhibition of the enzyme by lead was found to be of uncompetitive type (Ki value, 3.6 mM which negatively influenced both the Vmax and the enzyme-substrate binding affinity. Taken together, these results indicate that AChE from human erythrocytes could be exploited as a surrogate biomarker of lead induced neurotoxicity particularly in the people occupationally exposed to lead.

  13. Erythroid differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells is independent of donor cell type of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Isabel; Klich, Katharina; Arauzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Radstaak, Martina; Santourlidis, Simeon; Ghanjati, Foued; Radke, Teja F; Psathaki, Olympia E; Hargus, Gunnar; Kramer, Jan; Einhaus, Martin; Kim, Jeong Beom; Kögler, Gesine; Wernet, Peter; Schöler, Hans R; Schlenke, Peter; Zaehres, Holm

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic memory in induced pluripotent stem cells, which is related to the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, might lead to variations in the differentiation capacities of the pluripotent stem cells. In this context, induced pluripotent stem cells from human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells might be more suitable for hematopoietic differentiation than the commonly used fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. To investigate the influence of an epigenetic memory on the ex vivo expansion of induced pluripotent stem cells into erythroid cells, we compared induced pluripotent stem cells from human neural stem cells and human cord blood-derived CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells and evaluated their potential for differentiation into hematopoietic progenitor and mature red blood cells. Although genome-wide DNA methylation profiling at all promoter regions demonstrates that the epigenetic memory of induced pluripotent stem cells is influenced by the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, we found a similar hematopoietic induction potential and erythroid differentiation pattern of induced pluripotent stem cells of different somatic cell origin. All human induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed terminal maturation into normoblasts and enucleated reticulocytes, producing predominantly fetal hemoglobin. Differences were only observed in the growth rate of erythroid cells, which was slightly higher in the induced pluripotent stem cells derived from CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. More detailed methylation analysis of the hematopoietic and erythroid promoters identified similar CpG methylation levels in the induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from CD34(+) cells and those derived from neural stem cells, which confirms their comparable erythroid differentiation potential.

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junying; Vodyanik, Maxim A; Smuga-Otto, Kim; Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica; Frane, Jennifer L; Tian, Shulan; Nie, Jeff; Jonsdottir, Gudrun A; Ruotti, Victor; Stewart, Ron; Slukvin, Igor I; Thomson, James A

    2007-12-21

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows trans-acting factors present in the mammalian oocyte to reprogram somatic cell nuclei to an undifferentiated state. We show that four factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, and LIN28) are sufficient to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells that exhibit the essential characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells. These induced pluripotent human stem cells have normal karyotypes, express telomerase activity, express cell surface markers and genes that characterize human ES cells, and maintain the developmental potential to differentiate into advanced derivatives of all three primary germ layers. Such induced pluripotent human cell lines should be useful in the production of new disease models and in drug development, as well as for applications in transplantation medicine, once technical limitations (for example, mutation through viral integration) are eliminated.

  15. Mechanisms of ploidy increase in human cancers: a new role for cell cannibalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcovic, Matej; Overholtzer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Aneuploidy is a hallmark of human cancers that originates from abnormal mitoses. Many aneuploid cancer cells also have greater-than-diploid DNA content, suggesting that polyploidy is a common precursor to aneuploidy during tumor progression. Polyploid cells can originate from cell fusion, endoreplication, and cytokinesis failure. Recently we found that cell cannibalism by entosis, a form of cell engulfment involving live cells, also leads to polyploidy, as internalized cells disrupt cytokinesis of their engulfing cell hosts. By this mechanism, cannibalistic cell behavior could promote tumor progression by leading to aneuploidy. Here we discuss cell cannibalism in cancer and other mechanisms that result in the formation of polyploid cancer cells. PMID:22447569

  16. Determination of cadmium and lead in human biological samples by spectrometric techniques: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Valfredo Azevedo; de Carvalho, Anaildes Lago

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of human biological samples, such as blood, urine, nails, and hair, is generally used for the verification of human exposure to toxic metals. In this review, various spectrometric methods for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples are discussed and compared. Several spectrometric techniques are presented and discussed with respect to various characteristics such as sensitivity, selectivity, and cost. Special attention is drawn to the procedures for digestion prior to the determination of cadmium and lead in hair, nails, blood, and urine.

  17. EBI2 overexpression in mice leads to B1 B cell expansion and chronic lymphocytic leukemia-(CLL)-like B cell malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss Arfelt, Kristine; Barington, Line; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2017-01-01

    Human and mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) develop from CD5+ B cells that in mice and macaques are known to define the distinct B1a B cell lineage. B1a cells are characterized by lack of germinal center development and the B1a cell population is increased in mice with reduced germinal...... center formation. As a major mediator of follicular B cell migration, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Epstein Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2 or GPR183) directs B cell migration in the lymphoid follicles in response to its endogenous ligands, oxysterols. Thus, upregulation of EBI2 drives the B...... cells towards the extrafollicular area, whereas downregulation is essential for germinal center formation. We therefore speculated whether increased expression of EBI2 would lead to an expanded B1 cell subset and, ultimately, progression to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Here we demonstrate that B cell...

  18. Leading and trailing cells cooperate in collective migration of the zebrafish posterior lateral line primordium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Nogare, Damian; Somers, Katherine; Rao, Swetha; Matsuda, Miho; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Raz, Erez; Chitnis, Ajay B

    2014-08-01

    Collective migration of cells in the zebrafish posterior lateral line primordium (PLLp) along a path defined by Cxcl12a expression depends on Cxcr4b receptors in leading cells and on Cxcr7b in trailing cells. Cxcr7b-mediated degradation of Cxcl12a by trailing cells generates a local gradient of Cxcl12a that guides PLLp migration. Agent-based computer models were built to explore how a polarized response to Cxcl12a, mediated by Cxcr4b in leading cells and prevented by Cxcr7b in trailing cells, determines unidirectional migration of the PLLp. These chemokine signaling-based models effectively recapitulate many behaviors of the PLLp and provide potential explanations for the characteristic behaviors that emerge when the PLLp is severed by laser to generate leading and trailing fragments. As predicted by our models, the bilateral stretching of the leading fragment is lost when chemokine signaling is blocked in the PLLp. However, movement of the trailing fragment toward the leading cells, which was also thought to be chemokine dependent, persists. This suggested that a chemokine-independent mechanism, not accounted for in our models, is responsible for this behavior. Further investigation of trailing cell behavior shows that their movement toward leading cells depends on FGF signaling and it can be re-oriented by exogenous FGF sources. Together, our observations reveal the simple yet elegant manner in which leading and trailing cells coordinate migration; while leading cells steer PLLp migration by following chemokine cues, cells further back play follow-the-leader as they migrate toward FGFs produced by leading cells. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Leading and trailing cells cooperate in collective migration of the zebrafish posterior lateral line primordium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Nogare, Damian; Somers, Katherine; Rao, Swetha; Matsuda, Miho; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Raz, Erez; Chitnis, Ajay B.

    2014-01-01

    Collective migration of cells in the zebrafish posterior lateral line primordium (PLLp) along a path defined by Cxcl12a expression depends on Cxcr4b receptors in leading cells and on Cxcr7b in trailing cells. Cxcr7b-mediated degradation of Cxcl12a by trailing cells generates a local gradient of Cxcl12a that guides PLLp migration. Agent-based computer models were built to explore how a polarized response to Cxcl12a, mediated by Cxcr4b in leading cells and prevented by Cxcr7b in trailing cells, determines unidirectional migration of the PLLp. These chemokine signaling-based models effectively recapitulate many behaviors of the PLLp and provide potential explanations for the characteristic behaviors that emerge when the PLLp is severed by laser to generate leading and trailing fragments. As predicted by our models, the bilateral stretching of the leading fragment is lost when chemokine signaling is blocked in the PLLp. However, movement of the trailing fragment toward the leading cells, which was also thought to be chemokine dependent, persists. This suggested that a chemokine-independent mechanism, not accounted for in our models, is responsible for this behavior. Further investigation of trailing cell behavior shows that their movement toward leading cells depends on FGF signaling and it can be re-oriented by exogenous FGF sources. Together, our observations reveal the simple yet elegant manner in which leading and trailing cells coordinate migration; while leading cells steer PLLp migration by following chemokine cues, cells further back play follow-the-leader as they migrate toward FGFs produced by leading cells. PMID:25063456

  20. [The quality control of preanalytical variations for the determination of lead in samples of human origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kun; Wang, Wei; He, Falin; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this article was to provide the quality control requirements of preanalytical variation for the determination of lead in samples of human origin, reduce the influence of preanalytical variation on the test results. According to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute documents, control of preanalytical variation in trace element determinations, analytical procedures for the determination of lead in blood and urine and other references and guidelines, the methods of quality control of lead determination had been made, including: the factors needed to be considered before collection, preservation, transportation and other preanalytical factors, the abilities and considerations of laboratory staff, etc.

  1. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  2. Specific Inflammatory Stimuli Lead to Distinct Platelet Responses in Mice and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Lea M.; Clancy, Lauren; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Kramer, Carolyn D.; Weinberg, Ellen O.; He, Xianbao; Mekasha, Samrawit; Mick, Eric; Ingalls, Robin R.; Genco, Caroline A.; Freedman, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diverse and multi-factorial processes contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. These processes affect cells involved in the development of this disease in varying ways, ultimately leading to atherothrombosis. The goal of our study was to compare the differential effects of specific stimuli – two bacterial infections and a Western diet – on platelet responses in ApoE-/- mice, specifically examining inflammatory function and gene expression. Results from murine studies were verified using platelets from participants of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS; n = 1819 participants). Methods Blood and spleen samples were collected at weeks 1 and 9 from ApoE-/- mice infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis or Chlamydia pneumoniae and from mice fed a Western diet for 9 weeks. Transcripts based on data from a Western diet in ApoE-/- mice were measured in platelet samples from FHS using high throughput qRT-PCR. Results At week 1, both bacterial infections increased circulating platelet-neutrophil aggregates. At week 9, these cells individually localized to the spleen, while Western diet resulted in increased platelet-neutrophil aggregates in the spleen only. Microarray analysis of platelet RNA from infected or Western diet-fed mice at week 1 and 9 showed differential profiles. Genes, such as Serpina1a, Ttr, Fgg, Rpl21, and Alb, were uniquely affected by infection and diet. Results were reinforced in platelets obtained from participants of the FHS. Conclusion Using both human studies and animal models, results demonstrate that variable sources of inflammatory stimuli have the ability to influence the platelet phenotype in distinct ways, indicative of the diverse function of platelets in thrombosis, hemostasis, and immunity. PMID:26148065

  3. Specific Inflammatory Stimuli Lead to Distinct Platelet Responses in Mice and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea M Beaulieu

    Full Text Available Diverse and multi-factorial processes contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. These processes affect cells involved in the development of this disease in varying ways, ultimately leading to atherothrombosis. The goal of our study was to compare the differential effects of specific stimuli--two bacterial infections and a Western diet--on platelet responses in ApoE-/- mice, specifically examining inflammatory function and gene expression. Results from murine studies were verified using platelets from participants of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS; n = 1819 participants.Blood and spleen samples were collected at weeks 1 and 9 from ApoE-/- mice infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis or Chlamydia pneumoniae and from mice fed a Western diet for 9 weeks. Transcripts based on data from a Western diet in ApoE-/- mice were measured in platelet samples from FHS using high throughput qRT-PCR.At week 1, both bacterial infections increased circulating platelet-neutrophil aggregates. At week 9, these cells individually localized to the spleen, while Western diet resulted in increased platelet-neutrophil aggregates in the spleen only. Microarray analysis of platelet RNA from infected or Western diet-fed mice at week 1 and 9 showed differential profiles. Genes, such as Serpina1a, Ttr, Fgg, Rpl21, and Alb, were uniquely affected by infection and diet. Results were reinforced in platelets obtained from participants of the FHS.Using both human studies and animal models, results demonstrate that variable sources of inflammatory stimuli have the ability to influence the platelet phenotype in distinct ways, indicative of the diverse function of platelets in thrombosis, hemostasis, and immunity.

  4. Tin- and Lead-Based Perovskite Solar Cells under Scrutiny: An Environmental Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serrano-Luján, Lucía; Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod

    2015-01-01

    The effect of substituting lead with tin in perovskite-based solar cells (PSCs) has shows that lead is preferred over tin by a lower cumulative energy demand. The results, which also include end-of-life management, show that a recycling scenario that carefully handles emission of lead enables use...

  5. Loss of Lkb1 and Pten Leads to Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Elevated PD-L1 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunxiao; Fillmore, Christine M.; Koyama, Shohei; Wu, Hongbo; Zhao, Yanqiu; Chen, Zhao; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Akbay, Esra A.; Tchaicha, Jeremy H.; Altabef, Abigail; Reibel, Jacob B.; Walton, Zandra; Ji, Hongbin; Watanabe, Hideo; Jänne, Pasi A.; Castrillon, Diego H.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Bass, Adam J.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Padera, Robert F.; Dranoff, Glenn; Hammerman, Peter S.; Kim, Carla F.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a deadly disease for which current treatments are inadequate. We demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Lkb1 and Pten in the mouse lung leads to SCC that recapitulates the histology, gene expression, and microenvironment found in human disease. Lkb1;Pten null (LP) tumors expressed the squamous markers KRT5, p63 and SOX2, and transcriptionally resembled the basal subtype of human SCC. In contrast to mouse adenocarcinomas, the LP tumors contained immune populations enriched for tumor-associated neutrophils. SCA1+NGFR+ fractions were enriched for tumor-propagating cells (TPCs) that could serially transplant the disease in orthotopic assays. TPCs in the LP model and NGFR+ cells in human SCCs highly expressed Pd-ligand-1 (PD-L1), suggesting a mechanism of immune escape for TPCs. PMID:24794706

  6. Interfacial Degradation of Planar Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Antonio; You, Jingbi; Aranda, Clara; Kang, Yong Soo; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà; Zhou, Huanping; Bisquert, Juan; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-26

    The stability of perovskite solar cells is one of the major challenges for this technology to reach commercialization, with water believed to be the major degradation source. In this work, a range of devices containing different cathode metal contacts in the configuration ITO/PEDOT:PSS/MAPbI3/PCBM/Metal are fully electrically characterized before and after degradation caused by steady illumination during 4 h that induces a dramatic reduction in power conversion efficiency from values of 12 to 1.8%. We show that a decrease in performance and generation of the S-shape is associated with chemical degradation of the metal contact. Alternatively, use of Cr2O3/Cr as the contact enhances the stability, but modification of the energetic profile during steady illumination takes place, significantly reducing the performance. Several techniques including capacitance-voltage, X-ray diffraction, and optical absorption results suggest that the properties of the bulk perovskite layer are little affected in the device degradation process. Capacitance-voltage and impedance spectroscopy results show that the electrical properties of the cathode contact are being modified by generation of a dipole at the cathode that causes a large shift of the flat-band potential that modifies the interfacial energy barrier and impedes efficient extraction of electrons. Ionic movement in the perovskite layer changes the energy profile close to the contacts, modifying the energy level stabilization at the cathode. These results provide insights into the degradation mechanisms of perovskite solar cells and highlight the importance to further study the use of protecting layers to avoid the chemical reactivity of the perovskite with the external contacts.

  7. Cytokine-producing T cell subsets in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, Kåre

    2000-01-01

    Leishmania specific Th1/Th2 cells have been identified in humans as well as in mice. There is a correlation between the clinical outcome of the infection and the cytokine response profile. Generally, the production of Th2 cytokines leads to severe infection, whereas the production of Th1 cytokine...... cells mutually down-regulate each other. However, the presence of antigen specific regulatory T cell subsets may provide an environment that allows the presence of both Th1 and Th2 cells....

  8. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  9. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    including incubation with factors such as SHH ) and proceed to Human Neural Progenitor Cells Dopaminergic Differentiation β-III Tubulin/TH...exposure in human embryonic stem cells. J Recept Signal Transduct Res. 2011 Jun;31(3):206-13. Gerwe BA, Angel PM, West FD, Hasneen K, Young A

  10. Critical values of the external magnetic field leading biological effects in the human organism

    CERN Document Server

    Kanokov, Zakirjon

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the simplified stochastic model the critical values of an induction of the external magnetic field leading to sharp increase of fluctuations of a casual current of biologically important ions in different blood vessels of a human body are calculated.

  11. Cell models lead to understanding of multi-cellular morphogenesis consisting of successive self-construction of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hisao; Nagai, Tatsuzo

    2015-03-01

    Morphogenesis of multi-cellular organisms occurs through cell behaviours within a cell aggregate. Cell behaviours have been described using cell models involving equations of motion for cells. Cells in cell models construct shapes of the cell aggregate by themselves. Here, a history of cell models, the cell centre model and the vertex cell model, which we have constructed, are described. Furthermore, the application of these cell models is explained in detail. These cell models have been applied to transformation of cell aggregates to become spherical, formation of mammalian blastocysts and cell intercalation in elongating tissues. These are all elemental processes of morphogenesis and take place in succession during the whole developmental process. A chain of successive elemental processes leads to morphogenesis. Finally, we highlight that cell models are indispensable to understand the process whereby genes direct biological shapes.

  12. Restoring KLF5 in esophageal squamous cell cancer cells activates the JNK pathway leading to apoptosis and reduced cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarapore, Rohinton S; Yang, Yizeng; Katz, Jonathan P

    2013-05-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world and has an extremely dismal prognosis, with a 5-year survival of less than 20%. Current treatment options are limited, and thus identifying new molecular targets and pathways is critical to derive novel therapies. Worldwide, more than 90% of esophageal cancers are esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). Previously, we identified that Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5), a key transcriptional regulator normally expressed in esophageal squamous epithelial cells, is lost in human ESCC. To examine the effects of restoring KLF5 in ESCC, we transduced the human ESCC cell lines TE7 and TE15, both of which lack KLF5 expression, with retrovirus to express KLF5 upon doxycycline induction. When KLF5 was induced, ESCC cells demonstrated increased apoptosis and decreased viability, with up-regulation of the proapoptotic factor BAX. Interestingly, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, an important upstream mediator of proapoptotic pathways including BAX, was also activated following KLF5 induction. KLF5 activation of JNK signaling was mediated by KLF5 transactivation of two key upstream regulators of the JNK pathway, ASK1 and MKK4, and inhibition of JNK blocked apoptosis and normalized cell survival following KLF5 induction. Thus, restoring KLF5 in ESCC cells promotes apoptosis and decreases cell survival in a JNK-dependent manner, providing a potential therapeutic target for human ESCC.

  13. Cortical network from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The connection of embryonic stem cell technology and developmental biology provides valuable tools to decipher the mechanisms underlying human brain development and diseases, especially among neuronal populations, that are not readily available in primary cultures. It is obviously the case of neurons forming the human cerebral cortex. In the images that are presented, the neurons were generated in vitro from human embryonic stem cells via forebrain-like progenitors. Maintained in cul...

  14. Mechanisms of collective cell movement lacking a leading or free front edge in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uechi, Hiroyuki; Kuranaga, Erina

    2017-08-01

    Collective cell movement is one of the strategies for achieving the complex shapes of tissues and organs. In this process, multiple cells within a group held together by cell-cell adhesion acquire mobility and move together in the same direction. In some well-studied models of collective cell movement, the mobility depends strongly on traction generated at the leading edge by cells located at the front. However, recent advances in live-imaging techniques have led to the discovery of other types of collective cell movement lacking a leading edge or even a free edge at the front, in a diverse array of morphological events, including tubule elongation, epithelial sheet extension, and tissue rotation. We herein review some of the developmental events that are organized by collective cell movement and attempt to elucidate the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, which include membrane protrusions, guidance cues, cell intercalation, and planer cell polarity, or chirality pathways.

  15. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B;

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long...

  16. Human embryonic stem cells derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Fulati, Alimujiang; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith; Larson, Janine; Eaton, Deborah; Sadler-Fredd, Karen; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard L; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-06-06

    Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state.

  17. Human natural killer cells promote cross-presentation of tumor cell-derived antigens by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deauvieau, Florence; Ollion, Vincent; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Achard, Carole; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Verronese, Estelle; Durand, Isabelle; Ghittoni, Raffaella; Marvel, Jacqueline; Dezutter-Dambuyant, Colette; Walzer, Thierry; Vie, Henri; Perrot, Ivan; Goutagny, Nadège; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny

    2015-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) cross-present antigen (Ag) to initiate T-cell immunity against most infections and tumors. Natural killer (NK) cells are innate cytolytic lymphocytes that have emerged as key modulators of multiple DC functions. Here, we show that human NK cells promote cross-presentation of tumor cell-derived Ag by DC leading to Ag-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation. Surprisingly, cytotoxic function of NK cells was not required. Instead, we highlight a critical and nonredundant role for IFN-γ and TNF-α production by NK cells to enhance cross-presentation by DC using two different Ag models. Importantly, we observed that NK cells promote cell-associated Ag cross-presentation selectively by monocytes-derived DC (Mo-DC) and CD34-derived CD11b(neg) CD141(high) DC subsets but not by myeloid CD11b(+) DC. Moreover, we demonstrate that triggering NK cell activation by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs)-coated tumor cells leads to efficient DC cross-presentation, supporting the concept that NK cells can contribute to therapeutic mAbs efficiency by inducing downstream adaptive immunity. Taken together, our findings point toward a novel role of human NK cells bridging innate and adaptive immunity through selective induction of cell-associated Ag cross-presentation by CD141(high) DC, a process that could be exploited to better harness Ag-specific cellular immunity in immunotherapy. © 2014 UICC.

  18. Increased DNA damage in blood cells of rat treated with lead as assessed by comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Arif

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that oxidative stress is the key player in the pathogenesis of lead-induced toxicity. The present study investigated lead induced oxidative DNA damage, if any in rat blood cells by alkaline comet assay. Lead was administered intraperitoneally to rats at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight for 5 days consecutively. Blood collected on day six from sacrificed lead-treated rats was used to assess the extent of DNA damage by comet assay which entailed measurement of comet length, olive tail moment, tail DNA (% and tail length. The results showed that treatment with lead significantly increased DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, our data suggests that lead treatment is associated with oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in rat blood cells which could be used as an early bio-marker of lead-toxicity.

  19. Human Neuroepithelial Cells Express NMDA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappell B

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1 cerebral endothelial barrier and 2 cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1 were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease.

  20. Lead (Pb) Isotope Baselines for Studies of Ancient Human Migration and Trade in the Maya Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Ashley E; Kamenov, George D; Gilli, Adrian; Hodell, David A; Emery, Kitty F; Brenner, Mark; Krigbaum, John

    2016-01-01

    We examined the potential use of lead (Pb) isotopes to source archaeological materials from the Maya region of Mesoamerica. The main objectives were to determine if: 1) geologic terrains throughout the Maya area exhibit distinct lead isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb), and 2) a combination of lead and strontium ratios can enhance sourcing procedures in the Mesoamerica region. We analyzed 60 rock samples for lead isotope ratios and a representative subset of samples for lead, uranium, and thorium concentrations across the Maya region, including the Northern Lowlands of the Mexican Yucatan Peninsula, the Southern Lowlands of Guatemala and Belize, the Volcanic Highlands, the Belizean Maya Mountains, and the Metamorphic Province/Motagua Valley. Although there is some overlap within certain sub-regions, particularly the geologically diverse Metamorphic Province, lead isotopes can be used to distinguish between the Northern Lowlands, the Southern Lowlands, and the Volcanic Highlands. The distinct lead isotope ratios in the sub-regions are related to the geology of the Maya area, exhibiting a general trend in the lowlands of geologically younger rocks in the north to older rocks in the south, and Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the southern highlands. Combined with other sourcing techniques such as strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and oxygen (δ18O), a regional baseline for lead isotope ratios can contribute to the development of lead isoscapes in the Maya area, and may help to distinguish among geographic sub-regions at a finer scale than has been previously possible. These isotope baselines will provide archaeologists with an additional tool to track the origin and movement of ancient humans and artifacts across this important region.

  1. [Effects of lead exposure on the human body and health implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Fátima Ramos; Moreira, Josino Costa

    2004-02-01

    To review the literature concerning the risks associated with exposure to lead and lead compounds, especially in children and in populations that are occupationally exposed. Using "chumbo" [lead] and "efeitos" [effects] as search terms, two large databases, namely PubMed (United States National Library of Medicine) and LILACS (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde [Latin American and Caribbean Literature in the Health Sciences]), were searched for studies on lead toxicity from 1988 to 2002. Other sources used to conduct the search include the web page of the United States Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, in Atlanta, Georgia, and the library of the Toxicology Laboratory of the Center for Workers' Health and Human Ecology at the National School of Public Health [Centro de Estudos da Saúde de Trabalhador e Ecologia Humana, Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública], Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The toxic effects of lead and lead compounds have been extensively studied for over a century. In recent years, epidemiologic studies have focused primarily on the neurotoxic effects of lead on children, particularly in terms of impaired intellectual ability and behavioral problems. However, there is still insufficient information on the mechanisms of action that account for such toxicity. More in-depth studies are also needed on the effects of lead exposure on bone, the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, the liver, the male and female reproductive systems, and the endocrine system. The potential teratogenicity and carcinogenicity of lead, as well as its effect on pregnancy outcomes and neonatal growth and development, also require further study.

  2. Efficient Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells Based on Formamidinium Lead Bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusch, Fabian C; Wiesenmayer, Erwin; Mankel, Eric; Binek, Andreas; Angloher, Philipp; Fraunhofer, Christina; Giesbrecht, Nadja; Feckl, Johann M; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Johrendt, Dirk; Bein, Thomas; Docampo, Pablo

    2014-08-21

    The development of medium-bandgap solar cell absorber materials is of interest for the design of devices such as tandem solar cells and building-integrated photovoltaics. The recently developed perovskite solar cells can be suitable candidates for these applications. At present, wide bandgap alkylammonium lead bromide perovskite absorbers require a high-temperature sintered mesoporous TiO2 photoanode in order to function efficiently, which makes them unsuitable for some of the above applications. Here, we present for the first time highly efficient wide bandgap planar heterojunction solar cells based on the structurally related formamidinium lead bromide. We show that this material exhibits much longer diffusion lengths of the photoexcited species than its methylammonium counterpart. This results in planar heterojunction solar cells exhibiting power conversion efficiencies approaching 7%. Hence, formamidinium lead bromide is a strong candidate as a wide bandgap absorber in perovskite solar cells.

  3. Staphylococcal SSL5 Binding to Human Leukemia Cells Inhibits Cell Adhesion to Endothelial Cells and Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemiek M. E. Walenkamp

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial proteins provide promising tools for novel anticancer therapies. Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 (SSL5 was recently described to bind P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 on leukocytes and to inhibit neutrophil rolling on a P-selectin surface. As leukocytes and tumor cells share many characteristics in migration and dissemination, we explored the potential of SSL5 as an antagonist of malignant cell behavior. Previously, it was demonstrated that rolling of human HL-60 leukemia cells on activated endothelial cells was mediated by P-selectin. In this study, we show that SSL5 targets HL-60 cells. Binding of SSL5 was rapid and without observed toxicity. Competition of SSL5 with the binding of three anti-PSGL-1 antibodies and P-selectin to HL-60 cells identified PSGL-1 as the ligand on HL-60 cells. Presence of sialyl Lewis x epitopes on PSGL-1 was crucial for its interaction with SSL5. Importantly, SSL5 not only inhibited the interaction of HL-60 cells with activated endothelial cells but also with platelets, which both play an important role in growth and metastasis of cancers. These data support the concept that SSL5 could be a lead in the search for novel strategies against hematological malignancies.

  4. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  5. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  6. Substituted 2-phenylimidazopyridines: a new class of drug leads for human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatipaka, Hari Babu; Gillespie, J Robert; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Norcross, Neil R; Hulverson, Matthew A; Ranade, Ranae M; Nagendar, Pendem; Creason, Sharon A; McQueen, Joshua; Duster, Nicole A; Nagle, Advait; Supek, Frantisek; Molteni, Valentina; Wenzler, Tanja; Brun, Reto; Glynne, Richard; Buckner, Frederick S; Gelb, Michael H

    2014-02-13

    A phenotypic screen of a compound library for antiparasitic activity on Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, led to the identification of substituted 2-(3-aminophenyl)oxazolopyridines as a starting point for hit-to-lead medicinal chemistry. A total of 110 analogues were prepared, which led to the identification of 64, a substituted 2-(3-aminophenyl)imidazopyridine. This compound showed antiparasitic activity in vitro with an EC50 of 2 nM and displayed reasonable druglike properties when tested in a number of in vitro assays. The compound was orally bioavailable and displayed good plasma and brain exposure in mice. Compound 64 cured mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei when dosed orally down to 2.5 mg/kg. Given its potent antiparasitic properties and its ease of synthesis, compound 64 represents a new lead for the development of drugs to treat human African trypanosomiasis.

  7. ELECTROPORATION OF CONFLUENT HM-1 ES CELLS LEADS TO HIGHER AMOUNT COLONIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.ALENA BENCSIK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Electroporation is used to induce homologous recombination in the genome of the murine ES (embryonic stem cells. Routinelly subconfluent ES cells are recommended to be used in such experiments. Electroporation of immunoglobulin specific targeting vectors with different length of homology leads to reduced number of selected colonies. The enrichment of double selected colonies is high and thus the amount of HM-1 ES cell colonies for the analysis is very low. Here we show that the electroporation of confluent HM-1 ES cells leads to an increased amount of simple and double selected colonies.

  8. Regulatory T Cells in Human Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jun Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple layers of suppressive components including regulatory T (TReg cells, suppressive antigen-presenting cells, and inhibitory cytokines form suppressive networks in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. It has been demonstrated that as a major suppressive element, TReg cells infiltrate tumor, interact with several types of immune cells, and mediate immune suppression through different molecular and cellular mechanisms. In this paper, we focus on human ovarian cancer and will discuss the nature of TReg cells including their subsets, trafficking, expansion, and function. We will briefly review the development of manipulation of TReg cells in preclinical and clinical settings.

  9. Generation of pancreatic islet cells from human embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG DongHui; JIANG Wei; SHI Yan; DENG HongKui

    2009-01-01

    Efficiently obtaining functional pancreaUc islet cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells not only provides great potential to solve the shortage of islets sources for type I diabetes cell therapy,but also benefits the study of the development of the human pancreas and diabetes pathology. In 2001,hES cells were reported to have the capacity to generate insulin-producing cells by spontaneous differentiation in vitro. Since then, many strategies (such as overexpression of key transcription factors,delivery of key proteins for pancreatic development, co-transplantation of differentiated hES cells along with fetal pancreas, stepwise differentiation by mimicking in vivo pancreatic development) have been employed in order to induce the differentiation of pancreatic islet cells from hES cells. Moreover, patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated by reprogramming somatic cells.iPS cells have characteristics similar to those of ES cells and offer a new cell source for type I diabetes cell therapy that reduces the risk of immunologic rejection. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in the differentiation of hES and iPS cells into functional pancreatic islet cells and discuss the challenges for their future study.

  10. Generation of pancreatic islet cells from human embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Efficiently obtaining functional pancreatic islet cells derived from human embryonic stem(hES) cells not only provides great potential to solve the shortage of islets sources for type I diabetes cell therapy,but also benefits the study of the development of the human pancreas and diabetes pathology.In 2001,hES cells were reported to have the capacity to generate insulin-producing cells by spontaneous differentiation in vitro.Since then,many strategies(such as overexpression of key transcription factors,delivery of key proteins for pancreatic development,co-transplantation of differentiated hES cells along with fetal pancreas,stepwise differentiation by mimicking in vivo pancreatic development) have been employed in order to induce the differentiation of pancreatic islet cells from hES cells.Moreover,patient-specific induced pluripotent stem(iPS) cells can be generated by reprogramming somatic cells.iPS cells have characteristics similar to those of ES cells and offer a new cell source for type I diabetes cell therapy that reduces the risk of immunologic rejection.In this review,we summarize the recent progress made in the differentiation of hES and iPS cells into functional pancreatic islet cells and discuss the challenges for their future study.

  11. Plasma membrane proteomics of human embryonic stem cells and human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormeyer, W.; van Hoof, D.; Braam, S.R.; Heck, A.J.R.; Mummery, C.L.; Krijgsveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are of immense interest in regenerative medicine as they can self-renew indefinitely and can give rise to any adult cell type. Human embryonal carcinoma cells (hECCs) are the malignant counterparts of hESCs found in testis tumors. hESCs that have acquired chromosom

  12. Human health risk assessment of lead from mining activities at semi-arid locations in the context of total lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiajia; Huynh, Trang; Gasparon, Massimo; Ng, Jack; Noller, Barry

    2013-12-01

    Lead from historical mining and mineral processing activities may pose potential human health risks if materials with high concentrations of bioavailable lead minerals are released to the environment. Since the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization withdrew the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake of lead in 2011, an alternative method was required for lead exposure assessment. This study evaluated the potential lead hazard to young children (0-7 years) from a historical mining location at a semi-arid area using the U.S. EPA Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) Model, with selected site-specific input data. This study assessed lead exposure via the inhalation pathway for children living in a location affected by lead mining activities and with specific reference to semi-arid conditions and made comparison with the ingestion pathway by using the physiologically based extraction test for gastro-intestinal simulation. Sensitivity analysis for major IEUBK input parameters was conducted. Three groups of input parameters were classified according to the results of predicted blood concentrations. The modelled lead absorption attributed to the inhalation route was lower than 2 % (mean ± SE, 0.9 % ± 0.1 %) of all lead intake routes and was demonstrated as a less significant exposure pathway to children's blood, compared with ingestion. Whilst dermal exposure was negligible, diet and ingestion of soil and dust were the dominant parameters in terms of children's blood lead prediction. The exposure assessment identified the changing role of dietary intake when house lead loadings varied. Recommendations were also made to conduct comprehensive site-specific human health risk assessment in future studies of lead exposure under a semi-arid climate.

  13. Solution and vapour deposited lead perovskite solar cells: Ecotoxicity from a life cycle assessment perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Serrano-Luján, Lucía; Urbina, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    the inventory for all the components employed for the two different device architectures that resemble respectively a traditional dye sensitised solar cell (DSSC) and an inverted polymer solar cell (OPV). We analyse the impacts from generation of 1 kWh of electricity and assume a lifetime of 1 year......We present a life cycle analysis (LCA) and an environmental impact analysis (EIA) of lead based perovskite solar cells prepared according to the two most successfully reported literature methods that comprise either vapour phase deposition or solution phase deposition. We have developed...... lead(II)halides is very limited compared to methylammoniumhalides employed. This applies during the raw materials extraction, synthesis of the starting materials and manufacture of the perovskite solar cells and from these points of view the lead based perovskite solar cells do not pose extra concerns...

  14. Derivation of Human Skin Fibroblast Lines for Feeder Cells of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Christian; Felldin, Ulrika; Rodin, Sergey; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Dilber, Sirac; Hovatta, Outi

    2016-02-03

    After the first derivations of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines on fetal mouse feeder cell layers, the idea of using human cells instead of mouse cells as feeder cells soon arose. Mouse cells bear a risk of microbial contamination, and nonhuman immunogenic proteins are absorbed from the feeders to hESCs. Human skin fibroblasts can be effectively used as feeder cells for hESCs. The same primary cell line, which can be safely used for up to 15 passages after stock preparations, can be expanded and used for large numbers of hESC derivations and cultures. These cells are relatively easy to handle and maintain. No animal facilities or animal work is needed. Here, we describe the derivation, culture, and cryopreservation procedures for research-grade human skin fibroblast lines. We also describe how to make feeder layers for hESCs using these fibroblasts.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  16. DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination during cell cycle in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Bozzella, Michael; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2009-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that can lead to potentially oncogenic genomic rearrangements or cell death. The two major pathways for repair of DSBs are nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ is an intrinsically error-prone pathway while HR results in accurate repair. To understand the origin of genomic instability in human cells it is important to know the contribution of each DSB repair pathway. Studies of rodent cells and human cancer cell lines have shown that the choice between NHEJ or HR pathways depends on cell cycle stage. Surprisingly, cell cycle regulation of DSB repair has not been examined in normal human cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints. Here we measured the efficiency of NHEJ and HR at different cell cycle stages in hTERT-immortalized diploid human fibroblasts. We utilized cells with chromosomally-integrated fluorescent reporter cassettes, in which a unique DSB is introduced by a rare-cutting endonuclease. We show that NHEJ is active throughout the cell cycle, and its activity increases as cells progress from G1 to G2/M (G1cell cycle stages. We conclude that human somatic cells utilize error-prone NHEJ as the major DSB repair pathway at all cell cycle stages, while HR is used, primarily, in the S phase. PMID:18769152

  17. How can information on oral bioavailability improve human health risk assessment for lead-contaminated soils? Implementation and scientific basis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen AG; Brandon EFA; Swartjes FA; Sips AJAM; SIR; LER

    2006-01-01

    he human body, the risk assessment of soil contaminants for humans can be improved. Insight into the uptake process is obtained by simulating the human digestion process (in vitro digestion model). In this report a concrete proposal is given for using the knowledge on the uptake of lead in the human

  18. Lead toxicity induces autophagy to protect against cell death through mTORC1 pathway in cardiofibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Sui, Li; Zhang, Rui-Hong; Zhang, Ping; Yun, Ke-Li; Zhang, Hong-Cai; Liu, Li; Hu, Ming-Xu

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals, such as lead (Pb2+), are usually accumulated in human bodies and impair human's health. Lead is a metal with many recognized adverse health side effects and yet the molecular processes underlying lead toxicity are still poorly understood. In the present study, we proposed to investigate the effects of lead toxicity in cultured cardiofibroblasts. After lead treatment, cultured cardiofibroblasts showed severe endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, the lead-treated cardiofibro...

  19. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Schnell

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenylsemicarbazone (EGA has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT. Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria.

  20. Stem cells in the human breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Polyak, Kornelia

    2010-01-01

    The origins of the epithelial cells participating in the development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer of the human breast are poorly understood. However, emerging evidence suggests a role for adult tissue-specific stem cells in these processes. In a hierarchical manner, these generate the two main...

  1. Human hair genealogies and stem cell latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavaré Simon

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cells divide to reproduce themselves and produce differentiated progeny. A fundamental problem in human biology has been the inability to measure how often stem cells divide. Although it is impossible to observe every division directly, one method for counting divisions is to count replication errors; the greater the number of divisions, the greater the numbers of errors. Stem cells with more divisions should produce progeny with more replication errors. Methods To test this approach, epigenetic errors (methylation in CpG-rich molecular clocks were measured from human hairs. Hairs exhibit growth and replacement cycles and "new" hairs physically reappear even on "old" heads. Errors may accumulate in long-lived stem cells, or in their differentiated progeny that are eventually shed. Results Average hair errors increased until two years of age, and then were constant despite decades of replacement, consistent with new hairs arising from infrequently dividing bulge stem cells. Errors were significantly more frequent in longer hairs, consistent with long-lived but eventually shed mitotic follicle cells. Conclusion Constant average hair methylation regardless of age contrasts with the age-related methylation observed in human intestine, suggesting that error accumulation and therefore stem cell latency differs among tissues. Epigenetic molecular clocks imply similar mitotic ages for hairs on young and old human heads, consistent with a restart with each new hair, and with genealogies surreptitiously written within somatic cell genomes.

  2. Matrine induction of reactive oxygen species activates p38 leading to caspase-dependent cell apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Caihong; Qian, Xiaoqiang; Jia, Rongdi; Wu, Min; Liang, Zhongqin

    2013-11-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is one of the most refractory cancers in the clinic; it is insensitive to chemotherapy and is usually excised. However, screening natural compounds from herbs is also considered a possible method for its therapy. In the present study, we investigated whether matrine, a natural compound isolated from Sophora flavescens Ait. and exerting an inhibitory effect on lung cancer cells, also indicates inhibition on NSCLC cells and elucidated its molecular mechanism. Firstly, it is confirmed that matrine induces apoptosis of human NSCLC cells with anti-apoptotic factors inhibited and dependent on caspase activity. In addition, we found that matrine increases the phosphorylation of p38 but not its total protein, and inhibition of the p38 pathway with SB202190 partially prevents matrine-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, matrine generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which is reversed by pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Additionally, inhibition of cell proliferation and increase of phosphorylation of p38 was also partially reversed by NAC. Collectively, matrine activates p38 pathway leading to a caspase-dependent apoptosis by inducing generation of ROS in NSCLC cells and may be a potential chemical for NSCLC.

  3. Human-animal chimera: a neuro driven discussion? Comparison of three leading European research countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Trujillo, Laura Yenisa; Engel-Glatter, Sabrina

    2015-06-01

    Research with human-animal chimera raises a number of ethical concerns, especially when neural stem cells are transplanted into the brains of non-human primates (NHPs). Besides animal welfare concerns and ethical issues associated with the use of embryonic stem cells, the research is also regarded as controversial from the standpoint of NHPs developing cognitive or behavioural capabilities that are regarded as "unique" to humans. However, scientists are urging to test new therapeutic approaches for neurological diseases in primate models as they better mimic human physiology than all current animal models. As a response, various countries have issued reports on the topic. Our paper summarizes the ethical issues raised by research with human-animal brain chimeras and compares the relevant regulatory instruments and different recommendations issued in national reports from three important European research nations: Germany, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. We assess and discuss the focus and priorities set by the different reports, review various reasons for and perspectives on the importance of the brain in chimera research, and identify critical points in the reports that warrant further specification and debate.

  4. Fuel cells research in Canada and in other leading countries: a bibliometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambault, E. [Science Metrix, Montreal, QC (Canada)], e-mail: eric.archambault@science-metrix.com; Cote, G.

    2008-07-01

    This document is a study on fuel cells (FC) research in Canada and other leading countries, performed by Science Metrix for the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC). Fuel cells research started growing rapidly around 1999 and paused in 2005. In 1996, 519 papers were published in the field of fuel cells. In 2007, more than 3000 documents were presented. Most of the papers that mention a fuel cell type deal with solid oxide (SO) or proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Canada occupies the most advantageous position for both SOFCs and PEMFCs and ranks first in the multicriteria ranking of scientific research on fuel cells. Among the leading companies at the world level, Ballard ranks 5th for fuel cell papers and presents an excellent scientific impact and scientific impact. Among the leading universities, Penn State is the leading one in FC research regarding the number of fuel cell papers and the scientific impact. Scientific collaboration in this field is fragmented and appears to be mostly regional around the world. 8 tabs., 17 figs.

  5. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  6. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  7. Toxic effect of lead on human spermatozoa: A study among pigment factory workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naha N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational lead exposure caused male reproductive impairment, but information on spermatozoa activity, motility, and maturation is limited. In the above perspective, spermatozoa morphology, motility, activity, and nutritional status in lead exposed workers (7-15 years exposure were assessed. Low sperm velocity, gross, and forward progressive motility with high stationary motile spermatozoa revealed lowering of sperm cell activity after exposure (P < 0.001, which was supported by higher seminal fructose and reduced sperm ATPase activity. Lowering of seminal plasma total protein with concomitant increase in free amino acid was prevalent as exposure increased (P < 0.001, suggesting disturbance in cellular nutritional status. Prolonged liquefaction time, reduced semen volume, viscosity, seminal plasma protein, fructose, and cholesterol level among workers indicated accessory sex gland dysfunction after occupational lead exposure (P < 0.001. Deterioration of sperm density and morphology was associated with high blood and semen lead of workers (P < 0.001 leading to infertility without altering FSH, LH, and testosterone level.

  8. Chronophin coordinates cell leading edge dynamics by controlling active cofilin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme-Walker, Violaine; Seo, Ji-Yeon; Gohla, Antje; Fowler, Bruce; Bohl, Ben; DerMardirossian, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Cofilin, a critical player of actin dynamics, is spatially and temporally regulated to control the direction and force of membrane extension required for cell locomotion. In carcinoma cells, although the signaling pathways regulating cofilin activity to control cell direction have been established, the molecular machinery required to generate the force of the protrusion remains unclear. We show that the cofilin phosphatase chronophin (CIN) spatiotemporally regulates cofilin activity at the cell edge to generate persistent membrane extension. We show that CIN translocates to the leading edge in a PI3-kinase–, Rac1-, and cofilin-dependent manner after EGF stimulation to activate cofilin, promotes actin free barbed end formation, accelerates actin turnover, and enhances membrane protrusion. In addition, we establish that CIN is crucial for the balance of protrusion/retraction events during cell migration. Thus, CIN coordinates the leading edge dynamics by controlling active cofilin levels to promote MTLn3 cell protrusion. PMID:26324884

  9. High Open-Circuit Voltage Solar Cells Based on Organic-Inorganic Lead Bromide Perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edri, Eran; Kirmayer, Saar; Cahen, David; Hodes, Gary

    2013-03-21

    Mesoscopic solar cells, based on solution-processed organic-inorganic perovskite absorbers, are a promising avenue for converting solar to electrical energy. We used solution-processed organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite absorbers, in conjunction with organic hole conductors, to form high voltage solar cells. There is a dire need for low-cost cells of this type, to drive electrochemical reactions or as the high photon energy cell in a system with spectral splitting. These perovskite materials, although spin-coated from solution, form highly crystalline materials. Their simple synthesis, along with high chemical versatility, allows tuning their electronic and optical properties. By judicious selection of the perovskite lead halide-based absorber, matching organic hole conductor, and contacts, a cell with a ∼ 1.3 V open circuit voltage was made. While further study is needed, this achievement provides a general guideline for additional improvement of cell performance.

  10. MC-LR Exposure Leads to Subfertility of Female Mice and Induces Oxidative Stress in Granulosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Wu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Health risk of human exposure to microcystin-leucine arginine (MC-LR has aroused more and more attention over the past few decades. In the present study, MC-LR was orally administered to female mice at 0, 1, 10 and 40 μg/L for three and six months. We found that chronic exposure to MC-LR at environmental levels could stimulate follicle atresia and lead to decreased developmental follicles, accompanied by a reduction of gonadosomatic index (GSI. In line with the irregular gonadal hormone level and estrus cycles, subfertility of female mice was also confirmed by analyzing numbers of litters and pups. The in vitro study suggested that granulosa cells could uptake MC-LR and should be the target of the toxicant. Oxidative stress in granulose cells induced by MC-LR promoted follicle atresia and eventually leads to female subfertility.

  11. Lack of autophagy in the hematopoietic system leads to loss of hematopoietic stem cell function and dysregulated myeloid proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Monika; Watson, Alexander Scarth; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2011-09-01

    The regulated lysosomal degradation pathway of autophagy prevents cellular damage and thus protects from malignant transformation. Autophagy is also required for the maturation of various hematopoietic lineages, namely the erythroid and lymphoid ones, yet its role in adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remained unexplored. While normal HSCs sustain life-long hematopoiesis, malignant transformation of HSCs or early progenitors leads to leukemia. Mechanisms protecting HSCs from cellular damage are therefore essential to prevent hematopoietic malignancies. By conditionally deleting the essential autophagy gene Atg7 in the hematopoietic system, we found that autophagy is required for the maintenance of true HSCs and therefore also of downstream hematopoietic progenitors. Loss of autophagy in HSCs leads to the expansion of a progenitor cell population in the bone marrow, giving rise to a severe, invasive myeloproliferation, which strongly resembles human acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  12. Limited CD4+ T cell proliferation leads to preservation of CD4+ T cell counts in SIV-infected sooty mangabeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ming Liang; Petravic, Janka; Ortiz, Alexandra M; Engram, Jessica; Paiardini, Mirko; Cromer, Deborah; Silvestri, Guido; Davenport, Miles P

    2010-12-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections result in chronic virus replication and progressive depletion of CD4+ T cells, leading to immunodeficiency and death. In contrast, 'natural hosts' of SIV experience persistent infection with high virus replication but no severe CD4+ T cell depletion, and remain AIDS-free. One important difference between pathogenic and non-pathogenic infections is the level of activation and proliferation of CD4+ T cells. We analysed the relationship between CD4+ T cell number and proliferation in HIV, pathogenic SIV in macaques, and non-pathogenic SIV in sooty mangabeys (SMs) and mandrills. We found that CD4+ T cell proliferation was negatively correlated with CD4+ T cell number, suggesting that animals respond to the loss of CD4+ T cells by increasing the proliferation of remaining cells. However, the level of proliferation seen in pathogenic infections (SIV in rhesus macaques and HIV) was much greater than in non-pathogenic infections (SMs and mandrills). We then used a modelling approach to understand how the host proliferative response to CD4+ T cell depletion may impact the outcome of infection. This modelling demonstrates that the rapid proliferation of CD4+ T cells in humans and macaques associated with low CD4+ T cell levels can act to 'fuel the fire' of infection by providing more proliferating cells for infection. Natural host species, on the other hand, have limited proliferation of CD4+ T cells at low CD4+ T cell levels, which allows them to restrict the number of proliferating cells susceptible to infection.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydrogenase (ALAD variants and renal cell carcinoma risk among individuals exposed to lead.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M van Bemmel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies are reporting associations between lead exposure and human cancers. A polymorphism in the 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD gene affects lead toxicokinetics and may modify the adverse effects of lead. METHODS: The objective of this study was to evaluate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs tagging the ALAD region among renal cancer cases and controls to determine whether genetic variation alters the relationship between lead and renal cancer. Occupational exposure to lead and risk of cancer was examined in a case-control study of renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Comprehensive analysis of variation across the ALAD gene was assessed using a tagging SNP approach among 987 cases and 1298 controls. Occupational lead exposure was estimated using questionnaire-based exposure assessment and expert review. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: The adjusted risk associated with the ALAD variant rs8177796(CT/TT was increased (OR = 1.35, 95%CI = 1.05-1.73, p-value = 0.02 when compared to the major allele, regardless of lead exposure. Joint effects of lead and ALAD rs2761016 suggest an increased RCC risk for the homozygous wild-type and heterozygous alleles ((GGOR = 2.68, 95%CI = 1.17-6.12, p = 0.01; (GAOR = 1.79, 95%CI = 1.06-3.04 with an interaction approaching significance (p(int = 0.06. No significant modification in RCC risk was observed for the functional variant rs1800435(K68N. Haplotype analysis identified a region associated with risk supporting tagging SNP results. CONCLUSION: A common genetic variation in ALAD may alter the risk of RCC overall, and among individuals occupationally exposed to lead. Further work in larger exposed populations is warranted to determine if ALAD modifies RCC risk associated with lead exposure.

  14. Generation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor protein-deficient blood cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xuan; Braunstein, Evan M; Ye, Zhaohui; Liu, Cyndi F; Chen, Guibin; Zou, Jizhong; Cheng, Linzhao; Brodsky, Robert A

    2013-11-01

    PIG-A is an X-linked gene required for the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors; thus, PIG-A mutant cells have a deficiency or absence of all GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs). Acquired mutations in hematopoietic stem cells result in the disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hypomorphic germline PIG-A mutations lead to severe developmental abnormalities, seizures, and early death. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can differentiate into cell types derived from all three germ layers, providing a novel developmental system for modeling human diseases. Using PIG-A gene targeting and an inducible PIG-A expression system, we have established, for the first time, a conditional PIG-A knockout model in human iPSCs that allows for the production of GPI-AP-deficient blood cells. PIG-A-null iPSCs were unable to generate hematopoietic cells or any cells expressing the CD34 marker and were defective in generating mesodermal cells expressing KDR/VEGFR2 (kinase insert domain receptor) and CD56 markers. In addition, PIG-A-null iPSCs had a block in embryonic development prior to mesoderm differentiation that appears to be due to defective signaling through bone morphogenetic protein 4. However, early inducible PIG-A transgene expression allowed for the generation of GPI-AP-deficient blood cells. This conditional PIG-A knockout model should be a valuable tool for studying the importance of GPI-APs in hematopoiesis and human development.

  15. Evidence of asymmetric cell division and centrosome inheritance in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hideki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2012-10-30

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is believed to be a physiological event that occurs during development and tissue homeostasis in a large variety of organisms. ACD produces two unequal daughter cells, one of which resembles a multipotent stem and/or progenitor cell, whereas the other has potential for differentiation. Although recent studies have shown that the balance between self-renewal and differentiation potentials is precisely controlled and that alterations in the balance may lead to tumorigenesis in Drosophila neuroblasts, it is largely unknown whether human cancer cells directly show ACD in an evolutionarily conserved manner. Here, we show that the conserved polarity/spindle protein NuMA is preferentially localized to one side of the cell cortex during cell division, generating unequal inheritance of fate-altering molecules in human neuroblastoma cell lines. We also show that the cells with a single copy of MYCN showed significantly higher percentages of ACD than those with MYCN amplification. Moreover, suppression of MYCN in MYCN-amplified cells caused ACD, whereas expression of MYCN in MYCN-nonamplified cells enhanced symmetric cell division. Furthermore, we demonstrate that centrosome inheritance follows a definite rule in ACD: The daughter centrosome with younger mother centriole is inherited to the daughter cell with NuMA preferentially localized to the cell cortex, whereas the mother centrosome with the older mother centriole migrates to the other daughter cell. Thus, the mechanisms of cell division of ACD or symmetric cell division and centrosome inheritance are recapitulated in human cancer cells, and these findings may facilitate studies on cancer stem cells.

  16. Enterococcus faecalis internalization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Diana; Chiriboga, Carlos; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Fontanilla, Marta R

    2013-04-01

    Initial Enterococcus faecalis-endothelial cell molecular interactions which lead to enterococci associating in the host endothelial tissue, colonizing it and proliferating there can be assessed using in vitro models. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) have been used to study other Gram-positive bacteria-cell interactions; however, few studies have been aimed at establishing the relationship of E. faecalis with endothelial cells. The aggregation substance (AS) family of adhesins represents an E. faecalis virulence factor which has been implicated in endocarditis severity and bacterial persistence. The Asc10 protein (a member of this family) promotes bacterium-bacterium aggregation and bacterium-host cell binding. Evaluating Asc10 role in bacterial internalization by cultured enterocytes has shown that this adhesin facilitates E. faecalis endocytosis by HT-29 cells. A few eukaryotic cell structural components, such as cytoskeletal proteins, have been involved in E. faecalis entry into cell-lines; it is thus relevant to determine whether Asc10, as well as microtubules and actin microfilaments, play a role in E. faecalis internalization by cultured endothelial cells. The role of Asc10 and cytoskeleton proteins in E. faecalis ability to enter HUVEC was assessed in the present study, as well as cell apoptosis induction by enterococcal internalization by HUVEC; the data indicated increased cell apoptosis and that cytoskeleton components were partially involved in E. faecalis entry to endothelial cells, thereby suggesting that E. faecalis Asc10 protein would not be a critical factor for bacterial entry to cultured HUVEC.

  17. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE HUMAN GASTRIC CARCINOMA CELL AND THE HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To definite the interactions between the human gastric carcinoma cell and the human vascular endothelial cell during the establishment and maintenance of the tumor vascular system and the tumor hematogenous metastasis.Methods We prepared the conditioned mediums of each cell so as to study the effect of the conditioned medium on itself or others by MTT colorimetry. The comprehensive effect of interactions between two cells was determined by stratified transfilter co-culture or direct contact co-culture.Results The conditioned medium of human gastric carcinoma cell can stimulate the proliferation of the human vascular endothelial cell, but the CM of HVEC can inhibit the growth of HGCC. Both kinds of cells can inhibit the growth of itself. The ultimate comprehensive effect of the interactions between two kinds of cells was increase of total cell numbers.Conclusion There exist the complicated interactions between the human gastric carcinoma cell and the human vascular endothelial cell during the tumor angiogenesis and the tumor hematogenous metastasis. The ultimate comprehensive effect of the interactions is increase of total cells numbers and tumor volume.

  18. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  19. Human Stem Cells and Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hari Reddi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  20. Fibronectin production by human mammary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, M.R. (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Vlodavsky, I.; Smith, H.S.; Ford, R.; Becker, F.F.; Riggs, J.

    1981-01-01

    Human mammary cells were examined for the presence of the high-molecular-weight surface glycoprotein fibronectin. Early passage mammary epithelial cell and fibroblast cultures from both carcinomas and normal tissues were tested for the presence of cell-associated fibronectin by immunofluorescence microscopy and for the synthesis and secretion of fibronectin by specific immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled protein. In vivo frozen sections of primary carcinomas and normal tissues were tested for the localization of fibronectin by immunofluorescence microscopy. In contrast to the extensive fibrillar networks of fibronectin found in the fibroblast cultures, the epithelial cell cultures from both tissue sources displayed a pattern of cell-associated fibronectin characterizd by powdery, punctate staining. However, the cultured epithelial cells, as well as the fibroblasts, secreted large quantities of fibronectin into the medium. Putative myoepithelial cells also displayed extensive fibrillar networks of fibronectin. The difference in cell-associated fibronectin distribution between the epithelial cells and the fibroblasts and putative myoepithelial cells provided a simple means of quantitating stromal and myoepithelial cell contamination of the mammary epithelial cells in culture. In vivo, normal tissues showed fibronectin primarily localized in the basement membrane surrounding the epithelial cells and in the stroma. Most primary carcinomas displayed powdery, punctate staining on the epithelial cells in addition to the fibronectin present in the surrounding stroma.

  1. Human cytomegalovirus infection leads to elevated levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse aortic xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abele-Ohl, S; Leis, M; Wollin, M; Mahmoudian, S; Hoffmann, J; Müller, R; Heim, C; Spriewald, B M; Weyand, M; Stamminger, T; Ensminger, S M

    2012-07-01

    Recent findings emphasized an important role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (hu-PBL)/Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mouse-xenograft-model to investigate both immunological as well as viral effector mechanisms in the progression of transplant arteriosclerosis. For this, sidebranches from the internal mammary artery were recovered during coronary artery bypass graft surgery, tissue-typed and infected with HCMV. Then, size-matched sidebranches were implanted into the infrarenal aorta of Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice. The animals were reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) 7 days after transplantation. HCMV-infection was confirmed by Taqman-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. Arterial grafts were analyzed by histology on day 40 after transplantation. PBMC-reconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) animals showed splenic chimerism levels ranging from 1-16% human cells. After reconstitution, Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice developed human leukocyte infiltrates in their grafts and vascular lesions that were significantly elevated after infection. Cellular infiltration revealed significantly increased ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression after HCMV-infection of the graft. Arterial grafts from unreconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) recipients showed no vascular lesions. These data demonstrate a causative relationship between HCMV-infection as an isolated risk factor and the development of transplant-arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse arterial-transplant-model possibly by elevated ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression.

  2. Acids with an equivalent taste lead to different erosion of human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Markus; Reichert, Jörg; Bossert, Jörg; Sigusch, Bernd W; Watts, David C; Jandt, Klaus D

    2011-10-01

    The consumption of acidic soft drinks may lead to demineralization and softening of human dental enamel, known as dental erosion. The aims of this in vitro study were to determine: (i) if different acids with a similar sensorial acidic taste lead to different hardness loss of enamel and (ii) if the fruit acids tartaric, malic, lactic or ascorbic acid lead to less hardness loss of enamel than citric or phosphoric acid when their concentration in solution is based on an equivalent sensorial acidic taste. Enamel samples of non-erupted human third molars were treated with acidic solutions of tartaric (TA), malic (MA), lactic (LA), ascorbic (AA), phosphoric (PA) and citric (CA) acids with a concentration that gave an equivalent sensorial acidic taste. The acidic solutions were characterized by pH value and titratable acidity. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoindentation was used to study the nano mechanical properties and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the morphology of the treated enamel samples and the untreated control areas, respectively. The investigated acids fell into two groups. The nano hardnesses of MA, TA and CA treated enamel samples (group I) were statistically significantly greater (penamel samples (group II). Within each group the nano hardness was not statistically significantly different (p>0.05). The SEM micrographs showed different etch prism morphologies depending on the acid used. In vitro, the acids investigated led to different erosion effects on human dental enamel, despite their equivalent sensorial acidic taste. This has not been reported previously. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Laser printing of skin cells and human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lothar; Kuhn, Stefanie; Sorg, Heiko; Gruene, Martin; Schlie, Sabrina; Gaebel, Ralf; Polchow, Bianca; Reimers, Kerstin; Stoelting, Stephanie; Ma, Nan; Vogt, Peter M; Steinhoff, Gustav; Chichkov, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Laser printing based on laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a new biofabrication technique for the arrangement of biological materials or living cells in well-defined patterns. In the current study, skin cell lines (fibroblasts/keratinocytes) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were chosen for laser printing experiments due to their high potential in regeneration of human skin and new application possibilities of stem cell therapy. To evaluate the influence of LIFT on the cells, their survival rate, their proliferation and apoptotic activity, and the DNA damages and modifications of their cell surface markers were assessed and statistically evaluated over several days. The cells survived the transfer procedure with a rate of 98%  +/- 1% standard error of the mean (skin cells) and 90%  +/- 10% (hMSC), respectively. All used cell types maintain their ability to proliferate after LIFT. Further, skin cells and hMSC did not show an increase of apoptosis or DNA fragmentation. In addition, the hMSC keep their phenotype as proven by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. This study demonstrates LIFT as a suitable technique for unharmed computer-controlled positioning of different cell types and a promising tool for future applications in the ex vivo generation of tissue replacements.

  4. Overexpression of Ref-1 Inhibits Lead-induced Endothelial Cell Death via the Upregulation of Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwon Ho; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyo Shin; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Soo; Chang, Seok Jong; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2009-12-01

    The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ref-1) on the lead (Pb)-induced cellular response was investigated in the cultured endothelial cells. Pb caused progressive cellular death in endothelial cells, which occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, Ref-1 overexpression with AdRef-1 significantly inhibited Pb-induced cell death in the endothelial cells. Also the overexpression of Ref-1 significantly suppressed Pb-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide elevation in the endothelial cells. Pb exposure induced the downregulation of catalase, it was inhibited by the Ref-1 overexpression in the endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggests that the overexpression of Ref-1 inhibited Pb-induced cell death via the upregulation of catalase in the cultured endothelial cells.

  5. Human spleen and red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peng, Zhangli; Karniadakis, George; Buffet, Pierre; Dao, Ming

    2016-11-01

    Spleen plays multiple roles in the human body. Among them is removal of old and altered red blood cells (RBCs), which is done by filtering cells through the endothelial slits, small micron-sized openings. There is currently no experimental technique available that allows us to observe RBC passage through the slits. It was previously noticed that people without a spleen have less deformable red blood cells, indicating that the spleen may play a role in defining the size and shape of red blood cells. We used detailed RBC model implemented within the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation framework to study the filter function of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that spleen indeed plays major role in defining the size and shape of the healthy human red blood cells.

  6. Sertoli-cell-specific knockout of connexin 43 leads to multiple alterations in testicular gene expression in prepubertal mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Giese

    2012-11-01

    A significant decline in human male reproductive function has been reported for the past 20 years but the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. However, recent studies showed that the gap junction protein connexin-43 (CX43; also known as GJA1 might be involved. CX43 is the predominant testicular connexin (CX in most species, including in humans. Alterations of its expression are associated with different forms of spermatogenic disorders and infertility. Men with impaired spermatogenesis often exhibit a reduction or loss of CX43 expression in germ cells (GCs and Sertoli cells (SCs. Adult male transgenic mice with a conditional knockout (KO of the Gja1 gene [referred to here as connexin-43 (Cx43] in SCs (SCCx43KO show a comparable testicular phenotype to humans and are infertile. To detect possible signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms leading to the testicular phenotype in adult SCCx43KO mice and to their failure to initiate spermatogenesis, the testicular gene expression of 8-day-old SCCx43KO and wild-type (WT mice was compared. Microarray analysis revealed that 658 genes were significantly regulated in testes of SCCx43KO mice. Of these genes, 135 were upregulated, whereas 523 genes were downregulated. For selected genes the results of the microarray analysis were confirmed using quantitative real-time PCR and immunostaining. The majority of the downregulated genes are GC-specific and are essential for mitotic and meiotic progression of spermatogenesis, including Stra8, Dazl and members of the DM (dsx and map-3 gene family. Other altered genes can be associated with transcription, metabolism, cell migration and cytoskeleton organization. Our data show that deletion of Cx43 in SCs leads to multiple alterations of gene expression in prepubertal mice and primarily affects GCs. The candidate genes could represent helpful markers for investigators exploring human testicular biopsies from patients showing corresponding spermatogenic deficiencies and for

  7. Rotating cell culture systems for human cell culture: human trophoblast cells as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Warner, Jessica A; Machado, Heather L; Morris, Cindy A; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-18

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies. The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS

  8. Preimplantation Exposure to Bisphenol A and Triclosan May Lead to Implantation Failure in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs are chemicals that have the capacity to interfere with normal endocrine systems. Two EDCs, bisphenol A (BPA and triclosan (TCS, are mass-produced and widespread. They both have estrogenic properties and similar chemical structures and pharmacokinetic features and have been detected in human fluids and tissues. Clinical evidence has suggested a positive association between BPA exposure and implantation failure in IVF patients. Studies in mouse models have suggested that preimplantation exposure to BPA and TCS can lead to implantation failure. This paper reviews the relationship between preimplantation exposure to BPA and TCS and implantation failure and discusses the remaining problems and possible solutions.

  9. Existence of Hierarchies and Human's Pursuit of Top Hierarchy Lead to Power Law

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Shuiyuan; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    The power law is ubiquitous in natural and social phenomena, and is considered as a universal relationship between the frequency and its rank for diverse social systems. However, a general model is still lacking to interpret why these seemingly unrelated systems share great similarity. Through a detailed analysis of natural language texts and simulation experiments based on the proposed 'Hierarchical Selection Model', we found that the existence of hierarchies and human's pursuit of top hierarchy lead to the power law. Further, the power law is a statistical and emergent performance of hierarchies, and it is the universality of hierarchies that contributes to the ubiquity of the power law.

  10. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Tra

    Full Text Available Autophagy (macroautophagy is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC.

  11. Inhibition of FGF signaling accelerates neural crest cell differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroonwitchawan, Thiranut; Muangchan, Pattamon; Noisa, Parinya

    2016-12-02

    Neural crest (NC) is a transient population, arising during embryonic development and capable of differentiating into various somatic cells. The defects of neural crest development leads to neurocristopathy. Several signaling pathways were revealed their significance in NC cell specification. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) is recognized as an important signaling during NC development, for instance Xenopus and avian; however, its contributions in human species are remained elusive. Here we used human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to investigate the consequences of FGF inhibition during NC cell differentiation. The specific-FGF receptor inhibitor, SU5402, was used in this investigation. The inhibition of FGF did not found to affect the proliferation or death of hPSC-derived NC cells, but promoted hPSCs to commit NC cell fate. NC-specific genes, including PAX3, SLUG, and TWIST1, were highly upregulated, while hPSC genes, such as OCT4, and E-CAD, rapidly reduced upon FGF signaling blockage. Noteworthy, TFAP-2α, a marker of migratory NC cells, abundantly presented in SU5402-induced cells. This accelerated NC cell differentiation could be due to the activation of Notch signaling upon the blockage of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, since NICD was increased by SU5402. Altogether, this study proposed the contributions of FGF signaling in controlling human NC cell differentiation from hPSCs, the crosstalk between FGF and Notch, and might imply to the influences of FGF signaling in neurocristophatic diseases.

  12. Lipopolysaccharide induces IFN-γ production in human NK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid M Kanevskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells have been shown to play a regulatory role in sepsis. According to the current view, NK cells become activated via macrophages or dendritic cells primed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Recently TLR4 gene expression was detected in human NK cells suggesting the possibility of a direct action of LPS on NK cells. In this study, effects of LPS on NK cell cytokine production and cytotoxicity were studied using highly purified human NK cells. LPS induced IFN-γ production in the presence of IL-2 in cell populations containing >98% CD56+ cells. Surprisingly, in the same experiments LPS decreased NK cell degranulation. No significant expression of markers related to blood dendritic cells, monocytes or T or B lymphocytes in the NK cell preparations was observed; the portions of HLA-DRbright, CD14+, CD3+ and CD20+ cells amounted to less than 0.1% within the cell populations. No more than 0.2% of NK cells were shown to be slightly positive for surface TLR4 in our experimental system, although intracellular staining revealed moderate amounts of TLR4 inside the NK cell population. These cells were negative for surface CD14, the receptor participating in LPS recognition by TLR4. Incubation of NK cells with IL-2 or/and LPS did not lead to an increase in TLR4 surface expression. TLR4–CD56+ NK cells isolated by cell sorting secreted IFN-γ in response to LPS. Antibody to TLR4 did not block the LPS-induced increase in IFN-γ production. We have also shown that Re-form of LPS lacking outer core oligosaccharide and O-antigen induces less cytokine production in NK cells than full length LPS. We speculate that the polysaccharide fragments of LPS molecule may take part in LPS-induced IFN-γ production by NK cells. Collectively our data suggest the existence of a mechanism of LPS direct action on NK cells distinct from established TLR4-mediated signaling.

  13. Human embryonic stem cells for neuronal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2006-02-01

    Human embryonic stem cells may serve as a potentially endeless source of transplantable cells to treat various neurologic disorders. Accumulating data have shown the therapeutic value of various neural precursor cell types in experimental models of neurologic diseases. Tailoring cell therapy for specific disorders requires the generation of cells that are committed to specific neural lineages. To this end, protocols were recently developed for the derivation of dopaminergic neurons, spinal motor neurons and oligodendrocytes from hESC. These protocols recapitulate normal development in culture conditions. However, a novel concept emerging from these studies is that the beneficial effect of transplanted stem cells is not only via cell replacement in damaged host tissue, but also by trophic and protective effects, as well as by an immunomodulatory effect that down-regulates detrimental brain inflammation.

  14. Intraocular caspofungin: in vitro safety profile for human ocular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernt, M; Kampik, A

    2011-07-01

    Endogenous Candida endophthalmitis is sight-threatening, difficult to treat and sometimes leads to loss of the eye. Only a few therapeutic agents are available for its treatment. Caspofungin is the first of a new class of antifungal drugs (echinocandins) with a high activity against Candida species, the most common pathogens found in endogenous endophthalmitis. This study investigates the safety profile of caspofungin for intraocular application in a cell-culture model. Endothelial toxicity of caspofungin was evaluated in cultured human corneas. Possible toxic effects of caspofungin (5-300 μg ml(-1)) in corneal endothelial cells (CEC), primary human trabecular meshwork cells (TMC) and primary human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells were evaluated after 24 h and under conditions of inflammatory stress by treatment with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or interleukin-6 (IL-6) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Toxicity was evaluated by tetrazolium dye-reduction assay; cell viability was quantified by a microscopic live-dead assay. No corneal endothelial toxicity could be detected after 30 days of treatment with 75 μg ml(-1) of caspofungin. Concentrations up to 75 μg ml(-1) had no influence on CEC, TMC or RPE cell proliferation, or on cell viability when administered for 24 h. Exposure to H(2)O(2) did not increase cellular toxicity of caspofungin at concentrations of 5-50 μg ml(-1). After preincubation with TNF-α, LPS or IL-6 for 24 h followed by treatment with caspofungin for 24 h, no significant decrease in cell proliferation or viability was observed. This study showed no significant toxicity for caspofungin on CEC, TMC or RPE cells, or human corneal endothelium when administered in therapeutic concentrations up to 50 μg ml(-1).

  15. Mutagenesis of AS52 cells by low concentrations of lead(II) and mercury(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, M E; Williams, M V

    1996-01-01

    Little is known at the molecular level concerning the genotoxic effects following the acute exposure of eukaryotic cells to low concentrations of lead (II) or mercury (II). There have been conflicting reports concerning the mutagenic potential of these heavy metals, and there have not been any studies performed to determine the molecular mechanism(s) by which these metals are mutagenic. The Chinese hamster ovary cell line, AS52, contains a stably integrated single functional copy of the Escherichia coli xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (gpt) gene. Mutations in the gpt gene confer resistance to 6-thioguanine (TG). There was little effect on viability, as measured by relative cloning efficiency, of AS52 cells exposed to lead (II) or mercury (II) up to concentrations of 0.5 microM and 0.3 microM, respectively. However, higher concentrations of the metals caused a significant increase in cell death. There was also a dose-dependent increase in the isolation of mutants resistant to TG in treated cells when compared to non-treated controls. Concentrations of the metals as low as 0.1 microM caused a significant increase in the number of mutants resistant to TG when compared to the number of spontaneous mutants obtained in nontreated controls. While the molecular mechanism(s) by which lead and mercury (II) are genotoxic is unknown, the results of this study demonstrate that low concentrations of lead (II) and mercury (II) are mutagenic in eukaryotic cells.

  16. Novel agents inhibit human leukemic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ping YU; Juan LI

    2012-01-01

    Ouabain (OUA) and pyrithione zinc (PZ) have been proved as the potential drugs for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML).Selected from a screening among 1040 Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacological agents,both drugs showability to induce apoptosis of the culturing AML cells,exhibiting the poisoning effect on the cells.Studies also reveal the efficiency of the drugs in inhibiting the growth of human AML cells injected into the mice lacking of immunity and killing primary AML cells from the peripheral blood of AML patients[1].

  17. How Important Is the Organic Part of Lead Halide Perovskite Photovoltaic Cells? Efficient CsPbBr3 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbak, Michael; Cahen, David; Hodes, Gary

    2015-07-02

    Hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite photovoltaic cells have already surpassed 20% conversion efficiency in the few years that they have been seriously studied. However, many fundamental questions still remain unanswered as to why they are so good. One of these is "Is the organic cation really necessary to obtain high quality cells?" In this study, we show that an all-inorganic version of the lead bromide perovskite material works equally well as the organic one, in particular generating the high open circuit voltages that are an important feature of these cells.

  18. Membrane tension controls adhesion positioning at the leading edge of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Bruno; Monzo, Pascale; Gole, Laurent; Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Kosmalska, Anita Joanna; Tam, Zhi Yang; Luo, Weiwei; Kan, Sophie; Viasnoff, Virgile; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa; Gauthier, Nils C

    2017-09-04

    Cell migration is dependent on adhesion dynamics and actin cytoskeleton remodeling at the leading edge. These events may be physically constrained by the plasma membrane. Here, we show that the mechanical signal produced by an increase in plasma membrane tension triggers the positioning of new rows of adhesions at the leading edge. During protrusion, as membrane tension increases, velocity slows, and the lamellipodium buckles upward in a myosin II-independent manner. The buckling occurs between the front of the lamellipodium, where nascent adhesions are positioned in rows, and the base of the lamellipodium, where a vinculin-dependent clutch couples actin to previously positioned adhesions. As membrane tension decreases, protrusion resumes and buckling disappears, until the next cycle. We propose that the mechanical signal of membrane tension exerts upstream control in mechanotransduction by periodically compressing and relaxing the lamellipodium, leading to the positioning of adhesions at the leading edge of cells. © 2017 Pontes et al.

  19. 3 CFR - Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of July 30, 2009 Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research..., scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent...

  20. Near-critical fluctuations and cytoskeleton-assisted phase separation lead to subdiffusion in cell membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrig, Jens; Schwille, Petra

    2010-01-01

    We address the relationship between membrane microheterogeneity and anomalous subdiffusion in cell membranes by carrying out Monte Carlo simulations of two-component lipid membranes. We find that near-critical fluctuations in the membrane lead to transient subdiffusion, while membrane-cytoskeleton interaction strongly affects phase separation, enhances subdiffusion, and eventually leads to hop diffusion of lipids. Thus, we present a minimum realistic model for membrane rafts showing the features of both microscopic phase separation and subdiffusion.

  1. Myristoylation profiling in human cells and zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Broncel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human cells (HEK 293, HeLa, MCF-7 and zebrafish embryos were metabolically tagged with an alkynyl myristic acid probe, lysed with an SDS buffer and tagged proteomes ligated to multifunctional capture reagents via copper-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition (CuAAC. This allowed for affinity enrichment and high-confidence identification, by delivering direct MS/MS evidence for the modification site, of 87 and 61 co-translationally myristoylated proteins in human cells and zebrafish, respectively. The data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaíno et al., 2014 Nat. Biotechnol., 32, 223–6 (PXD001863 and PXD001876 and are described in detail in Multifunctional reagents for quantitative proteome-wide analysis of protein modification in human cells and dynamic protein lipidation during vertebrate development׳ by Broncel et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.

  2. Cholecystokinin expression in the β-cell leads to increased β-cell area in aged mice and protects from streptozotocin-induced diabetes and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Jeremy A; Kibbe, Carly R; Baan, Mieke; Sirinvaravong, Sirinart; Umhoefer, Heidi M; Engler, Kimberly A; Meske, Louise M; Sacotte, Kaitlyn A; Erhardt, Daniel P; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-11-15

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a peptide hormone produced in the gut and brain with beneficial effects on digestion, satiety, and insulin secretion. CCK is also expressed in pancreatic β-cells, but only in models of obesity and insulin resistance. Whole body deletion of CCK in obese mice leads to reduced β-cell mass expansion and increased apoptosis. We hypothesized that islet-derived CCK is important in protection from β-cell apoptosis. To determine the specific role of β-cell-derived CCK in β-cell mass dynamics, we generated a transgenic mouse that expresses CCK in the β-cell in the lean state (MIP-CCK). Although this transgene contains the human growth hormone minigene, we saw no expression of human growth hormone protein in transgenic islets. We examined the ability of MIP-CCK mice to maintain β-cell mass when subjected to apoptotic stress, with advanced age, and after streptozotocin treatment. Aged MIP-CCK mice have increased β-cell area. MIP-CCK mice are resistant to streptozotocin-induced diabetes and exhibit reduced β-cell apoptosis. Directed CCK overexpression in cultured β-cells also protects from cytokine-induced apoptosis. We have identified an important new paracrine/autocrine effect of CCK in protection of β-cells from apoptotic stress. Understanding the role of β-cell CCK adds to the emerging knowledge of classic gut peptides in intraislet signaling. CCK receptor agonists are being investigated as therapeutics for obesity and diabetes. While these agonists clearly have beneficial effects on body weight and insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues, they may also directly protect β-cells from apoptosis.

  3. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  4. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes.

  5. Human Embryonic Stem Cells Form Functional Thyroid Follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The molecular events that lead to human thyroid cell speciation remain incompletely characterized. It has been shown that overexpression of the regulatory transcription factors Pax8 and Nkx2-1 (ttf-1) directs murine embryonic stem (mES) cells to differentiate into thyroid follicular cells by initiating a transcriptional regulatory network. Such cells subsequently organized into three-dimensional follicular structures in the presence of extracellular matrix. In the current study, human embryonic stem (hES) cells were studied with the aim of recapitulating this scenario and producing functional human thyroid cell lines. Methods: Reporter gene tagged pEZ-lentiviral vectors were used to express human PAX8-eGFP and NKX2-1-mCherry in the H9 hES cell line followed by differentiation into thyroid cells directed by Activin A and thyrotropin (TSH). Results: Both transcription factors were expressed efficiently in hES cells expressing either PAX8, NKX2-1, or in combination in the hES cells, which had low endogenous expression of these transcription factors. Further differentiation of the double transfected cells showed the expression of thyroid-specific genes, including thyroglobulin (TG), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS), and the TSH receptor (TSHR) as assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. Most notably, the Activin/TSH-induced differentiation approach resulted in thyroid follicle formation and abundant TG protein expression within the follicular lumens. On stimulation with TSH, these hES-derived follicles were also capable of dose-dependent cAMP generation and radioiodine uptake, indicating functional thyroid epithelial cells. Conclusion: The induced expression of PAX8 and NKX2-1 in hES cells was followed by differentiation into thyroid epithelial cells and their commitment to form functional three-dimensional neo-follicular structures. The data provide proof of principal that hES cells can be

  6. Biobanking human embryonic stem cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Søren

    2016-01-01

    are curiously absent from the particular stem cell banking policy discourse. This to some extent artificially isolates this discourse from the broader discussions about the flows of reproductive materials and tissues in modern society, and such isolation may lead to the interests of important actors being...

  7. Bacillus subtilis Swarmer Cells Lead the Swarm, Multiply, and Generate a Trail of Quiescent Descendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouche, Lina; Laalami, Soumaya; Daerr, Adrian; Song, Solène; Holland, I Barry; Séror, Simone J; Hamze, Kassem; Putzer, Harald

    2017-02-07

    Bacteria adopt social behavior to expand into new territory, led by specialized swarmers, before forming a biofilm. Such mass migration of Bacillus subtilis on a synthetic medium produces hyperbranching dendrites that transiently (equivalent to 4 to 5 generations of growth) maintain a cellular monolayer over long distances, greatly facilitating single-cell gene expression analysis. Paradoxically, while cells in the dendrites (nonswarmers) might be expected to grow exponentially, the rate of swarm expansion is constant, suggesting that some cells are not multiplying. Little attention has been paid to which cells in a swarm are actually multiplying and contributing to the overall biomass. Here, we show in situ that DNA replication, protein translation and peptidoglycan synthesis are primarily restricted to the swarmer cells at dendrite tips. Thus, these specialized cells not only lead the population forward but are apparently the source of all cells in the stems of early dendrites. We developed a simple mathematical model that supports this conclusion.

  8. Bacillus subtilis Swarmer Cells Lead the Swarm, Multiply, and Generate a Trail of Quiescent Descendants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Hamouche

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria adopt social behavior to expand into new territory, led by specialized swarmers, before forming a biofilm. Such mass migration of Bacillus subtilis on a synthetic medium produces hyperbranching dendrites that transiently (equivalent to 4 to 5 generations of growth maintain a cellular monolayer over long distances, greatly facilitating single-cell gene expression analysis. Paradoxically, while cells in the dendrites (nonswarmers might be expected to grow exponentially, the rate of swarm expansion is constant, suggesting that some cells are not multiplying. Little attention has been paid to which cells in a swarm are actually multiplying and contributing to the overall biomass. Here, we show in situ that DNA replication, protein translation and peptidoglycan synthesis are primarily restricted to the swarmer cells at dendrite tips. Thus, these specialized cells not only lead the population forward but are apparently the source of all cells in the stems of early dendrites. We developed a simple mathematical model that supports this conclusion.

  9. Bacillus subtilis Swarmer Cells Lead the Swarm, Multiply, and Generate a Trail of Quiescent Descendants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouche, Lina; Laalami, Soumaya; Daerr, Adrian; Song, Solène; Holland, I. Barry; Séror, Simone J.; Hamze, Kassem

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria adopt social behavior to expand into new territory, led by specialized swarmers, before forming a biofilm. Such mass migration of Bacillus subtilis on a synthetic medium produces hyperbranching dendrites that transiently (equivalent to 4 to 5 generations of growth) maintain a cellular monolayer over long distances, greatly facilitating single-cell gene expression analysis. Paradoxically, while cells in the dendrites (nonswarmers) might be expected to grow exponentially, the rate of swarm expansion is constant, suggesting that some cells are not multiplying. Little attention has been paid to which cells in a swarm are actually multiplying and contributing to the overall biomass. Here, we show in situ that DNA replication, protein translation and peptidoglycan synthesis are primarily restricted to the swarmer cells at dendrite tips. Thus, these specialized cells not only lead the population forward but are apparently the source of all cells in the stems of early dendrites. We developed a simple mathematical model that supports this conclusion. PMID:28174308

  10. Efficient derivation and genetic modifications of human pluripotent stem cells on engineered human feeder cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chunlin; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Dowey, Sarah N; Tsang, Kitman; Huang, Xiaosong; Liu, Cyndi F; Smith, Cory; Yen, Jonathan; Mali, Prashant; Zhang, Yu Alex; Cheng, Linzhao; Ye, Zhaohui

    2012-08-10

    Derivation of pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) induced from somatic cell types and the subsequent genetic modifications of disease-specific or patient-specific iPSCs are crucial steps in their applications for disease modeling as well as future cell and gene therapies. Conventional procedures of these processes require co-culture with primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to support self-renewal and clonal growth of human iPSCs as well as embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, the variability of MEF quality affects the efficiencies of all these steps. Furthermore, animal sourced feeders may hinder the clinical applications of human stem cells. In order to overcome these hurdles, we established immortalized human feeder cell lines by stably expressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase, Wnt3a, and drug resistance genes in adult mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we show that these immortalized human feeders support efficient derivation of virus-free, integration-free human iPSCs and long-term expansion of human iPSCs and ESCs. Moreover, the drug-resistance feature of these feeders also supports nonviral gene transfer and expression at a high efficiency, mediated by piggyBac DNA transposition. Importantly, these human feeders exhibit superior ability over MEFs in supporting homologous recombination-mediated gene targeting in human iPSCs, allowing us to efficiently target a transgene into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in recently derived integration-free iPSCs. Our results have great implications in disease modeling and translational applications of human iPSCs, as these engineered human cell lines provide a more efficient tool for genetic modifications and a safer alternative for supporting self-renewal of human iPSCs and ESCs.

  11. Stromal-cell and cancer-cell exosomes leading the metastatic exodus for the promised niche

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are thought to play an important role in metastasis. Luga and colleagues have described the production of exosomes by stromal cells such as cancer-associated fibroblasts that are taken up by breast cancer cells and are then loaded with Wnt 11, which is associated with stimulation of the invasiveness and metastasis of the breast cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that exosomes produced by breast cancer cells are taken up by stromal fibroblasts and other stromal cells, suggestin...

  12. Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Cascade of Events Leading to Cell Death, Apoptosis or Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorga, Andrea; Dara, Lily; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) can broadly be divided into predictable and dose dependent such as acetaminophen (APAP) and unpredictable or idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI). Liver injury from drug hepatotoxicity (whether idiosyncratic or predictable) results in hepatocyte cell death and inflammation. The cascade of events leading to DILI and the cell death subroutine (apoptosis or necrosis) of the cell depend largely on the culprit drug. Direct toxins to hepatocytes likely induce oxidative organelle stress (such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial stress) leading to necrosis or apoptosis, while cell death in idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI) is usually the result of engagement of the innate and adaptive immune system (likely apoptotic), involving death receptors (DR). Here, we review the hepatocyte cell death pathways both in direct hepatotoxicity such as in APAP DILI as well as in IDILI. We examine the known signaling pathways in APAP toxicity, a model of necrotic liver cell death. We also explore what is known about the genetic basis of IDILI and the molecular pathways leading to immune activation and how these events can trigger hepatotoxicity and cell death. PMID:28486401

  13. Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Cascade of Events Leading to Cell Death, Apoptosis or Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorga, Andrea; Dara, Lily; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2017-05-09

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) can broadly be divided into predictable and dose dependent such as acetaminophen (APAP) and unpredictable or idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI). Liver injury from drug hepatotoxicity (whether idiosyncratic or predictable) results in hepatocyte cell death and inflammation. The cascade of events leading to DILI and the cell death subroutine (apoptosis or necrosis) of the cell depend largely on the culprit drug. Direct toxins to hepatocytes likely induce oxidative organelle stress (such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial stress) leading to necrosis or apoptosis, while cell death in idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI) is usually the result of engagement of the innate and adaptive immune system (likely apoptotic), involving death receptors (DR). Here, we review the hepatocyte cell death pathways both in direct hepatotoxicity such as in APAP DILI as well as in IDILI. We examine the known signaling pathways in APAP toxicity, a model of necrotic liver cell death. We also explore what is known about the genetic basis of IDILI and the molecular pathways leading to immune activation and how these events can trigger hepatotoxicity and cell death.

  14. [Human pluripotent stem cell and neural differentiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataya, Takafumi; Muguruma, Keiko; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2008-10-01

    Recovery of lost brain function is an important issue in medical studies because neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) have poor potential for regeneration. Since few CNS diseases can be treated completely by medicines, regenerative therapy by using stem cells should be studied as a new type of therapeutic intervention. The efficacy of cell replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease has been well investigated. Several studies on fetal tissue transplantation have revealed that quantity and purity of transplanted cells are necessary for recovery of symptoms. SFEB (Serum-free floating culture of embryoid body-like aggregates) method is capable of inducing multi-potential CNS progenitors that can be steered to differentiate into region-specific tissues. On the basis of the existing knowledge of embryology, we have succeeded in the generating of various types of neurons such as telencephalic, cerebeller (Purkinje and granule cells), retinal (photoreceptor cells) and hypothalamic neurons. Application of this culture method to human ES (hES) cells is necessary for clinical purpose: however, poor survival of hES cells in SFEB culture might limit the possibility of using these cells for future medical applications. We found that a selective Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y-27632, markedly diminished the dissociation-induced apoptosis of hES cells and enabled the cells to form aggregates in SFEB culture. For both mouse and human ES cells, SFEB culture is a favorable method that can generate large amounts of region-specific neurons. However, stem cell-based therapy continues to face several obstacles. It is important that researchers in the basic sciences and clinical medicine should discuss these problems together to overcome both scientific and ethical issues related to stem cells.

  15. Research Update: Physical and electrical characteristics of lead halide perovskites for solar cell applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A. Bretschneider

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The field of thin-film photovoltaics has been recently enriched by the introduction of lead halide perovskites as absorber materials, which allow low-cost synthesis of solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 16%. The exact impact of the perovskite crystal structure and composition on the optoelectronic properties of the material are not fully understood. Our progress report highlights the knowledge gained about lead halide perovskites with a focus on physical and optoelectronic properties. We discuss the crystal and band structure of perovskite materials currently implemented in solar cells and the impact of the crystal properties on ferroelectricity, ambipolarity, and the properties of excitons.

  16. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  17. Characterization of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Paul J; Andrews, Peter W

    2013-12-18

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), whether embryonic stem cells or induced PSCs, offer enormous opportunities for regenerative medicine and other biomedical applications once we have developed the ability to harness their capacity for extensive differentiation. Central to this is our ability to identify and characterize such PSCs, but this is fraught with potential difficulties that arise from a tension between functional definitions of pluripotency and the more convenient use of 'markers', a problem exacerbated by ethical issues, our lack of knowledge of early human embryonic development, and differences from the mouse paradigm.

  18. Regional and long-term patterns of lead concentrations in fluvial, marine and terrestrial systems and humans in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagner, C. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    2000-07-01

    Lead contamination of abiotic and biotic systems has been studied closely since the early 1970s, when lead was firstly perceived as an environmental problem. Lead emission reduction policies were implemented throughout Europe during that time. Nonetheless, analyses of lead loads in aquatic systems, such as the river Elbe, showed no decline over time in either suspended matter or surface sediments. Regional differences in lead concentrations of fluvial systems were found, due to tidal influence, runoff and local emissions. Lead contamination of sediments from the North Sea was highest in estuaries. Concentrations in sediment cores were quite stable down to the depth of background values, due to bioturbation, flow, waves and meandering channels. Terrestrial soils in Europe were highly polluted in industrial and ore mining areas and large cities. No decline in lead concentrations was evident in foraminifers, bladder wrack or fish. It was found that contamination in sediments, mammals and fish was higher in coastal zones than in the open sea. In contrast to in aquatic organisms, positive impacts of lead reduction regulations were detected in terrestrial plants, which adsorbed or took up lead mainly through atmospheric lead deposition. European lead concentrations in plants decreased coincidently with lead emissions. That trend could also be identified in the blood lead levels of the human population in Europe: since 1979 they have declined in every group of the population. Mainly influenced by age, sex and the living environment, overall, the lead loads of humans had never been high enough to cause health danger. (orig.)

  19. CLOSTRIDIUM SPORE ATTACHMENT TO HUMAN CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PANESSA-WARREN,B.; TORTORA,G.; WARREN,J.

    1997-08-10

    This paper uses high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with a LaB6 gun and the newest commercial field emission guns, to obtain high magnification images of intact clostridial spores throughout the activation/germination/outgrowth process. By high resolution SEM, the clostridial exosporial membrane can be seen to produce numerous delicate projections (following activation), that extend from the exosporial surface to a nutritive substrate (agar), or cell surface when anaerobically incubated in the presence of human cells (embryonic fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells). Magnifications of 20,000 to 200,000Xs at accelerating voltages low enough to minimize or eliminate specimen damage (1--5 kV) have permitted the entire surface of C.sporogenes and C.difficile endospores to be examined during all stages of germination. The relationships between the spore and the agar or human cell surface were also clearly visible.

  20. Human pluripotent stem cells in contemporary medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Rodin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are capable of indefinite proliferation and can be differentiated into any cell type of the human body. Therefore, they are a promising source of cells for treatment of numerous degenerative diseases and injuries. Pluripotent stem cells are also associated with a number of ethical, safety and technological issues. In this review, we describe various types of hPSCs, safety issues that concern all or some types of hPSCs and methods of clinical-grade hPSC line development. Also, we discuss current and past clinical trials involving hPSCs, their outcomes and future perspectives of hPSC-based therapy. 

  1. Streptococci-human papilloma virus interaction with ethanol exposure leads to keratinocyte damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joel; Pavlova, Sylvia; Kolokythas, Antonia; Lugakingira, Mulokozi; Tao, Lin; Miloro, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Ethanol, human papilloma virus (HPV), and poor oral hygiene are risk factors that have been attributed to oral carcinogenesis. Streptococci sp and HPV infections are common in the head and neck, often associated with sexual activity. Although HPV is linked to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, it is unclear whether there is a similar role for Streptococci sp. This cell study examines whether Streptococci sp and HPV-16 with exposure to ethyl alcohol (ETOH) can act as cofactors in the malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes. ETOH (0.1%-20% vol/vol) was used to investigate Streptococci sp attachment with immortalized E6-expressing HPV/HOK-16B cells, human oral buccal keratinocytes, and foreskin keratinocytes. Streptococci sp (Streptococci mutans [LT11]) and various strains of acetaldehyde (AA) producer and nonproducer Streptococcus salivarius (110-1, 109-2, 101-7, and 107-1) and a lactic acid producer bacterium, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (24-1 and 25-2), were examined for interactions with keratinocytes by use of a green dye (percent of cells with colonies after 24 hours). Carcinogens, AA, malondialdehyde, DNA damage, and proliferation (5'-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) among keratinocytes were also quantified. AA and malondialdehyde production from permissible Streptococci sp significantly increased with attachment to keratinocytes, whereas L rhamnosus did not significantly attach to keratinocytes. This attachment was associated with enhanced levels of AA adduct formation, proliferation (5'-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation), and enhanced migration through integrin-coated basement membrane by HPV oral keratinocytes, which are characteristics of a malignant phenotype. These cell studies suggest that oral Streptococci sp and HPV (HPV-16) cooperate to transform oral keratinocytes after low-level ETOH (1%) exposure. These results appear to suggest a significant clinical interaction, but further validation is warranted. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and

  2. Human trophoblast in trisomy 21: a model for cell-cell fusion dynamic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malassiné, André; Pidoux, Guillaume; Gerbaud, Pascale; Frendo, Jean Louis; Evain-Brion, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    Trophoblastic cell fusion is one essential step of the human trophoblast differentiation leading to formation of the syncytiotrophoblast, site of the numerous placental functions. This process is multifactorial and finely regulated. Using the physiological model of primary culture of trophoblastic cells isolated from human placenta, we have identified different membrane proteins directly involved in trophoblastic cell fusion: connexin 43, ZO-1 and recently syncytins. These fusogenic membrane retroviral envelop glycoproteins: syncytin-1 (encoded by the HERV-W gene) and syncytin-2 (encoded by the FRD gene) and their receptors are major factors involved in human placental development. Disturbances of syncytiotrophoblast formation are observed in trisomy 21-affected placentas. Overexpression of the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), encoded by chromosome 21 as well as an abnormal hCG signaling are implicated in the defect of syncytiotrophoblast formation. This abnormal trophoblast fusion and differentiation in trisomy 21-affected placenta is reversible in vitro by different ways.

  3. Cell pattern in adult human corneal endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H Wörner

    Full Text Available A review of the current data on the cell density of normal adult human endothelial cells was carried out in order to establish some common parameters appearing in the different considered populations. From the analysis of cell growth patterns, it is inferred that the cell aging rate is similar for each of the different considered populations. Also, the morphology, the cell distribution and the tendency to hexagonallity are studied. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that this phenomenon is analogous with cell behavior in other structures such as dry foams and grains in polycrystalline materials. Therefore, its driving force may be controlled by the surface tension and the mobility of the boundaries.

  4. Merkel cell distribution in the human eyelid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. May

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although Merkel cell carcinoma of the eye lid is reported frequently in the literature, only limited information exists about the distribution of Merkel cells in this tissue. Therefore, serial sections of 18 human cadaver eye lids (donors ages ranging between 63 and 97 years were stained for cytokeratin 20 in various planes. The overall appearance of Merkel cells in these samples was low and mainly located in the outer root layer of the cilia hair follicles. Merkel cells were more frequent in the middle, and almost not detectable at the nasal and temporal edges. The localization is in accordance with that of Merkel cell carcinoma, but concerning the scarce appearance within this adulthood group, a specific physiological role of these cells in the eye lid is difficult to establish.

  5. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  6. Rho GTPase expression in human myeloid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne F G van Helden

    Full Text Available Myeloid cells are critical for innate immunity and the initiation of adaptive immunity. Strict regulation of the adhesive and migratory behavior is essential for proper functioning of these cells. Rho GTPases are important regulators of adhesion and migration; however, it is unknown which Rho GTPases are expressed in different myeloid cells. Here, we use a qPCR-based approach to investigate Rho GTPase expression in myeloid cells.We found that the mRNAs encoding Cdc42, RhoQ, Rac1, Rac2, RhoA and RhoC are the most abundant. In addition, RhoG, RhoB, RhoF and RhoV are expressed at low levels or only in specific cell types. More differentiated cells along the monocyte-lineage display lower levels of Cdc42 and RhoV, while RhoC mRNA is more abundant. In addition, the Rho GTPase expression profile changes during dendritic cell maturation with Rac1 being upregulated and Rac2 downregulated. Finally, GM-CSF stimulation, during macrophage and osteoclast differentiation, leads to high expression of Rac2, while M-CSF induces high levels of RhoA, showing that these cytokines induce a distinct pattern. Our data uncover cell type specific modulation of the Rho GTPase expression profile in hematopoietic stem cells and in more differentiated cells of the myeloid lineage.

  7. Contact-independent cell death of human microglial cells due to pathogenic Naegleria fowleri trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Daesik; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2008-12-01

    Free-living Naegleria fowleri leads to a fatal infection known as primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans. Previously, the target cell death could be induced by phagocytic activity of N. fowleri as a contact-dependent mechanism. However, in this study we investigated the target cell death under a non-contact system using a tissue-culture insert. The human microglial cells, U87MG cells, co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites for 30 min in a non-contact system showed morphological changes such as the cell membrane destruction and a reduction in the number. By fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis, U87MG cells co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a non-contact system showed a significant increase of apoptotic cells (16%) in comparison with that of the control or N. fowleri lysate. When U87MG cells were co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a non-contact system for 30 min, 2 hr, and 4 hr, the cytotoxicity of amebae against target cells was 40.5, 44.2, and 45.6%, respectively. By contrast, the cytotoxicity of non-pathogenic N. gruberi trophozoites was 10.2, 12.4, and 13.2%, respectively. These results suggest that the molecules released from N. fowleri in a contact-independent manner as well as phagocytosis in a contact-dependent manner may induce the host cell death.

  8. Quercetin Inhibits Cell Migration and Invasion in Human Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Lan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor associated with high mortality; however, no effective therapies for the disease have been developed. Several studies have focused on elucidating the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma and have aimed to develop novel therapies for the disease. Quercetin is a vital dietary flavonoid that has been shown to have a variety of anticancer effects, as it induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation and is involved in cell adhesion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Herein, we aimed to investigate the effects of quercetin on osteosarcoma migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects on osteosarcoma migration and invasion. Methods: Cell viability, cell cycle activity and cell apoptosis were measured using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, and cell migration and invasion were evaluated by wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression levels of several proteins of interest were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively. Moreover, a nude mouse model of human osteosarcoma lung metastasis was established to assess the anti-metastatic effects of quercetin in vivo. Results: We noted no significant differences in cell cycle activity and apoptosis between HOS and MG63 cells and control cells. Treatment with quercetin significantly attenuated cell migration and invasion in HOS and MG63 cells compared with treatment with control medium. Moreover HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP2, and MMP9 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly downregulated in HOS cells treated with quercetin compared with HOS cells treated with controls. Additionally, treatment with quercetin attenuated metastatic lung tumor formation and growth in the nude mouse model of osteosarcoma compared with treatment with controls. Conclusion: Our findings regarding the inhibitory effects of quercetin on cell migration and

  9. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  10. Genetic Manipulation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiges, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    One of the great advantages of embryonic stem (ES) cells over other cell types is their accessibility to genetic manipulation. They can easily undergo genetic modifications while remaining pluripotent, and can be selectively propagated, allowing the clonal expansion of genetically altered cells in culture. Since the first isolation of ES cells in mice, many effective techniques have been developed for gene delivery and manipulation of ES cells. These include transfection, electroporation, and infection protocols, as well as different approaches for inserting, deleting, or changing the expression of genes. These methods proved to be extremely useful in mouse ES cells, for monitoring and directing differentiation, discovering unknown genes, and studying their function, and are now being extensively implemented in human ES cells (HESCs). This chapter describes the different approaches and methodologies that have been applied for the genetic manipulation of HESCs and their applications. Detailed protocols for generating clones of genetically modified HESCs by transfection, electroporation, and infection will be described, with special emphasis on the important technical details that are required for this purpose. All protocols are equally effective in human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

  11. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Rigorous Training of Dogs Leads to High Accuracy in Human Scent Matching-To-Sample Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Marchal

    Full Text Available Human scent identification is based on a matching-to-sample task in which trained dogs are required to compare a scent sample collected from an object found at a crime scene to that of a suspect. Based on dogs' greater olfactory ability to detect and process odours, this method has been used in forensic investigations to identify the odour of a suspect at a crime scene. The excellent reliability and reproducibility of the method largely depend on rigor in dog training. The present study describes the various steps of training that lead to high sensitivity scores, with dogs matching samples with 90% efficiency when the complexity of the scents presented during the task in the sample is similar to that presented in the in lineups, and specificity reaching a ceiling, with no false alarms in human scent matching-to-sample tasks. This high level of accuracy ensures reliable results in judicial human scent identification tests. Also, our data should convince law enforcement authorities to use these results as official forensic evidence when dogs are trained appropriately.

  13. Evaluation and Determination of Heavy Metals (Mercury, Lead and Cadmium in Human Breast Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi Atousa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury, Lead and Cadmium were determined in 100 samples of human breast milk samples from urban and rural mothers in Isfahan (IRAN. A questionnaire about area of residence, nutrition, smoking habits, and dental fillings was filled out by the lactating mothers. The combination of nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide and perchloric acid was found to be one of the most suitable acids in wet digestion of milk. Cold vapor atomic absorption was used to determine the mercury content in milk after wet digestion. The effect of concentration of nitric acid, influence of flow rate and tin(П chloride were investigated. The mean concentration of mercury in human breast milk samples was 0.96 ppb. Extraction of Pb and Cd were performed with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC to methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK and were determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The factors influencing, the complex formation, pH, time and buffer were optimized. The mean concentration of Pb and Cd in human breast milk was 0.0147 and 0.0121 ppm, respectively. The maximum concentrations were found in breast milk of rural mothers.

  14. Evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) as therapeutic leads for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Angela K; Guiguemde, W Armand; Guy, R Kiplin

    2015-08-15

    Two of the histone deacetylases, TbDAC1 and TbDAC3, have been reported to be essential genes in trypanosomes. Therefore, we tested the activity of a panel of human histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) for their ability to block proliferation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among the HDACi's, the hydroxamic acid derivatives panobinostat and belinostat exhibited potency that appeared to make them viable candidates for development due to their reported pharmacokinetic characteristics. However, cellular pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated that these drugs were unable to kill cultured parasites at exposures seen in patients at their tolerated doses and additionally failed to show any synergistic effects in combination with pentamidine, suramin, melarsoprol, or nifurtimox. Analysis of the potency of the entire HDACi panel revealed no correlations between potency against any human HDAC isoform and inhibition of T. brucei proliferation, suggesting that the trypanosome histone deacetylases possess a unique specificity. These studies confirmed that HDAC inhibitors have potential as leads against human African trypanosomiasis but that none of the current clinical candidates can be directly repurposed. Therefore, development of HDACi's with appropriate specificity and potency may be a viable route to a new class of anti-trypanosomal drugs.

  15. Glycoconjugates and Related Molecules in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiko Sasaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cells (ECs form the inner lining of blood vessels. They are critically involved in many physiological functions, including control of vasomotor tone, blood cell trafficking, hemostatic balance, permeability, proliferation, survival, and immunity. It is considered that impairment of EC functions leads to the development of vascular diseases. The carbohydrate antigens carried by glycoconjugates (e.g., glycoproteins, glycosphingolipids, and proteoglycans mainly present on the cell surface serve not only as marker molecules but also as functional molecules. Recent studies have revealed that the carbohydrate composition of the EC surface is critical for these cells to perform their physiological functions. In this paper, we consider the expression and functional roles of endogenous glycoconjugates and related molecules (galectins and glycan-degrading enzymes in human ECs.

  16. Local trauma in human patellar tendon leads to widespread changes in the tendon gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Lorentzen, Marc P; Kildevang Jensen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Low cellular activity and slow tissue turnover in human tendon may prolong resolution of tendinopathy. This may be stimulated by moderate localized traumas such as needle penetrations, but whether this results in a widespread cellular response in tendons is unknown. In an initial hypothesis...... and their matrix protein expression. The findings have implications for design of studies on human tendon, and may provide perspectives in future treatment strategies in tendinopathy.......-generating study, a trauma-induced tendon cell activity (increased total RNA and collagen I mRNA) was observed after repeated patellar tendon biopsies in young men. In a subsequent controlled study, 25 young men were treated with two 0.8 mm diameter needle penetrations (n=13, needle-group (NG)) or one 2.1 mm...

  17. Implications for wildlife and humans of dietary exposure to lead from fragments of lead rifle bullets in deer shot in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, Jeff, E-mail: jeff.knott@rspb.org.uk [Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, The Lodge, Sandy, Bedfordshire SG19 2DL (United Kingdom); Gilbert, Jo; Hoccom, David G. [Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, The Lodge, Sandy, Bedfordshire SG19 2DL (United Kingdom); Green, Rhys E. [Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, The Lodge, Sandy, Bedfordshire SG19 2DL (United Kingdom); Conservation Science Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-01

    Lead poisoning caused by ingested spent lead shotgun pellets has long been known to be a cause of unnecessary mortality in waterfowl and has led to legislation limiting its use in many countries. Recent evidence has shown that the problem extends to terrestrial ecosystems and to fragmented rifle bullets eaten by scavengers as well as shotgun pellets. Dietary exposure of human consumers to lead from spent ammunition in game meat also poses potential risks to human health. To assess the degree of fragmentation of lead bullets used to kill wild deer, twelve deer were shot in the thorax using copper-jacketed lead-cored bullets, as part of planned deer management operations. The thoracic region of the eviscerated carcasses and the abdominal viscera of each deer were X-rayed. An average of 356 metal fragments was visible on radiographs of the carcass and 180 fragments in the viscera. The weight of fragments was estimated by reference to an X-rayed scale of fragments of known weight. The average total weight of metal fragments, likely to be mostly lead, was estimated to be 1.2 g for the carcass and 0.2 g for the viscera. The total estimated weight of fragments in the entire carcass was estimated to be 17% of the weight of the bullet. Most fragments were small in size, with those in the viscera being smaller than those in the carcass. Metal fragments in the viscera were sufficiently small that at least 80% of the metallic bullet-derived lead in the viscera would be expected to be ingested by scavenging birds, such as buzzards and eagles, which feed on them.

  18. Implications for wildlife and humans of dietary exposure to lead from fragments of lead rifle bullets in deer shot in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Jeff; Gilbert, Jo; Hoccom, David G; Green, Rhys E

    2010-12-01

    Lead poisoning caused by ingested spent lead shotgun pellets has long been known to be a cause of unnecessary mortality in waterfowl and has led to legislation limiting its use in many countries. Recent evidence has shown that the problem extends to terrestrial ecosystems and to fragmented rifle bullets eaten by scavengers as well as shotgun pellets. Dietary exposure of human consumers to lead from spent ammunition in game meat also poses potential risks to human health. To assess the degree of fragmentation of lead bullets used to kill wild deer, twelve deer were shot in the thorax using copper-jacketed lead-cored bullets, as part of planned deer management operations. The thoracic region of the eviscerated carcasses and the abdominal viscera of each deer were X-rayed. An average of 356 metal fragments was visible on radiographs of the carcass and 180 fragments in the viscera. The weight of fragments was estimated by reference to an X-rayed scale of fragments of known weight. The average total weight of metal fragments, likely to be mostly lead, was estimated to be 1.2g for the carcass and 0.2g for the viscera. The total estimated weight of fragments in the entire carcass was estimated to be 17% of the weight of the bullet. Most fragments were small in size, with those in the viscera being smaller than those in the carcass. Metal fragments in the viscera were sufficiently small that at least 80% of the metallic bullet-derived lead in the viscera would be expected to be ingested by scavenging birds, such as buzzards and eagles, which feed on them. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Human ES cells: starting culture from frozen cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trish, Erin; Dimos, John; Eggan, Kevin

    2006-11-09

    Here we demonstrate how our lab begins a HuES human embryonic stem cell line culture from a frozen stock. First, a one to two day old ten cm plate of approximately one (to two) million irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells is rinsed with HuES media to remove residual serum and cell debris, and then HuES media added and left to equilibrate in the cell culture incubator. A frozen vial of cells from long term liquid nitrogen storage or a -80 C freezer is sourced and quickly submerged in a 37 C water bath for quick thawing. Cells in freezing media are then removed from the vial and placed in a large volume of HuES media. The large volume of HuES media facilitates removal of excess serum and DMSO, which can cause HuES human embryonic stem cells to differentiate. Cells are gently spun out of suspension, and then re-suspended in a small volume of fresh HuES media that is then used to seed the MEF plate. It is considered important to seed the MEF plate by gently adding the HuES cells in a drop wise fashion to evenly disperse them throughout the plate. The newly established HuES culture plate is returned to the incubator for 48 hrs before media is replaced, then is fed every 24 hours thereafter.

  20. Sodium Valproate Induces Cell Senescence in Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Mei An

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with epigenetic changes, including histone deacetylases (HDACs. Epigenetic modulation by HDAC inhibition is a potentially valuable approach for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. In present study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of sodium valproate (SVP, a known HDAC inhibitor, in human hepatocarcinoma cells. The results showed SVP inhibited the proliferation of Bel-7402 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Low dose SVP treatment caused a large and flat morphology change, positive SA-β-gal staining, and G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest in human hepatocarcinoma cells. Low dose SVP treatment also increased acetylation of histone H3 and H4 on p21 promoter, accompanied by up-regulation of p21 and down-regulation of RB phosphorylation. These observations suggested that a low dose of SVP could induce cell senescence in hepatocarcinoma cells, which might correlate with hyperacetylation of histone H3 and H4, up-regulation of p21, and inhibition of RB phosphorylation. Since the effective concentration inducing cell senescence in hepatocarcinoma cells is clinically available, whether a clinical dose of SVP could induce cell senescence in clinical hepatocarcinoma is worthy of further study.

  1. Human embryonic stem cell lines model experimental human cytomegalovirus latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2013-05-28

    Herpesviruses are highly successful pathogens that persist for the lifetime of their hosts primarily because of their ability to establish and maintain latent infections from which the virus is capable of productively reactivating. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, establishes latency in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells during natural infections in the body. Experimental infection of CD34(+) cells ex vivo has demonstrated that expression of the viral gene products that drive productive infection is silenced by an intrinsic immune defense mediated by Daxx and histone deacetylases through heterochromatinization of the viral genome during the establishment of latency. Additional mechanistic details about the establishment, let alone maintenance and reactivation, of HCMV latency remain scarce. This is partly due to the technical challenges of CD34(+) cell culture, most notably, the difficulty in preventing spontaneous differentiation that drives reactivation and renders them permissive for productive infection. Here we demonstrate that HCMV can establish, maintain, and reactivate in vitro from experimental latency in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for which spurious differentiation can be prevented or controlled. Furthermore, we show that known molecular aspects of HCMV latency are faithfully recapitulated in these cells. In total, we present ESCs as a novel, tractable model for studies of HCMV latency.

  2. Thymic involution perturbs negative selection leading to autoreactive T cells that induce chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coder, Brandon D; Wang, Hongjun; Ruan, Linhui; Su, Dong-Ming

    2015-06-15

    Thymic involution and the subsequent amplified release of autoreactive T cells increase the susceptibility toward developing autoimmunity, but whether they induce chronic inflammation with advanced age remains unclear. The presence of chronic low-level proinflammatory factors in elderly individuals (termed inflammaging) is a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality in virtually every chronic age-related disease. To determine how thymic involution leads to the persistent release and activation of autoreactive T cells capable of inducing inflammaging, we used a Foxn1 conditional knockout mouse model that induces accelerated thymic involution while maintaining a young periphery. We found that thymic involution leads to T cell activation shortly after thymic egress, which is accompanied by a chronic inflammatory phenotype consisting of cellular infiltration into non-lymphoid tissues, increased TNF-α production, and elevated serum IL-6. Autoreactive T cell clones were detected in the periphery of Foxn1 conditional knockout mice. A failure of negative selection, facilitated by decreased expression of Aire rather than impaired regulatory T cell generation, led to autoreactive T cell generation. Furthermore, the young environment can reverse age-related regulatory T cell accumulation in naturally aged mice, but not inflammatory infiltration. Taken together, these findings identify thymic involution and the persistent activation of autoreactive T cells as a contributing source of chronic inflammation (inflammaging).

  3. Characterization of tendon cell cultures of the human rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pauly

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available tator cuff tears are common soft tissue injuries of the musculoskeletal system that heal by formation of repair tissue and may lead to high retear rates and joint dysfunction. In particular, tissue from chronic, large tendon tears is of such degenerative nature that it may be prone to retear after surgical repair. Besides several biomechanical approaches, biologically based strategies such as application of growth factors may be promising for increasing cell activity and production of extracellular tendon matrix at the tendon-to-bone unit. As a precondition for subsequent experimental growth factor application, the aim of the present study was to establish and characterize a human rotator cuff tendon cell culture.Long head biceps (LHB- and supraspinatus muscle (SSP- tendon samples from donor patients undergoing shoulder surgery were cultivated and examined at the RNA level for expression of collagen type-I, -II and -III, biglycan, decorin, tenascin-C, aggrecan, osteocalcin, tenomodulin and scleraxis (by Real-time PCR. Finally, results were compared to chondrocytes and osteoblasts as control cells.An expression pattern was found which may reflect a human rotator cuff tenocyte-like cell culture. Both SSP and LHB tenocyte-like cells differed from chondrocyte cell cultures in terms of reduced expression of collagen type-II (p≤0.05 and decorin while higher levels of collagen type-I were seen (p≤0.05. With respect to osteoblasts, tenocyte-like cells expressed lower levels of osteocalcin (p≤0.05 as well as tenascin C, biglycan and collagen type-III. Expression of scleraxis, tenomodulin and aggrecan was similar between all cell types.This study represents a characterization of tenocyte-like cells from the human rotator cuff as close as possible. It helps analyzing their biological properties and allows further studies to improve production of tendon matrix and osteofibroblastic integration at the tendon-bone unit following tendon repair.

  4. [Immune system evolution. (From cells to humans)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belek, A S

    1992-01-01

    The great variety of cells and molecules observed in the mammalian immune system can be explained by stepwise acquisition of them during phylogeny. Self/nonself discrimination and cell-mediated immunity have been present since the early stages of evolution. Although some inducible antimicrobial molecules have been demonstrated in invertebrates, immunoglobulins appear in vertebrates. T and B cell diversity, development of the lymphoid organs, MHC molecules, complement and cytokines are the characteristics that appear through the evolution of vertebrates. Further knowledge that will be obtained from phylogenetic studies will improve our understanding of the immune system of human.

  5. Centre for human development, stem cells & regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-01-01

    The Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration (CHDSCR) was founded in 2004 as a cross-disciplinary research and translational program within the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton. The Centre undertakes fundamental research into early development and stem cells together with applied translational research for patient benefit. The Centre has vibrant and thriving multidisciplinary research programs that harness the translational strength of the Faculty together with an innovative Stem Cell PhD program, outstanding clinical infrastructure and enterprise to deliver on this vision.

  6. Human NK cells activated by EBV+ lymphoblastoid cells overcome anti-apoptotic mechanisms of drug resistance in haematological cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martínez, Diego; Azaceta, Gemma; Muntasell, Aura; Aguiló, Nacho; Núñez, David; Gálvez, Eva M; Naval, Javier; Anel, Alberto; Palomera, Luis; Vilches, Carlos; Marzo, Isabel; Villalba, Martín; Pardo, Julián

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells recognize and eliminate transformed or infected cells that have downregulated MHC class-I and express specific activating ligands. Recent evidence indicates that allogeneic NK cells are useful to eliminate haematological cancer cells independently of MHC-I expression. However, it is unclear if transformed cells expressing mutations that confer anti-apoptotic properties and chemoresistance will be susceptible to NK cells. Allogeneic primary human NK cells were activated using different protocols and prospectively tested for their ability to eliminate diverse mutant haematological and apoptotic-resistant cancer cell lines as well as patient-derived B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with chemotherapy multiresistance. Here, we show that human NK cells from healthy donors activated in vitro with Epstein Barr virus positive (EBV+)-lymphoblastoid cells display an enhanced cytotoxic and proliferative potential in comparison to other protocols of activation such a K562 cells plus interleukin (IL)2. This enhancement enables them to kill more efficiently a variety of haematological cancer cell lines, including a panel of transfectants that mimic natural mutations leading to oncogenic transformation and chemoresistance (e.g., overexpression of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 or downregulation of p53, Bak/Bax or caspase activity). The effect was also observed against blasts from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients showing multi-resistance to chemotherapy. Our findings demonstrate that particular in vitro activated NK cells may overcome anti-apoptotic mechanisms and oncogenic alterations frequently occurring in transformed cells, pointing toward the use of EBV+-lymphoblastoid cells as a desirable strategy to activate NK cells in vitro for the purpose of treating haematological neoplasia with poor prognosis. PMID:25949911

  7. Photoexcitation dynamics in solution-processed formamidinium lead iodide perovskite thin films for solar cell applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Feng; Adjokatse, Sampson; Zhao, Ni; Even, Jacky; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI(3)) is a newly developed hybrid perovskite that potentially can be used in high-efficiency solution-processed solar cells. Here, the temperature-dependent dynamic optical properties of three types of FAPbI(3) perovskite films (fabricated using three different precurs

  8. Photoexcitation dynamics in solution-processed formamidinium lead iodide perovskite thin films for solar cell applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Feng; Adjokatse, Sampson; Zhao, Ni; Even, Jacky; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI(3)) is a newly developed hybrid perovskite that potentially can be used in high-efficiency solution-processed solar cells. Here, the temperature-dependent dynamic optical properties of three types of FAPbI(3) perovskite films (fabricated using three different precurs

  9. Advances in human B cell phenotypic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise A Kaminski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (Big Biology, necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort.

  10. Human plasma cells express granzyme B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Narayanan, Priya; Kang, Ning; Clayton, Sandra; Ohne, Yoichiro; Shi, Peiqing; Herve, Marie-Cecile; Balderas, Robert; Picard, Capucine; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Oh, Sangkon; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    While studying the plasma cell (PC) compartment in human tonsils, we identified that immunoglobulin kappa or lambda chain-expressing PCs are the main cells expressing granzyme B (GrzB). In vitro studies revealed that activated B cells differentiated into GrzB-expressing PCs when co-cultured with macrophages and follicular helper T cells. This effect could be reproduced on combined stimulation of IL-15 (produced by macrophages) and IL-21 (produced by T follicular helper cells) in a STAT3-dependent manner. Whereas IL-21 triggers the transcription of mRNA of GrzB, IL-15 synergizes the translation of GrzB proteins. The precise role of GrzB in PC biology remains to be understood and studies in mice will not help as their PCs do not express GrzB.

  11. Human CD56bright NK Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Tatiana; Poli, Aurélie; Cuapio, Angelica

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells can be subdivided into various subsets based on the relative expression of CD16 and CD56. In particular, CD56(bright)CD16(-/dim) NK cells are the focus of interest. They are considered efficient cytokine producers endowed with immunoregulatory properties, but they can also become...... cytotoxic upon appropriate activation. These cells were shown to play a role in different disease states, such as cancer, autoimmunity, neuroinflammation, and infection. Although their phenotype and functional properties are well known and have been extensively studied, their lineage relationship with other...... NK cell subsets is not fully defined, nor is their precise hematopoietic origin. In this article, we summarize recent studies about CD56(bright) NK cells in health and disease and briefly discuss the current controversies surrounding them....

  12. Human embryonic stem cells: preclinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarda Kanchan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have been extensively discussed in public and scientific communities for their potential in treating diseases and injuries. However, not much has been achieved in turning them into safe therapeutic agents. The hurdles in transforming hESCs to therapies start right with the way these cells are derived and maintained in the laboratory, and goes up-to clinical complications related to need for patient specific cell lines, gender specific aspects, age of the cells, and several post transplantation uncertainties. The different types of cells derived through directed differentiation of hESC and used successfully in animal disease and injury models are described briefly. This review gives a brief outlook on the present and the future of hESC based therapies, and talks about the technological advances required for a safe transition from laboratory to clinic.

  13. Stromal-cell and cancer-cell exosomes leading the metastatic exodus for the promised niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-06-18

    Exosomes are thought to play an important role in metastasis. Luga and colleagues have described the production of exosomes by stromal cells such as cancer-associated fibroblasts that are taken up by breast cancer cells and are then loaded with Wnt 11, which is associated with stimulation of the invasiveness and metastasis of the breast cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that exosomes produced by breast cancer cells are taken up by stromal fibroblasts and other stromal cells, suggesting that exosomes are agents of cross-talk between cancer and stromal cells to stimulate metastasis. Imaging of exosomes by labeling with fluorescent proteins will enlighten the process by which exosomes enhance metastasis, including premetastatic niche formation.

  14. Stem cell factor and c-Kit in human primordial germ cells and fetal ovaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Poul Erik; Byskov, Anne Grete; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2005-01-01

    Prenatal ovary (human), Primordial germ cells, Folliculogenesis, c-Kit, Stem cell factor, immunohistochemistry......Prenatal ovary (human), Primordial germ cells, Folliculogenesis, c-Kit, Stem cell factor, immunohistochemistry...

  15. Characterization of tendon cell cultures of the human rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, S; Klatte, F; Strobel, C; Schmidmaier, G; Greiner, S; Scheibel, M; Wildemann, B

    2010-07-26

    Rotator cuff tears are common soft tissue injuries of the musculoskeletal system that heal by formation of repair tissue and may lead to high retear rates and joint dysfunction. In particular, tissue from chronic, large tendon tears is of such degenerative nature that it may be prone to retear after surgical repair. Besides several biomechanical approaches, biologically based strategies such as application of growth factors may be promising for increasing cell activity and production of extracellular tendon matrix at the tendon-to-bone unit. As a precondition for subsequent experimental growth factor application, the aim of the present study was to establish and characterize a human rotator cuff tendon cell culture. Long head biceps (LHB)- and supraspinatus muscle (SSP)- tendon samples from donor patients undergoing shoulder surgery were cultivated and examined at the RNA level for expression of collagen type-I, -II and -III, biglycan, decorin, tenascin-C, aggrecan, osteocalcin, tenomodulin and scleraxis (by Real-time PCR). Finally, results were compared to chondrocytes and osteoblasts as control cells. An expression pattern was found which may reflect a human rotator cuff tenocyte-like cell culture. Both SSP and LHB tenocyte-like cells differed from chondrocyte cell cultures in terms of reduced expression of collagen type-II (ptendon matrix and osteofibroblastic integration at the tendon-bone unit following tendon repair.

  16. Lead levels in human milk and children's health risk: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyashiki, Gina Ayumi Kobayashi; Paoliello, Monica Maria Bastos; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2010-01-01

    Lead (Pb), a naturally-occurring element and industrially-produced metal, is highly toxic to children, causing intellectual and behavioral deficits, hyperactivity, fine motor function deficits, decreased intelligence quotient, alteration of hand-eye coordination, and problems in reaction time. Children's exposure to Pb occurs mainly through ingestion of contaminated food, water and soil. Few discussions have been held on the magnitude and potential risk associated with exposure from the consumption of breast milk. Hence, this research was designed to systematically review the scientific literature on published epidemiologic studies, with an emphasis on the study designs and analytical procedures used for Pb assessment in breast milk. From a total of 112 selected articles published since the 1980s, 11 met the inclusion criteria. A review of the data indicated that Pb levels varied from 0.15 to 6.1 microg L(-1) in mature milk samples, from 0.48 to 14.6 microg L(-1) in colostrum samples, and were non-detectable in some samples. The milk/blood ratio, which estimates the mean efficiency transfer of lead from blood to milk, varied between 0.01 and 0.48. The heterogeneity of methods revealed by our assessment of published studies underscores the need for harmonization of study designs and sample collection and analysis protocols to reflect specific exposure scenarios. Human milk seems to be one of the relevant biological matrices for use as a biomarker for assessing children's health risk to Pb poisoning.

  17. Identification and Characterization of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma SPC-A1 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-liang Zhu; Long-bang Chen; Jing-hua Wang; Xin-yi Xia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There has been an increasing interest in recent years in the role of stem cells.With an extensive understanding of their biology,a major role for stem cells in the malignant process has been proposed and the existence of cancer stem cells(CSCs) has been confirmed in hematopoietic malignancies and solid organ malignancies including brain cancer,breast,prostate,colon,and pancreatic cancer.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in most large cities of China.It is possible that lung cancer contains cancer stem cells responsible for its malignancy.The aim of this study is to identify,characterize and enrich the CSC population that drives and maintains lung adenocarcinoma growth and metastasis.Methods: Side population(SP) cell analysis and sorting were applied on human lung adenocarcinoma cell line and an attempt to further enrich them by preliminary serum-free culture before fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was done.Stem cell properties of SP cells were evaluated by their proliferative index,colony-forming efficiency,tumorigenic potential,bi-differentiation capacity and the expression of common stem cell surface markers.Results: Lung cancer cells could grow in a serum-free Medium(SFM) as non-adherent spheres similar to neurospheres or mammospheres.The proportion of SP cells in cell spheres was significantly higher than that in cells grown as monolayers.SP cells had a greater proliferative index,a higher colony-forming efficiency and a greater ability to form tumor in vivo.SP cells were both CCA positive and SP-C positive while non-SP cells were only SP-C positive.Flow cytometric analysis of cell phenotype showed that SP cells expressed CD133 and CD44,the common cell surface markers of cancer stem cells,while non-SP cells only expressed CD44.Conclusion: SP cells existed in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and they could be further enriched by preliminary serum-free culture before FACS sorting.SP cells possessed the properties of

  18. Identification and Characterization of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma SPC-A1 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-liang Zhu; Long-bang Chen; Jing-hua Wang; Xin-yi Xia

    2010-01-01

    Objective:There has been an increasing interest in recent years in the role of stem cells.With an extensive understanding of their biology,a major role for stem cells in the malignant process has been proposed and the existence of cancer stem cells(CSCs)has been confirmed in hematopoietic malignancies and solid organ malignancies including brain cancer,breast,prostate,colon,and pancreatic cancer.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in most large cities of China.It is possible that lung cancer contains cancer stem cells responsible for its malignancy.The aim of this study is to identify,characterize and enrich the CSC population that drives and maintains lung adenocarcinoma growth and metastasis.Methods:Side population(SP)cell analysis and sorting were applied on human lung adenocarcinoma cell line and an attempt to further enrich them by preliminary serum-free culture before fluorescence activated cell sorting(FACS)was done.Stem cell properties of SP cells were evaluated by their proliferative index,colony-forming efficiency,tumorigenic potential,bi-differentiation capacity and the expression of common stem cell surface markers.Results:Lung cancer cells could grow in a serum-free Medium(SFM)as non-adherent spheres similar to neurospheres or mammospheres.The proportion of SP cells in cell spheres was significantly higher than that in cells grown as monolayers.SP cells had a greater proliferative index,a higher colony-forming efficiency and a greater ability to form tumor in vivo.SP cells were both CCA positive and SP-C positive while non-SP cells were only SP-C positive.Flow cytometric analysis of cell phenotype showed that SP cells expressed CD133 and CD44,the common cell surface markers of cancer stem cells,while non-SP cells only expressed CD44.Conclusion:SP cells existed in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and they could be further enriched by preliminary serum-free culture before FACS sorting.SP cells possessed the properties of cancer stem

  19. Differences in the microrheology of human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Brian R; Hale, Christopher M; Khatau, Shyam B; Kusuma, Sravanti; Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Gerecht, Sharon; Wirtz, Denis

    2010-12-01

    Embryonic and adult fibroblasts can be returned to pluripotency by the expression of reprogramming genes. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that these human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells and human embryonic stem (hES) cells are behaviorally, karyotypically, and morphologically similar. Here we sought to determine whether the physical properties of hiPS cells, including their micromechanical properties, are different from those of hES cells. To this end, we use the method of particle tracking microrheology to compare the viscoelastic properties of the cytoplasm of hES cells, hiPS cells, and the terminally differentiated parental human fibroblasts from which our hiPS cells are derived. Our results indicate that although the cytoplasm of parental fibroblasts is both viscous and elastic, the cytoplasm of hiPS cells does not exhibit any measurable elasticity and is purely viscous over a wide range of timescales. The viscous phenotype of hiPS cells is recapitulated in parental cells with disassembled actin filament network. The cytoplasm of hES cells is predominantly viscous but contains subcellular regions that are also elastic. This study supports the hypothesis that intracellular elasticity correlates with the degree of cellular differentiation and reveals significant differences in the mechanical properties of hiPS cells and hES cells. Because mechanical stimuli have been shown to mediate the precise fate of differentiating stem cells, our results support the concept that stem cell "softness" is a key feature of force-mediated differentiation of stem cells and suggest there may be subtle functional differences between force-mediated differentiation of hiPS cells and hES cells.

  20. Properties of lead deposits in cell walls of radish (Raphanus sativus) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Tatai, Yuri; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Hayatsu, Manabu; Ono, Manami; Suzuki, Suechika

    2013-01-01

    Various mechanisms are involved in detoxification of heavy metals such as lead (Pb) in plant cells. Most of the Pb taken up by plants accumulates in their roots. However, the detailed properties of Pb complexes in roots remain unclear. We have investigated the properties of Pb deposits in root cell walls of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings grown on glass beads bed containing Pb pellets, which are the source of Pb-contamination in shooting range soils. Pb deposits were tightly bound to cell walls. Cell wall fragments containing about 50,000 ppm Pb were prepared from the roots. After extracting Pb from the cell wall fragments using HCl, Pb ions were recombined with the Pb-extracted cell wall fragments in a solution containing Pb acetate. When the cell wall fragments were treated with pectinase (E.C. 3.2.1.15) and were chemically modified with 1-ethyl-3-dimethylamino-propylcarboimide, the Pb-rebinding ability of the treated cell wall fragments decreased. When acid-treated cell wall fragments were incubated in a solution containing Pb(2+) and excess amounts of a chelating agent, Pb recombined with the cell wall fragments were measured to estimate the affinity between Pb(2+) and the cell wall fragments. Our data show that Pb(2+) binds to carboxyl groups of cell walls. The source of the carboxyl groups is suggested to be pectic compounds. A stability constant of the Pb-cell wall complex was estimated to be about 10(8). The role of root cell walls in the mechanism underlying heavy metal tolerance was discussed.

  1. Derivation of transgene-free human induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral T cells in defined culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishino, Yoshikazu; Seki, Tomohisa; Fujita, Jun; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tohyama, Shugo; Kunitomi, Akira; Tabei, Ryota; Nakajima, Kazuaki; Okada, Marina; Hirano, Akinori; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established as promising cell sources for revolutionary regenerative therapies. The initial culture system used for iPSC generation needed fetal calf serum in the culture medium and mouse embryonic fibroblast as a feeder layer, both of which could possibly transfer unknown exogenous antigens and pathogens into the iPSC population. Therefore, the development of culture systems designed to minimize such potential risks has become increasingly vital for future applications of iPSCs for clinical use. On another front, although donor cell types for generating iPSCs are wide-ranging, T cells have attracted attention as unique cell sources for iPSCs generation because T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs) have a unique monoclonal T cell receptor genomic rearrangement that enables their differentiation into antigen-specific T cells, which can be applied to novel immunotherapies. In the present study, we generated transgene-free human TiPSCs using a combination of activated human T cells and Sendai virus under defined culture conditions. These TiPSCs expressed pluripotent markers by quantitative PCR and immunostaining, had a normal karyotype, and were capable of differentiating into cells from all three germ layers. This method of TiPSCs generation is more suitable for the therapeutic application of iPSC technology because it lowers the risks associated with the presence of undefined, animal-derived feeder cells and serum. Therefore this work will lead to establishment of safer iPSCs and extended clinical application.

  2. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  3. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Yinan; Ruis, Brian; Lin, Sherry; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-04-01

    Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair known as homologous recombination (HR). The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  4. Human exposure pathways of heavy metals in a lead-zinc mining area, Jiangsu Province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Sheng Qu

    Full Text Available Heavy metal pollution is becoming a serious issue in developing countries such as China, and the public is increasingly aware of its adverse health impacts in recent years. We assessed the potential health risks in a lead-zinc mining area and attempted to identify the key exposure pathways. We evaluated the spatial distributions of personal exposure using indigenous exposure factors and field monitoring results of water, soil, food, and indoor and outdoor air samples. The risks posed by 10 metals and the contribution of inhalation, ingestion and dermal contact pathways to these risks were estimated. Human hair samples were also analyzed to indicate the exposure level in the human body. Our results show that heavy metal pollution may pose high potential health risks to local residents, especially in the village closest to the mine (V1, mainly due to Pb, Cd and Hg. Correspondingly, the residents in V1 had higher Pb (8.14 mg/kg levels in hair than those in the other two villages. Most of the estimated risks came from soil, the intake of self-produced vegetables and indoor air inhalation. This study highlights the importance of site-specific multipathway health risk assessments in studying heavy-metal exposures in China.

  5. Human colostral cells. I. Separation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crago, S S; Prince, S J; Pretlow, T G; McGhee, J R; Mestecky, J

    1979-12-01

    Analyses of the cells present in human colostrum obtained from fifty-four healthy donors during the first four days of lactation revealed that there were 3.3 x 10(6) (range 1.1 x 10(5)--1.2 x 10(7)) cells per ml of colostrum. Based on histochemical examinations, it was found that this population consisted of 30--47% macrophages, 40--60% polymorphonuclear leucocytes, 5.2--8.9% lymphocytes, and 1.3--2.8% colostral corpuscles; epithelial cells were rarely encountered. The identity of various cell types was confirmed by Wright's stain and by a series of histochemical techniques which disclosed the presence of non-specific esterase, peroxidase, and lipids. For further characterization, the different types of cells were separated by various methods, such as Ficoll-Hypaque density centrifugation, isokinetic centrifugation on a linear Ficoll gradient, adherence to glass or plastic, and phagocytosis of carbonyl iron. Immunohistochemical staining with FITC- and/or TRITC-labelled reagents to IgA, IgM, IgG, K- and lambda-chains, secretory component, lactoferrin, and alpha-lactalbumin were applied to unseparated as well as separated colostral cells. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (staining for peroxidase) as well as macrophages and colostral corpuscles (staining for non-specific esterase) exhibited numerous intracellular vesicles that contained lipids as well as various combinations of milk proteins. Lymphoid cells did not stain with any of these reagents and plasma cells were not detected among the colostral cells. Individual phagocytic cells contained immunoglobulins of the IgA and IgM classes, both K and lambda light chains, secretory component, lactoferrin, and alpha-lactalbumin. The coincidental appearance of these proteins in single, phagocytic cells but not in lymphoid cells indicate that the cells acquired these proteins by ingestion from the environment. Markers commonly used for the identification of B lymphocytes (surface immunoglobulins) and T lymphocytes (receptors

  6. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro...

  7. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  8. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Momblona

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  9. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J., E-mail: henk.bolink@uv.es [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático J. Beltrán 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Roldán-Carmona, C. [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático J. Beltrán 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Department of Physical Chemistry and Applied Thermodynamics, University of Córdoba, Campus Rabanales, Ed. C3, 14014, Córdoba (Spain); Edri, E. [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Herzl St. 34, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-08-01

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  10. Single-cell analysis of mixed-lineage states leading to a binary cell fate choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Andre; Venkatasubramanian, Meenakshi; Chaudhri, Viren K; Aronow, Bruce J; Salomonis, Nathan; Singh, Harinder; Grimes, H Leighton

    2016-09-29

    Delineating hierarchical cellular states, including rare intermediates and the networks of regulatory genes that orchestrate cell-type specification, are continuing challenges for developmental biology. Single-cell RNA sequencing is greatly accelerating such research, given its power to provide comprehensive descriptions of genomic states and their presumptive regulators. Haematopoietic multipotential progenitor cells, as well as bipotential intermediates, manifest mixed-lineage patterns of gene expression at a single-cell level. Such mixed-lineage states may reflect the molecular priming of different developmental potentials by co-expressed alternative-lineage determinants, namely transcription factors. Although a bistable gene regulatory network has been proposed to regulate the specification of either neutrophils or macrophages, the nature of the transition states manifested in vivo, and the underlying dynamics of the cell-fate determinants, have remained elusive. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing coupled with a new analytic tool, iterative clustering and guide-gene selection, and clonogenic assays to delineate hierarchical genomic and regulatory states that culminate in neutrophil or macrophage specification in mice. We show that this analysis captured prevalent mixed-lineage intermediates that manifested concurrent expression of haematopoietic stem cell/progenitor and myeloid progenitor cell genes. It also revealed rare metastable intermediates that had collapsed the haematopoietic stem cell/progenitor gene expression programme, instead expressing low levels of the myeloid determinants, Irf8 and Gfi1 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13). Genetic perturbations and chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing revealed Irf8 and Gfi1 as key components of counteracting myeloid-gene-regulatory networks. Combined loss of these two determinants 'trapped' the metastable intermediate. We propose that mixed-lineage states are obligatory during cell-fate specification

  11. Interplay between phosphoinositide lipids and calcium signals at the leading edge of chemotaxing ameboid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Joseph J; Ziemba, Brian P

    2014-09-01

    The chemotactic migration of eukaryotic ameboid cells up concentration gradients is among the most advanced forms of cellular behavior. Chemotaxis is controlled by a complex network of signaling proteins bound to specific lipids on the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, or the leading edge. The central lipid players in this leading edge signaling pathway include the phosphoinositides PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), both of which play multiple roles. The products of PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, diacylglycerol (DAG) and Ins(1,4,5)P3 (IP3), are also implicated as important players. Together, these leading edge phosphoinositides and their degradation products, in concert with a local Ca(2+) signal, control the recruitment and activities of many peripheral membrane proteins that are crucial to the leading edge signaling network. The present critical review summarizes the current molecular understanding of chemotactic signaling at the leading edge, including newly discovered roles of phosphoinositide lipids and Ca(2+), while highlighting key questions for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Patterning human stem cells and endothelial cells with laser printing for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Ralf; Ma, Nan; Liu, Jun; Guan, Jianjun; Koch, Lothar; Klopsch, Christian; Gruene, Martin; Toelk, Anita; Wang, Weiwei; Mark, Peter; Wang, Feng; Chichkov, Boris; Li, Wenzhong; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2011-12-01

    Recent study showed that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) could inhibit apoptosis of endothelial cells in hypoxic condition, increase their survival, and stimulate the angiogenesis process. In this project we applied Laser-Induced-Forward-Transfer (LIFT) cell printing technique and prepared a cardiac patch seeded with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human MSC (hMSC) in a defined pattern for cardiac regeneration. We seeded HUVEC and hMSC in a defined pattern on a Polyester urethane urea (PEUU) cardiac patch. On control patches an equal amount of cells was randomly seeded without LIFT. Patches were cultivated in vitro or transplanted in vivo to the infarcted zone of rat hearts after LAD-ligation. Cardiac performance was measured by left ventricular catheterization 8 weeks post infarction. Thereafter hearts were perfused with fluorescein tomato lectin for the assessment of functional blood vessels and stored for histology analyses. We demonstrated that LIFT-derived cell seeding pattern definitely modified growth characteristics of co-cultured HUVEC and hMSC leading to increased vessel formation and found significant functional improvement of infarcted hearts following transplantation of a LIFT-tissue engineered cardiac patch. Further, we could show enhanced capillary density and integration of human cells into the functionally connected vessels of murine vascular system. LIFT-based Tissue Engineering of cardiac patches for the treatment of myocardial infarction might improve wound healing and functional preservation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Cha, Kyoung Je; Han, Jiyou; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-03-22

    Although previous studies suggest that nanotopographical features influence properties and behaviors of stem cells, only a few studies have attempted to derive clinically useful somatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells using nanopatterned surfaces. In the present study, we report that polystyrene nanopore-patterned surfaces significantly promote the pancreatic differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. We compared different diameters of nanopores and showed that 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces highly upregulated the expression of PDX1, a critical transcription factor for pancreatic development, leading to an approximately 3-fold increase in the percentage of differentiating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors compared with control flat surfaces. Furthermore, in the presence of biochemical factors, 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces profoundly enhanced the derivation of pancreatic endocrine cells producing insulin, glucagon, or somatostatin. We also demonstrate that nanopore-patterned surface-induced upregulation of PDX1 is associated with downregulation of TAZ, suggesting the potential role of TAZ in nanopore-patterned surface-mediated mechanotransduction. Our study suggests that appropriate cytokine treatments combined with nanotopographical stimulation could be a powerful tool for deriving a high purity of desired cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

  14. Natalizumab treatment leads to an increase in circulating CXCR3-expressing B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttilä, Tarja-Leena; Airas, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of natalizumab treatment on subgroups of circulating peripheral blood B cell populations. Methods: We studied the proportions and absolute numbers of CD19+CD20+, CD10+, and CD5+ B cell populations, and determined very late activation antigen-4 and chemokine receptor CXCR3, CCR5, and CCR6 expression on B cells in the peripheral blood of 14 natalizumab-treated patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Five blood samples per patient were obtained longitudinally before and during the first year of treatment. Blood samples were analyzed by 6-color flow cytometry. Results: Proportions of B cells and CD10+ pre–B cells were significantly increased, and very late activation antigen-4 expression on the B cell surface was significantly decreased already after 1 week of natalizumab treatment. Natalizumab-induced sustained increase in the proportion and absolute number of CXCR3-expressing B cells was statistically significant after 1 month of treatment. There were no changes in the proportions of CCR5- or CCR6-expressing B cells. Conclusions: The rapid and persistent increase in circulating CXCR3-expressing B cells in response to natalizumab treatment possibly reflects the relevance of this chemokine receptor in controlling migration of B cells into the CNS in humans in vivo. PMID:27800533

  15. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

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    Derek C. Macallan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  16. Biological impact of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Miguel; Menéndez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells is currently a field of great potential in biomedicine. These cells represent a highly valuable tool for developmental biology studies, disease models, and drug screening and toxicity. The ultimate goal of hESCs and iPS cell research is the treatment of diseases or disorders for which there is currently no treatment or existing therapies are only partially effective. Despite the disproportionate short-term hopes generated, which are putting too much pressure on scientists, the international scientific community is making rapid progress in understanding hESCs and iPS cells. Nonetheless, great efforts have to be made to provide an answer to still quite basic questions concerning their biology. Moreover, translation to clinical applications in cell replacement therapy requires prior solution to ethical barriers. The recent development of iPS cells has provided a strong alternative to overcome ethical issues concerning hESCs. However, an in-depth characterization of their genetic and epigenetic features, as well as their differentiation potential still remains to be undertaken. This chapter will describe, precisely, what the critical issues are, where scientific and ethical barriers stand, and how we are to overcome them. Only then, we shall finally discover whether hESCs and iPS cells will allow building reproducible disease models, and whether they really are a safe tool, with great potential for regenerative medicine.

  17. Loss of runt-related transcription factor 3 expression leads hepatocellular carcinoma cells to escape apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3 is known as a tumor suppressor gene for gastric cancer and other cancers, this gene may be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods RUNX3 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in HCC cells and tissues, respectively. Hep3B cells, lacking endogenous RUNX3, were introduced with RUNX3 constructs. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay and apoptosis was evaluated using DAPI staining. Apoptosis signaling was assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results RUNX3 protein expression was frequently inactivated in the HCC cell lines (91% and tissues (90%. RUNX3 expression inhibited 90 ± 8% of cell growth at 72 h in serum starved Hep3B cells. Forty-eight hour serum starvation-induced apoptosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells reached 31 ± 4% and 4 ± 1% in RUNX3-expressing Hep3B and control cells, respectively. Apoptotic activity was increased by Bim expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. Conclusion RUNX3 expression enhanced serum starvation-induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines. RUNX3 is deleted or weakly expressed in HCC, which leads to tumorigenesis by escaping apoptosis.

  18. Dimerization of a cell-penetrating peptide leads to enhanced cellular uptake and drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hoyer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 20 years, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs have gained tremendous interest due to their ability to deliver a variety of therapeutically active molecules that would otherwise be unable to cross the cellular membrane due to their size or hydrophilicity. Recently, we reported on the identification of a novel CPP, sC18, which is derived from the C-terminus of the 18 kDa cationic antimicrobial protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated successful application of sC18 for the delivery of functionalized cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (cymantrene complexes to tumor cell lines, inducing high cellular toxicity. In order to increase the potential of the organometallic complexes to kill tumor cells, we were looking for a way to enhance cellular uptake. Therefore, we designed a branched dimeric variant of sC18, (sC182, which was shown to have a dramatically improved capacity to internalize into various cell lines, even primary cells, using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Cell viability assays indicated increased cytotoxicity of the dimer presumably caused by membrane leakage; however, this effect turned out to be dependent on the specific cell type. Finally, we could show that conjugation of a functionalized cymantrene with (sC182 leads to significant reduction of its IC50 value in tumor cells compared to the respective sC18 conjugate, proving that dimerization is a useful method to increase the drug-delivery potential of a cell-penetrating peptide.

  19. Autolysis of Bacterial Cells Leads to Formation of Empty Sheaths by Leptothrix spp.

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    Jun Takada

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic, Fe-oxidizing bacteria Leptothrix spp. produce uniquely shaped extracellular sheaths composed of organic bacterial polymers encrusted with inorganic elements from its aquatic environments. At the initial stage of sheath formation, bacterial cells were aligned in the sheath, but later most sheaths became empty. Here, we studied the mechanism of sheath hollowing by examining an isolate of Leptothrix sp. strain OUMS1 cultured in either artificial medium or natural groundwater. After 3 days in the medium, most sheaths at the initial stage surrounded a line of live cells, while some cells in the line were dead regardless of their position in a sheath. In sheaths where cells and/or their remnants were barely distinguishable by differential interference contrast microscopy (DIC, a vital stain and a stain specific for nucleic acids occasionally revealed dead cells and/or nucleic acid remnants, while sheaths that lacked a positive response to these reagents looked transparent when viewed with DIC. In specimens cultured in the medium for 7 days, dead cells increased in number regardless of their position in the sheath. Almost the same phenomena occurred in specimens cultured in natural groundwater until day 7. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM showed that cells degenerated, leading to autolysis of bacterial cells in the sheath. These observations led us to conclude that autolysis of bacterial cells could be a major cause of sheath hollowing.

  20. Efficient, Semitransparent Neutral-Colored Solar Cells Based on Microstructured Formamidinium Lead Trihalide Perovskite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eperon, Giles E; Bryant, Daniel; Troughton, Joel; Stranks, Samuel D; Johnston, Michael B; Watson, Trystan; Worsley, David A; Snaith, Henry J

    2015-01-02

    Efficient, neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are of commercial interest for incorporation into the windows and surfaces of buildings and automobiles. Here, we report on semitransparent perovskite solar cells that are both efficient and neutral-colored, even in full working devices. Using the microstructured architecture previously developed, we achieve higher efficiencies by replacing methylammonium lead iodide perovskite with formamidinium lead iodide. Current-voltage hysteresis is also much reduced. Furthermore, we apply a novel transparent cathode to the devices, enabling us to fabricate neutral-colored semitransparent full solar cells for the first time. Such devices demonstrate over 5% power conversion efficiency for average visible transparencies of almost 30%, retaining impressive color-neutrality. This makes these devices the best-performing single-junction neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells to date. These microstructured perovskite solar cells are shown to have a significant advantage over silicon solar cells in terms of performance at high incident angles of sunlight, making them ideal for building integration.

  1. Human fetal liver stromal cells expressing erythropoietin promote hematopoietic development from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Ji, Lei; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Ruo-Yong; Li, Yan-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Xi, Jia-Fei; He, Li-Juan; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Blood cells transfusion and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation are important methods for cell therapy. They are widely used in the treatment of incurable hematological disorder, infectious diseases, genetic diseases, and immunologic deficiency. However, their availability is limited by quantity, capacity of proliferation and the risk of blood transfusion complications. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been shown to be an alternative resource for the generation of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we describe a novel method for the efficient production of hematopoietic cells from hESCs. The stable human fetal liver stromal cell lines (hFLSCs) expressing erythropoietin (EPO) were established using the lentiviral system. We observed that the supernatant from the EPO transfected hFLSCs could induce the hESCs differentiation into hematopoietic cells, especially erythroid cells. They not only expressed fetal and embryonic globins but also expressed the adult-globin chain on further maturation. In addition, these hESCs-derived erythroid cells possess oxygen-transporting capacity, which indicated hESCs could generate terminally mature progenies. This should be useful for ultimately developing an animal-free culture system to generate large numbers of erythroid cells from hESCs and provide an experimental model to study early human erythropoiesis.

  2. Cell phoney: human cloning after Quintavalle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Derek; Ford, Mary

    2004-12-01

    Reproductive cloning has thrown up new scientific possibilities, ethical conundrums, and legal challenges. An initial question, considered by the English courts in 2003, was whether the technique presently available, that of cell nucleus replacement, falls outside the provisions of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. If it does, the creation and use, including use in research protocols, of human embryos would be unregulated, disclosing a need to consider remedial legislation. The resolution by the courts of this legal question dramatically engages them in a resolution of fundamental ethical dilemmas, and discloses the possibilities and limitation of negotiating science policy through the processes of litigation.

  3. Epithelial cell stretching and luminal acidification lead to a retarded development of stria vascularis and deafness in mice lacking pendrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Mi Kim

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations of SLC26A4/pendrin are among the most prevalent causes of deafness. Deafness and vestibular dysfunction in the corresponding mouse model, Slc26a4(-/-, are associated with an enlargement and acidification of the membranous labyrinth. Here we relate the onset of expression of the HCO(3 (- transporter pendrin to the luminal pH and to enlargement-associated epithelial cell stretching. We determined expression with immunocytochemistry, cell stretching by digital morphometry and pH with double-barreled ion-selective electrodes. Pendrin was first expressed in the endolymphatic sac at embryonic day (E 11.5, in the cochlear hook-region at E13.5, in the utricle and saccule at E14.5, in ampullae at E16.5, and in the upper turn of the cochlea at E17.5. Epithelial cell stretching in Slc26a4(-/- mice began at E14.5. pH changes occurred first in the cochlea at E15.5 and in the endolymphatic sac at E17.5. At postnatal day 2, stria vascularis, outer sulcus and Reissner's membrane epithelial cells, and utricular and saccular transitional cells were stretched, whereas sensory cells in the cochlea, utricle and saccule did not differ between Slc26a4(+/- and Slc26a4(-/- mice. Structural development of stria vascularis, including vascularization, was retarded in Slc26a4(-/- mice. In conclusion, the data demonstrate that the enlargement and stretching of non-sensory epithelial cells precedes luminal acidification in the cochlea and the endolymphatic sac. Stretching and luminal acidification may alter cell-to-cell communication and lead to the observed retarded development of stria vascularis, which may be an important step on the path to deafness in Slc26a4(-/- mice, and possibly in humans, lacking functional pendrin expression.

  4. [Ideological conflicts leading to regulation of investigation with embryonic stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brena, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Human stem cells, particularly embryonic, have huge therapeutic potential to many degenerative diseases, so they are the subject of intense research in many countries. Because obtaining human stem cells involves the use of zygotes obtained by in vitro fertilization, when they arrive in the blastocyst stage, ethical issues arise that some groups considered insurmountable; in Mexico to date it has not been possible to established a law or rule that regulates the issue. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the ideological conflicts that have led to this situation, and about the light a judgment delivered by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights may shed on a democratic and secular legislation.

  5. Biobanking human embryonic stem cell lines: policy, ethics and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Søren

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell banks curating and distributing human embryonic stem cells have been established in a number of countries and by a number of private institutions. This paper identifies and critically discusses a number of arguments that are used to justify the importance of such banks in policy discussions relating to their establishment or maintenance. It is argued (1) that 'ethical arguments' are often more important in the establishment phase and 'efficiency arguments' more important in the maintenance phase, and (2) that arguments relating to the interests of embryo and gamete donors are curiously absent from the particular stem cell banking policy discourse. This to some extent artificially isolates this discourse from the broader discussions about the flows of reproductive materials and tissues in modern society, and such isolation may lead to the interests of important actors being ignored in the policy making process.

  6. Acidic environment leads to ROS-induced MAPK signaling in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Riemann

    Full Text Available Tumor micromilieu often shows pronounced acidosis forcing cells to adapt their phenotype towards enhanced tumorigenesis induced by altered cellular signalling and transcriptional regulation. In the presents study mechanisms and potential consequences of the crosstalk between extra- and intracellular pH (pH(e, pH(i and mitogen-activated-protein-kinases (ERK1/2, p38 was analyzed. Data were obtained mainly in AT1 R-3327 prostate carcinoma cells, but the principle importance was confirmed in 5 other cell types. Extracellular acidosis leads to a rapid and sustained decrease of pH(i in parallel to p38 phosphorylation in all cell types and to ERK1/2 phosphorylation in 3 of 6 cell types. Furthermore, p38 phosphorylation was elicited by sole intracellular lactacidosis at normal pH(e. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation during acidosis led to necrotic cell death. No evidence for the involvement of the kinases c-SRC, PKC, PKA, PI3K or EGFR nor changes in cell volume in acidosis-induced MAPK activation was obtained. However, our data reveal that acidosis enhances the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, probably originating from mitochondria, which subsequently trigger MAPK phosphorylation. Scavenging of ROS prevented acidosis-induced MAPK phosphorylation whereas addition of H(2O(2 enhanced it. Finally, acidosis increased phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB via p38, leading to increased transcriptional activity of a CRE-reporter even 24 h after switching the cells back to a normal environmental milieu. Thus, an acidic tumor microenvironment can induce a longer lasting p38-CREB-medited change in the transcriptional program, which may maintain the altered phenotype even when the cells leave the tumor environment.

  7. Ceramide transfer protein deficiency compromises organelle function and leads to senescence in primary cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Pralhada Rao

    Full Text Available Ceramide transfer protein (CERT transfers ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the Golgi complex. Its deficiency in mouse leads to embryonic death at E11.5. CERT deficient embryos die from cardiac failure due to defective organogenesis, but not due to ceramide induced apoptotic or necrotic cell death. In the current study we examined the effect of CERT deficiency in a primary cell line, namely, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. We show that in MEFs, unlike in mutant embryos, lack of CERT does not lead to increased ceramide but causes an accumulation of hexosylceramides. Nevertheless, the defects due to defective sphingolipid metabolism that ensue, when ceramide fails to be trafficked from ER to the Golgi complex, compromise the viability of the cell. Therefore, MEFs display an incipient ER stress. While we observe that ceramide trafficking from ER to the Golgi complex is compromised, the forward transport of VSVG-GFP protein is unhindered from ER to Golgi complex to the plasma membrane. However, retrograde trafficking of the plasma membrane-associated cholera toxin B to the Golgi complex is reduced. The dysregulated sphingolipid metabolism also leads to increased mitochondrial hexosylceramide. The mitochondrial functions are also compromised in mutant MEFs since they have reduced ATP levels, have increased reactive oxygen species, and show increased glutathione reductase activity. Live-cell imaging shows that the mutant mitochondria exhibit reduced fission and fusion events. The mitochondrial dysfunction leads to an increased mitophagy in the CERT mutant MEFs. The compromised organelle function compromise cell viability and results in premature senescence of these MEFs.

  8. Comparison of five in vitro digestion models to in vivo experimental results: Lead bioaccessibility in the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiele, T.R. van de; Oomen, A.G.; Wragg, J.; Cave, M.; Minekus, M.; Hack, A.; Cornelis, C.; Rompelberg, C.J.M.; Zwart, L.L. de; Klinck, B.; Wijnen, J. van; Verstraete, W.; Sips, A.J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-laboratory comparison study of in vitro models assessing bioaccessibility of soil-bound lead in the human gastrointestinal tract under simulated fasted and fed conditions. Oral bioavailability data from a previous human in vivo study on the same soil served as a reference

  9. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  10. Lead exposure impairs NMDA agonist-induced no production in pyramidal hippocampal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Nasser Ostad

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to Lead (Pb affects neural functions in central nervous system (CNS particularly the learning and memory. On the other hand, alteration of calcium level in the CNS results in activation of NOS where it is expected to increase nitric oxide level in hippocampus. In this study the role of Lead exposure in NMDA induced NO production in pyramidal hippocampal cells (CA1HP was investigated. The NO level was determined by measurement of concentration of nitrite and nitrate as NO products using the metHb production at 401 nm. The ACBD (NMDA agonist-induced NO level was almost reduced to the control level (2.5 nM in the presence of 10 and 100 nM of Lead acetate. Lead acetate at concentrations which normally results in chronic toxicity did not increase the nitric oxide (NO production by CA1HP. One reason for this finding could be the interaction of Lead with NMDA receptors due to similarity of Pb2+ to Zn2+ ion. Another reason may be related to direct interaction of Lead with NMDA receptors that inhibit the stimulated NO production.

  11. Lymphoid Cell-Glioma Cell Interaction Enhances Cell Coat Production by Human Gliomas: Novel Suppressor Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.; Macchi, Beatrice; Papazoglou, Savvas; Oldfield, Edward H.; Kornblith, Paul L.; Smith, Barry H.; Gately, Maurice K.

    1983-05-01

    Certain human glioma lines produce mucopolysaccharide coats that impair the generation of cytolytic lymphocytes in response to these lines in vitro. Coat production is substantially enhanced by the interaction of glioma cells with a macromolecular factor released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. This interaction thus constitutes an unusual mechanism by which inflammatory cells may nonspecifically suppress the cellular immune response to at least one class of solid tumors in humans.

  12. Direct induction of chondrogenic cells from human dermal fibroblast culture by defined factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetatsu Outani

    Full Text Available The repair of large cartilage defects with hyaline cartilage continues to be a challenging clinical issue. We recently reported that the forced expression of two reprogramming factors (c-Myc and Klf4 and one chondrogenic factor (SOX9 can induce chondrogenic cells from mouse dermal fibroblast culture without going through a pluripotent state. We here generated induced chondrogenic (iChon cells from human dermal fibroblast (HDF culture with the same factors. We developed a chondrocyte-specific COL11A2 promoter/enhancer lentiviral reporter vector to select iChon cells. The human iChon cells expressed marker genes for chondrocytes but not fibroblasts, and were derived from non-chondrogenic COL11A2-negative cells. The human iChon cells formed cartilage but not tumors in nude mice. This approach could lead to the preparation of cartilage directly from skin in human, without going through pluripotent stem cells.

  13. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Loss of HGF/c-Met signaling in pancreatic β-cells leads to incomplete maternal β-cell adaptation and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Cem; Ernst, Sara; Alvarez-Perez, Juan C; Rosa, Taylor; Valle, Shelley; Shridhar, Varsha; Casinelli, Gabriella P; Alonso, Laura C; Vasavada, Rupangi C; García-Ocana, Adolfo

    2012-05-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a mitogen and insulinotropic agent for the β-cell. However, whether HGF/c-Met has a role in maternal β-cell adaptation during pregnancy is unknown. To address this issue, we characterized glucose and β-cell homeostasis in pregnant mice lacking c-Met in the pancreas (PancMet KO mice). Circulating HGF and islet c-Met and HGF expression were increased in pregnant mice. Importantly, PancMet KO mice displayed decreased β-cell replication and increased β-cell apoptosis at gestational day (GD)15. The decreased β-cell replication was associated with reductions in islet prolactin receptor levels, STAT5 nuclear localization and forkhead box M1 mRNA, and upregulation of p27. Furthermore, PancMet KO mouse β-cells were more sensitive to dexamethasone-induced cytotoxicity, whereas HGF protected human β-cells against dexamethasone in vitro. These detrimental alterations in β-cell proliferation and death led to incomplete maternal β-cell mass expansion in PancMet KO mice at GD19 and early postpartum periods. The decreased β-cell mass was accompanied by increased blood glucose, decreased plasma insulin, and impaired glucose tolerance. PancMet KO mouse islets failed to upregulate GLUT2 and pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 mRNA, insulin content, and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during gestation. These studies indicate that HGF/c-Met signaling is essential for maternal β-cell adaptation during pregnancy and that its absence/attenuation leads to gestational diabetes mellitus.

  15. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells: implications for human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Hannibal, Jens

    2011-01-01

    interest on these cells, mainly focused on animal models. Only recently, a few studies have started to address the relevance of the mRGC system in humans and related diseases. We recently discovered that mRGCs resist neurodegeneration in two inherited mitochondrial disorders that cause blindness, i.......e. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy. The mechanism leading to mRGCs sparing in these blinding disorders, characterized by extensive and selective loss of RGCs, is currently unknown and under investigation. Other studies reported on mRGCs in glaucoma, on genetic variation...

  16. Dopamine receptor repertoire of human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunz Lars

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High levels of dopamine (DA were described in human ovary and recently evidence for DA receptors in granulosa and luteal cells has been provided, as well. However, neither the full repertoire of ovarian receptors for DA, nor their specific role, is established. Human granulosa cells (GCs derived from women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF are an adequate model for endocrine cells of the follicle and the corpus luteum and were therefore employed in an attempt to decipher their DA receptor repertoire and functionality. Methods Cells were obtained from patients undergoing IVF and examined using cDNA-array, RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. In addition, calcium measurements (with FLUO-4 were employed. Expression of two DA receptors was also examined by in-situ hybridization in rat ovary. Effects of DA on cell viability and cell volume were studied by using an ATP assay and an electronic cell counter system. Results We found members of the two DA receptor families (D1- and D2 -like associated with different signaling pathways in human GCs, namely D1 (as expected and D5 (both are Gs coupled and linked to cAMP increase and D2, D4 (Gi/Gq coupled and linked to IP3/DAG. D3 was not found. The presence of the trophic hormone hCG (10 IU/ml in the culture medium for several days did not alter mRNA (semiquantitative RT-PCR or protein levels (immunocytochemistry/Western blotting of D1,2,4,5 DA receptors. Expression of prototype receptors for the two families, D1 and D2, was furthermore shown in rat granulosa and luteal cells by in situ hybridization. Among the DA receptors found in human GCs, D2 expression was marked both at mRNA and protein levels and it was therefore further studied. Results of additional RT-PCR and Western blots showed two splice variants (D2L, D2S. Irrespective of these variants, D2 proved to be functional, as DA raised intracellular calcium levels. This calcium mobilizing effect of DA was observed

  17. Local trauma in human patellar tendon leads to widespread changes in the tendon gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Lorentzen, Marc P; Kildevang Jensen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Low cellular activity and slow tissue turnover in human tendon may prolong resolution of tendinopathy. This may be stimulated by moderate localized traumas such as needle penetrations, but whether this results in a widespread cellular response in tendons is unknown. In an initial hypothesis......-generating study, a trauma-induced tendon cell activity (increased total RNA and collagen I mRNA) was observed after repeated patellar tendon biopsies in young men. In a subsequent controlled study, 25 young men were treated with two 0.8 mm diameter needle penetrations (n=13, needle-group (NG)) or one 2.1 mm...... diameter needle biopsy (n=12, biopsy-group (BG)) in one patellar tendon. Four weeks later biopsies were taken from treated (5 mm lateral from trauma site) and contralateral tendons for analyses of RNA content (ribogreen assay), DNA content (PCR based), and gene expression for relevant target genes (Real...

  18. Where will the stem cells lead us? Prospects for dentistry in the 21 st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Durga Sreenivas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is dentists′ dream to achieve bone repair with predictability, but without donor site morbidity as well as reconstruction of injured or pathologically damaged complex dental structures, however, this will no longer be a dream as these are being made into a reality using stem cell science. Stem cell science is clearly an intriguing and promising area of science. Stem cells have been isolated from a variety of embryonic and adult tissues. Dental stem cells are multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs brought new enthusiasm among the researchers because of their easy accessibility, high quality and they don′t pose the same ethical concerns and controversy in comparison with embryonic stem cells. This review article provides brief insights about stem cell basics, the state of art in human dental stem cell research and its possible impact on future dentistry. Even though most of these modalities are still in infancy, it is evident that the 21 st century dentist is going to play a critical role in the field of medicine. The aim of this article is to bring awareness among the dentists about the huge potential associated with the use of stem cells in a clinical setting, as well as proper understanding of related problems.

  19. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2016-12-15

    A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans. Avian influenza viruses, including H5N1 and H7N9, have been associated with severe respiratory disease and fatal outcomes in humans. Although acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and progressive pulmonary endothelial damage

  20. Glioma cells on the run – the migratory transcriptome of 10 human glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holz David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary intracranial tumor and despite recent advances in treatment regimens, prognosis for affected patients remains poor. Active cell migration and invasion of GBM cells ultimately lead to ubiquitous tumor recurrence and patient death. To further understand the genetic mechanisms underlying the ability of glioma cells to migrate, we compared the matched transcriptional profiles of migratory and stationary populations of human glioma cells. Using a monolayer radial migration assay, motile and stationary cell populations from seven human long term glioma cell lines and three primary GBM cultures were isolated and prepared for expression analysis. Results Gene expression signatures of stationary and migratory populations across all cell lines were identified using a pattern recognition approach that integrates a priori knowledge with expression data. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed two discriminating patterns between migrating and stationary glioma cells: i global down-regulation and ii global up-regulation profiles that were used in a proband-based rule function implemented in GABRIEL to find subsets of genes having similar expression patterns. Genes with up-regulation pattern in migrating glioma cells were found to be overexpressed in 75% of human GBM biopsy specimens compared to normal brain. A 22 gene signature capable of classifying glioma cultures based on their migration rate was developed. Fidelity of this discovery algorithm was assessed by validation of the invasion candidate gene, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF. siRNA mediated knockdown yielded reduced in vitro migration and ex vivo invasion; immunohistochemistry on glioma invasion tissue microarray confirmed up-regulation of CTGF in invasive glioma cells. Conclusion Gene expression profiling of migratory glioma cells induced to disperse in vitro affords discovery of genomic signatures; selected

  1. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) Suppresses the Effects of Glycerol Monolaurate (GML) on Human T Cell Activation and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Michael S.; Houtman, Jon C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is a monoglyceride with well characterized anti-microbial properties. Because of these properties, GML is widely used in food, cosmetics, and personal care products and currently being tested as a therapeutic for menstrual associated toxic shock syndrome, superficial wound infections, and HIV transmission. Recently, we have described that GML potently suppresses select T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling events, leading to reduced human T cell effector functions. However, how soluble host factors present in the blood and at sites of infection affect GML-mediated human T cell suppression is unknown. In this study, we have characterized how human serum albumin (HSA) affects GML-induced inhibition of human T cells. We found that HSA and other serum albumins bind to 12 carbon acyl side chain of GML at low micromolar affinities and restores the TCR-induced formation of LAT, PLC-γ1, and AKT microclusters at the plasma membrane. Additionally, HSA reverses GML mediated inhibition of AKT phosphorylation and partially restores cytokine production in GML treated cells. Our data reveal that HSA, one of the most abundant proteins in the human serum and at sites of infections, potently reverses the suppression of human T cells by GML. This suggests that GML-driven human T cell suppression depends upon the local tissue environment, with albumin concentration being a major determinant of GML function. PMID:27764189

  2. TALEN-Induced Translocations in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piganeau, Marion; Renouf, Benjamin; Ghezraoui, Hind; Brunet, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Induction of chromosomal translocations in human cells is of a great interest to study tumorigenesis and genome instability. Here, we explain in detail a method to induce translocations using the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). We describe how to detect translocation formation by PCR, calculate translocation frequency by 96-well PCR screen, and analyze breakpoint junctions. When inducing cancer translocations, it is also possible to detect the fusion gene by FISH analysis or western blot.

  3. Differentiation and molecular profiling of human embryonic stem cell-derived corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeszczynska, J; Samuel, K; Greenhough, S; Ramaesh, K; Dhillon, B; Hay, D C; Ross, J A

    2014-06-01

    It has been suggested that the isolation of scalable populations of limbal stem cells may lead to radical changes in ocular therapy. In particular, the derivation and transplantation of corneal stem cells from these populations may result in therapies providing clinical normality of the diseased or damaged cornea. Although feasible in theory, the lack of donor material in sufficient quantity and quality currently limits such a strategy. A potential scalable source of corneal cells could be derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). We developed an in vitro and serum-free corneal differentiation model which displays significant promise. Our stepwise differentiation model was designed with reference to development and gave rise to cells which displayed similarities to epithelial progenitor cells which can be specified to cells displaying a corneal epithelial phenotype. We believe our approach is novel, provides a robust model of human development and in the future, may facilitate the generation of corneal epithelial cells that are suitable for clinical use. Additionally, we demonstrate that following continued cell culture, stem cell-derived corneal epithelial cells undergo transdifferentiation and exhibit squamous metaplasia and therefore, also offer an in vitro model of disease.

  4. Relationships between Lead Halide Perovskite Thin-Film Fabrication, Morphology, and Performance in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharenko, Alexander; Toney, Michael F

    2016-01-20

    Solution-processed lead halide perovskite thin-film solar cells have achieved power conversion efficiencies comparable to those obtained with several commercial photovoltaic technologies in a remarkably short period of time. This rapid rise in device efficiency is largely the result of the development of fabrication protocols capable of producing continuous, smooth perovskite films with micrometer-sized grains. Further developments in film fabrication and morphological control are necessary, however, in order for perovskite solar cells to reliably and reproducibly approach their thermodynamic efficiency limit. This Perspective discusses the fabrication of lead halide perovskite thin films, while highlighting the processing-property-performance relationships that have emerged from the literature, and from this knowledge, suggests future research directions.

  5. Gestational lead exposure selectively decreases retinal dopamine amacrine cells and dopamine content in adult mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Donald A., E-mail: dafox@uh.edu [College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Hamilton, W. Ryan [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, Jerry E. [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Houston-Downtown, Houston, TX (United States); Xiao, Weimin [College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Chaney, Shawntay; Mukherjee, Shradha [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Miller, Diane B.; O' Callaghan, James P. [Toxicology and Molecular Biology Branch, Health Effects Research Laboratory, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-NIOSH, Morgantown, WV USA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Gestational lead exposure (GLE) produces supernormal scotopic electroretinograms (ERG) in children, monkeys and rats, and a novel retinal phenotype characterized by an increased number of rod photoreceptors and bipolar cells in adult mice and rats. Since the loss of dopaminergic amacrine cells (DA ACs) in GLE monkeys and rats contributes to supernormal ERGs, the retinal DA system was analyzed in mice following GLE. C57BL/6 female mice were exposed to low (27 ppm), moderate (55 ppm) or high (109 ppm) lead throughout gestation and until postnatal day 10 (PN10). Blood [Pb] in control, low-, moderate- and high-dose GLE was {<=} 1, {<=} 10, {approx} 25 and {approx} 40 {mu}g/dL, respectively, on PN10 and by PN30 all were {<=} 1 {mu}g/dL. At PN60, confocal-stereology studies used vertical sections and wholemounts to characterize tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and the number of DA and other ACs. GLE dose-dependently and selectively decreased the number of TH-immunoreactive (IR) DA ACs and their synaptic plexus without affecting GABAergic, glycinergic or cholinergic ACs. Immunoblots and confocal revealed dose-dependent decreases in retinal TH protein expression and content, although monoamine oxidase-A protein and gene expression were unchanged. High-pressure liquid chromatography showed that GLE dose-dependently decreased retinal DA content, its metabolites and DA utilization/release. The mechanism of DA selective vulnerability is unknown. However, a GLE-induced loss/dysfunction of DA ACs during development could increase the number of rods and bipolar cells since DA helps regulate neuronal proliferation, whereas during adulthood it could produce ERG supernormality as well as altered circadian rhythms, dark/light adaptation and spatial contrast sensitivity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak [BPb] in control, low-, moderate- and high-dose newborn mice with gestational lead exposure: {<=} 1, {<=} 10, 25 and 40 {mu}g/dL Black

  6. The core regulatory network in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man-Sun; Kim, Dongsan; Kang, Nam Sook; Kim, Jeong-Rae

    2017-03-04

    In order to discover the common characteristics of various cell types in the human body, many researches have been conducted to find the set of genes commonly expressed in various cell types and tissues. However, the functional characteristics of a cell is determined by the complex regulatory relationships among the genes rather than by expressed genes themselves. Therefore, it is more important to identify and analyze a core regulatory network where all regulatory relationship between genes are active across all cell types to uncover the common features of various cell types. Here, based on hundreds of tissue-specific gene regulatory networks constructed by recent genome-wide experimental data, we constructed the core regulatory network. Interestingly, we found that the core regulatory network is organized by simple cascade and has few complex regulations such as feedback or feed-forward loops. Moreover, we discovered that the regulatory links from genes in the core regulatory network to genes in the peripheral regulatory network are much more abundant than the reverse direction links. These results suggest that the core regulatory network locates at the top of regulatory network and plays a role as a 'hub' in terms of information flow, and the information that is common to all cells can be modified to achieve the tissue-specific characteristics through various types of feedback and feed-forward loops in the peripheral regulatory networks. We also found that the genes in the core regulatory network are evolutionary conserved, essential and non-disease, non-druggable genes compared to the peripheral genes. Overall, our study provides an insight into how all human cells share a common function and generate tissue-specific functional traits by transmitting and processing information through regulatory network.

  7. Mesenchymal Stem/Multipotent Stromal Cells from Human Decidua Basalis Reduce Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshabibi, Manal A; Al Huqail, Al Joharah; Khatlani, Tanvir; Abomaray, Fawaz M; Alaskar, Ahmed S; Alawad, Abdullah O; Kalionis, Bill; Abumaree, Mohamed Hassan

    2017-09-15

    Recently, we reported the isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from the decidua basalis of human placenta (DBMSCs). These cells express a unique combination of molecules involved in many important cellular functions, which make them good candidates for cell-based therapies. The endothelium is a highly specialized, metabolically active interface between blood and the underlying tissues. Inflammatory factors stimulate the endothelium to undergo a change to a proinflammatory and procoagulant state (ie, endothelial cell activation). An initial response to endothelial cell activation is monocyte adhesion. Activation typically involves increased proliferation and enhanced expression of adhesion and inflammatory markers by endothelial cells. Sustained endothelial cell activation leads to a type of damage to the body associated with inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the ability of DBMSCs to protect endothelial cells from activation through monocyte adhesion, by modulating endothelial proliferation, migration, adhesion, and inflammatory marker expression. Endothelial cells were cocultured with DBMSCs, monocytes, monocyte-pretreated with DBMSCs and DBMSC-pretreated with monocytes were also evaluated. Monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells was examined following treatment with DBMSCs. Expression of endothelial cell adhesion and inflammatory markers was also analyzed. The interaction between DBMSCs and monocytes reduced endothelial cell proliferation and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In contrast, endothelial cell migration increased in response to DBMSCs and monocytes. Endothelial cell expression of adhesion and inflammatory molecules was reduced by DBMSCs and DBMSC-pretreated with monocytes. The mechanism of reduced endothelial proliferation involved enhanced phosphorylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Our study shows for the first time that DBMSCs protect endothelial cells from activation by

  8. Telomere shortening and cell senescence induced by perylene derivatives in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taka, Thanachai; Huang, Liming; Wongnoppavich, Ariyaphong; Tam-Chang, Suk-Wah; Lee, T Randall; Tuntiwechapikul, Wirote

    2013-02-15

    Cancer cells evade replicative senescence by re-expressing telomerase, which maintains telomere length and hence chromosomal integrity. Telomerase inhibition would lead cancer cells to senesce and therefore prevent cancer cells from growing indefinitely. G-quadruplex ligands can attenuate telomerase activity by inducing G-quadruplex formation at the 3'-overhang of telomere and at the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter; the former prevents telomerase from accessing the telomere, and the latter acts as a transcriptional silencer. The present investigation found that perylene derivatives PM2 and PIPER induced G-quadruplex formation from both telomeric DNA and the hTERT promoter region in vitro. Further, TRAP assay showed that these compounds inhibited telomerase in a dose-dependent manner. When A549 human lung cancer cells were treated with these compounds, hTERT expression was down-regulated. Moreover, the crude protein extract from these treated cells exhibited less telomerase activity. In the long-term treatment of A549 lung cancer cells with sub-cytotoxic dose of these perylenes, telomere shortening, reduction of cell proliferation and tumorigenicity, and cell senescence were observed. The results of this study indicate that perylene derivatives warrant further consideration as effective agents for cancer therapy.

  9. Oncogenic ras-driven cancer cell vesiculation leads to emission of double-stranded DNA capable of interacting with target cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Audemard, Eric [McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rak, Janusz, E-mail: janusz.rak@mcgill.ca [Montreal Children’s Hospital, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • Oncogenic H-ras stimulates emission of extracellular vesicles containing double-stranded DNA. • Vesicle-associated extracellular DNA contains mutant N-ras sequences. • Vesicles mediate intercellular transfer of mutant H-ras DNA to normal fibroblasts where it remains for several weeks. • Fibroblasts exposed to vesicles containing H-ras DNA exhibit increased proliferation. - Abstract: Cell free DNA is often regarded as a source of genetic cancer biomarkers, but the related mechanisms of DNA release, composition and biological activity remain unclear. Here we show that rat epithelial cell transformation by the human H-ras oncogene leads to an increase in production of small, exosomal-like extracellular vesicles by viable cancer cells. These EVs contain chromatin-associated double-stranded DNA fragments covering the entire host genome, including full-length H-ras. Oncogenic N-ras and SV40LT sequences were also found in EVs emitted from spontaneous mouse brain tumor cells. Disruption of acidic sphingomyelinase and the p53/Rb pathway did not block emission of EV-related oncogenic DNA. Exposure of non-transformed RAT-1 cells to EVs containing mutant H-ras DNA led to the uptake and retention of this material for an extended (30 days) but transient period of time, and stimulated cell proliferation. Thus, our study suggests that H-ras-mediated transformation stimulates vesicular emission of this histone-bound oncogene, which may interact with non-transformed cells.

  10. T-cell responses to dengue virus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurane, Ichiro; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A

    2011-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue virus infection induces specific CD4+CD8- and CD8+CD4- T cells in humans. In primary infection, T-cell responses to DENV are serotype cross-reactive, but the highest response is to the serotype that caused the infection. The epitopes recognized by DENV-specific T cells are located in most of the structural and non-structural proteins, but NS3 is the protein that is most dominantly recognized. In patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) caused by secondary DENV infection, T cells are highly activated in vivo. These highly activated T cells are DENV-specific and oligoclonal. Multiple kinds of lymphokines are produced by the activated T cells, and it has been hypothesized that these lymphokines are responsible for induction of plasma leakage, one of the most characteristic features of DHF. Thus, T-cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of DHF and in the recovery from DENV infection.

  11. Beta-cell specific deletion of Dicer1 leads to defective insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Kalis

    Full Text Available Mature microRNAs (miRNAs, derived through cleavage of pre-miRNAs by the Dicer1 enzyme, regulate protein expression in many cell-types including cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. To investigate the importance of miRNAs in mouse insulin secreting β-cells, we have generated mice with a β-cells specific disruption of the Dicer1 gene using the Cre-lox system controlled by the rat insulin promoter (RIP. In contrast to their normoglycaemic control littermates (RIP-Cre(+/- Dicer1(Δ/wt, RIP-Cre(+/-Dicer1(flox/flox mice (RIP-Cre Dicer1(Δ/Δ developed progressive hyperglycaemia and full-blown diabetes mellitus in adulthood that recapitulated the natural history of the spontaneous disease in mice. Reduced insulin gene expression and concomitant reduced insulin secretion preceded the hyperglycaemic state and diabetes development. Immunohistochemical, flow cytometric and ultrastructural analyses revealed altered islet morphology, marked decreased β-cell mass, reduced numbers of granules within the β-cells and reduced granule docking in adult RIP-Cre Dicer1(Δ/Δ mice. β-cell specific Dicer1 deletion did not appear to disrupt fetal and neonatal β-cell development as 2-week old RIP-Cre Dicer1(Δ/Δ mice showed ultrastructurally normal β-cells and intact insulin secretion. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that a β-cell specific disruption of the miRNAs network, although allowing for apparently normal β-cell development, leads to progressive impairment of insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and diabetes development.

  12. Beta-cell specific deletion of Dicer1 leads to defective insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalis, Martins; Bolmeson, Caroline; Esguerra, Jonathan L S; Gupta, Shashank; Edlund, Anna; Tormo-Badia, Neivis; Speidel, Dina; Holmberg, Dan; Mayans, Sofia; Khoo, Nelson K S; Wendt, Anna; Eliasson, Lena; Cilio, Corrado M

    2011-01-01

    Mature microRNAs (miRNAs), derived through cleavage of pre-miRNAs by the Dicer1 enzyme, regulate protein expression in many cell-types including cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. To investigate the importance of miRNAs in mouse insulin secreting β-cells, we have generated mice with a β-cells specific disruption of the Dicer1 gene using the Cre-lox system controlled by the rat insulin promoter (RIP). In contrast to their normoglycaemic control littermates (RIP-Cre(+/-) Dicer1(Δ/wt)), RIP-Cre(+/-)Dicer1(flox/flox) mice (RIP-Cre Dicer1(Δ/Δ)) developed progressive hyperglycaemia and full-blown diabetes mellitus in adulthood that recapitulated the natural history of the spontaneous disease in mice. Reduced insulin gene expression and concomitant reduced insulin secretion preceded the hyperglycaemic state and diabetes development. Immunohistochemical, flow cytometric and ultrastructural analyses revealed altered islet morphology, marked decreased β-cell mass, reduced numbers of granules within the β-cells and reduced granule docking in adult RIP-Cre Dicer1(Δ/Δ) mice. β-cell specific Dicer1 deletion did not appear to disrupt fetal and neonatal β-cell development as 2-week old RIP-Cre Dicer1(Δ/Δ) mice showed ultrastructurally normal β-cells and intact insulin secretion. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that a β-cell specific disruption of the miRNAs network, although allowing for apparently normal β-cell development, leads to progressive impairment of insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and diabetes development. © 2011 Kalis et al.

  13. Efficient perovskite solar cells fabricated using an aqueous lead nitrate precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Wei, Tzu-Chien; Wu, Kuan-Lin; Ikegami, Masashi; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2015-09-04

    A novel, aqueous precursor system (Pb(NO3)2 + water) is developed to replace conventional (PbI2 + DMF) for fabricating methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) perovskite solar cells (PSCs). When the morphology and surface coverage of the Pb(NO3)2 film was controlled during coating, a power conversion efficiency of 12.58% under standard conditions (AM1.5, 100 mW cm(-2)) was achieved for the PSC.

  14. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  15. Antioxidant status and selected biochemical parameters of porcine ovarian granulosa cells exposed to lead in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capcarová, Marcela; Kolesárová, Adriana; Lukác, Norbert; Sirotkin, Alexander; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant status (TAS) and release of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, total lipids, totals proteins, glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides by porcine ovarian granulosa cells cultured in vitro after lead acetate administration. The parameters were analyzed using semi-automated clinical chemistry analyzer Microlab 300, microprocessor-controlled analyzer EasyLite and spectrophotometer Genesys 10. Cells were cultured with lead acetate trihydrate [Pb(CH(3)COO)(2).3H(2)O] as follows: group Max (5 mg Pb(CH(3)COO)(2).3H(2)O/10 mL), group A (2.5 mg/10 mL), group B (0.83 mg/10 mL), group C (0.625 mg/10 mL), group D (0.455 mg/10 mL) and the control group without lead exposure for 18 hrs. The highest TAS was estimated in the control group without lead treatment in comparison with other groups (MAX, A, B, C, D). Statistical analyses showed significantly lower value (P 0.05) were detected in concentration of other studied parameters among observed groups, too.

  16. Preliminary study on human fibroblasts as feeder layer for human embryonic stem cells culture in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To avoid the direct contact with mouse cells and possible heterogeneous pathogen in future application, we need to replace mouse embryonic fibroblastswith human fibroblasts as the feeder layer to maintain human embryonic stem cells growth in the undifferentiated state. We successfully use human fibroblasts derived from aborted fetus and adult prepuce as feeder layer to maintain human embryonic stem cells growth. During the passage and growth on this feeder layer, the human embryonic stem cells can keep their undifferentiated state.

  17. Inorganic hole conductor-based lead halide perovskite solar cells with 12.4% conversion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Peng; Tanaka, Soichiro; Ito, Seigo; Tetreault, Nicolas; Manabe, Kyohei; Nishino, Hitoshi; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Organo-lead halide perovskites have attracted much attention for solar cell applications due to their unique optical and electrical properties. With either low-temperature solution processing or vacuum evaporation, the overall conversion efficiencies of perovskite solar cells with organic hole-transporting material were quickly improved to over 15% during the last 2 years. However, the organic hole-transporting materials used are normally quite expensive due to complicated synthetic procedure or high-purity requirement. Here, we demonstrate the application of an effective and cheap inorganic p-type hole-transporting material, copper thiocyanate, on lead halide perovskite-based devices. With low-temperature solution-process deposition method, a power conversion efficiency of 12.4% was achieved under full sun illumination. This work represents a well-defined cell configuration with optimized perovskite morphology by two times of lead iodide deposition, and opens the door for integration of a class of abundant and inexpensive material for photovoltaic application.

  18. Inorganic hole conductor-based lead halide perovskite solar cells with 12.4% conversion efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Peng

    2014-05-12

    Organo-lead halide perovskites have attracted much attention for solar cell applications due to their unique optical and electrical properties. With either low-temperature solution processing or vacuum evaporation, the overall conversion efficiencies of perovskite solar cells with organic hole-transporting material were quickly improved to over 15% during the last 2 years. However, the organic hole-transporting materials used are normally quite expensive due to complicated synthetic procedure or high-purity requirement. Here, we demonstrate the application of an effective and cheap inorganic p-type hole-transporting material, copper thiocyanate, on lead halide perovskite-based devices. With low-temperature solution-process deposition method, a power conversion efficiency of 12.4% was achieved under full sun illumination. This work represents a well-defined cell configuration with optimized perovskite morphology by two times of lead iodide deposition, and opens the door for integration of a class of abundant and inexpensive material for photovoltaic application. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  19. Primitive cardiac cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, James; Titmarsh, Drew; Hidalgo, Alejandro; Wolvetang, Ernst; Cooper-White, Justin

    2012-06-10

    Pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are currently being investigated for in vitro human heart models and as potential therapeutics for heart failure. In this study, we have developed a differentiation protocol that minimizes the need for specific human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line optimization. We first reduced the heterogeneity that exists within the starting population of bulk cultured hESCs by using cells adapted to single-cell passaging in a 2-dimensional (2D) culture format. Compared with bulk cultures, single-cell cultures comprised larger fractions of TG30(hi)/OCT4(hi) cells, corresponding to an increased expression of pluripotency markers OCT4 and NANOG, and reduced expression of early lineage-specific markers. A 2D temporal differentiation protocol was then developed, aimed at reducing the inherent heterogeneity and variability of embryoid body-based protocols, with induction of primitive streak cells using bone morphogenetic protein 4 and activin A, followed by cardiogenesis via inhibition of Wnt signaling using the small molecules IWP-4 or IWR-1. IWP-4 treatment resulted in a large percentage of cells expressing low amounts of cardiac myosin heavy chain and expression of early cardiac progenitor markers ISL1 and NKX2-5, thus indicating the production of large numbers of immature cardiomyocytes (~65,000/cm(2) or ~1.5 per input hESC). This protocol was shown to be effective in HES3, H9, and, to a lesser, extent, MEL1 hESC lines. In addition, we observed that IWR-1 induced predominantly atrial myosin light chain (MLC2a) expression, whereas IWP-4 induced expression of both atrial (MLC2a) and ventricular (MLC2v) forms. The intrinsic flexibility and scalability of this 2D protocol mean that the output population of primitive cardiomyocytes will be particularly accessible and useful for the investigation of molecular mechanisms driving terminal cardiomyocyte differentiation, and potentially for the future treatment of heart failure.

  20. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote glioma cell death by G2 checkpoint abrogation leading to mitotic catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornago, M; Garcia-Alberich, C; Blasco-Angulo, N; Vall-Llaura, N; Nager, M; Herreros, J; Comella, J X; Sanchis, D; Llovera, M

    2014-10-02

    Glioblastoma multiforme is resistant to conventional anti-tumoral treatments due to its infiltrative nature and capability of relapse; therefore, research efforts focus on characterizing gliomagenesis and identifying molecular targets useful on therapy. New therapeutic strategies are being tested in patients, such as Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) either alone or in combination with other therapies. Here two HDACi included in clinical trials have been tested, suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) and valproic acid (VPA), to characterize their effects on glioma cell growth in vitro and to determine the molecular changes that promote cancer cell death. We found that both HDACi reduce glioma cell viability, proliferation and clonogenicity. They have multiple effects, such as inducing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, nevertheless cell death is not prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh. Importantly, we found that HDACi alter cell cycle progression by decreasing the expression of G2 checkpoint kinases Wee1 and checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1). In addition, HDACi reduce the expression of proteins involved in DNA repair (Rad51), mitotic spindle formation (TPX2) and chromosome segregation (Survivin) in glioma cells and in human glioblastoma multiforme primary cultures. Therefore, HDACi treatment causes glioma cell entry into mitosis before DNA damage could be repaired and to the formation of an aberrant mitotic spindle that results in glioma cell death through mitotic catastrophe-induced apoptosis.

  1. Optimization of Invasion-Specific Effects of Betulin Derivatives on Prostate Cancer Cells through Lead Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Härmä

    Full Text Available The anti-invasive and anti-proliferative effects of betulins and abietane derivatives was systematically tested using an organotypic model system of advanced, castration-resistant prostate cancers. A preliminary screen of the initial set of 93 compounds was performed in two-dimensional (2D growth conditions using non-transformed prostate epithelial cells (EP156T, an androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP, and the castration-resistant, highly invasive cell line PC-3. The 25 most promising compounds were all betulin derivatives. These were selected for a focused secondary screen in three-dimensional (3D growth conditions, with the goal to identify the most effective and specific anti-invasive compounds. Additional sensitivity and cytotoxicity tests were then performed using an extended cell line panel. The effects of these compounds on cell cycle progression, mitosis, proliferation and unspecific cytotoxicity, versus their ability to specifically interfere with cell motility and tumor cell invasion was addressed. To identify potential mechanisms of action and likely compound targets, multiplex profiling of compound effects on a panel of 43 human protein kinases was performed. These target de-convolution studies, combined with the phenotypic analyses of multicellular organoids in 3D models, revealed specific inhibition of AKT signaling linked to effects on the organization of the actin cytoskeleton as the most likely driver of altered cell morphology and motility.

  2. Appearance of Human Plasma Cells Following Differentiation of Human B Cells in NOD/SCID Mouse Spleen

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Relatively little is known for the differentiation and maturation process of human B cells to plasma cells. This is particularly important in reconstitution work involving transfer of autoantibodies. To address this issue, we transplanted human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) directly into the spleen of irradiated NOD/SCID mice depleted of natural killer cell activity. Within 6 weeks, naïve B cells differentiated into memory B cells and, importantly, the numbers of human CD138+ plas...

  3. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Fukusumi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi. Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes.

  4. Human microglial cells synthesize albumin in brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Min Ahn

    Full Text Available Albumin, an abundant plasma protein with multifunctional properties, is mainly synthesized in the liver. Albumin has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD since it can bind to and transport amyloid beta (Abeta, the causative agent of AD; albumin is also a potent inhibitor of Abeta polymerization. Despite evidence of non-hepatic transcription of albumin in many tissues including kidney and pancreas, non-hepatic synthesis of albumin at the protein level has been rarely confirmed. In a pilot phase study of Human Brain Proteome Project, we found evidence that microglial cells in brain may synthesize albumin. Here we report, for the first time, the de novo synthesis of albumin in human microglial cells in brain. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the synthesis and secretion of albumin from microglial cells is enhanced upon microglial activation by Abeta(1-42- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS-treatment. These data indicate that microglial cells may play a beneficial role in AD by secreting albumin that not only inhibits Abeta polymerization but also increases its clearance.

  5. Neocortical glial cell numbers in human brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelvig, D.P.; Pakkenberg, H.; Stark, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    and neurons and counting were done in each of the four lobes. The study showed that the different subpopulations of glial cells behave differently as a function of age; the number of oligodendrocytes showed a significant 27% decrease over adult life and a strong correlation to the total number of neurons...... while the total astrocyte number is constant through life; finally males have a 28% higher number of neocortical glial cells and a 19% higher neocortical neuron number than females. The overall total number of neocortical neurons and glial cells was 49.3 billion in females and 65.2 billion in males......, a difference of 24% with a high biological variance. These numbers can serve as reference values in quantitative studies of the human neocortex. (C) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  6. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  7. Mechanism of inhibition of human secretory phospholipase A2 by flavonoids: rationale for lead design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lättig, Jens; Böhl, Markus; Fischer, Petra; Tischer, Sandra; Tietböhl, Claudia; Menschikowski, Mario; Gutzeit, Herwig O.; Metz, Peter; Pisabarro, M. Teresa

    2007-08-01

    The human secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (PLA2-IIA) is a lipolytic enzyme. Its inhibition leads to a decrease in eicosanoids levels and, thereby, to reduced inflammation. Therefore, PLA2-IIA is of high pharmacological interest in treatment of chronic diseases such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Quercetin and naringenin, amongst other flavonoids, are known for their anti-inflammatory activity by modulation of enzymes of the arachidonic acid cascade. However, the mechanism by which flavonoids inhibit Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) remained unclear so far. Flavonoids are widely produced in plant tissues and, thereby, suitable targets for pharmaceutical extractions and chemical syntheses. Our work focuses on understanding the binding modes of flavonoids to PLA2, their inhibition mechanism and the rationale to modify them to obtain potent and specific inhibitors. Our computational and experimental studies focused on a set of 24 compounds including natural flavonoids and naringenin-based derivatives. Experimental results on PLA2-inhibition showed good inhibitory activity for quercetin, kaempferol, and galangin, but relatively poor for naringenin. Several naringenin derivatives were synthesized and tested for affinity and inhibitory activity improvement. 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin revealed comparable PLA2 inhibition to quercetin-like compounds. We characterized the binding mode of these compounds and the determinants for their affinity, selectivity, and inhibitory potency. Based on our results, we suggest C(6) as the most promising position of the flavonoid scaffold to introduce chemical modifications to improve affinity, selectivity, and inhibition of PLA2-IIA by flavonoids.

  8. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications.

  9. Hypoxia induces miR-210, leading to anti-apoptosis in ovarian follicular cells of marine medaka Oryzias melastigma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tse, Anna Chung-Kwan [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Hong Kong SAR (China); Li, Jing-Woei; Chan, Ting-Fung [School of Life Sciences, Hong Kong Bioinformatics Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wu, Rudolf Shiu-Sun [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Hong Kong SAR (China); Lai, Keng-Po, E-mail: balllai@hku.hk [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate hypoxia induced miR-210 in ovarian follicular cells. • We show anti-apoptotic roles of miR-210 in ovarian follicular cells under hypoxia. • Apoptotic genes (DLC1, SLK, TNFRSF10B, RBM25, and USP7) are target of miR-210. • MiR-210 is vital for ovarian follicular cells proliferation in response to hypoxia. - Abstract: Hypoxia is a major global problem that impairs reproductive functions and reduces the quality and quantity of gametes and the fertilization success of marine fish. Nevertheless, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying hypoxia-induced female reproductive impairment remains largely unknown. There is increasing evidence that miRNA is vital in regulating ovarian functions and is closely associated with female fertility in humans. Certain miRNAs that regulate apoptotic genes can be induced by hypoxia, resulting in cell apoptosis. Using primary ovarian follicular cells of the marine medaka, Oryzias melastigma, as a model, we investigated the response of miR-210 to hypoxic stress in ovarian tissues to see if it would interrupt reproductive functions. A significant induction of miR-210 was found in primary ovarian follicular cells exposed to hypoxia, and gene ontology analysis further highlighted the potential roles of miR-210 in cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cell apoptosis. A number of miR-210 target apoptotic genes, including Deleted in liver cancer 1 protein (DLC1), STE20-like serine/threonine-protein kinase (SLK), tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 10b (TNFRSF10B), RNA binding motif protein 25 (RBM25), and Ubiquitin-specific-processing protease 7 (USP7), were identified. We further showed that ectopic expression of miR-210 would result in down-regulation of these apoptotic genes. On the other hand, the inhibition of miR-210 promoted apoptotic cell death and the expression of apoptotic marker – caspase 3 in follicular cells under hypoxic treatment, supporting the regulatory role of mi

  10. Appearance of Human Plasma Cells Following Differentiation of Human B Cells in NOD/SCID Mouse Spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Kikuchi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Relatively little is known for the differentiation and maturation process of human B cells to plasma cells. This is particularly important in reconstitution work involving transfer of autoantibodies. To address this issue, we transplanted human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC directly into the spleen of irradiated NOD/SCID mice depleted of natural killer cell activity. Within 6 weeks, naïve B cells differentiated into memory B cells and, importantly, the numbers of human CD138+ plasma cells in spleen increased by 100 fold after transplantation. Plasma cell numbers correlated with the detection of human IgM and IgG in serum, indicating that human B cells had differentiated into mature plasma cells in the murine spleen. In addition to CD19+ plasma cells, a distinct CD19- plasma cell population was detected, suggesting that downregulation of CD19 associated with maturation of plasma cells occurred. When purified human B cells were transplanted, those findings were not observed. Our results indicate that differentiation and maturation of human B cells and plasma cells can be investigated by transplantation of human PBMC into the spleen of NOD/SCID mice. The model will be useful for studying the differentiation of human B cells and generation of plasma cells.

  11. Gene expression signatures affected by alcohol-induced DNA methylomic deregulation in human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Omar; Kim, Jeffrey J.; Kim, Hyun-Sung; Hoang, Michael; Tu, Thanh G.; Elie, Omid; Lee, Connie; Vu, Catherine; Horvath, Steve; Spigelman, Igor; Kim, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells, especially human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), are useful models to study molecular mechanisms of human disorders that originate during gestation. Alcohol (ethanol, EtOH) consumption during pregnancy causes a variety of prenatal and postnatal disorders collectively referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). To better understand the molecular events leading to FASDs, we performed a genome-wide analysis of EtOH's effects on the maintenance and differentiation of hESCs ...

  12. Manufacture of gene-modified human T-cells with a memory stem/central memory phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Heemskerk, Bianca; van Rooij, Nienke; van den Berg, Joost H; Beijnen, Jos H; Uckert, Wolfgang; Kvistborg, Pia; Schumacher, Ton N; Haanen, John B A G; Jorritsma, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T-cell products that carry desired functionalities, such as the ability to recognize cancer cells. The currently used strategies for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products lead to highly differentiated cells within the

  13. Tissue factor triggers procoagulation in transplanted mesenchymal stem cells leading to thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kohei; Ohashi, Kazuo; Matsubara, Yoshinori; Kohori, Ayako; Ohno, Takahiro; Kakidachi, Hiroshi; Horii, Akihiro; Kanegae, Kazuko; Utoh, Rie; Iwata, Takanori; Okano, Teruo

    2013-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown extreme clinical promise as a therapeutic regenerative system in the treatment of numerous types of diseases. A recent report, however, documented lethal pulmonary thromboembolism in a patient following the administration of adipose-derived MSCs (ADSCs). In our study, we designed experiments to examine the role of tissue factor (TF), which is highly expressed at the level of mRNA and localized to the cell surface of cultured MSCs, as a triggering factor in the procoagulative cascade activated by infused MSCs. A high mortality rate of ~85% in mice was documented following intravenous infusion of mouse ADSCs within 24 h due to the observation of pulmonary embolism. Rotation thromboelastometry and plasma clotting assay demonstrated significant procoagulation by the cultured mouse ADSCs, and preconditioning of ADSCs with an anti-TF antibody or usage of factor VII deficient plasma in the assay successfully suppressed the procoagulant properties. These properties were also observed in human ADSCs, and could be suppressed by recombinant human thrombomodulin. In uncultured mouse adipose-derived cells (ADCs), the TF-triggered procoagulant activity was not observed and all mice infused with these uncultured ADCs survived after 24 h. This clearly demonstrated that the process of culturing cells plays a critical role in sensitizing these cells as a procoagulator through the induction of TF expression. Our results would recommend that clinical applications of MSCs to inhibit TF activity using anti-coagulant agents or genetic approaches to maximize clinical benefit to the patients.

  14. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer is alive and well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibelli, Jose B

    2014-06-05

    In this issue, Chung et al. (2014) generate human embryonic stem cells by fusing an adult somatic cell to a previously enucleated human oocyte, in agreement with recent reports by the Mitalipov and Egli groups. We can now safely say that human somatic cell nuclear transfer is alive and well.

  15. The association between human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal squamous cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walvik, Lena; Svensson, Amanda Björk; Friborg, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging evidence of the association between human papillomavirus and a subset of head and neck cancers. However, the role of human papillomavirus as a causal factor is still debated. This review addresses the association between human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal squamous cell...... of well-defined premalignant lesions. However, a causal relationship between human papillomavirus infection and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma seems evident....

  16. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Microencapsulated Human Pheochromocytoma Cell in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human pheochromocytoma cells, which are demonstrated to contain and release met-enkephalin and norepinephrine, may be a promising resource for cell therapy in cancer-induced intractable pain. Intrathecal injection of alginate-poly (l lysine-alginate (APA microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells leads to antinociceptive effect in a rat model of bone cancer pain, and this effect was blocked by opioid antagonist naloxone and alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist rauwolscine. Neurochemical changes of cerebrospinal fluid are in accordance with the analgesic responses. Taken together, these data support that human pheochromocytoma cell implant-induced antinociception was mediated by met-enkephalin and norepinephrine secreted from the cell implants and acting at spinal receptors. Spinal implantation of microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells may provide an alternative approach for the therapy of chronic intractable pain.

  17. Cell cycle regulation in human embryonic stem cells: links to adaptation to cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Tomas; Dolezalova, Dasa; Holubcova, Zuzana; Hampl, Ales

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle represents not only a tightly orchestrated mechanism of cell replication and cell division but it also plays an important role in regulation of cell fate decision. Particularly in the context of pluripotent stem cells or multipotent progenitor cells, regulation of cell fate decision is of paramount importance. It has been shown that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) show unique cell cycle characteristics, such as short doubling time due to abbreviated G1 phase; these properties change with the onset of differentiation. This review summarizes the current understanding of cell cycle regulation in hESCs. We discuss cell cycle properties as well as regulatory machinery governing cell cycle progression of undifferentiated hESCs. Additionally, we provide evidence that long-term culture of hESCs is accompanied by changes in cell cycle properties as well as configuration of several cell cycle regulatory molecules.

  18. Hypergravity Leads to the Redistribution of Calcium Ions in Plant Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedukha, Olena M.

    2008-06-01

    The study of hypergravity influence on calcium ions distribution and on the relative amount of Ca2+ in cells of Nicotiana tabacum callus was carried out using the centrifuge. 15-day-old N. tabacum callus grown in a Murashige and Scoog agar medium was exposed to hypergravity at 6.5 g and 14 g for 15 and 60 min. The control samples and the centrifuged callus were loaded with Fluo-4 and then studied by the confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The visible redistribution of Ca2+ in the investigated cells and the appearance of calcium-microdomains in cytoplasm have been established under influence of hypergravity. Readaptation of Ca2+ distribution in the cells occurred in 2-4 h after hypergravity ending. It is suggested that influence of hypergravity lead to change of ionic transport of plasmalemma and endomembranes, and also to efflux of Ca2+ from apoplast.

  19. Production of embryonic and fetal-like red blood cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chan-Jung; Mitra, Koyel; Koya, Mariko; Velho, Michelle; Desprat, Romain; Lenz, Jack; Bouhassira, Eric E

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into embryonic and fetal type of red blood cells that sequentially express three types of hemoglobins recapitulating early human erythropoiesis. We report here that we have produced iPS from three somatic cell types: adult skin fibroblasts as well as embryonic and fetal mesenchymal stem cells. We show that regardless of the age of the donor cells, the iPS produced are fully reprogrammed into a pluripotent state that is undistinguishable from that of hESCs by low and high-throughput expression and detailed analysis of globin expression patterns by HPLC. This suggests that reprogramming with the four original Yamanaka pluripotency factors leads to complete erasure of all functionally important epigenetic marks associated with erythroid differentiation regardless of the age or the tissue type of the donor cells, at least as detected in these assays. The ability to produce large number of erythroid cells with embryonic and fetal-like characteristics is likely to have many translational applications.

  20. Production of embryonic and fetal-like red blood cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Jung Chang

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into embryonic and fetal type of red blood cells that sequentially express three types of hemoglobins recapitulating early human erythropoiesis. We report here that we have produced iPS from three somatic cell types: adult skin fibroblasts as well as embryonic and fetal mesenchymal stem cells. We show that regardless of the age of the donor cells, the iPS produced are fully reprogrammed into a pluripotent state that is undistinguishable from that of hESCs by low and high-throughput expression and detailed analysis of globin expression patterns by HPLC. This suggests that reprogramming with the four original Yamanaka pluripotency factors leads to complete erasure of all functionally important epigenetic marks associated with erythroid differentiation regardless of the age or the tissue type of the donor cells, at least as detected in these assays. The ability to produce large number of erythroid cells with embryonic and fetal-like characteristics is likely to have many translational applications.

  1. Lead (Pb) Isotope Baselines for Studies of Ancient Human Migration and Trade in the Maya Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharpe, Ashley E; Kamenov, George D; Gilli, Adrian; Hodell, David A; Emery, Kitty F; Brenner, Mark; Krigbaum, John

    2016-01-01

    .... We analyzed 60 rock samples for lead isotope ratios and a representative subset of samples for lead, uranium, and thorium concentrations across the Maya region, including the Northern Lowlands...

  2. Glycomics of human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Jun-Ichi; Okada, Kazue; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2016-10-01

    Most cells are coated by a dense glycocalyx composed of glycoconjugates such as glycosphingolipids, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans. The overall glycomic profile is believed to be crucial for the diverse roles of glycans, which are mediated by specific interactions that regulate cell-cell adhesion, the immune response, microbial pathogenesis, and other cellular events. Many cell surface markers were discovered and identified as glycoconjugates such as stage-specific embryonic antigen, Tra-1-60/81 and various other cell surface molecules (e.g., cluster of differentiation). Recent progress in the development of analytical methodologies and strategies has begun to clarify the cellular glycomics of various cells including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). The glycomic profiles of these cells are highly cell type-specific and reflect cellular alterations, such as development, differentiation and cancerous change. In this mini review, we briefly summarize the glycosylation spectra specific to hESCs and hiPSCs, which cover glycans of all major glycoconjugates (i.e., glycosphingolipids, N- and O-glycans of glycoproteins, and glycosaminoglycans) and free oligosaccharides.

  3. Isolation and characterization of human spermatogonial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Shixue

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To isolate and characterization of human spermatogonial stem cells from stem spermatogonium. Methods The disassociation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs were performed using enzymatic digestion of type I collagenase and trypsin. The SSCs were isolated by using Percoll density gradient centrifugation, followed by differential surface-attachment method. Octamer-4(OCT4-positive SSC cells were further identified using immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry technques. The purity of the human SSCs was also determined, and a co-culture system for SSCs and Sertoli cells was established. Results The cell viability was 91.07% for the suspension of human spermatogonial stem cells dissociated using a two-step enzymatic digestion process. The cells isolated from Percoll density gradient coupled with differential surface-attachement purification were OCT4 positive, indicating the cells were human spermatogonial stem cells. The purity of isolated human spermatogonial stem cells was 86.7% as assessed by flow cytometry. The isolated SSCs were shown to form stable human spermatogonial stem cell colonies on the feeder layer of the Sertoli cells. Conclusions The two-step enzyme digestion (by type I collagenase and trypsin process is an economical, simple and reproducible technique for isolating human spermatogonial stem cells. With little contamination and less cell damage, this method facilitates isolated human spermatogonial stem cells to form a stable cell colony on the supporting cell layer.

  4. Mitochondria-specific accumulation of amyloid β induces mitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Moon-Yong; Han, Sun-Ho; Son, Sung Min; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Choi, Young-Ju; Byun, Jayoung; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are best known as the essential intracellular organelles that host the homeostasis required for cellular survival, but they also have relevance in diverse disease-related conditions, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide is the key molecule in AD pathogenesis, and has been highlighted in the implication of mitochondrial abnormality during the disease progress. Neuronal exposure to Aβ impairs mitochondrial dynamics and function. Furthermore, mitochondrial Aβ accumulation has been detected in the AD brain. However, the underlying mechanism of how Aβ affects mitochondrial function remains uncertain, and it is questionable whether mitochondrial Aβ accumulation followed by mitochondrial dysfunction leads directly to neuronal toxicity. This study demonstrated that an exogenous Aβ(1-42) treatment, when applied to the hippocampal cell line of mice (specifically HT22 cells), caused a deleterious alteration in mitochondria in both morphology and function. A clathrin-mediated endocytosis blocker rescued the exogenous Aβ(1-42)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the mitochondria-targeted accumulation of Aβ(1-42) in HT22 cells using Aβ(1-42) with a mitochondria-targeting sequence induced the identical morphological alteration of mitochondria as that observed in the APP/PS AD mouse model and exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. In addition, subsequent mitochondrial dysfunctions were demonstrated in the mitochondria-specific Aβ(1-42) accumulation model, which proved indistinguishable from the mitochondrial impairment induced by exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Finally, cellular toxicity was directly induced by mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation, which mimics the apoptosis process in exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation is the necessary and sufficient condition for Aβ-mediated mitochondria impairments, and leads

  5. Sourcing human embryos for embryonic stem cell lines: Problems & perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajvi H Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to successfully derive human embryonic stem cells (hESC lines from human embryos following in vitro fertilization (IVF opened up a plethora of potential applications of this technique. These cell lines could have been successfully used to increase our understanding of human developmental biology, transplantation medicine and the emerging science of regenerative medicine. The main source for human embryos has been ′discarded′ or ′spare′ fresh or frozen human embryos following IVF. It is a common practice to stimulate the ovaries of women undergoing any of the assisted reproductive technologies (ART and retrieve multiple oocytes which subsequently lead to multiple embryos. Of these, only two or maximum of three embryos are transferred while the rest are cryopreserved as per the decision of the couple. In case a couple does not desire to ′cryopreserve′ their embryos then all the embryos remaining following embryo transfer can be considered ′spare′ or if a couple is no longer in need of the ′cryopreserved′ embryos then these also can be considered as ′spare′. But, the question raised by the ethicists is, "what about ′slightly′ over-stimulating a woman to get a few extra eggs and embryos? The decision becomes more difficult when it comes to ′discarded′ embryos. As of today, the quality of the embryos is primarily assessed based on morphology and the rate of development mainly judged by single point assessment. Despite many criteria described in the literature, the quality assessment is purely subjective. The question that arises is on the decision of ′discarding′ embryos. What would be the criteria for discarding embryos and the potential ′use′ of ESC derived from the ′abnormal appearing′ embryos? This paper discusses some of the newer methods to procure embryos for the derivation of embryonic stem cell lines which will respect the ethical concerns but still provide the source material.

  6. Sourcing human embryos for embryonic stem cell lines: problems & perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rajvi H

    2014-11-01

    The ability to successfully derive human embryonic stem cells (hESC) lines from human embryos following in vitro fertilization (IVF) opened up a plethora of potential applications of this technique. These cell lines could have been successfully used to increase our understanding of human developmental biology, transplantation medicine and the emerging science of regenerative medicine. The main source for human embryos has been 'discarded' or 'spare' fresh or frozen human embryos following IVF. It is a common practice to stimulate the ovaries of women undergoing any of the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and retrieve multiple oocytes which subsequently lead to multiple embryos. Of these, only two or maximum of three embryos are transferred while the rest are cryopreserved as per the decision of the couple. in case a couple does not desire to 'cryopreserve' their embryos then all the embryos remaining following embryo transfer can be considered 'spare' or if a couple is no longer in need of the 'cryopreserved' embryos then these also can be considered as 'spare'. But, the question raised by the ethicists is, "what about 'slightly' over-stimulating a woman to get a few extra eggs and embryos? The decision becomes more difficult when it comes to 'discarded' embryos. As of today, the quality of the embryos is primarily assessed based on morphology and the rate of development mainly judged by single point assessment. Despite many criteria described in the literature, the quality assessment is purely subjective. The question that arises is on the decision of 'discarding' embryos. What would be the criteria for discarding embryos and the potential 'use' of ESC derived from the 'abnormal appearing' embryos? This paper discusses some of the newer methods to procure embryos for the derivation of embryonic stem cell lines which will respect the ethical concerns but still provide the source material.

  7. Cell entry by human pathogenic arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Jillian M; Kunz, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    The arenaviruses Lassa virus (LASV) in Africa and Machupo (MACV), Guanarito (GTOV) and Junin viruses (JUNV) in South America cause severe haemorrhagic fevers in humans with fatality rates of 15-35%. The present review focuses on the first steps of infection with human pathogenic arenaviruses, the interaction with their cellular receptor molecules and subsequent entry into the host cell. While similarities exist in genomic organization, structure and clinical disease caused by pathogenic Old World and New World arenaviruses these pathogens use different primary receptors. The Old World arenaviruses employ alpha-dystroglycan, a cellular receptor for proteins of the extracellular matrix, and the human pathogenic New World arenaviruses use the cellular cargo receptor transferrin receptor 1. While the New World arenavirus JUNV enters cells via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, evidence occurred for clathrin-independent entry of the prototypic Old World arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Upon internalization, arenaviruses are delivered to the endosome, where pH-dependent membrane fusion is mediated by the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While arenavirus GPs share characteristics with class I fusion GPs of other enveloped viruses, unusual mechanistic features of GP-mediated membrane fusion have recently been discovered for arenaviruses with important implications for viral entry.

  8. Markers of T Cell Senescence in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing the aging of their population, and many more will face a similar obstacle in the near future, which could be a burden to many healthcare systems. Increased susceptibility to infections, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease, cancer as well as reduced efficacy of vaccination are important matters for researchers in the field of aging. As older adults show higher prevalence for a variety of diseases, this also implies higher risk of complications, including nosocomial infections, slower recovery and sequels that may reduce the autonomy and overall quality of life of older adults. The age-related effects on the immune system termed as “immunosenescence” can be exemplified by the reported hypo-responsiveness to influenza vaccination of the elderly. T cells, which belong to the adaptive arm of the immune system, have been extensively studied and the knowledge gathered enables a better understanding of how the immune system may be affected after acute/chronic infections and how this matters in the long run. In this review, we will focus on T cells and discuss the surface and molecular markers that are associated with T cell senescence. We will also look at the implications that senescent T cells could have on human health and diseases. Finally, we will discuss the benefits of having these markers for investigators and the future work that is needed to advance the field of T cell senescence markers.

  9. Lovastatin-Mediated Changes in Human Tendon Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma-Kuzniarska, Maria; Cornell, Hannah R; Moneke, Michael C; Carr, Andrew J; Hulley, Philippa A

    2015-10-01

    Statins are among the most widely prescribed drugs worldwide. Numerous studies have shown their beneficial effects in prevention of cardiovascular disease through cholesterol-lowering and anti-atherosclerotic properties. Although some statin patients may experience muscle-related symptoms, severe side effects of statin therapy are rare, primarily due to extensive first-pass metabolism in the liver. Skeletal muscles appear to be the main site of side effects; however, recently some statin-related adverse effects have been described in tendon. The mechanism behind these side effects remains unknown. This is the first study that explores tendon-specific effects of statins in human primary tenocytes. The cells were cultured with different concentrations of lovastatin for up to 1 week. No changes in cell viability or morphology were observed in tenocytes incubated with therapeutic doses. Short-term exposure to lovastatin concentrations outside the therapeutic range had no effect on tenocyte viability; however, cell migration was reduced. Simvastatin and atorvastatin, two other drug family members, also reduced the migratory properties of the cells. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of lovastatin induced changes in cytoskeleton leading to cell rounding and decreased levels of mRNA for matrix proteins, but increased BMP-2 expression. Gap junctional communication was impaired but due to cell shape change and separation rather than direct gap junction inhibition. These effects were accompanied by inhibition of prenylation of Rap1a small GTPase. Collectively, we showed that statins in a dose-dependent manner decrease migration of human tendon cells, alter their expression profile and impair the functional network, but do not inhibit gap junction function.

  10. Human embryonic stem cells and microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu İskender

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs possess a great potential in the field of regenerative medicine by their virtue of pluripotent potential with indefinite proliferation capabilities. They can self renew themselves and differentiate into three embryonic germ layers. Although they are conventionally grown on mitotically inactivated mouse feeder cells, there are in vitro culture systems utilizing feeder cells of human origin in order to prevent cross-species contamination. Recently established in vitro culture systems suggested that direct interaction with feeder cells is not necessary but rather attachment to a substrate is required to ensure long-term, efficient hESC culture in vitro. This substrate is usually composed of a mixture of extracellular matrix components representing in vivo natural niche. In hESC biology, the mechanism of interaction of hESCs with extracellular matrix molecules remained insufficiently explored area of research due to their transient nature of interaction with the in vivo niche. However, an in vitro culture system established using extracellular matrix molecules may provide a safer alternative to culture systems with feeder cells while paving the way to Good Manufacturing Practice-GMP production of hESCs for therapeutic purposes. Therefore, it is essential to study the interaction of extracellular matrix molecules with hESCs in order to standardize in vitro culture systems for large-scale production of hESCs in a less labor-intensive way. This would not only provide valuable information regarding the mechanisms that control pluripotency but also serve to dissect the molecular signaling pathways of directed differentiation for prospective therapeutic applications in the future. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 486-495

  11. Arecoline is cytotoxic for human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mafaz; Cox, Stephen; Kelly, Elizabeth; Boadle, Ross; Zoellner, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis is a pre-malignant fibrotic condition caused by areca nut use and involves reduced mucosal vascularity. Arecoline is the principal areca nut alkaloid and is cytotoxic for epithelium and fibroblasts. Endothelial cell cycle arrest is reported on exposure to arecoline, as is cytotoxicity for endothelial-lung carcinoma hybrid cells. We here describe cytotoxicity for primary human endothelial cultures from seven separate donors. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of arecoline and examined by: phase-contrast microscopy, haemocytometer counts, transmission electron microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release and the methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium assay. Vacuolation and detachment of endothelium were observed at and above arecoline concentrations of 333 μg/ml or more. Ultrastructural features of cellular stress were seen after 24-h treatment with 111 μg/ml arecoline and included reduced ribosomal studding of endoplasmic reticulum, increased autophagolysosomal structures, increased vacuolation and reduced mitochondrial cristae with slight swelling. Similar changes were seen at 4 h with arecoline at 333 μg/ml or above, but with more severe mitochondrial changes including increased electron density of mitochondrial matrix and greater cristal swelling, while by 24 h, these cells were frankly necrotic. Haemocytometer counts were paralleled by both lactate dehydrogenase release and the methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium assays. Arecoline is cytotoxic via necrosis for endothelium, while biochemical assays indicate no appreciable cellular leakage before death and detachment, as well as no clear effect on mitochondrial function in viable cells. Arecoline toxicity may thus contribute to reduced vascularity in oral submucous fibrosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  13. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  14. Synthesis of POP3HT/lead sulfide nanocomposites for hybrid solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miaoxin

    2007-12-01

    The recent discovery of high efficiency multiexciton generation in lead sulfide (PbS) and lead selenide (PbSe) nanocrystals makes them promising materials for high efficiency solar cells. One complication of extracting charges from the nanocrystals is the insulating ligands capping their surfaces. In this dissertation, we have successfully developed and characterized a phosphonate functionalized poly-3-hexylthiophene (POP3HT-50) and used it in the direct synthesis of PbS nanocrystals without the aid of extraneous ligands. These POP3HT/PbS nanocomposites were characterized by HR-TEM, TM-AFM, 1H NMR and absorption spectroscopy. The nanocomposites were also incorporated into solar cell devices and tested under AM 1.5G conditions. Devices made of POP3HT-50/PbS nanocomposites show an order of magnitude improvement in photocurrent and power conversion efficiency (eta) when compared to that reported for a P3HT/PbS device (eta = 0.011% vs. 0.001%). The improved photocurrent is consistent with improved contact between PbS nanocrystals and POP3HT-50, presumably leading to more efficient charge transfer. However, the overall efficiencies of such devices were still very low suggesting that further modification was needed. Future research could be focused on developing functional conductive polymer with lower ionization potential (Ip) for proper band alignment with these infrared nanocrystals, and on developing elongated nanocrystals with proper aspect ratio to reduce the rate of Auger recombination (decay process of multiexciton state).

  15. Glucagon receptor inactivation leads to α-cell hyperplasia in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyu; Dean, E Danielle; Zhao, Liyuan; Nicholson, Wendell E; Powers, Alvin C; Chen, Wenbiao

    2015-11-01

    Glucagon antagonism is a potential treatment for diabetes. One potential side effect is α-cell hyperplasia, which has been noted in several approaches to antagonize glucagon action. To investigate the molecular mechanism of the α-cell hyperplasia and to identify the responsible factor, we created a zebrafish model in which glucagon receptor (gcgr) signaling has been interrupted. The genetically and chemically tractable zebrafish, which provides a robust discovery platform, has two gcgr genes (gcgra and gcgrb) in its genome. Sequence, phylogenetic, and synteny analyses suggest that these are co-orthologs of the human GCGR. Similar to its mammalian counterparts, gcgra and gcgrb are mainly expressed in the liver. We inactivated the zebrafish gcgra and gcgrb using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) first individually and then both genes, and assessed the number of α-cells using an α-cell reporter line, Tg(gcga:GFP). Compared to WT fish at 7 days postfertilization, there were more α-cells in gcgra-/-, gcgrb-/-, and gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- fish and there was an increased rate of α-cell proliferation in the gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- fish. Glucagon levels were higher but free glucose levels were lower in gcgra-/-, gcgrb-/-, and gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- fish, similar to Gcgr-/- mice. These results indicate that the compensatory α-cell hyperplasia in response to interruption of glucagon signaling is conserved in zebrafish. The robust α-cell hyperplasia in gcgra-/-;gcgrb-/- larvae provides a platform to screen for chemical and genetic suppressors, and ultimately to identify the stimulus of α-cell hyperplasia and its signaling mechanism.

  16. Mechanisms of virus immune evasion lead to development from chronic inflammation to cancer formation associated with human papillomavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masachika Senba

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV has developed strategies to escape eradication by innate and adaptive immunity. Immune response evasion has been considered an important aspect of HPV persistence, which is the main contributing factor leading to HPV-related cancers. HPV-induced cancers expressing viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are potentially recognized by the immune system. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules are patrolled by natural killer cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, respectively. This system of recognition is a main target for the strategies of immune evasion deployed by viruses. The viral immune evasion proteins constitute useful tools to block defined stages of the MHC class I presentation pathway, and in this way HPV avoids the host immune response. The long latency period from initial infection to persistence signifies that HPV evolves mechanisms to escape the immune response. It has now been established that there are oncogenic mechanisms by which E7 binds to and degrades tumor suppressor Rb, while E6 binds to and inactivates tumor suppressor p53. Therefore, interaction of p53 and pRb proteins can give rise to an increased immortalization and genomic instability. Overexpression of NF-kB in cervical and penile cancers suggests that NF-kB activation is a key modulator in driving chronic inflammation to cancer. HPV oncogene-mediated suppression of NF-kB activity contributes to HPV escape from the immune system. This review focuses on the diverse mechanisms of the virus immune evasion with HPV that leads to chronic inflammation and cancer.

  17. Redirection of Human Cancer Cells upon the Interaction with the Regenerating Mouse Mammary Gland Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. Rosenfield

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is often described as a result of accumulated mutations that lead to growth advantage and clonal expansion of mutated cells. There is evidence in the literature that cancer cells are influenced by the microenvironment. Our previous studies demonstrated that the mouse mammary gland is capable of redirecting mouse cells of non-mammary origins as well as Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-neu transformed cells toward normal mammary epithelial cell fate during gland regeneration. Interestingly, the malignant phenotype of MMTV-neu transformed cells was suppressed during serial transplantation experiments. Here, we discuss our studies that demonstrated the potential of the regenerating mouse mammary gland to redirect cancer cells of different species into a functional tumor-free mammary epithelial cell progeny. Immunochemistry for human specific CD133, mitochondria, cytokeratins as well as milk proteins and FISH for human specific probe identified human epithelial cell progeny in ducts, lobules, and secretory acini. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH for human centromeric DNA and FACS analysis of propidium iodine staining excluded the possibility of mouse-human cell fusion. To our knowledge this is the first evidence that human cancer cells of embryonic or somatic origins respond to developmental signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in vivo.

  18. Employing Lead Thiocyanate Additive to Reduce the Hysteresis and Boost the Fill Factor of Planar Perovskite Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Weijun [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo OH 43606 USA; Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education of China, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Xiao, Chuanxiao [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Wang, Changlei [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo OH 43606 USA; Saparov, Bayrammurad [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham NC 27708 USA; Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham NC 27708 USA; Duan, Hsin-Sheng [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham NC 27708 USA; Zhao, Dewei [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo OH 43606 USA; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Xiao, Zewen [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo OH 43606 USA; Schulz, Philip [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Harvey, Steven P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Liao, Weiqiang [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo OH 43606 USA; Meng, Weiwei [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo OH 43606 USA; Yu, Yue [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo OH 43606 USA; Cimaroli, Alexander J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo OH 43606 USA; Jiang, Chun-Sheng [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Zhu, Kai [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Al-Jassim, Mowafak [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Fang, Guojia [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education of China, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 China; Mitzi, David B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham NC 27708 USA; Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham NC 27708 USA; Yan, Yanfa [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo OH 43606 USA

    2016-05-04

    Lead thiocyanate in the perovskite precursor can increase the grain size of a perovskite thin film and reduce the conductivity of the grain boundaries, leading to perovskite solar cells with reduced hysteresis and enhanced fill factor. A planar perovskite solar cell with grain boundary and interface passivation achieves a steady-state efficiency of 18.42%.

  19. Employing Lead Thiocyanate Additive to Reduce the Hysteresis and Boost the Fill Factor of Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Weijun; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Zhao, Dewei; Xiao, Zewen; Schulz, Philip; Harvey, Steven P; Liao, Weiqiang; Meng, Weiwei; Yu, Yue; Cimaroli, Alexander J; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Zhu, Kai; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Fang, Guojia; Mitzi, David B; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-07-01

    Lead thiocyanate in the perovskite precursor can increase the grain size of a perovskite thin film and reduce the conductivity of the grain boundaries, leading to perovskite solar cells with reduced hysteresis and enhanced fill factor. A planar perovskite solar cell with grain boundary and interface passivation achieves a steady-state efficiency of 18.42%.

  20. Antitumoral Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa on Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacrida, Alessio; Maggioni, Daniele; Cassetti, Arianna; Nicolini, Gabriella; Cavaletti, Guido; Miloso, Mariarosaria

    2016-10-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite therapeutic improvements, some cancers are still untreatable. Recently there has been an increasing interest in the use of natural substances for cancer prevention and treatment. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) is a plant, belonging to Malvaceae family, widespread in South Asia and Central Africa. HS extract (HSE) used in folk medicine, gained researchers' interest thanks to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. In the present study, we initially assessed HSE effect on a panel of human tumor cell lines. Then we focused our study on the following that are most sensitive to HSE action cell lines: Multiple Myeloma (MM) cells (RPMI 8226) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC-25). In both RPMI 8226 and SCC-25 cells, HSE impaired cell growth, exerted a reversible cytostatic effect, and reduced cell motility and invasiveness. We evaluated the involvement of MAPKs ERK1/2 and p38 in HSE effects by using specific inhibitors, U0126 and SB203580, respectively. For both SCC-25 and RPMI 8226, HSE cytostatic effect depends on p38 activation, whereas ERK1/2 modulation is crucial for cell motility and invasiveness. Our results suggest that HSE may be a potential therapeutic agent against MM and OSCC.

  1. Annexin 1: differential expression in tumor and mast cells in human larynx cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silistino-Souza, Rosana; Rodrigues-Lisoni, Flávia C; Cury, Patricia M; Maniglia, José V; Raposo, Luis S; Tajara, Eloiza H; Christian, Helen C; Oliani, Sonia M

    2007-06-15

    Annexin 1 protein (ANXA1) expression was evaluated in tumor and mast cells in human larynx cancer and control epithelium. The effect of the exogenous ANXA1 (peptide Ac 2-26) was also examined during the cellular growth of the Hep-2 human larynx epidermoid carcinoma cell line. This peptide inhibited the proliferation of the Hep-2 cells within 144 hr. In surgical tissue specimens from 20 patients with larynx cancer, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry analysis showed in vivo down-regulation of ANXA1 expression in the tumor and increased in mast cells and Hep-2 cells treated with peptide Ac2-26. Combined in vivo and in vitro analysis demonstrated that ANXA1 plays a regulatory role in laryngeal cancer cell growth. We believe that a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of ANXA1 in tumor and mast cells may lead to future biological targets for the therapeutic intervention of human larynx cancer.

  2. Identification of a candidate stem cell in human gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Manohar

    2015-05-01

    In conclusion, we have isolated a distinct clonogenic population of epithelial cells from primary human fetal gallbladder with stem cell characteristics and found it to be unique compared to IHBD cells.

  3. Alteration in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-mediated epigenetic regulation leads to Purkinje cell vulnerability in ATM deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dewei; Zhang, Ying; Hart, Ronald P; Chen, Jianmin; Herrup, Karl; Li, Jiali

    2015-12-01

    A long-standing mystery surrounding ataxia-telangiectasia is why it is mainly cerebellar neurons, Purkinje cells in particular, that appear vulnerable to ATM deficiency. Here we present data showing that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), a newly recognized epigenetic marker found at high levels in neurons, is substantially reduced in human ataxia-telangiectasia and Atm(-/-) mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells. We further show that TET1, an enzyme that converts 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5hmC, responds to DNA damage and manipulation of TET1 activity directly affects the DNA damage signalling and ATM-deficient neuronal cell cycle re-entry and death. Quantitative genome-wide analysis of 5hmC-containing sequences shows that in ATM deficiency there is a cerebellum- and Purkinje cell-specific shift in 5hmC enrichment in both regulatory elements and repeated sequences. Finally, we verify that TET1-mediated 5hmC production is linked to the degenerative process of Purkinje cells and behavioural deficits in Atm(-/-) mice. Taken together, the selective loss of 5hmC plays a critical role in driving Purkinje cell vulnerability in ATM deficiency.

  4. Surface Photovoltage Spectroscopy Study of Organo-Lead Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea-Nehoshtan, Lee; Kirmayer, Saar; Edri, Eran; Hodes, Gary; Cahen, David

    2014-07-17

    The field of organo-lead perovskite absorbers for solar cells is developing rapidly, with open-circuit voltage of reported devices already approaching the maximal theoretical voltage. Obtaining such high voltages on spun-cast or evaporated thin films is intriguing and calls for detailed investigation of the source of photovoltage in those devices. We present here a study of the roles of the selective contacts to methylammonium lead iodide chloride (MAPbI3-xClx) using surface photovoltage spectroscopy. By depositing and characterizing each layer at a time, we show that the electron-extracting interface is more than twice as effective as the hole-extracting interface in generating photovoltage, for several combinations of electrode materials. We further observe the existence of an electron-injection related spectral feature at 1.1 eV, which might bear significance for the cell's operation. Our results illustrate the usefulness of SPV spectroscopy in highlighting gaps in cells efficiency and for deepening the understanding of charge injection processes in perovskite-based photovoltaics.

  5. Funneled landscape leads to robustness of cell networks: yeast cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We uncovered the underlying energy landscape for a cellular network. We discovered that the energy landscape of the yeast cell-cycle network is funneled towards the global minimum (G0/G1 phase from the experimentally measured or inferred inherent chemical reaction rates. The funneled landscape is quite robust against random perturbations. This naturally explains robustness from a physical point of view. The ratio of slope versus roughness of the landscape becomes a quantitative measure of robustness of the network. The funneled landscape can be seen as a possible realization of the Darwinian principle of natural selection at the cellular network level. It provides an optimal criterion for network connections and design. Our approach is general and can be applied to other cellular networks.

  6. Cell cycle regulation by glucosamine in human pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kun-Han; Lu, Chih-Shen; Kou, Yu Ru; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2013-04-01

    Airway epithelial cells play an important role against intruding pathogens. Glucosamine, a commonly used supplemental compound, has recently begun to be regarded as a potential anti-inflammatory molecule. This study aimed to uncover how glucosamine impacts on cellular proliferation in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) and bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). With trypan blue-exclusion assay, we observed that glucosamine (10, 20, 50 mM) caused a decrease in cell number at 24 and 48 h; with a flow cytometric analysis, we also noted an enhanced cell accumulation within the G(0)/G(1) phase at 24 h and induction of late apoptosis at 24 and 48 h by glucosamine (10, 20, 50 mM) in A549 cells and HBECs. Examination of phosphorylation in retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, we found an inhibitory effect by glucosamine at 20 and 50 mM. Glucosamine at 50 mM was demonstrated to elevate both the mRNA and protein expression of p53 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), but also caused a reduction in p21 protein expression. In addition, glucosamine attenuated p21 protein stability via the proteasomal proteolytic pathway, as well as inducing p21 nuclear accumulation. Altogether, our results suggest that a high dose of glucosamine may inhibit cell proliferation through apoptosis and disturb cell cycle progression with a halt at G(0)/G(1) phase, and that this occurs, at least in part, by a reduction in Rb phosphorylation together with modulation of p21, p53 and HO-1 expression, and nuclear p21 accumulation.

  7. Enhancement of radiation response in human hepatocarcinoma cells by Metformin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Joon; Jung, Won Gyun [Division of heavy ion clinical research, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Hoon; Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Metformin (1, 1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the most widely used drug to treat type 2 diabetic patients under benefit good tolerability profile and low cost, has sparked keen interest as potential anticancer agent. Preclinical studies showed that the primary mechanism of action of metformin is through its ability to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin inhibits complex 1 in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to an increase in the AMP-to-ATP ratio, then, phospholylated AMPK increase energy generation or suppress energy consumption and then, inhibits cell growth. However, important caveat in direct action theory of metformin is that millimorlar range, effective dose for inhibition tumor cell growth in vitro, cannot be achieved in patients. This is probably because metformin enter cells through the organic cation transporters OCT1 and OCT2, which is lowly expressed in human cells except liver and adipose cells. dependent pathway rather than through direct effects of the tumor cells. We analyzed combination effect of metformin and radiation focusing to HCC cell lines, which theoretically express high organic cation transporters, producing high centration of metformin in tumor cells. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether metformin had anti-tumor effects when combined with radiation as radiosensitizer in HCC. The results showed that metformin increased radiosensitizing efficacy in HCC cells , as well as in Huh7 xenograft mouse models. Interestingly, metformin effectively sensitizes IR-induced apoptosis in HCC through upregulation of cleaved PARP and caspase3 and increase synergically on DNA damage response with combined treatment.HCC, suggesting potential usefulness of combined therapy of metformin together with radiation for HCC cancer therapy.

  8. Rain on Methylammonium Lead Iodide Based Perovskites: Possible Environmental Effects of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailegnaw, Bekele; Kirmayer, Saar; Edri, Eran; Hodes, Gary; Cahen, David

    2015-05-07

    The great promise of hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite (HOIP)-based solar cells is being challenged by its Pb content and its sensitivity to water. Here, the impact of rain on methylammonium lead iodide perovskite films was investigated by exposing such films to water of varying pH values, simulating exposure of the films to rain. The amount of Pb loss was determined using both gravimetric and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements. Using our results, the extent of Pb loss to the environment, in the case of catastrophic module failure, was evaluated. Although very dependent on module siting, even total destruction of a large solar electrical power generating plant, based on HOIPs, while obviously highly undesirable, is estimated to be far from catastrophic for the environment.

  9. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Puck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence.

  10. Human embryonic stem cells and patent protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Sanja M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of biotechnological research in modern diagnostics and therapeutics, on the one hand, and stimulative function of a patent, on the other hand, this work deals with the question of the possibility of pa-tent protection of human embryonic stem cells. Taking into account that this is a biotechnological invention, the key question that this paper highlights is the interpretation of the provisions of their patentability. Namely, thanks to the advanced methods of isolation, purification and preparation for implementation, modern patent systems do not exclude a priori living organisms from patent protection. Therefore, the analysis of representative administrative decisions or court rulings sought to define the criteria that would be applied in order to give patent protection to a certain biotechnological invention (stem cells while others do not.

  11. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from dermal fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The generation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells has the potential to accelerate the implementation of stem cells for clinical treatment of degenerative diseases. Technologies including somatic cell nuclear transfer and cell fusion might generate such cells but are hindered by issues that might prevent them from being used clinically. Here, we describe methods to use dermal fibroblasts easily obtained from an individual human to generate human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by ...

  12. Restriction of human adenovirus replication in Chinese hamster cell lines and their hybrids with human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radna, R L; Foellmer, B; Feldman, L A; Francke, U; Ozer, H L

    1987-11-01

    We have found that the replication of human adenovirus (Ad2) is restricted in multiple Chinese hamster cell lines including CHO and V79. The major site of restriction involves differential accumulation of late viral proteins as demonstrated by immunofluorescence assay and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with and without prior immunoprecipitation. Synthesis of fiber and penton base are markedly reduced, whereas others, such as the 100K polypeptide, are synthesized efficiently. This pattern of restriction is similar to that previously reported for Ad2 infection of several monkey cell lines; however, the restriction is more marked in the Chinese hamster cell lines. The restriction is most likely due to a deficient cellular function since stable cell hybrids between V79 or CHO and human cells are permissive for virus replication. By analysis of a series of hybrids with reduced numbers of human chromosomes, fiber synthesis was correlated with the presence of the short arm of human chromosome 3. More hybrids showed restoration of fiber synthesis than production of progeny virus, suggesting that more than one unlinked function is required for the latter.

  13. Phenotypic changes of human cells in human-rat liver during partial hepatectomy-induced regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Sun; Dong Xiao; Hong-An Li; Jin-Fang Jiang; Qing Li; Ruo-Shuang Zhang; Xi-Gu Chen

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components in rat liver and the phenotypic changes of human cells in liver of human-rat chimera (HRC) generated by in utero transplantation of human cells during partial hepatectomy (PHx)-induced liver regeneration. METHODS: Human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components and phenotypic changes of human